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Judging by this 18 tweet thread, Amy Harmon, the New York Times‘ reporter in charge of snitching on science crimethinkers, is really, really peeved that each time she does another touchdown dance on Twitter over her having gotten DNA structure co-discoverer James D. Watson cancelled, nobodies tweet back to her: “And yet, it moves:”

 
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  1. anon[394] • Disclaimer says:

    Here is a relaxing, mellow music video for Amy Harmon to enjoy. I hope she benefits.

  2. In a similar vein, the Spectator has some choice words about L’affaire Bari…

    Bari Weiss was one of the last couple of liberal voices (in the true sense) left at the paper. And as you could see from the deranged online behaviour of her colleagues towards her, it was clear she was not going to be long for the role.

    Her resignation letter is damning. She alleges ‘constant bullying by colleagues.’ And in a memorable line she says, ‘Twitter is not on the masthead of the New York Times. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor.’

    No idea if the Spectator has a paywall, so I’ll post the entire piece with the usual caveats:

    [MORE]

    US Politics
    What is the point of the New York Times?
    Douglas Murray
    July 14, 2020

    Earlier today, Bari Weiss resigned from the New York Times and published a devastating letter of resignation on her website (also available here). There will be those who try to pretend that this is no big deal, or that it is just a storm in a journalistic tea-cup: they would be wrong.

    For several generations now the New York Times has been seen as America’s ‘paper of record’. You might have appreciated some aspects of it more than others, and it may have been a little dull, but it was reliable; even necessary. A sort of journalistic fibre. Then at some stage in recent decades, it started to exemplify a rot which has wormed its way through much of the legacy media. Its reporting became unreliable and its comment pages monotone. The paper became increasingly unreadable. If there was one reason above all, it was that it became untrustworthy.

    It first passed through a stage of appearing to believe that its job was to stand equidistant between the facts and the public. Then – and never more so than in the era of its nemesis, Donald Trump – it just came out for a particular side on issue after issue. It stopped being a newspaper and became an organ of opinion for one set of political positions.

    Some time ago I became aware that I no longer trusted it even on issues that I didn’t know about. Because on every issue I did know about, I discovered that the paper was spreading untruths and lies. Take the bizarre animus against Britain (which I have written about a number of times here). It appears that the NYT at some stage made a decision that Brexit had something to do with Trump, and since the NYT hated Trump, it must not just report negatively against Brexit Britain, but campaign against it. Its London ‘correspondents’ must be among the least informed and most campaign-minded journalists in the paper’s history. The misinformation that the NYT has now published against this country is so extraordinary that nobody who actually knows the UK could possibly trust its coverage. And if you see that this is the case with things you do know about, then why would you remotely trust the NYT on things you don’t know about? And at that stage, what is the point of the paper? It’s not as though it is worth reading for the wit.

    Anyhow – after recent sackings at the paper (relating to the publication of a perfectly reasonable opinion piece by Senator Tom Cotton) it became clear that Bari Weiss was one of the last couple of liberal voices (in the true sense) left at the paper. And as you could see from the deranged online behaviour of her colleagues towards her, it was clear she was not going to be long for the role.

    Her resignation letter is damning. She alleges ‘constant bullying by colleagues.’ And in a memorable line she says, ‘Twitter is not on the masthead of the New York Times. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor.’ Ouch.

    Of course there will doubtless now be more bullying and hectoring. All once again done by ‘liberal’ voices presuming that they are acting in the name of good. It is an extraordinary thing this, and in some ways emblematic of the age. Publications like the NYT, who profess to be most opposed to ‘fake news’, continuously turn out to have been the era’s biggest purveyors of the thing they complain of. And campaigning journalists, imagining that they are acting in the name of decency, turn out to behave so indecently that they bully out a minority, dissenting opinion from their ranks.

    Bari Weiss has a bright future ahead of her. The same cannot be said of the paper she has just left.

    https://spectator.us/what-is-the-point-of-the-new-york-times/

  3. BenKenobi says:

    You know, Steve – these people would gladly send you to a gulag where you would be subject to 168 hours of continuous interrogation even tho you’ve done nothing,

    Solzhenitsyn was a successful Artillery Officer and they still gave him 14 years for the crime of noticing.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
  4. I get the whole political angle here–and the Jewish determination to push this stuff (which basically all Jews in particular must know is nonsense): This is the bread and butter justification for minoritarianism. (Everyone’s the same so it’s whitey’s fault.)

    But to me, this is just absolutely the dumbest nonsense to actually believe is supported by “science”. Natural selection *requires* that different population groups will have different adaptations if they are in different selective environments. Human environments have become radically more different these past 10,000 years after the agricultural revolution, especially in ways that tax our mental processes because we’re now altering our environments with … human culture.

    Steve, i don’t “tweet” (and if i tried i assume i’d quickly find myself cancelled). But it might be worth asking poor little Amy to clarify her thinking?

    Does Amy not believe:
    a) That the selective environment has radically varied between human populations these last several thousand years?
    or
    b) Does she not believe in natural selection?

    Given her claims … it’s a or b.

  5. black sea says:

    So, I guess she won’t be resigning from the New York Times anytime soon.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  6. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    Inquiring Boomers want to know! Not about Bari Weiss who made national news, that’s not meta enough. Some weird thing about Amy Harmon that no one even knows about.

    Go to sleep BOOMERS

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  7. Judging by this 18 tweet thread, Amy Harmon,..

  8. anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    What about gender hierarchy?

  9. OT, Steve but this should be of interest:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-53409521

    1. Japan’s population is projected to fall from a peak of 128 million in 2017 to less than 53 million by the end of the century.

    2. Italy is expected to see an equally dramatic population crash from 61 million to 28 million over the same timeframe.

    3. China, currently the most populous nation in the world, is expected to peak at 1.4 billion in four years time before nearly halving to 732 million by 2100.

    So, big problem…any solutions?

    “We will go from the period where it’s a choice to open borders, or not, to frank competition for migrants, as there won’t be enough,” argues Prof Murray.

    But where from?

    The population of sub-Saharan Africa is expected to treble in size to more than three billion people by 2100.

    And the study says Nigeria will become the world’s second biggest country, with a population of 791 million.

    Prof Murray says: “We will have many more people of African descent in many more countries as we go through this.

    “Global recognition of the challenges around racism are going to be all the more critical if there are large numbers of people of African descent in many countries.”

  10. Yeah.

    Steve,
    In the last few weeks, how many instances have occurred of you being fingered/referenced by The Woke, and compare to the previous few years….

    But Unz Review is protected by the Lord Voldemort Effect Shield according to Unz.

    You know what I think of the LVE Shield?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  11. kihowi says:
    @AnotherDad

    I figured this out when I was in my teens. The fact that blacks have a different color skin means there must have been some natural selection, and if there was some natural selection it’s madness to assume it only happened to the organs that we can see on the outside. But believing in something obviously true isn’t pious.

    • Replies: @PiousAnon
  12. duncsbaby says:

    That pic of Amy on her twitter scroll really bugs me. What’s up w/the white eyeshadow which only seems to be on one eye? What the hell is that supposed to signify and why is she so goofily gleeful about it? She’s a very odd duck but holds a powerful position.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    , @MEH 0910
  13. Amy Harmon rolling up the sleeves to take on the good fight for us all ….

  14. Anon[140] • Disclaimer says:
    @Not Only Wrathful

    Take the benefits of Western civilization away from Africans and there will be no overpopulation problems in Africa.

    Such as, no crop surpluses. Get rid of all the modern farming equipment. Their population will drop back to hunter-gatherer stage. It’s doable.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
  15. @Anon

    The “population will drop” is another way of saying that hundreds of millions, potentially billions, will die in extraordinary suffering.

    Therefore, no.

  16. @AnotherDad

    They believe in the Theory, not Occurrence, of Evolution, as someone posted on another site.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  17. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    Amy Harmon, the New York Times‘ reporter in charge of snitching on science crimethinkers, is really, really peeved that each time she does another touchdown dance on Twitter over her having gotten DNA structure co-discoverer James D. Watson cancelled

    Has a betting pool yet been established for how long it will be until Harmon herself is cancelled? The left seems to be fast running out of right-wingers to persecute. As energy cannot be destroyed, all of the cancel culture momentum that has been building up will have to go somewhere.

    I am going to give A. Harmon until the end of the year before she finds herself seeking advice from James Watson on how cancelled people go about finding jobs. Five months would seem plenty of time for one of her fellow left-wingers to come up with the requisite “six lines” from her frenetic scribblings needed to have her chucked out of her job.

  18. “And yet, it moves.”

    Not so fast. Maybe if she’d tweet out some cleavage …

  19. Anonymous[404] • Disclaimer says:
    @Not Only Wrathful

    So the fact that Africans can’t get their act together and have populations that can be maintained without outside help requires us to support them forever. You would allow them to use their own incompetence as a weapon against us.

    What is the endgame here?

    Here it is. In order to avoid suffering in Africa, we must work harder and harder for them. More and more of our output must go to support their ever increasing numbers. Eventually, we must let them all in. In short, our civilization must destroyed.

    With your lack of a sense of self-preservation and your bleeding heart, you could be a character in Jean Raspail’s The Camp of the Saints.

    • Agree: Ragnar White
    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
  20. @Not Only Wrathful

    OK, let them die off painlessly, even blissfully.

  21. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Not Only Wrathful

    Observation: We can’t have many kids, so we aren’t going to have many descendants.

    Abstracted problem: We have to find somebody to replace the descendants we can’t have.

    Solution: Bring the replacements from Africa!

    Ah, maybe the problem is that we can’t have many kids. Or perhaps that the Earth is over-populated, seeing as how the US got along pretty well with 100 million people way back then.

    I fail to see why I should be interested in replacing my descendants (or myself).

  22. @Anonymous

    Big difference between “take the benefits of Western civilization away” and let them get on with it/who feels benevolent to help can.

    You’re splitting.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  23. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Not Only Wrathful

    The “population will drop” is another way of saying that hundreds of millions, potentially billions, will die in extraordinary suffering.

    But it’s just fine that Western populations will dwindle to extinction. You don’t think somebody might suffer a bit in this process? Perhaps the White suicide rate is up because they just love the dwindling, and the economic / political squeeze that’s keeping them from having their own kids? You’re very sensitive to Africa, but not to the people around you?

    Nietzsche said that would happen to the Last Men, and it would appear that the Nietzsche was correct.

    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
  24. @AnotherDad

    You are operating from the false premise that Harmon would engage with the concept of logical consistency. That’s not how these things work.

    In her view, science is a social construct. She believes something is scientifically correct so long as there is a consensus among scientists to publicly affirm it.

    That’s why she literal doesn’t understand the “it still moves” line. She thinks she is refuting it by saying back, in effect: “It’s different because Gallileo is now respectable whereas Watson’s ‘racial hierarchy’ ideas are socially unacceptable.”

    • Replies: @res
  25. @Chrisnonymous

    Does the fact that something can actually be named as the “Voldemort Effect Shield” imply that it might not be a perfect shield?

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  26. @BenKenobi

    In the cattle wagon headed to Siberia:

    “How long is your sentence?”
    “Twenty-five years.”
    “Wow. What did you do?”
    “Nothing! Nothing!”
    “Feugh! You’re lying! Everybody knows: for nothing, the sentence is only ten years.”

    • Thanks: BenKenobi
    • LOL: Thomas
  27. @Mr McKenna

    It is not really surprising that Amalekite eliminationist Bari Weiss paints herself as a “centrist”. Genocideers, lunatics and extremists have every incentive to yank the Overton Window so as to frame themselves as favorably as possible.

    It is less clear why supposed “conservative” Douglas Murray should help her with this misdirection: “Bari Weiss was one of the last couple of liberal voices (in the true sense)”. Has he actually read this bitch?

    Which is stranger, that a writer with the intellectual horsepower and uberBrit Establishment credentials of Murray should waste his time on nepotism-hire Weiss, or that he should promote this crybully as the Second Coming of Voltaire?

    Murray thinks Weiss “has a bright future ahead of her”, but it is hard to see who besides the clannish sinecurists at the Times would be foolish enough hire this spoiled brat midwit for their editorial board. Murray also thinks the Times has no “bright future”, but he fails to apprehend that while the Times hasn’t been bright for a long time, that is no impediment to its oligopolist present nor to its oligarchist future.

    • Agree: Charon, Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @anon
  28. @AnotherDad

    As with the case of Galileo, there is esoteric knowledge that is suitable for the enlightened few that can handle it, and there is politically correct knowledge that is best for the edification of the masses.

  29. @Anon

    Some are obsessed with “systemic racism”, some with systemic ageism.

    I don’t believe in any kind of astrology, but the traditional variety is much more entertaining than this.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  30. @AnotherDad

    Have you ever heard of the Ptolemaic universe?

  31. anon[494] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Murray thinks Weiss “has a bright future ahead of her”, but it is hard to see who besides the clannish sinecurists at the Times would be foolish enough hire this spoiled brat midwit for their editorial board.

    The Jerusalem Post or Times of Israel come to mind. Or she could learn to code…

  32. @AnotherDad

    You are laboring under the misapprehension that ‘Bourgeois truth’, i.e. correspondence with reality, is what’s significant. As Amy knows, what is really significant is ‘Revolutionary truth’, i.e. that which serves the Revolution. In that context, Galileo’s quip is not “helpful’.

  33. @Not Only Wrathful

    The “population will drop” is another way of saying that hundreds of millions, potentially billions, will die in extraordinary suffering.

    Therefore, no.

    I understand your view and it is admirable in morally absolute terms.

    The question, however, will increasingly become one of which set of millions will suffer and die – the Africans, or us Westerners? I feel a much more morally compelling duty to my kith and kin and countrymen than I do to the exponentially expanding mass of Africans.

    The people in charge of things really ought to take into account the fact that my moral feelings aren’t unique.

    That said, does anyone else have the sneaking suspicion that the international movement to combat climate change, headquartered in the U.N. and its IPCC, is a scientifically dubious problem in search of a solution to the real problem that may keep the U.N. types up at night – viz, iSteve’s “Most Important Chart in the World?” In other words, dealing with a turbo charged African population bomb immediately runs into two sticky wickets – the first being the problem with mentioning that maybe somewhere and sometime in the future it may be desirable for the World to have fewer Africans than the future maximum possible number of Africans approaching infinity; the second being that the true attitude of most wealthy Westerners will not be that we need to shift immense resources from our own nations to Africa to deal with the issue of African fertility head-on. Disguising the true looming catastrophe under the cover of a boutique political issue which nevertheless requires the massive shifting of resources to the third world (i.e., Sub-Saharan Africa) may have been the only politically palatable or even possible manner to deal with the issue from their point of view.

  34. @kaganovitch

    You are laboring under the misapprehension that ‘Bourgeois truth’, i.e. correspondence with reality, is what’s significant. As Amy knows, what is really significant is ‘Revolutionary truth’, i.e. that which serves the Revolution. In that context, Galileo’s quip is not “helpful’.

    Perhaps more to the point (and more dispiriting) is that Harmon’s retort seems to imply that if Galileo’s heliocentrism had been racist in some way, he would have only gotten what he had justly coming to him.

  35. @Mr McKenna

    Whether right or left, think twice about finding yourself on the same side about anything with Bari Weiss. It’s just as likely that she was vibed out of the NYT for being an idiot.

    • Replies: @dcthrowback
    , @anonymous
  36. @Reg Cæsar

    “And yet, it moves.”

    Said the Boomer after taking Viagra. (Sorry Reg, I’m an incorrigible smartass. I agree with you on systemic ageism. There’s quite a bit of it in my line of work; and now there’s a let’s discriminate against whitey aspect. Good thing I’m young and full of colour.)

  37. @black sea

    Maybe she was one of the Mean Girls bullying poor Bari.

  38. “I could tuck you in, and we can talk about it.”
    — Kim Gordon

  39. @Not Only Wrathful

    “Global recognition of the challenges around racism are going to be all the more critical if there are large numbers of people of African descent in many countries.”

    If there are to be large numbers of sub-Saharan Africans in many countries, then I can assure the writer that the challenges of racism will be among the least of these countries’ worries.

  40. @Not Only Wrathful

    Evidently you feel (think is not an appropriate word here) that it would be better that all the rest of humanity should suffer than that sub-Saharan Africans should be forced to deal with the consequences of their profligate philoprogenetive and economically feckless ways.

    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
  41. res says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    That’s why she literal doesn’t understand the “it still moves” line. She thinks she is refuting it by saying back, in effect: “It’s different because Gallileo is now respectable whereas Watson’s ‘racial hierarchy’ ideas are socially unacceptable.”

    That was helpful. Thanks.

  42. Eagle Eye says:
    @Mr McKenna

    [Douglas Murray:] Some time ago I became aware that I no longer trusted it even on issues that I didn’t know about. Because on every issue I did know about, I discovered that the paper was spreading untruths and lies.

    Great example of Gell-Mann Amnesia.

  43. @Not Only Wrathful

    Not starving makes people have less children. A scientific fact. Evolution at work. All the not-starving nations will un-breed themselves out of existence. The fittest are the starvingest. It’s like the domesticated foxes getting curly tails and spots. There is nothing that connects curly tails and spots with being friendly to human beings. They are just a tag-along traits that go along with domestication. The tag-along trait that goes along with un-starvation is un-breeding.

    • Disagree: Not Only Wrathful
    • Replies: @PiousAnon
  44. @Jus' Sayin'...

    No, I neither feel that, nor is there any evidence of me feeling that.

    Why do you think there is?

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
  45. @AnotherDad

    Amy hates whites and will believe any kind of creationism that supports this hatred. You’re thinking way too much about the motivations of an obvious bigot

  46. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Natural selection *requires* that different population groups will have different adaptations if they are in different selective environments.

    I’m sorry but this is not as QED as you think it is. For example, Japanese and Europeans evolved in different environments and made different adaptations regarding skin tone and eyelid shape, for example (one theory is that the epicanthic fold is an adaptation for extreme cold to keep your eyeballs from freezing). However, intellectually they ended up in more or less the same place.

    Africans COULD also have ended up in the same place despite their different environment. While it may be quite obvious to you and I that they didn’t, it could have been otherwise. You may take these observed differences and reason backward that it was due to different evolutionary environments – e.g. that the easy living in a mild climate did not lead Africans to great heights of intellectual achievement.

    But Amy starts out believing that “all men are created equal” and so if some men end up short of the finish line intellectually, it must be something that happens to them AFTER they are created. You are never going to convince Amy that the gap is not 100% environmental and that if we could fix the “climate of racism” the gap would go away. If the gap persists, this just means we haven’t tried hard enough yet to root out evil racists who perpetuate it. Since it’s impossible to conduct truly controlled experiments on humans, you are never going to prove otherwise.

    As has often been stated, belief in the equality, neigh, superiority of blacks is really an article of faith of the new religion. As such it is not really subject to scientific proof any more than I could “prove” to you that it’s impossible for a guy to be dead for 3 days and then rise up out of his tomb.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  47. @Not Only Wrathful

    What you wrote:

    The “population will drop” is another way of saying that hundreds of millions, potentially billions, will die in extraordinary suffering.

    Therefore, no.

    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
  48. @Jus' Sayin'...

    Yes, “no” to isolating them and taking away pre-existing technologies.

    That has nothing to do with border control. You can show compassion or, even, just decency, to people, without making them equal residents in your home!

  49. Anonymous[246] • Disclaimer says:
    @Not Only Wrathful

    If you’re saying that America (and the West in general) should not support Africa’s increasing numbers by engaging in endless acts of pathological altruism (including allowing Africans to come here), then I have no argument with you.

  50. @New Dealer

    that was embarassingly amusing, thanks

  51. Peter Frost says: • Website
    @Jack D

    For example, Japanese and Europeans evolved in different environments and made different adaptations regarding skin tone and eyelid shape, for example (one theory is that the epicanthic fold is an adaptation for extreme cold to keep your eyeballs from freezing). However, intellectually they ended up in more or less the same place.

    That’s convergent evolution. If distantly related populations are adapting to similar cultural environments with similar cognitive demands, they will become more or less similar mentally and behaviorally. In this case, there will be the same trend toward lower time preference, higher cognitive ability, stronger impulse control, and a higher threshold for personal violence.

    The word “similar” should be stressed. There are always some differences between any two environments. Moreover, the two populations will be cobbling together their adaptations from different cultural and genetic materials.

    • Replies: @anon
  52. anon[321] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Frost

    The word “similar” should be stressed. There are always some differences between any two environments. Moreover, the two populations will be cobbling together their adaptations from different cultural and genetic materials.

    Case in point, and sorry I don’t have links:

    * The high altitude adaptation found in native peoples of the Peruvian and Bolivian mountains is not the same as the adaptation of Tibetans. But both populations live and the women carry children to term at high altitudes.

    Of course none of them know what “toady” means, so they can never be editors at the NYT.

  53. MEH 0910 says:

    Amy Harmon Retweeted:

  54. Eagle Eye says:
    @Not Only Wrathful

    The underlying document used by the BBC as an excuse for this softball interview/propaganda piece was published as an alleged “research” paper on fertility in the Lancet.

    https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2820%2930677-2

  55. PiousAnon says:
    @kihowi

    No, piety is believing in something obviously untrue. Believing in things that are obviously true is sometimes okay as long as the thing is Not Racist and the Goya beans guy isn’t involved.

  56. anonymous[691] • Disclaimer says:
    @New Dealer

    Here is the distilled version – just Joe Rogan talking with Bari Weiss, minus all the theatrical smugness and self-congratulation interjected by Jimmy Dore and his claque.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Mr McKenna
  57. PiousAnon says:
    @obwandiyag

    Really? Because from what I can tell starving makes people have fewer* children and then once they get to be not-starving they go on a carb-fueled sex-fest in response.

    https://ourworldindata.org/do-famines-check-population-growth

    I’m old and don’t know how to make it a link. Now, if they’re not-starving for a long time AND they don’t have enough land or jobs to go around AND they have ways to have the sex-fest without reproducing then sure. But that’s a rather different set of assumptions.

    *Countable things are “fewer” and uncountable things are “less.” One cannot have “less children” unless one plans on dividing the children a la King Solomon.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    , @Kratoklastes
  58. @Hypnotoad666

    I don’t know because I didn’t get into that children’s lit series. But I will say that the whole thing seems to be about UNZIAN HUBRIS, as in “sure, the ADL will go after every other source of anti-Zionism, but my shit is so brilliant, they’re afraid the whole world will suddenly change their minds about Israel if they it.”

    It’s either UNZ’s HUBRIS or UR is part of an ADL 1000 FLOWERS CAMPAIGN or UR is a DEEP STATE PLOT to create a DISSIDENT SINK.

  59. anon[154] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Thanks. It is easier to concentrate without the claque.

    Bari Weiss was born in 1984. She’s in her mid-30’s, but she talks a lot like a college sophomore, complete with the obligatory vocal fry. Look, I get that millennials have short attention spans and can’t remember much because phones, I really get that at the personal level, but this is marginally ditzy. This is a graduate of Columbia with a BA in history? This? Her vocabulary is not that impressive. Yet this is or was a high ranking journo – list at the New Duranty Times. Nothing in my unimportant opinion changes.

    Here is an opinion maker, part of a group of people who regularly demonstrate that they are stupid and ignorant. The only reason they are on the high perch is nepotism. It is not merit, it is not meritocracy, it is nepotism. Backscratching.

    PS:
    IMO the way to back off from a short attention span due to the phone is to put down the phone and force yourself to do things that require focus for a period of time. Even just chopping weeds, but without the phone.

  60. @anonymous

    Thanks for that. She’s scary stupid. But not the first NYT editor I’ve known who fit that description, FWIW.

  61. @Jack D

    However, intellectually they [Japanese and Europeans] ended up in more or less the same place.

    No, they did not. You’re confusing intellectual development and IQ. Northern Europeans built the modern world, the Japanese contributed nothing. (East Asians seem to have evolved as a much more collectively cohesive, but much less individualistic people, hence the lack of innovation)

  62. @Anonymous

    I suspect Nietzsche would have agreed with me that the white suicide rate is up, partly, because blackness is seen as the other, and so whites deny everything associated with it in themselves.

    Crudely, why don’t whites dance spontaneously anymore?

  63. @PiousAnon

    Oh, what I said was proven science.

    What you said is your typical stupid opinion. The same one everyone has who doesn’t know the science. Thanks for giving me conventional wisdom that I could have guessed before you typed it.

    You don’t even know what I’m talking about. Either in my comment about starving or my comment about your response. Give up.

    • Troll: Not Only Wrathful
    • Replies: @Not Only Wrathful
  64. @Jack D

    I’m sorry but this is not as QED as you think it is. For example, Japanese and Europeans evolved in different environments and made different adaptations regarding skin tone and eyelid shape, for example (one theory is that the epicanthic fold is an adaptation for extreme cold to keep your eyeballs from freezing). However, intellectually they ended up in more or less the same place.

    No Jack, i think it is QED.

    I think i’d quibble even on your Japanese example. (I think the Japanese and white westerners are measurably different in a bunch of mental traits–though clearly Japanese and Whites are much closer in mental traits than whites and blacks.)

    But my point is not the magnitude or even the nature of the differences. My point is simply that selection implies that differences will exist.

    What those differences are and how big they are empirical questions.

    But it is the assertion of the mere existence of the differences that gets Amy Harmon disturbed … and that got Watson fired.

    Watson didn’t say “blacks are really stupid and have the IQ of turnip”, his comment suggested that blacks have a lower IQ, but mainly just an assertion of difference.

    Dr Watson told The Sunday Times that he was “inherently gloomy about the prospect of Africa” because “all our social policies are based on the fact that their intelligence is the same as ours – whereas all the testing says not really”. He said there was a natural desire that all human beings should be equal but “people who have to deal with black employees find this not true”.

    Amy Harmon–and her like minded ilk–are not running around saying “Hey, i’ve carefully studied the data and really the black/white difference is no biggie–best estimate about 4 IQ points. Doesn’t look like selection did much to create a black/white IQ gap … not like the yawning white/Australian-Aboriginal gap.”

    No, the deniers, actually deny. They say “there’s no genetic difference”. Any test difference is due to poverty … due to white racism! “Skin color doesn’t matter.” “Race is socially constructed.”

    So again the question to Amy:
    — Do you not believe that the selective environment was different for whites and blacks this past 10,000 years?
    or
    — Do you not believe in natural selection?

  65. @obwandiyag

    You don’t even know what I’m talking about.

    No one knows what you are talking about, obviously including yourself. Half-felt expressions aren’t being real, they’re incoherent.

  66. MEH 0910 says:

  67. MEH 0910 says:
    @duncsbaby

    That pic of Amy on her twitter scroll really bugs me. What’s up w/the white eyeshadow which only seems to be on one eye? What the hell is that supposed to signify and why is she so goofily gleeful about it?

    I’m going to guess that Amy was face painted by her artistic daughter Sasha, and that’s who she’s smiling at.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sasha_Matthews

  68. @PiousAnon

    I think obwandiyag was just phrasing things colourfully when linking not-breeding to not-starving.

    The link between rising per capita income and falling TFR is well-established (as is the link between rising per capita income and rising life expectancy); before his death in 2017, Hans Rosling gave a few interesting presentations on this subject, using cross-sectional data from pretty much the entire globe.

    There are a range of causative reasons that link low levels of income to high TFR – the main one being that in an economy characterised by subsistence agriculture, children are the only way to have long-term investments. The central idea is that raising a decent number of kids to adulthood, means a better chance of being taken care of in old age.

    Furthermore, as economic conditions – especially health and hygiene infrastructure – improve, TFR lags (in fact it increases in the short term) because couples misperceive neonatal risks.

    Whereas the subsistence environment might lead to an infant mortality rate in the high teens, small improvements in conditions – especially sanitation – can slash that to the low single digits.

    Cultures take time to adapt to the falling mortality rate: it takes time to establish that the falling mortality rate can be expected to persist. During this time, there is a period during which TFR rises simply because more births result in live 2 year olds.

    As I wrote in one of iSteve’s pearl-clutching about impending African Hordes (one of the “Most Important Chart” posts), the estimates for the peak of Sub-Saharan African population are typical of demographic projections by bureaucracies: they have assumed that
    ① it will take SSA longer to get to food security than is statistically likely; and
    ② SSA reproductive strategies will not adapt quickly (i.e., they’re assuming that cultural adaptation will be transmitted by word of mouth – an unrealistic assumption given the urbanisation of Africa).

    The underlying TFR estimates used in “The Most Important Chart” represent the least-defensible possible future for Sub-Saharan Africa. I’m prepared to put money on the population of SSA peaking at 1.5 billion before 2035-2040 and declining gently thereafter.

    The pearl clutching about 4 billion fuzzy-wuzzies migrating north and violating our (obese, tattooed pramface) women is a fever dream.

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