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From a classic upside-down NYT article:

‘Everybody Is Armed’: As Shootings Soar, Philadelphia Is Awash in Guns

More than 1,400 people have been shot this year in Philadelphia, hundreds of them fatally — a higher toll than in much larger New York or Los Angeles.

By Campbell Robertson
Aug. 11, 2022

PHILADELPHIA — … With her death, the 322nd of the year, the number of homicides in Philadelphia was on track toward becoming the highest in police records, passing the bleak milestone set just last year. So far this year, more than 1,400 people in the city have been shot, hundreds of them fatally, a higher toll than in the much larger cities of New York or Los Angeles. Alarms have sounded about gun violence across the country over the past two years, but Philadelphia is one of the few major American cities where it truly is as bad as it has ever been.

The crisis is all the more harrowing for having been so concentrated in certain neighborhoods in North and West Philadelphia, places that were left behind decades ago by redlining and other forms of discrimination and are now among the poorest parts of what is often called the country’s poorest big city. …

The city government has rolled out an array of efforts to address the crisis, including grants for community groups, violence intervention programs and earlier curfews. But on one crucial matter, there seem to be no ready answers: what to do about all the guns.

“Everybody is armed,” said Jonathan Wilson, director of the Fathership Foundation, a nonprofit organization in Southwest Philadelphia that has been helping to conduct a multicity survey of young people’s attitudes about gun culture. “Nobody’s without a gun in these ZIP codes, because they’ve always been dangerous.”

In a recent news conference, Mayor Jim Kenney lamented that the authorities “keep taking guns off the street, and they’re simultaneously replaced almost immediately.” In fact, the problem is more drastic than that, according to a city report earlier this year. For every illegal gun seized by the police in Philadelphia between 1999 and 2019, about three more guns were bought or sold legally — and that was before a recent boom in gun ownership.

In Philadelphia over the past two years, as all around the country, the pace of legal gun sales surged, roughly doubling during the pandemic years. The number of firearm licenses issued in the city jumped to more than 52,000 in 2021, from around 7,400 in 2020.

Obviously, Philadelphia’s current murder orgy has to do with recent legal gun purchases. Philadelphia rednecks are to blame.

About at this point, most New York Times subscribers stop reading, satisfied that their view of who are the good guys and who are the bad guys has been upheld yet again.

None of these figures include the apparently flourishing market in illegal guns. Over the past two years, reports of stolen guns have spiked, major gun-trafficking pipelines have been uncovered and, according to the police, many more guns have been found that were illegally converted into fully automatic weapons.

The city has sued the gun-friendly state legislature for pre-empting its authority to enact stronger local gun laws, like reporting requirements for lost or stolen guns. And officials in Philadelphia have publicly quarreled among themselves about enforcement of the laws on the books. In July, after two police officers were shot at a Fourth of July celebration, some City Council leaders even suggested returning to a police tactic that many people had come to see as the shame of an earlier era: stop-and-frisk.

After all, what did stop and frisk ever do under Mayor Bloomberg to make New York City have by far the lowest murder rate of any huge city in the country? Who can remember that far back?

“There are a lot of citizens in the streets of the city of Philadelphia that talk about, ‘When are we going to look at stop-and-frisk in a constitutional and active way?’” Darrell L. Clarke, the council president, said at a news conference. “Those are conversations that people have to have.”

Given a consent decree that requires the monitoring of police stops, as well as opposition from other city leaders and a dearth of evidence that the practice ever worked, the old days of stop-and-frisk, when the police conducted thousands of street searches that overwhelmingly targeted Black Philadelphians, are unlikely to return. But broaching the subject at all revealed the depths of official exasperation.

Some of the frustration has been directed at the district attorney, Larry Krasner, whose approach to criminal justice has drawn criticism from the mayor, ire from the police union and a threat of impeachment from Republican state lawmakers.

That’s pretty brave. Of course, it’s the 12th paragraph and metrics from the marketing department show that most NYT subscribers have long stopped reading by this point, at which the reporter can start to edge in to explaining what’s really going on.

Of course, the reporter wouldn’t be so suicidal as to mention that George Soros contributed 30% of the campaign funds to the 7 candidate primary in which Krasner emerged in 2017. The notion that George Soros is a very opinionated, very rich, and very effective man who took to heart The New Jim Crow anti-mass incarceration conventional wisdom of the Great Awokening over the last decade is just an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory. It’s not like he’s a Koch Brother!

Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years. I doubt that Mr. Soros would much disagree with this assessment of mine. He and I are grown-ups who are entitled to disagree. He just has far more money than I do, so he expects to win.

But being impressed but concerned by Mr. Soros’ vast efforts is lately considered an anti-Semitic Conspiracy Theory.

Mr. Krasner, one of the most prominent progressive prosecutors in the country, has long argued that putting a major focus on the arrest and incarceration of people caught carrying firearms without a permit is not only ineffectual but counterproductive, because it diverts police energy and resources from solving violent crime and alienates people whom investigators need as sources and witnesses.

“You can make massive numbers of gun arrests, and you do not see significant reductions in shooting,” he said in an interview.

That would be point-of-use gun control and we progressives only care about point-of-sale gun control. The whole point of gun control is to persecute rednecks buying rifles legally, not to discourage black criminals from carrying handguns illegally and shooting other blacks who peeve them.

There were no arrests in three quarters of last year’s fatal shootings, according to statistics provided by Mr. Krasner’s office, even as arrests for illegal guns soared to record levels.

Only a small fraction of the people who are arrested for carrying guns without permits are the ones actually driving the violence, Mr. Krasner said. He insisted that the city needed to focus instead on people who had already proven themselves to be dangerous, and to invest in advanced forensic technology to clear the hundreds of unsolved shootings.

“What is their theory — that rather than go vigorously after the people who actually shoot the gun,” Mr. Krasner asked, “that we should take 100 people and put them in jail, because one of them might shoot somebody?”

Larry Krasner and the other Soros district attorneys are like the NRA for criminals: criminals need their illegal handguns for self-defense! We can’t have Philadelphia turn into New York where the criminals became more scared of the cops than of other criminals so they decided to leave their illegal handguns at home. Can you imagine, if criminals weren’t packing illegal heat, somebody might diss them at a block party and they wouldn’t be able to pull out their Glock and fire off a fusillade in the general direction of their insulting rival and by happenstance wound little girls jumping rope in the background! Is that the kind of America we want, one where urban hoodlums can’t shoot little girls by accident?

Some city officials, including the police chief, see things differently.

“I think there are some philosophical differences between us,” said Police Commissioner Danielle M. Outlaw in an interview.

Chief Outlaw is a woman who is black and is named “Outlaw,” so her fabulous career (she’s the former police chief of Portland) has been particularly fabulous.

She said she advocated “a both-and, not an either-or” approach. …

“There have to be consequences for those who are carrying and using these guns illegally,” Ms. Outlaw said. “If I go out and get this gun, knowing nothing’s going to happen to me, why would that preclude me from doing anything else illegally with a gun?”

For those who live in the crisis every day, these questions are visceral.

Marguerite Ruff is a special education classroom assistant at an elementary school in Philadelphia. On a Saturday morning seven years ago, her youngest son, Justin, 23, was shot to death in the street.

There should be stiffer penalties for carrying guns illegally, Ms Ruff said in a recent interview. But she added that it probably wouldn’t make any difference. “They think they can get away with it, because they’re young,” she said.

Some years ago, “a thinking person” would not carry a gun on the streets of Philadelphia, Ms. Ruff said, “but now you can’t even step out of your house, can’t go to your car, you can’t drive to the corner.” She did not like that so many people carried guns, she said, but “in a way, I can understand it.”

At the North Philadelphia headquarters of NOMO, a nonprofit for at-risk youth in the city, a few dozen young people — boys and girls, 11 to 17 — had gathered on a sweltering summer afternoon. Rickey Duncan, the organization’s chief executive, asked for a show of hands: How many felt endangered on a daily basis? A large majority raised a hand. How many would feel safer with a gun? The response was about the same.

How many knew how to get a gun with a single phone call? The response was nearly unanimous.

One young man explained it this way: If you were arrested, you could still see your family in jail. Not so if you were dead.

Mr. Duncan had called this man, a 21-year-old participant in the program who did not want his name published for his own safety, and asked him to tell his story.

Several years ago, the young man said, he bought a 9-millimeter pistol from an acquaintance for several hundred dollars, only to have another friend take it, fire it at him and leave with it. That friend was later charged with shooting two people to death. This is how it is these days, he said.

“We still want to do better,” he said. “But there’s a lot of things in the way.”

Like all the criminals in Larry Krasner’s Philadelphia who carry illegal handguns because the other criminals aren’t scared of the law.

 
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  1. With her death, the 322nd of the year, the number of homicides in Philadelphia was on track toward becoming the highest in police records, passing the bleak milestone set just last year. So far this year, more than 1,400 people in the city have been shot, hundreds of them fatally,

    So, an injury to kill rate of over three to one. That tells you all you need to know about who’s doing the shooting.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  2. Steve, any thoughts on Anne Heche?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    A crazy woman from way way back.

    Replies: @Franz, @Joe Joe

    , @Right_On
    @Anonymous

    She was Marion in the shot-for-shot remake of Psycho. Many moons ago, I switched on the TV, not knowing what was on, and chanced on the scene where she's trading in her car. I didn't know Heche, or the other actors, but the dialogue was familiar. For a few minutes, I had the weirdest feeling trying to reconcile my auditory and visual inputs.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpPEPbi79W8&ab_channel=columbiafan

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  3. @Anonymous
    Steve, any thoughts on Anne Heche?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Right_On

    A crazy woman from way way back.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Franz
    @Steve Sailer


    A crazy woman from way way back.
     
    A crazy woman FROM OHIO from way back.

    We specialize in exporting nuts.

    George Custer, William Clarke Quantrill, Annie Oakley (she really did shoot the cigar out of the Czar's mouth) and even more. Without counting all the movie stars like Clark Gable, Tyrone Power, Paul Newman and the Wicked Witch of the West.

    Replies: @Philbert Desanex, @Redneck farmer

    , @Joe Joe
    @Steve Sailer

    LOL ;-)

  4. Obviously, Philadelphia’s current murder orgy has to do with recent legal gun purchases. Philadelphia rednecks are to blame.

    About at this point, most New York Times subscribers stop reading, satisfied that their view of who are the good guys and who are the bad guys has been upheld yet again.

    I posted this before but it’s too good not to post here.

    ‘Send prayers’: 5 people shot at East Texas trail ride event
    Following a fight near a concert stage, one or more trail ride groups started shooting into the crowd
    https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/shooting-East-Texas-trail-ride-17267178.php

    Wow, East Texas trail riders, must be a bunch of Yosemite Sam types losing their cool. But it’s 5 wounded no dead, there is that law…

    The Smith County Sheriff’s Office said it received a call at 12:35 a.m. Sunday about multiple gunshot victims in a large pasture area in the eastern part of the county. People were taking part in an annual trail ride sponsored by Unified Elite Riderzz from nearby Marshall, Texas.

    Authorities say witnesses told investigators that following a fight near a concert stage, one or more trail ride groups started shooting into the crowd.

    Oh.

    https://texashighways.com/culture/giddyup-zydeco-bill-pickett-zydeco-trail-ride/

    https://www.huckmag.com/art-and-culture/zydeco-cowboys-hip-hop-country-dance-louisiana/

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
  5. Don’t go into town, Jack! We need you here buddy.

  6. In Octopus by Sam Israel, Israel tells of being trained by Soros in the ‘70s in the fine art of insider trading a crime for which Soros has an much under reported conviction in France. Maybe the fact that he’s an fellow con is what motivates George?

    I challenge you to find an reference to this conviction in any American news article mentioning Soros.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13132058-octopus

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @raga10
    @Curle


    I challenge you to find an reference to this conviction in any American news article mentioning Soros.
     
    challenge accepted:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2011-10-06/soros-loses-human-rights-appeal-against-insider-trading-case
    https://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/14/business/worldbusiness/14iht-soros.1974397.html
    https://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/10/06/soros-loses-challenge-to-insider-trading-conviction/
    https://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/21/business/soros-is-found-guilty-in-france-on-charges-of-insider-trading.html

    and it's not like I had to dig deep - all are links to mainstream sites, taken from the top of the first page of search results. I used Brave search and I can't be bothered comparing it to results that google would produce but clearly, the information is out there.

  7. OT – Guardian/BMJ

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/aug/11/rise-in-popularity-of-anal-sex-has-led-to-health-problems-for-women

    https://www.bmj.com/content/378/bmj.o1975

    “Clinicians’ reluctance to discuss possible harms is letting down a generation of women”

    Bottom line (ba-dum-tish! thank you!)

    a) a lot more young women are having sex “per vas nefandum” – by the unmentionable vessel, as Aleister Crowley euphemised it.

    Anal intercourse is becoming more common among heterosexual couples. Within popular culture it has moved from the world of pornography to mainstream media.1 It is no longer considered an extreme behaviour but increasingly portrayed as a prized and pleasurable experience.2 In Britain, the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyle shows participation in heterosexual anal intercourse among 16 to 24 year olds rose from 12.5% to 28.5% over the past few decades.3 Similar trends are seen in the US, where 30-44% of men and women report experience of anal sex.4

    b) a fair few girlies are doing it either because its fashionable (“as seen on TV”) or because their men want it

    Young women cite pleasure, curiosity, pleasing male partners, and coercion as factors.56 Up to 25% of women with experience of anal sex report they have been pressured into it at least once.7 Hit television shows such as Sex and the City and Fleabag may unwittingly add to the pressure, as they seem to normalise anal sex in heterosexual relationships or make it appear racy and daring.

    c) the physiology of the nether regions differs between the sexes, perhaps surprisingly

    Women have less robust anal sphincters and lower anal canal pressures than men,13 and damage caused by anal penetration is therefore more consequential.

    I don’t know what anal canal pressure is, and I’m not sure I want to know.

    d) and the results of damaging that area are not very nice

    The absence of vaginal secretions, increased traumatic abrasions, and less common use of condoms increase the risk of sexually transmitted disease and anal malignancy.9 Anal pain, bleeding, and fissures also occur as a result of anal intercourse.1011

    Increased rates of faecal incontinence and anal sphincter injury have been reported in women who have anal intercourse.12 Women are at a higher risk of incontinence than men because of their different anatomy and the effects of hormones, pregnancy, and childbirth on the pelvic floor.

    Incontinence of the traditional kind is no joke. “Faecal incontinence” sounds like an appalling fate.

    e) and no one is warning young women about the dangers

    NHS patient information on anal sex considers only sexually transmitted diseases, making no mention of anal trauma, incontinence, or the psychological aftermath of the coercion young women report in relation to this activity.17 A plethora of non-medical or pseudomedical websites fill the health information void. Rather than helping young women make informed decisions, some sites may increase societal pressure to try anal sex.

    It may not be just avoidance or stigma that prevents health professionals talking to young women about the risks of anal sex. There is genuine concern that the message may be seen as judgmental or even misconstrued as homophobic. However, by avoiding these discussions, we may be failing a generation of young women, who are unaware of the risks. With better information, women who want anal sex would be able to protect themselves more effectively from possible harm, and those who agree to anal sex reluctantly to meet society’s expectations (my horrified emboldening), or please partners, may feel better empowered to say no.

    This is a public information post.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon

    So discouraging anal sex may be "construed as homophobic", even it's advice given to a heterosexual woman.

    Two remarks I read about this practice spring randomly to mind. Auberon Waugh said it was a form of contraception in some parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Anthony Burgess in one of his novels said Arabs did it "to avoid each others' bad breath".

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  8. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    A crazy woman from way way back.

    Replies: @Franz, @Joe Joe

    A crazy woman from way way back.

    A crazy woman FROM OHIO from way back.

    We specialize in exporting nuts.

    George Custer, William Clarke Quantrill, Annie Oakley (she really did shoot the cigar out of the Czar’s mouth) and even more. Without counting all the movie stars like Clark Gable, Tyrone Power, Paul Newman and the Wicked Witch of the West.

    • Replies: @Philbert Desanex
    @Franz

    you forgot Woody Hayes and Bobby Knight

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Franz

    You forgot Curtis Lemay.
    And Indiana outdoes us in crazy.

    Replies: @Franz

  9. It’s simple. No matter how bad our leadership [email protected] up, blacks are too incompetent to threaten them.
    Rural whites, could.

  10. Why does the NYT give the full story at all, even in the 12 + paragraphs ?

  11. Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years.

    Care to flesh out the first half of that sentence? I realize that Mr. Soros has done things that I could not have done, like become fabulously wealthy without ever doing anything physically productive, which elicits a sort of grudging admiration from me, in the same way that I grudgingly admire when hoodrats with rap sheets down to the floor somehow manage not to be incarcerated or even hunted fugitives.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
    • Thanks: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @SFG
    @Almost Missouri

    Julius Caesar reference?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @Anonymous
    @Almost Missouri

    He ripped of UK taxpayers - albeit because of dumb ass 'economists' - to the tune of several billion pounds thirty years ago.
    He's no better than a thief, a counterfeiter and a fraudster.

    , @John Milton's Ghost
    @Almost Missouri

    Trend trading, of which Soros was one of a handful of extremely successful practitioners, is not easily mastered, nor often replicable in any sort of mass level (hence no good mutual funds or etfs that copy it). It would be analogous to say Warren Buffett or Peter Lynch is a great man. Steve's language is curious, though, and methinks he's having a little arch fun with it: does anyone say Buffett is a great man, using such terms?

    Perhaps the greatness Steve refers to is the flash of idiosyncrasy that Soros displays in what would, for anyone else, be a Quixotic futile enterprise. Successful trend trader John W. Henry decided to buy the Red Sox with his wealth. Soros has decided to destroy civilized places. Maybe that's greatness in the same way Ghengis Khan was great?

    I have an extremely libertarian friend who is a strong proponent of Karl Popper's open society, and he holds Soros (a former Popper student) to be a huge disappointment, because his actions are the opposite of Popper's professed ideals. I don't necessarily find Soros to be pure evil, but rather an accelerated version of what the Ford and Rockefeller families did, albeit in a single generation: accrue amazing wealth, then turn on and close the door for anyone else to build something similar, by completely embracing theories that destroy what made wealth accumulation possible for common people in the first place. That, and having so much wealth to embrace ridiculous decadent ideas that don't harm one who is well-protected from the ramifications of said ideas.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  12. 1,400 gunshot wounds in one city. Think about what that costs. From a 1997 article “Costs of gunshot and cut/stab wounds in the United States, with some Canadian comparisons“:

    Across medically treated cases, costs average U.S. \$154,000 per gunshot survivor and U.S. \$12,000 per cut/stab survivor.

    — and that’s at 1997 prices. Anyone do the math on this? What does this violence cost us each year?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Tracy



    Across medically treated cases, costs average U.S. $154,000 per gunshot survivor and U.S. $12,000 per cut/stab survivor.
     
    — and that’s at 1997 prices. Anyone do the math on this? What does this violence cost us each year?
     
    Accounting for inflation, and medical advances (with commensurate cost advances) that might be about a quarter million per shot nowadays, which for 1400 shots means about a third of a $billion. Most of the victims are probably uninsured so the cost mostly falls on the city.

    In FY2020, the latest year available, Phila. took in $4.3 bil. and spent $4.7 bil., $223m of which was on "health services", so either they are blowing out that budget line, they're charging it elsewhere, or the Feds (i.e., the rest of the US) are kicking in money.
    , @AnotherDad
    @Tracy


    1,400 gunshot wounds in one city. Think about what that costs.
     
    The legacy of slavery has been very, very expensive.

    If you value "diversity", that same money could create really spectacular zoos/refuges that would be a heck of a lot more pleasant.

    There's a moral there: Cheap labor never is.

    , @Detroit Refugee
    @Tracy

    What does this black violence cost us each year?

    More than I could guesstimate. But add human lives lost as well as dollars, and blacks owe us reparations.

  13. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    A crazy woman from way way back.

    Replies: @Franz, @Joe Joe

    LOL 😉

  14. I suspect social media has played a role in the rise of shootings since it allows petty slights to spread to a huge audience in short order, and most urban violence is over small insults as opposed to intricate drug or gang wars as a lot of people imagine.

    One thing that I think is worth examining is what effect the fact that the overwhelming majority of black boys are raised by single mothers has on their emotional response to insults. Women are far less likely to let a real or perceived insult go and instead prefer to stir the pot, and younger ones do use social media platforms for this. Perhaps a lot of young black males internalized this instinct from observing their mothers and that, coupled with a young man’s willingness to apply violence, might partially account for the extremely low bar in urban American for comments or acts that demand a lethal response.

    • Agree: Charon
    • Thanks: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Arclight

    Women are far less likely to let a real or perceived insult go and instead prefer to stir the pot, and younger ones do use social media platforms for this.

    This phenomenon has been remarked upon throughout history. From Njal's Saga, a 13th-century Icelandic saga:


    Bergthora, the mother of Skarpheddin, has just heard that her husbands and sons have been viciously insulted. She tells the men about it as they are seated at the table, and Skarpheddin responds as follows:

    “We don’t have women’s dispositions, getting enraged over everything.”

    “But Gunnar got enraged on your behalf,” said Bergthora, “and he is considered even-tempered. If you don’t avenge this, you won’t avenge any shame done you.”

    “Our mother, the old gal, is having a lot of fun,” said Skarpheddin--and he grinned, but, nevertheless, sweat showed on his forehead and red spots appeared on his cheeks, and this was very unusual.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  15. “Mr. Krasner, one of the most prominent progressive prosecutors in the country, has long argued that putting a major focus on the arrest and incarceration of people caught carrying firearms without a permit is not only ineffectual but counterproductive, because it diverts police energy and resources from solving violent crime and alienates people whom investigators need as sources and witnesses.”

    That’s the identical talking point they use against enforcing immigration laws.

    “You can make massive numbers of gun arrests, and you do not see significant reductions in shooting,” he said in an interview.

    He’s a bald-faced liar. He’s evil.

    • Agree: Charon
  16. what is often called the country’s poorest big city

    This is why Philadelphia is doomed. I’d guess Philadelphia has the fewest number of high net worth individuals (i.e. > \$100 million) per capita of any American city with a population over 500,000. Nobody with any political clout cares if it’s severely mismanaged.

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Technite78


    I’d guess Philadelphia has the fewest number of high net worth individuals (i.e. > $100 million) per capita of any American city with a population over 500,000.
     
    Thanks. How do you find this kind of information?
  17. The whole point of gun control is to persecute rednecks buying rifles legally, not to discourage black criminals from carrying handguns illegally and shooting other blacks who peeve them.

    It would be interesting to look at when and why this flip took place. My recollection is that back in the 1970s/80s the focus of gun control was very much on handguns and inner city violence.

    It’s probably too late for stop and frisk in Philadelphia anyway. The great advantage of New York is that it just isn’t that black. Philadelphia unfortunately seems to have reached the tipping point where it is headed toward the irrelevance of a Baltimore or Detroit.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Heard a black guy a couple of years ago swear the violence is Philadelphia was driven by black gang members who moved from NYC.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Peter Akuleyev


    It’s probably too late for stop and frisk in Philadelphia anyway. The great advantage of New York is that it just isn’t that black. Philadelphia unfortunately seems to have reached the tipping point where it is headed toward the irrelevance of a Baltimore or Detroit.
     
    In the end, there is nothing useful to be done if you can't talk about eugenics and borders.

    Good hygiene is how "we have nice things".

    My guess, is down the road--if it makes sense--the Mexicans/Central Americans, as well as the current Caribbean/PR mulattos, will push into, take over and "safety upgrade" some of these areas. But only if it "makes sense"--the whole suite of causality involving the economy, local jobs, desirable housing/transportation, etc. etc. etc. And as I've noted the robotics revolution is coming to quash lots of low skill jobs, so all of this is highly dependent on timeline.
    , @Jack P
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Ten years ago Philly was looking like the next great city for young professionals - some New York type experiences, lots of history, and cheaper. I figure that's gone now.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  18. Everything I Know, I Learned from Reading New York Times Articles All the Way to the End

    Sounds like a Ron Unz quote.

  19. Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years.

    Great? How? He’s a financial speculator. He is a parasite who has used his fantastic wealth to further undermine the societies that he parasitized.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Sailer is a good man, but he's got a real flaw about worshipping fame and power. If you mean "Soros is a great man", as in great in the "powerful" sense like Genghis Khan, OK, but he's not a good person. He's evil. He could be the anti-Christ, if there weren't so many other contenders around right now - I don't have enough info yet to call it.

  20. @Almost Missouri

    Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years.
     
    Care to flesh out the first half of that sentence? I realize that Mr. Soros has done things that I could not have done, like become fabulously wealthy without ever doing anything physically productive, which elicits a sort of grudging admiration from me, in the same way that I grudgingly admire when hoodrats with rap sheets down to the floor somehow manage not to be incarcerated or even hunted fugitives.

    Replies: @SFG, @Anonymous, @John Milton's Ghost

    Julius Caesar reference?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @SFG

    Julius Caesar reference?

    Or a Louis Farrakhan reference?“


    The Jews don’t like Farrakhan, so they call me Hitler. Well, that’s a good name. Hitler was a very great man. He wasn’t great for me as a black person, but he was a great German. Now I’m not proud of Hitler’s evil against Jewish people, but that’s a matter of record. He rose Germany up from nothing,” Farrakhan said.
     

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  21. Chief Outlaw is a woman who is black and is named “Outlaw,” so her fabulous career (she’s the former police chief of Portland) has been particularly fabulous.

    You’re making a reasonable assumption in your humor, but I have some respect for her being a literal outlaw against the demands of the white Left powers that be in Portland who handed control of it to Antifa. More than a few times she Resisted them, for example in their prosecution of a siege of the city’s ICE office, and that’s practically unheard of.

  22. @SFG
    @Almost Missouri

    Julius Caesar reference?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Julius Caesar reference?

    Or a Louis Farrakhan reference?“

    The Jews don’t like Farrakhan, so they call me Hitler. Well, that’s a good name. Hitler was a very great man. He wasn’t great for me as a black person, but he was a great German. Now I’m not proud of Hitler’s evil against Jewish people, but that’s a matter of record. He rose Germany up from nothing,” Farrakhan said.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Harry Baldwin

    It's interesting to consider the extent to which Farrakhan has been memory-holed.

    Farrakhan's Million Man March was a huge deal in October 1995, coming as it did just a couple of weeks after the O.J. Simpson verdict. It received a massive amount of media attention, much of it fairly positive.

    Shortly thereafter, Colin Powell began traveling around the country on a highly-publicized book tour. There was a great deal of media speculation that he was about to announce a run for the Republican nomination in '96.

    Powell finally announced that he was *not* running in early November, a few days after the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin and a few days before the first of a series of government shutdowns growing out of the budgetary pissing match between Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton.

    (You might recall that, during the first shutdown, our esteemed president made the acquaintance of a lovely young lady named Monica Lewinsky.)

    It's interesting to contemplate a scenario in which Powell did make a serious run for the White House in '96.

  23. The whole point of gun control is to persecute rednecks buying rifles legally, not to discourage black criminals from carrying handguns illegally and shooting other blacks who peeve them.

    It would be interesting to look at when and why this flip took place. My recollection is that back in the 1970s/80s the focus of gun control was very much on handguns and inner city violence.

    We know the when. John Sugarman is one of the most important figures in the gun grabbing community. He founded his Violence Policy Center in 1988 and wrote the playbook with explicit deceptions for the push against “assault weapons” (which does hinder semi-automatic handguns) which was then put into play after the Stockton, California school shooting. Part of the why for the latter is that G. H. W. Bush was a dedicated gun grabber, helping his win against Dukakis is the latter is very open in his opinion that civilians should own absolutely no guns.

    Clinton with his literally pathological dislike of guns followed, and as a cultural Baby Boomer he made it personal/cultural. He also really put it on national map with his “assault weapons” ban (fortunately with a ten year sunset), whereas Bush was lower key in a way, for example using his GCA of 1968 to ban direct imports.

  24. It is a false assumption that Krasner gives a solitary shit if blacks shoot each other.

    Same goes for Soros. If you asked him about it, he’d probably laugh, or make whatever croaking noise a demon makes when amused.

    Conservatives run themselves into dead ends identifying logical inconsistencies and hypocrisy on the Left. Assume they are doing what they want to do, which is demoralize local law enforcement, induce early retirements and discourage civic-minded young men who support law-and-order from enlisting in the local PD.

    Witness how much the commies love the FBI now that the FBI is a fully engaged partner in the totalitarian police state project. It’s because personnel is policy, and once they get their people in full control of local law enforcement, they can start arresting people for causing other people ‘anxiety,’ like they do in England. It is about power and control. Blacks shooting each other is beside the point.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Recently Based
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Even 5 years ago, I would have called this paranoid, and now I think it's correct.

    I don't think most (like >99%) of people pushing this agenda have this internal monologue, but it is exactly their motivation as far as I can tell.

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    It is a false assumption that Krasner gives a solitary shit if blacks shoot each other.

    Same goes for Soros. If you asked him about it, he’d probably laugh, or make whatever croaking noise a demon makes when amused.
     
    In the Independent Lens Philly D.A. docuseries, Krasner tears up in a discussion with his wife (who is a Judge) that he "can't stand bullies." What he means by "bullies" are the police, not the 250lb black thugs who hit little old ladies over the head to steal their pocketbooks - the latter in his view are the victims of the cops' bullying. Krasner's background is fuzzy - his mother was an evangelical minister and his father a Russian Jew, and he grew up in Missouri before coming to the suburban Philadelphia area for high school. I tend to think his perception of who is and who is not a bully might have some roots in ethnic divisions - he probably would never have vibed well with Irish American blue collar types who make up the bulk of the police force.

    I don't know about Soros, but Krasner is a "clever silly," who has to invert the normal moral order because only a really smart guy can see how cops are bad and criminals are victims, whereas any dime store dummy can think that cops are good and criminals are bad. He doesn't get into it, but I have little doubt that it's not more complex than the leftist critical theory shibboleth that laws are an expression of power relations - the laws against stealing and so forth are just the preferences of the powerful that they should accumulate stuff, even if other people don't have much stuff and want it. The cops are just the thuggish muscle that enforces the whims of the rich and powerful, maybe a little to gleefully.
    , @res
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    Witness how much the commies love the FBI now that the FBI is a fully engaged partner in the totalitarian police state project.
     
    Good point. The strange new respect for the FBI from the left is interesting. It would be interesting to hear Chesa Boudin's take on recent Mar-a-Lago events.
  25. Steve, if you get a chance watch the docuseries Philly D.A. on PBS’s Independent Lens. Krasner was elected and there was an exodus of career prosecutors from the office, while others were summarily fired. Hundreds of years of combined prosecutorial and institutional knowledge as well as working relationships with law enforcement and Judges in Philadelphia’s Criminal Court were gone in a matter of days. Krasner then sought to hire lawyers with zero experience in criminal law, including diverse graduates of middling law schools, as new prosecutors. (IIRC, many of them who had been hired awaiting admission to practice had to leave the office because they didn’t pass the bar examination).

    As you probably know, Krasner hired Dana Bazelon of the multigenerational criminal-coddling Bazelon clan as a “policy advisor,” and some doughy professor to present Krasner with (social) science which reinforces that what Krasner wants to do in the first place. There’s a scene when the murder rate had exploded to the point that Krasner was getting particularly abundant criticism from all corners including the old line Democrat machine and in a meeting with Krasner the professor says something to the effect of “I don’t understand it – it doesn’t square with the science.” You’d get a chuckle out of that one.

    • LOL: Unladen Swallow
  26. Several years ago, the young man said, he bought a 9-millimeter pistol from an acquaintance for several hundred dollars, only to have another friend take it, fire it at him and leave with it. That friend was later charged with shooting two people to death.

    You need better friends, pumpkin.

  27. @Arclight
    I suspect social media has played a role in the rise of shootings since it allows petty slights to spread to a huge audience in short order, and most urban violence is over small insults as opposed to intricate drug or gang wars as a lot of people imagine.

    One thing that I think is worth examining is what effect the fact that the overwhelming majority of black boys are raised by single mothers has on their emotional response to insults. Women are far less likely to let a real or perceived insult go and instead prefer to stir the pot, and younger ones do use social media platforms for this. Perhaps a lot of young black males internalized this instinct from observing their mothers and that, coupled with a young man's willingness to apply violence, might partially account for the extremely low bar in urban American for comments or acts that demand a lethal response.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Women are far less likely to let a real or perceived insult go and instead prefer to stir the pot, and younger ones do use social media platforms for this.

    This phenomenon has been remarked upon throughout history. From Njal’s Saga, a 13th-century Icelandic saga:

    Bergthora, the mother of Skarpheddin, has just heard that her husbands and sons have been viciously insulted. She tells the men about it as they are seated at the table, and Skarpheddin responds as follows:

    “We don’t have women’s dispositions, getting enraged over everything.”

    “But Gunnar got enraged on your behalf,” said Bergthora, “and he is considered even-tempered. If you don’t avenge this, you won’t avenge any shame done you.”

    “Our mother, the old gal, is having a lot of fun,” said Skarpheddin–and he grinned, but, nevertheless, sweat showed on his forehead and red spots appeared on his cheeks, and this was very unusual.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin

    Njál was invited to a party, drank too much mead, and gouged his host's eye out. Not an ideal guest.

    Nor is this guy. A few minutes ago:


    Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York

    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill's detail?

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Harry Baldwin, @shlomit

  28. “Marguerite Ruff”.

    Did you know that Ms. Ruff owned a dog?

    Once at the vets’ office the animal nurse endearingly asked of the dog, “how are you feeling”?

    The answer was “Ruff!”.

  29. At least Philly doesn’t have polio. Unlke a certain city up the Acela.

    Several years ago, the young man said, he bought a 9-millimeter pistol from an acquaintance for several hundred dollars, only to have another friend take it, fire it at him and leave with it. That friend was later charged with shooting two people to death.

    Good thing Andrea Constand wasn’t packing.

  30. @Almost Missouri

    Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years.
     
    Care to flesh out the first half of that sentence? I realize that Mr. Soros has done things that I could not have done, like become fabulously wealthy without ever doing anything physically productive, which elicits a sort of grudging admiration from me, in the same way that I grudgingly admire when hoodrats with rap sheets down to the floor somehow manage not to be incarcerated or even hunted fugitives.

    Replies: @SFG, @Anonymous, @John Milton's Ghost

    He ripped of UK taxpayers – albeit because of dumb ass ‘economists’ – to the tune of several billion pounds thirty years ago.
    He’s no better than a thief, a counterfeiter and a fraudster.

  31. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    It is a false assumption that Krasner gives a solitary shit if blacks shoot each other.

    Same goes for Soros. If you asked him about it, he'd probably laugh, or make whatever croaking noise a demon makes when amused.

    Conservatives run themselves into dead ends identifying logical inconsistencies and hypocrisy on the Left. Assume they are doing what they want to do, which is demoralize local law enforcement, induce early retirements and discourage civic-minded young men who support law-and-order from enlisting in the local PD.

    Witness how much the commies love the FBI now that the FBI is a fully engaged partner in the totalitarian police state project. It's because personnel is policy, and once they get their people in full control of local law enforcement, they can start arresting people for causing other people 'anxiety,' like they do in England. It is about power and control. Blacks shooting each other is beside the point.

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @res

    Even 5 years ago, I would have called this paranoid, and now I think it’s correct.

    I don’t think most (like >99%) of people pushing this agenda have this internal monologue, but it is exactly their motivation as far as I can tell.

  32. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    It is a false assumption that Krasner gives a solitary shit if blacks shoot each other.

    Same goes for Soros. If you asked him about it, he'd probably laugh, or make whatever croaking noise a demon makes when amused.

    Conservatives run themselves into dead ends identifying logical inconsistencies and hypocrisy on the Left. Assume they are doing what they want to do, which is demoralize local law enforcement, induce early retirements and discourage civic-minded young men who support law-and-order from enlisting in the local PD.

    Witness how much the commies love the FBI now that the FBI is a fully engaged partner in the totalitarian police state project. It's because personnel is policy, and once they get their people in full control of local law enforcement, they can start arresting people for causing other people 'anxiety,' like they do in England. It is about power and control. Blacks shooting each other is beside the point.

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @res

    It is a false assumption that Krasner gives a solitary shit if blacks shoot each other.

    Same goes for Soros. If you asked him about it, he’d probably laugh, or make whatever croaking noise a demon makes when amused.

    In the Independent Lens Philly D.A. docuseries, Krasner tears up in a discussion with his wife (who is a Judge) that he “can’t stand bullies.” What he means by “bullies” are the police, not the 250lb black thugs who hit little old ladies over the head to steal their pocketbooks – the latter in his view are the victims of the cops’ bullying. Krasner’s background is fuzzy – his mother was an evangelical minister and his father a Russian Jew, and he grew up in Missouri before coming to the suburban Philadelphia area for high school. I tend to think his perception of who is and who is not a bully might have some roots in ethnic divisions – he probably would never have vibed well with Irish American blue collar types who make up the bulk of the police force.

    I don’t know about Soros, but Krasner is a “clever silly,” who has to invert the normal moral order because only a really smart guy can see how cops are bad and criminals are victims, whereas any dime store dummy can think that cops are good and criminals are bad. He doesn’t get into it, but I have little doubt that it’s not more complex than the leftist critical theory shibboleth that laws are an expression of power relations – the laws against stealing and so forth are just the preferences of the powerful that they should accumulate stuff, even if other people don’t have much stuff and want it. The cops are just the thuggish muscle that enforces the whims of the rich and powerful, maybe a little to gleefully.

  33. @Harry Baldwin
    @Arclight

    Women are far less likely to let a real or perceived insult go and instead prefer to stir the pot, and younger ones do use social media platforms for this.

    This phenomenon has been remarked upon throughout history. From Njal's Saga, a 13th-century Icelandic saga:


    Bergthora, the mother of Skarpheddin, has just heard that her husbands and sons have been viciously insulted. She tells the men about it as they are seated at the table, and Skarpheddin responds as follows:

    “We don’t have women’s dispositions, getting enraged over everything.”

    “But Gunnar got enraged on your behalf,” said Bergthora, “and he is considered even-tempered. If you don’t avenge this, you won’t avenge any shame done you.”

    “Our mother, the old gal, is having a lot of fun,” said Skarpheddin--and he grinned, but, nevertheless, sweat showed on his forehead and red spots appeared on his cheeks, and this was very unusual.
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Njál was invited to a party, drank too much mead, and gouged his host’s eye out. Not an ideal guest.

    Nor is this guy. A few minutes ago:

    Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York

    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill’s detail?

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Reg Cæsar


    Nor is this guy. A few minutes ago:

    Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York

    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill’s detail?
     
    Prepare to hear about the inherent White Supremacy of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's acolytes.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Reg Cæsar

    Were it not for the fatwa, Salman Rushdie would be a barely remembered, third-tier novelist, wouldn't he?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @shlomit
    @Reg Cæsar

    No, Chautauqua. Easy to mix up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  34. @Peter Akuleyev
    The whole point of gun control is to persecute rednecks buying rifles legally, not to discourage black criminals from carrying handguns illegally and shooting other blacks who peeve them.

    It would be interesting to look at when and why this flip took place. My recollection is that back in the 1970s/80s the focus of gun control was very much on handguns and inner city violence.

    It’s probably too late for stop and frisk in Philadelphia anyway. The great advantage of New York is that it just isn’t that black. Philadelphia unfortunately seems to have reached the tipping point where it is headed toward the irrelevance of a Baltimore or Detroit.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @AnotherDad, @Jack P

    Heard a black guy a couple of years ago swear the violence is Philadelphia was driven by black gang members who moved from NYC.

  35. The city government has rolled out an array of efforts to address the crisis, including grants for community groups, violence intervention programs and earlier curfews. But on one crucial matter, there seem to be no ready answers: what to do about all the guns.

    I think they’d carry out rain dances and voodoo rituals before they’d ever consider, you know, arresting criminals

  36. Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York
    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill’s detail?

    Not Chappaqua. Chautauqua, in the far western part of the state.

  37. @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin

    Njál was invited to a party, drank too much mead, and gouged his host's eye out. Not an ideal guest.

    Nor is this guy. A few minutes ago:


    Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York

    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill's detail?

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Harry Baldwin, @shlomit

    Nor is this guy. A few minutes ago:

    Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York

    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill’s detail?

    Prepare to hear about the inherent White Supremacy of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini’s acolytes.

  38. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    It is a false assumption that Krasner gives a solitary shit if blacks shoot each other.

    Same goes for Soros. If you asked him about it, he'd probably laugh, or make whatever croaking noise a demon makes when amused.

    Conservatives run themselves into dead ends identifying logical inconsistencies and hypocrisy on the Left. Assume they are doing what they want to do, which is demoralize local law enforcement, induce early retirements and discourage civic-minded young men who support law-and-order from enlisting in the local PD.

    Witness how much the commies love the FBI now that the FBI is a fully engaged partner in the totalitarian police state project. It's because personnel is policy, and once they get their people in full control of local law enforcement, they can start arresting people for causing other people 'anxiety,' like they do in England. It is about power and control. Blacks shooting each other is beside the point.

    Replies: @Recently Based, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @res

    Witness how much the commies love the FBI now that the FBI is a fully engaged partner in the totalitarian police state project.

    Good point. The strange new respect for the FBI from the left is interesting. It would be interesting to hear Chesa Boudin’s take on recent Mar-a-Lago events.

  39. many more guns have been found that were illegally converted into fully automatic weapons.

    This would seem to imply some White involvement.

  40. “They think they can get away with it, because they’re young,” she said.

    Silly rabbit. They think they can get away with it because they can get away with it.

  41. @Harry Baldwin
    @SFG

    Julius Caesar reference?

    Or a Louis Farrakhan reference?“


    The Jews don’t like Farrakhan, so they call me Hitler. Well, that’s a good name. Hitler was a very great man. He wasn’t great for me as a black person, but he was a great German. Now I’m not proud of Hitler’s evil against Jewish people, but that’s a matter of record. He rose Germany up from nothing,” Farrakhan said.
     

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    It’s interesting to consider the extent to which Farrakhan has been memory-holed.

    Farrakhan’s Million Man March was a huge deal in October 1995, coming as it did just a couple of weeks after the O.J. Simpson verdict. It received a massive amount of media attention, much of it fairly positive.

    Shortly thereafter, Colin Powell began traveling around the country on a highly-publicized book tour. There was a great deal of media speculation that he was about to announce a run for the Republican nomination in ’96.

    Powell finally announced that he was *not* running in early November, a few days after the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin and a few days before the first of a series of government shutdowns growing out of the budgetary pissing match between Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton.

    (You might recall that, during the first shutdown, our esteemed president made the acquaintance of a lovely young lady named Monica Lewinsky.)

    It’s interesting to contemplate a scenario in which Powell did make a serious run for the White House in ’96.

  42. many more guns have been found that were illegally converted into fully automatic weapons.

    This would seem to imply some White involvement.

    This may mostly be referring to a widget for a Glock that turns it into a full auto or select fire handgun, a supremely bad idea which helps our host’s law about the wounded vs. killed ratio.

    And/or “many more” might describe small absolute numbers, like previously 1-2 ARs converted into full auto or select fire per year and now a dozen or more. This has been done by at least one group of “Sudden Jihad Syndrome” losers, at least one example in California as I recall. So “whites” as we view them not necessarily required expect I suppose for the plans.

    Not to mention gun designers are all but uniformly white, especially the legendary ones. John Moses Browning (PBUH), Mauser, Garand, Kalashnikov, Stoner, the elder Ruger, who else can we name?? Garand and Ruger get extra credit for manufacturability, the latter for adding precision investment casting to the game.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @That Would Be Telling


    Not to mention gun designers are all but uniformly white, especially the legendary ones. John Moses Browning (PBUH), Mauser, Garand, Kalashnikov, Stoner, the elder Ruger, who else can we name??
     
    I can think of one that isn't white: the firearms designer responsible for the Kahr handgun.

    Kahr Arms was founded by Justin Moon, who is CEO and president. He is the son of Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church[1][2] and brother to Hyung Jin Moon, pastor of the World Peace and Unification Sanctuary Church, which is known to hold blessing ceremonies for AR-15 rifles.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kahr_Arms
     
    https://shopkahrfirearmsgroup.com/product_images/uploaded_images/kjm011121-0092-1k.jpg

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  43. @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin

    Njál was invited to a party, drank too much mead, and gouged his host's eye out. Not an ideal guest.

    Nor is this guy. A few minutes ago:


    Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York

    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill's detail?

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Harry Baldwin, @shlomit

    Were it not for the fatwa, Salman Rushdie would be a barely remembered, third-tier novelist, wouldn’t he?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Harry Baldwin

    There are a fair few Muslims on Twutter saying "diss the prophet and pay the price". Also people saying 'Iran inspired it' which to be fair isn't too far off. They send him a reminder of the fatwa every April.

    Will this be used as an excuse for airstrikes?

    https://english.khamenei.ir/news/4634/Ayatollah-Khamenei-s-fatwa-on-Salman-Rushdie-s-apostasy-from

    The alleged attacker is a Lebanese Shia. Only the US can explain why he's in the States. Not that a Brit can talk.

  44. I am surprised that no one has brought up the Op-Ed piece by Soros (or more likely a Soros familiar) that appeared in the WSJ a few weeks ago. In it, he justified his campaign contributions to woke DAs (and promised to continue them) on three grounds. First, the existing administration of criminal justice has resulted in the arrest and incarceration of blacks in proportions that exceed their proportion of the general population which Soros asserts is “unjust”. Second, the program of the woke prosecutors is “effective”. And finally, people “like” the new approach. I believe that iSteve and his commentators have previously demolished these points, but it would be entertaining to see more.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Ausra

    Read the comment by Ghost of Bull Moose above, Ausra. I don't think Soros is a dummy. He doesn't believe all these points that iSteve and commenters demolished. What he's helping to do, ruining traditional America, is working. He wrote the op-ed just to help keep his program running.

  45. @Tracy
    1,400 gunshot wounds in one city. Think about what that costs. From a 1997 article "Costs of gunshot and cut/stab wounds in the United States, with some Canadian comparisons":

    Across medically treated cases, costs average U.S. $154,000 per gunshot survivor and U.S. $12,000 per cut/stab survivor.
     
    -- and that's at 1997 prices. Anyone do the math on this? What does this violence cost us each year?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @AnotherDad, @Detroit Refugee

    Across medically treated cases, costs average U.S. \$154,000 per gunshot survivor and U.S. \$12,000 per cut/stab survivor.

    — and that’s at 1997 prices. Anyone do the math on this? What does this violence cost us each year?

    Accounting for inflation, and medical advances (with commensurate cost advances) that might be about a quarter million per shot nowadays, which for 1400 shots means about a third of a \$billion. Most of the victims are probably uninsured so the cost mostly falls on the city.

    In FY2020, the latest year available, Phila. took in \$4.3 bil. and spent \$4.7 bil., \$223m of which was on “health services”, so either they are blowing out that budget line, they’re charging it elsewhere, or the Feds (i.e., the rest of the US) are kicking in money.

  46. @Tracy
    1,400 gunshot wounds in one city. Think about what that costs. From a 1997 article "Costs of gunshot and cut/stab wounds in the United States, with some Canadian comparisons":

    Across medically treated cases, costs average U.S. $154,000 per gunshot survivor and U.S. $12,000 per cut/stab survivor.
     
    -- and that's at 1997 prices. Anyone do the math on this? What does this violence cost us each year?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @AnotherDad, @Detroit Refugee

    1,400 gunshot wounds in one city. Think about what that costs.

    The legacy of slavery has been very, very expensive.

    If you value “diversity”, that same money could create really spectacular zoos/refuges that would be a heck of a lot more pleasant.

    There’s a moral there: Cheap labor never is.

  47. @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin

    Njál was invited to a party, drank too much mead, and gouged his host's eye out. Not an ideal guest.

    Nor is this guy. A few minutes ago:


    Author Salman Rushdie attacked on lecture stage in New York

    In Chappaqua! Where was Bill and Hill's detail?

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Harry Baldwin, @shlomit

    No, Chautauqua. Easy to mix up.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @shlomit


    No, Chautauqua. Easy to mix up.
     
    Spare us from traveling Chappaquas!


    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5117L0W6v5L._SY291_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_FMwebp_.jpg
  48. @Peter Akuleyev
    The whole point of gun control is to persecute rednecks buying rifles legally, not to discourage black criminals from carrying handguns illegally and shooting other blacks who peeve them.

    It would be interesting to look at when and why this flip took place. My recollection is that back in the 1970s/80s the focus of gun control was very much on handguns and inner city violence.

    It’s probably too late for stop and frisk in Philadelphia anyway. The great advantage of New York is that it just isn’t that black. Philadelphia unfortunately seems to have reached the tipping point where it is headed toward the irrelevance of a Baltimore or Detroit.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @AnotherDad, @Jack P

    It’s probably too late for stop and frisk in Philadelphia anyway. The great advantage of New York is that it just isn’t that black. Philadelphia unfortunately seems to have reached the tipping point where it is headed toward the irrelevance of a Baltimore or Detroit.

    In the end, there is nothing useful to be done if you can’t talk about eugenics and borders.

    Good hygiene is how “we have nice things”.

    My guess, is down the road–if it makes sense–the Mexicans/Central Americans, as well as the current Caribbean/PR mulattos, will push into, take over and “safety upgrade” some of these areas. But only if it “makes sense”–the whole suite of causality involving the economy, local jobs, desirable housing/transportation, etc. etc. etc. And as I’ve noted the robotics revolution is coming to quash lots of low skill jobs, so all of this is highly dependent on timeline.

  49. @Harry Baldwin
    @Reg Cæsar

    Were it not for the fatwa, Salman Rushdie would be a barely remembered, third-tier novelist, wouldn't he?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    There are a fair few Muslims on Twutter saying “diss the prophet and pay the price”. Also people saying ‘Iran inspired it’ which to be fair isn’t too far off. They send him a reminder of the fatwa every April.

    Will this be used as an excuse for airstrikes?

    https://english.khamenei.ir/news/4634/Ayatollah-Khamenei-s-fatwa-on-Salman-Rushdie-s-apostasy-from

    The alleged attacker is a Lebanese Shia. Only the US can explain why he’s in the States. Not that a Brit can talk.

  50. @Franz
    @Steve Sailer


    A crazy woman from way way back.
     
    A crazy woman FROM OHIO from way back.

    We specialize in exporting nuts.

    George Custer, William Clarke Quantrill, Annie Oakley (she really did shoot the cigar out of the Czar's mouth) and even more. Without counting all the movie stars like Clark Gable, Tyrone Power, Paul Newman and the Wicked Witch of the West.

    Replies: @Philbert Desanex, @Redneck farmer

    you forgot Woody Hayes and Bobby Knight

    • Thanks: Franz
  51. @Anonymous
    Steve, any thoughts on Anne Heche?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Right_On

    She was Marion in the shot-for-shot remake of Psycho. Many moons ago, I switched on the TV, not knowing what was on, and chanced on the scene where she’s trading in her car. I didn’t know Heche, or the other actors, but the dialogue was familiar. For a few minutes, I had the weirdest feeling trying to reconcile my auditory and visual inputs.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Right_On

    Possibly the most pointless remake of all time.

  52. The fact that Krasner was able to win re-election is really damning for that city.

  53. @That Would Be Telling


    many more guns have been found that were illegally converted into fully automatic weapons.
     
    This would seem to imply some White involvement.
     
    This may mostly be referring to a widget for a Glock that turns it into a full auto or select fire handgun, a supremely bad idea which helps our host's law about the wounded vs. killed ratio.

    And/or "many more" might describe small absolute numbers, like previously 1-2 ARs converted into full auto or select fire per year and now a dozen or more. This has been done by at least one group of "Sudden Jihad Syndrome" losers, at least one example in California as I recall. So "whites" as we view them not necessarily required expect I suppose for the plans.

    Not to mention gun designers are all but uniformly white, especially the legendary ones. John Moses Browning (PBUH), Mauser, Garand, Kalashnikov, Stoner, the elder Ruger, who else can we name?? Garand and Ruger get extra credit for manufacturability, the latter for adding precision investment casting to the game.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Not to mention gun designers are all but uniformly white, especially the legendary ones. John Moses Browning (PBUH), Mauser, Garand, Kalashnikov, Stoner, the elder Ruger, who else can we name??

    I can think of one that isn’t white: the firearms designer responsible for the Kahr handgun.

    Kahr Arms was founded by Justin Moon, who is CEO and president. He is the son of Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church[1][2] and brother to Hyung Jin Moon, pastor of the World Peace and Unification Sanctuary Church, which is known to hold blessing ceremonies for AR-15 rifles.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kahr_Arms

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Joe Stalin


    I can think of one [firearms designer] that isn’t white: the firearms designer responsible for the Kahr handgun.
     
    One Justin Moon, "the son of Sun Myung Moon." And before the big guys started paying attention to the true compact handgun market, Kahr was said to make the best, assuming you accept the tradeoffs of striker fired guns like Glocks (dangerous to holster compared to ones with external triggers). More from Wikipedia:

    From the age of 14, Justin Moon enjoyed shooting guns [let's hear it for America!]. At age 18, Moon got a license to carry a handgun, co-signed by one of his older brothers, but he was not satisfied with the small calibers available in compact handguns. "I had been licensed to carry in New York State since I was 18 and had looked for an ultra-compact 9mm pistol," Justin later told American Handgunner. "To my chagrin, I could not find a pistol with the quality of construction and features in design which I felt were appropriate for a carry gun. Therefore, I decided to design an ultra-compact 9-mm pistol that I could carry." By his junior year of college, he decided to design one himself.
     
    That would be around 1990-1, founding the company in 1995. Very well timed for the nationwide sweep of "Shall Issue" laws and as the article notes, the Clinton AW ban which limited new guns to ten rounds.

    Come to think of it, someone or ones who are not white designed South Korea's K2 assault rifle which was sold in the US prior to G. H W. Bush's import ban, about which I've heard nothing bad except the difficulty of getting spare parts after the ban.

    Thanks!
  54. @Peter Akuleyev
    The whole point of gun control is to persecute rednecks buying rifles legally, not to discourage black criminals from carrying handguns illegally and shooting other blacks who peeve them.

    It would be interesting to look at when and why this flip took place. My recollection is that back in the 1970s/80s the focus of gun control was very much on handguns and inner city violence.

    It’s probably too late for stop and frisk in Philadelphia anyway. The great advantage of New York is that it just isn’t that black. Philadelphia unfortunately seems to have reached the tipping point where it is headed toward the irrelevance of a Baltimore or Detroit.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @AnotherDad, @Jack P

    Ten years ago Philly was looking like the next great city for young professionals – some New York type experiences, lots of history, and cheaper. I figure that’s gone now.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jack P

    Downtown Philadelphia has all these wonderful amenities, several of them personally founded by Ben Franklin.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  55. @shlomit
    @Reg Cæsar

    No, Chautauqua. Easy to mix up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    No, Chautauqua. Easy to mix up.

    Spare us from traveling Chappaquas!

  56. @Right_On
    @Anonymous

    She was Marion in the shot-for-shot remake of Psycho. Many moons ago, I switched on the TV, not knowing what was on, and chanced on the scene where she's trading in her car. I didn't know Heche, or the other actors, but the dialogue was familiar. For a few minutes, I had the weirdest feeling trying to reconcile my auditory and visual inputs.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpPEPbi79W8&ab_channel=columbiafan

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Possibly the most pointless remake of all time.

  57. @Franz
    @Steve Sailer


    A crazy woman from way way back.
     
    A crazy woman FROM OHIO from way back.

    We specialize in exporting nuts.

    George Custer, William Clarke Quantrill, Annie Oakley (she really did shoot the cigar out of the Czar's mouth) and even more. Without counting all the movie stars like Clark Gable, Tyrone Power, Paul Newman and the Wicked Witch of the West.

    Replies: @Philbert Desanex, @Redneck farmer

    You forgot Curtis Lemay.
    And Indiana outdoes us in crazy.

    • Replies: @Franz
    @Redneck farmer

    I have to agree. But I'd cut Indiana some slack. The Chicago Mob used the whole northern part of the state as their dumping ground for corpses and whatever. Affected their minds.

  58. @Mr. Anon

    Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years.
     
    Great? How? He's a financial speculator. He is a parasite who has used his fantastic wealth to further undermine the societies that he parasitized.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Mr. Sailer is a good man, but he’s got a real flaw about worshipping fame and power. If you mean “Soros is a great man”, as in great in the “powerful” sense like Genghis Khan, OK, but he’s not a good person. He’s evil. He could be the anti-Christ, if there weren’t so many other contenders around right now – I don’t have enough info yet to call it.

  59. @Ausra
    I am surprised that no one has brought up the Op-Ed piece by Soros (or more likely a Soros familiar) that appeared in the WSJ a few weeks ago. In it, he justified his campaign contributions to woke DAs (and promised to continue them) on three grounds. First, the existing administration of criminal justice has resulted in the arrest and incarceration of blacks in proportions that exceed their proportion of the general population which Soros asserts is “unjust”. Second, the program of the woke prosecutors is “effective”. And finally, people “like” the new approach. I believe that iSteve and his commentators have previously demolished these points, but it would be entertaining to see more.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Read the comment by Ghost of Bull Moose above, Ausra. I don’t think Soros is a dummy. He doesn’t believe all these points that iSteve and commenters demolished. What he’s helping to do, ruining traditional America, is working. He wrote the op-ed just to help keep his program running.

  60. @Jack P
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Ten years ago Philly was looking like the next great city for young professionals - some New York type experiences, lots of history, and cheaper. I figure that's gone now.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Downtown Philadelphia has all these wonderful amenities, several of them personally founded by Ben Franklin.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Steve Sailer

    “After all, what did stop and frisk ever do under Mayor Bloomberg to make New York City have by far the lowest murder rate of any huge city in the country?“

    Yeah who can remember way back when. Between 2003 and 2013, over 100,000 stops were made per year, with 685,724 people being stopped at the height of the program in 2011. Ninety percent of those stopped in 2017 were African-American or Latino, mostly aged 14–24. Seventy percent of those stopped were later found to be innocent.

    So, the police randomly stop people walking down a street, and demand them to be searched. Reasonable suspicion? Something tells me if that happened to you repeatedly you would find that distinctly problematic. But then again, why would a police state bother you? I mean, we live in one already, right?

  61. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - Guardian/BMJ

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/aug/11/rise-in-popularity-of-anal-sex-has-led-to-health-problems-for-women

    https://www.bmj.com/content/378/bmj.o1975

    "Clinicians’ reluctance to discuss possible harms is letting down a generation of women"

    Bottom line (ba-dum-tish! thank you!)

    a) a lot more young women are having sex "per vas nefandum" - by the unmentionable vessel, as Aleister Crowley euphemised it.


    Anal intercourse is becoming more common among heterosexual couples. Within popular culture it has moved from the world of pornography to mainstream media.1 It is no longer considered an extreme behaviour but increasingly portrayed as a prized and pleasurable experience.2 In Britain, the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyle shows participation in heterosexual anal intercourse among 16 to 24 year olds rose from 12.5% to 28.5% over the past few decades.3 Similar trends are seen in the US, where 30-44% of men and women report experience of anal sex.4
     
    b) a fair few girlies are doing it either because its fashionable ("as seen on TV") or because their men want it

    Young women cite pleasure, curiosity, pleasing male partners, and coercion as factors.56 Up to 25% of women with experience of anal sex report they have been pressured into it at least once.7 Hit television shows such as Sex and the City and Fleabag may unwittingly add to the pressure, as they seem to normalise anal sex in heterosexual relationships or make it appear racy and daring.
     
    c) the physiology of the nether regions differs between the sexes, perhaps surprisingly

    Women have less robust anal sphincters and lower anal canal pressures than men,13 and damage caused by anal penetration is therefore more consequential.
     
    I don't know what anal canal pressure is, and I'm not sure I want to know.

    d) and the results of damaging that area are not very nice


    The absence of vaginal secretions, increased traumatic abrasions, and less common use of condoms increase the risk of sexually transmitted disease and anal malignancy.9 Anal pain, bleeding, and fissures also occur as a result of anal intercourse.1011

    Increased rates of faecal incontinence and anal sphincter injury have been reported in women who have anal intercourse.12 Women are at a higher risk of incontinence than men because of their different anatomy and the effects of hormones, pregnancy, and childbirth on the pelvic floor.
     

    Incontinence of the traditional kind is no joke. "Faecal incontinence" sounds like an appalling fate.

    e) and no one is warning young women about the dangers


    NHS patient information on anal sex considers only sexually transmitted diseases, making no mention of anal trauma, incontinence, or the psychological aftermath of the coercion young women report in relation to this activity.17 A plethora of non-medical or pseudomedical websites fill the health information void. Rather than helping young women make informed decisions, some sites may increase societal pressure to try anal sex.

    It may not be just avoidance or stigma that prevents health professionals talking to young women about the risks of anal sex. There is genuine concern that the message may be seen as judgmental or even misconstrued as homophobic. However, by avoiding these discussions, we may be failing a generation of young women, who are unaware of the risks. With better information, women who want anal sex would be able to protect themselves more effectively from possible harm, and those who agree to anal sex reluctantly to meet society’s expectations (my horrified emboldening), or please partners, may feel better empowered to say no.
     

    This is a public information post.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    So discouraging anal sex may be “construed as homophobic”, even it’s advice given to a heterosexual woman.

    Two remarks I read about this practice spring randomly to mind. Auberon Waugh said it was a form of contraception in some parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Anthony Burgess in one of his novels said Arabs did it “to avoid each others’ bad breath”.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Rob McX

    What really struck me was the bit about young women who "agree to anal sex reluctantly to meet society’s expectations".

    Still, at least it's not those bad old days when a girl was expected by society to be a virgin on marriage, an expectation probably honoured more in the breach than in the observance.

    It's a miracle that either the BMJ or the Guardian published it, really, though I'm very glad they did. As long as the issue is "evil men coercing young women into potentially damaging practice" I guess they can get away with it.

    But you when it's male sleeping with male you NEVER hear about coercion. Apparently M-M relationships have none of that toxic masculinity that just leaps out when there's a girl involved. Logically there should be twice as much, or is the idea that it cancels out?

    I still wait for a Guardian piece on "anal trauma, incontinence, or the psychological aftermath of the coercion" where the sufferers are gay men.

  62. @Tracy
    1,400 gunshot wounds in one city. Think about what that costs. From a 1997 article "Costs of gunshot and cut/stab wounds in the United States, with some Canadian comparisons":

    Across medically treated cases, costs average U.S. $154,000 per gunshot survivor and U.S. $12,000 per cut/stab survivor.
     
    -- and that's at 1997 prices. Anyone do the math on this? What does this violence cost us each year?

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @AnotherDad, @Detroit Refugee

    What does this black violence cost us each year?

    More than I could guesstimate. But add human lives lost as well as dollars, and blacks owe us reparations.

  63. @Rob McX
    @YetAnotherAnon

    So discouraging anal sex may be "construed as homophobic", even it's advice given to a heterosexual woman.

    Two remarks I read about this practice spring randomly to mind. Auberon Waugh said it was a form of contraception in some parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Anthony Burgess in one of his novels said Arabs did it "to avoid each others' bad breath".

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    What really struck me was the bit about young women who “agree to anal sex reluctantly to meet society’s expectations“.

    Still, at least it’s not those bad old days when a girl was expected by society to be a virgin on marriage, an expectation probably honoured more in the breach than in the observance.

    It’s a miracle that either the BMJ or the Guardian published it, really, though I’m very glad they did. As long as the issue is “evil men coercing young women into potentially damaging practice” I guess they can get away with it.

    But you when it’s male sleeping with male you NEVER hear about coercion. Apparently M-M relationships have none of that toxic masculinity that just leaps out when there’s a girl involved. Logically there should be twice as much, or is the idea that it cancels out?

    I still wait for a Guardian piece on “anal trauma, incontinence, or the psychological aftermath of the coercion” where the sufferers are gay men.

    • Agree: Rob McX
  64. @Joe Stalin
    @That Would Be Telling


    Not to mention gun designers are all but uniformly white, especially the legendary ones. John Moses Browning (PBUH), Mauser, Garand, Kalashnikov, Stoner, the elder Ruger, who else can we name??
     
    I can think of one that isn't white: the firearms designer responsible for the Kahr handgun.

    Kahr Arms was founded by Justin Moon, who is CEO and president. He is the son of Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church[1][2] and brother to Hyung Jin Moon, pastor of the World Peace and Unification Sanctuary Church, which is known to hold blessing ceremonies for AR-15 rifles.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kahr_Arms
     
    https://shopkahrfirearmsgroup.com/product_images/uploaded_images/kjm011121-0092-1k.jpg

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I can think of one [firearms designer] that isn’t white: the firearms designer responsible for the Kahr handgun.

    One Justin Moon, “the son of Sun Myung Moon.” And before the big guys started paying attention to the true compact handgun market, Kahr was said to make the best, assuming you accept the tradeoffs of striker fired guns like Glocks (dangerous to holster compared to ones with external triggers). More from Wikipedia:

    From the age of 14, Justin Moon enjoyed shooting guns [let’s hear it for America!]. At age 18, Moon got a license to carry a handgun, co-signed by one of his older brothers, but he was not satisfied with the small calibers available in compact handguns. “I had been licensed to carry in New York State since I was 18 and had looked for an ultra-compact 9mm pistol,” Justin later told American Handgunner. “To my chagrin, I could not find a pistol with the quality of construction and features in design which I felt were appropriate for a carry gun. Therefore, I decided to design an ultra-compact 9-mm pistol that I could carry.” By his junior year of college, he decided to design one himself.

    That would be around 1990-1, founding the company in 1995. Very well timed for the nationwide sweep of “Shall Issue” laws and as the article notes, the Clinton AW ban which limited new guns to ten rounds.

    Come to think of it, someone or ones who are not white designed South Korea’s K2 assault rifle which was sold in the US prior to G. H W. Bush’s import ban, about which I’ve heard nothing bad except the difficulty of getting spare parts after the ban.

    Thanks!

  65. “Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, ”

    The definition of a great man being: works to actively dismantle the criminal justice system of a foreign country thereby, among other things, facilitating the further death and suffering of a minority negro population that he would probably claim to care about.

    Got it.

  66. anon[337] • Disclaimer says:

    I live in Philly and take public transportation daily. My neighborhood is 80% black and I work in one of the worst neighborhoods in North Philly (where most of Philly’s shootings happen).

    Large groups of young black men are always hanging around the turnstiles at the Erie subway station. SEPTA transit police do nothing to disperse them. I don’t recall this situation prior to the 2020 BLM Infitada.

    Even in 95+ degree weather, more than half of the young black men I see are wearing hoodies, presumably to conceal both their identity and to aid in concealment of weapons. This being the demographic responsible for the large majority of shootings, and being in the zip codes where a large majority of shootings occur, it only makes sense to target them for stop and frisk. But police do nothing, of course.

    Quite often, I see young black people throwing trash on the subway tracks, playing Bluetooth speakers on board trains and busses, smoking weed and cigarettes in the subway platform, etc. More than half of the people on the bus simply walk past the payment kiosk and ride for free. All of these things are reason enough for transit police to initiate interactions with them, which would introduce more opportunities to stop and frisk. This would undoubtedly turn up illegally carried firearms. But of course the police do nothing.

    Aggressive ‘quality of life’ policing (along with aggressive prosecution on the back end) would do wonders to clean up this city and reduce the murder rate. But we can’t have that until we can dismantle the legal concept of Disparate Impact.

    • Replies: @ForeverCARealist
    @anon

    wow, I hope you're making lots of $$ doing your job. Maybe you really love the excitement? Maybe you're black and have a way of being inconspicuous?

    whatever it is, I admire you.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @anon


    I see young black people throwing trash on the subway tracks
     
    Coolest thing I've ever seen thrown on the CTA EL train tracks by kids was bare copper wire and when it got between the third rail and other tracks...

    Instant plasma when the 600V power hit it.

  67. Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man,

    Aaaaaaand Steve jumps the shark.

    Next up, Lucifer canonized in Vatican ceremony.

  68. @Almost Missouri

    Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years.
     
    Care to flesh out the first half of that sentence? I realize that Mr. Soros has done things that I could not have done, like become fabulously wealthy without ever doing anything physically productive, which elicits a sort of grudging admiration from me, in the same way that I grudgingly admire when hoodrats with rap sheets down to the floor somehow manage not to be incarcerated or even hunted fugitives.

    Replies: @SFG, @Anonymous, @John Milton's Ghost

    Trend trading, of which Soros was one of a handful of extremely successful practitioners, is not easily mastered, nor often replicable in any sort of mass level (hence no good mutual funds or etfs that copy it). It would be analogous to say Warren Buffett or Peter Lynch is a great man. Steve’s language is curious, though, and methinks he’s having a little arch fun with it: does anyone say Buffett is a great man, using such terms?

    Perhaps the greatness Steve refers to is the flash of idiosyncrasy that Soros displays in what would, for anyone else, be a Quixotic futile enterprise. Successful trend trader John W. Henry decided to buy the Red Sox with his wealth. Soros has decided to destroy civilized places. Maybe that’s greatness in the same way Ghengis Khan was great?

    I have an extremely libertarian friend who is a strong proponent of Karl Popper’s open society, and he holds Soros (a former Popper student) to be a huge disappointment, because his actions are the opposite of Popper’s professed ideals. I don’t necessarily find Soros to be pure evil, but rather an accelerated version of what the Ford and Rockefeller families did, albeit in a single generation: accrue amazing wealth, then turn on and close the door for anyone else to build something similar, by completely embracing theories that destroy what made wealth accumulation possible for common people in the first place. That, and having so much wealth to embrace ridiculous decadent ideas that don’t harm one who is well-protected from the ramifications of said ideas.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @John Milton's Ghost


    It would be analogous to say Warren Buffett or Peter Lynch is a great man.
     
    That comparison raises interesting questions. I would maintain that Buffet's work (portfolio building) is different from from Soros's work (arbitrage). Buffet's work is a step less removed from actual production, and arguably enables better production in a way that Soros's doesn't. (Buzz Mohawk may disagree though.) Then there is the fact that Buffet hasn't been convicted of insider trading or accused of the technically legal but morally dubious ripoff of a national treasury as Soros has.

    Peter Lynch's work is more akin to Soros's, as they are both financial market traders disconnected from actual productivity. However, besides that Lynch is not a criminal, Lynch took a much smaller portion of his investors' winnings as his own personal enrichment. He is not a billionaire.

    And, FWIW, anyone with a few bucks could share in Buffet's or Lynch's success, while only hedge funders (i.e., the already rich) could participate with Soros.
  69. “Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man”

    You’re either a liar or a fool, Sailer. And it’s comments like this that show why you are useless for the fight we find ourselves in now.

  70. @anon
    I live in Philly and take public transportation daily. My neighborhood is 80% black and I work in one of the worst neighborhoods in North Philly (where most of Philly's shootings happen).

    Large groups of young black men are always hanging around the turnstiles at the Erie subway station. SEPTA transit police do nothing to disperse them. I don't recall this situation prior to the 2020 BLM Infitada.

    Even in 95+ degree weather, more than half of the young black men I see are wearing hoodies, presumably to conceal both their identity and to aid in concealment of weapons. This being the demographic responsible for the large majority of shootings, and being in the zip codes where a large majority of shootings occur, it only makes sense to target them for stop and frisk. But police do nothing, of course.

    Quite often, I see young black people throwing trash on the subway tracks, playing Bluetooth speakers on board trains and busses, smoking weed and cigarettes in the subway platform, etc. More than half of the people on the bus simply walk past the payment kiosk and ride for free. All of these things are reason enough for transit police to initiate interactions with them, which would introduce more opportunities to stop and frisk. This would undoubtedly turn up illegally carried firearms. But of course the police do nothing.

    Aggressive 'quality of life' policing (along with aggressive prosecution on the back end) would do wonders to clean up this city and reduce the murder rate. But we can't have that until we can dismantle the legal concept of Disparate Impact.

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Joe Stalin

    wow, I hope you’re making lots of \$\$ doing your job. Maybe you really love the excitement? Maybe you’re black and have a way of being inconspicuous?

    whatever it is, I admire you.

  71. @Redneck farmer
    @Franz

    You forgot Curtis Lemay.
    And Indiana outdoes us in crazy.

    Replies: @Franz

    I have to agree. But I’d cut Indiana some slack. The Chicago Mob used the whole northern part of the state as their dumping ground for corpses and whatever. Affected their minds.

  72. @anon
    I live in Philly and take public transportation daily. My neighborhood is 80% black and I work in one of the worst neighborhoods in North Philly (where most of Philly's shootings happen).

    Large groups of young black men are always hanging around the turnstiles at the Erie subway station. SEPTA transit police do nothing to disperse them. I don't recall this situation prior to the 2020 BLM Infitada.

    Even in 95+ degree weather, more than half of the young black men I see are wearing hoodies, presumably to conceal both their identity and to aid in concealment of weapons. This being the demographic responsible for the large majority of shootings, and being in the zip codes where a large majority of shootings occur, it only makes sense to target them for stop and frisk. But police do nothing, of course.

    Quite often, I see young black people throwing trash on the subway tracks, playing Bluetooth speakers on board trains and busses, smoking weed and cigarettes in the subway platform, etc. More than half of the people on the bus simply walk past the payment kiosk and ride for free. All of these things are reason enough for transit police to initiate interactions with them, which would introduce more opportunities to stop and frisk. This would undoubtedly turn up illegally carried firearms. But of course the police do nothing.

    Aggressive 'quality of life' policing (along with aggressive prosecution on the back end) would do wonders to clean up this city and reduce the murder rate. But we can't have that until we can dismantle the legal concept of Disparate Impact.

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist, @Joe Stalin

    I see young black people throwing trash on the subway tracks

    Coolest thing I’ve ever seen thrown on the CTA EL train tracks by kids was bare copper wire and when it got between the third rail and other tracks…

    Instant plasma when the 600V power hit it.

  73. Personally, I think that George Soros is a great man, but I disagree with the emphases that he has devoted his greatness to in recent years.

  74. @Curle
    In Octopus by Sam Israel, Israel tells of being trained by Soros in the ‘70s in the fine art of insider trading a crime for which Soros has an much under reported conviction in France. Maybe the fact that he’s an fellow con is what motivates George?

    I challenge you to find an reference to this conviction in any American news article mentioning Soros.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13132058-octopus

    Replies: @raga10

    I challenge you to find an reference to this conviction in any American news article mentioning Soros.

    challenge accepted:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2011-10-06/soros-loses-human-rights-appeal-against-insider-trading-case
    https://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/14/business/worldbusiness/14iht-soros.1974397.html
    https://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/10/06/soros-loses-challenge-to-insider-trading-conviction/
    https://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/21/business/soros-is-found-guilty-in-france-on-charges-of-insider-trading.html

    and it’s not like I had to dig deep – all are links to mainstream sites, taken from the top of the first page of search results. I used Brave search and I can’t be bothered comparing it to results that google would produce but clearly, the information is out there.

  75. @Technite78

    what is often called the country’s poorest big city
     
    This is why Philadelphia is doomed. I'd guess Philadelphia has the fewest number of high net worth individuals (i.e. > $100 million) per capita of any American city with a population over 500,000. Nobody with any political clout cares if it's severely mismanaged.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    I’d guess Philadelphia has the fewest number of high net worth individuals (i.e. > \$100 million) per capita of any American city with a population over 500,000.

    Thanks. How do you find this kind of information?

  76. @John Milton's Ghost
    @Almost Missouri

    Trend trading, of which Soros was one of a handful of extremely successful practitioners, is not easily mastered, nor often replicable in any sort of mass level (hence no good mutual funds or etfs that copy it). It would be analogous to say Warren Buffett or Peter Lynch is a great man. Steve's language is curious, though, and methinks he's having a little arch fun with it: does anyone say Buffett is a great man, using such terms?

    Perhaps the greatness Steve refers to is the flash of idiosyncrasy that Soros displays in what would, for anyone else, be a Quixotic futile enterprise. Successful trend trader John W. Henry decided to buy the Red Sox with his wealth. Soros has decided to destroy civilized places. Maybe that's greatness in the same way Ghengis Khan was great?

    I have an extremely libertarian friend who is a strong proponent of Karl Popper's open society, and he holds Soros (a former Popper student) to be a huge disappointment, because his actions are the opposite of Popper's professed ideals. I don't necessarily find Soros to be pure evil, but rather an accelerated version of what the Ford and Rockefeller families did, albeit in a single generation: accrue amazing wealth, then turn on and close the door for anyone else to build something similar, by completely embracing theories that destroy what made wealth accumulation possible for common people in the first place. That, and having so much wealth to embrace ridiculous decadent ideas that don't harm one who is well-protected from the ramifications of said ideas.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    It would be analogous to say Warren Buffett or Peter Lynch is a great man.

    That comparison raises interesting questions. I would maintain that Buffet’s work (portfolio building) is different from from Soros’s work (arbitrage). Buffet’s work is a step less removed from actual production, and arguably enables better production in a way that Soros’s doesn’t. (Buzz Mohawk may disagree though.) Then there is the fact that Buffet hasn’t been convicted of insider trading or accused of the technically legal but morally dubious ripoff of a national treasury as Soros has.

    Peter Lynch’s work is more akin to Soros’s, as they are both financial market traders disconnected from actual productivity. However, besides that Lynch is not a criminal, Lynch took a much smaller portion of his investors’ winnings as his own personal enrichment. He is not a billionaire.

    And, FWIW, anyone with a few bucks could share in Buffet’s or Lynch’s success, while only hedge funders (i.e., the already rich) could participate with Soros.

  77. @Steve Sailer
    @Jack P

    Downtown Philadelphia has all these wonderful amenities, several of them personally founded by Ben Franklin.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “After all, what did stop and frisk ever do under Mayor Bloomberg to make New York City have by far the lowest murder rate of any huge city in the country?“

    Yeah who can remember way back when. Between 2003 and 2013, over 100,000 stops were made per year, with 685,724 people being stopped at the height of the program in 2011. Ninety percent of those stopped in 2017 were African-American or Latino, mostly aged 14–24. Seventy percent of those stopped were later found to be innocent.

    So, the police randomly stop people walking down a street, and demand them to be searched. Reasonable suspicion? Something tells me if that happened to you repeatedly you would find that distinctly problematic. But then again, why would a police state bother you? I mean, we live in one already, right?

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