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Fashion Update: Gentlemen Are Now Carrying Canes for Thrashing Bounders
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By 2021, the well-dressed gentleman will be wearing a sword like Cyrano de Bergerac.

 
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  1. Didn’t GK Chesterton bear arms in the shape of a swordstick? En garde!

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Henry's Cat

    I once said to a friend that I'd always fancied a sword stick. He strode to his umbrella stand and pulled one out.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat

  2. Anonymous[212] • Disclaimer says:

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Anonymous

    Thanks for the video. The women's reactions and facial expressions was the best part.

  3. A decent cane for just that purpose needs to have a hefty brass nob on the end to really get the point across, not just a stick to prop up one’s weary bones.

  4. It’s interesting how people on the bleeding edge of fashion are really sheep, not the innovators they believe themselves to be.

    • Agree: Pat Kittle
    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
    @Cato

    "Fashion" & "fascism" share the same root word.

    Replies: @David, @fascist, @SteveRogers42, @Anonymous

  5. I remember being impressed by the shillelagh that was wielded in Gangs of New York. Looked like something out of Steve’s golf bag.

  6. Aha! Cue my post from June 8:

    Why did men carry walking sticks in cities all the way into the early 20th century? Style?

    “Come, let’s mix where Rockefellers walk with sticks or umbrellas in their mitts.”

    Puttin’ On the Ritz

  7. Just reading Barbara Tuchman’s Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45 (1971), and she remarks several times that Stilwell disliked the swagger stick of British officer fame. The U.S. Army regiment stationed in China between the wars required officers off duty but in uniform to carry a swagger stick. Vinegar Joe apparently hated that kind of officiousness.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Percy Gryce

    Those were (originally) for beating soldiers, and officers beating soldiers is un-American. It's the reason Patton got into trouble for those slapping incidents. Free citizens of a republic aren't supposed to treat each other that way. If a beating is necessary for discipline reasons, it must be carried out by fellow soldiers, not officers.

    Replies: @Gordo

  8. That fellow is either bowlegged, or has too much in his pockets.

    Will the police be authorized to inspect these for hidden poison?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_umbrella

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Reg Cæsar

    He’s got something in his side pockets.

    -Avocados?

    , @meh
    @Reg Cæsar


    That fellow is either bowlegged, or has too much in his pockets.
     
    Bring back jodhpurs.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Dago Shoes
    @Reg Cæsar

    Camera angle …

  9. There‘s nothing like a nice piece of hickory…

    • Agree: Sol
  10. Interesting idea, and definitely something I’ll keep in mind depending on how things progress here. Now I just need one that looks benign but is good for cracking skulls. Any suggestions?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JosephB

    Your best bet is a collapsible baton, but only if you take the POST credit eligible course from a local vendor. Usually the firearms instructors give that course. With the course, the baton is legally a non-lethal weapon -- without it, the baton is a lethal weapon.

    There are books on cane fighting -- you can look at one of those and then pick your cane.

    I'm not an enthusiast for metal heads. Too easy to kill your opponent and find yourself in real trouble. Looks bad to the jury.

    BTW, if you think you might have to actually fight it is a good idea to buy a contract for legal services in defense of weapons use charges prior to buying any kind of weapon. You want one that will defend against both criminal and civil actions involving use of any weapon.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @JosephB

    "Any suggestions?"

    Forget the dandy crap; societal meltdown requires a serious weapon. Get yourself a firearm. I prefer a hand cannon .45; but a snub nose .38 works well in an urban environment and is easier to conceal.

    Replies: @JosephB

    , @SteveRogers42
    @JosephB

    Blackthorn walking stick.

  11. Nope in the US its concealed carry. The UK has no real access to weapons. Eventually someone will make a directed energy weapon like a real potent laser, particle beam generator or the like out of sheer necessity.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Whiskey

    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1286749281521631237

    Replies: @El Dato, @Anonymous

  12. Never mind the shillelagh, he’s wearing nikes! Very disappointing.

  13. The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Rob McX


    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.
     
    This is true, sadly.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Rob McX


    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.
     
    In California, anything potentially useful for self-defense is also potentially illegal to own. The law is so broad and vague they could probably charge you for owning a rock if they felt like it.

    PC 22210 states that “any person in this state who manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state, keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends, or possesses any leaded cane, or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a billy, blackjack, sandbag, sandclub, sap, or slungshot, is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or imprisonment.”
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rob McX, @Jay Igaboo

    , @Muggles
    @Rob McX

    >>The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.<<

    Maybe. If that is a concern then obtain some injury gauze wrap and tie that tight around your right ankle underneath the sock and/or trouser leg.

    Then you can beat the rap by explaining your newly sprained but not badly injured ankle. Should you actually be arrested you can just wait it out as it is highly unlikely that you will be offered a doctor's examination of that injury.

    By the time that might happen, thanks to Jesus, injury mostly healed. Still sore though! No crime here Your Honor, just a poor hobbling soul. Those sprained ankles are very hurtful.

  14. If everybody has to go around armed, society has failed……massively. Almost every State in the Union has legal concealed carry now, but that doesn’t seem to be sufficient. Wow, the collapse is accelerating.

    So what are we talking here, sword canes with quick releases? They are kind of a chore to carry around, in and out of a car, where you set it at the restaurant or theater, where to put it aside when you are making out with your Chick, and so forth. Texas in its infinite wisdom allowed legal open sword carry in 2015 (seriously, you can’t make this stuff up) and just for grins I spent a day toting around my katana, and it was exhausting. I have a flail I carry once in a while just because it scares the hell out of people, and it is not like I am uncurling it and swinging the spiked balls. (Note, flails are EXTREMELY dangerous to use – if you miss an intended target, the balls come back at you full force. To use one at all, you pretty much have to have chain mail, gauntlets, and a helm or head protection, especially the last one one. I almost broke my forearm once catching a ricochet. And armor is very hot to wear.)

    If you absolutely must, I recommend a war hammer. They can be ornate and decorative fashion accessories, and, as a huge bonus, if anybody asks what the hammer is for you can tell them “pounding in nails, dumb-ass”.

  15. I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out… if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Thomas

    That "collapsible baton" doesn't look too threatening, but it could come in handy during an impromptu PowerPoint presentation or to mix up some eggs for an omelette.

    , @Anon
    @Thomas

    That's 100% not true, I would advise you stop carrying the baton immediately.

    Replies: @Bozo the Clown

    , @Paul Mendez
    @Thomas

    In my state, one cannot carry a collapsible baton concealed. In a few states, you can’t even carry them openly.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Thomas

    Can something like this be passed off as a walking aid if challenged?

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Twinkie
    @Thomas

    Be aware that several states ban or regulate collapsible batons stringently.

    Do you know how to use one effectively?

    Replies: @Thomas

    , @Charles St. Charles
    @Thomas

    I am permitted to carry neither gun nor baton in sunny SoCal. I‘m relying on pepper spray until I move the f*** out of here in the next few months.

    , @Kronos
    @Thomas

    I can see how that can be useful.

    https://youtu.be/HiEbl4kgaU4

    (I’d ask how long it was but I’m worried about all the 4Chan-like snickering that’ll entail.)

    , @NickG
    @Thomas

    I'm far better equipped than Dominic Cummings, carrying anything with intent to use as a weapon in the UK is illegal, but his stick confers plausible deniability.

    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip, the slide is milled and it has a reflex sight (Holosun 508T), there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Thomas, @Jack D, @Anonymous

  16. By 2021, the well-dressed gentleman will be wearing a sword like Cyrano de Bergerac.

    Do you think zip guns will make a comeback?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @James Speaks

    Only if thats all we have left.

    , @Dago Shoes
    @James Speaks

    Apparently brass knuckles already have … you can't beat the classics …

  17. Swordcanes next, please. Then a return to duelling.

    • Replies: @Ano
    @jbwilson24

    Yes, I'd love to see pistols at dawn in Washington DC.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/aoc-drops-f-bomb-house-floor-after-refusing-accept-apology-over-insult

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @jbwilson24

    The honorable institution of the duel was ruined by Reconstruction.

    Before then, anyone actively involved with a duel was made ineligible for government employment, i.e. given a certificate of appreciation from the taxpayers.

  18. A cane-sword might be the way to go but like fedoras are celebrated by the same dweebish group.

    It’ll be good to look into everyone’s respective state knife-control laws (yes, they exist.) Some states have laws against gravity knives and that kind of thing. Though I don’t think blunt-weapon control is a thing besides brass knuckles.

    https://knifeup.com/knife-laws/

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Kronos

    An unopened Buck 110 concentrates the impact power of your punch wonderfully.

    , @Twinkie
    @Kronos

    That sword has the curvature of a Katana. A cane-sword is typically straight for obvious reasons.

    Replies: @Kronos, @J.Ross

  19. @Reg Cæsar
    That fellow is either bowlegged, or has too much in his pockets.

    Will the police be authorized to inspect these for hidden poison?


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_umbrella

    Replies: @Kronos, @meh, @Dago Shoes

    He’s got something in his side pockets.

    -Avocados?

  20. @Reg Cæsar
    That fellow is either bowlegged, or has too much in his pockets.

    Will the police be authorized to inspect these for hidden poison?


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_umbrella

    Replies: @Kronos, @meh, @Dago Shoes

    That fellow is either bowlegged, or has too much in his pockets.

    Bring back jodhpurs.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @meh


    Bring back jodhpurs
     
    I wear a pair whenever I ride.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  21. • Thanks: Sol
    • Replies: @Sol
    @Zoodles

    When one isn't allowed to have handguns or edged weapons ...

  22. @Kronos
    A cane-sword might be the way to go but like fedoras are celebrated by the same dweebish group.

    https://i.redd.it/75s0ltib13q01.jpg

    It’ll be good to look into everyone’s respective state knife-control laws (yes, they exist.) Some states have laws against gravity knives and that kind of thing. Though I don’t think blunt-weapon control is a thing besides brass knuckles.

    https://knifeup.com/knife-laws/

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Twinkie

    An unopened Buck 110 concentrates the impact power of your punch wonderfully.

  23. It’s a jungle out there, Begorrah:

    https://www.oldeshillelagh.com/

  24. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    That “collapsible baton” doesn’t look too threatening, but it could come in handy during an impromptu PowerPoint presentation or to mix up some eggs for an omelette.

  25. anon[116] • Disclaimer says:

    Eh, that’s a cane, nothing messianic about it.

    Try this instead:

    There were manuals on how to fight with canes over 120 years ago. For example:

    A plain old stockman’s cane has much to recommend it.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @anon

    Nice if you're up against a drunk. Not so much otherwise. Sam Colt changed the world.

    , @Paul Mendez
    @anon

    Stockman’s cane.

    That’s what I carry.

    You learn something every day.

    Thank you very much.

    , @Old Prude
    @anon

    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight. It also made clear a gun is the trump card.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @SunBakedSuburb, @Ancient Briton

  26. Anonymous[132] • Disclaimer says:

    Speaking of fashion, I was thinking the other day about the decadence of the culture, and how few people still try to be the best of Humanity. Standards have lowered so much that now you see rudeness and vulgarity even from upper middle-class professional, the people that used to hold the standards for Society. You need to really climb the social food chain to still find examples of old-fashioned class and elegance.

    The most stunning example of style, elegance and lady-like behavior would be that of Princess Leonor of Spain. I was actually blown away by her. Just so classy and stylish. She manages to combine edgy sophistication with a conservative and discreet style.

    The word “lady” gets thrown around a lot, but it really does apply to her.

    Princess Leonor has a huge following of American teenage girls that copy her dress, style and mannerisms. That is odd because Americans in general don’t care about European Royalty. I guess teenage girls are the exception. Of course, it’s easy to have an amazing wardrobe when it is paid for by the National Treasury(because The Nation wants their crown princess to look as gorgeous as possible)the Princess sometimes wears 50K in her body, and even rich girls find it difficult to copy her style in full. But they try. The Princess has also recived thousands of love letters from boys thrghout the World. Don’t know if she reads them. I think Princess Leonora is a much better role model for young women than whores like Christina Aguillera, Britney Spears, etc.

    Perhaps the reason why she is so lady-like in style, dress and mannerisms is because her father, The King, a huge man notorious for his domineering temper, would kill her if she anything other than the perfect young lady.

    She truly is a fairy tale princess. Just watch this:

    • Replies: @Joe H
    @Anonymous

    Terrible lyrics in the song that accompanies the slideshow of such a young girl. Very pedo.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @anon
    @Anonymous

    And then you have the King of Thighland poncing about with his tattoos and shitty clothes.
    He's an ugly man with terrible taste.

  27. I fenced when younger, so I already had skill set to handle a cane. I carry a regular wooden cane with a crook handle. At 63, no one gives me a second glance.

    “The Cane as a Weapon,” by A.C. Cunningham. (C) 1912.

    • Thanks: Gordo
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Paul Mendez

    Where might one buy such a cane? I am in your demographic.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @J.Ross, @Gordo

    , @Kronos
    @Paul Mendez

    It might help to rebrand it as a “Whoop-ass Stick” to market it towards younger demographics.

    , @ThreeCranes
    @Paul Mendez

    I was taught not to swing a cane but to stab your opponent directly in the eyes. Your opponent has to react to that. This gives you a moment to either flee or whatever. Try it with a friend sometime in mock combat. It's like having a baseball hit directly at your eyes. It's hard to get a visual fix on something coming right at your eyes.

    The best wrestler I ever encountered would flick his hands at my eyes before he came in low for a takedown. Even knowing what was coming, it was very hard not to flinch and throw my head backwards, which opened my defensive posture up.

  28. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    That’s 100% not true, I would advise you stop carrying the baton immediately.

    • Replies: @Bozo the Clown
    @Anon

    My thoughts exactly. I long ago researched the legality of carrying a leather sap, and was surprised to learn that pretty much every state forbids it. Collapsible batons are the same category.

    Replies: @Thomas, @Harry Baldwin

  29. The FT’s “wooden staff” looks an awful lot like a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shillelagh_(club)

  30. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    In my state, one cannot carry a collapsible baton concealed. In a few states, you can’t even carry them openly.

  31. Hmm, canes, swords, remind me what comes next?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Mr McKenna

    Cannons!!!

    https://youtu.be/Bo8Q88bAXyQ

  32. Folding knives and clip-on folding razor knives are very practical (and justifiable — they’re necessary in many jobs) but, given the requirement to unfold and the hesitation threshold to cut someone, are very unlikely to be useful in a fight. Small hand tools like a hammer or screwdriver can be carried in the car, as can sporting equipment such as a baseball bat. A swagger stick (or a telescoping Monadnock) could get around size issues while retaining some value as a bludgeon. Bear in mind that some states forbid the use of small bludgeons. One workaround might be heavy work gloves: you’re still reduced to fists, but they’re not bare.
    Of course the real answer would be a short, small gladius, a Confederate bowie (which is a very long knife — remember the store owner who tried to use slashing attacks with a long sword and was put on the ground before he could do anything), or a puuka. A real man brings out his puuka when necessary and doesn’t put it away until the sun goes down, which, in Finland, the land of the puuka, can be a while.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @J.Ross

    When I was in college, one of my fencing teammates made a pair of wooden Bowie knives, and we would go at it full-till wearing our fencing gear. Very enlightening! Disabuses you of Hollywood knife fight tropes very quickly.

    With essentially no parrying capability, it’s mutual maiming. Seconds after the fight starts, someone is going to be missing a few fingers.

    Old saying: “In a knife fight, the winner goes to the emergency room and the loser goes to the morgue.”

    Replies: @J.Ross

  33. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    Can something like this be passed off as a walking aid if challenged?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Jim Don Bob

    I doubt it, the real blind man’s collapsable stick seems too light and fragile to cave-in someone’s head. The German Shepard guide dog would make a superb double purpose for that though.


    https://youtu.be/Yr0mGHiMfyo

    Some people are able to get away with using brass knuckles as jewelry so what do I know.

    http://www.blankexit.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/brass-knuckles-ear-peircing-plug-guy.jpg

  34. @Paul Mendez
    I fenced when younger, so I already had skill set to handle a cane. I carry a regular wooden cane with a crook handle. At 63, no one gives me a second glance.

    “The Cane as a Weapon,” by A.C. Cunningham. (C) 1912.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Kronos, @ThreeCranes

    Where might one buy such a cane? I am in your demographic.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Jim Don Bob

    I bought mine for $0.25 at a thrift shop. It already had a nice “patina.” Just an old fart with bad ankles out for a walk.

    Amazon has plain, solid-wood canes for under $20. I suppose pharmacies carry them, too. I like the crook handle because you can hang it on your arm or a chair when you need both hands.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    , @J.Ross
    @Jim Don Bob

    Pay attention to the wood, seek hickory.

    , @Gordo
    @Jim Don Bob

    Unbreakable umbrella.

    This is probably okay, even in UK.:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/NTOI-Unbreakable-Walking-Stick-Umbrella-Standard/dp/B00C2TI14E/

  35. @Paul Mendez
    I fenced when younger, so I already had skill set to handle a cane. I carry a regular wooden cane with a crook handle. At 63, no one gives me a second glance.

    “The Cane as a Weapon,” by A.C. Cunningham. (C) 1912.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Kronos, @ThreeCranes

    It might help to rebrand it as a “Whoop-ass Stick” to market it towards younger demographics.

  36. Bicycle U-locks are the deniable weapon of choice for the Antifa.

  37. Canes don’t appear to have gone up in price like guns.

    Walmart still carries canes.

    Off to look for the Cunningham book.

  38. @Anonymous
    Speaking of fashion, I was thinking the other day about the decadence of the culture, and how few people still try to be the best of Humanity. Standards have lowered so much that now you see rudeness and vulgarity even from upper middle-class professional, the people that used to hold the standards for Society. You need to really climb the social food chain to still find examples of old-fashioned class and elegance.

    The most stunning example of style, elegance and lady-like behavior would be that of Princess Leonor of Spain. I was actually blown away by her. Just so classy and stylish. She manages to combine edgy sophistication with a conservative and discreet style.

    The word "lady" gets thrown around a lot, but it really does apply to her.

    Princess Leonor has a huge following of American teenage girls that copy her dress, style and mannerisms. That is odd because Americans in general don't care about European Royalty. I guess teenage girls are the exception. Of course, it's easy to have an amazing wardrobe when it is paid for by the National Treasury(because The Nation wants their crown princess to look as gorgeous as possible)the Princess sometimes wears 50K in her body, and even rich girls find it difficult to copy her style in full. But they try. The Princess has also recived thousands of love letters from boys thrghout the World. Don't know if she reads them. I think Princess Leonora is a much better role model for young women than whores like Christina Aguillera, Britney Spears, etc.

    Perhaps the reason why she is so lady-like in style, dress and mannerisms is because her father, The King, a huge man notorious for his domineering temper, would kill her if she anything other than the perfect young lady.

    She truly is a fairy tale princess. Just watch this: https://youtu.be/V2NNFZM557Q

    Replies: @Joe H, @anon

    Terrible lyrics in the song that accompanies the slideshow of such a young girl. Very pedo.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Joe H

    Why are you even thinking about sex? The point is her style, elegance and incredible lady-like behavior truly beffitting of a princess. Yes, she is a beautiful, but that is not the point. Also, she is a teenager now and not a little girl. Some of the pictures are from when she was younger, which shows her style from a young age. This has nothing to do with anything sexual. She is fully clothed(and with what clothes!) in all pictures. Maybe you are just uptight?

    Replies: @Joe H

  39. In the People’s Republic of Illinois, get an FOID even if you don’t want a gun — for now.

    For years, it was illegal to carry a switchblade in Illinois, but as of this month, it is now legal, but there is a catch.

    On August 11th, Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner signed into law SB 607 which repeals a ban on switchblade knives in Illinois. But, before you go out and purchase a switchblade, you will need to obtain an Illinois Firearms Owner Identification (FOID) card.

    The new law, which has gotten very little news coverage, will take effect immediately. It will require switchblade owners to:

    Have a valid FOID card
    Be at least 21 years of age

    FOID cards take 30 days for the state to process, and require a $10 fee and last 10 years.. The new law amends the previous legislation from 2012, which maintained the switchblade ban.

    https://q985online.com/carrying-a-switchblade-knife-is-now-legal-in-illinois-but-you-need-to-know-this-first/

    https://www.coldsteel.com/sword-canes/

  40. Sometimes when I do my exercise walking I carry an old-fashioned walking stick.

  41. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    Be aware that several states ban or regulate collapsible batons stringently.

    Do you know how to use one effectively?

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Twinkie


    Do you know how to use one effectively?
     
    Keep it in tight, snap from the hip, snap back just as fast so it doesn't get grabbed, aim from shoulder to hip.

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

  42. @Kronos
    A cane-sword might be the way to go but like fedoras are celebrated by the same dweebish group.

    https://i.redd.it/75s0ltib13q01.jpg

    It’ll be good to look into everyone’s respective state knife-control laws (yes, they exist.) Some states have laws against gravity knives and that kind of thing. Though I don’t think blunt-weapon control is a thing besides brass knuckles.

    https://knifeup.com/knife-laws/

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Twinkie

    That sword has the curvature of a Katana. A cane-sword is typically straight for obvious reasons.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Twinkie

    I couldn’t find a good photo of a fedora guy with a cane sword. This was the best I could find.

    Replies: @Sol

    , @J.Ross
    @Twinkie

    And both are long, rely on slashing, expect you to be able to move your arms, and are collected by people like pic related.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  43. @meh
    @Reg Cæsar


    That fellow is either bowlegged, or has too much in his pockets.
     
    Bring back jodhpurs.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Bring back jodhpurs

    I wear a pair whenever I ride.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Twinkie


    I wear a pair whenever I ride.
     
    My wife doesn't let me.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  44. @Anon
    @Thomas

    That's 100% not true, I would advise you stop carrying the baton immediately.

    Replies: @Bozo the Clown

    My thoughts exactly. I long ago researched the legality of carrying a leather sap, and was surprised to learn that pretty much every state forbids it. Collapsible batons are the same category.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Bozo the Clown

    The law where I live categorizes "slungshots" like a leather sap or blackjack differently than an ASP-type baton. At worst, it might qualify as an "other dangerous weapon." I'd classify it as a legal gray area.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Bozo the Clown

    You can buy a coin purse that doubles as a blackjack. There are a number of these on the market, the handle is the part that snaps around your belt. I find it hard to believe you would get away with using one of these if they're illegal in your jurisdiction.

    https://barrantileather.com/shop/ols/products/life-changer-tm

  45. @Jim Don Bob
    @Paul Mendez

    Where might one buy such a cane? I am in your demographic.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @J.Ross, @Gordo

    I bought mine for $0.25 at a thrift shop. It already had a nice “patina.” Just an old fart with bad ankles out for a walk.

    Amazon has plain, solid-wood canes for under $20. I suppose pharmacies carry them, too. I like the crook handle because you can hang it on your arm or a chair when you need both hands.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @Paul Mendez

    I just learned from another commentator that what I carry is called a “Stockman’s Cane”

    Who knew? I’ve been speaking prose all my life!

  46. fnn says:

    Somewhat related:
    https://unherd.com/thepost/an-untrue-claim-in-the-new-yorker-speaks-volumes/

    Reading the latest copy of the New Yorker magazine, published exactly a week ago, I came across this sentence in a piece by Jill Lepore:

    One study suggests that two-thirds of Americans between the ages of fifteen and thirty-four who were treated in emergency rooms suffered from injuries inflicted by police and security guards, about as many people as the number of pedestrians injured by motor vehicles.
    – JILL LEPORE, NEW YORKER

    I sought out the study she was referring to, and found it: a 2016 paper, whose lead author, Justin Feldman, was a doctoral student at Harvard at the time. Soon after publication, the findings were described in a Harvard press release, and also reported on by The Guardian.

    And it turns out I was right — the ‘two-thirds’ claim is not true. Not even close.

    I did my best to work out a rough estimate of the true proportion of 15-34 year olds visiting the ER who had suffered legal intervention injuries, and arrived at a figure of 0.2% (you can follow my working in this thread). So I believe Lepore’s claim to be off by a factor of several hundred.

    • Replies: @Dan Smith
    @fnn

    Math is hard.

  47. @J.Ross
    Folding knives and clip-on folding razor knives are very practical (and justifiable -- they're necessary in many jobs) but, given the requirement to unfold and the hesitation threshold to cut someone, are very unlikely to be useful in a fight. Small hand tools like a hammer or screwdriver can be carried in the car, as can sporting equipment such as a baseball bat. A swagger stick (or a telescoping Monadnock) could get around size issues while retaining some value as a bludgeon. Bear in mind that some states forbid the use of small bludgeons. One workaround might be heavy work gloves: you're still reduced to fists, but they're not bare.
    Of course the real answer would be a short, small gladius, a Confederate bowie (which is a very long knife -- remember the store owner who tried to use slashing attacks with a long sword and was put on the ground before he could do anything), or a puuka. A real man brings out his puuka when necessary and doesn't put it away until the sun goes down, which, in Finland, the land of the puuka, can be a while.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    When I was in college, one of my fencing teammates made a pair of wooden Bowie knives, and we would go at it full-till wearing our fencing gear. Very enlightening! Disabuses you of Hollywood knife fight tropes very quickly.

    With essentially no parrying capability, it’s mutual maiming. Seconds after the fight starts, someone is going to be missing a few fingers.

    Old saying: “In a knife fight, the winner goes to the emergency room and the loser goes to the morgue.”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Paul Mendez

    In a lot of the antifa fight videos from the Democrat riots you generally see a knockdown punch followed by a single or group battery on the ground, so the whole idea is presumably to get away from the strike that enables the stomping. The store owner with the long sword had no parry for the simple (right?) hook and pretty much seemed to expect his target to stand still.
    Fighting "fairly" with the same weapons contradicts my surely ignorant understanding of Sun Tzu. You don't fence with a knife, you close and stab. There's no dance because you're being a knife-wielding bastard. Again, even done "correctly" this is not something a normal person can do: stabbing and cutting is psychologically harder than hitting, even during an attack.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @Old Prude

  48. @James Speaks

    By 2021, the well-dressed gentleman will be wearing a sword like Cyrano de Bergerac.
     
    Do you think zip guns will make a comeback?

    Replies: @JMcG, @Dago Shoes

    Only if thats all we have left.

  49. @Twinkie
    @Kronos

    That sword has the curvature of a Katana. A cane-sword is typically straight for obvious reasons.

    Replies: @Kronos, @J.Ross

    I couldn’t find a good photo of a fedora guy with a cane sword. This was the best I could find.

    • Replies: @Sol
    @Kronos

    Someone should post a Zatoichi clip.

  50. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    I am permitted to carry neither gun nor baton in sunny SoCal. I‘m relying on pepper spray until I move the f*** out of here in the next few months.

  51. @anon
    Eh, that's a cane, nothing messianic about it.

    Try this instead:

    http://www.mesora.org/mosesstaff.png

    There were manuals on how to fight with canes over 120 years ago. For example:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/14/1c/fd/141cfd1336578f8bc67aff03e4996a74.jpg

    A plain old stockman's cane has much to recommend it.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Paul Mendez, @Old Prude

    Nice if you’re up against a drunk. Not so much otherwise. Sam Colt changed the world.

    • Agree: JMcG
  52. I carry a billy club in my codpiece.

    • LOL: JMcG
  53. I’m far removed from these things, but I believe there’s a resurgence of interest in knobbly polished briar staffs and the like, rather than the smooth canes of the suave tuxedoed crowd of old.

  54. Anonymous[132] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe H
    @Anonymous

    Terrible lyrics in the song that accompanies the slideshow of such a young girl. Very pedo.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Why are you even thinking about sex? The point is her style, elegance and incredible lady-like behavior truly beffitting of a princess. Yes, she is a beautiful, but that is not the point. Also, she is a teenager now and not a little girl. Some of the pictures are from when she was younger, which shows her style from a young age. This has nothing to do with anything sexual. She is fully clothed(and with what clothes!) in all pictures. Maybe you are just uptight?

    • Replies: @Joe H
    @Anonymous

    Did you listen to the song lyrics at all?

  55. @Reg Cæsar
    That fellow is either bowlegged, or has too much in his pockets.

    Will the police be authorized to inspect these for hidden poison?


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_umbrella

    Replies: @Kronos, @meh, @Dago Shoes

    Camera angle …

  56. Anon[213] • Disclaimer says:

    Canes were used in the old days not just because of bounders, but because all dogs were off-leash back then and farmers’ livestock roamed the streets and village commons. You used canes more often for misbehaving animals than humans. Of course, there was always the gun, but a cane could be effective without being lethal, so it was useful.

  57. @James Speaks

    By 2021, the well-dressed gentleman will be wearing a sword like Cyrano de Bergerac.
     
    Do you think zip guns will make a comeback?

    Replies: @JMcG, @Dago Shoes

    Apparently brass knuckles already have … you can’t beat the classics …

  58. @Paul Mendez
    @J.Ross

    When I was in college, one of my fencing teammates made a pair of wooden Bowie knives, and we would go at it full-till wearing our fencing gear. Very enlightening! Disabuses you of Hollywood knife fight tropes very quickly.

    With essentially no parrying capability, it’s mutual maiming. Seconds after the fight starts, someone is going to be missing a few fingers.

    Old saying: “In a knife fight, the winner goes to the emergency room and the loser goes to the morgue.”

    Replies: @J.Ross

    In a lot of the antifa fight videos from the Democrat riots you generally see a knockdown punch followed by a single or group battery on the ground, so the whole idea is presumably to get away from the strike that enables the stomping. The store owner with the long sword had no parry for the simple (right?) hook and pretty much seemed to expect his target to stand still.
    Fighting “fairly” with the same weapons contradicts my surely ignorant understanding of Sun Tzu. You don’t fence with a knife, you close and stab. There’s no dance because you’re being a knife-wielding bastard. Again, even done “correctly” this is not something a normal person can do: stabbing and cutting is psychologically harder than hitting, even during an attack.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @J.Ross


    You don’t fence with a knife, you close and stab. There’s no dance because you’re being a knife-wielding bastard.
     
    Exactly!

    That’s why our coach made us stop as soon as he found out what we were doing. Technique is everything in fencing. “Technique” gets you killed in knife fights.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Old Prude
    @J.Ross

    Yeah. Shooting a cowbird with a .22 is easy. Stomping on it or bludgeoning it because you only winged it is an entirely different thing and a normal person recoils from that after one or two experiences and just keeps shooting at the wounded bird until it's dead.

  59. @Twinkie
    @Kronos

    That sword has the curvature of a Katana. A cane-sword is typically straight for obvious reasons.

    Replies: @Kronos, @J.Ross

    And both are long, rely on slashing, expect you to be able to move your arms, and are collected by people like pic related.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @J.Ross

    Real Katanas made by master craftsmen in Japan easily cost $50,000-$100,000. Don’t confuse them with junk sold at malls or via catalogs.

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

  60. @Jim Don Bob
    @Paul Mendez

    Where might one buy such a cane? I am in your demographic.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @J.Ross, @Gordo

    Pay attention to the wood, seek hickory.

  61. @Anonymous
    Speaking of fashion, I was thinking the other day about the decadence of the culture, and how few people still try to be the best of Humanity. Standards have lowered so much that now you see rudeness and vulgarity even from upper middle-class professional, the people that used to hold the standards for Society. You need to really climb the social food chain to still find examples of old-fashioned class and elegance.

    The most stunning example of style, elegance and lady-like behavior would be that of Princess Leonor of Spain. I was actually blown away by her. Just so classy and stylish. She manages to combine edgy sophistication with a conservative and discreet style.

    The word "lady" gets thrown around a lot, but it really does apply to her.

    Princess Leonor has a huge following of American teenage girls that copy her dress, style and mannerisms. That is odd because Americans in general don't care about European Royalty. I guess teenage girls are the exception. Of course, it's easy to have an amazing wardrobe when it is paid for by the National Treasury(because The Nation wants their crown princess to look as gorgeous as possible)the Princess sometimes wears 50K in her body, and even rich girls find it difficult to copy her style in full. But they try. The Princess has also recived thousands of love letters from boys thrghout the World. Don't know if she reads them. I think Princess Leonora is a much better role model for young women than whores like Christina Aguillera, Britney Spears, etc.

    Perhaps the reason why she is so lady-like in style, dress and mannerisms is because her father, The King, a huge man notorious for his domineering temper, would kill her if she anything other than the perfect young lady.

    She truly is a fairy tale princess. Just watch this: https://youtu.be/V2NNFZM557Q

    Replies: @Joe H, @anon

    And then you have the King of Thighland poncing about with his tattoos and shitty clothes.
    He’s an ugly man with terrible taste.

  62. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    A beating cane is all the rage amongst the good gentlemen and women of Portland. One never knows when a proper beating might be required by a visitor or local personality alike, during a lazy, after-dinner stroll…

  63. All of the self defense ideas mentioned are interesting and viable but of course they violate the rule of forgetting to bring a gun to a gun fight. In today’s environment even a justiable use of deadly force would leave someone ensnared in a nightmare of legal consequences especially if the victims are POCs or other favored victim groups

    I think many people many who fantasize about thrashing a ruffian with their shillelagh discount how challenging hand to hand combat can be against attackers who are younger stronger and who outnumber you. Unfortunately a walking stick will look peculiar unless you are visible disabled or very old.

    The unbreakable umbrella is expensive ($120) but light and will get you no attention even on an airplane. Not a good option in place like sunny CA where it never rains
    https://unbreakableumbrella.com/

    One of the antifa thug that attacked OAN’s Jack Posobiec in front of the the White House was shown carrying a cheap articulated aluminum cane that he used as a weapon.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @jesse helms think-alike


    All of the self defense ideas mentioned are interesting and viable but of course they violate the rule of forgetting to bring a gun to a gun fight.
     
    True, unless you live in a state where you can’t bring a gun anywhere except to a shooting range licensed gunsmith.

    .

    .,a walking stick will look peculiar unless you are visible disabled or very old.
     
    “Very old” is basically the target audience of every conservative blog.

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

  64. @anon
    Eh, that's a cane, nothing messianic about it.

    Try this instead:

    http://www.mesora.org/mosesstaff.png

    There were manuals on how to fight with canes over 120 years ago. For example:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/14/1c/fd/141cfd1336578f8bc67aff03e4996a74.jpg

    A plain old stockman's cane has much to recommend it.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Paul Mendez, @Old Prude

    Stockman’s cane.

    That’s what I carry.

    You learn something every day.

    Thank you very much.

  65. Anonymous[504] • Disclaimer says:

    The walking stick serves the purpose of an advertisement that the bearer’s hands are employed otherwise than in useful effort, and it therefore has utility as an evidence of leisure.

    https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Thorstein_Veblen#The_Theory_of_the_Leisure_Class_(1899)

    • Agree: Haruto Rat
  66. @jbwilson24
    Swordcanes next, please. Then a return to duelling.

    Replies: @Ano, @Abolish_public_education

  67. @Paul Mendez
    @Jim Don Bob

    I bought mine for $0.25 at a thrift shop. It already had a nice “patina.” Just an old fart with bad ankles out for a walk.

    Amazon has plain, solid-wood canes for under $20. I suppose pharmacies carry them, too. I like the crook handle because you can hang it on your arm or a chair when you need both hands.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    I just learned from another commentator that what I carry is called a “Stockman’s Cane”

    Who knew? I’ve been speaking prose all my life!

  68. @Rob McX
    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Hypnotoad666, @Muggles

    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.

    This is true, sadly.

  69. @Jim Don Bob
    @Paul Mendez

    Where might one buy such a cane? I am in your demographic.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @J.Ross, @Gordo

    Unbreakable umbrella.

    This is probably okay, even in UK.:

  70. @Rob McX
    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Hypnotoad666, @Muggles

    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.

    In California, anything potentially useful for self-defense is also potentially illegal to own. The law is so broad and vague they could probably charge you for owning a rock if they felt like it.

    PC 22210 states that “any person in this state who manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state, keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends, or possesses any leaded cane, or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a billy, blackjack, sandbag, sandclub, sap, or slungshot, is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or imprisonment.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hypnotoad666


    In California, anything potentially useful for self-defense is also potentially illegal to own. The law is so broad and vague they could probably charge you for owning a rock if they felt like it.
     
    If you live atop the Oceanwide Tower, the Metropolis, or 820 Olive, everything you own constitutes a deadly weapon.


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_buildings_in_Los_Angeles
    , @Rob McX
    @Hypnotoad666

    It looks like they have all the loopholes covered in the event of whites having to defend themselves.

    , @Jay Igaboo
    @Hypnotoad666

    Not so.
    Section 5 Subsection 3 of PC 22210 reads " Exemption from prosecution if given to members of The Dindu tribe for cultural reasons with regard to: metal-tipped canes carried or firearms by Dindu in pursuit of the traditional Dindu occupations of pimping hohs and/or selling crack cocaine out side school gates. or when engaging in the sacred tribal rituals of rioting, arson and looting Nike shoes and electronic devices."

  71. The Express says that Englishmen are still required to possess and practice with longbows, but I thought that was repealed in 1960. If not, it’s high time to enforce that statute.

    Here are 11 of the most BIZARRE British laws that you probably never knew about

    Lowering the Bar has a different take:

    Do Englishmen Still Have to Show Up for Longbow Practice?

    • Replies: @Bill B.
    @Reg Cæsar

    The modern Englishman couldn't do it. It was extremely hard to use a full-scale war bow. It required great strength and skill.

    The contemporary Englishman is typically fat, weak and impatient.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  72. interesting comment thread but if you spend any time at all among people who might be murderously violent the main weapon you need are confederates.

    trust me people have tried or threatened to kill me every decade of my life, except the first and the most recent. they all failed because I always had confederates when I needed them.

  73. @Hypnotoad666
    @Rob McX


    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.
     
    In California, anything potentially useful for self-defense is also potentially illegal to own. The law is so broad and vague they could probably charge you for owning a rock if they felt like it.

    PC 22210 states that “any person in this state who manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state, keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends, or possesses any leaded cane, or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a billy, blackjack, sandbag, sandclub, sap, or slungshot, is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or imprisonment.”
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rob McX, @Jay Igaboo

    In California, anything potentially useful for self-defense is also potentially illegal to own. The law is so broad and vague they could probably charge you for owning a rock if they felt like it.

    If you live atop the Oceanwide Tower, the Metropolis, or 820 Olive, everything you own constitutes a deadly weapon.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_buildings_in_Los_Angeles

  74. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    I can see how that can be useful.

    (I’d ask how long it was but I’m worried about all the 4Chan-like snickering that’ll entail.)

  75. @Hypnotoad666
    @Rob McX


    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.
     
    In California, anything potentially useful for self-defense is also potentially illegal to own. The law is so broad and vague they could probably charge you for owning a rock if they felt like it.

    PC 22210 states that “any person in this state who manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state, keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends, or possesses any leaded cane, or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a billy, blackjack, sandbag, sandclub, sap, or slungshot, is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or imprisonment.”
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rob McX, @Jay Igaboo

    It looks like they have all the loopholes covered in the event of whites having to defend themselves.

  76. @Jim Don Bob
    @Thomas

    Can something like this be passed off as a walking aid if challenged?

    Replies: @Kronos

    I doubt it, the real blind man’s collapsable stick seems too light and fragile to cave-in someone’s head. The German Shepard guide dog would make a superb double purpose for that though.

    Some people are able to get away with using brass knuckles as jewelry so what do I know.

  77. @Mr McKenna
    Hmm, canes, swords, remind me what comes next?

    Replies: @Kronos

    Cannons!!!

  78. @jesse helms think-alike
    All of the self defense ideas mentioned are interesting and viable but of course they violate the rule of forgetting to bring a gun to a gun fight. In today's environment even a justiable use of deadly force would leave someone ensnared in a nightmare of legal consequences especially if the victims are POCs or other favored victim groups

    I think many people many who fantasize about thrashing a ruffian with their shillelagh discount how challenging hand to hand combat can be against attackers who are younger stronger and who outnumber you. Unfortunately a walking stick will look peculiar unless you are visible disabled or very old.

    The unbreakable umbrella is expensive ($120) but light and will get you no attention even on an airplane. Not a good option in place like sunny CA where it never rains
    https://unbreakableumbrella.com/

    One of the antifa thug that attacked OAN's Jack Posobiec in front of the the White House was shown carrying a cheap articulated aluminum cane that he used as a weapon.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    All of the self defense ideas mentioned are interesting and viable but of course they violate the rule of forgetting to bring a gun to a gun fight.

    True, unless you live in a state where you can’t bring a gun anywhere except to a shooting range licensed gunsmith.

    .

    .,a walking stick will look peculiar unless you are visible disabled or very old.

    “Very old” is basically the target audience of every conservative blog.

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    @Paul Mendez

    It’s also the preferred target of knockout game enthusiasts nationwide.

  79. Anonymous[716] • Disclaimer says:
    @Percy Gryce
    Just reading Barbara Tuchman's Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45 (1971), and she remarks several times that Stilwell disliked the swagger stick of British officer fame. The U.S. Army regiment stationed in China between the wars required officers off duty but in uniform to carry a swagger stick. Vinegar Joe apparently hated that kind of officiousness.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Those were (originally) for beating soldiers, and officers beating soldiers is un-American. It’s the reason Patton got into trouble for those slapping incidents. Free citizens of a republic aren’t supposed to treat each other that way. If a beating is necessary for discipline reasons, it must be carried out by fellow soldiers, not officers.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Anonymous


    Those were (originally) for beating soldiers, and officers beating soldiers is un-American. It’s the reason Patton got into trouble for those slapping incidents.
     
    Disagree, the stick was a symbol of authority, or even of just being a soldier as all ranks in the British Army before WWI carried them or a variant thereof.

    Did Patton slap more than one squaddie? I thought he just gubbed the one that was is the casualty station because of 'nerves' and the reason a big thing was made of it was because of the soldier's identity.

    Historians correct me if I'm wrong here.
  80. @J.Ross
    @Paul Mendez

    In a lot of the antifa fight videos from the Democrat riots you generally see a knockdown punch followed by a single or group battery on the ground, so the whole idea is presumably to get away from the strike that enables the stomping. The store owner with the long sword had no parry for the simple (right?) hook and pretty much seemed to expect his target to stand still.
    Fighting "fairly" with the same weapons contradicts my surely ignorant understanding of Sun Tzu. You don't fence with a knife, you close and stab. There's no dance because you're being a knife-wielding bastard. Again, even done "correctly" this is not something a normal person can do: stabbing and cutting is psychologically harder than hitting, even during an attack.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @Old Prude

    You don’t fence with a knife, you close and stab. There’s no dance because you’re being a knife-wielding bastard.

    Exactly!

    That’s why our coach made us stop as soon as he found out what we were doing. Technique is everything in fencing. “Technique” gets you killed in knife fights.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Paul Mendez


    “Technique” gets you killed in knife fights.
     
    That’s nonsense. As with any type of fighting, effective techniques realistically trained to a high degree usually yield good results and improve your odds. It’s just that fighting “techniques” you see marketed are often laughably silly.

    The thing about a knife is that it has two main fighting applications due to its extremely short range - a weapon for sudden killing/assassination (such as a prison shanking) and a “get off me” tool while grappling.

    Check out the knife instructionals by a cofounder of the Dog Brothers. And understand that fighting skills are not some tricks you can learn once - you have to train constantly (both drills and sparring) to refine the techniques and build attributes, and to develop the capacity to perform under stress and pressure. In other words, they have to become a lifestyle.

    Back when I trained intensively in Kali, my instructors would run magic marker days, just to show how often you’d get “stabbed” when going full force-on-force. You don’t knife-duel in real life, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t effective knife fighting techniques.

    Technique is everything in fencing.
     
    Fencing is a highly stylized combat sport, so its real world utility is quite low. It’s still a sport, so, no, technique is not “everything,” and it requires development of specific physical attributes. I’ve never seen competitive fencers who were slow and had poor reaction time.
  81. My favorite US Senator is the southerner who used his cane to clobber a Yankee colleague.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caning_of_Charles_Sumner

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    @Abolish_public_education

    Brooks looks a bit like Tucker Carlson.

  82. My favorite US representative was the southerner who used his cane to clobber a Yankee senator.

  83. @Bozo the Clown
    @Anon

    My thoughts exactly. I long ago researched the legality of carrying a leather sap, and was surprised to learn that pretty much every state forbids it. Collapsible batons are the same category.

    Replies: @Thomas, @Harry Baldwin

    The law where I live categorizes “slungshots” like a leather sap or blackjack differently than an ASP-type baton. At worst, it might qualify as an “other dangerous weapon.” I’d classify it as a legal gray area.

  84. @Twinkie
    @Thomas

    Be aware that several states ban or regulate collapsible batons stringently.

    Do you know how to use one effectively?

    Replies: @Thomas

    Do you know how to use one effectively?

    Keep it in tight, snap from the hip, snap back just as fast so it doesn’t get grabbed, aim from shoulder to hip.

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    @Thomas

    And watch it bend in an arc or collapse back in on itself.

    Replies: @Jack D

  85. @Whiskey
    Nope in the US its concealed carry. The UK has no real access to weapons. Eventually someone will make a directed energy weapon like a real potent laser, particle beam generator or the like out of sheer necessity.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @MEH 0910

    Will people point out that blinding lasers are banned Weapons of War with the same fervor as is regularly used to point out that "Tear Gas" is "banned by Geneva Convention" (which is true, but so what)?

    Freedom Gooner Generation will just laugh & approve.

    In my book, you shine a laser at me, I shine 7.62 at you.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Anonymous
    @MEH 0910


    Federal agents likely permanently blinded by Portland protesters' lasers
     
    You know, the Portland Federal Courthouse is starting to look a whole like like Fort Sumter.
  86. @Reg Cæsar
    The Express says that Englishmen are still required to possess and practice with longbows, but I thought that was repealed in 1960. If not, it's high time to enforce that statute.

    Here are 11 of the most BIZARRE British laws that you probably never knew about


    Lowering the Bar has a different take:


    Do Englishmen Still Have to Show Up for Longbow Practice?


    https://odinsonarchery.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/longbow.jpg

    Replies: @Bill B.

    The modern Englishman couldn’t do it. It was extremely hard to use a full-scale war bow. It required great strength and skill.

    The contemporary Englishman is typically fat, weak and impatient.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Bill B.



    The contemporary Englishman is typically fat, weak and impatient.

     

    The Americans can impress us with how well-built, tenacious, and masterful they are by standing up on their hind legs and fighting to take their country back.
  87. @MEH 0910
    @Whiskey

    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1286749281521631237

    Replies: @El Dato, @Anonymous

    Will people point out that blinding lasers are banned Weapons of War with the same fervor as is regularly used to point out that “Tear Gas” is “banned by Geneva Convention” (which is true, but so what)?

    Freedom Gooner Generation will just laugh & approve.

    In my book, you shine a laser at me, I shine 7.62 at you.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @El Dato

    Ngo posted a photo of peaceful protesters attempting to break into a federal building containing government personnel with a circular saw, so they could attack the government employees.

  88. Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America:

    Virginia Dress Ways: Cavalier Ideas of Clothing and Rank

    ******
    High fashions of this sort were never static. The “traditional” world of the seventeenth century was as changeable in that respect as our “modern” society would be. Fashions whirled constantly from one generation to another—even from one season to the next. In the reign of James I, when political conditions were dangerously unstable throughout Europe, gentlemen wore quilted doublets and breeches for protection against a dagger’s thrust. This cloth armor was encrusted with precious stones, and trimmed with ribbons, and interwoven with gold and silver thread.2

  89. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @JosephB
    Interesting idea, and definitely something I'll keep in mind depending on how things progress here. Now I just need one that looks benign but is good for cracking skulls. Any suggestions?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SunBakedSuburb, @SteveRogers42

    Your best bet is a collapsible baton, but only if you take the POST credit eligible course from a local vendor. Usually the firearms instructors give that course. With the course, the baton is legally a non-lethal weapon — without it, the baton is a lethal weapon.

    There are books on cane fighting — you can look at one of those and then pick your cane.

    I’m not an enthusiast for metal heads. Too easy to kill your opponent and find yourself in real trouble. Looks bad to the jury.

    BTW, if you think you might have to actually fight it is a good idea to buy a contract for legal services in defense of weapons use charges prior to buying any kind of weapon. You want one that will defend against both criminal and civil actions involving use of any weapon.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Anyone who doesnt at least carry a completely legal knife is crazy imo.

    There are laws on this. Any legit multi-tool will satisfy your local laws on what is or is not a weapon. Multi-tools are fun and practical and easy to carry in your pocket. I use my pliers and bit and bottle opener and blade all the time. Anyone who does outdoors stuff or fixes stuff knows the value of having tools on your person at all times.

    And one of those tools happens to be a knife. But its not a knife weapon per the law.

    Act accordingly.

    Replies: @NickG

  90. @Abolish_public_education
    My favorite US Senator is the southerner who used his cane to clobber a Yankee colleague.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caning_of_Charles_Sumner

    Replies: @Henry's Cat

    Brooks looks a bit like Tucker Carlson.

  91. @Cato
    It's interesting how people on the bleeding edge of fashion are really sheep, not the innovators they believe themselves to be.

    Replies: @Pat Kittle

    “Fashion” & “fascism” share the same root word.

    • Replies: @David
    @Pat Kittle

    Untrue, but "fag" and "fascism" do.

    , @fascist
    @Pat Kittle



    fashion (n.)
    c. 1300, fasoun, "physical make-up or composition; form, shape; appearance," from Old French façon, fachon, fazon "face, appearance; construction, pattern, design; thing done; beauty; manner, characteristic feature" (12c.), from Latin factionem (nominative factio) "a making or doing, a preparing," also "group of people acting together," from facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

     



    fascist (adj.)
    1921, from Italian partito nazionale fascista, the anti-communist political movement organized 1919 under Benito Mussolini (1883-1945); from Italian fascio "group, association," literally "bundle," from Latin fasces (see fasces).

     

    seems legit
    , @SteveRogers42
    @Pat Kittle

    Hugo Boss would agree.

    , @Anonymous
    @Pat Kittle



    “Fashion” & “fascism” share the same root word.

     

    I cannot find the YouTube clip, so you'll just have to settle for this:

    https://abitoffryandlaurie.co.uk/sketches/fascion
  92. @anon
    Eh, that's a cane, nothing messianic about it.

    Try this instead:

    http://www.mesora.org/mosesstaff.png

    There were manuals on how to fight with canes over 120 years ago. For example:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/14/1c/fd/141cfd1336578f8bc67aff03e4996a74.jpg

    A plain old stockman's cane has much to recommend it.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @Paul Mendez, @Old Prude

    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight. It also made clear a gun is the trump card.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Old Prude


    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight.
     
    That depends on what your definition of a “fight” is. If you are already grappling with an assailant, a knife is a better “get off me”* tool than a baton. A baton’s advantage over a knife is two-fold - it has a greater range, and if used well, can keep an assailant from closing the distance, and it delivers an impact which is more useful in certain situations than stabbing/slashing.

    *This also means a knife is usually a more effective tool for primary weapon (long gun or a handgun) retention.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Old Prude

    "a gun is the trump card"

    Of course. All this talk about knife-fighting is fantasy-land unless you have training, and can back up the blade with martial arts or boxing skills. A knife will get you killed. Carry a gun.

    , @Ancient Briton
    @Old Prude

    Unless you are James Coburn in Magnificant Seven - Hollywood physics rules!

  93. @J.Ross
    @Paul Mendez

    In a lot of the antifa fight videos from the Democrat riots you generally see a knockdown punch followed by a single or group battery on the ground, so the whole idea is presumably to get away from the strike that enables the stomping. The store owner with the long sword had no parry for the simple (right?) hook and pretty much seemed to expect his target to stand still.
    Fighting "fairly" with the same weapons contradicts my surely ignorant understanding of Sun Tzu. You don't fence with a knife, you close and stab. There's no dance because you're being a knife-wielding bastard. Again, even done "correctly" this is not something a normal person can do: stabbing and cutting is psychologically harder than hitting, even during an attack.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez, @Old Prude

    Yeah. Shooting a cowbird with a .22 is easy. Stomping on it or bludgeoning it because you only winged it is an entirely different thing and a normal person recoils from that after one or two experiences and just keeps shooting at the wounded bird until it’s dead.

  94. Or they could be wearing two guns on their hips like Jesse James.

  95. Anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @JosephB

    Your best bet is a collapsible baton, but only if you take the POST credit eligible course from a local vendor. Usually the firearms instructors give that course. With the course, the baton is legally a non-lethal weapon -- without it, the baton is a lethal weapon.

    There are books on cane fighting -- you can look at one of those and then pick your cane.

    I'm not an enthusiast for metal heads. Too easy to kill your opponent and find yourself in real trouble. Looks bad to the jury.

    BTW, if you think you might have to actually fight it is a good idea to buy a contract for legal services in defense of weapons use charges prior to buying any kind of weapon. You want one that will defend against both criminal and civil actions involving use of any weapon.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Anyone who doesnt at least carry a completely legal knife is crazy imo.

    There are laws on this. Any legit multi-tool will satisfy your local laws on what is or is not a weapon. Multi-tools are fun and practical and easy to carry in your pocket. I use my pliers and bit and bottle opener and blade all the time. Anyone who does outdoors stuff or fixes stuff knows the value of having tools on your person at all times.

    And one of those tools happens to be a knife. But its not a knife weapon per the law.

    Act accordingly.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Anonymous

    In the UK locking blade Leathermans will get you in trouble with the Peelers, as will a locking blade over 3 inches. There I tote a non locking Leatherman Juice CS4, but purely as a tool. I wouldn't rate it as a weapon. My Leatherman Charge, with it's nice locking blade, stays with the Glock 26 in South Africa.

  96. @J.Ross
    @Twinkie

    And both are long, rely on slashing, expect you to be able to move your arms, and are collected by people like pic related.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Real Katanas made by master craftsmen in Japan easily cost $50,000-$100,000. Don’t confuse them with junk sold at malls or via catalogs.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @Twinkie

    A friend of mine was a soldier in Ethiopia back in the days of Hallie Selassie. He had brought back a sword that some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can't get much better steel than that and it won't set you back $50,000.

    Like everyone, I admire Japanese traditional crafts, have owned a few of their expensive chisels, but at some point, an edged tool (or weapon) is just a tool. Use it and it will get dull and nicked. Course if you just want a conversation piece to hang above your mantel or want to support an artist, that's a different thing.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jack D

  97. @Bozo the Clown
    @Anon

    My thoughts exactly. I long ago researched the legality of carrying a leather sap, and was surprised to learn that pretty much every state forbids it. Collapsible batons are the same category.

    Replies: @Thomas, @Harry Baldwin

    You can buy a coin purse that doubles as a blackjack. There are a number of these on the market, the handle is the part that snaps around your belt. I find it hard to believe you would get away with using one of these if they’re illegal in your jurisdiction.

    https://barrantileather.com/shop/ols/products/life-changer-tm

  98. @Paul Mendez
    @J.Ross


    You don’t fence with a knife, you close and stab. There’s no dance because you’re being a knife-wielding bastard.
     
    Exactly!

    That’s why our coach made us stop as soon as he found out what we were doing. Technique is everything in fencing. “Technique” gets you killed in knife fights.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    “Technique” gets you killed in knife fights.

    That’s nonsense. As with any type of fighting, effective techniques realistically trained to a high degree usually yield good results and improve your odds. It’s just that fighting “techniques” you see marketed are often laughably silly.

    The thing about a knife is that it has two main fighting applications due to its extremely short range – a weapon for sudden killing/assassination (such as a prison shanking) and a “get off me” tool while grappling.

    Check out the knife instructionals by a cofounder of the Dog Brothers. And understand that fighting skills are not some tricks you can learn once – you have to train constantly (both drills and sparring) to refine the techniques and build attributes, and to develop the capacity to perform under stress and pressure. In other words, they have to become a lifestyle.

    Back when I trained intensively in Kali, my instructors would run magic marker days, just to show how often you’d get “stabbed” when going full force-on-force. You don’t knife-duel in real life, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t effective knife fighting techniques.

    Technique is everything in fencing.

    Fencing is a highly stylized combat sport, so its real world utility is quite low. It’s still a sport, so, no, technique is not “everything,” and it requires development of specific physical attributes. I’ve never seen competitive fencers who were slow and had poor reaction time.

  99. @Twinkie
    @J.Ross

    Real Katanas made by master craftsmen in Japan easily cost $50,000-$100,000. Don’t confuse them with junk sold at malls or via catalogs.

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    A friend of mine was a soldier in Ethiopia back in the days of Hallie Selassie. He had brought back a sword that some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can’t get much better steel than that and it won’t set you back $50,000.

    Like everyone, I admire Japanese traditional crafts, have owned a few of their expensive chisels, but at some point, an edged tool (or weapon) is just a tool. Use it and it will get dull and nicked. Course if you just want a conversation piece to hang above your mantel or want to support an artist, that’s a different thing.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @ThreeCranes


    You can’t get much better steel than that and it won’t set you back $50,000.
     
    No and yes. You CAN get much better (modern) steel than that (though one can quibble about "much better") and, no, it won't set you back close to $50,000.

    But you don't buy master smith-crafted Katanas to use them (though I don't doubt there are wealthy Iaido practioners who do use their purchases). At that price level, they are objects of art and heirlooms.

    How many people buy $3,000 Wilson Combat 1911's to carry them around? Not many.
    , @Jack D
    @ThreeCranes


    some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can’t get much better steel than that
     
    Car spring steel is great for car springs. Not ideal for cutting tools and weapons although you can certainly make serviceable items out of them. Aside from the better, more modern steel alloys that Twinkie mentions, a katana is made by special techniques (unknown to Ethiopian blacksmiths) which combine a soft (and therefore flexible) iron backbone with a hard steel cutting edge. These techniques require a lot of skill and are time consuming, so a genuine handmade katana made by a master craftsman is very pricey (and accordingly no one in their right mind is going to use it as a machete to chop down brush in their yard).

    A knife or sword made from a single material is always a compromise. If you make a knife or sword from a hard, brittle material (nowadays there are even ceramic knives) the edge will resist wear (if not chipping) and it will stay sharp for a very long time but such materials have no give - if you try to bend them they will snap. Having your sword break in the middle of a sword fight is not good. If you make something from a softer material (a car spring) it will be flexible but the edge will not last for long. But by combining the two materials in the right way (and this is not easy - it was especially not easy to do in the era of hand forging) you can produce a sword or knife that is the best of both worlds (as well as being an object of great beauty - the pattern that is created at the point where the materials join is aesthetically pleasing). Is it worth $50,000? People pay that much (and much more) for a piece of canvas that is dabbed with a bit of paint, so who am I to say. I'm sure there's some guy in Ethiopia who would paint that same piece of canvas for $5.

    Replies: @Zoodles, @anon

  100. @Old Prude
    @anon

    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight. It also made clear a gun is the trump card.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @SunBakedSuburb, @Ancient Briton

    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight.

    That depends on what your definition of a “fight” is. If you are already grappling with an assailant, a knife is a better “get off me”* tool than a baton. A baton’s advantage over a knife is two-fold – it has a greater range, and if used well, can keep an assailant from closing the distance, and it delivers an impact which is more useful in certain situations than stabbing/slashing.

    *This also means a knife is usually a more effective tool for primary weapon (long gun or a handgun) retention.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Twinkie

    https://www.jameslafond.com/?f=store

    What think you of Mr LaFond, go-to guy for stick-fighting and general urban survival hints, his skills honed by decades in Baltimore?


    "In The Combat Space James LaFond takes the reader through five fields of the combat experience: Mind & Body, Boxing, MMA, Stick & Blade use, and postmodern survival applications from awareness to legal preparedness."
     

    "I met James LaFond two months before 9/11. That’s a while ago. I walked with my new girlfriend at the time down to Light Street in South Baltimore to visit this guy. One can imagine how I felt near the end of reading When You’re Food about an interracial beat down, described by James as a ‘Messerschmitt attack on unescorted B-17s’, that occurred on that same street. I should have been shot for putting my girlfriend in jeopardy by being anywhere near that geographical location. Then again, she and I walked in our hometown on streets where the same thing has happened at one time or another. Every day is a chance to be prey, no matter who or where you are.
    This is the theme of When You’re Food…probably the most potentially offensive and bleak book ever to fall under the genre of “self-defense/martial arts”. It’s awesome! The “how to” section to let middleclass/middle-aged white guys think they have a chance is relegated to a single paragraph."
     

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

  101. @Paul Mendez
    I fenced when younger, so I already had skill set to handle a cane. I carry a regular wooden cane with a crook handle. At 63, no one gives me a second glance.

    “The Cane as a Weapon,” by A.C. Cunningham. (C) 1912.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Kronos, @ThreeCranes

    I was taught not to swing a cane but to stab your opponent directly in the eyes. Your opponent has to react to that. This gives you a moment to either flee or whatever. Try it with a friend sometime in mock combat. It’s like having a baseball hit directly at your eyes. It’s hard to get a visual fix on something coming right at your eyes.

    The best wrestler I ever encountered would flick his hands at my eyes before he came in low for a takedown. Even knowing what was coming, it was very hard not to flinch and throw my head backwards, which opened my defensive posture up.

  102. Who among us has not fantasized being the hero in Sticks of Death?

  103. Re your remarks on Clockwork Orange, skinheads had been going for a couple of years by then – I can remember girls at school around 1970 reading the Richard Allen books.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skinhead#Origins_and_first_wave

    A few football fans cosplayed as droogs when the film came out, but it was very shortlived (I attended a lot of games in those days and only saw Leicester supporters doing it). On the other hand, there was a nasty and prolonged assault (also in Leicester) of a teenage girl on a train by people dressed droog-style. The whole craze only lasted a few months and involved few people. By then skinheads were becoming suedeheads.

  104. @Twinkie
    @Old Prude


    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight.
     
    That depends on what your definition of a “fight” is. If you are already grappling with an assailant, a knife is a better “get off me”* tool than a baton. A baton’s advantage over a knife is two-fold - it has a greater range, and if used well, can keep an assailant from closing the distance, and it delivers an impact which is more useful in certain situations than stabbing/slashing.

    *This also means a knife is usually a more effective tool for primary weapon (long gun or a handgun) retention.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    https://www.jameslafond.com/?f=store

    What think you of Mr LaFond, go-to guy for stick-fighting and general urban survival hints, his skills honed by decades in Baltimore?

    “In The Combat Space James LaFond takes the reader through five fields of the combat experience: Mind & Body, Boxing, MMA, Stick & Blade use, and postmodern survival applications from awareness to legal preparedness.”

    “I met James LaFond two months before 9/11. That’s a while ago. I walked with my new girlfriend at the time down to Light Street in South Baltimore to visit this guy. One can imagine how I felt near the end of reading When You’re Food about an interracial beat down, described by James as a ‘Messerschmitt attack on unescorted B-17s’, that occurred on that same street. I should have been shot for putting my girlfriend in jeopardy by being anywhere near that geographical location. Then again, she and I walked in our hometown on streets where the same thing has happened at one time or another. Every day is a chance to be prey, no matter who or where you are.
    This is the theme of When You’re Food…probably the most potentially offensive and bleak book ever to fall under the genre of “self-defense/martial arts”. It’s awesome! The “how to” section to let middleclass/middle-aged white guys think they have a chance is relegated to a single paragraph.”

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    @YetAnotherAnon

    LaFond is worth listening to, on a variety of topics.

  105. @Anonymous
    @Joe H

    Why are you even thinking about sex? The point is her style, elegance and incredible lady-like behavior truly beffitting of a princess. Yes, she is a beautiful, but that is not the point. Also, she is a teenager now and not a little girl. Some of the pictures are from when she was younger, which shows her style from a young age. This has nothing to do with anything sexual. She is fully clothed(and with what clothes!) in all pictures. Maybe you are just uptight?

    Replies: @Joe H

    Did you listen to the song lyrics at all?

  106. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910
    @Whiskey

    https://twitter.com/nypost/status/1286749281521631237

    Replies: @El Dato, @Anonymous

    Federal agents likely permanently blinded by Portland protesters’ lasers

    You know, the Portland Federal Courthouse is starting to look a whole like like Fort Sumter.

  107. @Anonymous
    @Percy Gryce

    Those were (originally) for beating soldiers, and officers beating soldiers is un-American. It's the reason Patton got into trouble for those slapping incidents. Free citizens of a republic aren't supposed to treat each other that way. If a beating is necessary for discipline reasons, it must be carried out by fellow soldiers, not officers.

    Replies: @Gordo

    Those were (originally) for beating soldiers, and officers beating soldiers is un-American. It’s the reason Patton got into trouble for those slapping incidents.

    Disagree, the stick was a symbol of authority, or even of just being a soldier as all ranks in the British Army before WWI carried them or a variant thereof.

    Did Patton slap more than one squaddie? I thought he just gubbed the one that was is the casualty station because of ‘nerves’ and the reason a big thing was made of it was because of the soldier’s identity.

    Historians correct me if I’m wrong here.

  108. @Henry's Cat
    Didn't GK Chesterton bear arms in the shape of a swordstick? En garde!

    Replies: @dearieme

    I once said to a friend that I’d always fancied a sword stick. He strode to his umbrella stand and pulled one out.

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    @dearieme

    A real one? Or was he making the point that an umbrella would equally do the job?

  109. @Zoodles
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcH0ww_Jbfg

    Replies: @Sol

    When one isn’t allowed to have handguns or edged weapons …

  110. @Kronos
    @Twinkie

    I couldn’t find a good photo of a fedora guy with a cane sword. This was the best I could find.

    Replies: @Sol

    Someone should post a Zatoichi clip.

  111. @fnn
    Somewhat related:
    https://unherd.com/thepost/an-untrue-claim-in-the-new-yorker-speaks-volumes/

    Reading the latest copy of the New Yorker magazine, published exactly a week ago, I came across this sentence in a piece by Jill Lepore:

    One study suggests that two-thirds of Americans between the ages of fifteen and thirty-four who were treated in emergency rooms suffered from injuries inflicted by police and security guards, about as many people as the number of pedestrians injured by motor vehicles.
    - JILL LEPORE, NEW YORKER
     

    I sought out the study she was referring to, and found it: a 2016 paper, whose lead author, Justin Feldman, was a doctoral student at Harvard at the time. Soon after publication, the findings were described in a Harvard press release, and also reported on by The Guardian.

    And it turns out I was right — the ‘two-thirds’ claim is not true. Not even close.
     

    I did my best to work out a rough estimate of the true proportion of 15-34 year olds visiting the ER who had suffered legal intervention injuries, and arrived at a figure of 0.2% (you can follow my working in this thread). So I believe Lepore’s claim to be off by a factor of several hundred.
     

    Replies: @Dan Smith

    Math is hard.

  112. @Thomas
    I sometimes tuck a collapsible baton in my belt when I go out... if I imagine I might run into an issue that might call for something less than the 9mm subcompact I usually keep in the other side of my belt. It can be legally-advantageous to say you had a less-lethal option available.

    https://www.asp-usa.com/collections/protector/products/protector-concealable-baton-16?variant=39890979396

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Paul Mendez, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie, @Charles St. Charles, @Kronos, @NickG

    I’m far better equipped than Dominic Cummings, carrying anything with intent to use as a weapon in the UK is illegal, but his stick confers plausible deniability.

    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip, the slide is milled and it has a reflex sight (Holosun 508T), there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @NickG

    What, no flashlight?

    What kind a belt do you wear?

    Replies: @NickG

    , @Thomas
    @NickG

    Reflex sight on a carry gun seems like an invitation to snag on something. I'm typically carrying IWB under a T-shirt.

    Replies: @NickG

    , @Jack D
    @NickG


    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip... there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.
     
    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.

    Replies: @NickG, @Twinkie

    , @Anonymous
    @NickG



    If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

     

    Is there a specific reason you choose to carry a stout stick rather than a sjambok?



    I must say that, given a choice between your stout stick and a sjambok, I would choose the latter.

    Perhaps they are uncommon/oft-declared to be illegal in many countries, but I am surprised that there hasn't been a single reference to them in 150+ posts.

    Replies: @NickG

  113. An expert in the gentlemanly art of bartitsu will know how to react should you set upon him with your stout hazel:

    • Agree: SOL
  114. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Anyone who doesnt at least carry a completely legal knife is crazy imo.

    There are laws on this. Any legit multi-tool will satisfy your local laws on what is or is not a weapon. Multi-tools are fun and practical and easy to carry in your pocket. I use my pliers and bit and bottle opener and blade all the time. Anyone who does outdoors stuff or fixes stuff knows the value of having tools on your person at all times.

    And one of those tools happens to be a knife. But its not a knife weapon per the law.

    Act accordingly.

    Replies: @NickG

    In the UK locking blade Leathermans will get you in trouble with the Peelers, as will a locking blade over 3 inches. There I tote a non locking Leatherman Juice CS4, but purely as a tool. I wouldn’t rate it as a weapon. My Leatherman Charge, with it’s nice locking blade, stays with the Glock 26 in South Africa.

  115. @El Dato
    @MEH 0910

    Will people point out that blinding lasers are banned Weapons of War with the same fervor as is regularly used to point out that "Tear Gas" is "banned by Geneva Convention" (which is true, but so what)?

    Freedom Gooner Generation will just laugh & approve.

    In my book, you shine a laser at me, I shine 7.62 at you.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Ngo posted a photo of peaceful protesters attempting to break into a federal building containing government personnel with a circular saw, so they could attack the government employees.

  116. @Anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOj04taRAbI

    Replies: @Clyde

    Thanks for the video. The women’s reactions and facial expressions was the best part.

  117. @ThreeCranes
    @Twinkie

    A friend of mine was a soldier in Ethiopia back in the days of Hallie Selassie. He had brought back a sword that some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can't get much better steel than that and it won't set you back $50,000.

    Like everyone, I admire Japanese traditional crafts, have owned a few of their expensive chisels, but at some point, an edged tool (or weapon) is just a tool. Use it and it will get dull and nicked. Course if you just want a conversation piece to hang above your mantel or want to support an artist, that's a different thing.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jack D

    You can’t get much better steel than that and it won’t set you back $50,000.

    No and yes. You CAN get much better (modern) steel than that (though one can quibble about “much better”) and, no, it won’t set you back close to $50,000.

    But you don’t buy master smith-crafted Katanas to use them (though I don’t doubt there are wealthy Iaido practioners who do use their purchases). At that price level, they are objects of art and heirlooms.

    How many people buy $3,000 Wilson Combat 1911’s to carry them around? Not many.

  118. @ThreeCranes
    @Twinkie

    A friend of mine was a soldier in Ethiopia back in the days of Hallie Selassie. He had brought back a sword that some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can't get much better steel than that and it won't set you back $50,000.

    Like everyone, I admire Japanese traditional crafts, have owned a few of their expensive chisels, but at some point, an edged tool (or weapon) is just a tool. Use it and it will get dull and nicked. Course if you just want a conversation piece to hang above your mantel or want to support an artist, that's a different thing.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jack D

    some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can’t get much better steel than that

    Car spring steel is great for car springs. Not ideal for cutting tools and weapons although you can certainly make serviceable items out of them. Aside from the better, more modern steel alloys that Twinkie mentions, a katana is made by special techniques (unknown to Ethiopian blacksmiths) which combine a soft (and therefore flexible) iron backbone with a hard steel cutting edge. These techniques require a lot of skill and are time consuming, so a genuine handmade katana made by a master craftsman is very pricey (and accordingly no one in their right mind is going to use it as a machete to chop down brush in their yard).

    A knife or sword made from a single material is always a compromise. If you make a knife or sword from a hard, brittle material (nowadays there are even ceramic knives) the edge will resist wear (if not chipping) and it will stay sharp for a very long time but such materials have no give – if you try to bend them they will snap. Having your sword break in the middle of a sword fight is not good. If you make something from a softer material (a car spring) it will be flexible but the edge will not last for long. But by combining the two materials in the right way (and this is not easy – it was especially not easy to do in the era of hand forging) you can produce a sword or knife that is the best of both worlds (as well as being an object of great beauty – the pattern that is created at the point where the materials join is aesthetically pleasing). Is it worth $50,000? People pay that much (and much more) for a piece of canvas that is dabbed with a bit of paint, so who am I to say. I’m sure there’s some guy in Ethiopia who would paint that same piece of canvas for $5.

    • Replies: @Zoodles
    @Jack D

    Traditional Japanese swords were made the way they were because Japanese smelting technology was crude, resulting in lumps of impure iron of various softness. To compensate for this, the steel was folded several times in order to beat out impurities and even up the carbon content, then the harder steel was wrapped around the softer steel.

    This process is called lamination, and is common amongst cultures with primitive steel making technology.

    If you have good steel, its entirely unneeded. Europeans largely abandoned lamination in the middle ages, because they access to greatly superior steel, allowing them to mass produce large numbers of high quality monosteel blades. Monosteel is better than lamination, allowing a similar edge, but being structurally stronger due to lack of imperfections found between the welds in the layers of a laminated blade.

    The spring steel from an automobile would be better steel than anything masamune would have had access to.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie

    , @anon
    @Jack D

    Was it a bar spring like Valiants [Chrysler Dart] had in the front?
    That might be okay.
    I've got a wrecking bar fashioned by a blacksmith, air quenched, out of a truck spring, it's
    only limitation is the user's strength.
    1440 mm long [57.6 inches], 27 mm diameter.
    A fucking big truck, whatever it was.

    Replies: @Jack D

  119. @JosephB
    Interesting idea, and definitely something I'll keep in mind depending on how things progress here. Now I just need one that looks benign but is good for cracking skulls. Any suggestions?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SunBakedSuburb, @SteveRogers42

    “Any suggestions?”

    Forget the dandy crap; societal meltdown requires a serious weapon. Get yourself a firearm. I prefer a hand cannon .45; but a snub nose .38 works well in an urban environment and is easier to conceal.

    • Replies: @JosephB
    @SunBakedSuburb

    For home, I agree. For work, I'm at a life-stage where I'm rather limited in where I can work. My present employer has a strict "no guns" policy. However, folks there are idiosyncratic enough that a walking stick would be ignored.

  120. @jbwilson24
    Swordcanes next, please. Then a return to duelling.

    Replies: @Ano, @Abolish_public_education

    The honorable institution of the duel was ruined by Reconstruction.

    Before then, anyone actively involved with a duel was made ineligible for government employment, i.e. given a certificate of appreciation from the taxpayers.

  121. @Old Prude
    @anon

    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight. It also made clear a gun is the trump card.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @SunBakedSuburb, @Ancient Briton

    “a gun is the trump card”

    Of course. All this talk about knife-fighting is fantasy-land unless you have training, and can back up the blade with martial arts or boxing skills. A knife will get you killed. Carry a gun.

  122. Study Patrick Macnee as John Steed in The Avengers — never without the finest umbrella or walking stick, and they were virtual armories of hidden weaponry. Plus of course the steel plate in his bowler

  123. @Jack D
    @ThreeCranes


    some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can’t get much better steel than that
     
    Car spring steel is great for car springs. Not ideal for cutting tools and weapons although you can certainly make serviceable items out of them. Aside from the better, more modern steel alloys that Twinkie mentions, a katana is made by special techniques (unknown to Ethiopian blacksmiths) which combine a soft (and therefore flexible) iron backbone with a hard steel cutting edge. These techniques require a lot of skill and are time consuming, so a genuine handmade katana made by a master craftsman is very pricey (and accordingly no one in their right mind is going to use it as a machete to chop down brush in their yard).

    A knife or sword made from a single material is always a compromise. If you make a knife or sword from a hard, brittle material (nowadays there are even ceramic knives) the edge will resist wear (if not chipping) and it will stay sharp for a very long time but such materials have no give - if you try to bend them they will snap. Having your sword break in the middle of a sword fight is not good. If you make something from a softer material (a car spring) it will be flexible but the edge will not last for long. But by combining the two materials in the right way (and this is not easy - it was especially not easy to do in the era of hand forging) you can produce a sword or knife that is the best of both worlds (as well as being an object of great beauty - the pattern that is created at the point where the materials join is aesthetically pleasing). Is it worth $50,000? People pay that much (and much more) for a piece of canvas that is dabbed with a bit of paint, so who am I to say. I'm sure there's some guy in Ethiopia who would paint that same piece of canvas for $5.

    Replies: @Zoodles, @anon

    Traditional Japanese swords were made the way they were because Japanese smelting technology was crude, resulting in lumps of impure iron of various softness. To compensate for this, the steel was folded several times in order to beat out impurities and even up the carbon content, then the harder steel was wrapped around the softer steel.

    This process is called lamination, and is common amongst cultures with primitive steel making technology.

    If you have good steel, its entirely unneeded. Europeans largely abandoned lamination in the middle ages, because they access to greatly superior steel, allowing them to mass produce large numbers of high quality monosteel blades. Monosteel is better than lamination, allowing a similar edge, but being structurally stronger due to lack of imperfections found between the welds in the layers of a laminated blade.

    The spring steel from an automobile would be better steel than anything masamune would have had access to.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Zoodles



    If you have good steel, its entirely unneeded. Europeans largely abandoned lamination in the middle ages, because they access to greatly superior steel, allowing them to mass produce large numbers of high quality monosteel blades. Monosteel is better than lamination, allowing a similar edge, but being structurally stronger due to lack of imperfections found between the welds in the layers of a laminated blade.

     

    Thank you for posting this.

    I had always wondered what would have happened in a fight between a 15th century Japanese katana and a then-contemporary Scottish broadsword. Now you have me wondering if the broadsword chappie could have broken the katana-wielder's weapon and taken their head off in a single stroke.
    , @Twinkie
    @Zoodles


    If you have good steel
     
    IF. The best steel to which Europeans had access to for making swords was called Toledo steel and it was not a “mono steel”: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toledo_steel

    In the Middle East, the best sword steel was called Damascus steel and it was made with Wootz steel from India: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damascus_steel

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wootz_steel


    Legends of wootz steel and Damascus swords aroused the curiosity of the European scientific community from the 17th to the 19th century. The use of high-carbon alloys was not known in Europe previously and thus the research into wootz steel played an important role in the development of modern English, French and Russian metallurgy.[19]

    In 1790, samples of wootz steel were received by Sir Joseph Banks, president of the British Royal Society, sent by Helenus Scott. These samples were subjected to scientific examination and analysis by several experts.[20][21][22]


  124. @Pat Kittle
    @Cato

    "Fashion" & "fascism" share the same root word.

    Replies: @David, @fascist, @SteveRogers42, @Anonymous

    Untrue, but “fag” and “fascism” do.

  125. @Pat Kittle
    @Cato

    "Fashion" & "fascism" share the same root word.

    Replies: @David, @fascist, @SteveRogers42, @Anonymous

    fashion (n.)
    c. 1300, fasoun, “physical make-up or composition; form, shape; appearance,” from Old French façon, fachon, fazon “face, appearance; construction, pattern, design; thing done; beauty; manner, characteristic feature” (12c.), from Latin factionem (nominative factio) “a making or doing, a preparing,” also “group of people acting together,” from facere “to make” (from PIE root *dhe- “to set, put”).

    fascist (adj.)
    1921, from Italian partito nazionale fascista, the anti-communist political movement organized 1919 under Benito Mussolini (1883-1945); from Italian fascio “group, association,” literally “bundle,” from Latin fasces (see fasces).

    seems legit

  126. @JosephB
    Interesting idea, and definitely something I'll keep in mind depending on how things progress here. Now I just need one that looks benign but is good for cracking skulls. Any suggestions?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SunBakedSuburb, @SteveRogers42

    Blackthorn walking stick.

  127. @Pat Kittle
    @Cato

    "Fashion" & "fascism" share the same root word.

    Replies: @David, @fascist, @SteveRogers42, @Anonymous

    Hugo Boss would agree.

  128. @Thomas
    @Twinkie


    Do you know how to use one effectively?
     
    Keep it in tight, snap from the hip, snap back just as fast so it doesn't get grabbed, aim from shoulder to hip.

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

    And watch it bend in an arc or collapse back in on itself.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @SteveRogers42

    Maybe if you buy some lightweight Chinese POS. A properly made expandable baton such the ASP that is used every day by law enforcement does neither and can be a very effective weapon. The friction locks prevent it from collapsing unless you intentionally rap it hard axially on a hard surface in order to collapse it when you are done. Whipping it around to hit someone will only lock it tighter. And your opponents bones will bend before the baton does. If batons did what you said they do, then cops wouldn't carry them but most of them do.

    Replies: @Thomas, @SteveRogers42

  129. I fractured my femur and had surgery a number of years ago. I found a used Canadian crutch, also called a forearm crutch. It’s steel. People gave me lots of room as did dogs. If I were to go to Portland, I would take it with me. A weapon? If need be.

  130. @Twinkie
    @meh


    Bring back jodhpurs
     
    I wear a pair whenever I ride.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I wear a pair whenever I ride.

    My wife doesn’t let me.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Jim Don Bob

    Someone needs a whip! ;)

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  131. All you pathetic alt-righters are whining babies. Society is not crumbling. Every summer, every summer, every single summer, there is unrest in the cities. The media just didn’t cover it. Now they do, and so, like the sheep you so roundly excoriate, like Pavlov’s dog, you start to salivate, just like they want you to.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @obwandiyag

    In Chicago, for example. there have been over 1900 shootings this year so far , vs. 1351 for all of 2019. So it's not just like any other summer.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/data/ct-shooting-victims-map-charts-htmlstory.html

    And if you look at the graph, you can see that from Jan. to June of this year, things were on their normal track (which is admittedly pretty appalling already) but then when George Floyd Mania started, thing really took off. I'm not sure why a notorious case of a white cop killing a black person causes black on black shootings to take off like a rocket, but it does, every time. BLM and the mass media know this and yet they persist in their shit stirring. BLM and CNN have lots and lots of black blood on their hands and they pretend as if they have nothing to do with it. They clearly don't really give a shit about black lives - they have another agenda, one that involves money and power for themselves.

  132. @Rob McX
    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.

    Replies: @Gordo, @Hypnotoad666, @Muggles

    >>The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.<<

    Maybe. If that is a concern then obtain some injury gauze wrap and tie that tight around your right ankle underneath the sock and/or trouser leg.

    Then you can beat the rap by explaining your newly sprained but not badly injured ankle. Should you actually be arrested you can just wait it out as it is highly unlikely that you will be offered a doctor's examination of that injury.

    By the time that might happen, thanks to Jesus, injury mostly healed. Still sore though! No crime here Your Honor, just a poor hobbling soul. Those sprained ankles are very hurtful.

  133. I claim no expertise or experience with self defense weaponry or skills.

    Some suggestions here such as the umbrella or forearm crutch are likely always legal if reasonable under the circumstances.

    I would mention here than some biker clubs (Mongols I recall) would have members ready to rumble wear tool belts with ball peen hammers on them, etc. That might work.

    What I have read in self defense literature is that your basic leather belt (better with a large metal buckle) can be effective. You can wrap that around your fist for protection/weight. Won’t help much against a firearm but you can use it to whip at your opponent’s face or wrap around his knife hand.

    Even a substantial shirt or better, a jacket, can be used to ward off knife thrusts or wrap your opponent’s weapon hand. Anything to make them think twice about close in attacks.

    Running away is always a good defensive move when possible. But your belt can by your friend as last resort. With a hammer (not commonly carried) best to make a leather strap and attach to the hammer so it can’t be easily grabbed from you.

    Wasp spray is legal and said to be as good as bear spray. Though you normally won’t carry it, bright orange spray paint from a can can also work. Getting hit in the face and front with bright paint spray is disorienting and unpleasant. Attackers don’t like to be easily recognized. Paint in the eyes, hair, etc. very disgusting, and clothing permanently marked/ruined.

    Just tell John Law (later) you were putting BLM tags on fences, you’re home free…

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Muggles


    bright orange spray paint from a can can also work.
     
    Yes, it can work to make your attacker really really pissed at you. It might turn a few blows into a severe beating or a beating into a murder. You need to use something that will leave your attacker dead or at least (temporarily or permanently) disabled so that he can't chase after you and you can safely run away.

    Replies: @Muggles

  134. @obwandiyag
    All you pathetic alt-righters are whining babies. Society is not crumbling. Every summer, every summer, every single summer, there is unrest in the cities. The media just didn't cover it. Now they do, and so, like the sheep you so roundly excoriate, like Pavlov's dog, you start to salivate, just like they want you to.

    Replies: @Jack D

    In Chicago, for example. there have been over 1900 shootings this year so far , vs. 1351 for all of 2019. So it’s not just like any other summer.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/data/ct-shooting-victims-map-charts-htmlstory.html

    And if you look at the graph, you can see that from Jan. to June of this year, things were on their normal track (which is admittedly pretty appalling already) but then when George Floyd Mania started, thing really took off. I’m not sure why a notorious case of a white cop killing a black person causes black on black shootings to take off like a rocket, but it does, every time. BLM and the mass media know this and yet they persist in their shit stirring. BLM and CNN have lots and lots of black blood on their hands and they pretend as if they have nothing to do with it. They clearly don’t really give a shit about black lives – they have another agenda, one that involves money and power for themselves.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  135. @Muggles
    I claim no expertise or experience with self defense weaponry or skills.

    Some suggestions here such as the umbrella or forearm crutch are likely always legal if reasonable under the circumstances.

    I would mention here than some biker clubs (Mongols I recall) would have members ready to rumble wear tool belts with ball peen hammers on them, etc. That might work.

    What I have read in self defense literature is that your basic leather belt (better with a large metal buckle) can be effective. You can wrap that around your fist for protection/weight. Won't help much against a firearm but you can use it to whip at your opponent's face or wrap around his knife hand.

    Even a substantial shirt or better, a jacket, can be used to ward off knife thrusts or wrap your opponent's weapon hand. Anything to make them think twice about close in attacks.

    Running away is always a good defensive move when possible. But your belt can by your friend as last resort. With a hammer (not commonly carried) best to make a leather strap and attach to the hammer so it can't be easily grabbed from you.

    Wasp spray is legal and said to be as good as bear spray. Though you normally won't carry it, bright orange spray paint from a can can also work. Getting hit in the face and front with bright paint spray is disorienting and unpleasant. Attackers don't like to be easily recognized. Paint in the eyes, hair, etc. very disgusting, and clothing permanently marked/ruined.

    Just tell John Law (later) you were putting BLM tags on fences, you're home free...

    Replies: @Jack D

    bright orange spray paint from a can can also work.

    Yes, it can work to make your attacker really really pissed at you. It might turn a few blows into a severe beating or a beating into a murder. You need to use something that will leave your attacker dead or at least (temporarily or permanently) disabled so that he can’t chase after you and you can safely run away.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Jack D

    I think you would agree that there is no magic solution in self defense.

    Best to avoid being attacked.

    Any means of self defense "might" provoke greater violence by an attacker. That is situational. Why the attack? If robbery, then some counter attack often works. If drug crazed nut, then yes, putting them down is your best option.

    In case you aren't following the news, killing attackers (or disabling them) can lead you to prison these days.

    Most people aren't carrying bear/wasp spray or orange spray paint. But an attacker being covered with messy and slimy paint all over could give you time to run away. Even trained, armed police find themselves hurt sometimes after shooting crazies or drugged fueled attackers. "Putting them down" is not easy as police widows will testify.

    For self defense, most don't carry concealed firearms for many reasons. Or anything else very useful other than what they are already wearing.

  136. @Old Prude
    @anon

    Advanced Close Quarters Combat class that I took made it very clear that a well handled baton or club far out classed any edged weapon in a fight. It also made clear a gun is the trump card.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @SunBakedSuburb, @Ancient Briton

    Unless you are James Coburn in Magnificant Seven – Hollywood physics rules!

  137. @SteveRogers42
    @Thomas

    And watch it bend in an arc or collapse back in on itself.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Maybe if you buy some lightweight Chinese POS. A properly made expandable baton such the ASP that is used every day by law enforcement does neither and can be a very effective weapon. The friction locks prevent it from collapsing unless you intentionally rap it hard axially on a hard surface in order to collapse it when you are done. Whipping it around to hit someone will only lock it tighter. And your opponents bones will bend before the baton does. If batons did what you said they do, then cops wouldn’t carry them but most of them do.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Jack D

    Mine take a very forceful drive, ideally with body weight, straight into a hard surface to close. If I jammed one into someone's groin or solar plexus that forcefully, they'd collapse much faster than the baton would.

    , @SteveRogers42
    @Jack D

    The ASP baton was adopted by police departments because it was small and innocuous and wouldn’t look intimidating on the duty belt of a modern social-worker-with-a-badge. Most of today’s cops have used an impact weapon for real On the job exactly as many times as they have fired their pistol on duty —ie never.

    Replies: @Jack D

  138. Here’s Steven Segal’s take on stick fighting:

    Jeff Speakman in The Perfect Weapon:

    Man the early ’90s were so much more fun.

  139. @NickG
    @Thomas

    I'm far better equipped than Dominic Cummings, carrying anything with intent to use as a weapon in the UK is illegal, but his stick confers plausible deniability.

    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip, the slide is milled and it has a reflex sight (Holosun 508T), there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Thomas, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    What, no flashlight?

    What kind a belt do you wear?

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Twinkie


    What kind a belt do you wear?
     
    I've tried all sorts. I've settled on a conventional belt.A 1.5 inch wide, thick — about 5 mm — sewn, quality leather belt, rather nicely hand cut and stitched by a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan. Allegedly the conventional buckle comes from Sweden. It's very stable, more than anything else I've tried. It cost me the equivalent of US$ 50. It would likely cost rather more in the US, north of $ 100.

    What, no flashlight?
     
    Yes, a small aluminium LED number, plus, of course, that incorporated into the cell phone - a Samsung Galaxy 10+.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie

  140. @Jim Don Bob
    @Twinkie


    I wear a pair whenever I ride.
     
    My wife doesn't let me.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Someone needs a whip! 😉

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Twinkie


    Someone needs a whip!
     
    She has one. ;-)
  141. @Twinkie
    @Jim Don Bob

    Someone needs a whip! ;)

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Someone needs a whip!

    She has one. 😉

    • LOL: Twinkie
  142. @Jack D
    @Muggles


    bright orange spray paint from a can can also work.
     
    Yes, it can work to make your attacker really really pissed at you. It might turn a few blows into a severe beating or a beating into a murder. You need to use something that will leave your attacker dead or at least (temporarily or permanently) disabled so that he can't chase after you and you can safely run away.

    Replies: @Muggles

    I think you would agree that there is no magic solution in self defense.

    Best to avoid being attacked.

    Any means of self defense “might” provoke greater violence by an attacker. That is situational. Why the attack? If robbery, then some counter attack often works. If drug crazed nut, then yes, putting them down is your best option.

    In case you aren’t following the news, killing attackers (or disabling them) can lead you to prison these days.

    Most people aren’t carrying bear/wasp spray or orange spray paint. But an attacker being covered with messy and slimy paint all over could give you time to run away. Even trained, armed police find themselves hurt sometimes after shooting crazies or drugged fueled attackers. “Putting them down” is not easy as police widows will testify.

    For self defense, most don’t carry concealed firearms for many reasons. Or anything else very useful other than what they are already wearing.

  143. @SunBakedSuburb
    @JosephB

    "Any suggestions?"

    Forget the dandy crap; societal meltdown requires a serious weapon. Get yourself a firearm. I prefer a hand cannon .45; but a snub nose .38 works well in an urban environment and is easier to conceal.

    Replies: @JosephB

    For home, I agree. For work, I’m at a life-stage where I’m rather limited in where I can work. My present employer has a strict “no guns” policy. However, folks there are idiosyncratic enough that a walking stick would be ignored.

  144. @NickG
    @Thomas

    I'm far better equipped than Dominic Cummings, carrying anything with intent to use as a weapon in the UK is illegal, but his stick confers plausible deniability.

    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip, the slide is milled and it has a reflex sight (Holosun 508T), there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Thomas, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    Reflex sight on a carry gun seems like an invitation to snag on something. I’m typically carrying IWB under a T-shirt.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Thomas

    I carry IWB — Inside Waist Band too, currently I mainly use an Alien Gear Shape Shift. Though I had to fettle it to accommodate the Glock 26's reflex sight. The reflex sight helps, it rides over the thick leather belt, it's actually less liable to snag, I have suppressor extra high Trijicon night ssights co-witnessing with the reflex sight's reticule. I have an awful lot of scope time with a rifle, and I'm convinced the skill is transferable in picking up the pistol reflex sight's reticule. It takes many people a goodly while to acquire the reflex sight's reticule immediately. But the improvement in accuracy is dramatic.

    Replies: @Thomas, @Twinkie

  145. @Jack D
    @SteveRogers42

    Maybe if you buy some lightweight Chinese POS. A properly made expandable baton such the ASP that is used every day by law enforcement does neither and can be a very effective weapon. The friction locks prevent it from collapsing unless you intentionally rap it hard axially on a hard surface in order to collapse it when you are done. Whipping it around to hit someone will only lock it tighter. And your opponents bones will bend before the baton does. If batons did what you said they do, then cops wouldn't carry them but most of them do.

    Replies: @Thomas, @SteveRogers42

    Mine take a very forceful drive, ideally with body weight, straight into a hard surface to close. If I jammed one into someone’s groin or solar plexus that forcefully, they’d collapse much faster than the baton would.

  146. Rambo 3 stick fight:

    What a terrific score from the supremely gifted Jerry Goldsmith.

    As always, Stallone >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Schwarzenegger.

  147. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Twinkie

    https://www.jameslafond.com/?f=store

    What think you of Mr LaFond, go-to guy for stick-fighting and general urban survival hints, his skills honed by decades in Baltimore?


    "In The Combat Space James LaFond takes the reader through five fields of the combat experience: Mind & Body, Boxing, MMA, Stick & Blade use, and postmodern survival applications from awareness to legal preparedness."
     

    "I met James LaFond two months before 9/11. That’s a while ago. I walked with my new girlfriend at the time down to Light Street in South Baltimore to visit this guy. One can imagine how I felt near the end of reading When You’re Food about an interracial beat down, described by James as a ‘Messerschmitt attack on unescorted B-17s’, that occurred on that same street. I should have been shot for putting my girlfriend in jeopardy by being anywhere near that geographical location. Then again, she and I walked in our hometown on streets where the same thing has happened at one time or another. Every day is a chance to be prey, no matter who or where you are.
    This is the theme of When You’re Food…probably the most potentially offensive and bleak book ever to fall under the genre of “self-defense/martial arts”. It’s awesome! The “how to” section to let middleclass/middle-aged white guys think they have a chance is relegated to a single paragraph."
     

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

    LaFond is worth listening to, on a variety of topics.

  148. @Paul Mendez
    @jesse helms think-alike


    All of the self defense ideas mentioned are interesting and viable but of course they violate the rule of forgetting to bring a gun to a gun fight.
     
    True, unless you live in a state where you can’t bring a gun anywhere except to a shooting range licensed gunsmith.

    .

    .,a walking stick will look peculiar unless you are visible disabled or very old.
     
    “Very old” is basically the target audience of every conservative blog.

    Replies: @SteveRogers42

    It’s also the preferred target of knockout game enthusiasts nationwide.

  149. @Jack D
    @SteveRogers42

    Maybe if you buy some lightweight Chinese POS. A properly made expandable baton such the ASP that is used every day by law enforcement does neither and can be a very effective weapon. The friction locks prevent it from collapsing unless you intentionally rap it hard axially on a hard surface in order to collapse it when you are done. Whipping it around to hit someone will only lock it tighter. And your opponents bones will bend before the baton does. If batons did what you said they do, then cops wouldn't carry them but most of them do.

    Replies: @Thomas, @SteveRogers42

    The ASP baton was adopted by police departments because it was small and innocuous and wouldn’t look intimidating on the duty belt of a modern social-worker-with-a-badge. Most of today’s cops have used an impact weapon for real On the job exactly as many times as they have fired their pistol on duty —ie never.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @SteveRogers42


    it was small and innocuous and wouldn’t look intimidating
     
    This sounds exactly like what you would want as a civilian.
  150. @Jack D
    @ThreeCranes


    some Ethiopian had fashioned from a car spring. You can’t get much better steel than that
     
    Car spring steel is great for car springs. Not ideal for cutting tools and weapons although you can certainly make serviceable items out of them. Aside from the better, more modern steel alloys that Twinkie mentions, a katana is made by special techniques (unknown to Ethiopian blacksmiths) which combine a soft (and therefore flexible) iron backbone with a hard steel cutting edge. These techniques require a lot of skill and are time consuming, so a genuine handmade katana made by a master craftsman is very pricey (and accordingly no one in their right mind is going to use it as a machete to chop down brush in their yard).

    A knife or sword made from a single material is always a compromise. If you make a knife or sword from a hard, brittle material (nowadays there are even ceramic knives) the edge will resist wear (if not chipping) and it will stay sharp for a very long time but such materials have no give - if you try to bend them they will snap. Having your sword break in the middle of a sword fight is not good. If you make something from a softer material (a car spring) it will be flexible but the edge will not last for long. But by combining the two materials in the right way (and this is not easy - it was especially not easy to do in the era of hand forging) you can produce a sword or knife that is the best of both worlds (as well as being an object of great beauty - the pattern that is created at the point where the materials join is aesthetically pleasing). Is it worth $50,000? People pay that much (and much more) for a piece of canvas that is dabbed with a bit of paint, so who am I to say. I'm sure there's some guy in Ethiopia who would paint that same piece of canvas for $5.

    Replies: @Zoodles, @anon

    Was it a bar spring like Valiants [Chrysler Dart] had in the front?
    That might be okay.
    I’ve got a wrecking bar fashioned by a blacksmith, air quenched, out of a truck spring, it’s
    only limitation is the user’s strength.
    1440 mm long [57.6 inches], 27 mm diameter.
    A fucking big truck, whatever it was.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @anon

    Those are called torsion bars. I assume that the blacksmiths of Ethiopia prefer old leaf springs, which are closer in shape (flat) to a knife.

  151. @Thomas
    @NickG

    Reflex sight on a carry gun seems like an invitation to snag on something. I'm typically carrying IWB under a T-shirt.

    Replies: @NickG

    I carry IWB — Inside Waist Band too, currently I mainly use an Alien Gear Shape Shift. Though I had to fettle it to accommodate the Glock 26’s reflex sight. The reflex sight helps, it rides over the thick leather belt, it’s actually less liable to snag, I have suppressor extra high Trijicon night ssights co-witnessing with the reflex sight’s reticule. I have an awful lot of scope time with a rifle, and I’m convinced the skill is transferable in picking up the pistol reflex sight’s reticule. It takes many people a goodly while to acquire the reflex sight’s reticule immediately. But the improvement in accuracy is dramatic.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @NickG

    Does it still conceal well? That sounds like it rides kind of high. I tend to be a fairly casual dresser, especially this time of year (summer for us in the Northern Hemisphere), and rambling around outdoors presents many opportunities for a shirt to ride up, so my focus is often on "deep concealment."

    I mainly use a couple of Alien Gear rigs too. I prefer the Cloak Tuck 3.5 to the Shape Shift for IWB, because it seems smoother and less likely to print. I have a Shape Shift too though and a couple of different shells. The ability to switch to various OWB setups, or all kinds of other setups they sell accessories for, is neat. I've been taking family road trips this summer, and the car rig is a nice touch for long drives where I'd rather not have an IWB pistol digging into my hip for three or four hours on the road.

    Alien Gear's sister company, Bigfoot Gun Belts (gunbelts.com) makes some very nice steel-cored gun belts in many configurations. I've had one of their belts as a mostly daily wear belt for 4 years now and it's still holding up great.

    Replies: @NickG, @Twinkie

    , @Twinkie
    @NickG


    I have an awful lot of scope time with a rifle, and I’m convinced the skill is transferable in picking up the pistol reflex sight’s reticule. It takes many people a goodly while to acquire the reflex sight’s reticule immediately. But the improvement in accuracy is dramatic.
     
    I’ve found that electronic sights (red dot, holographic, etc.) do not increase accuracy, but do increase speed tremendously. More specifically, they cut down on the aiming time necessary to get hits. They are really of the greatest benefit in highly dynamic close quarter gun fights.

    As far as transitioning to electronic sights from iron sights, it’s unfortunately people who shoot the latter correctly who have trouble adjusting quickly - just as they focus on the front sight with the latter, they try to pick up the reticle first when using the former. Shotgunners take more easily to electronic sights, because they are used to focusing on the target and then moving their bead onto it.
  152. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill B.
    @Reg Cæsar

    The modern Englishman couldn't do it. It was extremely hard to use a full-scale war bow. It required great strength and skill.

    The contemporary Englishman is typically fat, weak and impatient.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The contemporary Englishman is typically fat, weak and impatient.

    The Americans can impress us with how well-built, tenacious, and masterful they are by standing up on their hind legs and fighting to take their country back.

  153. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pat Kittle
    @Cato

    "Fashion" & "fascism" share the same root word.

    Replies: @David, @fascist, @SteveRogers42, @Anonymous

    “Fashion” & “fascism” share the same root word.

    I cannot find the YouTube clip, so you’ll just have to settle for this:

    https://abitoffryandlaurie.co.uk/sketches/fascion

  154. @SteveRogers42
    @Jack D

    The ASP baton was adopted by police departments because it was small and innocuous and wouldn’t look intimidating on the duty belt of a modern social-worker-with-a-badge. Most of today’s cops have used an impact weapon for real On the job exactly as many times as they have fired their pistol on duty —ie never.

    Replies: @Jack D

    it was small and innocuous and wouldn’t look intimidating

    This sounds exactly like what you would want as a civilian.

  155. @anon
    @Jack D

    Was it a bar spring like Valiants [Chrysler Dart] had in the front?
    That might be okay.
    I've got a wrecking bar fashioned by a blacksmith, air quenched, out of a truck spring, it's
    only limitation is the user's strength.
    1440 mm long [57.6 inches], 27 mm diameter.
    A fucking big truck, whatever it was.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Those are called torsion bars. I assume that the blacksmiths of Ethiopia prefer old leaf springs, which are closer in shape (flat) to a knife.

  156. @NickG
    @Thomas

    I'm far better equipped than Dominic Cummings, carrying anything with intent to use as a weapon in the UK is illegal, but his stick confers plausible deniability.

    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip, the slide is milled and it has a reflex sight (Holosun 508T), there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Thomas, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip… there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Jack D


    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.
     
    Yup, you better believe it, and I live in a good neighbourhood within sight — about a km as the crow flies — of the State President's residence in the middle of Pretoria, I can step outside our gate and see it.
    , @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.
     
    Don’t be hyperbolic. Blacks are only 13% of American population and their political power is going to decline in the future. They don’t have the economic resources or the intellectual firepower, and their population share is being eclipsed by other minorities. They are useful to GoodWhites as symbols and emblems as well as tools of street intimidation, but what political power they have exists at liberal white sufferance.

    The long-term concern for America is Hispanicization at the low (and demographic) end and the Indianization at the high (elite) end of the economy.
  157. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Zoodles
    @Jack D

    Traditional Japanese swords were made the way they were because Japanese smelting technology was crude, resulting in lumps of impure iron of various softness. To compensate for this, the steel was folded several times in order to beat out impurities and even up the carbon content, then the harder steel was wrapped around the softer steel.

    This process is called lamination, and is common amongst cultures with primitive steel making technology.

    If you have good steel, its entirely unneeded. Europeans largely abandoned lamination in the middle ages, because they access to greatly superior steel, allowing them to mass produce large numbers of high quality monosteel blades. Monosteel is better than lamination, allowing a similar edge, but being structurally stronger due to lack of imperfections found between the welds in the layers of a laminated blade.

    The spring steel from an automobile would be better steel than anything masamune would have had access to.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie

    If you have good steel, its entirely unneeded. Europeans largely abandoned lamination in the middle ages, because they access to greatly superior steel, allowing them to mass produce large numbers of high quality monosteel blades. Monosteel is better than lamination, allowing a similar edge, but being structurally stronger due to lack of imperfections found between the welds in the layers of a laminated blade.

    Thank you for posting this.

    I had always wondered what would have happened in a fight between a 15th century Japanese katana and a then-contemporary Scottish broadsword. Now you have me wondering if the broadsword chappie could have broken the katana-wielder’s weapon and taken their head off in a single stroke.

  158. When that happens, will it be normal for gun owners to carry a weapon in a low-slung, quick-draw holster? Time to start honing your pistol skills!

  159. @Zoodles
    @Jack D

    Traditional Japanese swords were made the way they were because Japanese smelting technology was crude, resulting in lumps of impure iron of various softness. To compensate for this, the steel was folded several times in order to beat out impurities and even up the carbon content, then the harder steel was wrapped around the softer steel.

    This process is called lamination, and is common amongst cultures with primitive steel making technology.

    If you have good steel, its entirely unneeded. Europeans largely abandoned lamination in the middle ages, because they access to greatly superior steel, allowing them to mass produce large numbers of high quality monosteel blades. Monosteel is better than lamination, allowing a similar edge, but being structurally stronger due to lack of imperfections found between the welds in the layers of a laminated blade.

    The spring steel from an automobile would be better steel than anything masamune would have had access to.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie

    If you have good steel

    IF. The best steel to which Europeans had access to for making swords was called Toledo steel and it was not a “mono steel”: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toledo_steel

    In the Middle East, the best sword steel was called Damascus steel and it was made with Wootz steel from India: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damascus_steel

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wootz_steel

    Legends of wootz steel and Damascus swords aroused the curiosity of the European scientific community from the 17th to the 19th century. The use of high-carbon alloys was not known in Europe previously and thus the research into wootz steel played an important role in the development of modern English, French and Russian metallurgy.[19]

    In 1790, samples of wootz steel were received by Sir Joseph Banks, president of the British Royal Society, sent by Helenus Scott. These samples were subjected to scientific examination and analysis by several experts.[20][21][22]

  160. @Twinkie
    @NickG

    What, no flashlight?

    What kind a belt do you wear?

    Replies: @NickG

    What kind a belt do you wear?

    I’ve tried all sorts. I’ve settled on a conventional belt.A 1.5 inch wide, thick — about 5 mm — sewn, quality leather belt, rather nicely hand cut and stitched by a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan. Allegedly the conventional buckle comes from Sweden. It’s very stable, more than anything else I’ve tried. It cost me the equivalent of US$ 50. It would likely cost rather more in the US, north of $ 100.

    What, no flashlight?

    Yes, a small aluminium LED number, plus, of course, that incorporated into the cell phone – a Samsung Galaxy 10+.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @NickG

    I wear a horsehide belt (double-layered), also 1.5 inch wide, 1/4 inch thick. I find that horsehide is tougher and much more sweat-resistant than cow hide. If I’m hiking or hunting, though, I wear a 5-stitch wilderness instructor belt.

    https://www.thewilderness.com/belts/original-instructor-belt/

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @NickG

    What the self defense use of a flashlight?

    Replies: @Jack D, @NickG

    , @Twinkie
    @NickG


    a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan.
     
    South African artisans makes some excellent stuff. I own and use knives made by Arno Bernard. Functional and good-looking. And less costly than American- or European-made knives of comparable material and workmanship.

    https://arnobernard.com/

    Customer-service is a little goofy though.

    Replies: @NickG

  161. @Jack D
    @NickG


    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip... there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.
     
    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.

    Replies: @NickG, @Twinkie

    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.

    Yup, you better believe it, and I live in a good neighbourhood within sight — about a km as the crow flies — of the State President’s residence in the middle of Pretoria, I can step outside our gate and see it.

  162. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @NickG
    @Thomas

    I'm far better equipped than Dominic Cummings, carrying anything with intent to use as a weapon in the UK is illegal, but his stick confers plausible deniability.

    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip, the slide is milled and it has a reflex sight (Holosun 508T), there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Thomas, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

    Is there a specific reason you choose to carry a stout stick rather than a sjambok?

    I must say that, given a choice between your stout stick and a sjambok, I would choose the latter.

    Perhaps they are uncommon/oft-declared to be illegal in many countries, but I am surprised that there hasn’t been a single reference to them in 150+ posts.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Anonymous


    Is there a specific reason you choose to carry a stout stick rather than a sjambok?
     
    A few reasons:
    1) Carrying a sjambok while out walking would look odd, is overtly aggressive. I'd look like an utter prick looking for trouble.
    2) A sjambok is not much of a walking stick, I have no experience with them and am not particularly interested in acquiring it.
    3) I spend alot of time in the UK. Toting a stick while country walking is part of country lore.... to stabilise on muddy ground, beat away nettles and brambles etcetera, and as a general countryside accoutrement, so I'm used to and comfortable with one.
    4) It's a good tool as first line of defence against sudden attack by dogs, until I can deploy a jolly good dose of pepper spray, which in my experience, and I've had a bit, generally works swimmingly on stroppy hounds.
    5) It makes me a tad less inviting to opportunists with nefarious intent, while not being in the least bit overtly aggressive.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  163. @NickG
    @Twinkie


    What kind a belt do you wear?
     
    I've tried all sorts. I've settled on a conventional belt.A 1.5 inch wide, thick — about 5 mm — sewn, quality leather belt, rather nicely hand cut and stitched by a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan. Allegedly the conventional buckle comes from Sweden. It's very stable, more than anything else I've tried. It cost me the equivalent of US$ 50. It would likely cost rather more in the US, north of $ 100.

    What, no flashlight?
     
    Yes, a small aluminium LED number, plus, of course, that incorporated into the cell phone - a Samsung Galaxy 10+.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie

    I wear a horsehide belt (double-layered), also 1.5 inch wide, 1/4 inch thick. I find that horsehide is tougher and much more sweat-resistant than cow hide. If I’m hiking or hunting, though, I wear a 5-stitch wilderness instructor belt.

    https://www.thewilderness.com/belts/original-instructor-belt/

  164. @NickG
    @Twinkie


    What kind a belt do you wear?
     
    I've tried all sorts. I've settled on a conventional belt.A 1.5 inch wide, thick — about 5 mm — sewn, quality leather belt, rather nicely hand cut and stitched by a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan. Allegedly the conventional buckle comes from Sweden. It's very stable, more than anything else I've tried. It cost me the equivalent of US$ 50. It would likely cost rather more in the US, north of $ 100.

    What, no flashlight?
     
    Yes, a small aluminium LED number, plus, of course, that incorporated into the cell phone - a Samsung Galaxy 10+.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie

    What the self defense use of a flashlight?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jim Don Bob

    Even a small flashlight can temporarily disorient someone if you shine it in their eyes at night (make it difficult for them to see you) but modern compact LED flashlights are mostly useless for defense (I suppose you can hold them in your fist and they would increase the impact of a punch like a roll of quarters). However, the old fashioned 3 D cell Maglites can be used as batons. In fact they are better as batons than they are as lights, at least with their original pathetic little incandescent bulbs.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @NickG
    @Jim Don Bob


    What the self defense use of a flashlight?
     
    In my case, somewhat unlikely, though technically possible — we have alot of power outages due to load shedding, it can suddenly get very dark, there's more demand for electricity than supply — though not actually where I live, we are exempt because we are on the government grid. The torch is mainly used for looking for stuff, finding keys dropped under car seat, illuminating little jobs in dark badly lit places, recreational gynaecology — that sort of thing.
  165. @Jim Don Bob
    @NickG

    What the self defense use of a flashlight?

    Replies: @Jack D, @NickG

    Even a small flashlight can temporarily disorient someone if you shine it in their eyes at night (make it difficult for them to see you) but modern compact LED flashlights are mostly useless for defense (I suppose you can hold them in your fist and they would increase the impact of a punch like a roll of quarters). However, the old fashioned 3 D cell Maglites can be used as batons. In fact they are better as batons than they are as lights, at least with their original pathetic little incandescent bulbs.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Jack D


    Even a small flashlight can temporarily disorient someone if you shine it in their eyes at night
     
    That’s nice, but the primary purpose of a flashlight is illumination. If you can’t see, you can’t identify threats, target them, or shoot at them.
  166. @NickG
    @Thomas

    I carry IWB — Inside Waist Band too, currently I mainly use an Alien Gear Shape Shift. Though I had to fettle it to accommodate the Glock 26's reflex sight. The reflex sight helps, it rides over the thick leather belt, it's actually less liable to snag, I have suppressor extra high Trijicon night ssights co-witnessing with the reflex sight's reticule. I have an awful lot of scope time with a rifle, and I'm convinced the skill is transferable in picking up the pistol reflex sight's reticule. It takes many people a goodly while to acquire the reflex sight's reticule immediately. But the improvement in accuracy is dramatic.

    Replies: @Thomas, @Twinkie

    Does it still conceal well? That sounds like it rides kind of high. I tend to be a fairly casual dresser, especially this time of year (summer for us in the Northern Hemisphere), and rambling around outdoors presents many opportunities for a shirt to ride up, so my focus is often on “deep concealment.”

    I mainly use a couple of Alien Gear rigs too. I prefer the Cloak Tuck 3.5 to the Shape Shift for IWB, because it seems smoother and less likely to print. I have a Shape Shift too though and a couple of different shells. The ability to switch to various OWB setups, or all kinds of other setups they sell accessories for, is neat. I’ve been taking family road trips this summer, and the car rig is a nice touch for long drives where I’d rather not have an IWB pistol digging into my hip for three or four hours on the road.

    Alien Gear’s sister company, Bigfoot Gun Belts (gunbelts.com) makes some very nice steel-cored gun belts in many configurations. I’ve had one of their belts as a mostly daily wear belt for 4 years now and it’s still holding up great.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Thomas


    Does it still conceal well? That sounds like it rides kind of high
     
    Yes pretty much, it's canted forward, a bit which helps, this is easy to do with the Shape Shift. In the winter — it's Winter here now, though spring is already in the air (Pretoria today high of 64°f low of 46°f sunny dawn til dusk) — when I wear a t-shirt with a long sleeve shirt over it I have a 15 round Glock 19 mag with an X-grip spacer in the Glock 26. In the Summer, when I wear just a short sleeve shirt, I go back to the Glock 26's 10 round mag, as it prints far less, I carry a 15 rounder Glock 19 mag as a spare. The 17 rounder Glock 17 mag is just a bit too bulky.
    , @Twinkie
    @Thomas


    Alien Gear’s sister company, Bigfoot Gun Belts (gunbelts.com) makes some very nice steel-cored gun belts in many configurations. I’ve had one of their belts as a mostly daily wear belt for 4 years now and it’s still holding up great.
     
    Magpul makes a double-layered belt with leather outside and polymer inside, and it’s quite stout. I’m sure it won’t wear out easily. It’s certainly very stiff (vertically). The downside is, it’s not nearly as comfortable as all-leather belts.

    I’m traditional. I wear a horsehide belt and usually a horsehide IWB holster. A long time ago, my wife bought me a shark gun belt and that thing is tough as heck, but I don’t wear it much, because it’s black.
  167. @Jim Don Bob
    @NickG

    What the self defense use of a flashlight?

    Replies: @Jack D, @NickG

    What the self defense use of a flashlight?

    In my case, somewhat unlikely, though technically possible — we have alot of power outages due to load shedding, it can suddenly get very dark, there’s more demand for electricity than supply — though not actually where I live, we are exempt because we are on the government grid. The torch is mainly used for looking for stuff, finding keys dropped under car seat, illuminating little jobs in dark badly lit places, recreational gynaecology — that sort of thing.

  168. @Anonymous
    @NickG



    If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.

     

    Is there a specific reason you choose to carry a stout stick rather than a sjambok?



    I must say that, given a choice between your stout stick and a sjambok, I would choose the latter.

    Perhaps they are uncommon/oft-declared to be illegal in many countries, but I am surprised that there hasn't been a single reference to them in 150+ posts.

    Replies: @NickG

    Is there a specific reason you choose to carry a stout stick rather than a sjambok?

    A few reasons:
    1) Carrying a sjambok while out walking would look odd, is overtly aggressive. I’d look like an utter prick looking for trouble.
    2) A sjambok is not much of a walking stick, I have no experience with them and am not particularly interested in acquiring it.
    3) I spend alot of time in the UK. Toting a stick while country walking is part of country lore…. to stabilise on muddy ground, beat away nettles and brambles etcetera, and as a general countryside accoutrement, so I’m used to and comfortable with one.
    4) It’s a good tool as first line of defence against sudden attack by dogs, until I can deploy a jolly good dose of pepper spray, which in my experience, and I’ve had a bit, generally works swimmingly on stroppy hounds.
    5) It makes me a tad less inviting to opportunists with nefarious intent, while not being in the least bit overtly aggressive.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @NickG



    5) It makes me a tad less inviting to opportunists with nefarious intent, while not being in the least bit overtly aggressive.

     

    Point taken.

    I suppose I lean more toward looking overtly aggressive in the hope that people with nefarious intent will take one look and decide to move on to easier pickings. However, I see what you mean about the "opportunists" angle and now realise I ought to pay more attention to that at a time when opportunists abound.

    Thank you for the thoughtful reply. I am glad to hear that the authorities in SA have enlightened views when it comes to people arming themselves (which is more than can be said for the UK, alas).

    Replies: @NickG

  169. @Thomas
    @NickG

    Does it still conceal well? That sounds like it rides kind of high. I tend to be a fairly casual dresser, especially this time of year (summer for us in the Northern Hemisphere), and rambling around outdoors presents many opportunities for a shirt to ride up, so my focus is often on "deep concealment."

    I mainly use a couple of Alien Gear rigs too. I prefer the Cloak Tuck 3.5 to the Shape Shift for IWB, because it seems smoother and less likely to print. I have a Shape Shift too though and a couple of different shells. The ability to switch to various OWB setups, or all kinds of other setups they sell accessories for, is neat. I've been taking family road trips this summer, and the car rig is a nice touch for long drives where I'd rather not have an IWB pistol digging into my hip for three or four hours on the road.

    Alien Gear's sister company, Bigfoot Gun Belts (gunbelts.com) makes some very nice steel-cored gun belts in many configurations. I've had one of their belts as a mostly daily wear belt for 4 years now and it's still holding up great.

    Replies: @NickG, @Twinkie

    Does it still conceal well? That sounds like it rides kind of high

    Yes pretty much, it’s canted forward, a bit which helps, this is easy to do with the Shape Shift. In the winter — it’s Winter here now, though spring is already in the air (Pretoria today high of 64°f low of 46°f sunny dawn til dusk) — when I wear a t-shirt with a long sleeve shirt over it I have a 15 round Glock 19 mag with an X-grip spacer in the Glock 26. In the Summer, when I wear just a short sleeve shirt, I go back to the Glock 26’s 10 round mag, as it prints far less, I carry a 15 rounder Glock 19 mag as a spare. The 17 rounder Glock 17 mag is just a bit too bulky.

  170. Out with a couple of friends (all of us in our late 60’s) when approached by a bunch of young lads who saw easy pickings. Demanded our wallets and mobile phones and one attacked my mate when he refused. The young lad suddenly stepped back with blood pouring from his neck, with a pencil, an ordinary HB pencil, sticking out. After advising his mates to phone for an ambulance, we three ex Royal Marines, left. No guns, no knives, no canes. Which Police officer is going to object to some old bloke with a pencil in his jacket pocket?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Penseivat

    Harry Brown! Excellent work.

  171. @Penseivat
    Out with a couple of friends (all of us in our late 60's) when approached by a bunch of young lads who saw easy pickings. Demanded our wallets and mobile phones and one attacked my mate when he refused. The young lad suddenly stepped back with blood pouring from his neck, with a pencil, an ordinary HB pencil, sticking out. After advising his mates to phone for an ambulance, we three ex Royal Marines, left. No guns, no knives, no canes. Which Police officer is going to object to some old bloke with a pencil in his jacket pocket?

    Replies: @JMcG

    Harry Brown! Excellent work.

  172. @NickG
    @Thomas

    I carry IWB — Inside Waist Band too, currently I mainly use an Alien Gear Shape Shift. Though I had to fettle it to accommodate the Glock 26's reflex sight. The reflex sight helps, it rides over the thick leather belt, it's actually less liable to snag, I have suppressor extra high Trijicon night ssights co-witnessing with the reflex sight's reticule. I have an awful lot of scope time with a rifle, and I'm convinced the skill is transferable in picking up the pistol reflex sight's reticule. It takes many people a goodly while to acquire the reflex sight's reticule immediately. But the improvement in accuracy is dramatic.

    Replies: @Thomas, @Twinkie

    I have an awful lot of scope time with a rifle, and I’m convinced the skill is transferable in picking up the pistol reflex sight’s reticule. It takes many people a goodly while to acquire the reflex sight’s reticule immediately. But the improvement in accuracy is dramatic.

    I’ve found that electronic sights (red dot, holographic, etc.) do not increase accuracy, but do increase speed tremendously. More specifically, they cut down on the aiming time necessary to get hits. They are really of the greatest benefit in highly dynamic close quarter gun fights.

    As far as transitioning to electronic sights from iron sights, it’s unfortunately people who shoot the latter correctly who have trouble adjusting quickly – just as they focus on the front sight with the latter, they try to pick up the reticle first when using the former. Shotgunners take more easily to electronic sights, because they are used to focusing on the target and then moving their bead onto it.

  173. @Jack D
    @Jim Don Bob

    Even a small flashlight can temporarily disorient someone if you shine it in their eyes at night (make it difficult for them to see you) but modern compact LED flashlights are mostly useless for defense (I suppose you can hold them in your fist and they would increase the impact of a punch like a roll of quarters). However, the old fashioned 3 D cell Maglites can be used as batons. In fact they are better as batons than they are as lights, at least with their original pathetic little incandescent bulbs.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Even a small flashlight can temporarily disorient someone if you shine it in their eyes at night

    That’s nice, but the primary purpose of a flashlight is illumination. If you can’t see, you can’t identify threats, target them, or shoot at them.

  174. @Thomas
    @NickG

    Does it still conceal well? That sounds like it rides kind of high. I tend to be a fairly casual dresser, especially this time of year (summer for us in the Northern Hemisphere), and rambling around outdoors presents many opportunities for a shirt to ride up, so my focus is often on "deep concealment."

    I mainly use a couple of Alien Gear rigs too. I prefer the Cloak Tuck 3.5 to the Shape Shift for IWB, because it seems smoother and less likely to print. I have a Shape Shift too though and a couple of different shells. The ability to switch to various OWB setups, or all kinds of other setups they sell accessories for, is neat. I've been taking family road trips this summer, and the car rig is a nice touch for long drives where I'd rather not have an IWB pistol digging into my hip for three or four hours on the road.

    Alien Gear's sister company, Bigfoot Gun Belts (gunbelts.com) makes some very nice steel-cored gun belts in many configurations. I've had one of their belts as a mostly daily wear belt for 4 years now and it's still holding up great.

    Replies: @NickG, @Twinkie

    Alien Gear’s sister company, Bigfoot Gun Belts (gunbelts.com) makes some very nice steel-cored gun belts in many configurations. I’ve had one of their belts as a mostly daily wear belt for 4 years now and it’s still holding up great.

    Magpul makes a double-layered belt with leather outside and polymer inside, and it’s quite stout. I’m sure it won’t wear out easily. It’s certainly very stiff (vertically). The downside is, it’s not nearly as comfortable as all-leather belts.

    I’m traditional. I wear a horsehide belt and usually a horsehide IWB holster. A long time ago, my wife bought me a shark gun belt and that thing is tough as heck, but I don’t wear it much, because it’s black.

  175. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @NickG
    @Anonymous


    Is there a specific reason you choose to carry a stout stick rather than a sjambok?
     
    A few reasons:
    1) Carrying a sjambok while out walking would look odd, is overtly aggressive. I'd look like an utter prick looking for trouble.
    2) A sjambok is not much of a walking stick, I have no experience with them and am not particularly interested in acquiring it.
    3) I spend alot of time in the UK. Toting a stick while country walking is part of country lore.... to stabilise on muddy ground, beat away nettles and brambles etcetera, and as a general countryside accoutrement, so I'm used to and comfortable with one.
    4) It's a good tool as first line of defence against sudden attack by dogs, until I can deploy a jolly good dose of pepper spray, which in my experience, and I've had a bit, generally works swimmingly on stroppy hounds.
    5) It makes me a tad less inviting to opportunists with nefarious intent, while not being in the least bit overtly aggressive.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    5) It makes me a tad less inviting to opportunists with nefarious intent, while not being in the least bit overtly aggressive.

    Point taken.

    I suppose I lean more toward looking overtly aggressive in the hope that people with nefarious intent will take one look and decide to move on to easier pickings. However, I see what you mean about the “opportunists” angle and now realise I ought to pay more attention to that at a time when opportunists abound.

    Thank you for the thoughtful reply. I am glad to hear that the authorities in SA have enlightened views when it comes to people arming themselves (which is more than can be said for the UK, alas).

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Anonymous


    I am glad to hear that the authorities in SA have enlightened views when it comes to people arming themselves (which is more than can be said for the UK, alas).
     
    The government would disarm us in a heartbeat. Fortunately separation of powers still operates, to some extent in SA, at least for now.

    The licencing system changed in the early naughties and new licences have to be renewed each 5 years. Most people re registered on the new system and their old licence were revoked. I was one of the few that held out and a legal challenge prevailed on the very last day. Old non renewable lifetime licences not cancelled were effectively grandfathered and are still valid. So it looks as if I am stuck with a Gen 3 Glock 26 for the duration.

    Worse things happen at sea!

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  176. @NickG
    @Twinkie


    What kind a belt do you wear?
     
    I've tried all sorts. I've settled on a conventional belt.A 1.5 inch wide, thick — about 5 mm — sewn, quality leather belt, rather nicely hand cut and stitched by a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan. Allegedly the conventional buckle comes from Sweden. It's very stable, more than anything else I've tried. It cost me the equivalent of US$ 50. It would likely cost rather more in the US, north of $ 100.

    What, no flashlight?
     
    Yes, a small aluminium LED number, plus, of course, that incorporated into the cell phone - a Samsung Galaxy 10+.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jim Don Bob, @Twinkie

    a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan.

    South African artisans makes some excellent stuff. I own and use knives made by Arno Bernard. Functional and good-looking. And less costly than American- or European-made knives of comparable material and workmanship.

    https://arnobernard.com/

    Customer-service is a little goofy though.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Twinkie

    Robie Barkman of Robar is Sith Ifrican too.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  177. @Jack D
    @NickG


    I carry a pepper spray in my right trouser pocket, a Glock 26 on me right hip... there is a spare 12 round mag on the left side and a Leatherman Charge. If I go for a stroll around the neighbourhood, I tote a stout stick too. I live in South Africa.
     
    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.

    Replies: @NickG, @Twinkie

    A vision of our future. Something all Americans can look forward to in the new black ruled America.

    Don’t be hyperbolic. Blacks are only 13% of American population and their political power is going to decline in the future. They don’t have the economic resources or the intellectual firepower, and their population share is being eclipsed by other minorities. They are useful to GoodWhites as symbols and emblems as well as tools of street intimidation, but what political power they have exists at liberal white sufferance.

    The long-term concern for America is Hispanicization at the low (and demographic) end and the Indianization at the high (elite) end of the economy.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  178. @Anonymous
    @NickG



    5) It makes me a tad less inviting to opportunists with nefarious intent, while not being in the least bit overtly aggressive.

     

    Point taken.

    I suppose I lean more toward looking overtly aggressive in the hope that people with nefarious intent will take one look and decide to move on to easier pickings. However, I see what you mean about the "opportunists" angle and now realise I ought to pay more attention to that at a time when opportunists abound.

    Thank you for the thoughtful reply. I am glad to hear that the authorities in SA have enlightened views when it comes to people arming themselves (which is more than can be said for the UK, alas).

    Replies: @NickG

    I am glad to hear that the authorities in SA have enlightened views when it comes to people arming themselves (which is more than can be said for the UK, alas).

    The government would disarm us in a heartbeat. Fortunately separation of powers still operates, to some extent in SA, at least for now.

    The licencing system changed in the early naughties and new licences have to be renewed each 5 years. Most people re registered on the new system and their old licence were revoked. I was one of the few that held out and a legal challenge prevailed on the very last day. Old non renewable lifetime licences not cancelled were effectively grandfathered and are still valid. So it looks as if I am stuck with a Gen 3 Glock 26 for the duration.

    Worse things happen at sea!

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @NickG


    The government would disarm us in a heartbeat. Fortunately separation of powers still operates, to some extent in SA, at least for now.
     
    Off-topic, but had to be asked - are the white South Africans you're acquainted with looking for a way out at all? What would you say is the percentage trying to leave vs those who are looking to stay put?

    Replies: @NickG

  179. @NickG
    @Anonymous


    I am glad to hear that the authorities in SA have enlightened views when it comes to people arming themselves (which is more than can be said for the UK, alas).
     
    The government would disarm us in a heartbeat. Fortunately separation of powers still operates, to some extent in SA, at least for now.

    The licencing system changed in the early naughties and new licences have to be renewed each 5 years. Most people re registered on the new system and their old licence were revoked. I was one of the few that held out and a legal challenge prevailed on the very last day. Old non renewable lifetime licences not cancelled were effectively grandfathered and are still valid. So it looks as if I am stuck with a Gen 3 Glock 26 for the duration.

    Worse things happen at sea!

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    The government would disarm us in a heartbeat. Fortunately separation of powers still operates, to some extent in SA, at least for now.

    Off-topic, but had to be asked – are the white South Africans you’re acquainted with looking for a way out at all? What would you say is the percentage trying to leave vs those who are looking to stay put?

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Johann Ricke


    are the white South Africans you’re acquainted with looking for a way out at all?
     
    There is a huge white brain drain. The population is perhaps 60 million of which about 4.4 million are white. There are nearly a million South Africans in the UK alone, I bump into them constantly there. Others go to Australia, New Zealand and some — fewer the US and Canada.

    Many don't have the option to leave, they don't have the money to do it, the qualifications or are tied by family. Many whites, especially Afrikaaners — one of the 2 white tribes, the other being of English stock — have strong blood and soil feelings about the place.

    There are still quite a few very wealthy people in SA that enjoy a difficult to beat lifestyle. But many of the middle classes are finding it tough with the draconian black race preference policies (euphemistically called BBBE - Broad Based Black economic empowerment). SA is a weird juxtaposition of first and third World. The place can definitely can get into your blood.

    I'm a full blooded English Englishman with a UK passport, married to an Afrikaaner.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  180. @Twinkie
    @NickG


    a local, rather bohemian looking, Afrikaans artisan.
     
    South African artisans makes some excellent stuff. I own and use knives made by Arno Bernard. Functional and good-looking. And less costly than American- or European-made knives of comparable material and workmanship.

    https://arnobernard.com/

    Customer-service is a little goofy though.

    Replies: @NickG

    Robie Barkman of Robar is Sith Ifrican too.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @NickG


    Robar
     
    If you are referring to the gun finish/metal treatment company, it has been out of business since last summer.
  181. @Johann Ricke
    @NickG


    The government would disarm us in a heartbeat. Fortunately separation of powers still operates, to some extent in SA, at least for now.
     
    Off-topic, but had to be asked - are the white South Africans you're acquainted with looking for a way out at all? What would you say is the percentage trying to leave vs those who are looking to stay put?

    Replies: @NickG

    are the white South Africans you’re acquainted with looking for a way out at all?

    There is a huge white brain drain. The population is perhaps 60 million of which about 4.4 million are white. There are nearly a million South Africans in the UK alone, I bump into them constantly there. Others go to Australia, New Zealand and some — fewer the US and Canada.

    Many don’t have the option to leave, they don’t have the money to do it, the qualifications or are tied by family. Many whites, especially Afrikaaners — one of the 2 white tribes, the other being of English stock — have strong blood and soil feelings about the place.

    There are still quite a few very wealthy people in SA that enjoy a difficult to beat lifestyle. But many of the middle classes are finding it tough with the draconian black race preference policies (euphemistically called BBBE – Broad Based Black economic empowerment). SA is a weird juxtaposition of first and third World. The place can definitely can get into your blood.

    I’m a full blooded English Englishman with a UK passport, married to an Afrikaaner.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @NickG


    fewer the US and Canada.
     
    There is a decent-sized RSA expatriate community in Colorado.
  182. @NickG
    @Twinkie

    Robie Barkman of Robar is Sith Ifrican too.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Robar

    If you are referring to the gun finish/metal treatment company, it has been out of business since last summer.

  183. @NickG
    @Johann Ricke


    are the white South Africans you’re acquainted with looking for a way out at all?
     
    There is a huge white brain drain. The population is perhaps 60 million of which about 4.4 million are white. There are nearly a million South Africans in the UK alone, I bump into them constantly there. Others go to Australia, New Zealand and some — fewer the US and Canada.

    Many don't have the option to leave, they don't have the money to do it, the qualifications or are tied by family. Many whites, especially Afrikaaners — one of the 2 white tribes, the other being of English stock — have strong blood and soil feelings about the place.

    There are still quite a few very wealthy people in SA that enjoy a difficult to beat lifestyle. But many of the middle classes are finding it tough with the draconian black race preference policies (euphemistically called BBBE - Broad Based Black economic empowerment). SA is a weird juxtaposition of first and third World. The place can definitely can get into your blood.

    I'm a full blooded English Englishman with a UK passport, married to an Afrikaaner.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    fewer the US and Canada.

    There is a decent-sized RSA expatriate community in Colorado.

  184. @dearieme
    @Henry's Cat

    I once said to a friend that I'd always fancied a sword stick. He strode to his umbrella stand and pulled one out.

    Replies: @Henry's Cat

    A real one? Or was he making the point that an umbrella would equally do the job?

  185. @Hypnotoad666
    @Rob McX


    The police would class it as an offensive weapon if they needed an excuse to arrest you.
     
    In California, anything potentially useful for self-defense is also potentially illegal to own. The law is so broad and vague they could probably charge you for owning a rock if they felt like it.

    PC 22210 states that “any person in this state who manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state, keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends, or possesses any leaded cane, or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as a billy, blackjack, sandbag, sandclub, sap, or slungshot, is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or imprisonment.”
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rob McX, @Jay Igaboo

    Not so.
    Section 5 Subsection 3 of PC 22210 reads ” Exemption from prosecution if given to members of The Dindu tribe for cultural reasons with regard to: metal-tipped canes carried or firearms by Dindu in pursuit of the traditional Dindu occupations of pimping hohs and/or selling crack cocaine out side school gates. or when engaging in the sacred tribal rituals of rioting, arson and looting Nike shoes and electronic devices.”

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