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Farhad Theyjoo in NYT: California Needs to be More Like Mumbai
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From New York Times opinion columnist Farhad Manjoo (who recently demanded both Open Borders and to be personally referred to as “they“):

It’s the End of California as We Know It
The fires and the blackouts are connected to a larger problem in this state: a failure to live sustainably.

By Farhad Manjoo
Opinion Columnist

Oct. 30, 2019

I have lived nearly all my life in California, and my love for this place and its people runs deep and true. There have been many times in the past few years when I’ve called myself a California nationalist: Sure, America seemed to be going crazy, but at least I lived in the Golden State, where things were still pretty chill.

But lately my affinity for my home state has soured. Maybe it’s the smoke and the blackouts, but a very un-Californian nihilism has been creeping into my thinking. I’m starting to suspect we’re over. It’s the end of California as we know it. I don’t feel fine.

It isn’t just the fires — although, my God, the fires. Is this what life in America’s most populous, most prosperous state is going to be like from now on? …

The fires and the blackouts aren’t like the earthquakes, a natural threat we’ve all chosen to ignore. They are more like California’s other problems, like housing affordability and homelessness and traffic — human-made catastrophes we’ve all chosen to ignore, connected to the larger dysfunction at the heart of our state’s rot: a failure to live sustainably.

…The founding idea of this place is infinitude — mile after endless mile of cute houses connected by freeways and uninsulated power lines stretching out far into the forested hills. Our whole way of life is built on a series of myths — the myth of endless space, endless fuel, endless water, endless optimism, endless outward reach and endless free parking.

One by one, those myths are bursting into flame. We are running out of land, housing, water, road space and now electricity. Fixing all this requires systemic change, but we aren’t up to the task….

The apocalypse now feels more elemental — as if the place is not working in a fundamental way, at the level of geography and climate. And everything we need to do to avoid the end goes against everything we’ve ever done.

The long-term solutions to many of our problems are obvious: To stave off fire and housing costs and so much else, the people of California should live together more densely. We should rely less on cars. And we should be more inclusive in the way we design infrastructure — transportation, the power grid, housing stock — aiming to design for the many rather than for the wealthy few.

If we redesigned our cities for the modern world, they’d be taller and less stretched out into the fire-prone far reaches — what scientists call the wildland-urban interface. Housing would be affordable because there’d be more of it. You’d be able to get around more cheaply because we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices. It wouldn’t be the end of the California dream, but a reconceptualization — not as many endless blocks of backyards and swimming pools, but perhaps a new kind of more livable, more accessible life for all.

And Farhad has a few cousins in South Asia who’d be happy to come over here and show us how to do dense living.

But who wants to do all this? Not the people of this state. …

Either we alter how we live here, or many of us won’t live here anymore.

Check in next week for Farhad’s upcoming column on how what California needs is more immigrants like him.

Manjoo was born in South Africa in 1978 to a family with ancestral roots in India. A cisgender man, Manjoo prefers to be referred to with singular they pronouns.[4] Their family left South Africa when Manjoo was eight years old,[5] and they were raised in Southern California.

They were fleeing apartheid! (Or perhaps they were fleeing the upcoming end of apartheid?) They sure didn’t seem to go back when apartheid was over, now did they?

iSteve commenter Hail offers some useful numbers for perspective:

White non-Hispanics in California
– 1980 census: 15.8 million out of 23.8 million
– 1990 census: 17.0 million [/ 29.8 million]
– 2000 census: 15.8 million [/ 33.9 million]
– 2010 census: 14.9 million [/ 37.3 million]

Non-non-white Hispanics in California:

1980: 8.0 million
1990: 12.8 million
2000: 18.1 million
2010: 22.4 million

Ergo, the solution to California’s problems: More Immigration and More Diversity!

 
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  1. Hey Steve! Somebody’s at the door! Can you answer it??

  2. “To save the state from burning up, we have to burn it down.”

  3. We seriously need to have a discussion on the Manjoo-ish Question.

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
  4. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/145563-only-a-catastrophe-gets-our-attention-we-want-them-we

    “Only a catastrophe gets our attention. We want them, we depend on them. As long as they happen somewhere else. This is where California comes in. Mud slides, brush fires, coastal erosion, mass killings, et cetera. We can relax and enjoy these disasters because in our hearts we feel that California deserves whatever it gets. Californians invented the concept of life-style. This alone warrants their doom.”

    – Don DeLillo

  5. Here’s a thought- why not stop bringing in immigrants, and start deporting them? If the root cause of California’s problems are too many people and not enough housing, and housing is too spread out, let’s just choose the cheaper option- it’s a whole lot cheaper to deport a family rather than build a home for them. Also less auto congestion. Less demand for services. Less demand for colleges. Less CO2. Less everything! Plus, as an added bonus, less labor means wages go up! Less income inequality!

    Why, it’s a win-win all around!! These ex-immigrants can go back to their wonderful homelands, and having learned our ways of doing things, copy them and fix their own countries! Then we can simply trade with them! We get the products, they get the pollution and the social problems these POC’s create!! Everybody is happy!

    No autographs, please. I leave this brilliant solution here for all the world to see and implement.

    I have another solution, but it involves a civil war with nuclear weapons, and I’m afraid the California snail darter and the spotted owl might be harmed.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Charlesz Martel


    Why, it’s a win-win all around!!
     
    It is not a win for the boot-stamping-on-your-face-forever crew. Otherwise, it would have already been accepted as the rational path forward (as you have inconveniently demonstrated). Common sense does not work when reasoning with religious zealots.
    , @Pericles
    @Charlesz Martel

    Endless immigration, brrruh!

  6. Thankfully I don’t live in the city anymore. But anyone who has knows that cities with tall buildings don’t tend to be known for affordable housing.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Just Saying

    Probably because tall buildings are not built to stash more people into restricted space in order to keep cost down, but appear once prices for an appartment or office are high enough so it starts to make economic sense to build upwards.

    That or there is an economic bubble going and someone has so much cash that it can be splurged on vainglorious verticality.

  7. India needs to import millions of Chinese LEGAL IMMIGRANTS…..

    • Replies: @Change that Matters
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Include tens of millions from Pakistan and Bangladesh and you have my vote.

  8. >we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices. <

    How's CA's high speed rail doing Mr. Manboob?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @newrouter

    What he was saying was ALMOST plausible, until he got to LOW PRICES. Sorry Mr. Rug Merchant, you are just lying now. The government doesn't know how to do ANYTHING for low prices and ESPECIALLY not how to move around a lot of people using mass transit. At least be honest and say, "we're going to need lots and lots of taxes to pay for this new mass transit, which can never be made to pay from the fare box (if we can even get the vibrant masses to pay their fares)."

    Replies: @bomag

  9. Who wants to import the Democratic Party Voting Bloc…LEGALLY OF COURSE….from India?

    Answer:Donald Trump and Stephen Miller….

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Trump: Definitely!

    Miller: Not So Sure?

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

  10. I’m starting to suspect we’re over. It’s the end of California as we know it.

    The founding idea of this place is infinitude — mile after endless mile of cute houses [..] the myth of endless space

    One by one, those myths are bursting into flame. We are running out of land, housing, water, road space

    And yet, amazingly, the number of Whites in California is the same as it was about 1966, give or take (this per US census figures).

    Whites started leaving the state, on net, in the (early?) 1990s. The Farhads and the Manjoos kept moving in.

    (They tried to stop it, but were overruled by judges with names like Pfaelzer who found that white racial interests were unconstitutional, and favoring citizens over illegal foreigners was also unconstitutional and illegal, in addition to being highly immoral.)

    The less-told story is that it’s not just that it’s more crowded.

    Something else is going on: California has lost Whites steadily, on par with population losses in much of the so-called Rust Belt.

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)

    Census 2020 is supposed to be pegged to April 2020, which is now under six months away, with results to be released, I think, in Q1 and Q2 2021.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Hail

    '... White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)...'


    Worse, just how many of those people are actual Californians?

    People from New Jersey or Ohio are just light-skinned Guatemalans as far as I'm concerned.

    Replies: @Hail, @Ed

    , @adreadline
    @Hail


    Whites started leaving the state, on net, in the (early?) 1990s. The Farhads and the Manjoos kept moving in.
     

    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
     
    The long legacy of the 1992 Los Angeles riots? Although for whatever reason it doesn't seem to drive out the Asians (save for the Koreans, I guess), does it?

    Replies: @Hail

    , @Moses
    @Hail

    It's really not hard to understand.

    CA has fewer Whites than in 1990. The crowding has come from mass non-White immigration like Mr. Fargoo.

    As CA population begins to resemble third world, CA living conditions and infrastructure begin to resemble third world.

    No more difficult to understand than 1+1=2.

  11. It’s bad enough people like this asshole have replaced me and mine — but must they claim to be ‘Californians’?

    Gee, Manjoo…let’s hear your Californian accent. Apparently, I had one when I was younger.

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @TWS
    @Colin Wright

    My family left the res for California in the twenties. They settled in Alaska. I'm back living a stone's throw from where my great grandparents back to the mammoths were born. We dodged a bullet when great grandad passed on The Golden State.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

  12. Their family left South Africa when Manjoo was eight years old [1986 or 1987] and they were raised in Southern California.

    They were fleeing apartheid!

    What kind of visa did they get into the USA on?

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @Hail

    Yet apartheid ended less then 10 years later, they should have been able to return to SA easily enough in that time frame. But they failed to do so. For some reason.

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Hail


    What kind of visa did they get into the USA on?
     
    No idea, but Zman did a podcast about the alphabet soup of US visas that are available...and it turned out to be no joke...this country literally has a visa type for nearly every letter of the English alphabet.
  13. If we redesigned our cities for the modern world

    The world that’s pretty full, has resources that are either spare or polluted, scant area for more cityscape and has no money for public services? No to mention hindered by the lousy fact that a city of N miles² needs to be fed through an interface of length proportional to sqrt(N).

    they’d be taller and less stretched out into the fire-prone far reaches

    You will still need to support that “modern world city” with an extended land area unless you drop a lot of amenities.

    We really need buildings that grow themselves (by mining coal layers for carbon to get both fuel and building materials maybe?). Magic Tech. We need it! That’s generally a bad sign.

    From William Gibson’s SciFi novel “Idoru”. It’s so old that they still have hotel telephones.

    11. Collapse of New Buildings [should probably be “Einstürzende Neubauten”]

    Laney’s room was high up in a narrow tower faced with white ceramic tile. It was trapezoidal in cross section and dated from the eighties boomtown, the years of the Bubble. That it had survived the great earthquake was testimony to the skill of its engineers; that it had survived the subsequent reconstruction testified to an arcane tangle of ownership and an ongoing struggle between two of the city’s oldest criminal organizations. Yamazaki had explained this in the cab, returning from New Golden Street.

    “We were uncertain how you might feel about new buildings,” he’d said.

    “You mean the nanotech buildings?” Laney had been struggling to keep his eyes open. The driver wore spotless white gloves.

    “Yes. Some people find them disturbing.”

    “I don’t know. I’d have to see one.”

    “You can see them from your hotel, I think.”

    And he could. He knew their sheer brutality of scale from constructs, but virtuality had failed to convey the peculiarity of their apparent texture, a streamlined organicism. “They are like Giger’s paintings of New York,” Yamazaki had said, but the reference had been lost on Laney.

    Now he sat on the edge of his bed, staring blankly out at these miracles of the new technology, as banal and as sinister as such miracles usually were, and they were only annoying: the world’s largest inhabited structures. (The Chernobyl containment structure was larger, but nothing human would ever live there.)

    The umbrella Yamazaki had given him was collapsing into itself, shrinking. Going away.

    The phone began to ring. He couldn’t find it.

    “Telephone,” he said. “Where is it?”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @El Dato

    They still have hotel phones, El Data. Nobody uses them except for calling to see when breakfast ends, because they used to positively ream people in the ass with charges, even for local calls. Remember that?

    , @BenKenobi
    @El Dato


    unless you drop a lot of amenities
     
    Good news, bigot! The plan is for you to live in a pod in one-fourth of a converted shipping container and eat bugs. Unless you want 2 billion negros to die, and you wouldn't want that, would you? It would be a shame if that last part went in bold red letters at the top of your Linkedin, wouldn't it?

    PS: Microaggressions are now felonies and all POC have the Judge Dredd power to convict and sentence on the spot.

    Replies: @bomag, @Nico

  14. @Hail

    I’m starting to suspect we’re over. It’s the end of California as we know it.
     

    The founding idea of this place is infinitude — mile after endless mile of cute houses [..] the myth of endless space
     

    One by one, those myths are bursting into flame. We are running out of land, housing, water, road space
     
    And yet, amazingly, the number of Whites in California is the same as it was about 1966, give or take (this per US census figures).

    Whites started leaving the state, on net, in the (early?) 1990s. The Farhads and the Manjoos kept moving in.

    (They tried to stop it, but were overruled by judges with names like Pfaelzer who found that white racial interests were unconstitutional, and favoring citizens over illegal foreigners was also unconstitutional and illegal, in addition to being highly immoral.)


    The less-told story is that it’s not just that it’s more crowded.

    Something else is going on: California has lost Whites steadily, on par with population losses in much of the so-called Rust Belt.

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)
     

    Census 2020 is supposed to be pegged to April 2020, which is now under six months away, with results to be released, I think, in Q1 and Q2 2021.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @adreadline, @Moses

    ‘… White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)…’

    Worse, just how many of those people are actual Californians?

    People from New Jersey or Ohio are just light-skinned Guatemalans as far as I’m concerned.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Colin Wright


    how many of those people are actual Californians?
     

    People from New Jersey or Ohio
     
    What about recent foreign-origin persons who get counted as Whites?

    I am thinking of the iSteve anthropological category of "Gold-Chain Americans" (See 'Men With Gold Chains').

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @TWS

    , @Ed
    @Colin Wright

    Wow that’s some stark stagnation. Wonder how much is due to out migration?

    Also would be interested in seeing New Jersey white non-Hispanic trend. In the 1970 census it was like 85% white. In 2020 good chance it’ll be below 50%.

    Replies: @anon

  15. California needs to be run by the British East India Company for a few decades, that’s all.

    • LOL: jim jones
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Redneck farmer

    Black Hole of California.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Hole_of_Calcutta

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/The_Black_hole%27_june_20_1756.jpg

  16. I was born and raised on the east coast of the US and am part of the generation that viewed California as an American utopia. Back in the day, it was accepted that California represented the future of America.

    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

    Steve, I’m really jealous of you. Living in California in the era you did was living in one of the best places in the history of human civilization.

    • Agree: Charon
    • Replies: @san joaquin sam
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

     

    Hey pal, we're solidly 2nd World.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Indeed, NJ, it was one place you figured you could always go to and leave it all behind and start anew.... They called it Paradise. I don't know why .. you call some place paradise and kiss it goodbye...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYgJBmqEKNw

    , @Hail
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    California is fast becoming a 3rd world country
     
    which ex-SPLC'ler and Southern California native Heidi Beirich celebrates (filed under, "Immigration as Punishment"):

    Heidi Beirich: There was very strong white nationalist and anti-government activism in the whole region [Southern California] [i.e., when she was growing up in the 1970s and 1980s].

    Orange County’s the next county to the north in California [above San Diego County, where she graduated high school]. That’s where the John Birch Society had a huge foothold in the Sixties and the Seventies.

    So, the whole region — which is so different today, right [rolls eyes on the word ‘so’] — It’s multi-ethnic, right, it’s not the same!

    Interviewer: Right.

    Heidi Beirich: The whole region had some very extremist politics infecting it. In fact, (laughs), my high school history teacher was like somebody out of Dr. Strangelove. He was a rabid anti-communist. Didn’t think Reagan was radical enough. So there was a lot of this going on in the area.
     

  17. @Just Saying
    Thankfully I don't live in the city anymore. But anyone who has knows that cities with tall buildings don't tend to be known for affordable housing.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Probably because tall buildings are not built to stash more people into restricted space in order to keep cost down, but appear once prices for an appartment or office are high enough so it starts to make economic sense to build upwards.

    That or there is an economic bubble going and someone has so much cash that it can be splurged on vainglorious verticality.

  18. That’s right. It starts with an earthquake, birds and snakes and airplanes.
    Lenny Bruce is not afraid.
    Eye of a hurricane, listen to yourself churn,
    mumble, mumble something else … right? Right!

    It’s the end of the world California, as we know it,
    and I feel fine …

    Want more Calamity Rock? Fine.:

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    @Achmed E. Newman

    More interesting R.E.M. end of the world lyrics:

    Team by team reporters baffled. Trump tethered, cropped,
    Look at that low plane! Fine... then,
    Uh oh! Overflow population, common group,
    But it'll do. Save yourself. Serve yourself.

    , @Ozymandias
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's going to be pretty hard to top this little ditty about the future of L.A.:

    http://www.bing.com/search?q=tool+learn+to+swim+lyrics

    Replies: @Polynikes

  19. California needs to be more like India?

    I could go for that. Like burning coal to generate affordable electricity for the masses.

  20. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I was born and raised on the east coast of the US and am part of the generation that viewed California as an American utopia. Back in the day, it was accepted that California represented the future of America.

    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

    Steve, I’m really jealous of you. Living in California in the era you did was living in one of the best places in the history of human civilization.

    Replies: @san joaquin sam, @Achmed E. Newman, @Hail

    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

    Hey pal, we’re solidly 2nd World.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @san joaquin sam


    Hey pal, we’re solidly 2nd World.
     
    2nd World doesn't shut off electricity like California has. You are 3rd world, and declining.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @san joaquin sam

    The old-timey 2nd world was the Communist world. Come to think of it, yeah, you're right.

  21. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I was born and raised on the east coast of the US and am part of the generation that viewed California as an American utopia. Back in the day, it was accepted that California represented the future of America.

    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

    Steve, I’m really jealous of you. Living in California in the era you did was living in one of the best places in the history of human civilization.

    Replies: @san joaquin sam, @Achmed E. Newman, @Hail

    Indeed, NJ, it was one place you figured you could always go to and leave it all behind and start anew…. They called it Paradise. I don’t know why .. you call some place paradise and kiss it goodbye…

  22. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I was born and raised on the east coast of the US and am part of the generation that viewed California as an American utopia. Back in the day, it was accepted that California represented the future of America.

    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

    Steve, I’m really jealous of you. Living in California in the era you did was living in one of the best places in the history of human civilization.

    Replies: @san joaquin sam, @Achmed E. Newman, @Hail

    California is fast becoming a 3rd world country

    which ex-SPLC’ler and Southern California native Heidi Beirich celebrates (filed under, “Immigration as Punishment”):

    [MORE]

    Heidi Beirich: There was very strong white nationalist and anti-government activism in the whole region [Southern California] [i.e., when she was growing up in the 1970s and 1980s].

    Orange County’s the next county to the north in California [above San Diego County, where she graduated high school]. That’s where the John Birch Society had a huge foothold in the Sixties and the Seventies.

    So, the whole region — which is so different today, right [rolls eyes on the word ‘so’] — It’s multi-ethnic, right, it’s not the same!

    Interviewer: Right.

    Heidi Beirich: The whole region had some very extremist politics infecting it. In fact, (laughs), my high school history teacher was like somebody out of Dr. Strangelove. He was a rabid anti-communist. Didn’t think Reagan was radical enough. So there was a lot of this going on in the area.

  23. @Hail


    Their family left South Africa when Manjoo was eight years old [1986 or 1987] and they were raised in Southern California.
     
    They were fleeing apartheid!
     
    What kind of visa did they get into the USA on?

    Replies: @Lurker, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Yet apartheid ended less then 10 years later, they should have been able to return to SA easily enough in that time frame. But they failed to do so. For some reason.

  24. We’re running out of electricity! The electricity mines are exhausted! And we’re running out of water! And we can’t desalinate water because that takes too much electric power, and we’ve used up all our electricity! We’ll have to live in mud huts and burn candles! Capitalism is a failure!

    • LOL: Hail
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Icy Blast

    Russia can provide!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_zsIL4hMqM

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Tipsy, @nebulafox

    , @The Alarmist
    @Icy Blast


    We’re running out of electricity! The electricity mines are exhausted! ... We’ll have to live in mud huts and burn candles! Capitalism is a failure!
     
    No worries, you can sleep in your electric vehicles.

    Replies: @danand

  25. @El Dato

    If we redesigned our cities for the modern world
     
    The world that's pretty full, has resources that are either spare or polluted, scant area for more cityscape and has no money for public services? No to mention hindered by the lousy fact that a city of N miles² needs to be fed through an interface of length proportional to sqrt(N).

    they’d be taller and less stretched out into the fire-prone far reaches
     
    You will still need to support that "modern world city" with an extended land area unless you drop a lot of amenities.

    We really need buildings that grow themselves (by mining coal layers for carbon to get both fuel and building materials maybe?). Magic Tech. We need it! That's generally a bad sign.

    From William Gibson's SciFi novel "Idoru". It's so old that they still have hotel telephones.


    11. Collapse of New Buildings [should probably be "Einstürzende Neubauten"]

    Laney's room was high up in a narrow tower faced with white ceramic tile. It was trapezoidal in cross section and dated from the eighties boomtown, the years of the Bubble. That it had survived the great earthquake was testimony to the skill of its engineers; that it had survived the subsequent reconstruction testified to an arcane tangle of ownership and an ongoing struggle between two of the city's oldest criminal organizations. Yamazaki had explained this in the cab, returning from New Golden Street.

    “We were uncertain how you might feel about new buildings,” he'd said.

    “You mean the nanotech buildings?” Laney had been struggling to keep his eyes open. The driver wore spotless white gloves.

    “Yes. Some people find them disturbing.”

    “I don't know. I'd have to see one.”

    “You can see them from your hotel, I think.”

    And he could. He knew their sheer brutality of scale from constructs, but virtuality had failed to convey the peculiarity of their apparent texture, a streamlined organicism. “They are like Giger's paintings of New York,” Yamazaki had said, but the reference had been lost on Laney.

    Now he sat on the edge of his bed, staring blankly out at these miracles of the new technology, as banal and as sinister as such miracles usually were, and they were only annoying: the world's largest inhabited structures. (The Chernobyl containment structure was larger, but nothing human would ever live there.)

    The umbrella Yamazaki had given him was collapsing into itself, shrinking. Going away.

    The phone began to ring. He couldn't find it.

    “Telephone,” he said. “Where is it?”
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @BenKenobi

    They still have hotel phones, El Data. Nobody uses them except for calling to see when breakfast ends, because they used to positively ream people in the ass with charges, even for local calls. Remember that?

  26. @Hail


    Their family left South Africa when Manjoo was eight years old [1986 or 1987] and they were raised in Southern California.
     
    They were fleeing apartheid!
     
    What kind of visa did they get into the USA on?

    Replies: @Lurker, @The Wild Geese Howard

    What kind of visa did they get into the USA on?

    No idea, but Zman did a podcast about the alphabet soup of US visas that are available…and it turned out to be no joke…this country literally has a visa type for nearly every letter of the English alphabet.

  27. California is already a third world country. It’s a corrupt one-party state with a nonfunctioning government that exists only to metaphorically wall off the very well-off haves from the destitute have-nots. They can’t deliver basic services like water and electricity anymore. Poverty and homelessness are spiraling out of control. The cities have lots of beautiful architecture but are surrounded by squalor. Really, what separates California from Mexico these days, outside of out-of-control gang activ… oh wait.

    Surely all of these problems have nothing to do with the addition of 15 million immigrants, overwhelmingly from third world countries with corrupt one-party governments and tons of squalor and nonfunctioning infrastructures.

    The thing that gets me, though, is the way Californians still act like it is 1958 and the place is still the envy of the world. It’s kind of funny, kind of sad.

    • Agree: Charon
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Mycale

    They haven't ruined the weather yet, though if there's a way they'll probably find it.

    , @Pericles
    @Mycale


    They can’t deliver basic services like water and electricity anymore. Poverty and homelessness are spiraling out of control.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bhy3zI3wvAo

    Next step: white favelas.
  28. “My love for this place and its people runs deep and true…” Now be like New York or New Delhi!

  29. Searching for the famous string “immigra-” in this article.

    i – 506
    im – 18 = there’s hope
    immi – 1 – uh oh – my cursor jumped to swimming pool.
    immig – 0 Bzzzt, you lose. please try again next time.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  30. @Hail

    I’m starting to suspect we’re over. It’s the end of California as we know it.
     

    The founding idea of this place is infinitude — mile after endless mile of cute houses [..] the myth of endless space
     

    One by one, those myths are bursting into flame. We are running out of land, housing, water, road space
     
    And yet, amazingly, the number of Whites in California is the same as it was about 1966, give or take (this per US census figures).

    Whites started leaving the state, on net, in the (early?) 1990s. The Farhads and the Manjoos kept moving in.

    (They tried to stop it, but were overruled by judges with names like Pfaelzer who found that white racial interests were unconstitutional, and favoring citizens over illegal foreigners was also unconstitutional and illegal, in addition to being highly immoral.)


    The less-told story is that it’s not just that it’s more crowded.

    Something else is going on: California has lost Whites steadily, on par with population losses in much of the so-called Rust Belt.

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)
     

    Census 2020 is supposed to be pegged to April 2020, which is now under six months away, with results to be released, I think, in Q1 and Q2 2021.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @adreadline, @Moses

    Whites started leaving the state, on net, in the (early?) 1990s. The Farhads and the Manjoos kept moving in.

    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million

    The long legacy of the 1992 Los Angeles riots? Although for whatever reason it doesn’t seem to drive out the Asians (save for the Koreans, I guess), does it?

    • Replies: @Hail
    @adreadline

    Some point to the end of the Cold War as an immediate, structural economic cause, as it caused the loss of SoCal defense jobs in the early 1990s (which was the plot behind early-1990s rage movie Falling Down). Anyway, that would not necessarily explain continuing white losses, year after year, until the present.

    I'm thinking cultural pessimism was a strong factor -- the loss of control by the former conservative white majority (which elected Nixon, Reagan) to an ascendant Coalition of the Fringes, which itself is now a supermajority in California. (Hence Ann Coulter's warnings about the same happening in other states, after which "the country's over.")

    Where the April 1992 riots specifically fit in is, IMO, as a symbol of that ongoing loss of cultural control. So: symptom, not cause.

    The Third Worlders took over, but a sneeringly hostile political class is largely to blame for abetting it. A famous instance (LA Times headline, Nov. 19, 1997):


    Prop. 187 Found Unconstitutional by Federal Judge

    A federal judge [Mariana Pfaelzer] in Los Angeles ruled Friday that Proposition 187, the divisive 1994 ballot initiative targeting illegal immigrants, violates...the Constitution
     

    Replies: @bomag, @Alden

  31. “Quick, send in the Pajeets,
    Don’t bother, they’re here…”

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @White Guy In Japan

    I saw what you did!

  32. @Colin Wright
    @Hail

    '... White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)...'


    Worse, just how many of those people are actual Californians?

    People from New Jersey or Ohio are just light-skinned Guatemalans as far as I'm concerned.

    Replies: @Hail, @Ed

    how many of those people are actual Californians?

    People from New Jersey or Ohio

    What about recent foreign-origin persons who get counted as Whites?

    I am thinking of the iSteve anthropological category of “Gold-Chain Americans” (See ‘Men With Gold Chains‘).

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Hail

    'What about recent foreign-origin persons who get counted as Whites?'

    Them too.

    , @TWS
    @Hail

    Gold chain Americans sound just peachy. Ten year old me imagines pirates dripping with the barbaric splendor of a Harold Lamb story or Robert E. Howard. I see fat greasy men with too much exposed flesh and weird body odor you smell across the street. I wish it was murderous pirates with sunglasses and muskets and names like Teach, Kidd, and Lafayette. We'd be better off.

  33. @newrouter
    >we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices. <

    How's CA's high speed rail doing Mr. Manboob?

    Replies: @Jack D

    What he was saying was ALMOST plausible, until he got to LOW PRICES. Sorry Mr. Rug Merchant, you are just lying now. The government doesn’t know how to do ANYTHING for low prices and ESPECIALLY not how to move around a lot of people using mass transit. At least be honest and say, “we’re going to need lots and lots of taxes to pay for this new mass transit, which can never be made to pay from the fare box (if we can even get the vibrant masses to pay their fares).”

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Jack D


    What he was saying was ALMOST plausible, until he got to LOW PRICES...
     
    Also, he lists a bunch of problems and then acts as if they can be solved by cramming people closer together; seemingly unaware that more people are on their way to swamp whatever relief that brings.
  34. There will be ethnic cleansing. And it will be ugly. It fills me with dread.

  35. @Charlesz Martel
    Here's a thought- why not stop bringing in immigrants, and start deporting them? If the root cause of California's problems are too many people and not enough housing, and housing is too spread out, let's just choose the cheaper option- it's a whole lot cheaper to deport a family rather than build a home for them. Also less auto congestion. Less demand for services. Less demand for colleges. Less CO2. Less everything! Plus, as an added bonus, less labor means wages go up! Less income inequality!

    Why, it's a win-win all around!! These ex-immigrants can go back to their wonderful homelands, and having learned our ways of doing things, copy them and fix their own countries! Then we can simply trade with them! We get the products, they get the pollution and the social problems these POC's create!! Everybody is happy!

    No autographs, please. I leave this brilliant solution here for all the world to see and implement.

    I have another solution, but it involves a civil war with nuclear weapons, and I'm afraid the California snail darter and the spotted owl might be harmed.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Pericles

    Why, it’s a win-win all around!!

    It is not a win for the boot-stamping-on-your-face-forever crew. Otherwise, it would have already been accepted as the rational path forward (as you have inconveniently demonstrated). Common sense does not work when reasoning with religious zealots.

  36. @Achmed E. Newman
    That's right. It starts with an earthquake, birds and snakes and airplanes.
    Lenny Bruce is not afraid.
    Eye of a hurricane, listen to yourself churn,
    mumble, mumble something else ... right? Right!

    It's the end of the world California, as we know it,
    and I feel fine ...


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0GFRcFm-aY

    Want more Calamity Rock? Fine.:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcGSEbfegrs

    Replies: @Another Canadian, @Ozymandias

    More interesting R.E.M. end of the world lyrics:

    Team by team reporters baffled. Trump tethered, cropped,
    Look at that low plane! Fine… then,
    Uh oh! Overflow population, common group,
    But it’ll do. Save yourself. Serve yourself.

  37. @san joaquin sam
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

     

    Hey pal, we're solidly 2nd World.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    Hey pal, we’re solidly 2nd World.

    2nd World doesn’t shut off electricity like California has. You are 3rd world, and declining.

  38. These new plans for cities are sounding a lot like Asian cities. Look up pictures of Asian metropolises, most I’ve seen look sooo lovely and human scaled.

  39. @Achmed E. Newman
    That's right. It starts with an earthquake, birds and snakes and airplanes.
    Lenny Bruce is not afraid.
    Eye of a hurricane, listen to yourself churn,
    mumble, mumble something else ... right? Right!

    It's the end of the world California, as we know it,
    and I feel fine ...


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0GFRcFm-aY

    Want more Calamity Rock? Fine.:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcGSEbfegrs

    Replies: @Another Canadian, @Ozymandias

    It’s going to be pretty hard to top this little ditty about the future of L.A.:

    http://www.bing.com/search?q=tool+learn+to+swim+lyrics

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Ozymandias

    Betting on a “cleansing” earthquake seems like the ultimate hail may approach. Song was written in the nineties. Wonder if MJK would have three balls to add immigration to the list these days? Doubt it...

  40. @san joaquin sam
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Now that California is fast becoming a 3rd world country, I worry that California might still be a leading indicator for where the rest of the US is headed.

     

    Hey pal, we're solidly 2nd World.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Achmed E. Newman

    The old-timey 2nd world was the Communist world. Come to think of it, yeah, you’re right.

    • Agree: Charon
  41. “ Manjoo prefers to be referred to with singular they pronouns … they were raised in Southern California.“

    So retarded that he fails to follow his own rule one sentence after announcing it. If “they” is singular then “they was raised” not “they were raised.”

    Also, dense India:

    Not dense enough LA:

    Century City in foreground, downtown a few miles away in background.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Lot

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/48/Mumbai_Skyline1.jpg

    Mumbai skyline.

    This is not true anymore. Skyscraper technology is 130 years old. 3rd world cities, even in Africa, are full of skyscrapers. They are not uniquely American anymore at all. India is the world's #2 steel producer and the US is #4. The world has changed and it's not USA #1 anymore in much of anything.

    Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.), @Amerimutt Golems

    , @Neil Templeton
    @Lot

    That first pic has a yard almost as nice as Steve's!

  42. Meh. They is a nut job with an opinion – but who isn’t. Feels like reaching tho to pull this up as an example of a trend. I don’t think, narrative or not, too many people are actually advocating California turn into Singapore.

  43. @Colin Wright
    @Hail

    '... White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)...'


    Worse, just how many of those people are actual Californians?

    People from New Jersey or Ohio are just light-skinned Guatemalans as far as I'm concerned.

    Replies: @Hail, @Ed

    Wow that’s some stark stagnation. Wonder how much is due to out migration?

    Also would be interested in seeing New Jersey white non-Hispanic trend. In the 1970 census it was like 85% white. In 2020 good chance it’ll be below 50%.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Ed

    Median Age of Wypipo in the various Censuseses might also be an eye opener

  44. @adreadline
    @Hail


    Whites started leaving the state, on net, in the (early?) 1990s. The Farhads and the Manjoos kept moving in.
     

    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
     
    The long legacy of the 1992 Los Angeles riots? Although for whatever reason it doesn't seem to drive out the Asians (save for the Koreans, I guess), does it?

    Replies: @Hail

    Some point to the end of the Cold War as an immediate, structural economic cause, as it caused the loss of SoCal defense jobs in the early 1990s (which was the plot behind early-1990s rage movie Falling Down). Anyway, that would not necessarily explain continuing white losses, year after year, until the present.

    I’m thinking cultural pessimism was a strong factor — the loss of control by the former conservative white majority (which elected Nixon, Reagan) to an ascendant Coalition of the Fringes, which itself is now a supermajority in California. (Hence Ann Coulter’s warnings about the same happening in other states, after which “the country’s over.”)

    Where the April 1992 riots specifically fit in is, IMO, as a symbol of that ongoing loss of cultural control. So: symptom, not cause.

    The Third Worlders took over, but a sneeringly hostile political class is largely to blame for abetting it. A famous instance (LA Times headline, Nov. 19, 1997):

    Prop. 187 Found Unconstitutional by Federal Judge

    A federal judge [Mariana Pfaelzer] in Los Angeles ruled Friday that Proposition 187, the divisive 1994 ballot initiative targeting illegal immigrants, violates…the Constitution

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Hail


    I’m thinking cultural pessimism was a strong factor — the loss of control by the former conservative white majority (which elected Nixon, Reagan) to an ascendant Coalition of the Fringes, which itself is now a supermajority in California. (Hence Ann Coulter’s warnings about the same happening in other states, after which “the country’s over.”)
     
    I'm wondering about the particular dynamics. Whites famously decamped for nearby states after selling their property for a relatively large amount, then promptly started agitating for the same liberal policies that sank Cali. What happened to conservative Californians?

    Who bought the property? Wealthy foreigners? Tech moguls? FOB Chinese living fifteen to a house?

    Replies: @Nico

    , @Alden
    @Hail

    After the 1992 riots TPTB decided anything is better for Los Angeles than continued black rule. Hence replacement by anything else.yay 😋yay 😀 yay yay 😁 yay

  45. I can’t be the only one to note that ‘they’ is not singular. He makes a living writing. In English. Crazy years. We blew right past clown world into the crazy years.

  46. What I am curious about and have been unable to find with some google searches:

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs? I was under the impression that all the subsidized personal solar panels were connected to the state power grid and if the grid is turned off the solar power is disconnected and won’t do the panel owner one lick of good.

    Does anybody know? When there are a million customers with no (PG&E) power is there a huge fraction that do not really care?

    • Replies: @Roger
    @Morton's toes

    You can get solar panels with batteries, and then you can live off the grid with no dependence on the electric company. But most Californians do not do that, as it is an extra $10k or so. The solar panels are only productive when connected to a working electrical grid.

    Replies: @res, @Jack D

    , @anon
    @Morton's toes

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs?

    None. The typical deal requires the photovoltaics to feed into the grid, the customer receives a smaller electric bill from the utility.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @res
    @Morton's toes


    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs? I was under the impression that all the subsidized personal solar panels were connected to the state power grid and if the grid is turned off the solar power is disconnected and won’t do the panel owner one lick of good.
     
    I am aware of two approaches for using solar as a backup in power outages.

    1. Battery backup
    2. Backup outlet that is separate from the house wiring and only works while the sun is shining. For example: https://www.smainverted.com/how-to-explain-secure-power-supply-to-homeowners/

    I have been unable to find any statistics for what has actually been installed. If anyone has data, please post.

    When there are a million customers with no (PG&E) power is there a huge fraction that do not really care?
     
    I would say no. A lot of people are pissed off. Whether that results in anything constructive remains to be seen.
  47. Who is this “we” they keeps referring to?

    • Replies: @Alan Mercer
    @MBlanc46

    It's the "I" of the nonbinary nutcase.

  48. @Hail
    @Colin Wright


    how many of those people are actual Californians?
     

    People from New Jersey or Ohio
     
    What about recent foreign-origin persons who get counted as Whites?

    I am thinking of the iSteve anthropological category of "Gold-Chain Americans" (See 'Men With Gold Chains').

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @TWS

    ‘What about recent foreign-origin persons who get counted as Whites?’

    Them too.

  49. @Hail
    @Colin Wright


    how many of those people are actual Californians?
     

    People from New Jersey or Ohio
     
    What about recent foreign-origin persons who get counted as Whites?

    I am thinking of the iSteve anthropological category of "Gold-Chain Americans" (See 'Men With Gold Chains').

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @TWS

    Gold chain Americans sound just peachy. Ten year old me imagines pirates dripping with the barbaric splendor of a Harold Lamb story or Robert E. Howard. I see fat greasy men with too much exposed flesh and weird body odor you smell across the street. I wish it was murderous pirates with sunglasses and muskets and names like Teach, Kidd, and Lafayette. We’d be better off.

  50. My cousin in San Marino informs me that yes the homeless have indeed spread up Huntington Blvd from LA and on occasion sleep, cry or puke on her lawn. San Marino.

    Time to move.

    • Replies: @Alan Mercer
    @Carol

    Move out now, but keep an eye out for the buying opportunity.

    It's the same old shell game (Chicago, NYC, San Diego south of the 8): move human refuse into prime real estate, chase out former residents, depress property values, urban blight ensues, buy slum property at pennies on the dollar, cause gentrification through policy (e.g. dispersive rental vouchers), renovate the building, sell/rent to whites, receive profit. You just have to watch for the cues to buy when they do.

  51. @Colin Wright
    It's bad enough people like this asshole have replaced me and mine -- but must they claim to be 'Californians'?

    Gee, Manjoo...let's hear your Californian accent. Apparently, I had one when I was younger.

    Replies: @TWS

    My family left the res for California in the twenties. They settled in Alaska. I’m back living a stone’s throw from where my great grandparents back to the mammoths were born. We dodged a bullet when great grandad passed on The Golden State.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @TWS

    Hang in there, TWS, we're going to bring the mammoth back! Better eating, more fat than moose. Much better than river-run salmon.

  52. @War for Blair Mountain
    Who wants to import the Democratic Party Voting Bloc...LEGALLY OF COURSE....from India?

    Answer:Donald Trump and Stephen Miller....

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Trump: Definitely!

    Miller: Not So Sure?

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    @Dan Hayes

    Miller for sure....It’s called the Policy Wolicy Points Based Immigration System.....Asians get to vote Whitey into a White Racial Foreigner-White Racial Minority within the borders of America....And deskill Whitey in the process by driving them out of STEM Labor Markets.....This is called WHITE GENOCIDE...but since it’s done legally and in accordance with our Constitution...So I guess it’s alright.....

  53. @Dan Hayes
    @War for Blair Mountain

    Trump: Definitely!

    Miller: Not So Sure?

    Replies: @War for Blair Mountain

    Miller for sure….It’s called the Policy Wolicy Points Based Immigration System…..Asians get to vote Whitey into a White Racial Foreigner-White Racial Minority within the borders of America….And deskill Whitey in the process by driving them out of STEM Labor Markets…..This is called WHITE GENOCIDE…but since it’s done legally and in accordance with our Constitution…So I guess it’s alright…..

  54. @Lot
    “ Manjoo prefers to be referred to with singular they pronouns ... they were raised in Southern California.“

    So retarded that he fails to follow his own rule one sentence after announcing it. If “they” is singular then “they was raised” not “they were raised.”

    Also, dense India:

    http://localcode.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Jristian-Bertel-Mumbi-photograph.jpg

    Not dense enough LA:

    https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8189/8378970129_1a110a40c1_k.jpg

    Century City in foreground, downtown a few miles away in background.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Neil Templeton

    Mumbai skyline.

    This is not true anymore. Skyscraper technology is 130 years old. 3rd world cities, even in Africa, are full of skyscrapers. They are not uniquely American anymore at all. India is the world’s #2 steel producer and the US is #4. The world has changed and it’s not USA #1 anymore in much of anything.

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
    @Jack D

    Perhaps you should run a YouTube channel for perspective immigrants detailing how horrible America is. If there is even a miniscule decline in immigration -- say 20% -- over the course of a year I would donate heavily afterwards...but you have to produce results. Sadly, and honestly, for all the Indian and Chinese b#llsh$t those countries suck so bad -- a reflection of their cultures -- they keep on coming here. It's sad really.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @bomag

    , @Amerimutt Golems
    @Jack D

    This is not true anymore. Skyscraper technology is 130 years old. 3rd world cities, even in Africa, are full of skyscrapers. They are not uniquely American anymore at all. India is the world’s #2 steel producer and the US is #4. The world has changed and it’s not USA #1 anymore in much of anything.

     

    Copying other people's technologies is also easy but the challenge is cognitive abilities needed for maintenance.

    First Nuclear Reactor in Africa Now Sits Unused Near Kinshasa (subscription)
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB864940999688145000

    Congo Reactor Should Be Dismantled, Report Says
    https://www.nti.org/gsn/article/congo-reactor-should-be-dismantled-report-says/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ny6Lzjm6fW8

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7V7RSltDAY

    Indian steel producers use slave labor like China. In fact El Trumpo's trade war might lead to China dumping excess capacity on India.

  55. I’ve noticed that Indians in the media are just as unhinged as their Jewish colleagues when it comes to immigration and race.

  56. @War for Blair Mountain
    India needs to import millions of Chinese LEGAL IMMIGRANTS.....

    Replies: @Change that Matters

    Include tens of millions from Pakistan and Bangladesh and you have my vote.

  57. @El Dato

    If we redesigned our cities for the modern world
     
    The world that's pretty full, has resources that are either spare or polluted, scant area for more cityscape and has no money for public services? No to mention hindered by the lousy fact that a city of N miles² needs to be fed through an interface of length proportional to sqrt(N).

    they’d be taller and less stretched out into the fire-prone far reaches
     
    You will still need to support that "modern world city" with an extended land area unless you drop a lot of amenities.

    We really need buildings that grow themselves (by mining coal layers for carbon to get both fuel and building materials maybe?). Magic Tech. We need it! That's generally a bad sign.

    From William Gibson's SciFi novel "Idoru". It's so old that they still have hotel telephones.


    11. Collapse of New Buildings [should probably be "Einstürzende Neubauten"]

    Laney's room was high up in a narrow tower faced with white ceramic tile. It was trapezoidal in cross section and dated from the eighties boomtown, the years of the Bubble. That it had survived the great earthquake was testimony to the skill of its engineers; that it had survived the subsequent reconstruction testified to an arcane tangle of ownership and an ongoing struggle between two of the city's oldest criminal organizations. Yamazaki had explained this in the cab, returning from New Golden Street.

    “We were uncertain how you might feel about new buildings,” he'd said.

    “You mean the nanotech buildings?” Laney had been struggling to keep his eyes open. The driver wore spotless white gloves.

    “Yes. Some people find them disturbing.”

    “I don't know. I'd have to see one.”

    “You can see them from your hotel, I think.”

    And he could. He knew their sheer brutality of scale from constructs, but virtuality had failed to convey the peculiarity of their apparent texture, a streamlined organicism. “They are like Giger's paintings of New York,” Yamazaki had said, but the reference had been lost on Laney.

    Now he sat on the edge of his bed, staring blankly out at these miracles of the new technology, as banal and as sinister as such miracles usually were, and they were only annoying: the world's largest inhabited structures. (The Chernobyl containment structure was larger, but nothing human would ever live there.)

    The umbrella Yamazaki had given him was collapsing into itself, shrinking. Going away.

    The phone began to ring. He couldn't find it.

    “Telephone,” he said. “Where is it?”
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @BenKenobi

    unless you drop a lot of amenities

    Good news, bigot! The plan is for you to live in a pod in one-fourth of a converted shipping container and eat bugs. Unless you want 2 billion negros to die, and you wouldn’t want that, would you? It would be a shame if that last part went in bold red letters at the top of your Linkedin, wouldn’t it?

    PS: Microaggressions are now felonies and all POC have the Judge Dredd power to convict and sentence on the spot.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @BenKenobi

    This is it. Manjoo et al are happy to show up with a bulldozer and politely explain that, for service to the greater good, you now have a place in pod world while he and his will dispose of your stuff and backfill it with the proper things.

    , @Nico
    @BenKenobi


    Unless you want 2 billion negros to die, and you wouldn’t want that, would you?
     
    It would be interesting if we could figure out the evolution in the number of people - whites, sure, but also Asian, Middle-Eastern and mestizo - who secretly fantasize about a black genocide* from time to time, since the continuous hissy fit of “Black Lives Matter” erupted back in 2012. Of course, then it wouldn’t be a secret, but that in itself would be a good thing if it gave the Mondays impetus to relearn their place. (It probably wouldn’t, though.)

    *Brahmins seem to have this sentiment about the majority of their countrymen as well, though they are a bit less subtle. Of course, when they move to America and their melanin becomes a moral status symbol they usually turn their attentions to colonizing the Land of the Free.
  58. @Morton's toes
    What I am curious about and have been unable to find with some google searches:

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs? I was under the impression that all the subsidized personal solar panels were connected to the state power grid and if the grid is turned off the solar power is disconnected and won't do the panel owner one lick of good.

    Does anybody know? When there are a million customers with no (PG&E) power is there a huge fraction that do not really care?

    Replies: @Roger, @anon, @res

    You can get solar panels with batteries, and then you can live off the grid with no dependence on the electric company. But most Californians do not do that, as it is an extra $10k or so. The solar panels are only productive when connected to a working electrical grid.

    • Replies: @res
    @Roger

    It is worth noting that even if you have battery backup it is unlikely it will be able to supply power for everything in the house at once. Typically the minimum size for home electric service is 100A:
    https://groverelectric.com/assets/downloads/howto/03_How%20to%20Determine%20Sizes%20for%20a%20Home%20Electrical%20Service.pdf

    And even that minimum is over 20kW. A typical home inverter puts out 5kW:
    https://news.energysage.com/what-size-solar-inverter-do-i-need/

    The typical solution is a subpanel serving important loads. Here is an example. Note that is important to distinguish output watts from battery capacity (4kW and 11kW respectively in this case):
    https://www.bluepacificsolar.com/home-solar/home-battery-backup.html

    , @Jack D
    @Roger

    For around $1,000 you could get a generator that would allow you to run every load in your house for the (hopefully rare) occasions when the grid is down.

  59. @Lot
    “ Manjoo prefers to be referred to with singular they pronouns ... they were raised in Southern California.“

    So retarded that he fails to follow his own rule one sentence after announcing it. If “they” is singular then “they was raised” not “they were raised.”

    Also, dense India:

    http://localcode.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Jristian-Bertel-Mumbi-photograph.jpg

    Not dense enough LA:

    https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8189/8378970129_1a110a40c1_k.jpg

    Century City in foreground, downtown a few miles away in background.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Neil Templeton

    That first pic has a yard almost as nice as Steve’s!

  60. O/T

    Ski Bums rotting on the slopes

    Ski resorts face worker shortage
    Labor market has industry worried as season nears

    New Hampshire’s Wildcat is offering a $1,000 bonus for new snowmakers to come on board, and Sunday River in Maine last year increased its hourly wage from $13 to $20 for that job. Utah’s Snowbird is expanding its pool van service to get employees to the mountain, and Sugarbush in Vermont, which has among the lowest unemployment rates in the country, is hiring more foreign college students.

    https://www.journalgazette.net/news/us/20191027/ski-resorts-face-worker-shortage

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @216

    Oh man, sign me up for this!

  61. Farhad Theyjoo in NYT: California Needs to be More Like Mumbai

    Well, they’re getting the street-shitting part down allright.

  62. @TWS
    @Colin Wright

    My family left the res for California in the twenties. They settled in Alaska. I'm back living a stone's throw from where my great grandparents back to the mammoths were born. We dodged a bullet when great grandad passed on The Golden State.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    Hang in there, TWS, we’re going to bring the mammoth back! Better eating, more fat than moose. Much better than river-run salmon.

  63. @Morton's toes
    What I am curious about and have been unable to find with some google searches:

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs? I was under the impression that all the subsidized personal solar panels were connected to the state power grid and if the grid is turned off the solar power is disconnected and won't do the panel owner one lick of good.

    Does anybody know? When there are a million customers with no (PG&E) power is there a huge fraction that do not really care?

    Replies: @Roger, @anon, @res

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs?

    None. The typical deal requires the photovoltaics to feed into the grid, the customer receives a smaller electric bill from the utility.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @anon

    Interesting. So home solar panels are a bit like the backyard steel mills of China's "Great Leap Forward".

  64. @Jack D
    @Lot

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/48/Mumbai_Skyline1.jpg

    Mumbai skyline.

    This is not true anymore. Skyscraper technology is 130 years old. 3rd world cities, even in Africa, are full of skyscrapers. They are not uniquely American anymore at all. India is the world's #2 steel producer and the US is #4. The world has changed and it's not USA #1 anymore in much of anything.

    Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.), @Amerimutt Golems

    Perhaps you should run a YouTube channel for perspective immigrants detailing how horrible America is. If there is even a miniscule decline in immigration — say 20% — over the course of a year I would donate heavily afterwards…but you have to produce results. Sadly, and honestly, for all the Indian and Chinese b#llsh$t those countries suck so bad — a reflection of their cultures — they keep on coming here. It’s sad really.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    Exactly. Because the one thing that the USA is still undisputed champion at is acting as a magnet for the wretched refuse of the third world. Until eventually we have slid all the way down ourselves. #2 is Russia btw.

    , @bomag
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    Personally, I've never met an immigrant who didn't indicate the home country was better than 'merica.

    They're pretty much here to expand the brand.

  65. California Needs to be More Like Mumbai

    Is that where Mumblypegs live?

    the wildland-urban interface.

    Uh, in America, and even more so in South Africa, the urban is the wildland.

  66. @Hail

    I’m starting to suspect we’re over. It’s the end of California as we know it.
     

    The founding idea of this place is infinitude — mile after endless mile of cute houses [..] the myth of endless space
     

    One by one, those myths are bursting into flame. We are running out of land, housing, water, road space
     
    And yet, amazingly, the number of Whites in California is the same as it was about 1966, give or take (this per US census figures).

    Whites started leaving the state, on net, in the (early?) 1990s. The Farhads and the Manjoos kept moving in.

    (They tried to stop it, but were overruled by judges with names like Pfaelzer who found that white racial interests were unconstitutional, and favoring citizens over illegal foreigners was also unconstitutional and illegal, in addition to being highly immoral.)


    The less-told story is that it’s not just that it’s more crowded.

    Something else is going on: California has lost Whites steadily, on par with population losses in much of the so-called Rust Belt.

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2017 govt estimate: 14.6 million
    – 2020 census: As low as 14.2 million? As high as 14.5 million? (wait and see)
     

    Census 2020 is supposed to be pegged to April 2020, which is now under six months away, with results to be released, I think, in Q1 and Q2 2021.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @adreadline, @Moses

    It’s really not hard to understand.

    CA has fewer Whites than in 1990. The crowding has come from mass non-White immigration like Mr. Fargoo.

    As CA population begins to resemble third world, CA living conditions and infrastructure begin to resemble third world.

    No more difficult to understand than 1+1=2.

  67. @Ed
    @Colin Wright

    Wow that’s some stark stagnation. Wonder how much is due to out migration?

    Also would be interested in seeing New Jersey white non-Hispanic trend. In the 1970 census it was like 85% white. In 2020 good chance it’ll be below 50%.

    Replies: @anon

    Median Age of Wypipo in the various Censuseses might also be an eye opener

  68. @Mycale
    California is already a third world country. It's a corrupt one-party state with a nonfunctioning government that exists only to metaphorically wall off the very well-off haves from the destitute have-nots. They can't deliver basic services like water and electricity anymore. Poverty and homelessness are spiraling out of control. The cities have lots of beautiful architecture but are surrounded by squalor. Really, what separates California from Mexico these days, outside of out-of-control gang activ... oh wait.

    Surely all of these problems have nothing to do with the addition of 15 million immigrants, overwhelmingly from third world countries with corrupt one-party governments and tons of squalor and nonfunctioning infrastructures.

    The thing that gets me, though, is the way Californians still act like it is 1958 and the place is still the envy of the world. It's kind of funny, kind of sad.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Pericles

    They haven’t ruined the weather yet, though if there’s a way they’ll probably find it.

  69. @Redneck farmer
    California needs to be run by the British East India Company for a few decades, that's all.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  70. @BenKenobi
    @El Dato


    unless you drop a lot of amenities
     
    Good news, bigot! The plan is for you to live in a pod in one-fourth of a converted shipping container and eat bugs. Unless you want 2 billion negros to die, and you wouldn't want that, would you? It would be a shame if that last part went in bold red letters at the top of your Linkedin, wouldn't it?

    PS: Microaggressions are now felonies and all POC have the Judge Dredd power to convict and sentence on the spot.

    Replies: @bomag, @Nico

    This is it. Manjoo et al are happy to show up with a bulldozer and politely explain that, for service to the greater good, you now have a place in pod world while he and his will dispose of your stuff and backfill it with the proper things.

  71. @XYZ (no Mr.)
    @Jack D

    Perhaps you should run a YouTube channel for perspective immigrants detailing how horrible America is. If there is even a miniscule decline in immigration -- say 20% -- over the course of a year I would donate heavily afterwards...but you have to produce results. Sadly, and honestly, for all the Indian and Chinese b#llsh$t those countries suck so bad -- a reflection of their cultures -- they keep on coming here. It's sad really.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @bomag

    Exactly. Because the one thing that the USA is still undisputed champion at is acting as a magnet for the wretched refuse of the third world. Until eventually we have slid all the way down ourselves. #2 is Russia btw.

  72. @Icy Blast
    We're running out of electricity! The electricity mines are exhausted! And we're running out of water! And we can't desalinate water because that takes too much electric power, and we've used up all our electricity! We'll have to live in mud huts and burn candles! Capitalism is a failure!

    Replies: @El Dato, @The Alarmist

    Russia can provide!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    I think Heinlein served on an aircraft carrier around 1930 that provided electricity to Tacoma (?) for a few weeks in an emergency.

    Anyway, California has plenty of electricity, it just has too much wind at the moment to safely transmit it in some places. E.g., The Getty fire was due to a eucalyptus branch crashing in to a power line. The LADWP hasn't been cutting electricity because they figure the fire department can get to any fire in their restricted area of service pretty fast, unlike in the northern California hinterlands.

    There was just a mild breeze in the flatlands of the San Fernando Valley today, but the wind has really been howling out at the Ronald Reagan Library 35 miles to the northwest.

    Replies: @res

    , @Tipsy
    @El Dato

    Even Indonesia is getting into the floating reactor game, through the startup ThorConPower:

    http://thorconpower.com/design/

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @nebulafox
    @El Dato

    I'm increasingly convinced that Michael Schellenberger is right: the green crowd is emphatically against nuclear power precisely because it would enable a clean earth to coexist with human economic drives without necessitating an attempt to wholly rehaul society.

  73. @Icy Blast
    We're running out of electricity! The electricity mines are exhausted! And we're running out of water! And we can't desalinate water because that takes too much electric power, and we've used up all our electricity! We'll have to live in mud huts and burn candles! Capitalism is a failure!

    Replies: @El Dato, @The Alarmist

    We’re running out of electricity! The electricity mines are exhausted! … We’ll have to live in mud huts and burn candles! Capitalism is a failure!

    No worries, you can sleep in your electric vehicles.

    • Replies: @danand
    @The Alarmist


    “They (Mr. Manjoo) are the author of the book True Enough: Learning to Live in a Post-Fact Society”

     
    Enough info about “They” to allow comfortable dismissal of everything he has to say. I’d bet his parents are more than a little pissed he didn’t become a doctor, or at least a developer at Google for god’s sakes. Why bother dragging him all the way to America just for him to wind up as a “they” contributing writer?


    “No worries, you can sleep in your electric vehicles.”

     
    Alarmist,
    One of the benefits is being able to use the cars AC/heater minus a running engine. Nice while sleeping waiting for ballet class to finish.
  74. He is right about California running out of both land and water. I mean you can build in the desert but the cost of bringing utilities and water there….

    The liability costs alone have destroyed PG&E….on top of Looney environmental laws….

  75. @El Dato
    @Icy Blast

    Russia can provide!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_zsIL4hMqM

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Tipsy, @nebulafox

    I think Heinlein served on an aircraft carrier around 1930 that provided electricity to Tacoma (?) for a few weeks in an emergency.

    Anyway, California has plenty of electricity, it just has too much wind at the moment to safely transmit it in some places. E.g., The Getty fire was due to a eucalyptus branch crashing in to a power line. The LADWP hasn’t been cutting electricity because they figure the fire department can get to any fire in their restricted area of service pretty fast, unlike in the northern California hinterlands.

    There was just a mild breeze in the flatlands of the San Fernando Valley today, but the wind has really been howling out at the Ronald Reagan Library 35 miles to the northwest.

    • Replies: @res
    @Steve Sailer

    You have a great memory, Steve.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Lexington_(CV-2)#Service_history


    After fitting-out and shakedown cruises, Lexington was transferred to the West Coast of the United States and arrived at San Pedro, California, part of Los Angeles, on 7 April 1928. She was based there until 1940 and mainly stayed on the West Coast, although she did participate in several Fleet Problems (training exercises) in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea.[2] These exercises tested the Navy's evolving doctrine and tactics for the use of carriers. During Fleet Problem IX in January 1929, Lexington and the Scouting Force failed to defend the Panama Canal against an aerial attack launched by her sister ship Saratoga.[30] Future science fiction author Robert A. Heinlein reported aboard on 6 July as a newly minted ensign under Captain Frank Berrien.[31] Heinlein experienced his first literary rejection when his short story about a case of espionage discovered at the Naval Academy failed to win a shipboard writing contest.[32]

    In 1929, western Washington state suffered a drought which resulted in low levels in Lake Cushman that provided water for Cushman Dam No. 1. The hydro-electric power generated by this dam was the primary source for the city of Tacoma and the city requested help from the federal government once the water in the lake receded below the dam's intakes during December. The U.S. Navy sent Lexington, which had been at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, to Tacoma, and heavy electric lines were rigged into the city's power system. The ship's generators provided a total of 4,520,960 kilowatt hours from 17 December to 16 January 1930 until melting snow and rain brought the reservoirs up to the level needed to generate sufficient power for the city.[18]
     

    Replies: @Jack D

  76. so (re chart) , it’s not just all the leaves that are brown, then.

  77. @The Alarmist
    @Icy Blast


    We’re running out of electricity! The electricity mines are exhausted! ... We’ll have to live in mud huts and burn candles! Capitalism is a failure!
     
    No worries, you can sleep in your electric vehicles.

    Replies: @danand

    “They (Mr. Manjoo) are the author of the book True Enough: Learning to Live in a Post-Fact Society”

    Enough info about “They” to allow comfortable dismissal of everything he has to say. I’d bet his parents are more than a little pissed he didn’t become a doctor, or at least a developer at Google for god’s sakes. Why bother dragging him all the way to America just for him to wind up as a “they” contributing writer?

    “No worries, you can sleep in your electric vehicles.”

    Alarmist,
    One of the benefits is being able to use the cars AC/heater minus a running engine. Nice while sleeping waiting for ballet class to finish.

  78. to be personally referred to as “they”

    I think they all should be referred to as “Them!”.

  79. @Ozymandias
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's going to be pretty hard to top this little ditty about the future of L.A.:

    http://www.bing.com/search?q=tool+learn+to+swim+lyrics

    Replies: @Polynikes

    Betting on a “cleansing” earthquake seems like the ultimate hail may approach. Song was written in the nineties. Wonder if MJK would have three balls to add immigration to the list these days? Doubt it…

  80. You’d be able to get around more cheaply because we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @MEH 0910

    I may be re-evaluating my Vacation in Pakistan plans.

    , @Jack D
    @MEH 0910

    Apparently a bunch of folks were on their way to camp out at some kind of (Muslim) revivalist tent meeting and they decided to start the cookout early, on the train. The British left behind an impressive rail network all over the subcontinent but it's a struggle to maintain it with the human capital that Pakistan has. When the fire started, the passengers pulled the emergency brake but nothing happened.

    As far as I can tell, the organization the pilgrims belonged to, Tablighi Jamaat, is a legitimate religious organization that advocates a "back to Mohammed" approach and not some kind of radical political Islamist thing, but there's never really a bright line.

    , @anon
    @MEH 0910

    But how is the train? Is the train ok?

    Replies: @Jack D

  81. @MEH 0910

    You’d be able to get around more cheaply because we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices.
     
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1189796115199205376

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D, @anon

    I may be re-evaluating my Vacation in Pakistan plans.

  82. @Jack D
    @Lot

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/48/Mumbai_Skyline1.jpg

    Mumbai skyline.

    This is not true anymore. Skyscraper technology is 130 years old. 3rd world cities, even in Africa, are full of skyscrapers. They are not uniquely American anymore at all. India is the world's #2 steel producer and the US is #4. The world has changed and it's not USA #1 anymore in much of anything.

    Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.), @Amerimutt Golems

    This is not true anymore. Skyscraper technology is 130 years old. 3rd world cities, even in Africa, are full of skyscrapers. They are not uniquely American anymore at all. India is the world’s #2 steel producer and the US is #4. The world has changed and it’s not USA #1 anymore in much of anything.

    Copying other people’s technologies is also easy but the challenge is cognitive abilities needed for maintenance.

    First Nuclear Reactor in Africa Now Sits Unused Near Kinshasa (subscription)
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB864940999688145000

    Congo Reactor Should Be Dismantled, Report Says
    https://www.nti.org/gsn/article/congo-reactor-should-be-dismantled-report-says/

    Indian steel producers use slave labor like China. In fact El Trumpo’s trade war might lead to China dumping excess capacity on India.

  83. I just realized something.

    Once the New California State manages to split off from the urban metro areas, the urban metro areas will vote to become a state of Mexico. Complete with snot-dribbling pathos about historical justice.

    This will probably give a lot of people in New Mexico and Texas certain ideas too. Meanwhile the (((elites))) responsible will move from “Northern Mexico California” to the US proper and start over.

    *That’s* why, if you absolutely gotta import immigrants–import them from the other side of the globe, not from across the border. It’s just basic safety logic. Neighbors will not find ways to bite chunks from you, if you don’t have chunks of their ethnicity on the border.

    **

    During the 20th century the Anglosphere was the only place which didn’t go through:
    1) military occupation by enemy, and/or
    2) civil war, and/or
    3) dictatorship, and/or
    4) total war, and/or
    5) total economic collapse, and/or
    6) loss of statehood

    Everyone else did. Fill in with a dark color the continent of Europe that went through all that crap, and the only ones not colored in will be Switzerland and Sweden.

    Hence today the Anglosphericals, especially, the US of A, seem terribly naive about many things. Especially basic national survival. Basic survival of your nation within your country’s borders is the fundamental level, on which the rest of a hypothetical “Maslow’s levels of national success” rest.

    Ahem, “Rahan’s Pyramid of National Success”–drumroll.

    On top of “basic survival”, you can get “basic affluence”, and on top of “basic affluence” you can get “basic freedoms”, and so on, but without “basic survival” the pyramid collapses.

    **

    The Russians and the Chinese know from 20th century history the importance of “basic survival”, hence once a leader provides this, he’s already seen as a good Tsar. If he manages to start delivering the next steps of the pyramid, beyond survival–so much the better.

    Hence North Koreans tolerating the Kim dynasty for so long. National survival was guaranteed, if nothing else. And that’s nothing to sneeze at, not unless you’re a naive Anglospherical or Swede who knows not what lost sovereignty, or thousands of tanks invading your border, or flattened and firestormed cities.

    Or, if you’re a European country, loss of democracy, or loss of economy, or, if you’re Eastern European, total loss of statehood is.

    Yet the US takes “basic national survival” for granted in so many ways… So many ways…
    As does the aforementioned Sweden…

  84. @MBlanc46
    Who is this “we” they keeps referring to?

    Replies: @Alan Mercer

    It’s the “I” of the nonbinary nutcase.

  85. @MEH 0910

    You’d be able to get around more cheaply because we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices.
     
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1189796115199205376

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D, @anon

    Apparently a bunch of folks were on their way to camp out at some kind of (Muslim) revivalist tent meeting and they decided to start the cookout early, on the train. The British left behind an impressive rail network all over the subcontinent but it’s a struggle to maintain it with the human capital that Pakistan has. When the fire started, the passengers pulled the emergency brake but nothing happened.

    As far as I can tell, the organization the pilgrims belonged to, Tablighi Jamaat, is a legitimate religious organization that advocates a “back to Mohammed” approach and not some kind of radical political Islamist thing, but there’s never really a bright line.

  86. @MEH 0910

    You’d be able to get around more cheaply because we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices.
     
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1189796115199205376

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D, @anon

    But how is the train? Is the train ok?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @anon

    A little paint and it will be as good as new. No need to be concerned.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/mritems/imagecache/mbdxxlarge/mritems/Images/2019/10/31/2170d0feb3204bd3a3058fcf2b0db6b3_18.jpg

  87. But I thought California’s two attractions were its sunny climate, and lack of density. People moved there to escape the fate Manjoo is promoting.

    Note, too, that in densely-populated areas, nobody gets around fast (or cheaply) on buses and trains. Plus, in Bill de Blasio’s NY, there’s constant violent crime on public transit.

  88. You’d be able to get around more cheaply because we’d ditch cars and turn to buses and trains and other ways we know how to move around a lot of people at high speeds, for low prices.

  89. @White Guy In Japan
    "Quick, send in the Pajeets,
    Don't bother, they're here..."

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    I saw what you did!

  90. California must go back to about 6 million people. Asset taxes — otherwise known as financial liquidations — can be used in areas of concentrated wealth like Malibu to financially liquidate and remove the Nose and the Meathead and others.

    Elizabeth Warren and her 2 percent wealth asset tax are small beans, baby, we gotta go big time.

    Of course, a militia force will be needed to be conjured into existence to protect the public from the over-reactions of the plutocrats to being financially liquidated.

    Foreigners will of course be removed and citizenship revocations and luxury barge accommodations can be used to produce the much needed environmentally-friendly depopulation of California.

    From 40 million to 6 million will be great for the environment and habitat for wildlife in California.

    6 million is the way to go!

    Departed money-grubber David Gelbaum bought the mass immigration boosting policy of the Sierra Club for 100 million dollars. Going from 40 million to 6 million population will be a bigger boost to the environment in California.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Charles Pewitt


    From 40 million to 6 million will be great for the environment and habitat for wildlife in California.
     
    You could let loose Chinese-made killer drones who randomly target the 34/40-th part of the population.

    It will be like The Walking Dead but w/o revival.
  91. @Carol
    My cousin in San Marino informs me that yes the homeless have indeed spread up Huntington Blvd from LA and on occasion sleep, cry or puke on her lawn. San Marino.

    Time to move.

    Replies: @Alan Mercer

    Move out now, but keep an eye out for the buying opportunity.

    It’s the same old shell game (Chicago, NYC, San Diego south of the 8): move human refuse into prime real estate, chase out former residents, depress property values, urban blight ensues, buy slum property at pennies on the dollar, cause gentrification through policy (e.g. dispersive rental vouchers), renovate the building, sell/rent to whites, receive profit. You just have to watch for the cues to buy when they do.

  92. Steve is in danger of turning into a pillar of salt.

  93. @El Dato
    @Icy Blast

    Russia can provide!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_zsIL4hMqM

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Tipsy, @nebulafox

    Even Indonesia is getting into the floating reactor game, through the startup ThorConPower:

    http://thorconpower.com/design/

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Tipsy

    That's pretty impressive. However I suspect there will be some hurdles to overcome when actually building this thing.

    Maybe the UK should be looking at things like that instead of trying to implement Hinkley Point C using the European Pressurised Reactor and Chinese money, with likely cost overruns, technical problems, milling clouds of protestors and more concrete pouring than it's worth.

    Brunel would probably approve.

  94. Population of the state has doubled in four decades, not heading for fifty million. A good deal of the state’s land area is uninhabitable, at least in the sense of 21st Century Western settlement. Condo’s in Death Valley, anyone? What sustainability?

    • Agree: Hail
  95. @Hail
    @adreadline

    Some point to the end of the Cold War as an immediate, structural economic cause, as it caused the loss of SoCal defense jobs in the early 1990s (which was the plot behind early-1990s rage movie Falling Down). Anyway, that would not necessarily explain continuing white losses, year after year, until the present.

    I'm thinking cultural pessimism was a strong factor -- the loss of control by the former conservative white majority (which elected Nixon, Reagan) to an ascendant Coalition of the Fringes, which itself is now a supermajority in California. (Hence Ann Coulter's warnings about the same happening in other states, after which "the country's over.")

    Where the April 1992 riots specifically fit in is, IMO, as a symbol of that ongoing loss of cultural control. So: symptom, not cause.

    The Third Worlders took over, but a sneeringly hostile political class is largely to blame for abetting it. A famous instance (LA Times headline, Nov. 19, 1997):


    Prop. 187 Found Unconstitutional by Federal Judge

    A federal judge [Mariana Pfaelzer] in Los Angeles ruled Friday that Proposition 187, the divisive 1994 ballot initiative targeting illegal immigrants, violates...the Constitution
     

    Replies: @bomag, @Alden

    I’m thinking cultural pessimism was a strong factor — the loss of control by the former conservative white majority (which elected Nixon, Reagan) to an ascendant Coalition of the Fringes, which itself is now a supermajority in California. (Hence Ann Coulter’s warnings about the same happening in other states, after which “the country’s over.”)

    I’m wondering about the particular dynamics. Whites famously decamped for nearby states after selling their property for a relatively large amount, then promptly started agitating for the same liberal policies that sank Cali. What happened to conservative Californians?

    Who bought the property? Wealthy foreigners? Tech moguls? FOB Chinese living fifteen to a house?

    • Replies: @Nico
    @bomag


    Whites famously decamped for nearby states after selling their property for a relatively large amount, then promptly started agitating for the same liberal policies that sank Cali.
     
    Did they? Probably somewhat but not nearly to the systematic extent this P.C. explanation of the purpling and bluing of states like Nevada and Colorado - which have also received accelerating numbers of POCs the last few decades - would have it. As far as Oregon and Washington go, I suspect those places were always somewhat more liberal than the rest of the country on average, and that their Reagan votes were as much generational as anything else.
  96. @BenKenobi
    @El Dato


    unless you drop a lot of amenities
     
    Good news, bigot! The plan is for you to live in a pod in one-fourth of a converted shipping container and eat bugs. Unless you want 2 billion negros to die, and you wouldn't want that, would you? It would be a shame if that last part went in bold red letters at the top of your Linkedin, wouldn't it?

    PS: Microaggressions are now felonies and all POC have the Judge Dredd power to convict and sentence on the spot.

    Replies: @bomag, @Nico

    Unless you want 2 billion negros to die, and you wouldn’t want that, would you?

    It would be interesting if we could figure out the evolution in the number of people – whites, sure, but also Asian, Middle-Eastern and mestizo – who secretly fantasize about a black genocide* from time to time, since the continuous hissy fit of “Black Lives Matter” erupted back in 2012. Of course, then it wouldn’t be a secret, but that in itself would be a good thing if it gave the Mondays impetus to relearn their place. (It probably wouldn’t, though.)

    *Brahmins seem to have this sentiment about the majority of their countrymen as well, though they are a bit less subtle. Of course, when they move to America and their melanin becomes a moral status symbol they usually turn their attentions to colonizing the Land of the Free.

  97. Fewer but better Californians. Works for me.

  98. @bomag
    @Hail


    I’m thinking cultural pessimism was a strong factor — the loss of control by the former conservative white majority (which elected Nixon, Reagan) to an ascendant Coalition of the Fringes, which itself is now a supermajority in California. (Hence Ann Coulter’s warnings about the same happening in other states, after which “the country’s over.”)
     
    I'm wondering about the particular dynamics. Whites famously decamped for nearby states after selling their property for a relatively large amount, then promptly started agitating for the same liberal policies that sank Cali. What happened to conservative Californians?

    Who bought the property? Wealthy foreigners? Tech moguls? FOB Chinese living fifteen to a house?

    Replies: @Nico

    Whites famously decamped for nearby states after selling their property for a relatively large amount, then promptly started agitating for the same liberal policies that sank Cali.

    Did they? Probably somewhat but not nearly to the systematic extent this P.C. explanation of the purpling and bluing of states like Nevada and Colorado – which have also received accelerating numbers of POCs the last few decades – would have it. As far as Oregon and Washington go, I suspect those places were always somewhat more liberal than the rest of the country on average, and that their Reagan votes were as much generational as anything else.

  99. @El Dato
    @Icy Blast

    Russia can provide!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_zsIL4hMqM

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Tipsy, @nebulafox

    I’m increasingly convinced that Michael Schellenberger is right: the green crowd is emphatically against nuclear power precisely because it would enable a clean earth to coexist with human economic drives without necessitating an attempt to wholly rehaul society.

    • Agree: EdwardM
  100. @anon
    @MEH 0910

    But how is the train? Is the train ok?

    Replies: @Jack D

    A little paint and it will be as good as new. No need to be concerned.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  101. @Morton's toes
    What I am curious about and have been unable to find with some google searches:

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs? I was under the impression that all the subsidized personal solar panels were connected to the state power grid and if the grid is turned off the solar power is disconnected and won't do the panel owner one lick of good.

    Does anybody know? When there are a million customers with no (PG&E) power is there a huge fraction that do not really care?

    Replies: @Roger, @anon, @res

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs? I was under the impression that all the subsidized personal solar panels were connected to the state power grid and if the grid is turned off the solar power is disconnected and won’t do the panel owner one lick of good.

    I am aware of two approaches for using solar as a backup in power outages.

    1. Battery backup
    2. Backup outlet that is separate from the house wiring and only works while the sun is shining. For example: https://www.smainverted.com/how-to-explain-secure-power-supply-to-homeowners/

    I have been unable to find any statistics for what has actually been installed. If anyone has data, please post.

    When there are a million customers with no (PG&E) power is there a huge fraction that do not really care?

    I would say no. A lot of people are pissed off. Whether that results in anything constructive remains to be seen.

  102. @Roger
    @Morton's toes

    You can get solar panels with batteries, and then you can live off the grid with no dependence on the electric company. But most Californians do not do that, as it is an extra $10k or so. The solar panels are only productive when connected to a working electrical grid.

    Replies: @res, @Jack D

    It is worth noting that even if you have battery backup it is unlikely it will be able to supply power for everything in the house at once. Typically the minimum size for home electric service is 100A:
    https://groverelectric.com/assets/downloads/howto/03_How%20to%20Determine%20Sizes%20for%20a%20Home%20Electrical%20Service.pdf

    And even that minimum is over 20kW. A typical home inverter puts out 5kW:
    https://news.energysage.com/what-size-solar-inverter-do-i-need/

    The typical solution is a subpanel serving important loads. Here is an example. Note that is important to distinguish output watts from battery capacity (4kW and 11kW respectively in this case):
    https://www.bluepacificsolar.com/home-solar/home-battery-backup.html

  103. @Steve Sailer
    @El Dato

    I think Heinlein served on an aircraft carrier around 1930 that provided electricity to Tacoma (?) for a few weeks in an emergency.

    Anyway, California has plenty of electricity, it just has too much wind at the moment to safely transmit it in some places. E.g., The Getty fire was due to a eucalyptus branch crashing in to a power line. The LADWP hasn't been cutting electricity because they figure the fire department can get to any fire in their restricted area of service pretty fast, unlike in the northern California hinterlands.

    There was just a mild breeze in the flatlands of the San Fernando Valley today, but the wind has really been howling out at the Ronald Reagan Library 35 miles to the northwest.

    Replies: @res

    You have a great memory, Steve.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Lexington_(CV-2)#Service_history

    After fitting-out and shakedown cruises, Lexington was transferred to the West Coast of the United States and arrived at San Pedro, California, part of Los Angeles, on 7 April 1928. She was based there until 1940 and mainly stayed on the West Coast, although she did participate in several Fleet Problems (training exercises) in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea.[2] These exercises tested the Navy’s evolving doctrine and tactics for the use of carriers. During Fleet Problem IX in January 1929, Lexington and the Scouting Force failed to defend the Panama Canal against an aerial attack launched by her sister ship Saratoga.[30] Future science fiction author Robert A. Heinlein reported aboard on 6 July as a newly minted ensign under Captain Frank Berrien.[31] Heinlein experienced his first literary rejection when his short story about a case of espionage discovered at the Naval Academy failed to win a shipboard writing contest.[32]

    In 1929, western Washington state suffered a drought which resulted in low levels in Lake Cushman that provided water for Cushman Dam No. 1. The hydro-electric power generated by this dam was the primary source for the city of Tacoma and the city requested help from the federal government once the water in the lake receded below the dam’s intakes during December. The U.S. Navy sent Lexington, which had been at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, to Tacoma, and heavy electric lines were rigged into the city’s power system. The ship’s generators provided a total of 4,520,960 kilowatt hours from 17 December to 16 January 1930 until melting snow and rain brought the reservoirs up to the level needed to generate sufficient power for the city.[18]

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @res

    That was the old America. I can't imagine that this would happen today. You would have to get environmental impact statements and the Navy wouldn't want to do it anyway - not their mission and are't those cables unsafe, etc.

  104. @Charles Pewitt
    California must go back to about 6 million people. Asset taxes -- otherwise known as financial liquidations -- can be used in areas of concentrated wealth like Malibu to financially liquidate and remove the Nose and the Meathead and others.

    Elizabeth Warren and her 2 percent wealth asset tax are small beans, baby, we gotta go big time.

    Of course, a militia force will be needed to be conjured into existence to protect the public from the over-reactions of the plutocrats to being financially liquidated.

    Foreigners will of course be removed and citizenship revocations and luxury barge accommodations can be used to produce the much needed environmentally-friendly depopulation of California.

    From 40 million to 6 million will be great for the environment and habitat for wildlife in California.

    6 million is the way to go!

    Departed money-grubber David Gelbaum bought the mass immigration boosting policy of the Sierra Club for 100 million dollars. Going from 40 million to 6 million population will be a bigger boost to the environment in California.

    Replies: @El Dato

    From 40 million to 6 million will be great for the environment and habitat for wildlife in California.

    You could let loose Chinese-made killer drones who randomly target the 34/40-th part of the population.

    It will be like The Walking Dead but w/o revival.

  105. They don’t make them like they used to anymore.

  106. @Tipsy
    @El Dato

    Even Indonesia is getting into the floating reactor game, through the startup ThorConPower:

    http://thorconpower.com/design/

    Replies: @El Dato

    That’s pretty impressive. However I suspect there will be some hurdles to overcome when actually building this thing.

    Maybe the UK should be looking at things like that instead of trying to implement Hinkley Point C using the European Pressurised Reactor and Chinese money, with likely cost overruns, technical problems, milling clouds of protestors and more concrete pouring than it’s worth.

    Brunel would probably approve.

  107. @Roger
    @Morton's toes

    You can get solar panels with batteries, and then you can live off the grid with no dependence on the electric company. But most Californians do not do that, as it is an extra $10k or so. The solar panels are only productive when connected to a working electrical grid.

    Replies: @res, @Jack D

    For around $1,000 you could get a generator that would allow you to run every load in your house for the (hopefully rare) occasions when the grid is down.

  108. @res
    @Steve Sailer

    You have a great memory, Steve.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Lexington_(CV-2)#Service_history


    After fitting-out and shakedown cruises, Lexington was transferred to the West Coast of the United States and arrived at San Pedro, California, part of Los Angeles, on 7 April 1928. She was based there until 1940 and mainly stayed on the West Coast, although she did participate in several Fleet Problems (training exercises) in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea.[2] These exercises tested the Navy's evolving doctrine and tactics for the use of carriers. During Fleet Problem IX in January 1929, Lexington and the Scouting Force failed to defend the Panama Canal against an aerial attack launched by her sister ship Saratoga.[30] Future science fiction author Robert A. Heinlein reported aboard on 6 July as a newly minted ensign under Captain Frank Berrien.[31] Heinlein experienced his first literary rejection when his short story about a case of espionage discovered at the Naval Academy failed to win a shipboard writing contest.[32]

    In 1929, western Washington state suffered a drought which resulted in low levels in Lake Cushman that provided water for Cushman Dam No. 1. The hydro-electric power generated by this dam was the primary source for the city of Tacoma and the city requested help from the federal government once the water in the lake receded below the dam's intakes during December. The U.S. Navy sent Lexington, which had been at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, to Tacoma, and heavy electric lines were rigged into the city's power system. The ship's generators provided a total of 4,520,960 kilowatt hours from 17 December to 16 January 1930 until melting snow and rain brought the reservoirs up to the level needed to generate sufficient power for the city.[18]
     

    Replies: @Jack D

    That was the old America. I can’t imagine that this would happen today. You would have to get environmental impact statements and the Navy wouldn’t want to do it anyway – not their mission and are’t those cables unsafe, etc.

    • Agree: res
  109. @216
    O/T

    Ski Bums rotting on the slopes

    Ski resorts face worker shortage
    Labor market has industry worried as season nears

    New Hampshire's Wildcat is offering a $1,000 bonus for new snowmakers to come on board, and Sunday River in Maine last year increased its hourly wage from $13 to $20 for that job. Utah's Snowbird is expanding its pool van service to get employees to the mountain, and Sugarbush in Vermont, which has among the lowest unemployment rates in the country, is hiring more foreign college students.
     
    https://www.journalgazette.net/news/us/20191027/ski-resorts-face-worker-shortage

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Oh man, sign me up for this!

  110. Sissy city boy immigrants.

    You’re not a real Californian till you’ve stood in the playground and watched an earthquake move your school back and forth about 15 feet and settle back down where it belongs

    Come home at age 4 during a blackout and held the flashlight while Mom and Dad lit the candles and kerosene lamp kept ready all winter long.

    Got to stay home from school because the street in front of the school was flooded too high to walk across.

    Spent a couple days in a city motel during wildfire season as your suburban house was in a danger zone

    Been in your office 30 stories up during an earthquake as the building swayed back and forth.

    Been the only family on your hill not burnt to death during the Napa 2017 wildfire because you smashed your Range Rover through the back fence and down the fire road while hearing the screams of the neighbors as they burnt to death.

    Go home sissy city boys and leave our Golden State to descendants of those who walked over the Rockies and went around Cape Horn to get here.

  111. @XYZ (no Mr.)
    @Jack D

    Perhaps you should run a YouTube channel for perspective immigrants detailing how horrible America is. If there is even a miniscule decline in immigration -- say 20% -- over the course of a year I would donate heavily afterwards...but you have to produce results. Sadly, and honestly, for all the Indian and Chinese b#llsh$t those countries suck so bad -- a reflection of their cultures -- they keep on coming here. It's sad really.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @bomag

    Personally, I’ve never met an immigrant who didn’t indicate the home country was better than ‘merica.

    They’re pretty much here to expand the brand.

    • Agree: sayless
  112. @anon
    @Morton's toes

    how many of these people who bought solar panels have power in spite of the PG&E power shut downs?

    None. The typical deal requires the photovoltaics to feed into the grid, the customer receives a smaller electric bill from the utility.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Interesting. So home solar panels are a bit like the backyard steel mills of China’s “Great Leap Forward”.

  113. @Hail
    @adreadline

    Some point to the end of the Cold War as an immediate, structural economic cause, as it caused the loss of SoCal defense jobs in the early 1990s (which was the plot behind early-1990s rage movie Falling Down). Anyway, that would not necessarily explain continuing white losses, year after year, until the present.

    I'm thinking cultural pessimism was a strong factor -- the loss of control by the former conservative white majority (which elected Nixon, Reagan) to an ascendant Coalition of the Fringes, which itself is now a supermajority in California. (Hence Ann Coulter's warnings about the same happening in other states, after which "the country's over.")

    Where the April 1992 riots specifically fit in is, IMO, as a symbol of that ongoing loss of cultural control. So: symptom, not cause.

    The Third Worlders took over, but a sneeringly hostile political class is largely to blame for abetting it. A famous instance (LA Times headline, Nov. 19, 1997):


    Prop. 187 Found Unconstitutional by Federal Judge

    A federal judge [Mariana Pfaelzer] in Los Angeles ruled Friday that Proposition 187, the divisive 1994 ballot initiative targeting illegal immigrants, violates...the Constitution
     

    Replies: @bomag, @Alden

    After the 1992 riots TPTB decided anything is better for Los Angeles than continued black rule. Hence replacement by anything else.yay 😋yay 😀 yay yay 😁 yay

  114. @Jack D
    @newrouter

    What he was saying was ALMOST plausible, until he got to LOW PRICES. Sorry Mr. Rug Merchant, you are just lying now. The government doesn't know how to do ANYTHING for low prices and ESPECIALLY not how to move around a lot of people using mass transit. At least be honest and say, "we're going to need lots and lots of taxes to pay for this new mass transit, which can never be made to pay from the fare box (if we can even get the vibrant masses to pay their fares)."

    Replies: @bomag

    What he was saying was ALMOST plausible, until he got to LOW PRICES…

    Also, he lists a bunch of problems and then acts as if they can be solved by cramming people closer together; seemingly unaware that more people are on their way to swamp whatever relief that brings.

  115. iSteve commenter Hail offers some useful numbers for perspective:

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1980 census: 15.8 million out of 23.8 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million [/ 29.8 million]
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million [/ 33.9 million]
    – 2010 census: 14.9 million [/ 37.3 million]

    Though the US census’ White Non-Hispanic category began in 1980, we have pretty solid data available also from the 1970 census, which asked the ‘White non-Hispanic’ question on its 5% and 15% samples. They also did this in 1940, but not 1950 or 1960.

    The most comprehensive version, then, would be:

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1940 census: 6.2 million
    – 1950 census: (No Data)
    – 1960 census: (No Data)
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million (5% sample) or 15.6 million (15% sample)
    – 1980 census: 15.8 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2018 census (est.): 14.55 million
    – 2020 census: circa 14.40 million?

    The state gained a net average of 330,000 ‘Whites’ per year in the 1960s (see Table 19 below), but many of those would be White Hispanics. If half of the newly arriving Whites were White non-Hispanics, that would put White California at 14.5 million somewhere between 1963 and 1966, a figure it again reached in 2018 according to the census bureau.

    Sources:

    [MORE]

    1940, 1970, 1980, 1990 data: “Historical Census Statistics on Population Totals By Race, 1790 to 1990, and By Hispanic Origin, 1970 to 1990, For The United States, Regions, Divisions, and States” [Sept. 2002], compilation of California results up to 1990 is in Table 19. California – Race and Hispanic Origin: 1850 to 1990.

    2000 data: “Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent,” for California (here). Not Hispanic or Latino, White alone is at 15,816,790.

    — 2010 data at “DP-1 – Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010” for California. “Not Hispanic or Latino, White alone” is at 14,956,253.

    — And I see the the latest 2018 census bureau estimate is at 14.55 million Whites. At this rate, California will clock in at around 14.4 million Whites on the April 2020 census. Or maybe net White population loss per year is a little higher than the census predicts.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Hail

    Here is a version of the California population chart incorporating the 1970 data (using the median between the 5% and 15% samples) and 1940:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EIRM_W4XUAAfABz.jpg

    Replies: @Hail

  116. @Hail

    iSteve commenter Hail offers some useful numbers for perspective:

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1980 census: 15.8 million out of 23.8 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million [/ 29.8 million]
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million [/ 33.9 million]
    – 2010 census: 14.9 million [/ 37.3 million]
     
    Though the US census' White Non-Hispanic category began in 1980, we have pretty solid data available also from the 1970 census, which asked the 'White non-Hispanic' question on its 5% and 15% samples. They also did this in 1940, but not 1950 or 1960.

    The most comprehensive version, then, would be:

    White non-Hispanics in California
    – 1940 census: 6.2 million
    – 1950 census: (No Data)
    – 1960 census: (No Data)
    – 1970 census: 15.2 million (5% sample) or 15.6 million (15% sample)
    – 1980 census: 15.8 million
    – 1990 census: 17.0 million
    – 2000 census: 15.8 million
    – 2010 census: 15.0 million
    – 2018 census (est.): 14.55 million
    – 2020 census: circa 14.40 million?

    The state gained a net average of 330,000 'Whites' per year in the 1960s (see Table 19 below), but many of those would be White Hispanics. If half of the newly arriving Whites were White non-Hispanics, that would put White California at 14.5 million somewhere between 1963 and 1966, a figure it again reached in 2018 according to the census bureau.

    Sources:



    -- 1940, 1970, 1980, 1990 data: "Historical Census Statistics on Population Totals By Race, 1790 to 1990, and By Hispanic Origin, 1970 to 1990, For The United States, Regions, Divisions, and States" [Sept. 2002], compilation of California results up to 1990 is in Table 19. California - Race and Hispanic Origin: 1850 to 1990.

    -- 2000 data: "Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent," for California (here). Not Hispanic or Latino, White alone is at 15,816,790.

    -- 2010 data at "DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010" for California. "Not Hispanic or Latino, White alone" is at 14,956,253.

    -- And I see the the latest 2018 census bureau estimate is at 14.55 million Whites. At this rate, California will clock in at around 14.4 million Whites on the April 2020 census. Or maybe net White population loss per year is a little higher than the census predicts.

    Replies: @Hail

    Here is a version of the California population chart incorporating the 1970 data (using the median between the 5% and 15% samples) and 1940:

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Hail

    We see the crossover point was about 1997.

    But when was the point-of-no-return for classic-America California?

    If we have to pick a decade, the graph suggests to me it was the 1980s at very latest. (I think a better case might be made for the 1970s.) The absolute decline in California White numbers, which begins in the early 1990s, may signal that a Rubicon had already been crossed by 1990.

    The immigration-restriction efforts in 1990s California are, then, rightly seen as an admirably-earnest-but-doomed rearguard effort at maintaining something like Classic White California, such as it existed ca. 1970.

    And now we see the Wall Street Journal publishing the following (Oct. 30):


    It’s hard to see how 40 million people can go overnight from First to Third World electric reliability without sparking a voter revolt
     
    "Third World California," as a concept, has passed into centrist discourse.

    Replies: @Ed

  117. @Hail
    @Hail

    Here is a version of the California population chart incorporating the 1970 data (using the median between the 5% and 15% samples) and 1940:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EIRM_W4XUAAfABz.jpg

    Replies: @Hail

    We see the crossover point was about 1997.

    But when was the point-of-no-return for classic-America California?

    If we have to pick a decade, the graph suggests to me it was the 1980s at very latest. (I think a better case might be made for the 1970s.) The absolute decline in California White numbers, which begins in the early 1990s, may signal that a Rubicon had already been crossed by 1990.

    The immigration-restriction efforts in 1990s California are, then, rightly seen as an admirably-earnest-but-doomed rearguard effort at maintaining something like Classic White California, such as it existed ca. 1970.

    And now we see the Wall Street Journal publishing the following (Oct. 30):

    It’s hard to see how 40 million people can go overnight from First to Third World electric reliability without sparking a voter revolt

    “Third World California,” as a concept, has passed into centrist discourse.

    • Replies: @Ed
    @Hail

    One could argue good ole Ronnie finished off Cali once as governor than as president.

    Replies: @Hail

  118. @Charlesz Martel
    Here's a thought- why not stop bringing in immigrants, and start deporting them? If the root cause of California's problems are too many people and not enough housing, and housing is too spread out, let's just choose the cheaper option- it's a whole lot cheaper to deport a family rather than build a home for them. Also less auto congestion. Less demand for services. Less demand for colleges. Less CO2. Less everything! Plus, as an added bonus, less labor means wages go up! Less income inequality!

    Why, it's a win-win all around!! These ex-immigrants can go back to their wonderful homelands, and having learned our ways of doing things, copy them and fix their own countries! Then we can simply trade with them! We get the products, they get the pollution and the social problems these POC's create!! Everybody is happy!

    No autographs, please. I leave this brilliant solution here for all the world to see and implement.

    I have another solution, but it involves a civil war with nuclear weapons, and I'm afraid the California snail darter and the spotted owl might be harmed.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Pericles

    Endless immigration, brrruh!

  119. @Mycale
    California is already a third world country. It's a corrupt one-party state with a nonfunctioning government that exists only to metaphorically wall off the very well-off haves from the destitute have-nots. They can't deliver basic services like water and electricity anymore. Poverty and homelessness are spiraling out of control. The cities have lots of beautiful architecture but are surrounded by squalor. Really, what separates California from Mexico these days, outside of out-of-control gang activ... oh wait.

    Surely all of these problems have nothing to do with the addition of 15 million immigrants, overwhelmingly from third world countries with corrupt one-party governments and tons of squalor and nonfunctioning infrastructures.

    The thing that gets me, though, is the way Californians still act like it is 1958 and the place is still the envy of the world. It's kind of funny, kind of sad.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Pericles

    They can’t deliver basic services like water and electricity anymore. Poverty and homelessness are spiraling out of control.

    Next step: white favelas.

  120. The process will only be complete once the dump is renamed Kolifarnia.

    PS. “Man-Joo”?

    PPS. Image caption: Look who’s staying for dinner.

    • LOL: GU
  121. White people (WEIRD) at some point simply lost sight of what really matters. How the hell do you let paradise on Earth (California) deteriorate into a third-world hovel?

  122. @Hail
    @Hail

    We see the crossover point was about 1997.

    But when was the point-of-no-return for classic-America California?

    If we have to pick a decade, the graph suggests to me it was the 1980s at very latest. (I think a better case might be made for the 1970s.) The absolute decline in California White numbers, which begins in the early 1990s, may signal that a Rubicon had already been crossed by 1990.

    The immigration-restriction efforts in 1990s California are, then, rightly seen as an admirably-earnest-but-doomed rearguard effort at maintaining something like Classic White California, such as it existed ca. 1970.

    And now we see the Wall Street Journal publishing the following (Oct. 30):


    It’s hard to see how 40 million people can go overnight from First to Third World electric reliability without sparking a voter revolt
     
    "Third World California," as a concept, has passed into centrist discourse.

    Replies: @Ed

    One could argue good ole Ronnie finished off Cali once as governor than as president.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Ed

    Reagan: elected CA Governor Nov. 1966; re-elected Nov. 1970; left office Jan. 1975.

    According to Pat Buchanan's political biography of Richard Nixon in the years 1966-1968 (The Greatest Comeback; published by Pat in 2014 as a kind of memoir of his own reminiscences as Nixon's closest aide in much of that period and insights derived therefrom), the Nixon campaign's greatest fear was Reagan entering the 1968 presidential race, which the latter was considering but finally decided to back Nixon.

    After the Nixon era ended, Reagan was in, what, more-or-less full-time presidential campaign mode as of circa mid 1975 (lost nomination to Ford, 1976) until his Nov. 1980 election, but we see he was partly in presidential campaign mode as early as 1967.

    Whatever Reagan was doing in California in the late 1960s and certainly by the early-mid 1970s, he was already shooting for 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, 3,000 or so miles to the east.

    ___________

    I'd love to see a well-thought-out essay here at the Unz Review by an informed observer addressing the question of what caused California's decline -- why and when.

    By 'when,' I mean: what was the critical period in which things could still have been changed, given different political conditions/leadership/etc.

    Replies: @Hail

  123. @Ed
    @Hail

    One could argue good ole Ronnie finished off Cali once as governor than as president.

    Replies: @Hail

    Reagan: elected CA Governor Nov. 1966; re-elected Nov. 1970; left office Jan. 1975.

    According to Pat Buchanan’s political biography of Richard Nixon in the years 1966-1968 (The Greatest Comeback; published by Pat in 2014 as a kind of memoir of his own reminiscences as Nixon’s closest aide in much of that period and insights derived therefrom), the Nixon campaign’s greatest fear was Reagan entering the 1968 presidential race, which the latter was considering but finally decided to back Nixon.

    After the Nixon era ended, Reagan was in, what, more-or-less full-time presidential campaign mode as of circa mid 1975 (lost nomination to Ford, 1976) until his Nov. 1980 election, but we see he was partly in presidential campaign mode as early as 1967.

    Whatever Reagan was doing in California in the late 1960s and certainly by the early-mid 1970s, he was already shooting for 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, 3,000 or so miles to the east.

    ___________

    I’d love to see a well-thought-out essay here at the Unz Review by an informed observer addressing the question of what caused California’s decline — why and when.

    By ‘when,’ I mean: what was the critical period in which things could still have been changed, given different political conditions/leadership/etc.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Hail

    The Decline of California: When and Why (or, Who Lost California?), longform essay based on, and expanded from, comments in this thread.

    Replies: @Ed

  124. @Hail
    @Ed

    Reagan: elected CA Governor Nov. 1966; re-elected Nov. 1970; left office Jan. 1975.

    According to Pat Buchanan's political biography of Richard Nixon in the years 1966-1968 (The Greatest Comeback; published by Pat in 2014 as a kind of memoir of his own reminiscences as Nixon's closest aide in much of that period and insights derived therefrom), the Nixon campaign's greatest fear was Reagan entering the 1968 presidential race, which the latter was considering but finally decided to back Nixon.

    After the Nixon era ended, Reagan was in, what, more-or-less full-time presidential campaign mode as of circa mid 1975 (lost nomination to Ford, 1976) until his Nov. 1980 election, but we see he was partly in presidential campaign mode as early as 1967.

    Whatever Reagan was doing in California in the late 1960s and certainly by the early-mid 1970s, he was already shooting for 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, 3,000 or so miles to the east.

    ___________

    I'd love to see a well-thought-out essay here at the Unz Review by an informed observer addressing the question of what caused California's decline -- why and when.

    By 'when,' I mean: what was the critical period in which things could still have been changed, given different political conditions/leadership/etc.

    Replies: @Hail

    The Decline of California: When and Why (or, Who Lost California?), longform essay based on, and expanded from, comments in this thread.

    • Replies: @Ed
    @Hail

    From your post: – Q. Who lost California? (A. No single person lost California. Being forced to pick one person, though, can be a useful thought-exercise, and the results instructive, if not necessarily to be taken fully seriously in a conclusive manner. This essay, below, explores the candidates and the critical periods. Many US conservatives may be surprised to learn that a prime candidate for who lost California, in such a thought-exercise, is Ronald Reagan, two-term governor of the state.

    ————

    It’s not out of the realm of possibility that Reagan’s name will be mud among what’s left of white Christian conservatives, 25 years from now.

  125. @Hail
    @Hail

    The Decline of California: When and Why (or, Who Lost California?), longform essay based on, and expanded from, comments in this thread.

    Replies: @Ed

    From your post: – Q. Who lost California? (A. No single person lost California. Being forced to pick one person, though, can be a useful thought-exercise, and the results instructive, if not necessarily to be taken fully seriously in a conclusive manner. This essay, below, explores the candidates and the critical periods. Many US conservatives may be surprised to learn that a prime candidate for who lost California, in such a thought-exercise, is Ronald Reagan, two-term governor of the state.

    ————

    It’s not out of the realm of possibility that Reagan’s name will be mud among what’s left of white Christian conservatives, 25 years from now.

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