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From the New York Times news section:

Aspirin Use to Prevent 1st Heart Attack or Stroke Should Be Curtailed, U.S. Panel Says

Adults at high risk for cardiovascular disease may face serious side effects if they start a daily regimen of low-dose aspirin.

By Roni Caryn Rabin
Oct. 12, 2021

Doctors should no longer routinely start people who are at high risk of heart disease on a daily regimen of low-dose aspirin to help prevent a first heart attack or stroke, according to new draft guidelines by a U.S. panel of experts.

The proposed recommendation is based on mounting evidence that the risk of serious side effects far outweighs the benefit of what was once considered a remarkably cheap weapon in the fight against heart disease.

The U.S. panel also plans to retreat from its 2016 recommendation to take baby aspirin for the prevention of colorectal cancer, guidance that was groundbreaking at the time. The panel said more recent data had raised questions about the benefits for cancer, and that more research was needed.

On the use of low-dose or baby aspirin, the recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force would apply to people younger than 60 who were at high risk of heart disease and for whom a new daily regimen of the mild analgesic might have been a tool to prevent a first heart attack or stroke. The proposed guidelines would not apply to those already taking aspirin or those who have already had a heart attack.

The U.S. task force also wants to strongly discourage anyone 60 and older from starting a low-dose aspirin regimen, citing concerns about the age-related heightened risk for life-threatening bleeding. The panel had previously recommended that people in their 60s who were at high risk for cardiovascular disease consult their doctors to make a decision. A low dose is 81 milligrams to 100 milligrams.

The task force proposals follow years of changes in advice by several leading medical organizations and federal agencies, some of which had already recommended limiting the use of low-dose aspirin as a preventive tool against heart disease and stroke. Aspirin inhibits the formation of blood clots that can block arteries, but studies have raised concerns that regular intake increases the risk of bleeding, especially in the digestive tract and the brain, dangers that increase with age.

 
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  1. JimDandy says:

    OMG, what is so hard about this? Just follow the SCIENCE, people! Stop doing your own “research” and fucking listen to the experts. Always.

  2. Altai says:

    Alternative headline: Human metabolism is highly variable person to person before you get into other biochemistry and a shocking amount of drugs are actually highly ineffective in their standard doses and at all.

    • Agree: Gabe Ruth
  3. Daniel H says:

    I have been taking 2 aspirin EVERY morning for the past 30 years and I’m going to continue do so.

    • Agree: Brutusale
  4. SafeNow says:

    I read the draft recommendations. It tells me that ultimately, I am a subgroup of one, and I should discuss with my “clinician” the various factors as they apply to me. Good advice. But mysteriously, the factors for weighing include my “values and preferences.”

    The second mystery to me is why a different analysis applies to someone already taking aspirin versus someone considering beginning the aspirin. The anti-platelet effect of aspirin reverses itself after seven days, so apart from that seven-day window, I do not understand the difference between person X and person Y. I guess the difference is that if you were already taking aspirin and you’re still alive, you don’t argue with success.

    • Replies: @epebble
  5. newrouter says:

    “Experts”: Uncertainty about aspirin. “Experts”: covid vax -take the jab moron.

    • Replies: @Buck Ransom
    , @Bill Jones
  6. Joseph A. says:

    Perhaps Satan’s minions want to remove a little, inexpensive obstacle to their villainous clotting.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  7. usNthem says:

    The medical community continues to sink further, amazingly enough. The longer this goes on and the more revelations, the harder it’ll be to take much of what any doctor recommends seriously – got a problem, here’s a pill…

    • Replies: @Forbes
  8. mounting evidence that the risk of serious side effects far outweighs the benefit

    Sound like anything else you might have heard of?

    • Thanks: Charon
  9. I had an MD start me on the LD aspirin (Chinese). After Obamacare, at a now different hospital, I asked the Physician’s Assistant (female White) about continuing this. She said that all the current research, including the opinion of the cardiac people at the hospital, indicated that I should drop that the regimen. She left the hospital last year, and was replaced by a dot-Indian PA. He said I should take the LD aspirin, even after I explained what the previous PA recommended.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  10. Sounds like they want us all clotted up, good and hard.

  11. Anon[385] • Disclaimer says:

    This coincides with global aspirin shortages following the pandemic. Follow the scarcity.

    • Replies: @Franz
  12. J.Ross says:

    Imagine exercising and eating proper supplemented nutrition instead of yo-yo-ing on big pharma’s patent expiration workarounds. Industrial society and its consequences have been a [smiiiiile] Naaational Traaagedy.

  13. Mr. Anon says:

    Doctors should no longer routinely start people who are at high risk of heart disease on a daily regimen of low-dose aspirin to help prevent a first heart attack or stroke, according to new draft guidelines by a U.S. panel of experts.

    The proposed recommendation is based on mounting evidence that the risk of serious side effects far outweighs the benefit of what was once considered a remarkably cheap weapon in the fight against heart disease.

    The U.S. panel also plans to retreat from its 2016 recommendation to take baby aspirin for the prevention of colorectal cancer, guidance that was groundbreaking at the time. The panel said more recent data had raised questions about the benefits for cancer, and that more research was needed.

    The panel further added that they will recommend a new daily regimen using a new drug called Pfeizerin, recently announced by Pfeizer in a press conference held at their satellite offices at the FDA’s White Oak Campus in Silver Springs Maryland. After shoving the FDA’s spokesman from the podium and then shooting his cuffs and adjusting his tie clip, Pfeizer’s Vice President for Marketing, Biff Glibman, announced the debut of the new drug and said that clinical trials of Pfeizerin had shown that it could command a price as high as \$5,000 or \$6,000 a year per customer. “That’s some real Cheddar!”, he added just before departing the building in his gold-plated Bentley

    • Replies: @Bridgeport_IPA
  14. Study: Blacks receive less aggressive treatment for heart attacks, die at higher rates than whites.
    Study: Billions can be saved by less aggressive treatment for possible heart attacks.
    A pair of headlines about 6 weeks apart.

  15. And then there is this:

    https://m.jpost.com/health-and-wellness/aspirin-lowers-risk-of-covid-new-findings-support-preliminary-israeli-trial-681127

    Oh, so this study suggests that there may be not only therapeutic benefits, but also prophylactic benefits from aspirin use in relation to Covid-19. You know, those issues with micro-clotting? Come to think of it, that seems to be an issue with the so-called fully vaccinated, too.

    How very timely that this prominently-featured article should arrive, and just in time, to throw shade on these uses for aspirin, an inexpensive, out of patent medicine. Sort of like how we heard nothing but terrible things about therapeutic, and prophylactic, uses of hydroxychlorquine and ivermectin from the press and the media right up to the present day regardless of reports from the field. Makes you wonder if the press and the media are just a bunch of cockblockers in service to the pharmaceutical industry, which industry is only incidentally one of their most lucrative sources of advertising revenue.

    Weird, huh?

    • Replies: @FPD72
  16. This is pretty old news in the civilised (i.e., non-US) West.

    There is a caveat in the ATT Collaboration paper from 2009 (see below for the reference):

    In primary prevention without previous disease, aspirin is of uncertain net value as the reduction in occlusive events needs to be weighed against any increase in major bleeds. Further trials are in progress.

    The NNT for low-dose aspirin for primary prevention is 1667 (that is, you need to treat 1667 people for a year, in order to prevent a single ‘first’ non-fatal heart attack or stroke) – the NNT site is always your friend on this.

    My father’s cardiologist told Dad to stop taking baby aspirin about 8 years ago based on his low heart attack and stroke risk. Dad’s never had a cardiac event of any type: he just has high blood pressure for apparently no reason whatsoever (like me: clear carotids; zero CAC; clear cardiac ultrasound (no LVH); good lipids; HBA1c < 35mmol/ml (so good blood glucose control); eGFR above 100 (so, good kidneys); resting pulse in the 50s… but a 'walking around' BP of 180/110).

    My uncle in Canada (who is a cardiologist) was agnostic when my Mum (his sister) ran the idea past him – and Uncle Murray is, to my mind, far too 'conventional' (he's been in practice for 50 years).

    Reference…

    Antithrombotic Trialists’ (ATT) Collaboration, Baigent C, Blackwell L, Collins R, Emberson J, Godwin J, Peto R, Buring J, Hennekens C, Kearney P, Meade T, Patrono C, Roncaglioni MC, Zanchetti A., “Aspirin in the primary and secondary prevention of vascular disease: collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised trials.Lancet. 2009 May 30;373(9678):1849-60. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60503-1. PMID: 19482214; PMCID: PMC2715005.

  17. Anon[335] • Disclaimer says:

    If you’ve been paying attention, or actually talking to your doctor about this, it’s been the advice for two or three decades.

    The only difference that I can see in this most recent advice and what I was getting in the 1990s is that they are saying to never take microdose aspirin, whereas the previous advice weighed the benefits against things like your risk for duodenal ulcers and eye bleeding against your risk for a heart attack.

    The actual truth is may be that there are some people who should be taking microdoses, but there is no way of communicating that in such a way that people who shouldn’t be taking them will nevertheless take them, so the lesser of two evils is to try to kill off the idea completely, and leave a few exceptions to doctors to deal with doctor to patient.

    A similar case is when the FDA told pregnant women to limit their intake of fish because of mercury. Women then stopped eating fish altogether, which was not the advice. I read an article once about a Harvard study that estimated an almost one-point drop in national IQ from this FDA advice due to decreased omega-3s and the like. Public health has problems delivering nuanced advice. The headlines don’t properly represent the advice, the public does a Chinese telephone transformation of the advice, and what comes out is a distortion of what was intended. The FDA probably should have told women to be absolutely sure to eat fish three times a week, and only in a footnote mention to not make it all tuna, but add in some sardines and whitefish.

  18. @Mr. Anon

    “Clinical trials have shown that…we can make scads of cash!”

    Good satire.

  19. Franz says:
    @Anon

    This coincides with global aspirin shortages following the pandemic.

    Yep, most suspicious.

    I’m not suggesting it, but a case of Bufferin at Walmart is still pretty cheap. At one a day, long time.

    They wouldn’t lie about something as important as our HEALTH, would they? After a year and a half of doing nothing but.

    Also grape juice or red wine has some of the same blood thinning effects as aspirin. Sometimes considered easier to take.

  20. Pericles says:
    @Joseph A.

    Perhaps Pfizer is getting ready to announce their new miracle drug, niripsa?

    • Thanks: Muggles
  21. Pericles says:
    @Joe Stalin

    C’mon man, just follow the science!

  22. Mr. Anon says:

    To paraphrase Henry Ford: medicine is bunk – a fable agreed upon.

    I’ll keep to my preferred health regimen……..six parts gin, one part vermouth, two olives.

  23. Slim says:

    A dozen years ago I started a daily low dose aspirin regimen. It caused angioedema and the realization that I am allergic to aspirin and NSAIDs. Angioedema is a common enough side effect that my primary care RN figured out the cause quite easily.

  24. Don’t throw that aspirin away: It might be useful for surviving the vaxx-induced clotting you might experience after you take the COVID vaxxes touted by the same experts as “safe & effective.”

  25. If you read Miguel Hernan, whom I pointed to some time ago for his work with observational studies, the debunking of aspirin and salmon oil would be old news. The association was not causal.

    But this is timely in a way that is underappreciated. Let’s connect this to other recent news. Hernan used techniques from observational studies that actually work. Instead, they gave the Nobel to someone who used imaginary pseudo control groups.

  26. If you read Miguel Hernan, whom I pointed to some time ago for his work with observational studies, the debunking of aspirin and salmon oil would be old news. The association was not causal.

    But this is timely in a way that is underappreciated. Let’s connect this to other recent news. Hernan used techniques from observational studies that actually work. Instead, they gave the Nobel to someone who used imaginary pseudo control groups .

    That’s not to say there are not some benefits to these, but there was no evidence regarding prevention of heart attacks.

  27. FPD72 says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian

    Oh, so this study suggests that there may be not only therapeutic benefits, but also prophylactic benefits from aspirin use in relation to Covid-19. You know, those issues with micro-clotting? Come to think of it, that seems to be an issue with the so-called fully vaccinated, too.

    The Front Line Covid-19 Critical Care (FLCCC) Alliance protocols recommend a daily aspirin dose of 325 mg for outpatient treatment of COVID-19. They recognize that COVID-19 is primarily a clotting and inflammation disease.

    https://covid19criticalcare.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/FLCCC-Alliance-I-MASKplus-Protocol-ENGLISH.pdf

  28. Ben Gunn says:

    Yes this comes at a time when it is revealed taking aspirin cuts the risk of hospitalization and death from Covid about in 1/2. This complaint has appeared before.

  29. Ralph L says:

    An occasional ibuprofen gave my dad a bleeding ulcer at 88. Poor hydration was also a factor.

  30. We need Zero Heart Disease and Zero Stroke goals. Nothing less is acceptable, and there are no such things as trade-offs or costs. Isn’t that what public health experts tell us?

  31. a remarkably cheap weapon in the fight against heart disease.

    There is already a completely free way to prevent or mitigate heart disease. Go for a walk every day and don’t eat garbage. Literally costs zero money and takes minimal time but half the country is incapable of doing it. Anybody who still trusts the medical-pharma industry deserves whatever happens to them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  32. @newrouter

    Aspirin inhibits the formation of blood clots that can block arteries…,

    And we wouldn’t want anything to interfere with all those billions of spike proteins you’ve acquired recently to clot up all your arteries, now would we?

  33. Muggles says:

    Odd, on a recent visit to my hematologist, he recommended that I start taking low dose aspirin daily again.

    I had stopped last year.

    I guess he hadn’t gotten the memo yet.

  34. Forbes says:
    @usNthem

    When my father was at a sufficiently advanced (75?), he attended a new PCP, as his current physician retired.

    First question: “What medications are you currently taking?”
    Father: “None.”
    Response: “Well that’s gonna change. I’ll write you out some scripts that you should start taking.”

    My father did live to be 93, but I’d say that was more due to a life of robust health, rather than the physician’s interventions.

  35. “U.S. Preventive Services Task Force”

    This nonsense issued by nebulous experts follows on the heels of an Israeli report on the therapeutic benefits of low dose 81mg aspirin for COVID patients. Use of 81 mg aspirin helps prevent blood clots; blood-clotting in lungs is one of the many nasty effects of the bio-weapon. Israeli data has been quite helpful in understanding the disease and the limited efficacy of the mRNA “vaccines”. It’s almost as if Science wants us to die.

  36. martin_2 says:

    I started taking 75 mg of aspirin everyday for a couple of weeks some years ago, and developed very painful heartburn, so packed it in.

  37. “and that more research was needed”

    And there it is, come out with a dubious claim and then petition for more grant money.

  38. epebble says:
    @SafeNow

    the difference is that if you were already taking aspirin and you’re still alive, you don’t argue with success.

    That is a good way of saying what the highfalutin tell:

    Bayesian inference is a method of statistical inference in which Bayes’ theorem is used to update the probability for a hypothesis as more evidence or information becomes available. Bayesian inference is an important technique in statistics, and especially in mathematical statistics. Bayesian updating is particularly important in the dynamic analysis of a sequence of data. Bayesian inference has found application in a wide range of activities, including science, engineering, philosophy, medicine, sport, carpooling, and law. In the philosophy of decision theory, Bayesian inference is closely related to subjective probability, often called “Bayesian probability”.

  39. @newrouter

    It’s time to get back to basic definitions: Expert-

    An Ex is a has been.
    A spurt is a drip under pressure.

    One wonders how much of the pressure is coming from those worried about all the Kill-Shot victims leakin in the streets.

  40. It’s kind of weird how anything that appears to work in the fight against Covid is now bad for you.

    https://www.jpost.com/health-and-wellness/aspirin-lowers-risk-of-covid-new-findings-support-preliminary-israeli-trial-681127

    Aspirin lowers risk of COVID: New findings support preliminary Israeli trial

    This just might be all about a search engine optimization technique. a duckduckgo search of “aspirin” yields 3 “current news” articles about the article we are commenting on and ZERO results for the link i’m providing in this reply.

    This story is about getting aspirin off the front search page results…..typing just aspirin returns nothing about the Israeli study in the first 3 pages.

  41. Anonymous[205] • Disclaimer says:
    @Magic Dirt Resident

    There is already a completely free way to prevent or mitigate heart disease. Go for a walk every day and don’t eat garbage. Literally costs zero money and takes minimal time but half the country is incapable of doing it.

    Could you post some instructions on how to eat not garbage?

    • Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident
  42. @Anonymous

    Nothing that contains vegetable oils, very little added sugar. Stick to natural whole foods like meat, eggs, dairy, fruit/vegetables and you’ll be fine. Processed food with added chemicals will make you fat and stupid.

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