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My impression of families that are happy owning an electric car are ones where dad drives a Tesla to work but mom owns a V-8 three-row SUV that they take for all long trips. Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway. From the Washington Post:

How do I know if my home can accommodate an electric vehicle?

First, the bad news: If you rely on street parking, your home likely can’t accommodate an EV.

It’s hard to see how outlawing the sale of new gasoline-powered cars after 2035 in California can fit in with Yes In My Back Yard pushes to build more housing, since a key component of those drives is to get rid of parking mandates and let residents fend for themselves finding street parking.

Are they really going to string Level 2 or higher chargers to every street parking space by then? The LA Department of Water and Power has been working since 2008 on a replacement water main across the San Fernando Valley for the still functioning one that William Mulholland built in about 18 months around 1915 with pickaxes and mules, and there are still open trenches in the middle of busy streets after 14 years.

 
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  1. Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    But the conflict with environmentalism is just glaring. Western nations all have sub-replacement TFRs and many are at or well past their native population peak. But they are still growing. Pack ever more people in? Haven’t you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?

    Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea. If you have a nice big suburban home with rooftop solar. Or if your community has a nice nuclear power plant. So which way are we going here? … For the now 40 million+ Californians.

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @AnotherDad


    Pack ever more people in? Haven’t you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?
     
    The rules on population, as on everything else, change when it comes to immigration. Any sacrifice is justified in the name of diversity. We saw the same phenomenon with COVID. Lockdowns and social distancing were imposed on the native population, while swarms of immigrants broke all these rules as they turned up at the border.

    Speaking of fossil fuel usage, as I pointed out in an earlier comment, in the first seven months of 2022 the UK Border Force spent £570,000 on diesel for vessels patrolling the English Channel to pick up immigrants lest they drown. That doesn't include Royal Navy or RNLI vessels.

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @AnotherDad

    Electric vehicles are never good for the environment. Because to build a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel to mine the required lithium and nickel creating environmental destruction and pollution. Then after just 100,000 miles the batteries become toxic waste.

    Replies: @Old Bad Nurse, @Barnard, @(((They))) Live

    , @jsm
    @AnotherDad


    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.
     
    Which goes to prove, they don't *actually* give two hoots about all these supposed liberal niceties like environment, etc. Libshits love being pro-environment, that is to say, (only to White people) stop having kids, inconvenience yourself by walking, etc., because it's anti-White. They are pro Affirmative Action for blacks because it's anti-White. They are pro-abortion and feminism and Zero Population Growth because it's anti-White kids. They are against big cars that can go long distances because it's anti-White kids.

    So, guess why they are pro-immigration, even though it supposedly conflicts with all their other values?

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    , @Pop Warner
    @AnotherDad


    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.
     
    Yes, and there's a very simple explanation for how democrats rationalize this:

    They hate White people.

    That's it. There's no other principle more important to the democratic platform. They will hamstring all of their other policy initiatives if they think it hurts Whites. Every contradiction can be explained by them hating Whites more than liking anything else. Even Floydianity doesn't make them love blacks more than they hate Whites, because the entire religion is driven by hating Whites. It really isn't that complicated, but Republicans are too useless to ever point this out explicitly and build a platform that fights it. Instead, they'll dedicate their platform to tax cuts for their bosses and wars for Israel

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    , @Adam Smith
    @AnotherDad


    "Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea."
     
    Unfortunately, No. They are not. ☮
  2. You’re taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don’t mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn’t about the Environment. It’s about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what’s good for you!).

    • Replies: @Travis
    @Mr. Anon

    exactly correct. Electric car mandates are similar to the covid mandates, these mandates designed to destroy our standard of living and make life less enjoyable for regular people. These mandates are not for our benefit, quite the opposite, these mandates are used to destroy our nation.

    so called "Environmentalists" have not been concerned about pollution and the environment for decades. Environmental organizations seek power and to destroy capitalism and our freedoms. They are mostly former communists and other authoritarian types who seek to obtain power and wealth via government dictates. Anyone paying attention would realize that CO2 levels have cannot cause catastrophic global warming. The world would be greatly improved if the United States warmed a little, yet no warming has been detected since the 1930s for the United States. The warmest decade remains the 1930s according to NASA and all recorded temperature data. Nevertheless most Americans would welcome a slightly warmer climate, and our farmers benefit from rising CO2 levels as plants thrive with more CO2 and need less water

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Hannah Katz
    @Mr. Anon

    Of course riding on public transportation is dangerous, due to all the diversity and vibrancy that infests it. So maybe you commoners should walk to work or ride a bicycle... in Houston in August. Show up dripping with sweat and see how your boss likes it.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what’s good for you!).

    Anyone who refuses to be happy is a Domestic Extremist. That's as clear as can be.

    , @Coemgen
    @Mr. Anon


    You will own nothing, and you will be happy
     
    When "the government" starts putting saltpeter into the government issued analog of soylent green, any problems with unhappy members of the hoi polloi will just fade away...
    , @Alfa158
    @Mr. Anon

    If you try to find out how much electrical generating capacity we need if we went full electric, you get widely varying answers. The conservative ones say we will need to increase it by 35% to accommodate the likely achievable increase in electric vehicles, and almost double our capacity if all passenger vehicles were electric. A couple decades ago a Purdue University engineering department study assumed all ground transportation, including freight trucks went electric and the power capacity would have to be two and a half times as great.
    The US currently has an electric generating capacity of 1,100 gigawatts. If we assume that we only have to double our generating capacity we would need to build another 500 nuclear power plants like the de-commissioned San Onofre plant.
    Or, if we went solar with things like the Ivanpah facility which generates an average of 107 megawatts we would need to build 1,028 more of these:
    https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=wiOEmeGl&id=33E8C1B2CFDE7EEF53E916408C6646F4E242B7C8&thid=OIP.wiOEmeGlgW83-7dH9HH14AHaE8&mediaurl=https%3A%2F%2Fexternal-preview.redd.it%2FBPHrDNm1D5XjpFLOZE3QntCzjMZgxZYm-FYjKAWRLGo.jpg%3Fauto%3Dwebp%26s%3D2d744c85a12555fef9b5c5ef0462d9e8c3590822&cdnurl=https%3A%2F%2Fth.bing.com%2Fth%2Fid%2FR.c2238499e1a5816f37fbb747f471f5e0%3Frik%3DyLdC4vRGZoxAFg%26pid%3DImgRaw%26r%3D0&exph=1600&expw=2400&q=ivanpah&simid=608008979794851628&form=IRPRST&ck=2C4FF929A41DAB42280DF2BC725C9C66&selectedindex=9&vt=4&sim=11

    Plus the electrical distribution network.

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @Mr. Anon

    The Green New Deal isn’t about the Environment. It’s about imposing austerity on the masses.

    These are hardly conflicting sentiments. If you conclude sincerely that the carrying capacity of the planet is rapidly diminishing, you may well devise a plan that preserves as much comfort for your group while forcing other people to carry most of the burden.

    , @mc23
    @Mr. Anon

    "Austerity for the masses", absolutely, Marx's labor theory of value s so 19th century.

    The great reset, to paraphrase Si-Fi writer Neal Stephenson, is about an economy where there's a "broad global layer of what a Pakistani bricklayer would consider prosperity.”

    Which means the leaders of our global fascist oligarchic leadership don't have to worry about how resource depletion affects them

  3. Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway.

    A snout house.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Reg Cæsar

    It's sad but much of late-model suburbia looks similar to that. Garages, really, with the living quarters something of an afterthought.

    , @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Is that not a duplex or a double house?
    Why do they not unite the two garages with a patio/porch/gatehouse structure?

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Reg Cæsar

    Some snout houses are downright friendly looking.

    https://i.imgur.com/jCv37oZ.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @SafeNow
    @Reg Cæsar


    A snout house

     

    Years ago one architect defined a house as: It has a peaked roof and shutters. This should now be amended to add snout to the list.
    I have seen a boxy protrusion as an architectural feature on some new public buildings recently. One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal. To me, a vulva perhaps.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  4. anonymous[157] • Disclaimer says:

    Electric cars are taking over rapidly in China, which has to worry about importing 10 million barrels of oil every day through sea lanes it does not control. The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?

    This year, a quarter of all new cars purchased in China will be an all-electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid. There are, by some estimates, more than 300 Chinese companies making E.V.s, ranging from discount offerings below $5,000 to high-end models that rival Tesla and German automakers. There are roughly four million charging units in the country, double the number from a year ago, with more coming.

    While other E.V. markets are still heavily dependent on subsidies and financial incentives, China has entered a new phase: Consumers are weighing the merits of electric vehicles against gas-powered cars based on features and price without much consideration of state support. By comparison, the United States is far behind. This year, the country passed a key threshold of E.V.s accounting for 5 percent of new car sales. China passed that level in 2018.

    I haven’t heard much about electric heavy trucks. But if both heavy trucks and cars go electric then surely at least 1/3 of oil demand disappears.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anonymous

    China:
    1 Totalitarian.
    2 Ethnically homogeneous.
    3 Masters of huge instant infrastructure projects.
    4 Densely concentrated urban populations,
    5 needing to travel short daily distances.
    6 Okay with generating electricity with nuclear power or coal (or the burning bodies of dissident students).
    7 Cannot be trusted with a real engine.
    Yes, China, you get electric cars. Electric cars were pretty much designed specifically for Chinese drivers.
    You, the Minnesotan, the Montanan, the Australian, the Saffa, for you the electric car is a toy. For the Chinese it actually makes enormous sense.
    In America, where we have
    1 Freedom or its whiff.
    2 Diversity-related security anxieties.
    3 No ability to do basic infrastructure since German labor was last cheap.
    4 Cities but also really a smear between the city and the country
    5 (and lots of country).
    6 And we're really not okay with the idea of energy coming from somewhere, even if it's petroleum, let alone nuclear.
    7 And we invented real engines and everything you can do with them.
    America has no use for the current iteration of electric cars. Electric cars are more or less appropriate to different societies depending on where they fall along these criteria.

    Replies: @Anon7

    , @AndrewR
    @anonymous

    Last I checked, China has no shortage of people, so I don't think raising fertility should be high on their list of priorities.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill Jones

    , @kicktheroos
    @anonymous

    You whiteys are too obsessed about asians and our sex lives you are losers ,go worry about africans and indians.

    , @Jack D
    @anonymous


    The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?
     
    Just because America is run by clowns doesn't mean that China is run by supermen. China has its own problems. As is the case with the current "Zero Covid" lockdown (people here complained about the lockdowns but they are NOTHING compared to what they do in China), the one child policy developed its own bureaucratic momentum and went on far longer than it should have. Because China is a face culture, it's impossible for the Communist Party to ever admit that it made a mistake so backing away even from something that they KNOW to be a mistake has to be done very delicately and in a way where you do not actually admit that you are wrong.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Johann Ricke

  5. The LA Department of Water and Power has been working since 2008 on a replacement water main across the San Fernando Valley for the still functioning one that William Mulholland built in about 18 months around 1915 with pickaxes and mules, and there are still open trenches in the middle of busy streets after 14 years.

    The U.S. had years of ~0% borrowing costs and we squandered them. We could have financed infrastructure projects like this, paid illegal migrants to leave, built dozens of new nuclear reactors, or filled the Strategic Petroleum Reserve with millions of barrels of ~$10 oil during the COVID crash (Trump’s idea, shot down by Dems).

    • Thanks: Thea
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Dave Pinsen

    Your belief that we have a critical mass of voters with that kind of foresight and lack of NIMBYism is quaint.

    , @Polistra
    @Dave Pinsen


    (Trump’s idea, shot down by Dems).
     
    They probably would have shut it down even if it hadn't been trump's idea. Dems are all about consuming, not investing. Remember these are the people who (just this year) passed a trillion-dollar spending plan to fix inflation!

    Their mistake, of course is in failing to call it the 'Anti-Racism Fix Inflation Plan'. Though in their defense we must admit that many of its provisions fit that description. As we've discussed a bit round here.

    One trillion, three trillion, whatever. At some point it gets into real money.
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-08-11/biden-says-his-3-5-trillion-spending-plan-won-t-stoke-inflation

    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @Dave Pinsen


    The U.S. had years of ~0% borrowing costs and we squandered them.
     
    This. The era of low interest was the time to engage in capital intensive products. Instead we had a consumption binge.

    I'll be interested to see how they manage federal debt financing as interest rates balloon.

    If one has a long memory, the "balanced budgets" during the Clinton years resulted from a couple key components
    1) higher than expected tax as stocks gains were realized
    2) lower interest rates that allowed the existing debt service to be re-financed on favorable terms
  6. Maybe power stations at the place of former common gas stations will be the solution for EV´s anyway.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Erik Sieven


    Maybe power stations at the place of former common gas stations will be the solution for EV´s anyway.
     
    Not sure if you mean "charging stations" or "power plants" but neither one will do squat to fix the problem of charging infrastructure.

    If you mean "power plants" then you still need more wires and transformers and the like to carry the extra demand for electricity to the charging stations themselves, whether they are in people's garages or on the street.

    If you mean "charging stations" then replacing current gas stations will do nothing but create big parking lots, because it still takes 30-60 minutes with the fastest chargers and batteries and even significantly more time with the less efficient but more common equipment. There is no 5 minute "in and out" like there is with gasoline stations.

    Hydrogen stations would provide a similar type of quick fill like gasoline for what is essentially the same ZEV profile, but hydrogen infrastructure and production is even further behind battery electric and there are even fewer fuel cell vehicles.

    Point is, like the proverbial dollar on the sidewalk, these types of technologies and solutions would develop on their own if they was sufficient demand and financial incentive to put them in. Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that's what we have.

    Replies: @turtle, @Reg Cæsar, @blake121666

  7. Are they really going to string Level 2 or higher chargers to every street parking space by then?

    Nope, not the plan. The plan is to drastically reduce human mobility and make basic transport outrageously expensive. Same as the the current energy plan that is impoverishing Europe. Get on the bus and eat the the bugs, maggot.

    All in the service of the unproven fantasy of “global warming”. The solution is to destroy affluence by relying on the bottleneck of electric automobiles. I admire Teslas and Revians, but remain unconvinced that they can scale to solve national transportation needs. It also remains unclear whether electric cars are really better for the environment in the long term. More research is needed.

    Exporting all manufacturing to China and India that use dirty coal plants to manufacture “clean energy products” which are then shipped half way across the world to America hardly seems like an environmentally sound solution. Seems more like outsourcing and globalization subsidized by the state….

    Plus, if we face catastrophic ocean rise, why are homes still selling in Malibu, The Hamptons and Miami Beach?

    They are also banning natural gas heaters and stoves in California because natural gas is efficient, cheap and relatively non-polluting. Can’t have that now can we, it almost makes sense.

    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @clifford brown

    This is the plan for electric vehicles that likely will not work. Take transit!

    https://twitter.com/CrimeInNYC/status/1573633728022290432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1573633728022290432%7Ctwgr%5Eb164e59e4176cbb39c38c7a3c36a5460d8f44153%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @John Pepple, @WJ, @Yancey Ward

  8. @clifford brown

    Are they really going to string Level 2 or higher chargers to every street parking space by then?
     
    Nope, not the plan. The plan is to drastically reduce human mobility and make basic transport outrageously expensive. Same as the the current energy plan that is impoverishing Europe. Get on the bus and eat the the bugs, maggot.

    All in the service of the unproven fantasy of "global warming". The solution is to destroy affluence by relying on the bottleneck of electric automobiles. I admire Teslas and Revians, but remain unconvinced that they can scale to solve national transportation needs. It also remains unclear whether electric cars are really better for the environment in the long term. More research is needed.

    Exporting all manufacturing to China and India that use dirty coal plants to manufacture "clean energy products" which are then shipped half way across the world to America hardly seems like an environmentally sound solution. Seems more like outsourcing and globalization subsidized by the state....

    Plus, if we face catastrophic ocean rise, why are homes still selling in Malibu, The Hamptons and Miami Beach?

    They are also banning natural gas heaters and stoves in California because natural gas is efficient, cheap and relatively non-polluting. Can't have that now can we, it almost makes sense.

    Replies: @clifford brown

    This is the plan for electric vehicles that likely will not work. Take transit!

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    @clifford brown

    Elizabeth Gomes was on her way to work at JFK airport at 5:15am on September 20 when she was attacked at the airport station.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11252991/Woman-33-fears-shell-lose-eye-battered-homeless-man-JFK-airport-subway.html

    https://abc7ny.com/woman-beaten-in-subway-station-waheed-foster-assault-howard-beach/12268543/


    In 1995, law enforcement sources say Foster was arrested for murdering his 82-year-old foster grandmother in a brutal beating at the age of 14. Six years later, he was arrested for stabbing his 21-year-old sister with a screwdriver. Then in 2010, he was arrested for attacking three workers at the Creedmore Psychiatric Center, where he was an inpatient. He was on parole until November 2024 at the time of last week's attack.
     
    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key?

    Replies: @Polistra, @AndrewR, @Adam Smith, @Sick n' Tired

    , @John Pepple
    @clifford brown

    Our elites want us living in cities and using mass transit, but at the same time they encourage (or fail to discourage) lots of anti-social behavior that makes people want to avoid cities and mass transit.

    Replies: @jsm, @clifford brown

    , @WJ
    @clifford brown

    The beaten lady will still vote for Adams and vote for Dems overall.

    , @Yancey Ward
    @clifford brown

    That guy that ran away needed a big knife or, preferably, a gun to shoot that dumbass.

  9. William Mulholland: They don’t make ‘em like that any more. He got shit done.

    Sadly, he will be forgotten once his street is renamed “Nipsy Hustle Drive.”

    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @Anon

    Mulholland is a testament to California's amazing history, but there is something to be said for engineering accreditation.

    Replies: @Anon

  10. I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    @PiltdownMan


    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?
     
    The battery is so large that it must be built into the structure of the car, and it adds substantially to the car's weight. Recharging can take as long as an hour, so it is best done overnight at home. On long journeys, drivers of electric cars suffer from "range anxiety", because suitable charging points are scarce. The power delivered by charging can be as high as 75 kW for one vehicle, and so there are obvious issues with the generation and distribution of all that extra electricity.

    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @Alfa158

    , @J.Ross
    @PiltdownMan

    You mean once the batteries are no longer the size of a New York apartment?

    , @Pixo
    @PiltdownMan

    That was tried and failed.

    California passed a huge swappable battery subsidy, Tesla took it, and then never delivered on it or returned the money. It did the same thing in NY State, promising to build a huge factory with a lot of manufacturing employees in Buffalo, taking the money and keeping it when it failed to deliver on the subsidy conditions. The factory was built, but it never scaled up production or hired many people.

    All in, Tesla has received about $30 billion in government subsidies to make Elon Musk the world’s richest man.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Nervous in Stalingrad

    , @Cave Johnson
    @PiltdownMan

    I swear, every mention of EVs and some future Nobel Prize candidate comes out and proposes swappable battery packs, as though these things are functional equivalents of a rechargeable AA battery. Without going into the details as to why it's not practical on an automotive scale, right now, scooters are about the ceiling on the practicality of that.

    https://electrek.co/2021/08/30/gogoro-named-global-leader-in-light-electric-vehicle-battery-swapping-passes-200-million-swaps/

    2035:

    An engineer I know who is in the parking garage construction business says the future in cities isnt public transit, its subscription services. Specifically, this will happen once self driving technology reaches a level where there is confidence in a car driving without anyone behind the wheel at all. You will have a subscription, call a car (like an uber), and the optimal unmanned electric unit will arrive at your location, where you will then be taken to your destination. The cars will be assigned routes to optimize battery usage, and will return to the garage to recharge when needed (or be cleaned in the event a messy event is detected or reported). He bases this notion on the way parking garage technology is moving to accommodate such a system.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Inquiring Mind, @Justvisiting

    , @Jack D
    @PiltdownMan

    Yes. On paper at least this is a very good idea but like everything else, the devil is in the details.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilwinton/2022/09/12/battery-swapping-revival-could-threaten-electric-car-charging-networks/?sh=75c117991b1b

    This has been tried several times and so far has failed but sometimes in technology the third time (or the 10th) is the charm - the fact that it failed before doesn't mean it will always fail.

    More broadly, rather than the old fashioned concept of "owning a car" (most people don't buy a car for cash in a lump sum anyway), you have the concept of "a subscription for your transportation needs". This could be just a subscription for battery swaps and you still own the car or it could be something much bigger depending on how fast other technology (such as self driving cars) proceeds.

    You don't actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. What you need is TRANSPORTATION - the car is just a means to an end. Now you could even now skip owning a car and just take Uber everywhere (but this is very costly because you are your own unpaid chauffeur now - with Uber you are hiring a car AND a driver). Or else you could use one of those services like Zipcar where you rent a car by the hour but this is only practical in the city where they can have Zipcars all over the place so you only have to walk a block or two. Most of America is not that dense.

    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time). If you needed to take the kids to soccer practice you could summon a 3 row SUV, if it was just you, you could summon a small car, if it was commuting to work the self driver might stop and pick up a couple of other people going downtown, etc.

    Steve's comment of "where are we going to put all the charging stations" is valid up to a point but it doesn't take into account that the technology is going to continue to develop - that charging times are going to drop, etc. When cars were new, tires only lasted a couple of thousand miles. So the Steve of 1902 might have said, "Where are we going to put all the tire shops? We are going to need to have a tire shop on every block." But if tires improve and last 20,000 miles instead of 2,000 miles, you only need 1/10th as many tire shops. It's going to be the same with vehicle charging.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @scrivener3, @James B. Shearer, @AnotherDad

  11. We seem to have lost Steve’s twitter feed on the sidebar. There’s just a link to twitter. Hell if I’m going to sign up so I can read more than a few inches. Someone call Elon.

  12. @AnotherDad
    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    But the conflict with environmentalism is just glaring. Western nations all have sub-replacement TFRs and many are at or well past their native population peak. But they are still growing. Pack ever more people in? Haven't you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?


    Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea. If you have a nice big suburban home with rooftop solar. Or if your community has a nice nuclear power plant. So which way are we going here? ... For the now 40 million+ Californians.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @jsm, @Pop Warner, @Adam Smith

    Pack ever more people in? Haven’t you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?

    The rules on population, as on everything else, change when it comes to immigration. Any sacrifice is justified in the name of diversity. We saw the same phenomenon with COVID. Lockdowns and social distancing were imposed on the native population, while swarms of immigrants broke all these rules as they turned up at the border.

    Speaking of fossil fuel usage, as I pointed out in an earlier comment, in the first seven months of 2022 the UK Border Force spent £570,000 on diesel for vessels patrolling the English Channel to pick up immigrants lest they drown. That doesn’t include Royal Navy or RNLI vessels.

    • Agree: Gordo
  13. @clifford brown
    @clifford brown

    This is the plan for electric vehicles that likely will not work. Take transit!

    https://twitter.com/CrimeInNYC/status/1573633728022290432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1573633728022290432%7Ctwgr%5Eb164e59e4176cbb39c38c7a3c36a5460d8f44153%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @John Pepple, @WJ, @Yancey Ward

    Elizabeth Gomes was on her way to work at JFK airport at 5:15am on September 20 when she was attacked at the airport station.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11252991/Woman-33-fears-shell-lose-eye-battered-homeless-man-JFK-airport-subway.html

    https://abc7ny.com/woman-beaten-in-subway-station-waheed-foster-assault-howard-beach/12268543/

    In 1995, law enforcement sources say Foster was arrested for murdering his 82-year-old foster grandmother in a brutal beating at the age of 14. Six years later, he was arrested for stabbing his 21-year-old sister with a screwdriver. Then in 2010, he was arrested for attacking three workers at the Creedmore Psychiatric Center, where he was an inpatient. He was on parole until November 2024 at the time of last week’s attack.

    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key?

    • Thanks: Pop Warner
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @James N. Kennett

    They're not throwing away any keys. They're going to make this Proud Black Man the keynote speaker at the next DNC convention!

    He embodies virtually every single woke principle, and I hope all of the virtuous white women who see this will send money for his defense, in the unlikely event that he's ever prosecuted. (Especially Alden. Open that purse girl!)

    You are looking at the future of the nation. Or is it just the present?

    Replies: @Alden

    , @AndrewR
    @James N. Kennett

    It's time we talk about common sense negro control.

    , @Adam Smith
    @James N. Kennett

    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key euthanize this feral beast?

    , @Sick n' Tired
    @James N. Kennett

    A homeless man with clean white pants and fresh looking $200 sneakers? This must be the new news speak excuse to down play violent black crime, similar to how they use "mentally ill", "shots rang out", "random attack", or "gun violence".

  14. 1,000% off topic, but it looks possible that the US (or possibly the UK under US instruction) have carried out what would usually be considered an act of war against Germany and the EU.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/sep/26/nord-stream-2-pipeline-pressure-collapses-mysteriously-overnight

    As winter approaches (and the mud has arrived in Ukraine) some minds in the EU have become fixated on the collapse of European high-energy-use industry i.e. a lot of it – steel, aluminium, chemicals, fertiliser. They note the resurgence in US manufacturing, after the decades of offshoring

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/factory-jobs-are-booming-like-it-e2-80-99s-the-1970s/ar-AA12gZzN

    and compare it with the industrial Armageddon facing Germany

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/sep/15/gas-rationing-germany-basf-plant-europe-crisis

    And all this time, Russia has been saying – “we’re not the ones who want economic warfare – Nordstream 2 is right there ready to deliver“. The worry for GAE is that sooner or later the EU, slowly bleeding jobs and exports, will crack and cry “enough!”

    It looks as if that option’s been effectively removed. The teenage girl is still in her room having taken the pills, but someone’s set fire to the ambulance which just pulled up outside with the antidote.

    “Nord Stream 2’s operator said pressure in the undersea pipeline dropped from 105 to 7 bar overnight.

    The Russian-owned pipeline, which was intended to double the volume of gas flowing from Vyborg, Russia, under the Baltic Sea to Germany, had just been completed and filled with 300m cubic metres of gas when the German chancellor, Olaf Scholz, cancelled it shortly before Russia invaded Ukraine.”

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, I've tried to understand this story for several hours now and the only solution I can find is that the US (or the UK) did it so as to prevent a settlement in Ukraine.

    Russia wants it to end, Ukraine wants it to end, continental Europe wants it to end. All three of those players have an incentive to negotiate a settlement and get that gas flowing again.

    But the US doesn't have an incentive for it to end and has a motive to prevent it from being ended easily.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @turtle

    , @SaneClownPosse
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Germany could have blown the pipeline. It would fit with their recent actions.

    Suicidal Germany went with the sanctions against Russia and its energy supplies, resulting in having to force drastic energy conservation upon its citizens and Industry, just to virtue signal support for the failed state of Ukraine.

  15. @PiltdownMan
    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @J.Ross, @Pixo, @Cave Johnson, @Jack D

    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?

    The battery is so large that it must be built into the structure of the car, and it adds substantially to the car’s weight. Recharging can take as long as an hour, so it is best done overnight at home. On long journeys, drivers of electric cars suffer from “range anxiety”, because suitable charging points are scarce. The power delivered by charging can be as high as 75 kW for one vehicle, and so there are obvious issues with the generation and distribution of all that extra electricity.

    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James N. Kennett

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @petit bourgeois, @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @JimDandy

    , @AnotherDad
    @James N. Kennett


    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.
     
    The quite reasonable solution for flexibility is methanol.

    -- Flex-fuel engines that can burn any combination of gasoline, ethanol, methanol down to say 15% gasoline.

    -- Methanol can be made easily from natural gas (converted to syngas). Or later make from organics through destructive distillation to get the gas. Or if you've gone nuclear, electolysis and CO2 capture.

    Methanol gives you only about half the punch of gasoline. But bigger fuel tanks aren't a ball breaker.

    And in "other uses", you can do methanol fuel cells, though obviously more efficient if already have electricity from your nuke to use that directly.

    Replies: @Travis

    , @Alfa158
    @James N. Kennett

    Musk demonstrated a scheme to have quick change battery packs for Teslas. The car would have a standardized battery pack that can be mounted and dismounted from underneath by automated machinery. The car is pulled into a slot over a pit at a Tesla supercharging station. Machinery unbolts the discharged pack, drops it down and slides it away to go back into a bank and be recharged for the next customer. A freshly charged pack gets slid under and bolted in. Should be workable, if you can milk cows with robotic milking stations, swapping batteries in a car is a much simpler automation challenge.
    In the demonstration Musk had a gasoline luxury car getting refilled with gasoline while one of these test Teslas had the battery pack replaced repeatedly by the automated service unit. They were able to complete about two and a half battery swaps in the time it took to refuel the gas car.
    Haven’t heard anything since then about this going into service, Tesla seems to be pouring its substantial profit margins from cars into building conventional DC supercharger stations and expecting their customers to wait while their car is recharged.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live

  16. @Dave Pinsen

    The LA Department of Water and Power has been working since 2008 on a replacement water main across the San Fernando Valley for the still functioning one that William Mulholland built in about 18 months around 1915 with pickaxes and mules, and there are still open trenches in the middle of busy streets after 14 years.
     
    The U.S. had years of ~0% borrowing costs and we squandered them. We could have financed infrastructure projects like this, paid illegal migrants to leave, built dozens of new nuclear reactors, or filled the Strategic Petroleum Reserve with millions of barrels of ~$10 oil during the COVID crash (Trump's idea, shot down by Dems).

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Polistra, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    Your belief that we have a critical mass of voters with that kind of foresight and lack of NIMBYism is quaint.

  17. Update on my OT comment

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2022/sep/27/russia-ukraine-war-live-news-voting-in-sham-referendums-due-to-end-japanese-consul-interrogated-in-russia

    Reuters has a further update on the pipeline situation, carrying a statement from Nord Stream AG, the operator of the network, which says three offshore lines of the Nord Stream gas pipeline system have sustained “unprecedented” damage in one day.

    It also said that it was impossible to estimate when the gas network system’s working capability would be restored.

    Sweden’s Maritime Authority said it had issued a warning of two leaks on the Russian-owned Nord Stream 1 pipeline in Swedish and Danish waters, shortly after a leak on the nearby Nord Stream 2 project was discovered.

    “There are two leaks on Nord Stream 1 – one in Swedish economic zone and one in Danish economic zone. They are very near each other,” a Swedish Maritime Administration (SMA) spokesperson told Reuters.

    The leaks were located north-east of the Danish island Bornholm, the spokesperson said. It was not immediately clear what had caused the leaks.

    “We are keeping extra watch to make sure no ship comes too close to the site,” a second SMA spokesperson said.

    On Monday, Danish authorities had asked ships to steer clear of a five nautical mile radius south-east off Bornholm after a gas leak from the defunct Nord Stream 2 pipeline drained into the Baltic Sea.

    Later the same day, the operator of the Nord Stream 1 pipeline, which ran at reduced capacity from mid-June before shutting down completely in August, also disclosed a pressure drop on both lines of the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline.

  18. @James N. Kennett
    @PiltdownMan


    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?
     
    The battery is so large that it must be built into the structure of the car, and it adds substantially to the car's weight. Recharging can take as long as an hour, so it is best done overnight at home. On long journeys, drivers of electric cars suffer from "range anxiety", because suitable charging points are scarce. The power delivered by charging can be as high as 75 kW for one vehicle, and so there are obvious issues with the generation and distribution of all that extra electricity.

    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @Alfa158

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Steve Sailer

    “Are they really going to string Level 2 or higher chargers to every street parking space by then?”

    More like by 2050. That’s assuming we aren’t overtaken by China, or by globohomo, or by another “fake” pandemic, or by Jewish cultivated mystery meat pets that leads us to become Brazil.

    Take your pick. We’ll leave the lights off for you.

    , @petit bourgeois
    @Steve Sailer

    I just got back from San Felipe BCN last night and got an Uber in a Tesla model 3 to get home from the train station. Nice car, if you live near a charging station.

    However, in San Felipe I didn't see one Tesla or charging station. I've been to fancy wineries in Valle de Guadalupe on the other side of the peninsula that have charging stations and don't even have paved roads.

    San Felipe is hostile to corporate ambitions to take it over. Only place I've been in Mexico where there's not a fleet of Domino's motorcycles delivering pizza, because there are four mom and pop places that won't allow it.

    Once you head south from San Felipe down the Sea of Cortez there are places with no electricity infrastructure or cell phone service, everything is either solar powered or diesel generated. Not a place you can go in an EV, much less survive if you live there. The entire country is powered on diesel and gasoline, and it works just fine as it always has.

    , @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    @Steve Sailer

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    I live in the downtown area of one of the ten most populous metro areas in the country and ride an EUC. Mine has a top speed of around 45 MPH.

    They're immensely convenient (never have to worry about parking) and also riding one is the most fun I've ever had with my clothes on.

    Since they're the greatest thing since sliced bread, I'm sure they'll be banned soon. America's government is an anarcho-tyranncal Karenocracy, a veritable photonegative of an ideal government, where everything that is cool is banned and everything that sucks is mandatory.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukVjXFIOdvs

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @duncsbaby

    , @JimDandy
    @Steve Sailer

    But where are the windmill cars? I'll tell you where--locked up in the sub-basement of Big Oil.

  19. @anonymous
    Electric cars are taking over rapidly in China, which has to worry about importing 10 million barrels of oil every day through sea lanes it does not control. The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?

    This year, a quarter of all new cars purchased in China will be an all-electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid. There are, by some estimates, more than 300 Chinese companies making E.V.s, ranging from discount offerings below $5,000 to high-end models that rival Tesla and German automakers. There are roughly four million charging units in the country, double the number from a year ago, with more coming.

    While other E.V. markets are still heavily dependent on subsidies and financial incentives, China has entered a new phase: Consumers are weighing the merits of electric vehicles against gas-powered cars based on features and price without much consideration of state support. By comparison, the United States is far behind. This year, the country passed a key threshold of E.V.s accounting for 5 percent of new car sales. China passed that level in 2018.
     
    I haven't heard much about electric heavy trucks. But if both heavy trucks and cars go electric then surely at least 1/3 of oil demand disappears.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AndrewR, @kicktheroos, @Jack D

    China:
    1 Totalitarian.
    2 Ethnically homogeneous.
    3 Masters of huge instant infrastructure projects.
    4 Densely concentrated urban populations,
    5 needing to travel short daily distances.
    6 Okay with generating electricity with nuclear power or coal (or the burning bodies of dissident students).
    7 Cannot be trusted with a real engine.
    Yes, China, you get electric cars. Electric cars were pretty much designed specifically for Chinese drivers.
    You, the Minnesotan, the Montanan, the Australian, the Saffa, for you the electric car is a toy. For the Chinese it actually makes enormous sense.
    In America, where we have
    1 Freedom or its whiff.
    2 Diversity-related security anxieties.
    3 No ability to do basic infrastructure since German labor was last cheap.
    4 Cities but also really a smear between the city and the country
    5 (and lots of country).
    6 And we’re really not okay with the idea of energy coming from somewhere, even if it’s petroleum, let alone nuclear.
    7 And we invented real engines and everything you can do with them.
    America has no use for the current iteration of electric cars. Electric cars are more or less appropriate to different societies depending on where they fall along these criteria.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Anon7
    @J.Ross

    "And we invented real engines and everything you can do with them. America has no use for the current iteration of electric cars. Electric cars are more or less appropriate to different societies depending on where they fall along these criteria."

    My five year-old Tesla Model S develops 518 horsepower with its two small electric engines and big battery, the power being applied instantly (no transmission, no gears to shift) to big asymmetrical tires with all-wheel drive, virtually eliminating slipping; it has the lowest center of gravity and the lowest drag coefficient of any production car. And I didn't even get the really zippy model, the one that develops 1,000 horsepower and 0-60 in less than two seconds.

    And NO I don't believe in Catastrophic Human-Caused Global Warming, NO I don't believe that storms are getting worse, NO I didn't vote for Biden, NO I don't really care about more CO2, NO NO NO.

    It's a hot car. You're wrong about that part.

  20. @PiltdownMan
    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @J.Ross, @Pixo, @Cave Johnson, @Jack D

    You mean once the batteries are no longer the size of a New York apartment?

  21. @Reg Cæsar

    Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway.
     
    A snout house.




    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/53dd6676e4b0fedfbc26ea91/1555014816697-ASBNMJFZRGRRGR2Q17H1/image-asset.jpeg

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @PiltdownMan, @SafeNow

    It’s sad but much of late-model suburbia looks similar to that. Garages, really, with the living quarters something of an afterthought.

  22. OT, but in honor of NASA’s heroically mad attempt to shoot a rocket ship at an asteroid, courtesy no doubt of our bold intrepid Xomen of Xolor…..

  23. @Reg Cæsar

    Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway.
     
    A snout house.




    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/53dd6676e4b0fedfbc26ea91/1555014816697-ASBNMJFZRGRRGR2Q17H1/image-asset.jpeg

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @PiltdownMan, @SafeNow

    Is that not a duplex or a double house?
    Why do they not unite the two garages with a patio/porch/gatehouse structure?

  24. @Dave Pinsen

    The LA Department of Water and Power has been working since 2008 on a replacement water main across the San Fernando Valley for the still functioning one that William Mulholland built in about 18 months around 1915 with pickaxes and mules, and there are still open trenches in the middle of busy streets after 14 years.
     
    The U.S. had years of ~0% borrowing costs and we squandered them. We could have financed infrastructure projects like this, paid illegal migrants to leave, built dozens of new nuclear reactors, or filled the Strategic Petroleum Reserve with millions of barrels of ~$10 oil during the COVID crash (Trump's idea, shot down by Dems).

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Polistra, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    (Trump’s idea, shot down by Dems).

    They probably would have shut it down even if it hadn’t been trump’s idea. Dems are all about consuming, not investing. Remember these are the people who (just this year) passed a trillion-dollar spending plan to fix inflation!

    Their mistake, of course is in failing to call it the ‘Anti-Racism Fix Inflation Plan’. Though in their defense we must admit that many of its provisions fit that description. As we’ve discussed a bit round here.

    One trillion, three trillion, whatever. At some point it gets into real money.
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-08-11/biden-says-his-3-5-trillion-spending-plan-won-t-stoke-inflation

  25. @James N. Kennett
    @clifford brown

    Elizabeth Gomes was on her way to work at JFK airport at 5:15am on September 20 when she was attacked at the airport station.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11252991/Woman-33-fears-shell-lose-eye-battered-homeless-man-JFK-airport-subway.html

    https://abc7ny.com/woman-beaten-in-subway-station-waheed-foster-assault-howard-beach/12268543/


    In 1995, law enforcement sources say Foster was arrested for murdering his 82-year-old foster grandmother in a brutal beating at the age of 14. Six years later, he was arrested for stabbing his 21-year-old sister with a screwdriver. Then in 2010, he was arrested for attacking three workers at the Creedmore Psychiatric Center, where he was an inpatient. He was on parole until November 2024 at the time of last week's attack.
     
    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key?

    Replies: @Polistra, @AndrewR, @Adam Smith, @Sick n' Tired

    They’re not throwing away any keys. They’re going to make this Proud Black Man the keynote speaker at the next DNC convention!

    He embodies virtually every single woke principle, and I hope all of the virtuous white women who see this will send money for his defense, in the unlikely event that he’s ever prosecuted. (Especially Alden. Open that purse girl!)

    You are looking at the future of the nation. Or is it just the present?

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Polistra

    You’re a moron if you think I like black criminals. I spent 27 years of my life sentencing then to maximum terms in state prison. Unlike the useless Men of UNZ who’ve never done a thing to punish black criminals. Or lowered the crime rate as I did. When they’re in state prison they can only harm each other. Instead of the rest of us.

    One of the dumbest posts ever.

    Replies: @HammerJack

  26. @anonymous
    Electric cars are taking over rapidly in China, which has to worry about importing 10 million barrels of oil every day through sea lanes it does not control. The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?

    This year, a quarter of all new cars purchased in China will be an all-electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid. There are, by some estimates, more than 300 Chinese companies making E.V.s, ranging from discount offerings below $5,000 to high-end models that rival Tesla and German automakers. There are roughly four million charging units in the country, double the number from a year ago, with more coming.

    While other E.V. markets are still heavily dependent on subsidies and financial incentives, China has entered a new phase: Consumers are weighing the merits of electric vehicles against gas-powered cars based on features and price without much consideration of state support. By comparison, the United States is far behind. This year, the country passed a key threshold of E.V.s accounting for 5 percent of new car sales. China passed that level in 2018.
     
    I haven't heard much about electric heavy trucks. But if both heavy trucks and cars go electric then surely at least 1/3 of oil demand disappears.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AndrewR, @kicktheroos, @Jack D

    Last I checked, China has no shortage of people, so I don’t think raising fertility should be high on their list of priorities.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Jimbo
    @AndrewR

    You need to check again. They have an enormous shortage of people - they basically have no young people to replace their current workers, and their economy is basically going to fall apart within this decade because of it.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @anonymous

    , @Bill Jones
    @AndrewR

    China has no shortage of current people. It has a disastrous shortage of Tomorrows Men.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/55/China_population_sex_by_age_on_Nov%2C_1st%2C_2020.png

  27. @James N. Kennett
    @clifford brown

    Elizabeth Gomes was on her way to work at JFK airport at 5:15am on September 20 when she was attacked at the airport station.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11252991/Woman-33-fears-shell-lose-eye-battered-homeless-man-JFK-airport-subway.html

    https://abc7ny.com/woman-beaten-in-subway-station-waheed-foster-assault-howard-beach/12268543/


    In 1995, law enforcement sources say Foster was arrested for murdering his 82-year-old foster grandmother in a brutal beating at the age of 14. Six years later, he was arrested for stabbing his 21-year-old sister with a screwdriver. Then in 2010, he was arrested for attacking three workers at the Creedmore Psychiatric Center, where he was an inpatient. He was on parole until November 2024 at the time of last week's attack.
     
    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key?

    Replies: @Polistra, @AndrewR, @Adam Smith, @Sick n' Tired

    It’s time we talk about common sense negro control.

    • LOL: JR Ewing
  28. @AnotherDad
    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    But the conflict with environmentalism is just glaring. Western nations all have sub-replacement TFRs and many are at or well past their native population peak. But they are still growing. Pack ever more people in? Haven't you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?


    Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea. If you have a nice big suburban home with rooftop solar. Or if your community has a nice nuclear power plant. So which way are we going here? ... For the now 40 million+ Californians.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @jsm, @Pop Warner, @Adam Smith

    Electric vehicles are never good for the environment. Because to build a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel to mine the required lithium and nickel creating environmental destruction and pollution. Then after just 100,000 miles the batteries become toxic waste.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Old Bad Nurse
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Hola Hernan,

    I am not trying to get into a comment-section argument. This is just information: Tesla batteries are rated for approximately 3000 full discharge cycles. My Model 3 gets 500km on a full charge. That adds up to 1.5 million km. Also, by using the 20%-80% charge-discharge limits, that battery life is extended. My wife, who drives the Tesla, commutes 250 km/day, 5-6 days per week. I did my homework before we made the decision. I'm figuring 7-9 years, 450-650,000 kms. Plenty of wiggle room.

    This is my opinion: a used lithium-ion battery is a great recycling target. It may not be well-understood how to do it, it may require new industrial capacity, but it has to be more efficient than mining lithium, once there are enough expired batteries to make scale worthwhile.

    Other EV challenges and problems abound.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Barnard
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    It amazes me they are still installing hideous wind turbines now that it has been proven what an environmental disaster they are. Energy companies are now putting out propaganda about how they are "recycling" the blades. I saw a picture of a park in the Netherlands with a playground made out of wind turbine blades. Most end up getting buried in landfills.

    , @(((They))) Live
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Na, Batteries like 99% of every car will end up being recycled, also its not 2012, so it pointless to claim EV batteries only last 100K miles, we know its BS

  29. @Steve Sailer
    @James N. Kennett

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @petit bourgeois, @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @JimDandy

    “Are they really going to string Level 2 or higher chargers to every street parking space by then?”

    More like by 2050. That’s assuming we aren’t overtaken by China, or by globohomo, or by another “fake” pandemic, or by Jewish cultivated mystery meat pets that leads us to become Brazil.

    Take your pick. We’ll leave the lights off for you.

    • Agree: tyrone
  30. @Reg Cæsar

    Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway.
     
    A snout house.




    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/53dd6676e4b0fedfbc26ea91/1555014816697-ASBNMJFZRGRRGR2Q17H1/image-asset.jpeg

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @PiltdownMan, @SafeNow

    Some snout houses are downright friendly looking.

    • LOL: Clark Kent
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @PiltdownMan

    Google Lens-- which I never heard of until now-- won't tell me where that is, but here is a matching kindergarten Kindergarten in Karlsruhe, co-designed by Tomi Ungerer:


    https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5cd63bbc2400005900727479.jpeg


    Kindergarten Wolfartsweier

    Replies: @noname, @PiltdownMan

  31. @Mr. Anon
    You're taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don't mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn't about the Environment. It's about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what's good for you!).

    Replies: @Travis, @Hannah Katz, @Harry Baldwin, @Coemgen, @Alfa158, @Peter Akuleyev, @mc23

    exactly correct. Electric car mandates are similar to the covid mandates, these mandates designed to destroy our standard of living and make life less enjoyable for regular people. These mandates are not for our benefit, quite the opposite, these mandates are used to destroy our nation.

    so called “Environmentalists” have not been concerned about pollution and the environment for decades. Environmental organizations seek power and to destroy capitalism and our freedoms. They are mostly former communists and other authoritarian types who seek to obtain power and wealth via government dictates. Anyone paying attention would realize that CO2 levels have cannot cause catastrophic global warming. The world would be greatly improved if the United States warmed a little, yet no warming has been detected since the 1930s for the United States. The warmest decade remains the 1930s according to NASA and all recorded temperature data. Nevertheless most Americans would welcome a slightly warmer climate, and our farmers benefit from rising CO2 levels as plants thrive with more CO2 and need less water

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Travis


    exactly correct. Electric car mandates are similar to the covid mandates, these mandates designed to destroy our standard of living and make life less enjoyable for regular people.
     
    Apart from simply impoverishing the broad mass of people - making the rich richer, etc. - I think maybe that the "making life less enjoyable" part is an important aspect of the whole program.

    Over the last hundred years or so, as life became better for the average person, that average person has become less inclined to bear the burdens of war and repression that the powerful are wont to impose on him. This has perhaps not gone unnoticed by the powerful. By making life crappier for people, they are making it easier to subject them to war, enslavement, what have you.

    That might also be the motive behind the whole "Eat the Bugs!" campaign. Food is one of life's greatest simple pleasures. Take that away, give them meal-worms, crickets, and roaches to eat, and you take away a lot of joy. Now that I'm on the subject, it is interesting to note that one of COVID's side-effects was to deaden people's sense of taste. If you were engineering a virus to implement a "make-life-crappy" agenda, that'd certainly be one way to start.
  32. @clifford brown
    @clifford brown

    This is the plan for electric vehicles that likely will not work. Take transit!

    https://twitter.com/CrimeInNYC/status/1573633728022290432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1573633728022290432%7Ctwgr%5Eb164e59e4176cbb39c38c7a3c36a5460d8f44153%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @John Pepple, @WJ, @Yancey Ward

    Our elites want us living in cities and using mass transit, but at the same time they encourage (or fail to discourage) lots of anti-social behavior that makes people want to avoid cities and mass transit.

    • Agree: Carol
    • Replies: @jsm
    @John Pepple

    And, everybody thinks it's just an oopsie, an oversight, an accidental failure to think things through.

    HA! All is going according to plan: Make life impossible for nice, ordinary White folks, and they'll stop having so many of those disgusting White babies who tend to grow up to outcompete the Hostile Elites' own regressed-to-the-mean Spawn for all the plum spots in society.

    , @clifford brown
    @John Pepple

    And they think it's funny.

  33. @Mr. Anon
    You're taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don't mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn't about the Environment. It's about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what's good for you!).

    Replies: @Travis, @Hannah Katz, @Harry Baldwin, @Coemgen, @Alfa158, @Peter Akuleyev, @mc23

    Of course riding on public transportation is dangerous, due to all the diversity and vibrancy that infests it. So maybe you commoners should walk to work or ride a bicycle… in Houston in August. Show up dripping with sweat and see how your boss likes it.

  34. Anon[231] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Axios reports on a “new report” (i.e., a press release from a law school-based social justice advocacy organization) about how black men are supposedly being framed for crimes and thrown in jail. The data they use is skewed by Soros DAs conspiring with prisoner advocacy groups to not object to the release of black prisoners (which they call “exoneration”). But they funniest part is when they compare the percentage of blacks in there general population to the percentage of blacks who are exonerated, rather than to use the percentage of blacks among convicted prisoners as the denominator.

    Black Americans are seven times more likely than white people to be falsely convicted of serious crimes, and spend longer in prison before exoneration, a new report shows.

    The big picture: The study, from the National Registry of Exonerations, examined defendants who were exonerated after serving at least part of a sentence — sometimes spending decades in prison.

    Details: Black people represent 13.6% of the American population, but account for 53% of 3,200 exonerations in the registry as of August 8, 2022, according to the report.

    Innocent Black Americans are about seven-and-a-half times more likely to be convicted of murder than innocent white people, the study found.
    in prison before exoneration, a new report shows.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Anon

    Axios is worse than Politico. Neither is worth the electrons they use.

    , @HammerJack
    @Anon


    Black people represent 13.6% of the American population, but account for 53% of 3,200 exonerations
     
    Even by woke standards, that's incredibly dense. Blacks also account for well over half of all violent crime, and that's the relevant metric, not their position in the food chain.

    At 53%, they're actually wrongfully convicted less often than parity would produce.

    This is the sort of junk science that drives policy nowadays. It helps that the masses are brainwashed idiots.

  35. @PiltdownMan
    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @J.Ross, @Pixo, @Cave Johnson, @Jack D

    That was tried and failed.

    California passed a huge swappable battery subsidy, Tesla took it, and then never delivered on it or returned the money. It did the same thing in NY State, promising to build a huge factory with a lot of manufacturing employees in Buffalo, taking the money and keeping it when it failed to deliver on the subsidy conditions. The factory was built, but it never scaled up production or hired many people.

    All in, Tesla has received about $30 billion in government subsidies to make Elon Musk the world’s richest man.

    • Thanks: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Pixo

    Tesla has been a huge boon to California. Its factory in Fremont has a staggering seven million square feet of production space.

    , @Nervous in Stalingrad
    @Pixo


    All in, Tesla has received about $30 billion in government subsidies to make Elon Musk the world’s richest man.
     
    From what I understand, Tesla's success has hinged largely, if not entirely, on tax credits.

    It will be interesting to see whether Tesla will be able to survive without these credits, which I believe have either run out or will do in the next year or two.

    People point to Tesla as a success, but a large part of their success has been based on gaming the system. I am not sure if this is replicable for other firms looking to get into the car business.
  36. What is the feasibility of electric vehicles in northern Canada or the Australian Outback? Deepest Africa?

    In the Sahara desert and the Arab Gulf region, the favorite vehicle is the gasoline or diesel-powered Toyota Landcruiser, designed in 1984, and still in production with few changes.

    Electric vehicles are for people who live in the ant colony or the hive, people who’ve never seen the backside of the city limits sign.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @beavertales

    A huge chunk of California is pretty much off the grid, such as the northeastern quarter of this giant state, but the legislature doesn't much care about them. On the other hand, the southwestern quarter of the state from San Francisco to the Mexican border is mostly densely wired and has plenty of sunshine for solar power. Going all-electric in this huge zone isn't crazy, but it will be much easier on well-to-do older families who will keep a 2034 Lexus V8 SUV running into the 2060s.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @ForeverCARealist
    @beavertales

    I know several people who own Teslas. They are all males with plenty of income. They also own other cars with gas engines that they use for something other than a short commute.

    They also all like to show off a bit.

  37. You live in big apartment complex with unassigned parking and limited recharging stations. No problem. You come home from work in the evening, park and exit the car. The car’s computer then starts searching on the internet for an available charging station in the vicinity. It drives over autonomously, a robot hooks it up, and charging occurs. When finished the car drives home and texts you “mission accomplished”.

    And if you like, you could even instruct the car to have breakfast from the McDonalds drive through hot and ready in the car at 7 am.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @B36

    A friend of mine made a wonderful bet in 2000 with another friend that on New Year's Eve 2025, they will be able to order a self-driving cab to take them out to dinner in Santa Monica. After 20 years of optimism, he now expects to lose his bet.

    Replies: @danindc, @Cave Johnson, @turtle, @Anon7, @Jack D

  38. @beavertales
    What is the feasibility of electric vehicles in northern Canada or the Australian Outback? Deepest Africa?

    In the Sahara desert and the Arab Gulf region, the favorite vehicle is the gasoline or diesel-powered Toyota Landcruiser, designed in 1984, and still in production with few changes.

    Electric vehicles are for people who live in the ant colony or the hive, people who've never seen the backside of the city limits sign.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @ForeverCARealist

    A huge chunk of California is pretty much off the grid, such as the northeastern quarter of this giant state, but the legislature doesn’t much care about them. On the other hand, the southwestern quarter of the state from San Francisco to the Mexican border is mostly densely wired and has plenty of sunshine for solar power. Going all-electric in this huge zone isn’t crazy, but it will be much easier on well-to-do older families who will keep a 2034 Lexus V8 SUV running into the 2060s.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    How Cuban

  39. @B36
    You live in big apartment complex with unassigned parking and limited recharging stations. No problem. You come home from work in the evening, park and exit the car. The car's computer then starts searching on the internet for an available charging station in the vicinity. It drives over autonomously, a robot hooks it up, and charging occurs. When finished the car drives home and texts you "mission accomplished".

    And if you like, you could even instruct the car to have breakfast from the McDonalds drive through hot and ready in the car at 7 am.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    A friend of mine made a wonderful bet in 2000 with another friend that on New Year’s Eve 2025, they will be able to order a self-driving cab to take them out to dinner in Santa Monica. After 20 years of optimism, he now expects to lose his bet.

    • Replies: @danindc
    @Steve Sailer

    is the main problem pedestrians? Would everyone have to wear an indicator? If not, what is holding this up?

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    , @Cave Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    The details of "when" and "how" a general concept will occur in the future are almost always a mistake.

    That's why I go with the assumption of a subscription model. It can be accomplished with existing technology (assuming there is a minimum wage operator to monitor the vehicle and passengers for bad behavior). The only thing that needs to change is the economic balance. If or when a major city bans internal combustion engines within city limits, or taxes them out of practicality for most people, expect automated garages that manage a fleet of subscription EVs (possibly cab style, possibly personal) to pop up quickly.

    https://www.autoevolution.com/news/how-automated-parking-systems-work-19523.html

    , @turtle
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWgrvNHjKkY

    , @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    I bought "Full Self-Driving" for $3K with my Tesla in 2017. I usually own cars for about a decade; Musk has five years to go. We'll see if my "bet" pays off.

    Unless someone figures out how to explain what we humans see as the external world to machines, autonomous computer driving in the real world is probably a problem that can't be solved. In my opinion, the only chance that your friend realistically has is if a community decides to meet autonomous cars halfway, like the Graffiti text symbols let us write "letters" easily translated into English by a Palm Pilot years ago.

    The simplest autonomous car is an elevator; you just need to extend the basic principle to the roads in your community. They won't need to run on tracks, but the lane and intersection markings will need to be freshly painted and perfect. I don't think cars driven by people will be permitted to share those roads, humans are too unpredictable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Jack D
    @Steve Sailer

    Well if they move their dinner to SF it can probably happen.

  40. They don’t want (other) people to have cars, Steve.

    It’s probably too late for Boomer minds to be able to construct a workable mental model for the people who rule over them. Only thing left is to pray that they’ll never really have to. Stranger things have happened.

  41. @Steve Sailer
    @beavertales

    A huge chunk of California is pretty much off the grid, such as the northeastern quarter of this giant state, but the legislature doesn't much care about them. On the other hand, the southwestern quarter of the state from San Francisco to the Mexican border is mostly densely wired and has plenty of sunshine for solar power. Going all-electric in this huge zone isn't crazy, but it will be much easier on well-to-do older families who will keep a 2034 Lexus V8 SUV running into the 2060s.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    How Cuban

  42. My impression of families that are happy owning an electric car are ones where dad drives a Tesla to work but mom owns a V-8 three-row SUV that they take for all long trips. Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway.

    This is hilariously accurate. I can’t think of a single family I know in which both the husband and the wife drive EVs. It’s always the husband with a Tesla and the wife with a big old Lexus SUV. I know some single guys who drive Teslas and live in luxury apartments with plenty of charging stations, but no EV-only families.

    It probably won’t be feasible for most people for another couple of decades at least. Various states have some version of an Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Plan (see Texas’s below) that will generally include plans for state / private cooperation on EV Charging Networks and a timetable. That said, it’s hard to see them building enough charging stations at large, middle-income apartment complexes to make that a viable option for the non-single-family home and non-luxury-apartment crowd any time soon.

    https://ftp.txdot.gov/pub/txdot/get-involved/statewide/EV%20Charging%20Plan/TexasElectricVehicleChargingPlan.pdf#page41

    • Replies: @possumman
    @pirelli

    I know a single guy with Tesla for commuting 40 miles each way but a bad ass Mustang with a v-8 for weekends and real travel.

  43. California has made mandates like this before and pushed them back. This one will be pushed back too.

    • Disagree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Rob Lee
    @Spud Boy

    Charging stations will indeed be built in CA intermittently, slowly and at great cost, then instantly demolished by criminals at 2am for their copper wiring, whereupon 'not in service' signs will promptly be hung. No repairs will be forthcoming any time soon.

    But you'll still have to comply with the electric-only mandate, or else...

    Replies: @E. Rekshun

  44. @AnotherDad
    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    But the conflict with environmentalism is just glaring. Western nations all have sub-replacement TFRs and many are at or well past their native population peak. But they are still growing. Pack ever more people in? Haven't you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?


    Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea. If you have a nice big suburban home with rooftop solar. Or if your community has a nice nuclear power plant. So which way are we going here? ... For the now 40 million+ Californians.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @jsm, @Pop Warner, @Adam Smith

    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    Which goes to prove, they don’t *actually* give two hoots about all these supposed liberal niceties like environment, etc. Libshits love being pro-environment, that is to say, (only to White people) stop having kids, inconvenience yourself by walking, etc., because it’s anti-White. They are pro Affirmative Action for blacks because it’s anti-White. They are pro-abortion and feminism and Zero Population Growth because it’s anti-White kids. They are against big cars that can go long distances because it’s anti-White kids.

    So, guess why they are pro-immigration, even though it supposedly conflicts with all their other values?

    • Agree: Kylie, Lurker
    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @jsm

    You are right.

  45. In London, they’re quickly turning every third street lamppost into a very basic L2 charger.

    Calif., of course, is going to ruin everything with absurd and overdone top-down mandates, but it is technically feasible to support a lot more electric vehicle charging than we do currently with some pretty modest but clever infrastructure hacks.

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Ben Kurtz

    One of the problems, though, is we’re running out of the sort of people who can think up and bring to fruition those clever hacks.

    , @Dmon
    @Ben Kurtz

    "but it is technically feasible to support a lot more electric vehicle charging than we do currently with some pretty modest but clever infrastructure hacks."

    Like room temperature fusion?
    https://www.8newsnow.com/news/local-news/hoover-dam-power-production-down-33-official-says/

    I propose a 300 mile long by 50 mile wide trench that passes directly through Malibu, so that the Pacific Ocean can refill Lake Meade. We can call it the William Tecumseh Sherman Canal. All current California government workers will be put to work in the salt processing plant at the terminus, as the water has to be desalinated to avoid damaging the turbines. Talk about your shovel ready infrastructure projects...

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @kaganovitch

  46. @John Pepple
    @clifford brown

    Our elites want us living in cities and using mass transit, but at the same time they encourage (or fail to discourage) lots of anti-social behavior that makes people want to avoid cities and mass transit.

    Replies: @jsm, @clifford brown

    And, everybody thinks it’s just an oopsie, an oversight, an accidental failure to think things through.

    HA! All is going according to plan: Make life impossible for nice, ordinary White folks, and they’ll stop having so many of those disgusting White babies who tend to grow up to outcompete the Hostile Elites’ own regressed-to-the-mean Spawn for all the plum spots in society.

  47. @Dave Pinsen

    The LA Department of Water and Power has been working since 2008 on a replacement water main across the San Fernando Valley for the still functioning one that William Mulholland built in about 18 months around 1915 with pickaxes and mules, and there are still open trenches in the middle of busy streets after 14 years.
     
    The U.S. had years of ~0% borrowing costs and we squandered them. We could have financed infrastructure projects like this, paid illegal migrants to leave, built dozens of new nuclear reactors, or filled the Strategic Petroleum Reserve with millions of barrels of ~$10 oil during the COVID crash (Trump's idea, shot down by Dems).

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Polistra, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    The U.S. had years of ~0% borrowing costs and we squandered them.

    This. The era of low interest was the time to engage in capital intensive products. Instead we had a consumption binge.

    I’ll be interested to see how they manage federal debt financing as interest rates balloon.

    If one has a long memory, the “balanced budgets” during the Clinton years resulted from a couple key components
    1) higher than expected tax as stocks gains were realized
    2) lower interest rates that allowed the existing debt service to be re-financed on favorable terms

    • Agree: AnotherDad, kaganovitch
  48. @PiltdownMan
    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @J.Ross, @Pixo, @Cave Johnson, @Jack D

    I swear, every mention of EVs and some future Nobel Prize candidate comes out and proposes swappable battery packs, as though these things are functional equivalents of a rechargeable AA battery. Without going into the details as to why it’s not practical on an automotive scale, right now, scooters are about the ceiling on the practicality of that.

    https://electrek.co/2021/08/30/gogoro-named-global-leader-in-light-electric-vehicle-battery-swapping-passes-200-million-swaps/

    2035:

    An engineer I know who is in the parking garage construction business says the future in cities isnt public transit, its subscription services. Specifically, this will happen once self driving technology reaches a level where there is confidence in a car driving without anyone behind the wheel at all. You will have a subscription, call a car (like an uber), and the optimal unmanned electric unit will arrive at your location, where you will then be taken to your destination. The cars will be assigned routes to optimize battery usage, and will return to the garage to recharge when needed (or be cleaned in the event a messy event is detected or reported). He bases this notion on the way parking garage technology is moving to accommodate such a system.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Cave Johnson


    I swear, every mention of EVs and some future Nobel Prize candidate comes out and proposes swappable battery packs, as though these things are functional equivalents of a rechargeable AA battery.
     
    You mean they're not?

    https://youtube.com/shorts/yCKiCP3ZfHI

    , @Inquiring Mind
    @Cave Johnson

    Cleaned?

    Like where I work, where users of the bathroom don't flush much of the time?

    Replies: @Cave Johnson

    , @Justvisiting
    @Cave Johnson

    Folks have such short memories.

    When I was a child the teachers promised us that by the time we had to commute to work we would all have flying cars and roads would be obsolete.

    It sounded like an interesting idea at the time.

    ;-)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  49. @Erik Sieven
    Maybe power stations at the place of former common gas stations will be the solution for EV´s anyway.

    Replies: @JR Ewing

    Maybe power stations at the place of former common gas stations will be the solution for EV´s anyway.

    Not sure if you mean “charging stations” or “power plants” but neither one will do squat to fix the problem of charging infrastructure.

    If you mean “power plants” then you still need more wires and transformers and the like to carry the extra demand for electricity to the charging stations themselves, whether they are in people’s garages or on the street.

    If you mean “charging stations” then replacing current gas stations will do nothing but create big parking lots, because it still takes 30-60 minutes with the fastest chargers and batteries and even significantly more time with the less efficient but more common equipment. There is no 5 minute “in and out” like there is with gasoline stations.

    Hydrogen stations would provide a similar type of quick fill like gasoline for what is essentially the same ZEV profile, but hydrogen infrastructure and production is even further behind battery electric and there are even fewer fuel cell vehicles.

    Point is, like the proverbial dollar on the sidewalk, these types of technologies and solutions would develop on their own if they was sufficient demand and financial incentive to put them in. Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that’s what we have.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @JR Ewing

    More copper, please.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bingham_Canyon_Mine
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chino_mine
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1J_hAa0ehnw

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @JR Ewing


    Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that’s what we have.
     
    Chain saws, though, are increasingly electric. These just have to be scaled up.

    Completely OT, if you've ever wondered what Elvis, Freddie, and others would look like today...

    https://americansongwriter.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Elvis-by-AlperYesiltas.jpg?w=1500

    https://americansongwriter.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Freddie-Mercury-by-AlperYesiltas.jpg?w=1347

    The king looks downright presidential.


    https://americansongwriter.com/ai-artist-imagines-what-elvis-presley-john-lennon-freddie-mercury-and-other-musical-icons-would-look-like-today/

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @blake121666
    @JR Ewing

    Nio has largely automated "battery swap" stations. Look it up, it's quite interesting.

  50. @Steve Sailer
    @B36

    A friend of mine made a wonderful bet in 2000 with another friend that on New Year's Eve 2025, they will be able to order a self-driving cab to take them out to dinner in Santa Monica. After 20 years of optimism, he now expects to lose his bet.

    Replies: @danindc, @Cave Johnson, @turtle, @Anon7, @Jack D

    is the main problem pedestrians? Would everyone have to wear an indicator? If not, what is holding this up?

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @danindc

    "... If not, what is holding this up?"

    The main problem is there are too many rare events (which collectively add up) where people can mostly figure out what to do but autonomous cars currently can't unless they have been specifically programmed to handle them and there are too many rare situations to program them all in individually. Things like a cop directing traffic around a pothole repair crew.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @Jack D

  51. @YetAnotherAnon
    1,000% off topic, but it looks possible that the US (or possibly the UK under US instruction) have carried out what would usually be considered an act of war against Germany and the EU.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/sep/26/nord-stream-2-pipeline-pressure-collapses-mysteriously-overnight

    As winter approaches (and the mud has arrived in Ukraine) some minds in the EU have become fixated on the collapse of European high-energy-use industry i.e. a lot of it - steel, aluminium, chemicals, fertiliser. They note the resurgence in US manufacturing, after the decades of offshoring

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/factory-jobs-are-booming-like-it-e2-80-99s-the-1970s/ar-AA12gZzN

    and compare it with the industrial Armageddon facing Germany

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/sep/15/gas-rationing-germany-basf-plant-europe-crisis

    And all this time, Russia has been saying - "we're not the ones who want economic warfare - Nordstream 2 is right there ready to deliver". The worry for GAE is that sooner or later the EU, slowly bleeding jobs and exports, will crack and cry "enough!"

    It looks as if that option's been effectively removed. The teenage girl is still in her room having taken the pills, but someone's set fire to the ambulance which just pulled up outside with the antidote.

    "Nord Stream 2’s operator said pressure in the undersea pipeline dropped from 105 to 7 bar overnight.

    The Russian-owned pipeline, which was intended to double the volume of gas flowing from Vyborg, Russia, under the Baltic Sea to Germany, had just been completed and filled with 300m cubic metres of gas when the German chancellor, Olaf Scholz, cancelled it shortly before Russia invaded Ukraine."

     

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @SaneClownPosse

    Yes, I’ve tried to understand this story for several hours now and the only solution I can find is that the US (or the UK) did it so as to prevent a settlement in Ukraine.

    Russia wants it to end, Ukraine wants it to end, continental Europe wants it to end. All three of those players have an incentive to negotiate a settlement and get that gas flowing again.

    But the US doesn’t have an incentive for it to end and has a motive to prevent it from being ended easily.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @JR Ewing

    "Russia wants it to end, Ukraine wants it to end, ..."

    Yeah but Russia wants it to end with Russia winning and Ukraine wants it to end with Ukraine winning and they both think they will do better than accepting what the other side is currently offering (basically nothing) by fighting on. This could go on a while.

    , @turtle
    @JR Ewing

    A suspiciously minded person might surmise that one of the objectives is to destroy Germany as an industrial power.

  52. Still OT I’m afraid

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2022/sep/27/russia-ukraine-war-live-news-voting-in-sham-referendums-due-to-end-japanese-consul-interrogated-in-russia

    Swedish seismologists registered explosions near the Nord Stream pipelines – reports

    The Swedish national broadcaster SVT is reporting that seismologists registered explosions near the Nord Stream pipelines in the last 36 hours. In a report published in the last few minutes it said:

    SVT can reveal that measuring stations in both Sweden and Denmark registered strong underwater explosions in the same area as the gas leaks on Monday. “There is no doubt that these are explosions,” says Björn Lund, lecturer in seismology at the Swedish National Seismic Network, SNSN.

    The first explosion was recorded at 02.03am on the night of Monday and the second at 7.04pm on Monday evening.

    The warnings about the gas leaks came from the Maritime Administration at 1.52pm and 8.41pm on Monday, respectively, after ships detected bubbles on the surface.

    SVT has obtained the coordinates of the measured explosions and they are in the same area where the gas leaks were registered.

    It further quoted Lund saying of the measurements: “You can clearly see how the waves bounce from the bottom to the surface. There is no doubt that it was a blast. We even had a station in Gnosjö that picked this up.”

    There’s a US fleet in the Eastern Baltic, sent there in August

    https://www.ndr.de/nachrichten/schleswig-holstein/US-Navy-zeigt-Flagge-in-der-oestlichen-Ostsee,usnavy102.html

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @YetAnotherAnon


    There’s a US fleet in the Eastern Baltic
     
    Well of course there is. Our country's vital interests are at stake there. As they are everywhere else on earth.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  53. @Cave Johnson
    @PiltdownMan

    I swear, every mention of EVs and some future Nobel Prize candidate comes out and proposes swappable battery packs, as though these things are functional equivalents of a rechargeable AA battery. Without going into the details as to why it's not practical on an automotive scale, right now, scooters are about the ceiling on the practicality of that.

    https://electrek.co/2021/08/30/gogoro-named-global-leader-in-light-electric-vehicle-battery-swapping-passes-200-million-swaps/

    2035:

    An engineer I know who is in the parking garage construction business says the future in cities isnt public transit, its subscription services. Specifically, this will happen once self driving technology reaches a level where there is confidence in a car driving without anyone behind the wheel at all. You will have a subscription, call a car (like an uber), and the optimal unmanned electric unit will arrive at your location, where you will then be taken to your destination. The cars will be assigned routes to optimize battery usage, and will return to the garage to recharge when needed (or be cleaned in the event a messy event is detected or reported). He bases this notion on the way parking garage technology is moving to accommodate such a system.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Inquiring Mind, @Justvisiting

    I swear, every mention of EVs and some future Nobel Prize candidate comes out and proposes swappable battery packs, as though these things are functional equivalents of a rechargeable AA battery.

    You mean they’re not?

    https://youtube.com/shorts/yCKiCP3ZfHI

  54. @AnotherDad
    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    But the conflict with environmentalism is just glaring. Western nations all have sub-replacement TFRs and many are at or well past their native population peak. But they are still growing. Pack ever more people in? Haven't you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?


    Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea. If you have a nice big suburban home with rooftop solar. Or if your community has a nice nuclear power plant. So which way are we going here? ... For the now 40 million+ Californians.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @jsm, @Pop Warner, @Adam Smith

    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    Yes, and there’s a very simple explanation for how democrats rationalize this:

    They hate White people.

    That’s it. There’s no other principle more important to the democratic platform. They will hamstring all of their other policy initiatives if they think it hurts Whites. Every contradiction can be explained by them hating Whites more than liking anything else. Even Floydianity doesn’t make them love blacks more than they hate Whites, because the entire religion is driven by hating Whites. It really isn’t that complicated, but Republicans are too useless to ever point this out explicitly and build a platform that fights it. Instead, they’ll dedicate their platform to tax cuts for their bosses and wars for Israel

    • Agree: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Pop Warner

    Correct.

  55. OT — MEAT
    “A top executive at [failed] plant-based food company Beyond Meat has been charged with felony battery after a fight outside a college football game in which he was accused of biting a man’s nose.”

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/beyond-meat-executive-charged-with-biting-man-in-fight/ar-AA122AOx

  56. Anon[394] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: The Nordstream pipeline has been sabotaged in three places, pretty obviously by us. The ding-dong Biden Administration has just given Europe a good reason to make sure that Democrats don’t stay in office here. Europe is desperate for that natural gas.

    Biden just crossed an uncrossable line when he chose to do serious damage to an ally in order attack an enemy. That was a massively stupid decision.

    If anyone’s hacking our next election, it’s going to be the EU. They’re going to have to become our enemy just to try to save themselves. Biden may not physically survive much longer either. Right now, both Russia and Europe have a good reason to do the corrupt old bugger in.

    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    @Anon

    The Germans and the most of the EU will assume it was the Russians, Orbán and maybe the new Italian PM will know better, but both of them are crazy Nazis, so they must be wrong

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Daniel H
    @Anon

    I expect the regime typists in the media to start claiming that Russia, herself, sabotaged the pipeline. But, of course, if Russia wanted to halt the gas she could just do so at her source.

    American foreign policy is run by desperados, and not a ripple of dissent.

  57. OT Steve — it’s easy to laugh at “and eagles are so much better than — eagles!” because nobody now remembers the 70s BBC historical drama Fall of Eagles (free on YouTube in multiple iterations). Patrick Stewart as Lenin by the way.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @J.Ross

    "...nobody now remembers the 70s BBC historical drama Fall of Eagles..."

    This nobody does. I have the series and the book. The series opens with Mahler, closes with Shostakovich, is narrated by the brilliant Michael Hordern and has Barry Forster playing Wilhelm II.

  58. @Mr. Anon
    You're taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don't mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn't about the Environment. It's about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what's good for you!).

    Replies: @Travis, @Hannah Katz, @Harry Baldwin, @Coemgen, @Alfa158, @Peter Akuleyev, @mc23

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what’s good for you!).

    Anyone who refuses to be happy is a Domestic Extremist. That’s as clear as can be.

  59. @pirelli

    My impression of families that are happy owning an electric car are ones where dad drives a Tesla to work but mom owns a V-8 three-row SUV that they take for all long trips. Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway.
     
    This is hilariously accurate. I can’t think of a single family I know in which both the husband and the wife drive EVs. It’s always the husband with a Tesla and the wife with a big old Lexus SUV. I know some single guys who drive Teslas and live in luxury apartments with plenty of charging stations, but no EV-only families.

    It probably won’t be feasible for most people for another couple of decades at least. Various states have some version of an Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Plan (see Texas’s below) that will generally include plans for state / private cooperation on EV Charging Networks and a timetable. That said, it’s hard to see them building enough charging stations at large, middle-income apartment complexes to make that a viable option for the non-single-family home and non-luxury-apartment crowd any time soon.

    https://ftp.txdot.gov/pub/txdot/get-involved/statewide/EV%20Charging%20Plan/TexasElectricVehicleChargingPlan.pdf#page41

    Replies: @possumman

    I know a single guy with Tesla for commuting 40 miles each way but a bad ass Mustang with a v-8 for weekends and real travel.

  60. @Polistra
    @James N. Kennett

    They're not throwing away any keys. They're going to make this Proud Black Man the keynote speaker at the next DNC convention!

    He embodies virtually every single woke principle, and I hope all of the virtuous white women who see this will send money for his defense, in the unlikely event that he's ever prosecuted. (Especially Alden. Open that purse girl!)

    You are looking at the future of the nation. Or is it just the present?

    Replies: @Alden

    You’re a moron if you think I like black criminals. I spent 27 years of my life sentencing then to maximum terms in state prison. Unlike the useless Men of UNZ who’ve never done a thing to punish black criminals. Or lowered the crime rate as I did. When they’re in state prison they can only harm each other. Instead of the rest of us.

    One of the dumbest posts ever.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Alden


    One of the dumbest posts ever.
     
    You're a fine one to whine about being misrepresented. FOAD, as you like to say. I've never said anything like that before, but you've earned it many times over.

    BTW, you were never a judge so you've never sentenced anyone to anything. What you are, is a liar.

  61. His stare makes me wonder exactly what drugs he’s on. And he seems to have earpieces in, or are they hearing aids? Any chance he’s being fed his lines?

    “If Russia invades, that means tanks and troops crossing the border of Ukraine again, there will be no longer a Nordstream 2, we will put an end to it”

    “How will you do that exactly, given that control of the project is with Germany?”

    “I promise you we will be able to do it”

    https://twitter.com/AZmilitary1/status/1574702376262701056

    Video of two of the leaks here

    https://www.forsvaret.dk/da/nyheder/2022/gaslakage-i-ostersoen/

    • Replies: @epebble
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Well, at least, Promises Made, Promises Kept. We haven't seen that in a while.

    , @Bill
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Any chance he’s being fed his lines?
     
    "Salute the Marines."
  62. @anonymous
    Electric cars are taking over rapidly in China, which has to worry about importing 10 million barrels of oil every day through sea lanes it does not control. The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?

    This year, a quarter of all new cars purchased in China will be an all-electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid. There are, by some estimates, more than 300 Chinese companies making E.V.s, ranging from discount offerings below $5,000 to high-end models that rival Tesla and German automakers. There are roughly four million charging units in the country, double the number from a year ago, with more coming.

    While other E.V. markets are still heavily dependent on subsidies and financial incentives, China has entered a new phase: Consumers are weighing the merits of electric vehicles against gas-powered cars based on features and price without much consideration of state support. By comparison, the United States is far behind. This year, the country passed a key threshold of E.V.s accounting for 5 percent of new car sales. China passed that level in 2018.
     
    I haven't heard much about electric heavy trucks. But if both heavy trucks and cars go electric then surely at least 1/3 of oil demand disappears.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AndrewR, @kicktheroos, @Jack D

    You whiteys are too obsessed about asians and our sex lives you are losers ,go worry about africans and indians.

  63. @Steve Sailer
    @James N. Kennett

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @petit bourgeois, @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @JimDandy

    I just got back from San Felipe BCN last night and got an Uber in a Tesla model 3 to get home from the train station. Nice car, if you live near a charging station.

    However, in San Felipe I didn’t see one Tesla or charging station. I’ve been to fancy wineries in Valle de Guadalupe on the other side of the peninsula that have charging stations and don’t even have paved roads.

    San Felipe is hostile to corporate ambitions to take it over. Only place I’ve been in Mexico where there’s not a fleet of Domino’s motorcycles delivering pizza, because there are four mom and pop places that won’t allow it.

    Once you head south from San Felipe down the Sea of Cortez there are places with no electricity infrastructure or cell phone service, everything is either solar powered or diesel generated. Not a place you can go in an EV, much less survive if you live there. The entire country is powered on diesel and gasoline, and it works just fine as it always has.

  64. @jsm
    @AnotherDad


    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.
     
    Which goes to prove, they don't *actually* give two hoots about all these supposed liberal niceties like environment, etc. Libshits love being pro-environment, that is to say, (only to White people) stop having kids, inconvenience yourself by walking, etc., because it's anti-White. They are pro Affirmative Action for blacks because it's anti-White. They are pro-abortion and feminism and Zero Population Growth because it's anti-White kids. They are against big cars that can go long distances because it's anti-White kids.

    So, guess why they are pro-immigration, even though it supposedly conflicts with all their other values?

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    You are right.

  65. @Ben Kurtz
    In London, they're quickly turning every third street lamppost into a very basic L2 charger.

    Calif., of course, is going to ruin everything with absurd and overdone top-down mandates, but it is technically feasible to support a lot more electric vehicle charging than we do currently with some pretty modest but clever infrastructure hacks.

    Replies: @usNthem, @Dmon

    One of the problems, though, is we’re running out of the sort of people who can think up and bring to fruition those clever hacks.

  66. @Mr. Anon
    You're taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don't mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn't about the Environment. It's about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what's good for you!).

    Replies: @Travis, @Hannah Katz, @Harry Baldwin, @Coemgen, @Alfa158, @Peter Akuleyev, @mc23

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy

    When “the government” starts putting saltpeter into the government issued analog of soylent green, any problems with unhappy members of the hoi polloi will just fade away…

  67. The lack of rare earth metals to make all the batteries is a problem. Not sure that can be solved in 13 years (by 2035). Scaling up Supercharger/Lvl III access points by then seems easily do-able. Then you don’t need off-street parking with your own Lvl II charge point. Which is what we have here for our Tesla. And a Dodge truck V8. So you have a a pretty good idea of the trends, except the proliferation of charging stations part. 2 men recently crossed Canada in a Tesla and only Tesla Superchargers. California could be carpeted with those things by 2035.

  68. @anonymous
    Electric cars are taking over rapidly in China, which has to worry about importing 10 million barrels of oil every day through sea lanes it does not control. The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?

    This year, a quarter of all new cars purchased in China will be an all-electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid. There are, by some estimates, more than 300 Chinese companies making E.V.s, ranging from discount offerings below $5,000 to high-end models that rival Tesla and German automakers. There are roughly four million charging units in the country, double the number from a year ago, with more coming.

    While other E.V. markets are still heavily dependent on subsidies and financial incentives, China has entered a new phase: Consumers are weighing the merits of electric vehicles against gas-powered cars based on features and price without much consideration of state support. By comparison, the United States is far behind. This year, the country passed a key threshold of E.V.s accounting for 5 percent of new car sales. China passed that level in 2018.
     
    I haven't heard much about electric heavy trucks. But if both heavy trucks and cars go electric then surely at least 1/3 of oil demand disappears.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @AndrewR, @kicktheroos, @Jack D

    The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?

    Just because America is run by clowns doesn’t mean that China is run by supermen. China has its own problems. As is the case with the current “Zero Covid” lockdown (people here complained about the lockdowns but they are NOTHING compared to what they do in China), the one child policy developed its own bureaucratic momentum and went on far longer than it should have. Because China is a face culture, it’s impossible for the Communist Party to ever admit that it made a mistake so backing away even from something that they KNOW to be a mistake has to be done very delicately and in a way where you do not actually admit that you are wrong.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Jack D


    the one child policy developed its own bureaucratic momentum and went on far longer than it should have.
     
    This is spot on. The one child policy should have been eased in 1995, rather than 2015. It is probably the greatest policy mistake made by the Chinese government since the start of the reform era in 1979. When the state puts so much into enforcing the one child policy, it's hard to admit wrong without appearing incompetent. As a result the one child policy kept on going for way too long.

    Sociology is not the strong point of the Chinese government but at least civil engineering is.
    , @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    Because China is a face culture
     
    That's the first time I've ever heard of "face culture" as a synonym for "dictatorship". Lots of countries in the Orient have shame rather than guilt cultures, i.e. it's only bad if you get caught vs it's a sin, whether you get caught or not. The difference between dictatorships and democracies? Electoral losses generally result in policy changes even when the reigning party or coalition merely gets a smaller majority. The only way to change government policy in the face of a dictator's stubborn insistence is to put him in the ground.
  69. @Anon
    OT

    Axios reports on a “new report” (i.e., a press release from a law school-based social justice advocacy organization) about how black men are supposedly being framed for crimes and thrown in jail. The data they use is skewed by Soros DAs conspiring with prisoner advocacy groups to not object to the release of black prisoners (which they call “exoneration”). But they funniest part is when they compare the percentage of blacks in there general population to the percentage of blacks who are exonerated, rather than to use the percentage of blacks among convicted prisoners as the denominator.

    Black Americans are seven times more likely than white people to be falsely convicted of serious crimes, and spend longer in prison before exoneration, a new report shows.

    The big picture: The study, from the National Registry of Exonerations, examined defendants who were exonerated after serving at least part of a sentence — sometimes spending decades in prison.

    Details: Black people represent 13.6% of the American population, but account for 53% of 3,200 exonerations in the registry as of August 8, 2022, according to the report.

    Innocent Black Americans are about seven-and-a-half times more likely to be convicted of murder than innocent white people, the study found.
    in prison before exoneration, a new report shows.
     

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @HammerJack

    Axios is worse than Politico. Neither is worth the electrons they use.

  70. @Mr. Anon
    You're taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don't mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn't about the Environment. It's about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what's good for you!).

    Replies: @Travis, @Hannah Katz, @Harry Baldwin, @Coemgen, @Alfa158, @Peter Akuleyev, @mc23

    If you try to find out how much electrical generating capacity we need if we went full electric, you get widely varying answers. The conservative ones say we will need to increase it by 35% to accommodate the likely achievable increase in electric vehicles, and almost double our capacity if all passenger vehicles were electric. A couple decades ago a Purdue University engineering department study assumed all ground transportation, including freight trucks went electric and the power capacity would have to be two and a half times as great.
    The US currently has an electric generating capacity of 1,100 gigawatts. If we assume that we only have to double our generating capacity we would need to build another 500 nuclear power plants like the de-commissioned San Onofre plant.
    Or, if we went solar with things like the Ivanpah facility which generates an average of 107 megawatts we would need to build 1,028 more of these:
    https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=wiOEmeGl&id=33E8C1B2CFDE7EEF53E916408C6646F4E242B7C8&thid=OIP.wiOEmeGlgW83-7dH9HH14AHaE8&mediaurl=https%3A%2F%2Fexternal-preview.redd.it%2FBPHrDNm1D5XjpFLOZE3QntCzjMZgxZYm-FYjKAWRLGo.jpg%3Fauto%3Dwebp%26s%3D2d744c85a12555fef9b5c5ef0462d9e8c3590822&cdnurl=https%3A%2F%2Fth.bing.com%2Fth%2Fid%2FR.c2238499e1a5816f37fbb747f471f5e0%3Frik%3DyLdC4vRGZoxAFg%26pid%3DImgRaw%26r%3D0&exph=1600&expw=2400&q=ivanpah&simid=608008979794851628&form=IRPRST&ck=2C4FF929A41DAB42280DF2BC725C9C66&selectedindex=9&vt=4&sim=11

    Plus the electrical distribution network.

  71. The whole point of Electric cars is that they are not for hoi polloi. Transportation is to become a service provided to you at the whim of the controllers. The rapid incubation of Uber in numerous shit-lib cities, despite the obvious illegality of the model was no accident. BTW Uber requires it’s patrons to agree to the most lunatic of shit-lib wokelisms every time they ride.

    Meanwhile the Biden regime is stiffening the spine of the Hun by ensuring that no matter the wishes of the people, there will be no Russian gas.

    Swedish broadcaster SVT reported that the Swedish National Seismic Network detected two underwater explosions near the Nord Stream pipeline system on Monday.

    “One of the explosions had a magnitude of 2.3, and was registered at as many as 30 measuring stations in southern Sweden,” SVT said.

    Bjorn Lund, a professor in seismology and director of the Swedish National Seismic Network, said these two seismic events were explosions.

    In line with Biden’s earlier terrorist threat

    Pres. Biden: “If Russia invades…then there will be no longer a Nord Stream 2. We will bring an end to it.”

    Reporter: “But how will you do that, exactly, since…the project is in Germany’s control?”

    Biden: “I promise you, we will be able to do that.”

    https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/damage-nord-stream-pipelines-unprecedented-may-have-been-sabotaged#comment-stream

  72. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @AnotherDad

    Electric vehicles are never good for the environment. Because to build a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel to mine the required lithium and nickel creating environmental destruction and pollution. Then after just 100,000 miles the batteries become toxic waste.

    Replies: @Old Bad Nurse, @Barnard, @(((They))) Live

    Hola Hernan,

    I am not trying to get into a comment-section argument. This is just information: Tesla batteries are rated for approximately 3000 full discharge cycles. My Model 3 gets 500km on a full charge. That adds up to 1.5 million km. Also, by using the 20%-80% charge-discharge limits, that battery life is extended. My wife, who drives the Tesla, commutes 250 km/day, 5-6 days per week. I did my homework before we made the decision. I’m figuring 7-9 years, 450-650,000 kms. Plenty of wiggle room.

    This is my opinion: a used lithium-ion battery is a great recycling target. It may not be well-understood how to do it, it may require new industrial capacity, but it has to be more efficient than mining lithium, once there are enough expired batteries to make scale worthwhile.

    Other EV challenges and problems abound.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Old Bad Nurse

    It's rarely a good idea to make static linear assumptions. In the 1930s someone calculated that the Bank of America would eventually need to hire the entire population of California to do their bookkeeping. Then the computer was invented so that never happened.

    It's impossible that a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel just to mine the nickel and lithium. People throw these dumb numbers around without stopping to think if they meet the smell test. These numbers get put out by environmental hacks who have zero understanding of business and couldn't run a lemonade stand. Do a little back of the envelope math first. Diesel fuel is currently around $5/gallon so if this was true then the vehicle battery alone would cost $50,000 just to recover the fuel cost, but the full retail price of a battery is more like $20K and this includes all labor and material costs and profit and not just the fuel component.

    A typical vehicle battery has 25 pounds of lithium @ $30/lb. ($750) and 60 pounds of nickel @ $10/lb. ($600), so $1,350 total for these two metals. If you had to spend $50,000 of just diesel fuel mining $1,350 worth of metal you would go broke REAL fast.

    10,000 gals. is a completely bogus # and even if it was true now (which it isn't) it wouldn't necessarily stay that way in the future.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @Adam Smith

  73. @Ben Kurtz
    In London, they're quickly turning every third street lamppost into a very basic L2 charger.

    Calif., of course, is going to ruin everything with absurd and overdone top-down mandates, but it is technically feasible to support a lot more electric vehicle charging than we do currently with some pretty modest but clever infrastructure hacks.

    Replies: @usNthem, @Dmon

    “but it is technically feasible to support a lot more electric vehicle charging than we do currently with some pretty modest but clever infrastructure hacks.”

    Like room temperature fusion?
    https://www.8newsnow.com/news/local-news/hoover-dam-power-production-down-33-official-says/

    I propose a 300 mile long by 50 mile wide trench that passes directly through Malibu, so that the Pacific Ocean can refill Lake Meade. We can call it the William Tecumseh Sherman Canal. All current California government workers will be put to work in the salt processing plant at the terminus, as the water has to be desalinated to avoid damaging the turbines. Talk about your shovel ready infrastructure projects…

    • Replies: @Ben Kurtz
    @Dmon

    Well, not in California, but I think I already addressed that point.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Dmon

    I propose a 300 mile long by 50 mile wide trench that passes directly through Malibu, so that the Pacific Ocean can refill Lake Meade. We can call it the William Tecumseh Sherman Canal. All current California government workers will be put to work in the salt processing plant at the terminus, as the water has to be desalinated to avoid damaging the turbines. Talk about your shovel ready infrastructure projects…

    Hear, hear!

  74. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @AnotherDad

    Electric vehicles are never good for the environment. Because to build a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel to mine the required lithium and nickel creating environmental destruction and pollution. Then after just 100,000 miles the batteries become toxic waste.

    Replies: @Old Bad Nurse, @Barnard, @(((They))) Live

    It amazes me they are still installing hideous wind turbines now that it has been proven what an environmental disaster they are. Energy companies are now putting out propaganda about how they are “recycling” the blades. I saw a picture of a park in the Netherlands with a playground made out of wind turbine blades. Most end up getting buried in landfills.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  75. @AndrewR
    @anonymous

    Last I checked, China has no shortage of people, so I don't think raising fertility should be high on their list of priorities.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill Jones

    You need to check again. They have an enormous shortage of people – they basically have no young people to replace their current workers, and their economy is basically going to fall apart within this decade because of it.

    • LOL: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @Jimbo

    That's why the Chinese are building large highways to the border of N Korea, one of the last closed off countries with millions of people living in such oppressive conditions, for generations, they'll be happy to live at Foxconn assembling iPhones for 3 bowls of rice & $1 a day. They will be the new generation of sweatshop labor now that China's middle class has grown.

    , @anonymous
    @Jimbo

    The Chinese economy will likely keep on growing until 2040. By then it will be first world and growth will stall. Average IQ of a population trumps other factors in predicting economic development.

  76. What’s an electric vehicle? If you count skateboards and bicycles I think 10% of US new vehicle sales are battery electric. How about golf carts, I am seeing a surprising number of golf carts, often summer seasonal rentals on the road?

    Is the vehicle in the article below a car? In China is probably is considered a car. Short distances at up to 30 mph it might be the optimal form of transportation.

    I Ordered A Brand-New Chinese $900 EV Online
    https://jalopnik.com/i-ordered-a-brand-new-chinese-900-ev-online-1842363027

    How many amps can they send to the area you live? In most parts of the US you can look out your window and see the cable that brings watts to you and your neighbors. Is there enough capacity? Do you any your neighbors have all those 1800+W toaster oven air fryers, plus 220v appliances like dryers, induction cook tops, central HVAC heat pumps? Can you and all your neighbors plus commercial business add a Tesla Rivian amps to your usage? Take a look at the cables and transformers behind you house? BTW, there is a new generation of electric heat pump water heaters. The arrival of EVs kind of hit just at the point electric light watts collapsed to near 0 (I remember those 300W even 500W mogul bulbs) while 1800W toaster ovens were not quite common.

    I see a few piston powered emergency generators outside homes, probably more stored in garages. The farce will be when blackouts force the use of emergency generators to juice up to top up Teslas and green efficient appliances.

    Just for fun go to your local home store an look at the price of copper electrical cable, I am seeing like $10 a foot for 2x 2/0 copper cables, but I could be misinterpreting Lowes website. But my point is that the Bidenflation is making adding miles and miles of copper very expensive.

  77. OT Mary Frances Ackerman Veeck has died at the age of 102. She converted Bill Veeck to Catholicism but Bill converted the Pittsburgh native to propping up proxy warriors through the “Civil Rights Movement”. They’re courtship doubtfully would have passed muster with St. Paul, as Bill was already married.

    Veeck wasnt Jewish but all his co-owners were including Abe Saperstein, Hank Greenberg. I’d be surprised if you did some geneaology on Veeck you wouldnt run into a Dutch Jew. He looked mischling.

    https://www.davehoekstra.com/2020/08/26/mary-frances-veeck-turns-100/

  78. In the green dream, all apartments are clustered near light rail. Renters are not supposed to own cars. Remember the motto of the great reset? You’ll own nothing, and you’ll be happy.

    Or else!

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @JimB

    In the green dream, all apartments are clustered near light rail. Renters are not supposed to own cars. Remember the motto of the great reset? You’ll own nothing, and you’ll be happy.

    This is really it. The left doesn't actually want mass ownership of electric vehicles. They don't want single occupancy vehicles for the majority.

    The left doesn't want the average White person to have kids or own a car. Walk to mass transit, walk home with vegetarian groceries, then take your anti-depressants when you get home. The is the tolerable White person to the left.

    In fact I have no doubt the left would actually be disappointed if some new tech allowed for mass ownership of electric vehicles. They want to end that model for Whites.

    The dream of the left is for most Whites to live in rat towers. They want to end the suburban model completely. They don't want Whites to have children and the suburban model only encourages that. The suburbs also allow private schools which is deeply offensive to leftists that believe it is their duty to indoctrinate White children.

    However the left always runs into economic realities. They are emotionally driven and don't plan very well. They can hope and dream about turning most Whites into childless urban dwellers but it isn't going to happen. Family leaning Whites are already chased out of the city because the left refuses to apply the law to the protected classes. So the Whites that remain and don't breed are liberally minded. Twin studies suggest that political outlook has a strong genetic basis. Leftists are basically reducing their own numbers through self-selection.

    Replies: @anon

  79. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @AnotherDad

    Electric vehicles are never good for the environment. Because to build a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel to mine the required lithium and nickel creating environmental destruction and pollution. Then after just 100,000 miles the batteries become toxic waste.

    Replies: @Old Bad Nurse, @Barnard, @(((They))) Live

    Na, Batteries like 99% of every car will end up being recycled, also its not 2012, so it pointless to claim EV batteries only last 100K miles, we know its BS

  80. @Anon
    OT: The Nordstream pipeline has been sabotaged in three places, pretty obviously by us. The ding-dong Biden Administration has just given Europe a good reason to make sure that Democrats don't stay in office here. Europe is desperate for that natural gas.

    Biden just crossed an uncrossable line when he chose to do serious damage to an ally in order attack an enemy. That was a massively stupid decision.

    If anyone's hacking our next election, it's going to be the EU. They're going to have to become our enemy just to try to save themselves. Biden may not physically survive much longer either. Right now, both Russia and Europe have a good reason to do the corrupt old bugger in.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live, @Daniel H

    The Germans and the most of the EU will assume it was the Russians, Orbán and maybe the new Italian PM will know better, but both of them are crazy Nazis, so they must be wrong

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @(((They))) Live

    https://twitter.com/radeksikorski/status/1574800653724966915

    Der Spiegel are reporting that Germany was warned by the US .

    https://www.spiegel.de/politik/beschaedigte-gasleitungen-cia-warnte-bundesregierung-vor-anschlag-auf-ostsee-pipelines-a-3ab0a183-8af6-4fb2-bae4-d134de0b3d57

  81. @AnotherDad
    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.

    But the conflict with environmentalism is just glaring. Western nations all have sub-replacement TFRs and many are at or well past their native population peak. But they are still growing. Pack ever more people in? Haven't you been telling us for the last 50 years what a disaster more people is?


    Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea. If you have a nice big suburban home with rooftop solar. Or if your community has a nice nuclear power plant. So which way are we going here? ... For the now 40 million+ Californians.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @jsm, @Pop Warner, @Adam Smith

    “Electric vehicles are a fine environmentally responsible idea.”

    Unfortunately, No. They are not. ☮

  82. @PiltdownMan
    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @J.Ross, @Pixo, @Cave Johnson, @Jack D

    Yes. On paper at least this is a very good idea but like everything else, the devil is in the details.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilwinton/2022/09/12/battery-swapping-revival-could-threaten-electric-car-charging-networks/?sh=75c117991b1b

    This has been tried several times and so far has failed but sometimes in technology the third time (or the 10th) is the charm – the fact that it failed before doesn’t mean it will always fail.

    More broadly, rather than the old fashioned concept of “owning a car” (most people don’t buy a car for cash in a lump sum anyway), you have the concept of “a subscription for your transportation needs”. This could be just a subscription for battery swaps and you still own the car or it could be something much bigger depending on how fast other technology (such as self driving cars) proceeds.

    You don’t actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. What you need is TRANSPORTATION – the car is just a means to an end. Now you could even now skip owning a car and just take Uber everywhere (but this is very costly because you are your own unpaid chauffeur now – with Uber you are hiring a car AND a driver). Or else you could use one of those services like Zipcar where you rent a car by the hour but this is only practical in the city where they can have Zipcars all over the place so you only have to walk a block or two. Most of America is not that dense.

    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time). If you needed to take the kids to soccer practice you could summon a 3 row SUV, if it was just you, you could summon a small car, if it was commuting to work the self driver might stop and pick up a couple of other people going downtown, etc.

    Steve’s comment of “where are we going to put all the charging stations” is valid up to a point but it doesn’t take into account that the technology is going to continue to develop – that charging times are going to drop, etc. When cars were new, tires only lasted a couple of thousand miles. So the Steve of 1902 might have said, “Where are we going to put all the tire shops? We are going to need to have a tire shop on every block.” But if tires improve and last 20,000 miles instead of 2,000 miles, you only need 1/10th as many tire shops. It’s going to be the same with vehicle charging.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Jack D


    You don’t actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway.
     
    Until you actually DO need it, and then you're stuck because whoever does own it has decided you don't get to go anywhere.

    Somebody has to own it and that person (or government) will have all the power.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @scrivener3
    @Jack D

    You need to own a car because in an emergency you want reliable transportation.

    I read that when Russia invaded eastern Ukraine all trains out immediately became booked for weeks. There was no public transportation out. People who owned cars could drive west to safety or even over the border to another country. Some people went to stay with family members who were working in other countries.

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Jack D

    "You don’t actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. .."

    Maybe it isn't a necessity but as soon as I get a little disposable income that is something I want. And I want a personal vehicle that I am used to and is filled with my junk not somebody else's.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations,, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time).
     
    This is clearly where the future is heading.

    Uber started nominally as the auto analog of AirBnB--there are all these unused car/driver hours sitting around. So why buy a taxi fleet and hire drivers?

    But immediately they started research on self-driving cars. Because the really big bucks are in eliminating the labor. Then you have the car gainfully employed for a large percentage of the day--so your amortization much quicker compared to a personal car.

    This is going to be a huge revolution with huge ripple effects...

    but just the tip of the iceberg compared to what the automation revolution is going to do overall.

    But our wonderful elites are still full speed ahead on importing cleaners, fast food workers, drivers, and landscaping specialists. Hmm???

    Replies: @Jack D

  83. anonymous[115] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @anonymous


    The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?
     
    Just because America is run by clowns doesn't mean that China is run by supermen. China has its own problems. As is the case with the current "Zero Covid" lockdown (people here complained about the lockdowns but they are NOTHING compared to what they do in China), the one child policy developed its own bureaucratic momentum and went on far longer than it should have. Because China is a face culture, it's impossible for the Communist Party to ever admit that it made a mistake so backing away even from something that they KNOW to be a mistake has to be done very delicately and in a way where you do not actually admit that you are wrong.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Johann Ricke

    the one child policy developed its own bureaucratic momentum and went on far longer than it should have.

    This is spot on. The one child policy should have been eased in 1995, rather than 2015. It is probably the greatest policy mistake made by the Chinese government since the start of the reform era in 1979. When the state puts so much into enforcing the one child policy, it’s hard to admit wrong without appearing incompetent. As a result the one child policy kept on going for way too long.

    Sociology is not the strong point of the Chinese government but at least civil engineering is.

  84. @Pixo
    @PiltdownMan

    That was tried and failed.

    California passed a huge swappable battery subsidy, Tesla took it, and then never delivered on it or returned the money. It did the same thing in NY State, promising to build a huge factory with a lot of manufacturing employees in Buffalo, taking the money and keeping it when it failed to deliver on the subsidy conditions. The factory was built, but it never scaled up production or hired many people.

    All in, Tesla has received about $30 billion in government subsidies to make Elon Musk the world’s richest man.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Nervous in Stalingrad

    Tesla has been a huge boon to California. Its factory in Fremont has a staggering seven million square feet of production space.

  85. @James N. Kennett
    @clifford brown

    Elizabeth Gomes was on her way to work at JFK airport at 5:15am on September 20 when she was attacked at the airport station.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11252991/Woman-33-fears-shell-lose-eye-battered-homeless-man-JFK-airport-subway.html

    https://abc7ny.com/woman-beaten-in-subway-station-waheed-foster-assault-howard-beach/12268543/


    In 1995, law enforcement sources say Foster was arrested for murdering his 82-year-old foster grandmother in a brutal beating at the age of 14. Six years later, he was arrested for stabbing his 21-year-old sister with a screwdriver. Then in 2010, he was arrested for attacking three workers at the Creedmore Psychiatric Center, where he was an inpatient. He was on parole until November 2024 at the time of last week's attack.
     
    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key?

    Replies: @Polistra, @AndrewR, @Adam Smith, @Sick n' Tired

    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key euthanize this feral beast?

  86. It’s hard to see how outlawing the sale of new gasoline-powered cars after 2035 in California can fit in with Yes In My Back Yard pushes to build more housing, since a key component of those drives is to get rid of parking mandates and let residents fend for themselves finding street parking.

    It would seem that they are counting on more people walking, biking, or taking public transportation to work.

  87. I live in a house in Berkeley, own a Tesla, and park it on the street. I have a driveway that I use to charge it approximately once a week, but I don’t think that’s necessary; the parking garage by my office has charging spots. (They’re a bit more expensive than charging at home, but not by too much, and certainly much cheaper than buying gas.)

    Also, the supercharger network for trips is pretty great. (I still can’t get over the time I went to a distant camping site to sleep under some trees, and there was a supercharger at the camping site.)

    • Replies: @ForeverCARealist
    @CA EV Owner

    Parking on the street in Berkeley.
    Is it available? Is it legal? Is it safe?

    These are real questions for 2022.

    When I left there in 1991 the answer to all three questions would have been NO.

  88. @danindc
    @Steve Sailer

    is the main problem pedestrians? Would everyone have to wear an indicator? If not, what is holding this up?

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    “… If not, what is holding this up?”

    The main problem is there are too many rare events (which collectively add up) where people can mostly figure out what to do but autonomous cars currently can’t unless they have been specifically programmed to handle them and there are too many rare situations to program them all in individually. Things like a cop directing traffic around a pothole repair crew.

    • Thanks: Danindc
    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @James B. Shearer

    You can get away with driving on autopilot most of the time, but that 1% of the time when you have to react in real time to an unexpected situation is what makes all the difference.

    I remember early on the Google autonomous cars could not predict the obnoxious aggressive driving of city bus drivers.

    , @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too. Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @James B. Shearer, @anon

  89. @Steve Sailer
    @B36

    A friend of mine made a wonderful bet in 2000 with another friend that on New Year's Eve 2025, they will be able to order a self-driving cab to take them out to dinner in Santa Monica. After 20 years of optimism, he now expects to lose his bet.

    Replies: @danindc, @Cave Johnson, @turtle, @Anon7, @Jack D

    The details of “when” and “how” a general concept will occur in the future are almost always a mistake.

    That’s why I go with the assumption of a subscription model. It can be accomplished with existing technology (assuming there is a minimum wage operator to monitor the vehicle and passengers for bad behavior). The only thing that needs to change is the economic balance. If or when a major city bans internal combustion engines within city limits, or taxes them out of practicality for most people, expect automated garages that manage a fleet of subscription EVs (possibly cab style, possibly personal) to pop up quickly.

    https://www.autoevolution.com/news/how-automated-parking-systems-work-19523.html

  90. @JR Ewing
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, I've tried to understand this story for several hours now and the only solution I can find is that the US (or the UK) did it so as to prevent a settlement in Ukraine.

    Russia wants it to end, Ukraine wants it to end, continental Europe wants it to end. All three of those players have an incentive to negotiate a settlement and get that gas flowing again.

    But the US doesn't have an incentive for it to end and has a motive to prevent it from being ended easily.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @turtle

    “Russia wants it to end, Ukraine wants it to end, …”

    Yeah but Russia wants it to end with Russia winning and Ukraine wants it to end with Ukraine winning and they both think they will do better than accepting what the other side is currently offering (basically nothing) by fighting on. This could go on a while.

  91. @Jack D
    @PiltdownMan

    Yes. On paper at least this is a very good idea but like everything else, the devil is in the details.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilwinton/2022/09/12/battery-swapping-revival-could-threaten-electric-car-charging-networks/?sh=75c117991b1b

    This has been tried several times and so far has failed but sometimes in technology the third time (or the 10th) is the charm - the fact that it failed before doesn't mean it will always fail.

    More broadly, rather than the old fashioned concept of "owning a car" (most people don't buy a car for cash in a lump sum anyway), you have the concept of "a subscription for your transportation needs". This could be just a subscription for battery swaps and you still own the car or it could be something much bigger depending on how fast other technology (such as self driving cars) proceeds.

    You don't actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. What you need is TRANSPORTATION - the car is just a means to an end. Now you could even now skip owning a car and just take Uber everywhere (but this is very costly because you are your own unpaid chauffeur now - with Uber you are hiring a car AND a driver). Or else you could use one of those services like Zipcar where you rent a car by the hour but this is only practical in the city where they can have Zipcars all over the place so you only have to walk a block or two. Most of America is not that dense.

    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time). If you needed to take the kids to soccer practice you could summon a 3 row SUV, if it was just you, you could summon a small car, if it was commuting to work the self driver might stop and pick up a couple of other people going downtown, etc.

    Steve's comment of "where are we going to put all the charging stations" is valid up to a point but it doesn't take into account that the technology is going to continue to develop - that charging times are going to drop, etc. When cars were new, tires only lasted a couple of thousand miles. So the Steve of 1902 might have said, "Where are we going to put all the tire shops? We are going to need to have a tire shop on every block." But if tires improve and last 20,000 miles instead of 2,000 miles, you only need 1/10th as many tire shops. It's going to be the same with vehicle charging.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @scrivener3, @James B. Shearer, @AnotherDad

    You don’t actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway.

    Until you actually DO need it, and then you’re stuck because whoever does own it has decided you don’t get to go anywhere.

    Somebody has to own it and that person (or government) will have all the power.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @JR Ewing

    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car? What if only people with special permission from the government (let's call it a "driver's license") were allowed to drive? What if not just any CAR could drive down the street but only cars where the owner had received a specially issued plaque from the government (we could call it a "license plate") which they would have to display in order even to drive to church on Sunday. Surely then America would be a dystopian hellhole of a sort seen only in science fiction movies.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it's not an issue.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @mc23

  92. @Jack D
    @PiltdownMan

    Yes. On paper at least this is a very good idea but like everything else, the devil is in the details.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilwinton/2022/09/12/battery-swapping-revival-could-threaten-electric-car-charging-networks/?sh=75c117991b1b

    This has been tried several times and so far has failed but sometimes in technology the third time (or the 10th) is the charm - the fact that it failed before doesn't mean it will always fail.

    More broadly, rather than the old fashioned concept of "owning a car" (most people don't buy a car for cash in a lump sum anyway), you have the concept of "a subscription for your transportation needs". This could be just a subscription for battery swaps and you still own the car or it could be something much bigger depending on how fast other technology (such as self driving cars) proceeds.

    You don't actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. What you need is TRANSPORTATION - the car is just a means to an end. Now you could even now skip owning a car and just take Uber everywhere (but this is very costly because you are your own unpaid chauffeur now - with Uber you are hiring a car AND a driver). Or else you could use one of those services like Zipcar where you rent a car by the hour but this is only practical in the city where they can have Zipcars all over the place so you only have to walk a block or two. Most of America is not that dense.

    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time). If you needed to take the kids to soccer practice you could summon a 3 row SUV, if it was just you, you could summon a small car, if it was commuting to work the self driver might stop and pick up a couple of other people going downtown, etc.

    Steve's comment of "where are we going to put all the charging stations" is valid up to a point but it doesn't take into account that the technology is going to continue to develop - that charging times are going to drop, etc. When cars were new, tires only lasted a couple of thousand miles. So the Steve of 1902 might have said, "Where are we going to put all the tire shops? We are going to need to have a tire shop on every block." But if tires improve and last 20,000 miles instead of 2,000 miles, you only need 1/10th as many tire shops. It's going to be the same with vehicle charging.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @scrivener3, @James B. Shearer, @AnotherDad

    You need to own a car because in an emergency you want reliable transportation.

    I read that when Russia invaded eastern Ukraine all trains out immediately became booked for weeks. There was no public transportation out. People who owned cars could drive west to safety or even over the border to another country. Some people went to stay with family members who were working in other countries.

  93. @Jack D
    @PiltdownMan

    Yes. On paper at least this is a very good idea but like everything else, the devil is in the details.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilwinton/2022/09/12/battery-swapping-revival-could-threaten-electric-car-charging-networks/?sh=75c117991b1b

    This has been tried several times and so far has failed but sometimes in technology the third time (or the 10th) is the charm - the fact that it failed before doesn't mean it will always fail.

    More broadly, rather than the old fashioned concept of "owning a car" (most people don't buy a car for cash in a lump sum anyway), you have the concept of "a subscription for your transportation needs". This could be just a subscription for battery swaps and you still own the car or it could be something much bigger depending on how fast other technology (such as self driving cars) proceeds.

    You don't actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. What you need is TRANSPORTATION - the car is just a means to an end. Now you could even now skip owning a car and just take Uber everywhere (but this is very costly because you are your own unpaid chauffeur now - with Uber you are hiring a car AND a driver). Or else you could use one of those services like Zipcar where you rent a car by the hour but this is only practical in the city where they can have Zipcars all over the place so you only have to walk a block or two. Most of America is not that dense.

    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time). If you needed to take the kids to soccer practice you could summon a 3 row SUV, if it was just you, you could summon a small car, if it was commuting to work the self driver might stop and pick up a couple of other people going downtown, etc.

    Steve's comment of "where are we going to put all the charging stations" is valid up to a point but it doesn't take into account that the technology is going to continue to develop - that charging times are going to drop, etc. When cars were new, tires only lasted a couple of thousand miles. So the Steve of 1902 might have said, "Where are we going to put all the tire shops? We are going to need to have a tire shop on every block." But if tires improve and last 20,000 miles instead of 2,000 miles, you only need 1/10th as many tire shops. It's going to be the same with vehicle charging.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @scrivener3, @James B. Shearer, @AnotherDad

    “You don’t actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. ..”

    Maybe it isn’t a necessity but as soon as I get a little disposable income that is something I want. And I want a personal vehicle that I am used to and is filled with my junk not somebody else’s.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno's generation. What you see as a "personal vehicle" someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people's cars for generations now. The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport). It's not perfect but it works reasonably well. I'm sure that when Mr. Hertz proposed the idea of rental cars people also told him it was impossible, that no one would want to rent a car, etc. You can always find 1,000 reasons for never changing anything - it takes imagination to see a future that is different than the present. Sometimes imagination can go too far (people have been talking about flying cars for a century) but sometimes you have to ignore the naysayers or you'll never get anything done.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Corvinus, @clifford brown, @James B. Shearer

  94. @Steve Sailer
    @B36

    A friend of mine made a wonderful bet in 2000 with another friend that on New Year's Eve 2025, they will be able to order a self-driving cab to take them out to dinner in Santa Monica. After 20 years of optimism, he now expects to lose his bet.

    Replies: @danindc, @Cave Johnson, @turtle, @Anon7, @Jack D

  95. @Jack D
    @PiltdownMan

    Yes. On paper at least this is a very good idea but like everything else, the devil is in the details.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilwinton/2022/09/12/battery-swapping-revival-could-threaten-electric-car-charging-networks/?sh=75c117991b1b

    This has been tried several times and so far has failed but sometimes in technology the third time (or the 10th) is the charm - the fact that it failed before doesn't mean it will always fail.

    More broadly, rather than the old fashioned concept of "owning a car" (most people don't buy a car for cash in a lump sum anyway), you have the concept of "a subscription for your transportation needs". This could be just a subscription for battery swaps and you still own the car or it could be something much bigger depending on how fast other technology (such as self driving cars) proceeds.

    You don't actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. What you need is TRANSPORTATION - the car is just a means to an end. Now you could even now skip owning a car and just take Uber everywhere (but this is very costly because you are your own unpaid chauffeur now - with Uber you are hiring a car AND a driver). Or else you could use one of those services like Zipcar where you rent a car by the hour but this is only practical in the city where they can have Zipcars all over the place so you only have to walk a block or two. Most of America is not that dense.

    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time). If you needed to take the kids to soccer practice you could summon a 3 row SUV, if it was just you, you could summon a small car, if it was commuting to work the self driver might stop and pick up a couple of other people going downtown, etc.

    Steve's comment of "where are we going to put all the charging stations" is valid up to a point but it doesn't take into account that the technology is going to continue to develop - that charging times are going to drop, etc. When cars were new, tires only lasted a couple of thousand miles. So the Steve of 1902 might have said, "Where are we going to put all the tire shops? We are going to need to have a tire shop on every block." But if tires improve and last 20,000 miles instead of 2,000 miles, you only need 1/10th as many tire shops. It's going to be the same with vehicle charging.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @scrivener3, @James B. Shearer, @AnotherDad

    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations,, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time).

    This is clearly where the future is heading.

    Uber started nominally as the auto analog of AirBnB–there are all these unused car/driver hours sitting around. So why buy a taxi fleet and hire drivers?

    But immediately they started research on self-driving cars. Because the really big bucks are in eliminating the labor. Then you have the car gainfully employed for a large percentage of the day–so your amortization much quicker compared to a personal car.

    This is going to be a huge revolution with huge ripple effects…

    but just the tip of the iceberg compared to what the automation revolution is going to do overall.

    But our wonderful elites are still full speed ahead on importing cleaners, fast food workers, drivers, and landscaping specialists. Hmm???

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    This is happening somewhat under the radar but big tech companies are spending BILLIONS on self driving cars (and are making very strong progress - as part of her job, my daughter has spent hours as a passenger in a fully self driving car on the streets of San Francisco and the car performed flawlessly. I asked her if this made her nervous and she said that at first it did but within a few minutes she became immersed in a conversation with her co-worker and completely forgot that no human being was driving the car which was driving down the street pretty much like any human driven taxi*). It's like flying on a jet liner - the first time you do it, it's wondrous that you are flying @ almost 600 mph seven miles up in the sky, the next time you do it you are bored and wish that the flight was over already.


    *I would say better - the last time I took an Uber from the airport the black female driver propped a 2nd cell phone on the steering wheel, put in a pair of headphones and was watching a YouTube video of a black woman giving makeup tips AS she was driving. I am not kidding.

    Anyway the companies that are throwing billions at this problem are not idiots - there are TRILLIONS of $ of value that could be picked up if you could restructure the transportation system to eliminate not only human drivers but car ownership itself. People have a ridiculous amount of capital tied up in something that takes up a lot of space in their home and which gets used, on average, 1 hr/day. And millions of people are employed as drivers of one sort or another. People are not thinking outside the box enough here - they keep imagining some future that will be EXACTLY like the present except that you are going to need install a charger at every curbside parking spot - why we will need MILLIONS of chargers! That's not how it's going to go at all.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @kaganovitch

  96. @Old Bad Nurse
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Hola Hernan,

    I am not trying to get into a comment-section argument. This is just information: Tesla batteries are rated for approximately 3000 full discharge cycles. My Model 3 gets 500km on a full charge. That adds up to 1.5 million km. Also, by using the 20%-80% charge-discharge limits, that battery life is extended. My wife, who drives the Tesla, commutes 250 km/day, 5-6 days per week. I did my homework before we made the decision. I'm figuring 7-9 years, 450-650,000 kms. Plenty of wiggle room.

    This is my opinion: a used lithium-ion battery is a great recycling target. It may not be well-understood how to do it, it may require new industrial capacity, but it has to be more efficient than mining lithium, once there are enough expired batteries to make scale worthwhile.

    Other EV challenges and problems abound.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It’s rarely a good idea to make static linear assumptions. In the 1930s someone calculated that the Bank of America would eventually need to hire the entire population of California to do their bookkeeping. Then the computer was invented so that never happened.

    It’s impossible that a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel just to mine the nickel and lithium. People throw these dumb numbers around without stopping to think if they meet the smell test. These numbers get put out by environmental hacks who have zero understanding of business and couldn’t run a lemonade stand. Do a little back of the envelope math first. Diesel fuel is currently around $5/gallon so if this was true then the vehicle battery alone would cost $50,000 just to recover the fuel cost, but the full retail price of a battery is more like $20K and this includes all labor and material costs and profit and not just the fuel component.

    A typical vehicle battery has 25 pounds of lithium @ $30/lb. ($750) and 60 pounds of nickel @ $10/lb. ($600), so $1,350 total for these two metals. If you had to spend $50,000 of just diesel fuel mining $1,350 worth of metal you would go broke REAL fast.

    10,000 gals. is a completely bogus # and even if it was true now (which it isn’t) it wouldn’t necessarily stay that way in the future.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @Jack D

    Tons of rock has to be excavated, transported, crushed, sorted, and refined in order to get a few pounds of nickel. Everything from the giant dump trucks, excavators, conveyor belts, and power for the plants generators are powered by diesel fuel. Then it gets put on massive cargo ships that use their diesel engines to go from ports in South America, Australia, Africa, Russia, and India to China where most of these batteries are being produced. Same process for all the other precious metals used in EV tech, like gold, copper, lithium, copper, silver, and lead. Look up the mines where they find these minerals, and tell me that's good for the environment as well. Also since EVs are mostly built with plastic, petroleum still needs to be extracted to make that, and plastic can only be recycled so many times before it loses much of it's integrity, and it can't be recycled when an EVs battery catches fire and burns it all up. Then of course there's the cobalt needed, which comes from minor miners in the DRC.

    https://www.ncregister.com/cna/testimony-china-backed-cobalt-mines-in-congo-exploit-40-000-child-workers?amp&gclid=CjwKCAjwvsqZBhAlEiwAqAHElSla9CBEqM8uqveiavm-xeD9zXqWJ8r26sQgyJj4LUB7KF99zPdHGxoCWhIQAvD_BwE

    https://www.911metallurgist.com/blog/15-largest-mines-on-earth

    https://medium.com/a-balanced-transition/the-troubling-environmental-impacts-of-a-battery-related-mining-boom-c36a0c294e02

    , @Adam Smith
    @Jack D

    Greetings, Mr. D. I truly hope this message finds you well. 🕊️

    I think Mr. del Blanco meant "10,000 gallons of diesel" in a metaphorical sort of way. Electric cars are not (yet)(may never be?) a panacea. At present, hybrids are more economical, practical, and eco-friendly for most people in most places; until the battery chemistry/charge time/fuel source/distribution network/grid capacity conundrum is resolved.

    https://i.ibb.co/0XnDF0N/Belaz-75710.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/fkP1K8v/open-mine.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/N3h9x4z/Tesla-Model-Y-being-charged-by-a-gas-generator-C.jpg

    https://youtu.be/ozqSdnkYxJM

    Cheers to a great evening, Mr. D.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  97. @clifford brown
    @clifford brown

    This is the plan for electric vehicles that likely will not work. Take transit!

    https://twitter.com/CrimeInNYC/status/1573633728022290432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1573633728022290432%7Ctwgr%5Eb164e59e4176cbb39c38c7a3c36a5460d8f44153%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @John Pepple, @WJ, @Yancey Ward

    The beaten lady will still vote for Adams and vote for Dems overall.

  98. @YetAnotherAnon
    His stare makes me wonder exactly what drugs he's on. And he seems to have earpieces in, or are they hearing aids? Any chance he's being fed his lines?

    "If Russia invades, that means tanks and troops crossing the border of Ukraine again, there will be no longer a Nordstream 2, we will put an end to it"

    "How will you do that exactly, given that control of the project is with Germany?"

    "I promise you we will be able to do it"
     

    https://twitter.com/AZmilitary1/status/1574702376262701056

    Video of two of the leaks here

    https://www.forsvaret.dk/da/nyheder/2022/gaslakage-i-ostersoen/

    Replies: @epebble, @Bill

    Well, at least, Promises Made, Promises Kept. We haven’t seen that in a while.

  99. In the year 2035:

    Center dash screen displays the emblem of Homeland Security. A harsh voice growls, “Attention citizen, you have exceeded your monthly mileage allowance. A fine will be automatically deducted from your credit card of record and deposited into the new vehicle purchase fund for indigent and immigrant drivers. Because this is your third offense, your vehicle will be disabled in one hour or in twenty miles travel, whichever comes first. Reactivation will require a hearing before a Traffic Magistrate. The balance of your mileage allowance may be forfeited and credited to the mileage subsidy pool for indigent and immigrant drivers.”

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Allain

    Zager and Evans never dreamed of anything like that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKQfxi8V5FA

  100. @John Pepple
    @clifford brown

    Our elites want us living in cities and using mass transit, but at the same time they encourage (or fail to discourage) lots of anti-social behavior that makes people want to avoid cities and mass transit.

    Replies: @jsm, @clifford brown

    And they think it’s funny.

  101. My impression of families that are happy owning an electric car are ones where dad drives a Tesla to work but mom owns a V-8 three-row SUV that they take for all long trips.

    Seems to be the case for a lot of liberal burbs.

    I know for the prius there are a lot more men than women that like to watch the animated screen while driving. Guys that like a bunch of gauges telling them exactly what the car is doing. I find the large screens annoying and especially at night. I really don’t give an F about knowing if the battery is charging or not while I’m driving.

    It’s hard to see how outlawing the sale of new gasoline-powered cars after 2035 in California can fit in with Yes In My Back Yard pushes to build more housing, since a key component of those drives is to get rid of parking mandates and let residents fend for themselves finding street parking.

    I really wouldn’t put too much thought into the gas vehicle ban.

    It’s mostly for liberal feels.

    There is no way that global lithium demand will be met in the next 10 years. That means electric cars will mostly be a luxury purchase and not cost effective for families.

    Newsom’s Big Dumb Ban can be rescinded at the ballot.

    But I doubt it will even get to that point. The California Democrats will eventually pass something less strict so as not to give the enemy political points.

  102. @JR Ewing
    @Erik Sieven


    Maybe power stations at the place of former common gas stations will be the solution for EV´s anyway.
     
    Not sure if you mean "charging stations" or "power plants" but neither one will do squat to fix the problem of charging infrastructure.

    If you mean "power plants" then you still need more wires and transformers and the like to carry the extra demand for electricity to the charging stations themselves, whether they are in people's garages or on the street.

    If you mean "charging stations" then replacing current gas stations will do nothing but create big parking lots, because it still takes 30-60 minutes with the fastest chargers and batteries and even significantly more time with the less efficient but more common equipment. There is no 5 minute "in and out" like there is with gasoline stations.

    Hydrogen stations would provide a similar type of quick fill like gasoline for what is essentially the same ZEV profile, but hydrogen infrastructure and production is even further behind battery electric and there are even fewer fuel cell vehicles.

    Point is, like the proverbial dollar on the sidewalk, these types of technologies and solutions would develop on their own if they was sufficient demand and financial incentive to put them in. Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that's what we have.

    Replies: @turtle, @Reg Cæsar, @blake121666

  103. @beavertales
    What is the feasibility of electric vehicles in northern Canada or the Australian Outback? Deepest Africa?

    In the Sahara desert and the Arab Gulf region, the favorite vehicle is the gasoline or diesel-powered Toyota Landcruiser, designed in 1984, and still in production with few changes.

    Electric vehicles are for people who live in the ant colony or the hive, people who've never seen the backside of the city limits sign.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @ForeverCARealist

    I know several people who own Teslas. They are all males with plenty of income. They also own other cars with gas engines that they use for something other than a short commute.

    They also all like to show off a bit.

  104. >If you rely on street parking, your home likely can’t accommodate an EV.

    Easy fix?? Let homeowners rent exclusive rights to a street-parking slot from the cash-strapped municipalities (or maybe just the overnight parking rights). Homeowner improves the slot with a fast charger.

  105. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    What if, though, you could SUMMON a self driving (electric) car from lots in each suburb (built on the premises of former gas stations,, parking lots, etc.) within 10 minutes (and at any pre-scheduled time).
     
    This is clearly where the future is heading.

    Uber started nominally as the auto analog of AirBnB--there are all these unused car/driver hours sitting around. So why buy a taxi fleet and hire drivers?

    But immediately they started research on self-driving cars. Because the really big bucks are in eliminating the labor. Then you have the car gainfully employed for a large percentage of the day--so your amortization much quicker compared to a personal car.

    This is going to be a huge revolution with huge ripple effects...

    but just the tip of the iceberg compared to what the automation revolution is going to do overall.

    But our wonderful elites are still full speed ahead on importing cleaners, fast food workers, drivers, and landscaping specialists. Hmm???

    Replies: @Jack D

    This is happening somewhat under the radar but big tech companies are spending BILLIONS on self driving cars (and are making very strong progress – as part of her job, my daughter has spent hours as a passenger in a fully self driving car on the streets of San Francisco and the car performed flawlessly. I asked her if this made her nervous and she said that at first it did but within a few minutes she became immersed in a conversation with her co-worker and completely forgot that no human being was driving the car which was driving down the street pretty much like any human driven taxi*). It’s like flying on a jet liner – the first time you do it, it’s wondrous that you are flying @ almost 600 mph seven miles up in the sky, the next time you do it you are bored and wish that the flight was over already.

    *I would say better – the last time I took an Uber from the airport the black female driver propped a 2nd cell phone on the steering wheel, put in a pair of headphones and was watching a YouTube video of a black woman giving makeup tips AS she was driving. I am not kidding.

    Anyway the companies that are throwing billions at this problem are not idiots – there are TRILLIONS of $ of value that could be picked up if you could restructure the transportation system to eliminate not only human drivers but car ownership itself. People have a ridiculous amount of capital tied up in something that takes up a lot of space in their home and which gets used, on average, 1 hr/day. And millions of people are employed as drivers of one sort or another. People are not thinking outside the box enough here – they keep imagining some future that will be EXACTLY like the present except that you are going to need install a charger at every curbside parking spot – why we will need MILLIONS of chargers! That’s not how it’s going to go at all.

    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @Jack D

    Yes, give up your freedom of movement to rely on a pay service like Uber that will slowly ramp up fees like a drug dealer over time as you become more dependent on it. Just like the convenience of smart homes that allow you to control your house with an app on your phone, until the power company decides you can't use your AC on a summer day. Ever have to take an Uber during surge pricing, where a $12 ride is now $45, or been in an area where there are no Ubers or taxis available? Self driving cars are just the next step in a society that has zero personal responsibility or accountability, leaving it up to tech companies to decide how you'll live your life and where you can and can't go. No thank you.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    I would say better – the last time I took an Uber from the airport the black female driver propped a 2nd cell phone on the steering wheel, put in a pair of headphones and was watching a YouTube video of a black woman giving makeup tips AS she was driving. I am not kidding.

    And yet you survived unscathed. #BlackGirlMagicIsReal!

  106. @Anon
    William Mulholland: They don’t make ‘em like that any more. He got shit done.

    Sadly, he will be forgotten once his street is renamed “Nipsy Hustle Drive.”

    Replies: @clifford brown

    Mulholland is a testament to California’s amazing history, but there is something to be said for engineering accreditation.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @clifford brown


    Mulholland is a testament to California’s amazing history, but there is something to be said for engineering accreditation.
     
    Hey, illegals gotta know they’re taking a risk. When your ticket’s up it’s up.
  107. @clifford brown
    @clifford brown

    This is the plan for electric vehicles that likely will not work. Take transit!

    https://twitter.com/CrimeInNYC/status/1573633728022290432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1573633728022290432%7Ctwgr%5Eb164e59e4176cbb39c38c7a3c36a5460d8f44153%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&

    Replies: @James N. Kennett, @John Pepple, @WJ, @Yancey Ward

    That guy that ran away needed a big knife or, preferably, a gun to shoot that dumbass.

  108. @JR Ewing
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, I've tried to understand this story for several hours now and the only solution I can find is that the US (or the UK) did it so as to prevent a settlement in Ukraine.

    Russia wants it to end, Ukraine wants it to end, continental Europe wants it to end. All three of those players have an incentive to negotiate a settlement and get that gas flowing again.

    But the US doesn't have an incentive for it to end and has a motive to prevent it from being ended easily.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @turtle

    A suspiciously minded person might surmise that one of the objectives is to destroy Germany as an industrial power.

  109. @James N. Kennett
    @clifford brown

    Elizabeth Gomes was on her way to work at JFK airport at 5:15am on September 20 when she was attacked at the airport station.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11252991/Woman-33-fears-shell-lose-eye-battered-homeless-man-JFK-airport-subway.html

    https://abc7ny.com/woman-beaten-in-subway-station-waheed-foster-assault-howard-beach/12268543/


    In 1995, law enforcement sources say Foster was arrested for murdering his 82-year-old foster grandmother in a brutal beating at the age of 14. Six years later, he was arrested for stabbing his 21-year-old sister with a screwdriver. Then in 2010, he was arrested for attacking three workers at the Creedmore Psychiatric Center, where he was an inpatient. He was on parole until November 2024 at the time of last week's attack.
     
    How many more crimes must this lowlife commit before they throw away the key?

    Replies: @Polistra, @AndrewR, @Adam Smith, @Sick n' Tired

    A homeless man with clean white pants and fresh looking $200 sneakers? This must be the new news speak excuse to down play violent black crime, similar to how they use “mentally ill”, “shots rang out”, “random attack”, or “gun violence”.

  110. Charging stations for every apt and home is not possible and it’s not meant to be possible. Only GenX and Boomers care about autonomous travel, everyone under 35 is perfectly happy communing 24/7 with their phone whilst baked 24/7 on maryjane whilst an Uber is one quick swipe away for their Tinder hookup. I know lots of people under 25 who have absolutely no interest in getting a driver license or owning a car. 24/7 swipe swipe vape vape whilst f**king the occasional Tinder whore. Zerocarbon WILL happen and only old people will care and soon GenX and Boomers will all be dead. Bank.

  111. @James N. Kennett
    @PiltdownMan


    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?
     
    The battery is so large that it must be built into the structure of the car, and it adds substantially to the car's weight. Recharging can take as long as an hour, so it is best done overnight at home. On long journeys, drivers of electric cars suffer from "range anxiety", because suitable charging points are scarce. The power delivered by charging can be as high as 75 kW for one vehicle, and so there are obvious issues with the generation and distribution of all that extra electricity.

    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @Alfa158

    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.

    The quite reasonable solution for flexibility is methanol.

    — Flex-fuel engines that can burn any combination of gasoline, ethanol, methanol down to say 15% gasoline.

    — Methanol can be made easily from natural gas (converted to syngas). Or later make from organics through destructive distillation to get the gas. Or if you’ve gone nuclear, electolysis and CO2 capture.

    Methanol gives you only about half the punch of gasoline. But bigger fuel tanks aren’t a ball breaker.

    And in “other uses”, you can do methanol fuel cells, though obviously more efficient if already have electricity from your nuke to use that directly.

    • Replies: @Travis
    @AnotherDad

    why burn methanol or ethanol when gasoline is more costly ? Not only does ethanol cost more than gasoline, it far worse for your engine. Ethanol is a hygroscopic chemical, which means it attracts water. Gasoline with a high ethanol content will also have a high moisture content. This is bad news for almost every component in your car. Contaminated fuel can cause anything from clogged fuel lines to cracked cylinder heads. Ethanol is a much stronger solvent than gasoline. It also attracts moisture. Can you think of a component in your fuel system that’s vulnerable to solvents and shouldn’t dry out? That’s right, your seals and gaskets.

    In addition to costing more and being bad for your car E-85 yields lower fuel mileage than regular gasoline. Consumer Reports found mileage for E85 to be up to 25% lower mileage while Car and Driver found the difference reached as high as 30% for E85.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  112. @Reg Cæsar

    Also, they own a single family home with a driveway, ideally a double wide driveway.
     
    A snout house.




    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/53dd6676e4b0fedfbc26ea91/1555014816697-ASBNMJFZRGRRGR2Q17H1/image-asset.jpeg

    Replies: @Polistra, @J.Ross, @PiltdownMan, @SafeNow

    A snout house

    Years ago one architect defined a house as: It has a peaked roof and shutters. This should now be amended to add snout to the list.
    I have seen a boxy protrusion as an architectural feature on some new public buildings recently. One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal. To me, a vulva perhaps.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @SafeNow


    One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal.
     
    Since urine comes out sterile, does that mean the gum in the urinal is safe to chew?

    I've said for some time now that garages are like toilets-- a necessity of modern life, but they shouldn't be the first thing you see.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AKAHorace, @J.Ross

  113. @JR Ewing
    @Jack D


    You don’t actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway.
     
    Until you actually DO need it, and then you're stuck because whoever does own it has decided you don't get to go anywhere.

    Somebody has to own it and that person (or government) will have all the power.

    Replies: @Jack D

    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car? What if only people with special permission from the government (let’s call it a “driver’s license”) were allowed to drive? What if not just any CAR could drive down the street but only cars where the owner had received a specially issued plaque from the government (we could call it a “license plate”) which they would have to display in order even to drive to church on Sunday. Surely then America would be a dystopian hellhole of a sort seen only in science fiction movies.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it’s not an issue.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Jack D

    Dishonest comparison -- people drive illegally every day because there's not enough police to find them and no internet-of-things kill switch, but legally speaking cars were allowed because government is the shadow cast by business over society and businesses need workers to reliably get to work. Assume no memory of a tradition of freedom or individualism, assume business is confident all its workers can reliably get to work without having a real car, and build a non-optional kill switch into every Musk golf cart: poof, every time you get behind the wheel becomes a visit to the DMV.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car?
     
    The government saying one thing, and the reality on the road, are two different things.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it’s not an issue.
     
    You ignored/missed his point. Physical possession (barring a remote ‘kill switch’ from an outside actor, like OnStar) means exclusive, immediate use by the owner for whatever reason. But if you need it and don’t have it, like with guns, you are stuck. Multiply this beyond the individual, and what was widespread (and hard to prohibit) self-directed personal mobility for millions will be much easier for a central authority to shut down (targeting individuals or masses or geographical areas). Not good.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @mc23
    @Jack D

    Strawman argument

  114. @Steve Sailer
    @James N. Kennett

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @petit bourgeois, @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @JimDandy

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    I live in the downtown area of one of the ten most populous metro areas in the country and ride an EUC. Mine has a top speed of around 45 MPH.

    They’re immensely convenient (never have to worry about parking) and also riding one is the most fun I’ve ever had with my clothes on.

    Since they’re the greatest thing since sliced bread, I’m sure they’ll be banned soon. America’s government is an anarcho-tyranncal Karenocracy, a veritable photonegative of an ideal government, where everything that is cool is banned and everything that sucks is mandatory.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    They caught a Hispanic man who was riding a one-wheel motorized skateboard feeling up woman in the Chicago South Loop.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b00Weo7a1c


    Suspect Charged With Sexual Assault After Allegedly Groping Multiple Women in Downtown Chicago

    https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/chicago-police-questioning-person-of-interest-after-multiple-woman-say-man-on-electric-skateboard-groped-them/2914442/
     

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    , @duncsbaby
    @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    Damn, Deborah Norville is still looking fine.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  115. @J.Ross
    OT Steve -- it's easy to laugh at "and eagles are so much better than -- eagles!" because nobody now remembers the 70s BBC historical drama Fall of Eagles (free on YouTube in multiple iterations). Patrick Stewart as Lenin by the way.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “…nobody now remembers the 70s BBC historical drama Fall of Eagles…”

    This nobody does. I have the series and the book. The series opens with Mahler, closes with Shostakovich, is narrated by the brilliant Michael Hordern and has Barry Forster playing Wilhelm II.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
  116. @Spud Boy
    California has made mandates like this before and pushed them back. This one will be pushed back too.

    Replies: @Rob Lee

    Charging stations will indeed be built in CA intermittently, slowly and at great cost, then instantly demolished by criminals at 2am for their copper wiring, whereupon ‘not in service’ signs will promptly be hung. No repairs will be forthcoming any time soon.

    But you’ll still have to comply with the electric-only mandate, or else…

    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
    @Rob Lee

    ‘not in service’ signs will promptly be hung.

    The Level-3 electric vehicle charging station at my local city hall has been out-of-service for three years. The sun destroyed the user interface screen.

  117. nothing California does makes sense, so this is in character. they can’t build anything, but they’re going to increase electricity capacity by 50% somehow. in true Decline of Rome fashion, they can’t even build stuff that smarter, better men built 50 to 100 years ago with lower tech levels and fewer resources. yet another additional 10 million useless, dead weight third worlders will be provided for by 2040 somehow. they can barely build roads, bridges, or dams. a single 1 GW fission reactor is FAR, FAR beyond their ability.

    every next Democrat President that gets elected makes it less likely that any of this stuff will happen. less likely, not more likely. Democrats don’t understand what they’re talking about. prices for all energy sources needs to remain low for decades, or the energy transition can’t even happen. at some point, it will be too expensive to build any of these projects, so the energy transition will NEVER happen. the situation is exactly the opposite of what Democrats think. there is a closing window to do this stuff, not an opening window. making energy more expensive does not advance the grid transition. it makes it less likely.

    not sure there will even be the materials for this stuff in a few decades. the copper situation alone is significant, barring the other metals needed.

    the only significant construction the United States has been able to do in 25 years is building combined cycle natural gas power plants, and those are thanks to horizontal hydraulic fracturing tech. needless to say, Democrats had -300% to do with any of that. many of them are actively trying to stop it of course.

  118. @Jimbo
    @AndrewR

    You need to check again. They have an enormous shortage of people - they basically have no young people to replace their current workers, and their economy is basically going to fall apart within this decade because of it.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @anonymous

    That’s why the Chinese are building large highways to the border of N Korea, one of the last closed off countries with millions of people living in such oppressive conditions, for generations, they’ll be happy to live at Foxconn assembling iPhones for 3 bowls of rice & $1 a day. They will be the new generation of sweatshop labor now that China’s middle class has grown.

  119. @PiltdownMan
    @Reg Cæsar

    Some snout houses are downright friendly looking.

    https://i.imgur.com/jCv37oZ.jpg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Google Lens– which I never heard of until now– won’t tell me where that is, but here is a matching kindergarten Kindergarten in Karlsruhe, co-designed by Tomi Ungerer:

    Kindergarten Wolfartsweier

    • Thanks: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @noname
    @Reg Cæsar

    It's in New Zealand - "Big Dog and Sheep", Tirau, New Zealand.

    https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/big-dog-and-sheep

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Reg Cæsar

    It's in Tirau, New Zealand, and it stands by a couple of sheep who give it the side eye.

    https://i.imgur.com/A8Ff1Tx.jpg

  120. @SafeNow
    @Reg Cæsar


    A snout house

     

    Years ago one architect defined a house as: It has a peaked roof and shutters. This should now be amended to add snout to the list.
    I have seen a boxy protrusion as an architectural feature on some new public buildings recently. One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal. To me, a vulva perhaps.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal.

    Since urine comes out sterile, does that mean the gum in the urinal is safe to chew?

    I’ve said for some time now that garages are like toilets– a necessity of modern life, but they shouldn’t be the first thing you see.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well (especially along the mountainous California coast where flat level cheaply buildable valley land was used up decades ago) if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street. Long winding driveways are nice (unless you have to shovel snow off of them) but they waste a lot of land and require a lot of paving materials. And who are you fooling? This is 2022 - almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    The key is not to hide the garage in the back but to make it an attractive part of the house. There are much more attractive garage doors than the faceless slabs that are pictured.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Bill, @James B. Shearer

    , @AKAHorace
    @Reg Cæsar

    Since urine comes out sterile, does that mean the gum in the urinal is safe to chew?


    Asking for a friend ?

    , @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    Or have garage, vestibule and base of stairwell be first floor, and have everything else be upper floors on the same footprint. But in the pic footprint is not an issue, they clearly have Midwestern levels of land.
    Agree about first thing you see.
    If I could I would combine the domus, the kraal, and the A-frame, so that the first thing you saw would either be an A-frame window-wall or a built out enclosed porch. There's a really nifty built-out porch in Grosse Pointe where the overall form is like two ground floor gables with a connection between them, but going from the first roof, through the connection, to the second roof, you see transition from totally enclosed vestibule, to somewhat-enclosed porch or front patio, to minimally enclosed front door with platform.

  121. @Pop Warner
    @AnotherDad


    Immigration conflicts with basically ever other non-diversity value the Democrats/establishment claim to champion.
     
    Yes, and there's a very simple explanation for how democrats rationalize this:

    They hate White people.

    That's it. There's no other principle more important to the democratic platform. They will hamstring all of their other policy initiatives if they think it hurts Whites. Every contradiction can be explained by them hating Whites more than liking anything else. Even Floydianity doesn't make them love blacks more than they hate Whites, because the entire religion is driven by hating Whites. It really isn't that complicated, but Republicans are too useless to ever point this out explicitly and build a platform that fights it. Instead, they'll dedicate their platform to tax cuts for their bosses and wars for Israel

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    Correct.

  122. @Alden
    @Polistra

    You’re a moron if you think I like black criminals. I spent 27 years of my life sentencing then to maximum terms in state prison. Unlike the useless Men of UNZ who’ve never done a thing to punish black criminals. Or lowered the crime rate as I did. When they’re in state prison they can only harm each other. Instead of the rest of us.

    One of the dumbest posts ever.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    One of the dumbest posts ever.

    You’re a fine one to whine about being misrepresented. FOAD, as you like to say. I’ve never said anything like that before, but you’ve earned it many times over.

    BTW, you were never a judge so you’ve never sentenced anyone to anything. What you are, is a liar.

  123. @Anon
    OT

    Axios reports on a “new report” (i.e., a press release from a law school-based social justice advocacy organization) about how black men are supposedly being framed for crimes and thrown in jail. The data they use is skewed by Soros DAs conspiring with prisoner advocacy groups to not object to the release of black prisoners (which they call “exoneration”). But they funniest part is when they compare the percentage of blacks in there general population to the percentage of blacks who are exonerated, rather than to use the percentage of blacks among convicted prisoners as the denominator.

    Black Americans are seven times more likely than white people to be falsely convicted of serious crimes, and spend longer in prison before exoneration, a new report shows.

    The big picture: The study, from the National Registry of Exonerations, examined defendants who were exonerated after serving at least part of a sentence — sometimes spending decades in prison.

    Details: Black people represent 13.6% of the American population, but account for 53% of 3,200 exonerations in the registry as of August 8, 2022, according to the report.

    Innocent Black Americans are about seven-and-a-half times more likely to be convicted of murder than innocent white people, the study found.
    in prison before exoneration, a new report shows.
     

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @HammerJack

    Black people represent 13.6% of the American population, but account for 53% of 3,200 exonerations

    Even by woke standards, that’s incredibly dense. Blacks also account for well over half of all violent crime, and that’s the relevant metric, not their position in the food chain.

    At 53%, they’re actually wrongfully convicted less often than parity would produce.

    This is the sort of junk science that drives policy nowadays. It helps that the masses are brainwashed idiots.

  124. here’s how much trouble humans are actually in, long term. i never see any discussion of these numbers, even here. indeed, i’ve never seen anybody mention the price of coal a single time in 20 years on this blog.

    inflation adjusted, coal was about $50 a ton from the 1940s all the way to 2009. an entire lifetime for many people, where electricity cost nothing, and they never had to think about it, ever. but that’s just one single lifetime, out of 8000 human generations or so.

    then in 2010, it went up to $100 a ton. the price of the base energy material doubled. and it fluctuated between $50 and $100 per ton from there.

    until 2021. when the price went up to $150. triple from just a decade ago.

    then, in 2022, the price of coal exploded to $400 a ton. the all time high by a huge margin. and today it’s even higher, around $430.

    all of a sudden, millions of people are yelling. “What is this? Now I can’t afford to (whatever whatever)”. uh, yeah. that’s the point. maybe two generations of humans max, had electricity so cheap they could afford to do whatever they wanted and never even had to think about it. from now on, it will be expensive. and get more expensive as time moves forward. imagine how expensive it is to make aluminum at this point. get ready for less aluminum, less steel.

  125. @CA EV Owner
    I live in a house in Berkeley, own a Tesla, and park it on the street. I have a driveway that I use to charge it approximately once a week, but I don't think that's necessary; the parking garage by my office has charging spots. (They're a bit more expensive than charging at home, but not by too much, and certainly much cheaper than buying gas.)

    Also, the supercharger network for trips is pretty great. (I still can't get over the time I went to a distant camping site to sleep under some trees, and there was a supercharger at the camping site.)

    Replies: @ForeverCARealist

    Parking on the street in Berkeley.
    Is it available? Is it legal? Is it safe?

    These are real questions for 2022.

    When I left there in 1991 the answer to all three questions would have been NO.

  126. Few thoughts on this:

    Even if climate change is a scam, there are lots of good reasons to like EV’s and hydrogen* vehicles.

    One, crude oil is far more valuable as a chemical feedstock than as an energy source. Burning oil for energy is as prodigal as using twenty-dollar bills for kindling.

    There is also the issue of conventional air pollution.†

    Finally, who likes being dependent on foreign oil?

    Also, fuck off, Arizona is full.

    ——————————-

    Footnotes for Fox News-watching retards:

    *Yes, I am aware of the Hindenburg disaster. Hydrogen is a material that must be treated with care and respect just like the natural gas that comes out of your stove. Fill a Hindenburg-sized blimp with that shit, fly it around in a thunderstorm, and see what happens. Also, no, you don’t need to burn fossil fuels to get hydrogen. It can be obtained by electrolyzing water with non-polluting energy sources and, in fact, works beautifully with wind and solar-generated electricity because it solves the intermittency problem of those energy sources by storing their energy in a stable reservoir of hydrogen that can be tapped whenever it’s needed. A lot of the executive details still need to be hashed out, but hydrogen is conceptually sound.

    †Yes, I know that a lot of the electricity for EV’s comes from coal fired-plants, but coal is a lot cleaner than it used to be and even an EV running on coal-generated electricity is much less polluting, mile-for-mile than one running on internal gasoline combustion.

  127. @YetAnotherAnon
    Still OT I'm afraid

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2022/sep/27/russia-ukraine-war-live-news-voting-in-sham-referendums-due-to-end-japanese-consul-interrogated-in-russia


    Swedish seismologists registered explosions near the Nord Stream pipelines – reports

    The Swedish national broadcaster SVT is reporting that seismologists registered explosions near the Nord Stream pipelines in the last 36 hours. In a report published in the last few minutes it said:

    SVT can reveal that measuring stations in both Sweden and Denmark registered strong underwater explosions in the same area as the gas leaks on Monday. “There is no doubt that these are explosions,” says Björn Lund, lecturer in seismology at the Swedish National Seismic Network, SNSN.

    The first explosion was recorded at 02.03am on the night of Monday and the second at 7.04pm on Monday evening.

    The warnings about the gas leaks came from the Maritime Administration at 1.52pm and 8.41pm on Monday, respectively, after ships detected bubbles on the surface.

    SVT has obtained the coordinates of the measured explosions and they are in the same area where the gas leaks were registered.

    It further quoted Lund saying of the measurements: “You can clearly see how the waves bounce from the bottom to the surface. There is no doubt that it was a blast. We even had a station in Gnosjö that picked this up.”
     

    There's a US fleet in the Eastern Baltic, sent there in August

    https://www.ndr.de/nachrichten/schleswig-holstein/US-Navy-zeigt-Flagge-in-der-oestlichen-Ostsee,usnavy102.html

    Replies: @HammerJack

    There’s a US fleet in the Eastern Baltic

    Well of course there is. Our country’s vital interests are at stake there. As they are everywhere else on earth.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @HammerJack


    Our country’s vital interests are at stake there. As they are everywhere else on earth.
     
    Everywhere except the Southern border, that is.
  128. @Reg Cæsar
    @SafeNow


    One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal.
     
    Since urine comes out sterile, does that mean the gum in the urinal is safe to chew?

    I've said for some time now that garages are like toilets-- a necessity of modern life, but they shouldn't be the first thing you see.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AKAHorace, @J.Ross

    Well (especially along the mountainous California coast where flat level cheaply buildable valley land was used up decades ago) if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street. Long winding driveways are nice (unless you have to shovel snow off of them) but they waste a lot of land and require a lot of paving materials. And who are you fooling? This is 2022 – almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    The key is not to hide the garage in the back but to make it an attractive part of the house. There are much more attractive garage doors than the faceless slabs that are pictured.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    And who are you fooling? This is 2022 – almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    Most of the WW2 era housing in first tier burbs were built with car spaces and street parking. Basically when you leave the downtown of a major city and get into the immediate neighborhoods with townhomes and duplexes.

    In fact I really hated going to a party at such a house because they usually only have one bathroom. Most of those houses are 2 or 3 bed and one bath. They often have nice porches. I will give them that.

    The people that own those houses also never seem to update the ventilation or the toilet. So one small bathroom with an old toilet and lousy fan. One person kills it and there is no alternative.

    Even worse are the urban homes built in the 1900s. Everything is tiny. WTF is that about? Were Americans all midgets then?

    Anyways these little houses can easily run half a million or more. No garage and a tiny toilet for half a million dollars.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Bill
    @Jack D


    if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street.
     
    The first part of the sentence is true; the second is not. It's perfectly straightforward to run an alley behind the houses and put the garage there with no driveway at all. There are lots of neighborhoods like this.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Jack D

    "... Long winding driveways are nice (unless you have to shovel snow off of them) but they waste a lot of land and require a lot of paving materials. .."

    They also waste time. If I am coming and going hundreds of times a year an extra minute or two to drive around back adds up.

  129. @Jimbo
    @AndrewR

    You need to check again. They have an enormous shortage of people - they basically have no young people to replace their current workers, and their economy is basically going to fall apart within this decade because of it.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @anonymous

    The Chinese economy will likely keep on growing until 2040. By then it will be first world and growth will stall. Average IQ of a population trumps other factors in predicting economic development.

  130. @Jack D
    @Old Bad Nurse

    It's rarely a good idea to make static linear assumptions. In the 1930s someone calculated that the Bank of America would eventually need to hire the entire population of California to do their bookkeeping. Then the computer was invented so that never happened.

    It's impossible that a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel just to mine the nickel and lithium. People throw these dumb numbers around without stopping to think if they meet the smell test. These numbers get put out by environmental hacks who have zero understanding of business and couldn't run a lemonade stand. Do a little back of the envelope math first. Diesel fuel is currently around $5/gallon so if this was true then the vehicle battery alone would cost $50,000 just to recover the fuel cost, but the full retail price of a battery is more like $20K and this includes all labor and material costs and profit and not just the fuel component.

    A typical vehicle battery has 25 pounds of lithium @ $30/lb. ($750) and 60 pounds of nickel @ $10/lb. ($600), so $1,350 total for these two metals. If you had to spend $50,000 of just diesel fuel mining $1,350 worth of metal you would go broke REAL fast.

    10,000 gals. is a completely bogus # and even if it was true now (which it isn't) it wouldn't necessarily stay that way in the future.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @Adam Smith

    Tons of rock has to be excavated, transported, crushed, sorted, and refined in order to get a few pounds of nickel. Everything from the giant dump trucks, excavators, conveyor belts, and power for the plants generators are powered by diesel fuel. Then it gets put on massive cargo ships that use their diesel engines to go from ports in South America, Australia, Africa, Russia, and India to China where most of these batteries are being produced. Same process for all the other precious metals used in EV tech, like gold, copper, lithium, copper, silver, and lead. Look up the mines where they find these minerals, and tell me that’s good for the environment as well. Also since EVs are mostly built with plastic, petroleum still needs to be extracted to make that, and plastic can only be recycled so many times before it loses much of it’s integrity, and it can’t be recycled when an EVs battery catches fire and burns it all up. Then of course there’s the cobalt needed, which comes from minor miners in the DRC.

    https://www.ncregister.com/cna/testimony-china-backed-cobalt-mines-in-congo-exploit-40-000-child-workers?amp&gclid=CjwKCAjwvsqZBhAlEiwAqAHElSla9CBEqM8uqveiavm-xeD9zXqWJ8r26sQgyJj4LUB7KF99zPdHGxoCWhIQAvD_BwE

    https://www.911metallurgist.com/blog/15-largest-mines-on-earth

    https://medium.com/a-balanced-transition/the-troubling-environmental-impacts-of-a-battery-related-mining-boom-c36a0c294e02

  131. If Dilbert could deliver electricity by Fax back in 1994…
    https://dilbert.com/strip/1994-09-25
    then by now surely we can recharge an electric car over the Internet!

  132. @Steve Sailer
    @James N. Kennett

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @petit bourgeois, @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @JimDandy

    But where are the windmill cars? I’ll tell you where–locked up in the sub-basement of Big Oil.

  133. @JimB
    In the green dream, all apartments are clustered near light rail. Renters are not supposed to own cars. Remember the motto of the great reset? You’ll own nothing, and you’ll be happy.

    Or else!

    Replies: @John Johnson

    In the green dream, all apartments are clustered near light rail. Renters are not supposed to own cars. Remember the motto of the great reset? You’ll own nothing, and you’ll be happy.

    This is really it. The left doesn’t actually want mass ownership of electric vehicles. They don’t want single occupancy vehicles for the majority.

    The left doesn’t want the average White person to have kids or own a car. Walk to mass transit, walk home with vegetarian groceries, then take your anti-depressants when you get home. The is the tolerable White person to the left.

    In fact I have no doubt the left would actually be disappointed if some new tech allowed for mass ownership of electric vehicles. They want to end that model for Whites.

    The dream of the left is for most Whites to live in rat towers. They want to end the suburban model completely. They don’t want Whites to have children and the suburban model only encourages that. The suburbs also allow private schools which is deeply offensive to leftists that believe it is their duty to indoctrinate White children.

    However the left always runs into economic realities. They are emotionally driven and don’t plan very well. They can hope and dream about turning most Whites into childless urban dwellers but it isn’t going to happen. Family leaning Whites are already chased out of the city because the left refuses to apply the law to the protected classes. So the Whites that remain and don’t breed are liberally minded. Twin studies suggest that political outlook has a strong genetic basis. Leftists are basically reducing their own numbers through self-selection.

    • Agree: J.Ross, Kylie
    • Replies: @anon
    @John Johnson

    You are correct on both counts. Every leftist country, from the USSR to North Korea in the extreme, was/is hostile to private car ownership. At least in the USSR you were allowed to own a car, but had to get permission and wait for years to be able to purchase a new one, and at several times the average annual salary. Parts were difficult to obtain and service was horrible. Despite these challenges, people somehow still managed to own cars. Even though public transportation was everywhere, it was disliked for the same reasons it is disliked everywhere.
    And yes, leftists are self-eliminating through Darwinian selection - from mass slaughter, one-child policies and mass abortion to homosexuality, transgenderism and masking/social distancing. Which is why they have to import new voters and brainwash the goodwhites into buying the idea that living in a beehive and owning nothing bigger than a bong is great. I used to work at a place where virtually everyone was childless, usually unmarried, lived in an apartment and took public transportation or biked to work. These were highly educated (MD/PhDs) folks in their prime child-bearing years, and virtually every one of them was a leftist. They all read the NYT and believed it like an evangelical believes the bible. So much for high IQ.

  134. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    This is happening somewhat under the radar but big tech companies are spending BILLIONS on self driving cars (and are making very strong progress - as part of her job, my daughter has spent hours as a passenger in a fully self driving car on the streets of San Francisco and the car performed flawlessly. I asked her if this made her nervous and she said that at first it did but within a few minutes she became immersed in a conversation with her co-worker and completely forgot that no human being was driving the car which was driving down the street pretty much like any human driven taxi*). It's like flying on a jet liner - the first time you do it, it's wondrous that you are flying @ almost 600 mph seven miles up in the sky, the next time you do it you are bored and wish that the flight was over already.


    *I would say better - the last time I took an Uber from the airport the black female driver propped a 2nd cell phone on the steering wheel, put in a pair of headphones and was watching a YouTube video of a black woman giving makeup tips AS she was driving. I am not kidding.

    Anyway the companies that are throwing billions at this problem are not idiots - there are TRILLIONS of $ of value that could be picked up if you could restructure the transportation system to eliminate not only human drivers but car ownership itself. People have a ridiculous amount of capital tied up in something that takes up a lot of space in their home and which gets used, on average, 1 hr/day. And millions of people are employed as drivers of one sort or another. People are not thinking outside the box enough here - they keep imagining some future that will be EXACTLY like the present except that you are going to need install a charger at every curbside parking spot - why we will need MILLIONS of chargers! That's not how it's going to go at all.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @kaganovitch

    Yes, give up your freedom of movement to rely on a pay service like Uber that will slowly ramp up fees like a drug dealer over time as you become more dependent on it. Just like the convenience of smart homes that allow you to control your house with an app on your phone, until the power company decides you can’t use your AC on a summer day. Ever have to take an Uber during surge pricing, where a $12 ride is now $45, or been in an area where there are no Ubers or taxis available? Self driving cars are just the next step in a society that has zero personal responsibility or accountability, leaving it up to tech companies to decide how you’ll live your life and where you can and can’t go. No thank you.

    • Agree: Sam Malone
  135. @Cave Johnson
    @PiltdownMan

    I swear, every mention of EVs and some future Nobel Prize candidate comes out and proposes swappable battery packs, as though these things are functional equivalents of a rechargeable AA battery. Without going into the details as to why it's not practical on an automotive scale, right now, scooters are about the ceiling on the practicality of that.

    https://electrek.co/2021/08/30/gogoro-named-global-leader-in-light-electric-vehicle-battery-swapping-passes-200-million-swaps/

    2035:

    An engineer I know who is in the parking garage construction business says the future in cities isnt public transit, its subscription services. Specifically, this will happen once self driving technology reaches a level where there is confidence in a car driving without anyone behind the wheel at all. You will have a subscription, call a car (like an uber), and the optimal unmanned electric unit will arrive at your location, where you will then be taken to your destination. The cars will be assigned routes to optimize battery usage, and will return to the garage to recharge when needed (or be cleaned in the event a messy event is detected or reported). He bases this notion on the way parking garage technology is moving to accommodate such a system.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Inquiring Mind, @Justvisiting

    Cleaned?

    Like where I work, where users of the bathroom don’t flush much of the time?

    • Replies: @Cave Johnson
    @Inquiring Mind

    Think of this like a rental car situation, except minus "return with a full tank".

  136. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well (especially along the mountainous California coast where flat level cheaply buildable valley land was used up decades ago) if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street. Long winding driveways are nice (unless you have to shovel snow off of them) but they waste a lot of land and require a lot of paving materials. And who are you fooling? This is 2022 - almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    The key is not to hide the garage in the back but to make it an attractive part of the house. There are much more attractive garage doors than the faceless slabs that are pictured.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Bill, @James B. Shearer

    And who are you fooling? This is 2022 – almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    Most of the WW2 era housing in first tier burbs were built with car spaces and street parking. Basically when you leave the downtown of a major city and get into the immediate neighborhoods with townhomes and duplexes.

    In fact I really hated going to a party at such a house because they usually only have one bathroom. Most of those houses are 2 or 3 bed and one bath. They often have nice porches. I will give them that.

    The people that own those houses also never seem to update the ventilation or the toilet. So one small bathroom with an old toilet and lousy fan. One person kills it and there is no alternative.

    Even worse are the urban homes built in the 1900s. Everything is tiny. WTF is that about? Were Americans all midgets then?

    Anyways these little houses can easily run half a million or more. No garage and a tiny toilet for half a million dollars.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area. My wife grew up in a postwar "Levittown" style suburb in a former farm field just outside the city limits where the 1,500 sf house had 1 bathroom (for 5 people) and no central air conditioning but it did have a (single car) garage. Recently we went back to the "old neighborhood" and the houses are remarkably unchanged although there is usually central air now. I looked at the most recent sales listing for her house and they had managed to tuck another bathroom in.

    Even some of the postwar row houses in Northeast Philly have an alley and garages in the back or sometimes even the front. Sometimes there are twin houses and the garage is a separate structure in the back.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new). And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ - again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    Replies: @Liza, @John Johnson, @Alfa158

  137. @Reg Cæsar
    @PiltdownMan

    Google Lens-- which I never heard of until now-- won't tell me where that is, but here is a matching kindergarten Kindergarten in Karlsruhe, co-designed by Tomi Ungerer:


    https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5cd63bbc2400005900727479.jpeg


    Kindergarten Wolfartsweier

    Replies: @noname, @PiltdownMan

    It’s in New Zealand – “Big Dog and Sheep”, Tirau, New Zealand.

    https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/big-dog-and-sheep

  138. @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    And who are you fooling? This is 2022 – almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    Most of the WW2 era housing in first tier burbs were built with car spaces and street parking. Basically when you leave the downtown of a major city and get into the immediate neighborhoods with townhomes and duplexes.

    In fact I really hated going to a party at such a house because they usually only have one bathroom. Most of those houses are 2 or 3 bed and one bath. They often have nice porches. I will give them that.

    The people that own those houses also never seem to update the ventilation or the toilet. So one small bathroom with an old toilet and lousy fan. One person kills it and there is no alternative.

    Even worse are the urban homes built in the 1900s. Everything is tiny. WTF is that about? Were Americans all midgets then?

    Anyways these little houses can easily run half a million or more. No garage and a tiny toilet for half a million dollars.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area. My wife grew up in a postwar “Levittown” style suburb in a former farm field just outside the city limits where the 1,500 sf house had 1 bathroom (for 5 people) and no central air conditioning but it did have a (single car) garage. Recently we went back to the “old neighborhood” and the houses are remarkably unchanged although there is usually central air now. I looked at the most recent sales listing for her house and they had managed to tuck another bathroom in.

    Even some of the postwar row houses in Northeast Philly have an alley and garages in the back or sometimes even the front. Sometimes there are twin houses and the garage is a separate structure in the back.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new). And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ – again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    • Replies: @Liza
    @Jack D


    Why so small and only 1 bath
     
    That's the least of our problems. I would kill for the right to live in a 400 sq. ft. hovel with 2 kids in exchange for a govt that is on our side and for true freedom.
    , @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area.

    It might depend on the area. I am talking about neighborhoods in West Coast cities, some of which were actually designed around trollies. Some people have no idea that their neighborhood was once on a trolly line. A lot of those neighborhoods were laid out logically in that the trolly would go all the way down them and turn around. So no need for a garage.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new).

    I figured but I can't imagine having a family and no second toilet. I would have built one. In fact I have been to older homes where they had converted a mud room to a toilet/sink combo. Those 40s/50s mud rooms are normally unused anyways and tend to smell.

    And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ – again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    I don't doubt that cost was a factor but there is a lot of Victorian influence in those homes. They'll have a dozen small drawers instead of 4 large ones. A lot of unnecessary arches and masonry. Victorian windows that certainly cost more than square ones. It's all very weird. In the more frontier areas of America you will find cabins built by a single person that have two bathrooms. So I'm guessing there was also a fancy living housing trend at the time that didn't prioritize bathrooms.

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @Liza

    , @Alfa158
    @Jack D

    Back in the old days, people just didn’t have much, so they didn’t need much house to hold it all. I live in a GI War Bride house built the year I was born. It was originally 1,000 square feet with three bedrooms and one bath. The closet in the main bedroom was four feet wide, more than enough space for Mom and Dad’s small number of dresses, suits and casual clothes. The garage is smaller than today’s standard 20’ by 20’ but it was still big enough to fit the family 1940 Ford with room left over for the push mower. Mom didn’t usually go to work and almost anything you bought was made by fellow Americans who got paid roughly as much as you did, so few people could really afford the tons of clothes, appliances,power tools, electronics, cars, knickknacks and multiple autos people can today. There was a family radio and/or TV because they cost a fortune in today’s dollars.
    The house was expanded in the 60’s boom to 1500 square feet, a new 10 foot closet was added to the master bedroom and two more bathrooms were added. The house is in Whitopia Beach so it would probably go for 1.7M even with today’s interest rates, but I’m buggered if I can figure out who can still afford these places now that we appear to be on the downslope.

  139. @Reg Cæsar
    @SafeNow


    One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal.
     
    Since urine comes out sterile, does that mean the gum in the urinal is safe to chew?

    I've said for some time now that garages are like toilets-- a necessity of modern life, but they shouldn't be the first thing you see.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AKAHorace, @J.Ross

    Since urine comes out sterile, does that mean the gum in the urinal is safe to chew?

    Asking for a friend ?

  140. Anon[384] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: The Nordstream pipeline sabotage. Has anybody noticed that the Biden administration weasels are now mistreating white Europeans exactly the way they have been mistreating Middle Easterners for so long? They’re all just sandn*iggers now.

    Biden has demoted European citizens to the status of nonpersons who can be tormented, tortured, kicked around, and robbed to benefit American natural gas suppliers. The Biden administration doesn’t care at all about inflicting a major disaster on Europe as long as it gives Russia the finger, makes Biden’s business buddies a buck and gives Biden himself some nice bribes for the favor he’s done them.

    There hasn’t been industrial sabotage on this scale since Saddam Hussein set all of Kuwait’s oil wells on fire. Biden is now a war criminal in the same class as Hussein.

    If you didn’t think the Biden administration was anti-white, you’d better believe it now.

  141. @(((They))) Live
    @Anon

    The Germans and the most of the EU will assume it was the Russians, Orbán and maybe the new Italian PM will know better, but both of them are crazy Nazis, so they must be wrong

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  142. @James N. Kennett
    @PiltdownMan


    I know nothing at all about this topic, but would it make sense for electric cars to have standardized slide-in/slide-out battery packs?
     
    The battery is so large that it must be built into the structure of the car, and it adds substantially to the car's weight. Recharging can take as long as an hour, so it is best done overnight at home. On long journeys, drivers of electric cars suffer from "range anxiety", because suitable charging points are scarce. The power delivered by charging can be as high as 75 kW for one vehicle, and so there are obvious issues with the generation and distribution of all that extra electricity.

    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnotherDad, @Alfa158

    Musk demonstrated a scheme to have quick change battery packs for Teslas. The car would have a standardized battery pack that can be mounted and dismounted from underneath by automated machinery. The car is pulled into a slot over a pit at a Tesla supercharging station. Machinery unbolts the discharged pack, drops it down and slides it away to go back into a bank and be recharged for the next customer. A freshly charged pack gets slid under and bolted in. Should be workable, if you can milk cows with robotic milking stations, swapping batteries in a car is a much simpler automation challenge.
    In the demonstration Musk had a gasoline luxury car getting refilled with gasoline while one of these test Teslas had the battery pack replaced repeatedly by the automated service unit. They were able to complete about two and a half battery swaps in the time it took to refuel the gas car.
    Haven’t heard anything since then about this going into service, Tesla seems to be pouring its substantial profit margins from cars into building conventional DC supercharger stations and expecting their customers to wait while their car is recharged.

    • Thanks: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    @Alfa158

    AFAIK Tesla did build one or more battery swap stations, but it wasn't popular, it doesn't surprise me that people don't really want to swap out large components of their car multiple times a year, it was also tried in Israel by a company called Better Place, it was a flop. a country like Israel is perfect for EVs, since its pretty much a small island for its car owners

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlaQuKk9bFg

    Tesla battery swap, 9 years old, time flies :-0

    All that said battery swapping does seem to be going well in China, cars and scooters, so who knows

  143. The LA Department of Water and Power has been working since 2008 on a replacement water main across the San Fernando Valley for the still functioning one that William Mulholland built in about 18 months around 1915 with pickaxes and mules, and there are still open trenches in the middle of busy streets after 14 years.

    New York’s been working on the Second Avenue Subway for 100 years.

  144. A partial solution to Steve’s problem, up to 1000 miles of range, and in some places 40 miles of range a day from the solar PV

    Yes, yes, I know its a weird mobile, but should be on the road in the US next year, all you Tesla haters may have a new obsession

  145. Help me out here. If we are going to end up switching from gasoline vehicles and buy electric cars instead – where, o where, is all that electricity supposed to come from?

  146. OT: Nordstream 1. Cui bono?

  147. @Anon
    OT: The Nordstream pipeline has been sabotaged in three places, pretty obviously by us. The ding-dong Biden Administration has just given Europe a good reason to make sure that Democrats don't stay in office here. Europe is desperate for that natural gas.

    Biden just crossed an uncrossable line when he chose to do serious damage to an ally in order attack an enemy. That was a massively stupid decision.

    If anyone's hacking our next election, it's going to be the EU. They're going to have to become our enemy just to try to save themselves. Biden may not physically survive much longer either. Right now, both Russia and Europe have a good reason to do the corrupt old bugger in.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live, @Daniel H

    I expect the regime typists in the media to start claiming that Russia, herself, sabotaged the pipeline. But, of course, if Russia wanted to halt the gas she could just do so at her source.

    American foreign policy is run by desperados, and not a ripple of dissent.

  148. @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area. My wife grew up in a postwar "Levittown" style suburb in a former farm field just outside the city limits where the 1,500 sf house had 1 bathroom (for 5 people) and no central air conditioning but it did have a (single car) garage. Recently we went back to the "old neighborhood" and the houses are remarkably unchanged although there is usually central air now. I looked at the most recent sales listing for her house and they had managed to tuck another bathroom in.

    Even some of the postwar row houses in Northeast Philly have an alley and garages in the back or sometimes even the front. Sometimes there are twin houses and the garage is a separate structure in the back.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new). And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ - again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    Replies: @Liza, @John Johnson, @Alfa158

    Why so small and only 1 bath

    That’s the least of our problems. I would kill for the right to live in a 400 sq. ft. hovel with 2 kids in exchange for a govt that is on our side and for true freedom.

  149. @Travis
    @Mr. Anon

    exactly correct. Electric car mandates are similar to the covid mandates, these mandates designed to destroy our standard of living and make life less enjoyable for regular people. These mandates are not for our benefit, quite the opposite, these mandates are used to destroy our nation.

    so called "Environmentalists" have not been concerned about pollution and the environment for decades. Environmental organizations seek power and to destroy capitalism and our freedoms. They are mostly former communists and other authoritarian types who seek to obtain power and wealth via government dictates. Anyone paying attention would realize that CO2 levels have cannot cause catastrophic global warming. The world would be greatly improved if the United States warmed a little, yet no warming has been detected since the 1930s for the United States. The warmest decade remains the 1930s according to NASA and all recorded temperature data. Nevertheless most Americans would welcome a slightly warmer climate, and our farmers benefit from rising CO2 levels as plants thrive with more CO2 and need less water

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    exactly correct. Electric car mandates are similar to the covid mandates, these mandates designed to destroy our standard of living and make life less enjoyable for regular people.

    Apart from simply impoverishing the broad mass of people – making the rich richer, etc. – I think maybe that the “making life less enjoyable” part is an important aspect of the whole program.

    Over the last hundred years or so, as life became better for the average person, that average person has become less inclined to bear the burdens of war and repression that the powerful are wont to impose on him. This has perhaps not gone unnoticed by the powerful. By making life crappier for people, they are making it easier to subject them to war, enslavement, what have you.

    That might also be the motive behind the whole “Eat the Bugs!” campaign. Food is one of life’s greatest simple pleasures. Take that away, give them meal-worms, crickets, and roaches to eat, and you take away a lot of joy. Now that I’m on the subject, it is interesting to note that one of COVID’s side-effects was to deaden people’s sense of taste. If you were engineering a virus to implement a “make-life-crappy” agenda, that’d certainly be one way to start.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  150. @Mr. Anon
    You're taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don't mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn't about the Environment. It's about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what's good for you!).

    Replies: @Travis, @Hannah Katz, @Harry Baldwin, @Coemgen, @Alfa158, @Peter Akuleyev, @mc23

    The Green New Deal isn’t about the Environment. It’s about imposing austerity on the masses.

    These are hardly conflicting sentiments. If you conclude sincerely that the carrying capacity of the planet is rapidly diminishing, you may well devise a plan that preserves as much comfort for your group while forcing other people to carry most of the burden.

  151. @AndrewR
    @anonymous

    Last I checked, China has no shortage of people, so I don't think raising fertility should be high on their list of priorities.

    Replies: @Jimbo, @Bill Jones

    China has no shortage of current people. It has a disastrous shortage of Tomorrows Men.

  152. The most recent counter-intuitive studies have suggested that charging infrastructure be constructed at work and not at home, which is considered the preferred strategy of charging today.

    The reason is that it is believed that more and more electricity will be generated by solar, which of course generates power during the day rather than at night. So, the extra dividend of this source will be used up by commuters who charge at work during the day, rather than running power plants to charge people’s cars at home at night.

    And so, apartment dwellers won’t need to figure out how to talk their landlords into investing in charging infrastructure.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    Right. The ideal would be to be able to fully charge your car at work from say 9am to noon, when much solar power is being generated (speaking from a Southern California viewpoint) but there's little demand for air conditioning yet.

  153. @Alfa158
    @James N. Kennett

    Musk demonstrated a scheme to have quick change battery packs for Teslas. The car would have a standardized battery pack that can be mounted and dismounted from underneath by automated machinery. The car is pulled into a slot over a pit at a Tesla supercharging station. Machinery unbolts the discharged pack, drops it down and slides it away to go back into a bank and be recharged for the next customer. A freshly charged pack gets slid under and bolted in. Should be workable, if you can milk cows with robotic milking stations, swapping batteries in a car is a much simpler automation challenge.
    In the demonstration Musk had a gasoline luxury car getting refilled with gasoline while one of these test Teslas had the battery pack replaced repeatedly by the automated service unit. They were able to complete about two and a half battery swaps in the time it took to refuel the gas car.
    Haven’t heard anything since then about this going into service, Tesla seems to be pouring its substantial profit margins from cars into building conventional DC supercharger stations and expecting their customers to wait while their car is recharged.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live

    AFAIK Tesla did build one or more battery swap stations, but it wasn’t popular, it doesn’t surprise me that people don’t really want to swap out large components of their car multiple times a year, it was also tried in Israel by a company called Better Place, it was a flop. a country like Israel is perfect for EVs, since its pretty much a small island for its car owners

    Tesla battery swap, 9 years old, time flies :-0

    All that said battery swapping does seem to be going well in China, cars and scooters, so who knows

  154. @YetAnotherAnon
    His stare makes me wonder exactly what drugs he's on. And he seems to have earpieces in, or are they hearing aids? Any chance he's being fed his lines?

    "If Russia invades, that means tanks and troops crossing the border of Ukraine again, there will be no longer a Nordstream 2, we will put an end to it"

    "How will you do that exactly, given that control of the project is with Germany?"

    "I promise you we will be able to do it"
     

    https://twitter.com/AZmilitary1/status/1574702376262701056

    Video of two of the leaks here

    https://www.forsvaret.dk/da/nyheder/2022/gaslakage-i-ostersoen/

    Replies: @epebble, @Bill

    Any chance he’s being fed his lines?

    “Salute the Marines.”

  155. @Reg Cæsar
    @SafeNow


    One architecture critic wrote that these evoke the spirit of a urinal.
     
    Since urine comes out sterile, does that mean the gum in the urinal is safe to chew?

    I've said for some time now that garages are like toilets-- a necessity of modern life, but they shouldn't be the first thing you see.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AKAHorace, @J.Ross

    Or have garage, vestibule and base of stairwell be first floor, and have everything else be upper floors on the same footprint. But in the pic footprint is not an issue, they clearly have Midwestern levels of land.
    Agree about first thing you see.
    If I could I would combine the domus, the kraal, and the A-frame, so that the first thing you saw would either be an A-frame window-wall or a built out enclosed porch. There’s a really nifty built-out porch in Grosse Pointe where the overall form is like two ground floor gables with a connection between them, but going from the first roof, through the connection, to the second roof, you see transition from totally enclosed vestibule, to somewhat-enclosed porch or front patio, to minimally enclosed front door with platform.

  156. @James B. Shearer
    @Jack D

    "You don’t actually NEED to own a car which sits in your driveway (or even worse inside an expensive garage that could be living space) taking up space 95% of the time anyway. .."

    Maybe it isn't a necessity but as soon as I get a little disposable income that is something I want. And I want a personal vehicle that I am used to and is filled with my junk not somebody else's.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation. What you see as a “personal vehicle” someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people’s cars for generations now. The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport). It’s not perfect but it works reasonably well. I’m sure that when Mr. Hertz proposed the idea of rental cars people also told him it was impossible, that no one would want to rent a car, etc. You can always find 1,000 reasons for never changing anything – it takes imagination to see a future that is different than the present. Sometimes imagination can go too far (people have been talking about flying cars for a century) but sometimes you have to ignore the naysayers or you’ll never get anything done.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation. What you see as a “personal vehicle” someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    You are right that there is less interest in cars as a hobby.

    But a lot of car sharing companies have gone belly up. When I was in the city there was always one being advertised.

    Car sharing makes sense until you realize that everyone wants to take off for labor day, go home for Christmas, shop on Sunday, etc.

    Cars represent freedom. You can always just get in one and go.

    The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport).

    How many times have you actually gotten the car you ordered? I usually get the luxo model just because I know damn well the mid level won't be there. It's aways the 2 door mouse car, a mini van or a luxury car or suv. It isn't by chance. That is in fact the business model. If they had a car lot of sedans then they wouldn't make as much money. They make their money by getting White guys to upgrade to the luxury sedan. That is the unspoken model. Get the White guy to upgrade. I am that White guy. I've been to the car desk many times and am fully aware of it. Just give me my luxury sedan and let me get out of here.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Corvinus
    @Jack D

    “Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation.”

    Try again.

    https://www.thedrive.com/news/35536/generation-z-wants-to-keep-classic-cars-alive-but-theres-a-lot-working-against-them

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1129921_survey-says-millennials-and-gen-z-care-about-classic-cars-after-all

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    , @clifford brown
    @Jack D

    Maybe we can just get around on rollerblades.

    I honestly read this and assumed it was written by a European who might not be familiar with the United States. This is your craziest take yet! Car ownership is declining, but car ownership is still critical to the lives of most Americans.


    If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?
     
    No, you get in your car and drive to the supermarket.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Jack D

    "Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. .."

    Are these kids with plenty of money or kids who can't afford a car anyway? Like me saying I have zero interest in dating a super model.

    "People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people’s cars for generations now. .."

    I have rented cars a few times. I stay in motels sometimes too but I still want a personal house.

  157. @JR Ewing
    @Erik Sieven


    Maybe power stations at the place of former common gas stations will be the solution for EV´s anyway.
     
    Not sure if you mean "charging stations" or "power plants" but neither one will do squat to fix the problem of charging infrastructure.

    If you mean "power plants" then you still need more wires and transformers and the like to carry the extra demand for electricity to the charging stations themselves, whether they are in people's garages or on the street.

    If you mean "charging stations" then replacing current gas stations will do nothing but create big parking lots, because it still takes 30-60 minutes with the fastest chargers and batteries and even significantly more time with the less efficient but more common equipment. There is no 5 minute "in and out" like there is with gasoline stations.

    Hydrogen stations would provide a similar type of quick fill like gasoline for what is essentially the same ZEV profile, but hydrogen infrastructure and production is even further behind battery electric and there are even fewer fuel cell vehicles.

    Point is, like the proverbial dollar on the sidewalk, these types of technologies and solutions would develop on their own if they was sufficient demand and financial incentive to put them in. Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that's what we have.

    Replies: @turtle, @Reg Cæsar, @blake121666

    Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that’s what we have.

    Chain saws, though, are increasingly electric. These just have to be scaled up.

    Completely OT, if you’ve ever wondered what Elvis, Freddie, and others would look like today…

    The king looks downright presidential.

    https://americansongwriter.com/ai-artist-imagines-what-elvis-presley-john-lennon-freddie-mercury-and-other-musical-icons-would-look-like-today/

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Reg Cæsar

    Not very realistic. Elvis looks like a 60-year-old Mormon who's never touched alcohol or drugs and is in bed by 10 every night. All those, uppers, downers and hamburgers would have taken their toll. Same goes for Freddie, plus he could well have monkeypox by now.

  158. @Jack D
    @JR Ewing

    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car? What if only people with special permission from the government (let's call it a "driver's license") were allowed to drive? What if not just any CAR could drive down the street but only cars where the owner had received a specially issued plaque from the government (we could call it a "license plate") which they would have to display in order even to drive to church on Sunday. Surely then America would be a dystopian hellhole of a sort seen only in science fiction movies.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it's not an issue.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @mc23

    Dishonest comparison — people drive illegally every day because there’s not enough police to find them and no internet-of-things kill switch, but legally speaking cars were allowed because government is the shadow cast by business over society and businesses need workers to reliably get to work. Assume no memory of a tradition of freedom or individualism, assume business is confident all its workers can reliably get to work without having a real car, and build a non-optional kill switch into every Musk golf cart: poof, every time you get behind the wheel becomes a visit to the DMV.

  159. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well (especially along the mountainous California coast where flat level cheaply buildable valley land was used up decades ago) if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street. Long winding driveways are nice (unless you have to shovel snow off of them) but they waste a lot of land and require a lot of paving materials. And who are you fooling? This is 2022 - almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    The key is not to hide the garage in the back but to make it an attractive part of the house. There are much more attractive garage doors than the faceless slabs that are pictured.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Bill, @James B. Shearer

    if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street.

    The first part of the sentence is true; the second is not. It’s perfectly straightforward to run an alley behind the houses and put the garage there with no driveway at all. There are lots of neighborhoods like this.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Bill

    Sure it can be done but this uses a lot more land. You have twice as many streets - the street in front of the house and the street (alley) in the back. This also tends to use up the back yard which is a valuable recreational space.

    Replies: @Bill

  160. @Dmon
    @Ben Kurtz

    "but it is technically feasible to support a lot more electric vehicle charging than we do currently with some pretty modest but clever infrastructure hacks."

    Like room temperature fusion?
    https://www.8newsnow.com/news/local-news/hoover-dam-power-production-down-33-official-says/

    I propose a 300 mile long by 50 mile wide trench that passes directly through Malibu, so that the Pacific Ocean can refill Lake Meade. We can call it the William Tecumseh Sherman Canal. All current California government workers will be put to work in the salt processing plant at the terminus, as the water has to be desalinated to avoid damaging the turbines. Talk about your shovel ready infrastructure projects...

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @kaganovitch

    Well, not in California, but I think I already addressed that point.

  161. @J.Ross
    @anonymous

    China:
    1 Totalitarian.
    2 Ethnically homogeneous.
    3 Masters of huge instant infrastructure projects.
    4 Densely concentrated urban populations,
    5 needing to travel short daily distances.
    6 Okay with generating electricity with nuclear power or coal (or the burning bodies of dissident students).
    7 Cannot be trusted with a real engine.
    Yes, China, you get electric cars. Electric cars were pretty much designed specifically for Chinese drivers.
    You, the Minnesotan, the Montanan, the Australian, the Saffa, for you the electric car is a toy. For the Chinese it actually makes enormous sense.
    In America, where we have
    1 Freedom or its whiff.
    2 Diversity-related security anxieties.
    3 No ability to do basic infrastructure since German labor was last cheap.
    4 Cities but also really a smear between the city and the country
    5 (and lots of country).
    6 And we're really not okay with the idea of energy coming from somewhere, even if it's petroleum, let alone nuclear.
    7 And we invented real engines and everything you can do with them.
    America has no use for the current iteration of electric cars. Electric cars are more or less appropriate to different societies depending on where they fall along these criteria.

    Replies: @Anon7

    “And we invented real engines and everything you can do with them. America has no use for the current iteration of electric cars. Electric cars are more or less appropriate to different societies depending on where they fall along these criteria.”

    My five year-old Tesla Model S develops 518 horsepower with its two small electric engines and big battery, the power being applied instantly (no transmission, no gears to shift) to big asymmetrical tires with all-wheel drive, virtually eliminating slipping; it has the lowest center of gravity and the lowest drag coefficient of any production car. And I didn’t even get the really zippy model, the one that develops 1,000 horsepower and 0-60 in less than two seconds.

    And NO I don’t believe in Catastrophic Human-Caused Global Warming, NO I don’t believe that storms are getting worse, NO I didn’t vote for Biden, NO I don’t really care about more CO2, NO NO NO.

    It’s a hot car. You’re wrong about that part.

  162. @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area. My wife grew up in a postwar "Levittown" style suburb in a former farm field just outside the city limits where the 1,500 sf house had 1 bathroom (for 5 people) and no central air conditioning but it did have a (single car) garage. Recently we went back to the "old neighborhood" and the houses are remarkably unchanged although there is usually central air now. I looked at the most recent sales listing for her house and they had managed to tuck another bathroom in.

    Even some of the postwar row houses in Northeast Philly have an alley and garages in the back or sometimes even the front. Sometimes there are twin houses and the garage is a separate structure in the back.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new). And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ - again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    Replies: @Liza, @John Johnson, @Alfa158

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area.

    It might depend on the area. I am talking about neighborhoods in West Coast cities, some of which were actually designed around trollies. Some people have no idea that their neighborhood was once on a trolly line. A lot of those neighborhoods were laid out logically in that the trolly would go all the way down them and turn around. So no need for a garage.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new).

    I figured but I can’t imagine having a family and no second toilet. I would have built one. In fact I have been to older homes where they had converted a mud room to a toilet/sink combo. Those 40s/50s mud rooms are normally unused anyways and tend to smell.

    And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ – again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    I don’t doubt that cost was a factor but there is a lot of Victorian influence in those homes. They’ll have a dozen small drawers instead of 4 large ones. A lot of unnecessary arches and masonry. Victorian windows that certainly cost more than square ones. It’s all very weird. In the more frontier areas of America you will find cabins built by a single person that have two bathrooms. So I’m guessing there was also a fancy living housing trend at the time that didn’t prioritize bathrooms.

    • Replies: @Ben Kurtz
    @John Johnson

    Re: Family quarters w/o second toilet.

    Chamber pots.

    , @Liza
    @John Johnson

    Re bathrooms. You can get away with one bathroom if the toilet is in another little room, all by itself. So if someone is hogging the bathtub/shower and/or the sink, you have a place to "go" instead of rapping on the bathroom door and shouting for the occupant to get out.

    Replies: @Rob McX

  163. @Steve Sailer
    @B36

    A friend of mine made a wonderful bet in 2000 with another friend that on New Year's Eve 2025, they will be able to order a self-driving cab to take them out to dinner in Santa Monica. After 20 years of optimism, he now expects to lose his bet.

    Replies: @danindc, @Cave Johnson, @turtle, @Anon7, @Jack D

    I bought “Full Self-Driving” for $3K with my Tesla in 2017. I usually own cars for about a decade; Musk has five years to go. We’ll see if my “bet” pays off.

    Unless someone figures out how to explain what we humans see as the external world to machines, autonomous computer driving in the real world is probably a problem that can’t be solved. In my opinion, the only chance that your friend realistically has is if a community decides to meet autonomous cars halfway, like the Graffiti text symbols let us write “letters” easily translated into English by a Palm Pilot years ago.

    The simplest autonomous car is an elevator; you just need to extend the basic principle to the roads in your community. They won’t need to run on tracks, but the lane and intersection markings will need to be freshly painted and perfect. I don’t think cars driven by people will be permitted to share those roads, humans are too unpredictable.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    Safe autonomous driving on I-5 through the Central Valley seems pretty doable.

    Replies: @Anon7

  164. @Jack D
    @JR Ewing

    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car? What if only people with special permission from the government (let's call it a "driver's license") were allowed to drive? What if not just any CAR could drive down the street but only cars where the owner had received a specially issued plaque from the government (we could call it a "license plate") which they would have to display in order even to drive to church on Sunday. Surely then America would be a dystopian hellhole of a sort seen only in science fiction movies.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it's not an issue.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @mc23

    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car?

    The government saying one thing, and the reality on the road, are two different things.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it’s not an issue.

    You ignored/missed his point. Physical possession (barring a remote ‘kill switch’ from an outside actor, like OnStar) means exclusive, immediate use by the owner for whatever reason. But if you need it and don’t have it, like with guns, you are stuck. Multiply this beyond the individual, and what was widespread (and hard to prohibit) self-directed personal mobility for millions will be much easier for a central authority to shut down (targeting individuals or masses or geographical areas). Not good.

    • Agree: mc23
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Keep a dirt bike or a quad for when the shtf. Your can't let the tail wag the dog or structure your whole existence around less than 1 percent probability black swan events.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  165. @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno's generation. What you see as a "personal vehicle" someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people's cars for generations now. The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport). It's not perfect but it works reasonably well. I'm sure that when Mr. Hertz proposed the idea of rental cars people also told him it was impossible, that no one would want to rent a car, etc. You can always find 1,000 reasons for never changing anything - it takes imagination to see a future that is different than the present. Sometimes imagination can go too far (people have been talking about flying cars for a century) but sometimes you have to ignore the naysayers or you'll never get anything done.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Corvinus, @clifford brown, @James B. Shearer

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation. What you see as a “personal vehicle” someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    You are right that there is less interest in cars as a hobby.

    But a lot of car sharing companies have gone belly up. When I was in the city there was always one being advertised.

    Car sharing makes sense until you realize that everyone wants to take off for labor day, go home for Christmas, shop on Sunday, etc.

    Cars represent freedom. You can always just get in one and go.

    The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport).

    How many times have you actually gotten the car you ordered? I usually get the luxo model just because I know damn well the mid level won’t be there. It’s aways the 2 door mouse car, a mini van or a luxury car or suv. It isn’t by chance. That is in fact the business model. If they had a car lot of sedans then they wouldn’t make as much money. They make their money by getting White guys to upgrade to the luxury sedan. That is the unspoken model. Get the White guy to upgrade. I am that White guy. I’ve been to the car desk many times and am fully aware of it. Just give me my luxury sedan and let me get out of here.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @John Johnson


    Cars represent freedom.
     
    The freedom to make regular monthly payments!


    You can always just get in one and go.

    And go sit in a traffic jam.

    Hell, you could even take your SUV off road. No one actually ever DOES , but you COULD if you wanted to!

    It's really amazing to what extent people respond to this kind of romantic brainwashing without thinking about the REALITY of car ownership (such as the 40,000 people who die in car crashes every year). But the thing about romantic brainwashing is that each generation has its own bullshit and is immune to the other generation's bullshit. Maybe to your grandpa cigarettes meant the Marlboro Man riding a horse on the open range but you see right thru that - cigarettes are just little paper tubes that represent death. The American car industry kept the illusion going for a century but at some point the Jedi mind tricks no longer work.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @John Johnson

  166. @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno's generation. What you see as a "personal vehicle" someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people's cars for generations now. The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport). It's not perfect but it works reasonably well. I'm sure that when Mr. Hertz proposed the idea of rental cars people also told him it was impossible, that no one would want to rent a car, etc. You can always find 1,000 reasons for never changing anything - it takes imagination to see a future that is different than the present. Sometimes imagination can go too far (people have been talking about flying cars for a century) but sometimes you have to ignore the naysayers or you'll never get anything done.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Corvinus, @clifford brown, @James B. Shearer

    “Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation.”

    Try again.

    https://www.thedrive.com/news/35536/generation-z-wants-to-keep-classic-cars-alive-but-theres-a-lot-working-against-them

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1129921_survey-says-millennials-and-gen-z-care-about-classic-cars-after-all

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Corvinus


    One quarter of Millennials surveyed said they owned a classic car, as did 22% of Gen Zers surveyed.
     
    I call bullshit. Unless somehow a rattly old 2001 Prius is a "classic car".

    Replies: @John Johnson

    , @Anonymous
    @Corvinus

    I'm a millennial and love classic cars. My favorite is a 1959 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer Super D-500 convertible. How can you not love it with a name like that? The one I drive belonged to my grandmother. My father and brothers restored it to original condition a few years ago. They installed a detachable audio system and I love playing gran's favorites while I tool along the backroads. I live in the country now and there's hardly any traffic -- I can drive for an hour and never see another car. The 383CID V-8, which the men had blue-printed, shot-peened, ported and polished, produces almost 400 hp and the amount of torque it delivers is unbelievable.
    When I'm driving it and listening to the tunes popular when my grandfather bought it for gran, I can totally forget this horrible world we live in now and that I hate so much. Please God, make it be 1959 again.

    https://i.imgur.com/HVPeJda.jpg

    https://youtu.be/cv8CZHRlLUQ

  167. OT — We live in the age of saying the quiet part out loud — Radek Sikorski (MEP and husband to “American” anti-Russian author Anne Appelbaum) has thanked the United States on Twitter, after the apparent fulfilment of Joseph Biden’s February 7th threat to sabotage NordStream 2, as punishment for the invasion of Ukraine (note: Germany has not invaded the Ukraine [this time]). He then goes on to tweet that there’s no shortage of pipelines. Poland just opened their own, coincidentally. The whole point of NS2 is it’s direct from Russia and can’t be cut off every time Ukraine or Poland get angry. Sikorski concluded by demanding cured ham and custard-filled crispy pastry tubes, while chanting “Badabing!” and “Ayyyyyyy!”

  168. @Reg Cæsar
    @PiltdownMan

    Google Lens-- which I never heard of until now-- won't tell me where that is, but here is a matching kindergarten Kindergarten in Karlsruhe, co-designed by Tomi Ungerer:


    https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5cd63bbc2400005900727479.jpeg


    Kindergarten Wolfartsweier

    Replies: @noname, @PiltdownMan

    It’s in Tirau, New Zealand, and it stands by a couple of sheep who give it the side eye.

  169. As one who was growing up in the fifties, I can recall all the great technological marvels that were predicted, so I guess electric cars are something. Still, we were promised flying cars, not negroes.

  170. @Mr. Anon
    You're taking the EV boosters at their word, Steve. Big mistake.

    They don't mean for everybody to have an electric vehicle. They mean for the well healed to have an EV or two, or three, plus maybe a Land Rover. The hoi-polloi will do without any personal transportation at all; they will be steered into public transit.

    The Green New Deal isn't about the Environment. It's about imposing austerity on the masses.

    You will own nothing, and you will be happy (if you know what's good for you!).

    Replies: @Travis, @Hannah Katz, @Harry Baldwin, @Coemgen, @Alfa158, @Peter Akuleyev, @mc23

    “Austerity for the masses”, absolutely, Marx’s labor theory of value s so 19th century.

    The great reset, to paraphrase Si-Fi writer Neal Stephenson, is about an economy where there’s a “broad global layer of what a Pakistani bricklayer would consider prosperity.”

    Which means the leaders of our global fascist oligarchic leadership don’t have to worry about how resource depletion affects them

  171. @Jack D
    @JR Ewing

    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car? What if only people with special permission from the government (let's call it a "driver's license") were allowed to drive? What if not just any CAR could drive down the street but only cars where the owner had received a specially issued plaque from the government (we could call it a "license plate") which they would have to display in order even to drive to church on Sunday. Surely then America would be a dystopian hellhole of a sort seen only in science fiction movies.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it's not an issue.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @mc23

    Strawman argument

  172. @Corvinus
    @Jack D

    “Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation.”

    Try again.

    https://www.thedrive.com/news/35536/generation-z-wants-to-keep-classic-cars-alive-but-theres-a-lot-working-against-them

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1129921_survey-says-millennials-and-gen-z-care-about-classic-cars-after-all

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    One quarter of Millennials surveyed said they owned a classic car, as did 22% of Gen Zers surveyed.

    I call bullshit. Unless somehow a rattly old 2001 Prius is a “classic car”.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Jack D


    One quarter of Millennials surveyed said they owned a classic car, as did 22% of Gen Zers surveyed.
     
    I call bullshit. Unless somehow a rattly old 2001 Prius is a “classic car”.

    More like a 1996 subaru outback with a bluetooth speaker in the console.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live

  173. @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation. What you see as a “personal vehicle” someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    You are right that there is less interest in cars as a hobby.

    But a lot of car sharing companies have gone belly up. When I was in the city there was always one being advertised.

    Car sharing makes sense until you realize that everyone wants to take off for labor day, go home for Christmas, shop on Sunday, etc.

    Cars represent freedom. You can always just get in one and go.

    The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport).

    How many times have you actually gotten the car you ordered? I usually get the luxo model just because I know damn well the mid level won't be there. It's aways the 2 door mouse car, a mini van or a luxury car or suv. It isn't by chance. That is in fact the business model. If they had a car lot of sedans then they wouldn't make as much money. They make their money by getting White guys to upgrade to the luxury sedan. That is the unspoken model. Get the White guy to upgrade. I am that White guy. I've been to the car desk many times and am fully aware of it. Just give me my luxury sedan and let me get out of here.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Cars represent freedom.

    The freedom to make regular monthly payments!

    You can always just get in one and go.

    And go sit in a traffic jam.

    Hell, you could even take your SUV off road. No one actually ever DOES , but you COULD if you wanted to!

    It’s really amazing to what extent people respond to this kind of romantic brainwashing without thinking about the REALITY of car ownership (such as the 40,000 people who die in car crashes every year). But the thing about romantic brainwashing is that each generation has its own bullshit and is immune to the other generation’s bullshit. Maybe to your grandpa cigarettes meant the Marlboro Man riding a horse on the open range but you see right thru that – cigarettes are just little paper tubes that represent death. The American car industry kept the illusion going for a century but at some point the Jedi mind tricks no longer work.

    • Replies: @clifford brown
    @Jack D

    Brainwashing or the reality of the American built environment? How do you get to Hertz from your house to pick up your car?

    , @John Johnson
    @Jack D


    Cars represent freedom.

     

    The freedom to make regular monthly payments!

    You can always just get in one and go

    I've done the city thing. As in walk everywhere.

    Kind of exciting for a while but then walking by the same hobos everyday in diesel exhaust and car horns gets old.

    Would much rather take a drive on Route 66.

    I own my cars outright so I'm not making payments. My insurance is lower than my internet bill.

    It’s really amazing to what extent people respond to this kind of romantic brainwashing without thinking about the REALITY of car ownership (such as the 40,000 people who die in car crashes every year).

    Romantic brainwashing? When I was in the city I didn't have cable.

    If anything city living is TV bullshit. It's far less interesting compared to how it is depicted on television. For one you are surrounded by soulless liberal drones that are completely full of s--t. Most of them in fact don't go on public transit or even walk to the market. All my liberal neighbors would drive less than a mile to get their groceries. Liberals are far more interesting on television. Liberal women in real life are a major disappointment.

    Urban living on TV is all a mirage. Most people in the city are boring, bitter liberals and don't really care to discuss something like cars. They just want to be told the latest trend to follow in order to feel progressive. If you asked if they support transit they would say OF COURSE and then drive 6 blocks to yoga where they wait 15 minutes to park. That is your typical urban liberal.

  174. @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area.

    It might depend on the area. I am talking about neighborhoods in West Coast cities, some of which were actually designed around trollies. Some people have no idea that their neighborhood was once on a trolly line. A lot of those neighborhoods were laid out logically in that the trolly would go all the way down them and turn around. So no need for a garage.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new).

    I figured but I can't imagine having a family and no second toilet. I would have built one. In fact I have been to older homes where they had converted a mud room to a toilet/sink combo. Those 40s/50s mud rooms are normally unused anyways and tend to smell.

    And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ – again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    I don't doubt that cost was a factor but there is a lot of Victorian influence in those homes. They'll have a dozen small drawers instead of 4 large ones. A lot of unnecessary arches and masonry. Victorian windows that certainly cost more than square ones. It's all very weird. In the more frontier areas of America you will find cabins built by a single person that have two bathrooms. So I'm guessing there was also a fancy living housing trend at the time that didn't prioritize bathrooms.

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @Liza

    Re: Family quarters w/o second toilet.

    Chamber pots.

  175. @AnotherDad
    @James N. Kennett


    Like it or not, hydrocarbons are in many ways the most convenient fuel for use in transportation.
     
    The quite reasonable solution for flexibility is methanol.

    -- Flex-fuel engines that can burn any combination of gasoline, ethanol, methanol down to say 15% gasoline.

    -- Methanol can be made easily from natural gas (converted to syngas). Or later make from organics through destructive distillation to get the gas. Or if you've gone nuclear, electolysis and CO2 capture.

    Methanol gives you only about half the punch of gasoline. But bigger fuel tanks aren't a ball breaker.

    And in "other uses", you can do methanol fuel cells, though obviously more efficient if already have electricity from your nuke to use that directly.

    Replies: @Travis

    why burn methanol or ethanol when gasoline is more costly ? Not only does ethanol cost more than gasoline, it far worse for your engine. Ethanol is a hygroscopic chemical, which means it attracts water. Gasoline with a high ethanol content will also have a high moisture content. This is bad news for almost every component in your car. Contaminated fuel can cause anything from clogged fuel lines to cracked cylinder heads. Ethanol is a much stronger solvent than gasoline. It also attracts moisture. Can you think of a component in your fuel system that’s vulnerable to solvents and shouldn’t dry out? That’s right, your seals and gaskets.

    In addition to costing more and being bad for your car E-85 yields lower fuel mileage than regular gasoline. Consumer Reports found mileage for E85 to be up to 25% lower mileage while Car and Driver found the difference reached as high as 30% for E85.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Travis

    You forgot the biggie ( Or were too kind to mention it, lest you be accused of rightly calling your interlocutor a dipshit.) The production of Ethanol requires more energy than the Ethanol provides,)

  176. @Jack D
    @John Johnson


    Cars represent freedom.
     
    The freedom to make regular monthly payments!


    You can always just get in one and go.

    And go sit in a traffic jam.

    Hell, you could even take your SUV off road. No one actually ever DOES , but you COULD if you wanted to!

    It's really amazing to what extent people respond to this kind of romantic brainwashing without thinking about the REALITY of car ownership (such as the 40,000 people who die in car crashes every year). But the thing about romantic brainwashing is that each generation has its own bullshit and is immune to the other generation's bullshit. Maybe to your grandpa cigarettes meant the Marlboro Man riding a horse on the open range but you see right thru that - cigarettes are just little paper tubes that represent death. The American car industry kept the illusion going for a century but at some point the Jedi mind tricks no longer work.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @John Johnson

    Brainwashing or the reality of the American built environment? How do you get to Hertz from your house to pick up your car?

  177. @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno's generation. What you see as a "personal vehicle" someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people's cars for generations now. The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport). It's not perfect but it works reasonably well. I'm sure that when Mr. Hertz proposed the idea of rental cars people also told him it was impossible, that no one would want to rent a car, etc. You can always find 1,000 reasons for never changing anything - it takes imagination to see a future that is different than the present. Sometimes imagination can go too far (people have been talking about flying cars for a century) but sometimes you have to ignore the naysayers or you'll never get anything done.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Corvinus, @clifford brown, @James B. Shearer

    Maybe we can just get around on rollerblades.

    I honestly read this and assumed it was written by a European who might not be familiar with the United States. This is your craziest take yet! Car ownership is declining, but car ownership is still critical to the lives of most Americans.

    If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    No, you get in your car and drive to the supermarket.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @clifford brown

    During Covid I didn't set foot in a supermarket for over a year and yet I had milk in my fridge. How was this possible?

    Replies: @Polistra

  178. @JR Ewing
    @Erik Sieven


    Maybe power stations at the place of former common gas stations will be the solution for EV´s anyway.
     
    Not sure if you mean "charging stations" or "power plants" but neither one will do squat to fix the problem of charging infrastructure.

    If you mean "power plants" then you still need more wires and transformers and the like to carry the extra demand for electricity to the charging stations themselves, whether they are in people's garages or on the street.

    If you mean "charging stations" then replacing current gas stations will do nothing but create big parking lots, because it still takes 30-60 minutes with the fastest chargers and batteries and even significantly more time with the less efficient but more common equipment. There is no 5 minute "in and out" like there is with gasoline stations.

    Hydrogen stations would provide a similar type of quick fill like gasoline for what is essentially the same ZEV profile, but hydrogen infrastructure and production is even further behind battery electric and there are even fewer fuel cell vehicles.

    Point is, like the proverbial dollar on the sidewalk, these types of technologies and solutions would develop on their own if they was sufficient demand and financial incentive to put them in. Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that's what we have.

    Replies: @turtle, @Reg Cæsar, @blake121666

    Nio has largely automated “battery swap” stations. Look it up, it’s quite interesting.

  179. @James B. Shearer
    @danindc

    "... If not, what is holding this up?"

    The main problem is there are too many rare events (which collectively add up) where people can mostly figure out what to do but autonomous cars currently can't unless they have been specifically programmed to handle them and there are too many rare situations to program them all in individually. Things like a cop directing traffic around a pothole repair crew.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @Jack D

    You can get away with driving on autopilot most of the time, but that 1% of the time when you have to react in real time to an unexpected situation is what makes all the difference.

    I remember early on the Google autonomous cars could not predict the obnoxious aggressive driving of city bus drivers.

  180. As a reply here to another comment I mentioned Nio’s “battery swap” architecture. Look it up. No problemo to simply swap batteries in a mostly automated type way. No need for the end-user to have to charge batteries if he doesn’t want to – just swap the old one out for a fresh one.

  181. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    What if the government said that not just anyone could drive a car on the publicly owned street even if you own the car?
     
    The government saying one thing, and the reality on the road, are two different things.

    Oh, wait, never mind we already have that and it’s not an issue.
     
    You ignored/missed his point. Physical possession (barring a remote ‘kill switch’ from an outside actor, like OnStar) means exclusive, immediate use by the owner for whatever reason. But if you need it and don’t have it, like with guns, you are stuck. Multiply this beyond the individual, and what was widespread (and hard to prohibit) self-directed personal mobility for millions will be much easier for a central authority to shut down (targeting individuals or masses or geographical areas). Not good.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Keep a dirt bike or a quad for when the shtf. Your can’t let the tail wag the dog or structure your whole existence around less than 1 percent probability black swan events.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    Your can’t … structure your whole existence around less than 1 percent probability black swan events
     
    “Less than 1 percent” (assuming .99 percent is possible) is a pretty high probability for black swan events.

    Do you consider the Holocaust to be a black swan event? Maybe all the Holocaust movies, media, education, and museums have made people paranoid and less willing to unnecessarily cede individual and mass physical control to centralized authorities, be they state or corporate.


    Keep a dirt bike or a quad for when the shtf.
     
    Cars and (light) trucks are much better. Can carry far more people (protected from the elements) and stuff (out of view). Also, you can sleep in an enclosed vehicle if necessary. Not so much on a dirt bike.
  182. @Steve Sailer
    @B36

    A friend of mine made a wonderful bet in 2000 with another friend that on New Year's Eve 2025, they will be able to order a self-driving cab to take them out to dinner in Santa Monica. After 20 years of optimism, he now expects to lose his bet.

    Replies: @danindc, @Cave Johnson, @turtle, @Anon7, @Jack D

    Well if they move their dinner to SF it can probably happen.

  183. @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    I bought "Full Self-Driving" for $3K with my Tesla in 2017. I usually own cars for about a decade; Musk has five years to go. We'll see if my "bet" pays off.

    Unless someone figures out how to explain what we humans see as the external world to machines, autonomous computer driving in the real world is probably a problem that can't be solved. In my opinion, the only chance that your friend realistically has is if a community decides to meet autonomous cars halfway, like the Graffiti text symbols let us write "letters" easily translated into English by a Palm Pilot years ago.

    The simplest autonomous car is an elevator; you just need to extend the basic principle to the roads in your community. They won't need to run on tracks, but the lane and intersection markings will need to be freshly painted and perfect. I don't think cars driven by people will be permitted to share those roads, humans are too unpredictable.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Safe autonomous driving on I-5 through the Central Valley seems pretty doable.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    Tesla is somewhat handicapped by Elon Musk’s famous Hard Road strategy, which means that you put all your effort into solving the general tough problem (Level 5 autonomy), rather than some sort of subset (like safely driving on the I-5 through the Central Valley).

    Tesla’s Navigate on Autopilot could probably handle the I-5 now, but it’s not true Level 5 autonomy.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  184. @Anon7
    The most recent counter-intuitive studies have suggested that charging infrastructure be constructed at work and not at home, which is considered the preferred strategy of charging today.

    The reason is that it is believed that more and more electricity will be generated by solar, which of course generates power during the day rather than at night. So, the extra dividend of this source will be used up by commuters who charge at work during the day, rather than running power plants to charge people's cars at home at night.

    And so, apartment dwellers won't need to figure out how to talk their landlords into investing in charging infrastructure.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right. The ideal would be to be able to fully charge your car at work from say 9am to noon, when much solar power is being generated (speaking from a Southern California viewpoint) but there’s little demand for air conditioning yet.

  185. @James B. Shearer
    @danindc

    "... If not, what is holding this up?"

    The main problem is there are too many rare events (which collectively add up) where people can mostly figure out what to do but autonomous cars currently can't unless they have been specifically programmed to handle them and there are too many rare situations to program them all in individually. Things like a cop directing traffic around a pothole repair crew.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @Jack D

    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too. Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Jack D


    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.
     
    Computers are able to beat people at chess because chess pieces are only able to move in defined, predictable ways.

    Computers, in effect, take all of these logical, known combinations of moves and predict the best way to move. But this is not a matter of computers thinking so much as it is mapping out millions of predictable, defined moves.

    People and cars, alas, do not move like chess pieces.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too.

     

    When a pedestrian thoughtlessly steps off a curb directly into traffic, what model is he following? What about mattresses lying in the roadway? A child's ball that has just rolled into the roadway?

    Human behaviour is frequently random and unpredictable. Computers do not tend to cope well with randomness and unpredictability.

    While it is amazing what AI can do at present, we tend to overlook that there is a great deal that it still cannot do. Making predictions related to out-of-the-blue events is something AI is notoriously inadequate at doing.

    Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.
     
    Having a large data set and making inferences from it is one thing. Recognising and predicting events from an data set that will likely remain forever incomplete is quite another.

    At present, the expectation that cars will drive themselves is the triumph of hope over experience. Will that change someday? Perhaps, but I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see it.

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jim Don Bob

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Jack D

    "They will solve this with AI. .."

    Maybe, but it is currently beyond the state of the art and requires a breakthrough or two. It could happen quickly, playing high level go was beyond the state of the art for quite a while but then there were two breakthroughs first Monte Carlo tree search and then deep neural nets. Combined with incremental improvements in computer power this allowed computer go programs to get better rapidly and they now play at superhuman levels. Something similar could happen with self-driving cars. But the timing of breakthroughs is unpredictable. The problem may prove to be hard like for example fusion power.

    , @anon
    @Jack D

    I agree. AI is already better than humans at many tasks, such as reading medical images or playing games. And given the (lack of) skills and attention in many human drivers, AI will have superior capabilities.
    The problem with autonomous driving isn't capability, it's the lack of autonomy for the individual being driven. It's great when your car is driving you to your destination while you play with your phone or nap. It's no so great when authorities decide that you are not allowed to go there, or that you should be driven somewhere else, e.g., jail or a "quarantine camp". You won't be able to unplug HAL in your car or even get out.

  186. @Jack D
    @John Johnson


    Cars represent freedom.
     
    The freedom to make regular monthly payments!


    You can always just get in one and go.

    And go sit in a traffic jam.

    Hell, you could even take your SUV off road. No one actually ever DOES , but you COULD if you wanted to!

    It's really amazing to what extent people respond to this kind of romantic brainwashing without thinking about the REALITY of car ownership (such as the 40,000 people who die in car crashes every year). But the thing about romantic brainwashing is that each generation has its own bullshit and is immune to the other generation's bullshit. Maybe to your grandpa cigarettes meant the Marlboro Man riding a horse on the open range but you see right thru that - cigarettes are just little paper tubes that represent death. The American car industry kept the illusion going for a century but at some point the Jedi mind tricks no longer work.

    Replies: @clifford brown, @John Johnson

    Cars represent freedom.

    The freedom to make regular monthly payments!

    You can always just get in one and go

    I’ve done the city thing. As in walk everywhere.

    Kind of exciting for a while but then walking by the same hobos everyday in diesel exhaust and car horns gets old.

    Would much rather take a drive on Route 66.

    I own my cars outright so I’m not making payments. My insurance is lower than my internet bill.

    It’s really amazing to what extent people respond to this kind of romantic brainwashing without thinking about the REALITY of car ownership (such as the 40,000 people who die in car crashes every year).

    Romantic brainwashing? When I was in the city I didn’t have cable.

    If anything city living is TV bullshit. It’s far less interesting compared to how it is depicted on television. For one you are surrounded by soulless liberal drones that are completely full of s–t. Most of them in fact don’t go on public transit or even walk to the market. All my liberal neighbors would drive less than a mile to get their groceries. Liberals are far more interesting on television. Liberal women in real life are a major disappointment.

    Urban living on TV is all a mirage. Most people in the city are boring, bitter liberals and don’t really care to discuss something like cars. They just want to be told the latest trend to follow in order to feel progressive. If you asked if they support transit they would say OF COURSE and then drive 6 blocks to yoga where they wait 15 minutes to park. That is your typical urban liberal.

    • Agree: Pixo, anarchyst
  187. @Jack D
    @Corvinus


    One quarter of Millennials surveyed said they owned a classic car, as did 22% of Gen Zers surveyed.
     
    I call bullshit. Unless somehow a rattly old 2001 Prius is a "classic car".

    Replies: @John Johnson

    One quarter of Millennials surveyed said they owned a classic car, as did 22% of Gen Zers surveyed.

    I call bullshit. Unless somehow a rattly old 2001 Prius is a “classic car”.

    More like a 1996 subaru outback with a bluetooth speaker in the console.

    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    @John Johnson

    A few months back I saw a 96 Subaru impreza with a Minidisc stereo, I was so tempted

    Sony are working on an EV, if they include a Mindisc player, I just don't think I could resist

  188. @Inquiring Mind
    @Cave Johnson

    Cleaned?

    Like where I work, where users of the bathroom don't flush much of the time?

    Replies: @Cave Johnson

    Think of this like a rental car situation, except minus “return with a full tank”.

  189. @John Johnson
    @Jack D


    One quarter of Millennials surveyed said they owned a classic car, as did 22% of Gen Zers surveyed.
     
    I call bullshit. Unless somehow a rattly old 2001 Prius is a “classic car”.

    More like a 1996 subaru outback with a bluetooth speaker in the console.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live

    A few months back I saw a 96 Subaru impreza with a Minidisc stereo, I was so tempted

    Sony are working on an EV, if they include a Mindisc player, I just don’t think I could resist

  190. @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    @Steve Sailer

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    I live in the downtown area of one of the ten most populous metro areas in the country and ride an EUC. Mine has a top speed of around 45 MPH.

    They're immensely convenient (never have to worry about parking) and also riding one is the most fun I've ever had with my clothes on.

    Since they're the greatest thing since sliced bread, I'm sure they'll be banned soon. America's government is an anarcho-tyranncal Karenocracy, a veritable photonegative of an ideal government, where everything that is cool is banned and everything that sucks is mandatory.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukVjXFIOdvs

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @duncsbaby

    They caught a Hispanic man who was riding a one-wheel motorized skateboard feeling up woman in the Chicago South Loop.

    Suspect Charged With Sexual Assault After Allegedly Groping Multiple Women in Downtown Chicago

    https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/chicago-police-questioning-person-of-interest-after-multiple-woman-say-man-on-electric-skateboard-groped-them/2914442/

    • Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    @Joe Stalin

    People use getaway cars in bank robberies. Let's ban cars, too.

  191. @Allain
    In the year 2035:

    Center dash screen displays the emblem of Homeland Security. A harsh voice growls, "Attention citizen, you have exceeded your monthly mileage allowance. A fine will be automatically deducted from your credit card of record and deposited into the new vehicle purchase fund for indigent and immigrant drivers. Because this is your third offense, your vehicle will be disabled in one hour or in twenty miles travel, whichever comes first. Reactivation will require a hearing before a Traffic Magistrate. The balance of your mileage allowance may be forfeited and credited to the mileage subsidy pool for indigent and immigrant drivers."

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Zager and Evans never dreamed of anything like that.

  192. @Pixo
    @PiltdownMan

    That was tried and failed.

    California passed a huge swappable battery subsidy, Tesla took it, and then never delivered on it or returned the money. It did the same thing in NY State, promising to build a huge factory with a lot of manufacturing employees in Buffalo, taking the money and keeping it when it failed to deliver on the subsidy conditions. The factory was built, but it never scaled up production or hired many people.

    All in, Tesla has received about $30 billion in government subsidies to make Elon Musk the world’s richest man.

    Replies: @prosa123, @Nervous in Stalingrad

    All in, Tesla has received about $30 billion in government subsidies to make Elon Musk the world’s richest man.

    From what I understand, Tesla’s success has hinged largely, if not entirely, on tax credits.

    It will be interesting to see whether Tesla will be able to survive without these credits, which I believe have either run out or will do in the next year or two.

    People point to Tesla as a success, but a large part of their success has been based on gaming the system. I am not sure if this is replicable for other firms looking to get into the car business.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  193. @HammerJack
    @YetAnotherAnon


    There’s a US fleet in the Eastern Baltic
     
    Well of course there is. Our country's vital interests are at stake there. As they are everywhere else on earth.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Our country’s vital interests are at stake there. As they are everywhere else on earth.

    Everywhere except the Southern border, that is.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  194. @clifford brown
    @Jack D

    Maybe we can just get around on rollerblades.

    I honestly read this and assumed it was written by a European who might not be familiar with the United States. This is your craziest take yet! Car ownership is declining, but car ownership is still critical to the lives of most Americans.


    If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?
     
    No, you get in your car and drive to the supermarket.

    Replies: @Jack D

    During Covid I didn’t set foot in a supermarket for over a year and yet I had milk in my fridge. How was this possible?

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Jack D


    During Covid I didn’t set foot in a supermarket for over a year and yet I had milk in my fridge. How was this possible?
     
    You're married and your wife does the shopping?

    Replies: @Brutusale

  195. @Reg Cæsar
    @JR Ewing


    Right now, nothing beats the convenience and efficiency of gasoline, so that’s what we have.
     
    Chain saws, though, are increasingly electric. These just have to be scaled up.

    Completely OT, if you've ever wondered what Elvis, Freddie, and others would look like today...

    https://americansongwriter.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Elvis-by-AlperYesiltas.jpg?w=1500

    https://americansongwriter.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Freddie-Mercury-by-AlperYesiltas.jpg?w=1347

    The king looks downright presidential.


    https://americansongwriter.com/ai-artist-imagines-what-elvis-presley-john-lennon-freddie-mercury-and-other-musical-icons-would-look-like-today/

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Not very realistic. Elvis looks like a 60-year-old Mormon who’s never touched alcohol or drugs and is in bed by 10 every night. All those, uppers, downers and hamburgers would have taken their toll. Same goes for Freddie, plus he could well have monkeypox by now.

    • Agree: Pixo
  196. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    Safe autonomous driving on I-5 through the Central Valley seems pretty doable.

    Replies: @Anon7

    Tesla is somewhat handicapped by Elon Musk’s famous Hard Road strategy, which means that you put all your effort into solving the general tough problem (Level 5 autonomy), rather than some sort of subset (like safely driving on the I-5 through the Central Valley).

    Tesla’s Navigate on Autopilot could probably handle the I-5 now, but it’s not true Level 5 autonomy.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    I-5 in the Central Valley of California was constructed with room to add 4 more lanes for 206 miles.

  197. @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area. My wife grew up in a postwar "Levittown" style suburb in a former farm field just outside the city limits where the 1,500 sf house had 1 bathroom (for 5 people) and no central air conditioning but it did have a (single car) garage. Recently we went back to the "old neighborhood" and the houses are remarkably unchanged although there is usually central air now. I looked at the most recent sales listing for her house and they had managed to tuck another bathroom in.

    Even some of the postwar row houses in Northeast Philly have an alley and garages in the back or sometimes even the front. Sometimes there are twin houses and the garage is a separate structure in the back.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new). And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ - again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    Replies: @Liza, @John Johnson, @Alfa158

    Back in the old days, people just didn’t have much, so they didn’t need much house to hold it all. I live in a GI War Bride house built the year I was born. It was originally 1,000 square feet with three bedrooms and one bath. The closet in the main bedroom was four feet wide, more than enough space for Mom and Dad’s small number of dresses, suits and casual clothes. The garage is smaller than today’s standard 20’ by 20’ but it was still big enough to fit the family 1940 Ford with room left over for the push mower. Mom didn’t usually go to work and almost anything you bought was made by fellow Americans who got paid roughly as much as you did, so few people could really afford the tons of clothes, appliances,power tools, electronics, cars, knickknacks and multiple autos people can today. There was a family radio and/or TV because they cost a fortune in today’s dollars.
    The house was expanded in the 60’s boom to 1500 square feet, a new 10 foot closet was added to the master bedroom and two more bathrooms were added. The house is in Whitopia Beach so it would probably go for 1.7M even with today’s interest rates, but I’m buggered if I can figure out who can still afford these places now that we appear to be on the downslope.

  198. @Jack D
    @Old Bad Nurse

    It's rarely a good idea to make static linear assumptions. In the 1930s someone calculated that the Bank of America would eventually need to hire the entire population of California to do their bookkeeping. Then the computer was invented so that never happened.

    It's impossible that a single battery takes 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel just to mine the nickel and lithium. People throw these dumb numbers around without stopping to think if they meet the smell test. These numbers get put out by environmental hacks who have zero understanding of business and couldn't run a lemonade stand. Do a little back of the envelope math first. Diesel fuel is currently around $5/gallon so if this was true then the vehicle battery alone would cost $50,000 just to recover the fuel cost, but the full retail price of a battery is more like $20K and this includes all labor and material costs and profit and not just the fuel component.

    A typical vehicle battery has 25 pounds of lithium @ $30/lb. ($750) and 60 pounds of nickel @ $10/lb. ($600), so $1,350 total for these two metals. If you had to spend $50,000 of just diesel fuel mining $1,350 worth of metal you would go broke REAL fast.

    10,000 gals. is a completely bogus # and even if it was true now (which it isn't) it wouldn't necessarily stay that way in the future.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @Adam Smith

    Greetings, Mr. D. I truly hope this message finds you well. 🕊️

    I think Mr. del Blanco meant “10,000 gallons of diesel” in a metaphorical sort of way. Electric cars are not (yet)(may never be?) a panacea. At present, hybrids are more economical, practical, and eco-friendly for most people in most places; until the battery chemistry/charge time/fuel source/distribution network/grid capacity conundrum is resolved.

    Cheers to a great evening, Mr. D.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Adam Smith

    Hybrids have been sold in large numbers for 15 or 20 years now. They get good gas mileage but you aren't dependent upon charging.

    A pure electric vehicle is simpler with fewer parts to repair, though.

  199. I happen to know a married couple who actually do have both cars as Teslas.

    As per Steve’s prediction, they live in suburbia (suburban Boston). To make it work, they installed solar panels on their home precisely so they can charge their cars from home. They don’t have a long commute to work in the city, and their longest drive is to their vacation home in (of course) Vermont — which they can do on one tank of “gas”, er electricity, without charging — and they have also installed solar panels on their vacation home to charge their car.

    So, yes, it can be done….so long as you are so extremely wealthy as to re-configure two houses into being solar powered car charges.But then again, if you can afford one Tesla, you’re rich, let alone two. The remodeling of their houses into solar batteries doesn’t seem like it put them out.

    However, don’t ask them to drive across the country in one. While it appears Elon has made deals with Target to have charging stations in all their lots, there’s a lot of empty space in this country.

  200. @Adam Smith
    @Jack D

    Greetings, Mr. D. I truly hope this message finds you well. 🕊️

    I think Mr. del Blanco meant "10,000 gallons of diesel" in a metaphorical sort of way. Electric cars are not (yet)(may never be?) a panacea. At present, hybrids are more economical, practical, and eco-friendly for most people in most places; until the battery chemistry/charge time/fuel source/distribution network/grid capacity conundrum is resolved.

    https://i.ibb.co/0XnDF0N/Belaz-75710.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/fkP1K8v/open-mine.jpg

    https://i.ibb.co/N3h9x4z/Tesla-Model-Y-being-charged-by-a-gas-generator-C.jpg

    https://youtu.be/ozqSdnkYxJM

    Cheers to a great evening, Mr. D.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Hybrids have been sold in large numbers for 15 or 20 years now. They get good gas mileage but you aren’t dependent upon charging.

    A pure electric vehicle is simpler with fewer parts to repair, though.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  201. @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    Tesla is somewhat handicapped by Elon Musk’s famous Hard Road strategy, which means that you put all your effort into solving the general tough problem (Level 5 autonomy), rather than some sort of subset (like safely driving on the I-5 through the Central Valley).

    Tesla’s Navigate on Autopilot could probably handle the I-5 now, but it’s not true Level 5 autonomy.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I-5 in the Central Valley of California was constructed with room to add 4 more lanes for 206 miles.

  202. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus
    @Jack D

    “Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno’s generation.”

    Try again.

    https://www.thedrive.com/news/35536/generation-z-wants-to-keep-classic-cars-alive-but-theres-a-lot-working-against-them

    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1129921_survey-says-millennials-and-gen-z-care-about-classic-cars-after-all

    Replies: @Jack D, @Anonymous

    I’m a millennial and love classic cars. My favorite is a 1959 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer Super D-500 convertible. How can you not love it with a name like that? The one I drive belonged to my grandmother. My father and brothers restored it to original condition a few years ago. They installed a detachable audio system and I love playing gran’s favorites while I tool along the backroads. I live in the country now and there’s hardly any traffic — I can drive for an hour and never see another car. The 383CID V-8, which the men had blue-printed, shot-peened, ported and polished, produces almost 400 hp and the amount of torque it delivers is unbelievable.
    When I’m driving it and listening to the tunes popular when my grandfather bought it for gran, I can totally forget this horrible world we live in now and that I hate so much. Please God, make it be 1959 again.

    • Agree: Polistra
  203. @Dmon
    @Ben Kurtz

    "but it is technically feasible to support a lot more electric vehicle charging than we do currently with some pretty modest but clever infrastructure hacks."

    Like room temperature fusion?
    https://www.8newsnow.com/news/local-news/hoover-dam-power-production-down-33-official-says/

    I propose a 300 mile long by 50 mile wide trench that passes directly through Malibu, so that the Pacific Ocean can refill Lake Meade. We can call it the William Tecumseh Sherman Canal. All current California government workers will be put to work in the salt processing plant at the terminus, as the water has to be desalinated to avoid damaging the turbines. Talk about your shovel ready infrastructure projects...

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @kaganovitch

    I propose a 300 mile long by 50 mile wide trench that passes directly through Malibu, so that the Pacific Ocean can refill Lake Meade. We can call it the William Tecumseh Sherman Canal. All current California government workers will be put to work in the salt processing plant at the terminus, as the water has to be desalinated to avoid damaging the turbines. Talk about your shovel ready infrastructure projects…

    Hear, hear!

  204. @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too. Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @James B. Shearer, @anon

    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.

    Computers are able to beat people at chess because chess pieces are only able to move in defined, predictable ways.

    Computers, in effect, take all of these logical, known combinations of moves and predict the best way to move. But this is not a matter of computers thinking so much as it is mapping out millions of predictable, defined moves.

    People and cars, alas, do not move like chess pieces.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too.

    When a pedestrian thoughtlessly steps off a curb directly into traffic, what model is he following? What about mattresses lying in the roadway? A child’s ball that has just rolled into the roadway?

    Human behaviour is frequently random and unpredictable. Computers do not tend to cope well with randomness and unpredictability.

    While it is amazing what AI can do at present, we tend to overlook that there is a great deal that it still cannot do. Making predictions related to out-of-the-blue events is something AI is notoriously inadequate at doing.

    Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.

    Having a large data set and making inferences from it is one thing. Recognising and predicting events from an data set that will likely remain forever incomplete is quite another.

    At present, the expectation that cars will drive themselves is the triumph of hope over experience. Will that change someday? Perhaps, but I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see it.

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Luddite in Chief


    At present, the expectation that cars will drive themselves is the triumph of hope over experience. Will that change someday? Perhaps, but I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see it.

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)
     
    In David McCollough's book about the Wright Brothers, he writes about the fact that at a time when the brothers were flying their plane on a daily basis around Huffman Prairie, Ohio, the NY Times kept printing stories exactly along these lines: "I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see a flying machine."

    Well, I have news for you buddy - cars that drive themselves ALREADY exist, today:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKriYPN6gNg

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Luddite in Chief


    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)
     
    I spent years "wrestling with software" and there is NFW I am getting in a self driving car anywhere other than an empty desert road.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

  205. Let’s see your V-8 do this:

    Doctor pulls off ‘likely the world’s first’ electric car-powered vasectomy

    And from a pickup. I’d never heard of this Rivian thing until now. An “electric adventure vehicle”.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Reg Cæsar

    Great. Now all we have to do is send hundreds of millions of these electric vasectomy vehicles to Africa, Mexico and Honduras, and all will be hunky-dory.

  206. @Jack D
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Keep a dirt bike or a quad for when the shtf. Your can't let the tail wag the dog or structure your whole existence around less than 1 percent probability black swan events.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Your can’t … structure your whole existence around less than 1 percent probability black swan events

    “Less than 1 percent” (assuming .99 percent is possible) is a pretty high probability for black swan events.

    Do you consider the Holocaust to be a black swan event? Maybe all the Holocaust movies, media, education, and museums have made people paranoid and less willing to unnecessarily cede individual and mass physical control to centralized authorities, be they state or corporate.

    Keep a dirt bike or a quad for when the shtf.

    Cars and (light) trucks are much better. Can carry far more people (protected from the elements) and stuff (out of view). Also, you can sleep in an enclosed vehicle if necessary. Not so much on a dirt bike.

  207. @Joe Stalin
    @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    They caught a Hispanic man who was riding a one-wheel motorized skateboard feeling up woman in the Chicago South Loop.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b00Weo7a1c


    Suspect Charged With Sexual Assault After Allegedly Groping Multiple Women in Downtown Chicago

    https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/chicago-police-questioning-person-of-interest-after-multiple-woman-say-man-on-electric-skateboard-groped-them/2914442/
     

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    People use getaway cars in bank robberies. Let’s ban cars, too.

  208. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well (especially along the mountainous California coast where flat level cheaply buildable valley land was used up decades ago) if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street. Long winding driveways are nice (unless you have to shovel snow off of them) but they waste a lot of land and require a lot of paving materials. And who are you fooling? This is 2022 - almost every house has a garage and has had one for a century.

    The key is not to hide the garage in the back but to make it an attractive part of the house. There are much more attractive garage doors than the faceless slabs that are pictured.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Bill, @James B. Shearer

    “… Long winding driveways are nice (unless you have to shovel snow off of them) but they waste a lot of land and require a lot of paving materials. ..”

    They also waste time. If I am coming and going hundreds of times a year an extra minute or two to drive around back adds up.

  209. @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. Car collectors are mostly Jay Leno's generation. What you see as a "personal vehicle" someone else can regard as a huge maintenance and parking heading that they would rather not have to deal with. If you want a glass of milk, do you go out and buy a cow?

    People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people's cars for generations now. The cars are (supposedly) cleaned between uses and you can order the type of car that you like (which they may or may not have when you get to the airport). It's not perfect but it works reasonably well. I'm sure that when Mr. Hertz proposed the idea of rental cars people also told him it was impossible, that no one would want to rent a car, etc. You can always find 1,000 reasons for never changing anything - it takes imagination to see a future that is different than the present. Sometimes imagination can go too far (people have been talking about flying cars for a century) but sometimes you have to ignore the naysayers or you'll never get anything done.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Corvinus, @clifford brown, @James B. Shearer

    “Maybe this is a generational thing. A lot of kids today have zero interest in cars. ..”

    Are these kids with plenty of money or kids who can’t afford a car anyway? Like me saying I have zero interest in dating a super model.

    “People who travel on business have been driving/riding in other people’s cars for generations now. ..”

    I have rented cars a few times. I stay in motels sometimes too but I still want a personal house.

  210. @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too. Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @James B. Shearer, @anon

    “They will solve this with AI. ..”

    Maybe, but it is currently beyond the state of the art and requires a breakthrough or two. It could happen quickly, playing high level go was beyond the state of the art for quite a while but then there were two breakthroughs first Monte Carlo tree search and then deep neural nets. Combined with incremental improvements in computer power this allowed computer go programs to get better rapidly and they now play at superhuman levels. Something similar could happen with self-driving cars. But the timing of breakthroughs is unpredictable. The problem may prove to be hard like for example fusion power.

  211. @Jack D
    @anonymous


    The Chinese government is really good at solving the strategic problems. I wonder what they will do about raising fertility?
     
    Just because America is run by clowns doesn't mean that China is run by supermen. China has its own problems. As is the case with the current "Zero Covid" lockdown (people here complained about the lockdowns but they are NOTHING compared to what they do in China), the one child policy developed its own bureaucratic momentum and went on far longer than it should have. Because China is a face culture, it's impossible for the Communist Party to ever admit that it made a mistake so backing away even from something that they KNOW to be a mistake has to be done very delicately and in a way where you do not actually admit that you are wrong.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Because China is a face culture

    That’s the first time I’ve ever heard of “face culture” as a synonym for “dictatorship”. Lots of countries in the Orient have shame rather than guilt cultures, i.e. it’s only bad if you get caught vs it’s a sin, whether you get caught or not. The difference between dictatorships and democracies? Electoral losses generally result in policy changes even when the reigning party or coalition merely gets a smaller majority. The only way to change government policy in the face of a dictator’s stubborn insistence is to put him in the ground.

  212. @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    @Steve Sailer

    If you live in a metropolis, an electric car sounds okay as long as you own a non-electric car too. It sounds like a hassle to be dependent upon an electric car.

    I live in the downtown area of one of the ten most populous metro areas in the country and ride an EUC. Mine has a top speed of around 45 MPH.

    They're immensely convenient (never have to worry about parking) and also riding one is the most fun I've ever had with my clothes on.

    Since they're the greatest thing since sliced bread, I'm sure they'll be banned soon. America's government is an anarcho-tyranncal Karenocracy, a veritable photonegative of an ideal government, where everything that is cool is banned and everything that sucks is mandatory.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukVjXFIOdvs

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @duncsbaby

    Damn, Deborah Norville is still looking fine.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @duncsbaby

    She's got a good plastic surgeon, that's for sure.

  213. @clifford brown
    @Anon

    Mulholland is a testament to California's amazing history, but there is something to be said for engineering accreditation.

    Replies: @Anon

    Mulholland is a testament to California’s amazing history, but there is something to be said for engineering accreditation.

    Hey, illegals gotta know they’re taking a risk. When your ticket’s up it’s up.

  214. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    This is happening somewhat under the radar but big tech companies are spending BILLIONS on self driving cars (and are making very strong progress - as part of her job, my daughter has spent hours as a passenger in a fully self driving car on the streets of San Francisco and the car performed flawlessly. I asked her if this made her nervous and she said that at first it did but within a few minutes she became immersed in a conversation with her co-worker and completely forgot that no human being was driving the car which was driving down the street pretty much like any human driven taxi*). It's like flying on a jet liner - the first time you do it, it's wondrous that you are flying @ almost 600 mph seven miles up in the sky, the next time you do it you are bored and wish that the flight was over already.


    *I would say better - the last time I took an Uber from the airport the black female driver propped a 2nd cell phone on the steering wheel, put in a pair of headphones and was watching a YouTube video of a black woman giving makeup tips AS she was driving. I am not kidding.

    Anyway the companies that are throwing billions at this problem are not idiots - there are TRILLIONS of $ of value that could be picked up if you could restructure the transportation system to eliminate not only human drivers but car ownership itself. People have a ridiculous amount of capital tied up in something that takes up a lot of space in their home and which gets used, on average, 1 hr/day. And millions of people are employed as drivers of one sort or another. People are not thinking outside the box enough here - they keep imagining some future that will be EXACTLY like the present except that you are going to need install a charger at every curbside parking spot - why we will need MILLIONS of chargers! That's not how it's going to go at all.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @kaganovitch

    I would say better – the last time I took an Uber from the airport the black female driver propped a 2nd cell phone on the steering wheel, put in a pair of headphones and was watching a YouTube video of a black woman giving makeup tips AS she was driving. I am not kidding.

    And yet you survived unscathed. #BlackGirlMagicIsReal!

  215. anon[466] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Johnson
    @JimB

    In the green dream, all apartments are clustered near light rail. Renters are not supposed to own cars. Remember the motto of the great reset? You’ll own nothing, and you’ll be happy.

    This is really it. The left doesn't actually want mass ownership of electric vehicles. They don't want single occupancy vehicles for the majority.

    The left doesn't want the average White person to have kids or own a car. Walk to mass transit, walk home with vegetarian groceries, then take your anti-depressants when you get home. The is the tolerable White person to the left.

    In fact I have no doubt the left would actually be disappointed if some new tech allowed for mass ownership of electric vehicles. They want to end that model for Whites.

    The dream of the left is for most Whites to live in rat towers. They want to end the suburban model completely. They don't want Whites to have children and the suburban model only encourages that. The suburbs also allow private schools which is deeply offensive to leftists that believe it is their duty to indoctrinate White children.

    However the left always runs into economic realities. They are emotionally driven and don't plan very well. They can hope and dream about turning most Whites into childless urban dwellers but it isn't going to happen. Family leaning Whites are already chased out of the city because the left refuses to apply the law to the protected classes. So the Whites that remain and don't breed are liberally minded. Twin studies suggest that political outlook has a strong genetic basis. Leftists are basically reducing their own numbers through self-selection.

    Replies: @anon

    You are correct on both counts. Every leftist country, from the USSR to North Korea in the extreme, was/is hostile to private car ownership. At least in the USSR you were allowed to own a car, but had to get permission and wait for years to be able to purchase a new one, and at several times the average annual salary. Parts were difficult to obtain and service was horrible. Despite these challenges, people somehow still managed to own cars. Even though public transportation was everywhere, it was disliked for the same reasons it is disliked everywhere.
    And yes, leftists are self-eliminating through Darwinian selection – from mass slaughter, one-child policies and mass abortion to homosexuality, transgenderism and masking/social distancing. Which is why they have to import new voters and brainwash the goodwhites into buying the idea that living in a beehive and owning nothing bigger than a bong is great. I used to work at a place where virtually everyone was childless, usually unmarried, lived in an apartment and took public transportation or biked to work. These were highly educated (MD/PhDs) folks in their prime child-bearing years, and virtually every one of them was a leftist. They all read the NYT and believed it like an evangelical believes the bible. So much for high IQ.

  216. @Travis
    @AnotherDad

    why burn methanol or ethanol when gasoline is more costly ? Not only does ethanol cost more than gasoline, it far worse for your engine. Ethanol is a hygroscopic chemical, which means it attracts water. Gasoline with a high ethanol content will also have a high moisture content. This is bad news for almost every component in your car. Contaminated fuel can cause anything from clogged fuel lines to cracked cylinder heads. Ethanol is a much stronger solvent than gasoline. It also attracts moisture. Can you think of a component in your fuel system that’s vulnerable to solvents and shouldn’t dry out? That’s right, your seals and gaskets.

    In addition to costing more and being bad for your car E-85 yields lower fuel mileage than regular gasoline. Consumer Reports found mileage for E85 to be up to 25% lower mileage while Car and Driver found the difference reached as high as 30% for E85.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    You forgot the biggie ( Or were too kind to mention it, lest you be accused of rightly calling your interlocutor a dipshit.) The production of Ethanol requires more energy than the Ethanol provides,)

  217. anon[159] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @James B. Shearer

    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too. Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @James B. Shearer, @anon

    I agree. AI is already better than humans at many tasks, such as reading medical images or playing games. And given the (lack of) skills and attention in many human drivers, AI will have superior capabilities.
    The problem with autonomous driving isn’t capability, it’s the lack of autonomy for the individual being driven. It’s great when your car is driving you to your destination while you play with your phone or nap. It’s no so great when authorities decide that you are not allowed to go there, or that you should be driven somewhere else, e.g., jail or a “quarantine camp”. You won’t be able to unplug HAL in your car or even get out.

  218. @Bill
    @Jack D


    if you want to make efficient use of a lot you want to minimize the driveway area and put the garage close to (and directly facing) the street.
     
    The first part of the sentence is true; the second is not. It's perfectly straightforward to run an alley behind the houses and put the garage there with no driveway at all. There are lots of neighborhoods like this.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Sure it can be done but this uses a lot more land. You have twice as many streets – the street in front of the house and the street (alley) in the back. This also tends to use up the back yard which is a valuable recreational space.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Jack D

    It doesn't use more land.

  219. @Luddite in Chief
    @Jack D


    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.
     
    Computers are able to beat people at chess because chess pieces are only able to move in defined, predictable ways.

    Computers, in effect, take all of these logical, known combinations of moves and predict the best way to move. But this is not a matter of computers thinking so much as it is mapping out millions of predictable, defined moves.

    People and cars, alas, do not move like chess pieces.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too.

     

    When a pedestrian thoughtlessly steps off a curb directly into traffic, what model is he following? What about mattresses lying in the roadway? A child's ball that has just rolled into the roadway?

    Human behaviour is frequently random and unpredictable. Computers do not tend to cope well with randomness and unpredictability.

    While it is amazing what AI can do at present, we tend to overlook that there is a great deal that it still cannot do. Making predictions related to out-of-the-blue events is something AI is notoriously inadequate at doing.

    Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.
     
    Having a large data set and making inferences from it is one thing. Recognising and predicting events from an data set that will likely remain forever incomplete is quite another.

    At present, the expectation that cars will drive themselves is the triumph of hope over experience. Will that change someday? Perhaps, but I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see it.

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jim Don Bob

    At present, the expectation that cars will drive themselves is the triumph of hope over experience. Will that change someday? Perhaps, but I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see it.

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)

    In David McCollough’s book about the Wright Brothers, he writes about the fact that at a time when the brothers were flying their plane on a daily basis around Huffman Prairie, Ohio, the NY Times kept printing stories exactly along these lines: “I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see a flying machine.”

    Well, I have news for you buddy – cars that drive themselves ALREADY exist, today:

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Jack D


    Well, I have news for you buddy – cars that drive themselves ALREADY exist, today:
     
    I hope you will forgive my scepticism, but I am sure you noticed, as I did, that the video you linked to was not one long, continuous take, but rather, a series of fast cuts.

    When a camera cuts away as often as that one did, it raises the question: what happened with the car in between those cuts.

    Having said that, I admit it: I am impressed. There is no denying that what the video did show was quite remarkable.

    It seems my knowledge has not kept up with the state of the art in autonomous cars. I am grateful to you for taking the time to link to that video and letting me know what the young kids are up to these days.
  220. @Luddite in Chief
    @Jack D


    Computers used to be not as good as humans at playing chess and then a 3,000 lb. Supercomputer was able to beat a human and now the computer on your desk is so much better than Magnus Carlsen that it is cheating if you ask the computer.
     
    Computers are able to beat people at chess because chess pieces are only able to move in defined, predictable ways.

    Computers, in effect, take all of these logical, known combinations of moves and predict the best way to move. But this is not a matter of computers thinking so much as it is mapping out millions of predictable, defined moves.

    People and cars, alas, do not move like chess pieces.

    They will solve this with AI. How does a human know when to stop for or evade a pedestrian? We have some model of pedestrian behavior in our head and the computer can learn that model too.

     

    When a pedestrian thoughtlessly steps off a curb directly into traffic, what model is he following? What about mattresses lying in the roadway? A child's ball that has just rolled into the roadway?

    Human behaviour is frequently random and unpredictable. Computers do not tend to cope well with randomness and unpredictability.

    While it is amazing what AI can do at present, we tend to overlook that there is a great deal that it still cannot do. Making predictions related to out-of-the-blue events is something AI is notoriously inadequate at doing.

    Learn it better than a human driver because the computer will never be drunk or distracted.
     
    Having a large data set and making inferences from it is one thing. Recognising and predicting events from an data set that will likely remain forever incomplete is quite another.

    At present, the expectation that cars will drive themselves is the triumph of hope over experience. Will that change someday? Perhaps, but I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see it.

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jim Don Bob

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)

    I spent years “wrestling with software” and there is NFW I am getting in a self driving car anywhere other than an empty desert road.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Jim Don Bob


    I spent years “wrestling with software” and there is NFW I am getting in a self driving car anywhere other than an empty desert road.
     
    I do not doubt for a moment that if/when autonomous cars become widely available, there will be no shortage of people who will immediately want to leap into one.

    Call me hidebound, but having spent a fair amount of time beta testing things (not always knowingly), I am perfectly happy to allow others the privilege of beta testing this latest idea before I do any leaping myself.
  221. @duncsbaby
    @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.

    Damn, Deborah Norville is still looking fine.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    She’s got a good plastic surgeon, that’s for sure.

  222. @Reg Cæsar
    Let's see your V-8 do this:


    Doctor pulls off ‘likely the world’s first’ electric car-powered vasectomy

    And from a pickup. I'd never heard of this Rivian thing until now. An "electric adventure vehicle".


    https://media.rivian.com/image/upload/v1637092072/rivian-com/home%20page/vehicles/r1t/R1T-9-2_xeudda.png

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Great. Now all we have to do is send hundreds of millions of these electric vasectomy vehicles to Africa, Mexico and Honduras, and all will be hunky-dory.

  223. @Cave Johnson
    @PiltdownMan

    I swear, every mention of EVs and some future Nobel Prize candidate comes out and proposes swappable battery packs, as though these things are functional equivalents of a rechargeable AA battery. Without going into the details as to why it's not practical on an automotive scale, right now, scooters are about the ceiling on the practicality of that.

    https://electrek.co/2021/08/30/gogoro-named-global-leader-in-light-electric-vehicle-battery-swapping-passes-200-million-swaps/

    2035:

    An engineer I know who is in the parking garage construction business says the future in cities isnt public transit, its subscription services. Specifically, this will happen once self driving technology reaches a level where there is confidence in a car driving without anyone behind the wheel at all. You will have a subscription, call a car (like an uber), and the optimal unmanned electric unit will arrive at your location, where you will then be taken to your destination. The cars will be assigned routes to optimize battery usage, and will return to the garage to recharge when needed (or be cleaned in the event a messy event is detected or reported). He bases this notion on the way parking garage technology is moving to accommodate such a system.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Inquiring Mind, @Justvisiting

    Folks have such short memories.

    When I was a child the teachers promised us that by the time we had to commute to work we would all have flying cars and roads would be obsolete.

    It sounded like an interesting idea at the time.

    😉

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Justvisiting


    When I was a child the teachers promised us that by the time we had to commute to work we would all have flying cars and roads would be obsolete.
     
    Guess who's two months old this week?

    https://static1.cbrimages.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Jetsons-Hanna-Barbera.jpg


    https://mobile.twitter.com/CH005Y/status/1552478240089989126?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1552478240089989126%7Ctwgr%5Edec2a8aeb809e3a86123b6cdaed5684d74fb7f53%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.yahoo.com%2Fentertainment%2Fhappy-birthday-george-jetson-why-180415697.html

  224. @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    I guess it depends where and how close to the city you are and how expensive land was and what the market was like in that area.

    It might depend on the area. I am talking about neighborhoods in West Coast cities, some of which were actually designed around trollies. Some people have no idea that their neighborhood was once on a trolly line. A lot of those neighborhoods were laid out logically in that the trolly would go all the way down them and turn around. So no need for a garage.

    Why so small and only 1 bath? Because this is what a returning war veteran could afford (these houses went for maybe $15k new).

    I figured but I can't imagine having a family and no second toilet. I would have built one. In fact I have been to older homes where they had converted a mud room to a toilet/sink combo. Those 40s/50s mud rooms are normally unused anyways and tend to smell.

    And why were the prewar houses even smaller? Because in those days blue collar workers did not make a lot of $ – again they were living in the biggest house that they could afford.

    I don't doubt that cost was a factor but there is a lot of Victorian influence in those homes. They'll have a dozen small drawers instead of 4 large ones. A lot of unnecessary arches and masonry. Victorian windows that certainly cost more than square ones. It's all very weird. In the more frontier areas of America you will find cabins built by a single person that have two bathrooms. So I'm guessing there was also a fancy living housing trend at the time that didn't prioritize bathrooms.

    Replies: @Ben Kurtz, @Liza

    Re bathrooms. You can get away with one bathroom if the toilet is in another little room, all by itself. So if someone is hogging the bathtub/shower and/or the sink, you have a place to “go” instead of rapping on the bathroom door and shouting for the occupant to get out.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Liza

    It depends how inhibited the occupants are about their bodily functions.

    https://youtu.be/cCzebM-zZzY

    Replies: @Liza

  225. I used to work at a place where virtually everyone was childless, usually unmarried, lived in an apartment and took public transportation or biked to work. These were highly educated (MD/PhDs) folks in their prime child-bearing years, and virtually every one of them was a leftist. They all read the NYT and believed it like an evangelical believes the bible. So much for high IQ.

    They don’t believe in human biology and as such aren’t concerned about their smartest having any kids.

    The liberals that do have kids tend to be in mixed marriages. So the husband or wife is Christian or privately doesn’t believe in liberalism. Thus the hardcore liberal genes are often diluted by marriage.

    A lib/lib match where both have advanced degrees is most likely going to be childless. That is your typical grad school couple.

    The grand assumption is immigration as you said. They think they can turn anyone into a good little leftist so it doesn’t matter if they have kids.

    Genetic studies suggest that both political outlook and empathy have a genetic basis. I suspect that liberalism exploits high empathy in Whites. High intellect / high empathy are very vulnerable and that combination is not distributed evenly in all populations.

    In fact I expect liberalism to eventually collapse from dysgenics but not to conservatism. Probably to the type of populism that is gaining ground in Europe.

  226. @Rob Lee
    @Spud Boy

    Charging stations will indeed be built in CA intermittently, slowly and at great cost, then instantly demolished by criminals at 2am for their copper wiring, whereupon 'not in service' signs will promptly be hung. No repairs will be forthcoming any time soon.

    But you'll still have to comply with the electric-only mandate, or else...

    Replies: @E. Rekshun

    ‘not in service’ signs will promptly be hung.

    The Level-3 electric vehicle charging station at my local city hall has been out-of-service for three years. The sun destroyed the user interface screen.

  227. @YetAnotherAnon
    1,000% off topic, but it looks possible that the US (or possibly the UK under US instruction) have carried out what would usually be considered an act of war against Germany and the EU.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/sep/26/nord-stream-2-pipeline-pressure-collapses-mysteriously-overnight

    As winter approaches (and the mud has arrived in Ukraine) some minds in the EU have become fixated on the collapse of European high-energy-use industry i.e. a lot of it - steel, aluminium, chemicals, fertiliser. They note the resurgence in US manufacturing, after the decades of offshoring

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/factory-jobs-are-booming-like-it-e2-80-99s-the-1970s/ar-AA12gZzN

    and compare it with the industrial Armageddon facing Germany

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/sep/15/gas-rationing-germany-basf-plant-europe-crisis

    And all this time, Russia has been saying - "we're not the ones who want economic warfare - Nordstream 2 is right there ready to deliver". The worry for GAE is that sooner or later the EU, slowly bleeding jobs and exports, will crack and cry "enough!"

    It looks as if that option's been effectively removed. The teenage girl is still in her room having taken the pills, but someone's set fire to the ambulance which just pulled up outside with the antidote.

    "Nord Stream 2’s operator said pressure in the undersea pipeline dropped from 105 to 7 bar overnight.

    The Russian-owned pipeline, which was intended to double the volume of gas flowing from Vyborg, Russia, under the Baltic Sea to Germany, had just been completed and filled with 300m cubic metres of gas when the German chancellor, Olaf Scholz, cancelled it shortly before Russia invaded Ukraine."

     

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @SaneClownPosse

    Germany could have blown the pipeline. It would fit with their recent actions.

    Suicidal Germany went with the sanctions against Russia and its energy supplies, resulting in having to force drastic energy conservation upon its citizens and Industry, just to virtue signal support for the failed state of Ukraine.

  228. @Liza
    @John Johnson

    Re bathrooms. You can get away with one bathroom if the toilet is in another little room, all by itself. So if someone is hogging the bathtub/shower and/or the sink, you have a place to "go" instead of rapping on the bathroom door and shouting for the occupant to get out.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    It depends how inhibited the occupants are about their bodily functions.

    • Replies: @Liza
    @Rob McX

    He's going #2!!!! Ghastly.

  229. @Rob McX
    @Liza

    It depends how inhibited the occupants are about their bodily functions.

    https://youtu.be/cCzebM-zZzY

    Replies: @Liza

    He’s going #2!!!! Ghastly.

  230. In European cities, residents use public transportation because there is no other choice. In many European cities, automobiles are restricted just because the authorities can.
    Every European I have come in contact with marvels at the wide-open spaces, the suburban areas, the ability to own a car giving one the ability to go wherever you want whenever you want.
    Almost every European would like to have the freedom to go where and when one wants without being encumbered by “public transportation” limitations.
    THAT is an aspect of freedom that many either do not understand or comprehend.
    Not being tied to bus or train schedules, not having to endure smelly, criminal passengers, and the inability to get one’s goods home without using a delivery service are all negatives to public transportation.
    It’s always been about CONTROL–nothing more.
    Rabid environmentalists have latched on to hatred of the automobile precisely because it allows one to travel where and when one wants without restriction.
    In addition, the automobile allows one to “vote with their wheels”, establishing suburban and rural communities where one can get away from “undesirables”.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  231. @Jack D
    @Luddite in Chief


    At present, the expectation that cars will drive themselves is the triumph of hope over experience. Will that change someday? Perhaps, but I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see it.

    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)
     
    In David McCollough's book about the Wright Brothers, he writes about the fact that at a time when the brothers were flying their plane on a daily basis around Huffman Prairie, Ohio, the NY Times kept printing stories exactly along these lines: "I am dubious that anyone reading this will live to see a flying machine."

    Well, I have news for you buddy - cars that drive themselves ALREADY exist, today:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKriYPN6gNg

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    Well, I have news for you buddy – cars that drive themselves ALREADY exist, today:

    I hope you will forgive my scepticism, but I am sure you noticed, as I did, that the video you linked to was not one long, continuous take, but rather, a series of fast cuts.

    When a camera cuts away as often as that one did, it raises the question: what happened with the car in between those cuts.

    Having said that, I admit it: I am impressed. There is no denying that what the video did show was quite remarkable.

    It seems my knowledge has not kept up with the state of the art in autonomous cars. I am grateful to you for taking the time to link to that video and letting me know what the young kids are up to these days.

  232. @Jim Don Bob
    @Luddite in Chief


    (Apart from which, after you have spent the day wrestling with software, the thought of stepping into a car controlled by software may not be the most appealing idea.)
     
    I spent years "wrestling with software" and there is NFW I am getting in a self driving car anywhere other than an empty desert road.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    I spent years “wrestling with software” and there is NFW I am getting in a self driving car anywhere other than an empty desert road.

    I do not doubt for a moment that if/when autonomous cars become widely available, there will be no shortage of people who will immediately want to leap into one.

    Call me hidebound, but having spent a fair amount of time beta testing things (not always knowingly), I am perfectly happy to allow others the privilege of beta testing this latest idea before I do any leaping myself.

  233. @Jack D
    @clifford brown

    During Covid I didn't set foot in a supermarket for over a year and yet I had milk in my fridge. How was this possible?

    Replies: @Polistra

    During Covid I didn’t set foot in a supermarket for over a year and yet I had milk in my fridge. How was this possible?

    You’re married and your wife does the shopping?

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Polistra

    During the Deep Covid lockdown, my mother was getting groceries delivered to her door by the local Publix. One day she went out to her front steps to find a gigantic load of stuff that she didn't order, so she called them to come and pick it up. They asked her if she had touched anything on the delivery, and when she said she had, she was told that she could just keep it!

    It's had to look back on these sorts of stories and not wonder if we were all under some sort of mass mental illness.

  234. Will the state of California still exist in 2035?

  235. @Justvisiting
    @Cave Johnson

    Folks have such short memories.

    When I was a child the teachers promised us that by the time we had to commute to work we would all have flying cars and roads would be obsolete.

    It sounded like an interesting idea at the time.

    ;-)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  236. @Polistra
    @Jack D


    During Covid I didn’t set foot in a supermarket for over a year and yet I had milk in my fridge. How was this possible?
     
    You're married and your wife does the shopping?

    Replies: @Brutusale

    During the Deep Covid lockdown, my mother was getting groceries delivered to her door by the local Publix. One day she went out to her front steps to find a gigantic load of stuff that she didn’t order, so she called them to come and pick it up. They asked her if she had touched anything on the delivery, and when she said she had, she was told that she could just keep it!

    It’s had to look back on these sorts of stories and not wonder if we were all under some sort of mass mental illness.

  237. @Jack D
    @Bill

    Sure it can be done but this uses a lot more land. You have twice as many streets - the street in front of the house and the street (alley) in the back. This also tends to use up the back yard which is a valuable recreational space.

    Replies: @Bill

    It doesn’t use more land.

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