The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
February in Paris
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From BBC:

Paris Gare de Lyon: Fire at station amid DR Congo concert protest
9 hours ago

Police evacuated Paris’s Gare de Lyon station after protesters started a fire to try to disrupt a concert by a Congolese singer.

Political opponents of the DR Congo government

Democratic Republic of Congo is Big Congo, the one that used to be Zaire for awhile. The Gare de Lyon is Paris’s big train station for lines going to Lyon and the Riviera.

set fire to parked scooters, motorcycles and bins and blocked firefighters from tackling the blaze.

They accuse singer Fally Ipupa of being too close to the Congolese government. …

Victoria Williams from the UK was in the Gare de Lyon at the time.

“There was big thick smoke. People were surging and setting fire to things,” she said. “It just seemed to get very ugly, very quickly. Traffic was gridlocked in every direction, it was pandemonium.

“The protesters were throwing anything they could at the police and fire brigade who were just trying to do their job. They were just setting fire to anything they could and fighting with each other.” …

For years parts of the Congolese diaspora have condemned musicians they view as too close to the political elite they blame for destroying the country.

As a punishment they have used direct action to effectively ban musicians from performing in Europe and thereby prevent them making money.

For about 10 years, some members of the diaspora would try to beat up any musician – and anyone who was part of the regime – whenever they visited Europe.

By the way, has anybody ever figured how who started the Notre Dame fire?

 
Hide 53 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Doesn’t this fit one of the definitions of terrorism?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Redneck farmer

    Redneck farmer, Congolese are not white people, and no tacky Hawaiian props were used.

  2. Epic chimpout.

    You want multiculturalism for all the fine exotic restaurants, but you get all the problem
    factors too.

    The fun thing is, Democratic Republic Congo is Belgium’s colonial legacy (or more precisely, the Belgian King’s as the “Congo Free State” was His private property), and how.

    France is on the tab for the less horribad Republic of the Congo.

    • Replies: @Just passing through
    @El Dato

    Pretty sure Congolese don't even run restaurants.

    Replies: @Sbalfa, @bomag

    , @Amerimutt Golems
    @El Dato

    It is called Françafrique or indulging African pets for vanity reasons as long as they speak French and pretend to be Frenchmen.

    Frogs were upset when another former Belgian colony Rwanda joined the Commonwealth or Brit club.

  3. A single heroin addicted Black-American expatriate horn player with genuine talent used to be able to bring the French together united as one.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @anonymous

    The same with a goofy comedian that is just misunderstood in America. I wonder if Congolese Frenchmen appreciate the humor of Jerry Lewis.

  4. By the way, has anybody ever figured how who started the Notre Dame fire?

    I’m sure it was caused by Trump and Russian hackers somehow.

    Here’s a tune from the 70’s performed in the 80’s just to cheer everyone up.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @anon

    The 1980s hair style threw me off a bit, but Joni still did a great job singing this one. Thanks.

    , @Lot
    @anon

    Great song. The particular combination of sounds and instruments and tempo shifts makes it unique.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    , @Clyde
    @anon

    The bass (Jaco) and drums propel this version. The sax man is very precise.

    Replies: @anon

  5. Whereabouts in Africa was this?

    • Replies: @Sue D. Nim
    @Smithsonian

    Occupied France

    , @bomag
    @Smithsonian

    New territory in the far north.

  6. The theories on Notre Dame are that it was started by some equipment in the attic during the renovations. This had happened before where such renovations caused the disaster they were deployed to forestall. The density of wood particles in the air would have made the environment much more prone to ignition than a typical indoor area.

    I think the damage was too severe to ever know for sure. They suggested a short in an electronic bell ringer or somewhere else or that some of the discarded cigarettes on the roof could have been evidence that a discarded butt had set the fire. (I personally would have thought being a non-smoker should have been a prerequisite for the job but maybe it’s too niche an area to be so picky, but then the question of how they lit the smokes and why they were permitted to bring anything that could do so is another matter.)

    • Replies: @Just passing through
    @Altai

    I did find it odd how they declared the fire accidental so quickly, if I recall correctly, there were still some fires going on within the structure when the authorities declared it an accident and pledged to investigate the exact causes further.

    , @Jack D
    @Altai

    The fact that they said (last April) that it was EITHER a cigarette or an electrical short shows that they really don't have a clue. That being said, no one thinks that it was anything suspicious. Once you introduce construction to a site, the risks of fire go way up. The real negligence was that they had no sprinklers and not even a effective method of smoke detection - by the time they figured out that there was a fire, it was out of control and this in an area where the ancient timbers were literally tinder dry such that the smallest spark could ignite them.

    Replies: @Louis Renault

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Altai

    Fuck I laughed when Notre Dame burned: WHERE IS YOUR 'GOD' NOW, MOTHERFUCKERS?

    After all... if the canonical literature of the various Avram-cults is to be taken seriously (KEK), everything that happens (or doesn't happen) is an Act of Yahweh.

    Anyone who is not an atheist should be excluded from insurance markets on that basis:


    Religious 'tard: I would like to make a claim for my burnt-out cathedral (or dead wife/child, or some other insurable event).

    Insurer: Sorry sport - you're the one who believes in a universe-controlling Sky Wizard. Don't come to us trying to pretend that you think that what went down wasn't (a) deliberate; (b) your fault (because you pissed off your Sky Maniac somehow). Thanks - now fuck off.
     
  7. Last summer, some family from South Africa came to visit us here in northern Europe. They wanted to see Paris, so we drove down there. We concluded that they could have seen the same blend of third- and first world scenes much cheaper in South Africa.

  8. As I tell my French lady friend almost every day, this problem and others like it are a CHOICE you’ve made, and until you make a different choice, which I like to call EXPULSION POUR TOUS, you are going to live the pathetic lives your cowardly politics lead to. Just the other day, a friend of hers was complaining about the horrible work and attitude and cost of some workers she’d hired to do some rather basic home repairs. One of them was Pakistani, which is unusual in France; usually the complaints are about North Africans. Basically you hire them and pay half the total cost of the work, then good luck to you as they have you over a barrel. The law seems to be entirely absent, unengageable. But instead of bracing themselves and getting on with the necessary work of expulsion, they bitch (including in ways that are specifically proscribed by law, even when uttered in private!) and when it’s all over they go back to talking about the “extreme right” as if it’s the plague. They are determined not to be racist, even while they flee so many of their magnificent cities. Their news media, which is head and shoulders more intelligent than ours, is nonetheless absolutely PC. A few weeks ago a nationalist weekly called Minute went bankrupt after decades in operation, and not a single radio or TV station that I heard mentioned it. Guillaume Durocher, do you see any hope for these people????

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    @Tono Bungay

    Minute is gone?

    Well, it's all over then.

  9. @anonymous
    A single heroin addicted Black-American expatriate horn player with genuine talent used to be able to bring the French together united as one.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    The same with a goofy comedian that is just misunderstood in America. I wonder if Congolese Frenchmen appreciate the humor of Jerry Lewis.

  10. @anon
    By the way, has anybody ever figured how who started the Notre Dame fire?

    I'm sure it was caused by Trump and Russian hackers somehow.


    Here's a tune from the 70's performed in the 80's just to cheer everyone up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXBba77U1_Y

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Lot, @Clyde

    The 1980s hair style threw me off a bit, but Joni still did a great job singing this one. Thanks.

  11. The can rename the place “Congo Square” now .

  12. @El Dato
    Epic chimpout.

    You want multiculturalism for all the fine exotic restaurants, but you get all the problem
    factors too.

    The fun thing is, Democratic Republic Congo is Belgium's colonial legacy (or more precisely, the Belgian King's as the "Congo Free State" was His private property), and how.

    France is on the tab for the less horribad Republic of the Congo.

    Replies: @Just passing through, @Amerimutt Golems

    Pretty sure Congolese don’t even run restaurants.

    • Replies: @Sbalfa
    @Just passing through

    Only if they serve monkey meat and other jungle fare.

    , @bomag
    @Just passing through

    They learned the fire part.

    Seems to be as far as they got.

  13. @Altai
    The theories on Notre Dame are that it was started by some equipment in the attic during the renovations. This had happened before where such renovations caused the disaster they were deployed to forestall. The density of wood particles in the air would have made the environment much more prone to ignition than a typical indoor area.

    I think the damage was too severe to ever know for sure. They suggested a short in an electronic bell ringer or somewhere else or that some of the discarded cigarettes on the roof could have been evidence that a discarded butt had set the fire. (I personally would have thought being a non-smoker should have been a prerequisite for the job but maybe it's too niche an area to be so picky, but then the question of how they lit the smokes and why they were permitted to bring anything that could do so is another matter.)

    Replies: @Just passing through, @Jack D, @Kratoklastes

    I did find it odd how they declared the fire accidental so quickly, if I recall correctly, there were still some fires going on within the structure when the authorities declared it an accident and pledged to investigate the exact causes further.

  14. @Altai
    The theories on Notre Dame are that it was started by some equipment in the attic during the renovations. This had happened before where such renovations caused the disaster they were deployed to forestall. The density of wood particles in the air would have made the environment much more prone to ignition than a typical indoor area.

    I think the damage was too severe to ever know for sure. They suggested a short in an electronic bell ringer or somewhere else or that some of the discarded cigarettes on the roof could have been evidence that a discarded butt had set the fire. (I personally would have thought being a non-smoker should have been a prerequisite for the job but maybe it's too niche an area to be so picky, but then the question of how they lit the smokes and why they were permitted to bring anything that could do so is another matter.)

    Replies: @Just passing through, @Jack D, @Kratoklastes

    The fact that they said (last April) that it was EITHER a cigarette or an electrical short shows that they really don’t have a clue. That being said, no one thinks that it was anything suspicious. Once you introduce construction to a site, the risks of fire go way up. The real negligence was that they had no sprinklers and not even a effective method of smoke detection – by the time they figured out that there was a fire, it was out of control and this in an area where the ancient timbers were literally tinder dry such that the smallest spark could ignite them.

    • Replies: @Louis Renault
    @Jack D

    They had no effective fire watch as everyone left at the same time. Conveniently.

  15. “Political opponents of the DR Congo government set fire to parked scooters, motorcycles and bins and blocked firefighters from tackling the blaze.”

    That’s what I’m going to do when I retire. Go to other countries and burn shit down in protest of politics in the US.

  16. Democratic Republic of Congo is Big Congo,

    Big Congo belonged to little Belgium (actually King Leopold), and little Congo to big France.

    Have you ever been corrected for talking about Congo during the Zaïre days, even though there was still a Congo extant? Probably not. Nobody ever talks about that Congo.

    More likely you were criticized for mentioning the Cape Coloured.

    The two Congos, by the way, have the only adjacent capitals in the world, unless you count the Vatican. Bratislava is close to Vienna, but they don’t abut.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Reg Cæsar

    Three good things about Mobutu:

    1. Hated communists
    2. Gave his country a name not shared by bordering nation
    3. Absolutely dapper.

    http://static.politico.com/cd/e9/9ef42e2c41bda5a7a6701cd512c2/untitled-4.jpg

  17. How times have changed! As a student in Paris in the 70s I worked as a fruit and vegetable vendor at an outdoor market in the 16th arrondisement. My boss was an elderly Spanish immigrant married to a French woman. I remember one day a lady of african descent was handling the produce too long for the bossman’s patience. He grabbed whatever it was in her hand and put it back on the table, slapped her hand and shouted:”On’est pas au Congo ici!”.

  18. By the way, has anybody ever figured how who started the Notre Dame fire?

    I keep hoping proximity to real diversity (in numbers) will wake up certain pigheaded White populations who live in la-la land about race.

  19. Soon it will be like South Africa…

    During every protest roads are blocked with tires which are then set alight.

    No one can get into the areas blocked and no one can leave.

  20. Diversity makes even Paris more romantic and charming and inspiring.

  21. Diversity is France’s Greatest Strength!

  22. @Redneck farmer
    Doesn't this fit one of the definitions of terrorism?

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Redneck farmer, Congolese are not white people, and no tacky Hawaiian props were used.

  23. The posted video is disturbing because there are zero riot police trying to clear the way for the firefighters to do their job and ensure public safety.

    There is no doubt the order for the police not to deploy came straight from Mayor Hildago’s office, possibly Maricón’s….whoops, I mean Macron’s office.

    • Replies: @MB
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Unless it's all chemical suppressant these days, you show up with a couple of pump trucks and hose down the neighborhood along with/on the way to the fire.
    No problems

  24. @El Dato
    Epic chimpout.

    You want multiculturalism for all the fine exotic restaurants, but you get all the problem
    factors too.

    The fun thing is, Democratic Republic Congo is Belgium's colonial legacy (or more precisely, the Belgian King's as the "Congo Free State" was His private property), and how.

    France is on the tab for the less horribad Republic of the Congo.

    Replies: @Just passing through, @Amerimutt Golems

    It is called Françafrique or indulging African pets for vanity reasons as long as they speak French and pretend to be Frenchmen.

    Frogs were upset when another former Belgian colony Rwanda joined the Commonwealth or Brit club.

  25. @anon
    By the way, has anybody ever figured how who started the Notre Dame fire?

    I'm sure it was caused by Trump and Russian hackers somehow.


    Here's a tune from the 70's performed in the 80's just to cheer everyone up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXBba77U1_Y

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Lot, @Clyde

    Great song. The particular combination of sounds and instruments and tempo shifts makes it unique.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @Lot

    Yeah, songs about how tough it is being a filthy rich rock star are real cool, daddio.

    Replies: @Lot

  26. @Reg Cæsar

    Democratic Republic of Congo is Big Congo,
     
    Big Congo belonged to little Belgium (actually King Leopold), and little Congo to big France.

    Have you ever been corrected for talking about Congo during the Zaïre days, even though there was still a Congo extant? Probably not. Nobody ever talks about that Congo.

    More likely you were criticized for mentioning the Cape Coloured.

    The two Congos, by the way, have the only adjacent capitals in the world, unless you count the Vatican. Bratislava is close to Vienna, but they don't abut.

    Replies: @Lot

    Three good things about Mobutu:

    1. Hated communists
    2. Gave his country a name not shared by bordering nation
    3. Absolutely dapper.

  27. @Jack D
    @Altai

    The fact that they said (last April) that it was EITHER a cigarette or an electrical short shows that they really don't have a clue. That being said, no one thinks that it was anything suspicious. Once you introduce construction to a site, the risks of fire go way up. The real negligence was that they had no sprinklers and not even a effective method of smoke detection - by the time they figured out that there was a fire, it was out of control and this in an area where the ancient timbers were literally tinder dry such that the smallest spark could ignite them.

    Replies: @Louis Renault

    They had no effective fire watch as everyone left at the same time. Conveniently.

  28. @Lot
    @anon

    Great song. The particular combination of sounds and instruments and tempo shifts makes it unique.

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    Yeah, songs about how tough it is being a filthy rich rock star are real cool, daddio.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @obwandiyag

    1. It’s about a studio exec, not a rock star

    2. You don’t need to be rich to enjoy Paris. Like centuries of others, I enjoyed it when nearly dead broke.

    [Budget on my first two trips, age 19 and 20:

    $300 for r/t flight
    $20/night for hostel, later $12 for a deluxe campground with electricity and bathrooms
    $3 for Le Metro
    $10 for food
    $5 entertainment]

  29. Lots of good photos here>
    First 18,000 Syrian refugees cross Greek border amid fresh tear gas clashes with guards after Turkish president Erdogan vowed to open doors to Europe and KEEP them open

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8059179/Turkish-president-Erdogan-vows-doors-open-Syrian-refugees-heading-Europe.html

    • Replies: @bigdicknick
    @Clyde

    it's funny that Erdogan clearly views opening borders as an act of violence towards europe, but europeans are taught open borders are a good thing. shows how mentally ill the left is.

  30. >>Yeah, songs about how tough it is being a filthy rich rock star are real cool, daddio.<<

    Yes, that Free Man in Paris does seem indulgent. But rich and famous people are notorious for being unhappy. Especially if they are instantly recognized. Constantly bothered after the initial instant gratification wears off.

    Many start wearing disguises. Also, every stupid thing they do is broadcast. Now with social media and the Internet Joni's song would be even more relevant.

    Way too many of these folks kill themselves with drugs, drink or other poor decisions. Better to be rich and obscure, or just ordinary. Be careful what you wish for, etc.

    Also though, fame is addictive. So some never want to retire even when the bucks are piled high and deep. That has never been my personal problem however. (Friends in Canada say that Joni, now in her 70s, has gotten very large. Just like everyone else…, no need for disguises now.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Muggles

    The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.

    Replies: @Clyde, @Muggles

  31. @Smithsonian
    Whereabouts in Africa was this?

    Replies: @Sue D. Nim, @bomag

    Occupied France

  32. @Muggles
    >>Yeah, songs about how tough it is being a filthy rich rock star are real cool, daddio.<<

    Yes, that Free Man in Paris does seem indulgent. But rich and famous people are notorious for being unhappy. Especially if they are instantly recognized. Constantly bothered after the initial instant gratification wears off.

    Many start wearing disguises. Also, every stupid thing they do is broadcast. Now with social media and the Internet Joni's song would be even more relevant.

    Way too many of these folks kill themselves with drugs, drink or other poor decisions. Better to be rich and obscure, or just ordinary. Be careful what you wish for, etc.

    Also though, fame is addictive. So some never want to retire even when the bucks are piled high and deep. That has never been my personal problem however. (Friends in Canada say that Joni, now in her 70s, has gotten very large. Just like everyone else..., no need for disguises now.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Steve Sailer

    The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.

    David Geffen of course. Gay but was bi back then, so it is said ...net worth above 8 billion though maybe he took a hit last week.
    "Free Man In Paris" was a great tune for its era and still sounds good.
    It appeared on her 1974 album Court and Spark

    Only 46 short years ago. Back when Paris was Paris.

    , @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    >>The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.<<

    Yes, you are correct. I incorrectly recalled the subject, instead thinking it was a generic "get away from my public" type of sentiment.

    Of course that was written pre Internet, pre Social Media, in the ancient times. Today there would be no escaping for a music producer. Or agent. It would be 24/7 though I guess that's why they all have underlings and probably, unlisted phone numbers. You'd have to go to Tehran to really escape, and not much fun there, if you could actually get there and also leave.

    I think that's why some musicians, particularly females like Madonna or at least temporarily, Taylor Swift have relocated to the UK, usually London. Of course there we read of break-ins of their flats and the usual media harassment. So not much respite, if any. The UK tabloids are far more aggressive than in the US, so it is said. Just ask Mr. and Mrs. Sussex.

  33. @Tono Bungay
    As I tell my French lady friend almost every day, this problem and others like it are a CHOICE you've made, and until you make a different choice, which I like to call EXPULSION POUR TOUS, you are going to live the pathetic lives your cowardly politics lead to. Just the other day, a friend of hers was complaining about the horrible work and attitude and cost of some workers she'd hired to do some rather basic home repairs. One of them was Pakistani, which is unusual in France; usually the complaints are about North Africans. Basically you hire them and pay half the total cost of the work, then good luck to you as they have you over a barrel. The law seems to be entirely absent, unengageable. But instead of bracing themselves and getting on with the necessary work of expulsion, they bitch (including in ways that are specifically proscribed by law, even when uttered in private!) and when it's all over they go back to talking about the "extreme right" as if it's the plague. They are determined not to be racist, even while they flee so many of their magnificent cities. Their news media, which is head and shoulders more intelligent than ours, is nonetheless absolutely PC. A few weeks ago a nationalist weekly called Minute went bankrupt after decades in operation, and not a single radio or TV station that I heard mentioned it. Guillaume Durocher, do you see any hope for these people????

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan

    Minute is gone?

    Well, it’s all over then.

  34. When it comes to this sort of thing, worse is better. Worse is not better when it comes to big things like outsourcing or immigration, but for non-whites to behave very badly, and get on the news and into people’s conscious awareness, as long as no white people die, and the damage is done where non-whites are infesting, I don’t see how this is actually bad.

    What are the chances the National Front wins the next election? Macron is very unpopular, and the FN seems to do better each cycle. Is the mainstream press as unpopular in France as it is here? I mean, how many times can they pull out all the stops against Le Pen before voters stop believing it?

  35. @Just passing through
    @El Dato

    Pretty sure Congolese don't even run restaurants.

    Replies: @Sbalfa, @bomag

    Only if they serve monkey meat and other jungle fare.

  36. @Steve Sailer
    @Muggles

    The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.

    Replies: @Clyde, @Muggles

    The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.

    David Geffen of course. Gay but was bi back then, so it is said …net worth above 8 billion though maybe he took a hit last week.
    “Free Man In Paris” was a great tune for its era and still sounds good.
    It appeared on her 1974 album Court and Spark

    Only 46 short years ago. Back when Paris was Paris.

  37. @anon
    By the way, has anybody ever figured how who started the Notre Dame fire?

    I'm sure it was caused by Trump and Russian hackers somehow.


    Here's a tune from the 70's performed in the 80's just to cheer everyone up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXBba77U1_Y

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Lot, @Clyde

    The bass (Jaco) and drums propel this version. The sax man is very precise.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Clyde

    That truly was an all-star band with Metheny, Brecker, Pastorius, etc. all blended well. Jaco Pastorius was a remarkable bass player both with Weather Report and Joni Mitchell's band. The audio recording on this concert was very well done; clean and balanced.

    Replies: @Clyde

  38. @obwandiyag
    @Lot

    Yeah, songs about how tough it is being a filthy rich rock star are real cool, daddio.

    Replies: @Lot

    1. It’s about a studio exec, not a rock star

    2. You don’t need to be rich to enjoy Paris. Like centuries of others, I enjoyed it when nearly dead broke.

    [Budget on my first two trips, age 19 and 20:

    $300 for r/t flight
    $20/night for hostel, later $12 for a deluxe campground with electricity and bathrooms
    $3 for Le Metro
    $10 for food
    $5 entertainment]

  39. @Clyde
    Lots of good photos here>
    First 18,000 Syrian refugees cross Greek border amid fresh tear gas clashes with guards after Turkish president Erdogan vowed to open doors to Europe and KEEP them open

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8059179/Turkish-president-Erdogan-vows-doors-open-Syrian-refugees-heading-Europe.html

    Replies: @bigdicknick

    it’s funny that Erdogan clearly views opening borders as an act of violence towards europe, but europeans are taught open borders are a good thing. shows how mentally ill the left is.

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @Muggles

    The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.

    Replies: @Clyde, @Muggles

    >>The song is about being a rich rock music producer-manager who dreams of getting away from his needy rock stars.<<

    Yes, you are correct. I incorrectly recalled the subject, instead thinking it was a generic "get away from my public" type of sentiment.

    Of course that was written pre Internet, pre Social Media, in the ancient times. Today there would be no escaping for a music producer. Or agent. It would be 24/7 though I guess that's why they all have underlings and probably, unlisted phone numbers. You'd have to go to Tehran to really escape, and not much fun there, if you could actually get there and also leave.

    I think that's why some musicians, particularly females like Madonna or at least temporarily, Taylor Swift have relocated to the UK, usually London. Of course there we read of break-ins of their flats and the usual media harassment. So not much respite, if any. The UK tabloids are far more aggressive than in the US, so it is said. Just ask Mr. and Mrs. Sussex.

  41. @Just passing through
    @El Dato

    Pretty sure Congolese don't even run restaurants.

    Replies: @Sbalfa, @bomag

    They learned the fire part.

    Seems to be as far as they got.

  42. @Smithsonian
    Whereabouts in Africa was this?

    Replies: @Sue D. Nim, @bomag

    New territory in the far north.

  43. How is that multicultural thing working out in France?

  44. @Clyde
    @anon

    The bass (Jaco) and drums propel this version. The sax man is very precise.

    Replies: @anon

    That truly was an all-star band with Metheny, Brecker, Pastorius, etc. all blended well. Jaco Pastorius was a remarkable bass player both with Weather Report and Joni Mitchell’s band. The audio recording on this concert was very well done; clean and balanced.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @anon

    The entire show is on you tube...about 80 minutes iirc. I guess do a Joni Jaco search but I saw it.

  45. @Altai
    The theories on Notre Dame are that it was started by some equipment in the attic during the renovations. This had happened before where such renovations caused the disaster they were deployed to forestall. The density of wood particles in the air would have made the environment much more prone to ignition than a typical indoor area.

    I think the damage was too severe to ever know for sure. They suggested a short in an electronic bell ringer or somewhere else or that some of the discarded cigarettes on the roof could have been evidence that a discarded butt had set the fire. (I personally would have thought being a non-smoker should have been a prerequisite for the job but maybe it's too niche an area to be so picky, but then the question of how they lit the smokes and why they were permitted to bring anything that could do so is another matter.)

    Replies: @Just passing through, @Jack D, @Kratoklastes

    Fuck I laughed when Notre Dame burned: WHERE IS YOUR ‘GOD’ NOW, MOTHERFUCKERS?

    After all… if the canonical literature of the various Avram-cults is to be taken seriously (KEK), everything that happens (or doesn’t happen) is an Act of Yahweh.

    Anyone who is not an atheist should be excluded from insurance markets on that basis:

    Religious ‘tard: I would like to make a claim for my burnt-out cathedral (or dead wife/child, or some other insurable event).

    Insurer: Sorry sport – you’re the one who believes in a universe-controlling Sky Wizard. Don’t come to us trying to pretend that you think that what went down wasn’t (a) deliberate; (b) your fault (because you pissed off your Sky Maniac somehow). Thanks – now fuck off.

  46. @anon
    @Clyde

    That truly was an all-star band with Metheny, Brecker, Pastorius, etc. all blended well. Jaco Pastorius was a remarkable bass player both with Weather Report and Joni Mitchell's band. The audio recording on this concert was very well done; clean and balanced.

    Replies: @Clyde

    The entire show is on you tube…about 80 minutes iirc. I guess do a Joni Jaco search but I saw it.

  47. I still refer to Big Congo as “Zaire”. Largely due to the fact that it’s stupid to have two countries right next to each other that are effectively named “Congo”.

  48. @The Wild Geese Howard
    The posted video is disturbing because there are zero riot police trying to clear the way for the firefighters to do their job and ensure public safety.

    There is no doubt the order for the police not to deploy came straight from Mayor Hildago's office, possibly Maricón's....whoops, I mean Macron's office.

    Replies: @MB

    Unless it’s all chemical suppressant these days, you show up with a couple of pump trucks and hose down the neighborhood along with/on the way to the fire.
    No problems

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS