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Personally, I kind of like using honorifics for people. It adds a little color to life: e.g., I might write “Even Sir Mick has admitted that his lyrics for ‘Brown Sugar’ might be …”

So I often refer to a person with Ph.D. rather than an M.D. as “Dr. So-and-So.”

But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district or community college), is pretty tacky. Keep in mind that Jill Biden doesn’t have a Ph.D., she just has an Ed.D.: Doctor of Education.

Mick Jagger, I’m guessing, doesn’t stop people who say “Mr. Jagger, may I have your autograph” and tell them, “Address me only as ‘Sir Mick:’ For I have been knighted by Her Majesty.” Or maybe he does. Who knows?

In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs (e.g., Beau, the late Good Son, failed the admittedly tough Delaware bar exam three times) who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly. Thus, this incident on the campaign trail in 1987:

For the facts, see:

In his statement today, Mr. Biden, who attended the Syracuse College of Law and graduated 76th in a class of 85, acknowledged: ”I did not graduate in the top half of my class at law school and my recollection of this was inaccurate.”

As for receiving three degrees, Mr. Biden said: ”I graduated from the University of Delaware with a double major in history and political science. My reference to degrees at the Claremont event was intended to refer to these majors – I said ‘three’ and should have said ‘two.’ ” Mr. Biden received a single B.A. in history and political science.

”With regard to my being the outstanding student in the political science department,” the statement went on. ”My name was put up for that award by David Ingersoll, who is still at the University of Delaware.”

In the Sunday interview, Mr. Biden said of his claim that he went to school on full academic scholarship: ”My recollection is – and I’d have to confirm this – but I don’t recall paying any money to go to law school.” Newsweek said Mr. Biden had gone to Syracuse ”on half scholarship based on financial need.”

In his statement today, Mr. Biden did not directly dispute this, but said he received a scholarship from the Syracuse University College of Law ”based in part on academics” as well as a grant from the Higher Education Scholarship Fund of the state of Delaware. He said the law school ”arranged for my first year’s room and board by placing me as an assistant resident adviser in the undergraduate school.”

As for the moot court competition, Mr. Biden said he had won such a competition, with a partner, in Kingston, Ontario, on Dec. 12, 1967.

Mr. Biden acknowledged that in the testy exchange in New Hampshire, he had lost his temper. ”I exaggerate when I’m angry,” Mr. Biden said, ”but I’ve never gone around telling people things that aren’t true about me.” Mr. Biden’s questioner had made the query in a mild tone, but provoked an explosive response from Mr. Biden.

 
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  1. This is just part of the Left’s War on Speech Control, where the Left tells you how you may address them, you peon. Hence the “pronouns in the profile” game, and the demanding you address them by their titles (whether real or imaginary), or where they give themselves hilarious monikers and insist that your not following that is hate (e.g. woke joke political commentator Toure Neblitt demanding that he be addressed by the mononym Toure instead of by his full name).

    This is about power to control speech. Very 1984.

    And Steve, good pick up on Biden’s intellectual insecurity. Although no one who gets to be a senator is dumb, Biden was never the smartest guy in the room in any Senate meeting, and he got all upset about it. It seems he couldn’t be happy being a corporate stooge and railroad pawn and decided he needed to “prove” his smarts when challenged.

    • Agree: AndrewR, Old and Grumpy
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @R.G. Camara

    So, he's definitely a dummy, I.Q.-wise. But... pretty darned successful, right? So... discuss. Thx.

    Replies: @anon

    , @AndrewR
    @R.G. Camara

    I shared this on another thread, but it's worth noting how dumb "Dr" Biden is, along with all the TDS sycophants in that thread feigning indignation that Mr Epstein doesn't worship Jill's pseudocredentials.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/mattbramanti/status/1338031367704154112

    And the idea that US Senators are all bright is pretty silly. The Feinstein thing is the clearest example, even if she was still sharp back in 1992. We also have Little Marco and that dumb lady from Tennessee to show us just how stupid these people can be. In electoral politics, higher intelligence is probably a liability past a rather low point. Maybe 110. They want midwits in there.

    , @pyrrhus
    @R.G. Camara

    No, Biden's poor performance at a 4th rate law school indicates that he is of barely average intelligence, and probably not a real hard worker either....

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @R.G. Camara

    "never the smartest guy in the room"

    Clever quips at your expense. But you know they feel a tingle of fear if you look at them a certain way. You know if you approach them in the parking lot with a smile that's not a smile their quip will gurgle in their gut like acid. Present day Neanderthal snaps smart guy's neck.

  2. anon[231] • Disclaimer says:

    That vid showing Biden in 1988 is like some of the vid from the current year, except he doesn’t talk as fast anymore. Pretty obvious Joe’s been an insecure cry-bully for his entire adult life.

    We can all rest easier once he’s installed as President! The long national nightmare will be over!

    • Replies: @Moral Stone
    @anon

    This is of course the same behavior the entire establishment would decry as unpresidential coming from Donald Trump. I do find it interesting that both Biden and Trump focus on “higher IQ” rather than saying “I guarantee I’m smarter than you are” or something similar in meaning.

    Also, I note that Joe Biden is the actual “mediocre white man” of leftist fever dreams. They must hate his ass for being necessary to their ambitions.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @David In TN

    , @Nachum
    @anon

    Apart from the lack of hair. I'd completely forgotten about that. (And I'm bald!)

    Replies: @Anon87

  3. Surprise, surprise, Biden has more hair now than he had in 1988.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Cato


    Surprise, surprise, Biden has more hair now than he had in 1988.

     

    In his nose and ears.


    https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1EuI2X6DuK1Rjy1zjq6zraFXaG.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Indiana Jack
    @Cato

    He doesn't actually have more hair, but his hair has been redistributed. He has more hair on the top of his head due to transplanting, but less in the donor area where the transplanted follicles came from (probably the back of his head).

  4. But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district), is pretty tacky.

    Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn’t handle.

    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @newrouter
    @ScarletNumber

    "Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn’t handle. "

    That's why drop outs for EDU PHD go to gender studies for a Pile it Higher and Deeper

    , @Kronos
    @ScarletNumber

    Also quite a bit of debt that most people couldn’t handle either.

    Does a Ph.D in Education actually cost effective?

    Replies: @Carol, @Mr. Anon, @unit472

    , @education realist
    @ScarletNumber

    The parenthetical isn't true. No teachers get PhDs for the money. For one thing, you don't have to get a degree to get paid more--just go to school, in most cases. A PhD is a huge amount of work for zero benefit that couldn't be achieved in a hundred easier ways. It's flatly false.

    People who get doctorates in education want to teach in university ed schools. And those jobs are going away, like all tenured positions. The minute tenured positions started falling, so did Ed doctorates. In 1998 they were 15% of all degrees. By 2017, they were just 9%.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @Ron Mexico

    , @gent
    @ScarletNumber

    The only thing you have to pass to get one of these degrees is a credit check.

    , @Curle
    @ScarletNumber

    “ it is still a lot of work that most people couldn’t handle.”

    When you meet, or worse, have to work with one of these doctors or, in my case, MBAs, with a degree from an effective diploma mill, you will learn that many profit seekers are working overtime to solve the unmanageable work load problem you describe. From my investigation it was revealed that my erstwhile credentialed associate received his degree from a place where the coursework was comprised of reading power point presentations.

    This article gives you some sense of the situation albeit written about undergrad degrees.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/06/in-the-basement-of-the-ivory-tower/306810/

    , @Stephen Paul Foster
    @ScarletNumber

    Your average plumber, auto mechanic 0r fireman would score a standard deviation higher on a IQ test than one of these frauds.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  5. Delaware’s bar exam pass rate is 68%, and is the 13th easiest by that measure in the USA.

    https://lawschooli.com/bar-exam-pass-rate-by-state/

    Likely under 15% of white males who take the exam fail it.

    Speaking of dim lawyers, more evidence Rudy really screwed up the Hunter laptop release.

    An e-mail admitting to underreporting the Burisma corrupt payments on taxes by $400,000 was on the drive in addition to all the pervy items.

    And Rudy is leaking it now after having it for months!

    https://hotair.com/headlines/archives/2020/12/email-hunter-biden-raises-fresh-questions-tax-dealings/

    • Replies: @Redman
    @Lot

    Article doesn’t say this was just leaked by Rudy. And the tax issue was never a major concern anyway. Nobody cares about the tax implications.

    Rudy and others were looking at the forrest not the trees.

    , @Ed
    @Lot

    Trump was done in more by hiring friends instead of competent people. There is something admirable about elevating a 4th rate lawyer like Cohen to be your personal but at a certain level it just becomes dangerous once you become president.

    Worst staffing mistake was jettisoning Bannon.

    Replies: @botazefa

  6. Anonymous[328] • Disclaimer says:

    Medical doctors have appropriated and monopolized the “Dr.” title, so effectively that most people exclusively or mainly associate it with medicine. But the original use of the title was for people with doctoral degrees.

    The medical guild, especially when it was quite a dodgy profession with very poor standards which was the case until the 20th century, insisted on being called doctors as a PR move to make themselves look better and more authoritative. Technically though, the medical degree was not and still isn’t a doctoral degree. This is obscured in the US because med students are required to have a separate bachelor’s degree as a prerequisite. But in the UK, Canada, and most countries elsewhere, the medical degree is a bachelor’s degree. You get a bachelor’s degree in medicine, surgery, etc.

    In other words, medical doctors don’t have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called “doctors”. They have bachelor’s degrees. But they’re members of a guild which successfully managed to usurp the label.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    All right, bad on the U.S. sawbones guild I suppose, but didn't the J.D. come first? And M.D. in the states was soon joined by Pharm.D., O.D., D.D.S./D.M.D., and probably more crazy crap in the future, so I don't see how they're running as impostors in front of everybody.

    Psy.D. would seem to be of that same clique but 1) apparently requires as much work as a Ph.D. in psychology; and 2) isn't sufficient for psychiatric jobs that require the professional/M.D. cred

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Pericles

    , @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    In other words, medical doctors don’t have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called “doctors”. They have bachelor’s degrees.

    Medical degrees require four calendar years of study in a discrete body of knowledge. To enter medical school, you need a body of credits in a set of adjacent subjects, earned while you're getting your BA degree or earned after in post-baccalaureate programs. Bachelor's degrees run for four academic years and your course list is commonly a mishmash of stuff, with 1/3 or 1/2 devoted to your major. The MD is perfectly appropriate. (And, if I'm not mistaken, European universities added medical schools during the Renaissance and early modern period).

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @for-the-record
    @Anonymous

    Medical doctors have appropriated and monopolized the “Dr.” title

    Here in Portugal anyone who has a university degree is entitled to be called "Doutor" (or Doutora). It's presumably because in the "old days" university degrees in Portugal were extraordinarily rare -- if I had gone to school in Portugal, obligatory schooling would have been to age 9.

    , @Ancient Briton
    @Anonymous

    In the UK, surgeons (Ch.B or B.S.) are called Mr. (see sgu.edu for background.)

  7. Awesome. He cut her up back down and sideways. I love good invective.

    The only good thing about Dr. (Ed.) Jill is that she may be that last person to keep Kamalaho at bay while she does Edith Wilson II with Joe.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Jim Don Bob


    The only good thing about Dr. (Ed.) Jill is that she may be that last person to keep Kamalaho at bay while she does Edith Wilson II with Joe.

     

    I agree; this looming showdown promises to be epic. The problem is that, given media omerta, few to no details of the inevitable donnybrooks may ever leak out to the public.
    , @Clyde
    @Jim Don Bob

    Dr. Jill will be the strongest force to keep mental decline Biden in the Presidency. I can see her being hooked into cabinet meetings via squawk box. Kamala is Obama's stooge. When this duo come after Joe to get him to step aside, look for the battle of the 50ft tall women in DC. Susan Rice will also be in this fray for Obama.

    Replies: @bomag

  8. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:

    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the “Dr”, it’s really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf

    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Anonymous


    University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal" Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.
     
    Would you believe that this (somewhat outdated) stereotype has been called anti-semitic? (Not the use of the Ivy affiliation but the notion that Penn is substandard.)

    Replies: @black sea, @Abolish_public_education, @Old and Grumpy, @International Jew

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do...
     
    It is amazing how many "historic" neighborhoods and towns there are in the Midwest. I don't remember any in the Northeast, even though theirs are 200 or so years older.


    https://www.explorebranson.com/sites/default/files/historic-branson-badge.png

    Replies: @newrouter, @black sea

    , @Dr. X
    @Anonymous


    As for the “Dr”, it’s really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity).
     
    In my experience, that's true. Despite my handle (which refers to a couple of things other than the fact that I do have an academic doctorate) I never made anyone call me "Doctor" -- I preferred "Professor."

    Like Jill Biden, I actually taught at community colleges (an experience I wouldn't want to repeat) and faculty who used the honorific were often marginally qualified and were simply trying to inflate their importance and pull rank over the majority of the faculty who held only Master's degrees -- e.g., "I'm DOCTAH Sha-nay-nay Washington of the African-American Studies Department." The practice was most common among females, and among female administrators in particular who held Ed.Ds. Many who did this were in fact very stupid and/or insecure.

    In a four-year university where pretty much all faculty are Ph.Ds, it's redundant and pointless to go around calling people "Doctor," and everybody goes by "Professor" or just their first name unless they're getting introduced at a formal event or public lecture.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @Flip
    @Anonymous

    Isn’t it Dr. Kissinger?

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

    , @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    It's absolutely standard on arts and sciences faculties, and for a reason. They spent a year or two taking classes and four or five years working on a research project to get that degree.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anonymous, @TTSSYF

    , @Carbon blob
    @Anonymous

    I wouldn’t consider Penn a second-rate Ivy at all, I think they just get tired of being confused with a certain cow college in central PA.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @The Last Real Calvinist

    , @Anon
    @Anonymous

    “Tell me what you brag about and I will tell you what you lack.”

    Very old saying.

  9. The more lightweight the doctoral program, the more the graduate will insist on being addressed as doctor.

    A notable exception was the prominent, public education critic William Cosby, EdD.

    I am so sick and tired of public union contracts that award pay raises (higher shares of government spending) to school teachers who accumulate graduate school credit-hours.

    Doctor of Babysitting.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @Abolish_public_education

    Well, you’d get even lower quality teachers if they didn’t bump the salaries for additional degrees. A BA in Education requires laughably low effort. Any bar is better than no bar.

    Nothing can be done about public Education until disciplinary issues are seriously addressed, however.

    , @Daniel H
    @Abolish_public_education

    I am so sick and tired of public union contracts that award pay raises (higher shares of government spending) to school teachers who accumulate graduate school credit-hours.

    This credential racket is a factor in most public employee advancement/compensation. I know a dude who started out as an $8 dollar/hour laborer for the city of North Las Vegas water department. Thirteen years later, just before he was fired, he was earning $110,000 per year, and that was ten years ago. I can only imagine how much he would be earning today if he hadn't gotten himself fired.

    How did he advance? Creeping credentialism. A certificate here, another certificate there. A 2 day seminar every now and then.....No college degrees needed, just simple certifications. Contracts between the labor union and government mandated that his compensation be advanced for every certification earned. Get a government job. Just get a government job and much of life's anxiety will ease up.

    , @John Up North
    @Abolish_public_education

    For many years Chicago public school teachers would attend Chicago State University. Now that's a school with a dodgy reputation. Teachers would get their Masters Degrees at CSU because was it was affordable and the course work was easy. The student teachers didn't have to do a lot of writing. Last I heard Chicago State was endangered of losing it's accreditation.

  10. Off topic Californians I went to a small privately owned food market where I buy meat and fish. New sign in the door “ by order of the public health authorities only 8 persons can be in the store at the same time”

    I went in Only 1 other customer in the store on Saturday afternoon. Has anyone else seen a sign like this?

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Alden

    That’s pretty common in Chicago. People wait in line outside to get in.

    , @binkyxz3
    @Alden

    Off off topic -- "Dr." Jill has a petite nastiness I find attractive.

    , @Gordo
    @Alden

    Pretty common in UK, bigger supermarkets have a security guard at the door with one of those clicky counting things.

  11. @ScarletNumber

    But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district), is pretty tacky.
     
    Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn't handle.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Kronos, @education realist, @gent, @Curle, @Stephen Paul Foster

    “Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn’t handle. ”

    That’s why drop outs for EDU PHD go to gender studies for a Pile it Higher and Deeper

  12. I went to law school with Beau, seemed a pretty genuinely good guy. Al Damato’s son was at SU Law at the same time, a total douche. Both were pulling good tail, unlike me, but I ain’t no senator’s son.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Anon


    but I ain’t no senator’s son.
     
    Trump arriving at The Villages Florida 10/23/20 in Marine One
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XOzEa7GM9s
  13. It’s “Sir Michael”. Anyway, I’m glad Joe’s hair has made as big a comeback as his presidential ambitions.

  14. @ScarletNumber

    But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district), is pretty tacky.
     
    Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn't handle.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Kronos, @education realist, @gent, @Curle, @Stephen Paul Foster

    Also quite a bit of debt that most people couldn’t handle either.

    Does a Ph.D in Education actually cost effective?

    • Replies: @Carol
    @Kronos

    It's an EdD and yeah it's worth it if you're already ensconced in a school district and looking to move up and get away from the classroom.

    Replies: @education realist

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Kronos


    Does a Ph.D in Education actually cost effective?
     
    For Education Colleges? Yes, very.
    , @unit472
    @Kronos

    I remember my high school principal admonishing me that if I didn't straighten up I'd never get into a good college. Since I was already in trouble I resisted the urge to comment on his college diploma hanging on the wall behind him. It was from North Carolina Appalachian State Teachers College!

    In fairness to the high school principal he did go on to become Superintendent of Schools for Fairfax County which is about as prestigious a post as one can aspire to in public education so. despite his alma mater's lack of prestige, he rose to the top of his field.

  15. since the taxpayer subsidies almost all 3rd level education, can we require that dissertations etc need to be posted on a searchable online database. It might cause lefties to pause before embracing vitriol and for professors grading it

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Houston 1992

    Considering she went to a public university, I'm sure it is if you know where to look. A few weeks ago I posted the link to Ibram Kendi's dissertation.

  16. @anon
    That vid showing Biden in 1988 is like some of the vid from the current year, except he doesn't talk as fast anymore. Pretty obvious Joe's been an insecure cry-bully for his entire adult life.

    We can all rest easier once he's installed as President! The long national nightmare will be over!

    Replies: @Moral Stone, @Nachum

    This is of course the same behavior the entire establishment would decry as unpresidential coming from Donald Trump. I do find it interesting that both Biden and Trump focus on “higher IQ” rather than saying “I guarantee I’m smarter than you are” or something similar in meaning.

    Also, I note that Joe Biden is the actual “mediocre white man” of leftist fever dreams. They must hate his ass for being necessary to their ambitions.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna, Redman, bomag
    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Moral Stone

    "I do find it interesting that both Biden and Trump focus on “higher IQ” rather than saying “I guarantee I’m smarter than you are” or something similar in meaning.'

    It's the influence of all the IQ nerds and HBD fetishists that congregate on Unz. Interesting how the "high IQ" types turn out to be Clintons or Trumps or Bidens. It's almost as if IQ had nothing to do with competence or even being a decent human being.

    Replies: @botazefa

    , @David In TN
    @Moral Stone

    Yes, Never Trumpers like to call Donald Trump a "buffoon," while backing a mediocrity known as a "buffoon" for 30 plus years.

    I saw the performance above on CSPAN at the time. Funny thing, I was a Democrat and was considering Joe Biden as my preferred candidate for the 1988 nomination. Soon after Biden was laughed out of the race for plagiarizing a Neal Kinnock speech and peddling a phony life story.

  17. Having to call an education dummy like Jill Biden “doctor” is like having to wear a mask in public: something we are forced to do as sign of social submission.

    Literally, just like having to call some clown “Sir”.

    It’s enforced by the same crowd.

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @RichardTaylor

    Richard, good practice to calls cops, "Officer", seems to smooth the interaction.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @black sea

  18. OT, sort of: here’s a photo of the most overlooked, ignored, and neglected PoC in America today:

    That’s Pierson Cooke, who seems to be the regular kicker on the Vanderbilt football team. He kicked a 39-yard field goal today in Vandy’s 42-17 loss to Tennessee.

    But he’s not making a lot of news, because on this day he wasn’t needed to kick extra points — that crucial duty was turned over to Sarah Fuller, who did indeed convert 2 for 2 chances.

    I love the way all of the news stories on Fuller emphasize the absolute NECESSITY of bringing her on to the team, because there JUST WAS NO OTHER CHOICE.

    But today their regular kicker was clearly available, and the actual kicking duties, other than the two gimmick extra points, were obviously turned back over to him.

    By the way, to bring this post back on topic, here’s a Guardian article that suggests a new form of address for powerful GRRRLZ who deserve respect and recognition for their accomplishments that will no doubt soon enter the lexicon:

    Sarah Fuller: ‘My male college football teammates call me Champ’

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The interim head coach must have thought this virtue signaling was his best path to another job. He had previously said he was going to play the kicker who best helped the team, that was a lie.

    Replies: @Curle

    , @ScarletNumber
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    I love the way all of the news stories on Fuller emphasize the absolute NECESSITY of bringing her on to the team, because there JUST WAS NO OTHER CHOICE.
     
    Well teams generally carry two kickers in case one gets hurt in the middle of the game.
    , @mmack
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Does anyone want to tell Sarah when men call each other "Champ" and nobody has won a championship it's a good bet we're being sarcastic, or do we let her run with it? 🤔

    , @Neuday
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Sarah Fuller: ‘My male college football teammates call me Champ’
     
    Silly girl doesn't realize that it's a joke. She's a backup kicker on a bad team who's only good for squibs, PATs and buckets of publicity because vagina. Calling her Champ is perfect, and the guys calling her that know she's too stupid to get it and she even repeats it to the fawning media. Brilliant.
  19. @Anonymous
    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the "Dr", it's really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a "Dr", it's a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf


    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Flip, @Art Deco, @Carbon blob, @Anon

    University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

    Would you believe that this (somewhat outdated) stereotype has been called anti-semitic? (Not the use of the Ivy affiliation but the notion that Penn is substandard.)

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Mr McKenna

    Probably, there's a fair amount of confusion as to whether The University of Pennsylvania is a private or a public school, and people affiliated with Penn want to let the world know that it's not a state institution.

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @Mr McKenna

    When the Ivy knives come out ..

    I was once at a restaurant table with a couple of Ivies. In due course the waiter informed us that his job was part of his program at Cornell’s College of Hotel Management.

    That prompted my dinner companions to mention their alma maters, whereby the waiter immediately expressed his delight at serving fellow Ivies.

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that CCHM was not Ivy League.

    Thanks for the info.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @ScarletNumber

    , @Old and Grumpy
    @Mr McKenna

    Penn is an Ivy League school. Now are you mixing up Penn State, who awhile a back purchased Dickinson's Law School? I never heard Dickinson refer itself as an Ivy school, although it is like a lot of snooty small private colleges with dreams of grandeur. Funny thing is they needed the money from the sale of their law school. As for Penn State, it is PA's land grant university. Thoroughly worthless these days as a land grant, which is very sad since at one time it was exceptional. It as definitely has become considerably pretentious in its attitude since I went there.

    , @International Jew
    @Mr McKenna

    Back in the day (I'm Steve's age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn. But that was before the tsunami of talented Chinese and Indian kids. Penn is more selective now, than Yale was back in '76.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

  20. About the article? First time I can remember a WSJ op-ed producing over 1200 reader comments. Only read a few, but was delighted to learn (from one of her fans) that Jill’s current title is “First Lady Elect”…and you thought you voted for…

    • Replies: @B36
    @Mr McKenna

    Douglas Emhoff is the First Gentleman Elect-In-Waiting

  21. @Jim Don Bob
    Awesome. He cut her up back down and sideways. I love good invective.

    The only good thing about Dr. (Ed.) Jill is that she may be that last person to keep Kamalaho at bay while she does Edith Wilson II with Joe.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Clyde

    The only good thing about Dr. (Ed.) Jill is that she may be that last person to keep Kamalaho at bay while she does Edith Wilson II with Joe.

    I agree; this looming showdown promises to be epic. The problem is that, given media omerta, few to no details of the inevitable donnybrooks may ever leak out to the public.

  22. Doctor is appropriate for PhDs in a professional setting but dumb to use in public. Plus everyone knows that EdDs are joke degrees that don’t count as a real doctorate.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Polynices

    Some years ago I read an article about John Carlos of 1968 Olympic fame. The writer called Carlos "Dr. Carlos" every other sentence. He apparently obtained a doctorate of some kind.

    Replies: @Clyde

    , @Crouchback
    @Polynices

    At my university we joke that acquiring the EdD means an automatic loss of 10 IQ points.

  23. @Abolish_public_education
    The more lightweight the doctoral program, the more the graduate will insist on being addressed as doctor.

    A notable exception was the prominent, public education critic William Cosby, EdD.

    I am so sick and tired of public union contracts that award pay raises (higher shares of government spending) to school teachers who accumulate graduate school credit-hours.

    Doctor of Babysitting.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @Daniel H, @John Up North

    Well, you’d get even lower quality teachers if they didn’t bump the salaries for additional degrees. A BA in Education requires laughably low effort. Any bar is better than no bar.

    Nothing can be done about public Education until disciplinary issues are seriously addressed, however.

  24. @Kronos
    @ScarletNumber

    Also quite a bit of debt that most people couldn’t handle either.

    Does a Ph.D in Education actually cost effective?

    Replies: @Carol, @Mr. Anon, @unit472

    It’s an EdD and yeah it’s worth it if you’re already ensconced in a school district and looking to move up and get away from the classroom.

    • Replies: @education realist
    @Carol

    Not true. Quicker to get an admin credential. Unfortunately, while teachers aren't hired by affirmative action, administrators are. But a doctorate isn't going to get you a job in admin any more than a simple credential is.

  25. I’ve disliked Joe Biden his entire career. His plagiarism, bullying, outright fabrications, and working-class schtick all piss me off, more than Barry O’s phony intellectualism-meets-numinous negro or the Squad’s insane leftism via identity politics of girl POCs. The fact that he enriched himself and his loser kids is just the icing on the cake.

    It seems most commentators around the political spectrum really do seem to like him and also think he is about as close an approximation to an average white guy that they like. Maybe that’s why it makes me so angry.

    Marx saved his most savage invective for the petit bourgeois, little guys who defended the system and truly believed in it even as they didn’t benefit from it. I suppose I hate Joe because he is the same way, at least in the sense that all working class whites have been gutted by his life’s work, even as he claims to be one of them. (Well, plus he has benefited, greatly.)

    • Agree: Nathan, Jim Christian
    • Thanks: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Agreed. I have not seen much besides youtube clips of this guy, but he just seems like one overly aggressive son of a bitch way too often. I remember that some guy on his campaign trail up in Ohio (somewhere in the area anyway) asked him a tough question and Biden got in the guy's face about it. That's about 180 degrees from the way Ronald Reagan would have handled it.

    I ran out of [Agree]s for the day, but a round of them on me for all those who know that the Ed. PhD is a crock.

    Are you crazy, are you high, or just an ordinary guy?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w58E2S315a4

    Replies: @anon, @Ganderson

  26. @Cato
    Surprise, surprise, Biden has more hair now than he had in 1988.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Indiana Jack

    Surprise, surprise, Biden has more hair now than he had in 1988.

    In his nose and ears.

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    If you want to avoid batteries and machines, I've found that bent chain nose jewelry pliers work well to remove both nose and ear hair.

  27. Brother Steve, I would probably guess that Hands-on Joe is closer to a mid-wit than you’re giving him credit for.

    That exchange of his that you posted above; I’ve met borderline mentally retarded tradesmen who didn’t string that many gaffes together in one try.

    But then again, Uncle Handsie might just be a really bad liar, and if that’s the case there’s even less to like about him than you think.

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin
  28. I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, “Hello, Mr. Kissinger!” The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, “DOCTOR Kissinger!”

    When I was a graduate student in Psychology, forty years ago, I used to joke that I only wanted to earn a Ph.D. so that I could be the only one NOT to call myself “Doctor.” My experiences, as both a student and as an employee, in several institutions of higher education, was that faculty members indeed did tend to be very sensitive to their being slighted by their lessers who failed to address them as “Doctor.”

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @D. K.


    My experiences, as both a student and as an employee, in several institutions of higher education, was that faculty members indeed did tend to be very sensitive to their being slighted by their lessers who failed to address them as “Doctor.”
     
    That's weird to me. My grad school days were ~30 years ago but everyone used first names. To be sure, there were certain older 'legends in the field' types with whom one would use the honorific, but I can't imagine even them bristling if someone didn't. Perhaps a EuroProf or two, older and affecting a grand mien. Fortunately we didn't have too many of those. I never used it, but I certainly addressed legends as "Professor", at least until we had become familiar.

    What would you call Professor Ta-Nehisi? The day is coming. For many years I was one person removed from Dr K but the connection was a woman in a clearly subservient position, whom he always addressed by her first name. Why does Herr K run amok, anyway?

    Replies: @D. K.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @D. K.


    I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, “Hello, Mr. Kissinger!” The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, “DOCTOR Kissinger!”
     
    I'm sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Orville H. Larson

    , @Cortes
    @D. K.

    Some NHS Consultants get very huffy if addressed as “Dr”; the preferred style is usually “Mr/Miss/Ms”, with “Dr” being a lower form of life: no cited papers, surgical techniques developed or hundreds of successful operations behind them, etc.

  29. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, sort of: here's a photo of the most overlooked, ignored, and neglected PoC in America today:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1200514937732370433/eYpTPab4_400x400.jpg

    That's Pierson Cooke, who seems to be the regular kicker on the Vanderbilt football team. He kicked a 39-yard field goal today in Vandy's 42-17 loss to Tennessee.

    But he's not making a lot of news, because on this day he wasn't needed to kick extra points -- that crucial duty was turned over to Sarah Fuller, who did indeed convert 2 for 2 chances.

    I love the way all of the news stories on Fuller emphasize the absolute NECESSITY of bringing her on to the team, because there JUST WAS NO OTHER CHOICE.

    But today their regular kicker was clearly available, and the actual kicking duties, other than the two gimmick extra points, were obviously turned back over to him.

    By the way, to bring this post back on topic, here's a Guardian article that suggests a new form of address for powerful GRRRLZ who deserve respect and recognition for their accomplishments that will no doubt soon enter the lexicon:

    Sarah Fuller: 'My male college football teammates call me Champ'

    Replies: @Barnard, @ScarletNumber, @mmack, @Neuday

    The interim head coach must have thought this virtue signaling was his best path to another job. He had previously said he was going to play the kicker who best helped the team, that was a lie.

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Barnard

    In his defense, this is probably the only football story the disproportionately large number of lesbian college presidents have read in the last decade.

  30. @Anonymous
    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the "Dr", it's really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a "Dr", it's a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf


    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Flip, @Art Deco, @Carbon blob, @Anon

    We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do…

    It is amazing how many “historic” neighborhoods and towns there are in the Midwest. I don’t remember any in the Northeast, even though theirs are 200 or so years older.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    @Reg Cæsar

    " I don’t remember any in the Northeast, even though theirs are 200 or so years older."

    What's your favorite pronoun?

    , @black sea
    @Reg Cæsar

    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dan Hayes

  31. My experience is anyone who gets a doctorate spends a few days making everyone call them, “Doctor.” This was largely just to be a dick about it. Afterwards, the title would be dropped except for siblings and whenever you need to pull rank. (“That’s Dr Jackass to you.”) I wonder if that means Jill considers Joe to be her little brother or someone who needs to be knocked down a few pegs.

    • Replies: @Russ
    @LRFD


    My experience is anyone who gets a doctorate spends a few days making everyone call them, “Doctor.” This was largely just to be a dick about it. Afterwards, the title would be dropped except for siblings and whenever you need to pull rank. (“That’s Dr Jackass to you.”)
     
    Twas certainly the case with my brother's engineering doctorate. I addressed him as DAHHHK-TORRR Jim for a week until he cried uncle. He tells new colleagues to address him as Jim: If they suddenly begin bleeding all over the place, he warns that all he can do for them is faint.

    Whereas he and his peers spent 1-2 years out of industry to do deep-dive technical research, the currently popular scam is to work full time AND do doctoral research, with the lie-agreed-upon than the candidate has the energy and focus for advanced research after eight hours at the day job. Yeah, right.

    My brother also regarded his crowning achievement as getting the paper summarizing his dissertation published in an IEEE Transactions, post-graduation. One surmises that simply achieving graduation is the consummate and only goal today, with the "Dr. Jackass" immediately following. It's regression, pure and simple.
  32. @Anonymous
    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the "Dr", it's really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a "Dr", it's a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf


    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Flip, @Art Deco, @Carbon blob, @Anon

    As for the “Dr”, it’s really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity).

    In my experience, that’s true. Despite my handle (which refers to a couple of things other than the fact that I do have an academic doctorate) I never made anyone call me “Doctor” — I preferred “Professor.”

    Like Jill Biden, I actually taught at community colleges (an experience I wouldn’t want to repeat) and faculty who used the honorific were often marginally qualified and were simply trying to inflate their importance and pull rank over the majority of the faculty who held only Master’s degrees — e.g., “I’m DOCTAH Sha-nay-nay Washington of the African-American Studies Department.” The practice was most common among females, and among female administrators in particular who held Ed.Ds. Many who did this were in fact very stupid and/or insecure.

    In a four-year university where pretty much all faculty are Ph.Ds, it’s redundant and pointless to go around calling people “Doctor,” and everybody goes by “Professor” or just their first name unless they’re getting introduced at a formal event or public lecture.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Dr. X


    Despite my handle (which refers to a couple of things other than the fact that I do have an academic doctorate) I never made anyone call me “Doctor” — I preferred “Professor.”
     
    Yes, but did you ever build a creature?

    Replies: @Dr. X

  33. Thirty years ago, when I worked in hospital administration, I don’t believe there was one PhD who wanted to be called “doctor”, no matter what science their degree was in. In hospitals, “doctor” establishes rank and precedence, and who actually holds the responsibility for the life and well-being of patients.

    Now, though, PhDs all insist on being called doctor, especially the women. Doctors of Nursing, Doctors of Public Health. In every field, no matter how unrelated to health care. And even when their doctorate is as useless as an education degree.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    Okay, so if in a hospital, somebody says, "Get a doctor now!" they don't have time for a discussion of whether a holder of a Ph.D. of Public Health or Education or whatever is or isn't a real doctor.

    That makes sense.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anon7, @Twinkie

    , @Gordo
    @Anon7

    It's when they're stupid enough to use it booking a flight and half way across the Atlantic a stewardess comes up and whispers 'can you help, someone in coach has had a heart attack?'

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Anon7

    A hospital is the one place where one should have to be an MD or a DO in order to use the honorific. The consequences are too severe otherwise.

    , @Art Deco
    @Anon7

    I used to work in a university medical center. It had a dental school appended to it and there might have been a sleep lab psychologist on the premises. These aside, I doubt you could have found a non-medical doctor around. (It was in the era before the Pharm.D. degree was common).

    Replies: @Anon7

  34. @D. K.
    I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, "Hello, Mr. Kissinger!" The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, "DOCTOR Kissinger!"

    When I was a graduate student in Psychology, forty years ago, I used to joke that I only wanted to earn a Ph.D. so that I could be the only one NOT to call myself "Doctor." My experiences, as both a student and as an employee, in several institutions of higher education, was that faculty members indeed did tend to be very sensitive to their being slighted by their lessers who failed to address them as "Doctor."

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Mr. Anon, @Cortes

    My experiences, as both a student and as an employee, in several institutions of higher education, was that faculty members indeed did tend to be very sensitive to their being slighted by their lessers who failed to address them as “Doctor.”

    That’s weird to me. My grad school days were ~30 years ago but everyone used first names. To be sure, there were certain older ‘legends in the field’ types with whom one would use the honorific, but I can’t imagine even them bristling if someone didn’t. Perhaps a EuroProf or two, older and affecting a grand mien. Fortunately we didn’t have too many of those. I never used it, but I certainly addressed legends as “Professor”, at least until we had become familiar.

    What would you call Professor Ta-Nehisi? The day is coming. For many years I was one person removed from Dr K but the connection was a woman in a clearly subservient position, whom he always addressed by her first name. Why does Herr K run amok, anyway?

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Mr McKenna

    I worked at Purdue, in between my B.A. and starting graduate school, and I was generally (although certainly not universally) popular with both the staff and the faculty, in our department. I became close to a few of the faculty members, occasionally socializing with them off of campus; yet, I always addressed them as "Doctor" rather than familiarly by their given names. It never would have occurred to me to address a random professor by his first name, whether I was an undergraduate, staff member or graduate student. I am sure that many faculty members would have reported me to my superiors, if I had addressed one of the former by his first name, when I was a staff member. "Professor" also was acceptable usage, of course, but I found it more off-putting than "Doctor," for some reason. Anyway, I even addressed my major professor as "Doctor," during and after graduate school, even though we had been friends since I first started working in the department. I suppose that it comes down to the way that I had been raised, as a blue-collar boy in Gary, Indiana, more so than what actually was expected of me, by him and the others to whom I was close, during those few years.

  35. Biden looked like Peter Boyle’s kid brother.

    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Mr. Anon

    "Biden looked like Peter Boyle's kid brother."

    You noticed that too? I've long thought of Biden's doo as "the Frank Barone."

  36. @Kronos
    @ScarletNumber

    Also quite a bit of debt that most people couldn’t handle either.

    Does a Ph.D in Education actually cost effective?

    Replies: @Carol, @Mr. Anon, @unit472

    Does a Ph.D in Education actually cost effective?

    For Education Colleges? Yes, very.

    • LOL: ScarletNumber
  37. @Anonymous
    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the "Dr", it's really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a "Dr", it's a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf


    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Flip, @Art Deco, @Carbon blob, @Anon

    Isn’t it Dr. Kissinger?

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
    @Flip

    I would have thought he'd want to be known by his last held title as Secretary Kissinger.

  38. @Alden
    Off topic Californians I went to a small privately owned food market where I buy meat and fish. New sign in the door “ by order of the public health authorities only 8 persons can be in the store at the same time”

    I went in Only 1 other customer in the store on Saturday afternoon. Has anyone else seen a sign like this?

    Replies: @Flip, @binkyxz3, @Gordo

    That’s pretty common in Chicago. People wait in line outside to get in.

  39. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do...
     
    It is amazing how many "historic" neighborhoods and towns there are in the Midwest. I don't remember any in the Northeast, even though theirs are 200 or so years older.


    https://www.explorebranson.com/sites/default/files/historic-branson-badge.png

    Replies: @newrouter, @black sea

    ” I don’t remember any in the Northeast, even though theirs are 200 or so years older.”

    What’s your favorite pronoun?

  40. @ScarletNumber

    But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district), is pretty tacky.
     
    Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn't handle.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Kronos, @education realist, @gent, @Curle, @Stephen Paul Foster

    The parenthetical isn’t true. No teachers get PhDs for the money. For one thing, you don’t have to get a degree to get paid more–just go to school, in most cases. A PhD is a huge amount of work for zero benefit that couldn’t be achieved in a hundred easier ways. It’s flatly false.

    People who get doctorates in education want to teach in university ed schools. And those jobs are going away, like all tenured positions. The minute tenured positions started falling, so did Ed doctorates. In 1998 they were 15% of all degrees. By 2017, they were just 9%.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @education realist

    In my experience, it is true, although it's more common that they pad their income with Masters degrees than with doctorates. Masters degrees in education can be completed in about a year and can be done part-time or in the evenings, without any loss of income. There's more bang for the buck with getting a Masters versus a Ph.D. I've observed the same thing with other State agencies. In fact, many of them will pay for the person to get an advanced degree and then will give them a salary increase. That's not to say that it isn't always warranted or didn't take a lot of effort to attain.

    , @Ron Mexico
    @education realist

    The Ed PhD has been replaced by Masters in Ed Leadership for those of us who want in on the Admin gravy train. Not for me. I have a bullshit Masters in Ed. Put me high up on the pay scale, but is an albatross when seeking a teaching job in another district. But you probably know all of this.

  41. 1. If Biden required 4 attempts to pass the bar exam, he was below the 8th percentile among licensed attorneys. I believe Marilyn Mosby, the abusive state’s attorney in Baltimore, required 3 attempts.

    2. “EdD” degrees are spurious as professional credentials. There’s been a great deal of credential inflation in the last generation or two, but disciplines and practices like dentistry, physical and occupational therapy, and pharmacy are distinct bodies of knowledge and skill whose practitioners either know things physicians and surgeons do not or have a much more detailed understanding than you commonly find among medical practitioners. Clinical psychologists commonly have some tricks up their sleeve that psychiatrists do not. (Optometrists and podiatrists, perhaps not). There is no such profession as ‘education’. There are public-sector apparatchiks, non-profit apparatchiks, public policy mavens, and tests-and-measurements psychologists.

    3. EdDs are spurious as research degrees as well. You can study psychology and you can study organizational behavior (under the heading of sociology or psychology or political science).

    Which is to say it’s another humbug degree. Same deal with all the other teaching degrees, social work degrees, library science degrees, ‘interdisciplinary’ degrees in the arts-and-sciences, and (in many places) degrees in sociology and cultural anthropology. And when they’re not humbug, they’re nevertheless padded (as are nearly all baccalaureate degree programs, not to mention JD programs). Abolish all of them.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave, TTSSYF
    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @Art Deco

    I've always thought that a teacher should have a degree in whatever subject matter they intend to teach, supplemented with a few psychology course or other general management courses.; e.g., an eighth-grade science teacher should have a degree in some sort of hard science, not education with an "emphasis" on science.

  42. @Carol
    @Kronos

    It's an EdD and yeah it's worth it if you're already ensconced in a school district and looking to move up and get away from the classroom.

    Replies: @education realist

    Not true. Quicker to get an admin credential. Unfortunately, while teachers aren’t hired by affirmative action, administrators are. But a doctorate isn’t going to get you a job in admin any more than a simple credential is.

  43. Anonymous[504] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Medical doctors have appropriated and monopolized the "Dr." title, so effectively that most people exclusively or mainly associate it with medicine. But the original use of the title was for people with doctoral degrees.

    The medical guild, especially when it was quite a dodgy profession with very poor standards which was the case until the 20th century, insisted on being called doctors as a PR move to make themselves look better and more authoritative. Technically though, the medical degree was not and still isn't a doctoral degree. This is obscured in the US because med students are required to have a separate bachelor's degree as a prerequisite. But in the UK, Canada, and most countries elsewhere, the medical degree is a bachelor's degree. You get a bachelor's degree in medicine, surgery, etc.

    In other words, medical doctors don't have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called "doctors". They have bachelor's degrees. But they're members of a guild which successfully managed to usurp the label.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Art Deco, @for-the-record, @Ancient Briton

    All right, bad on the U.S. sawbones guild I suppose, but didn’t the J.D. come first? And M.D. in the states was soon joined by Pharm.D., O.D., D.D.S./D.M.D., and probably more crazy crap in the future, so I don’t see how they’re running as impostors in front of everybody.

    Psy.D. would seem to be of that same clique but 1) apparently requires as much work as a Ph.D. in psychology; and 2) isn’t sufficient for psychiatric jobs that require the professional/M.D. cred

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymous


    but didn’t the J.D. come first?
     
    No. The traditional American law degree was LL.B. - bachelor of laws, although in most cases those attending law school already had undergrad degrees. At some point (the 1960s) law schools decided to call their degrees JD (Juris Doctor) and even allowed prior grads to upgrade their diplomas. The reason, I was once given to understand, was civil service pay scales which paid more for people with doctoral degrees. However it has never been the custom to call lawyers "doctor" and if you go back for another degree in say taxation after getting your JD, the next degree is a master of laws, LL.M., which makes no sense. And if you want to get a REAL doctorate in law, you have to get an SJD (Doctor of Juridical Science) degree.

    Replies: @Daniel H

    , @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    All right, bad on the U.S. sawbones guild I suppose, but didn’t the J.D. come first?

    No, the juris doctor was atypical until some point after about 1950. The LLB was the order of the day before that. Not sure when law degrees came to be more common than office apprenticeships. In my home town, superior court judges prior to 1920 were generally men who read law. After that, law school was the mode.

    , @Pericles
    @Anonymous

    Back in good old Europe, I believe the juris doctors and doctors of theology were first. Then the great umbrella of philosophy. The first medical doctor seems to have appeared in Glasgow 1703, though there seems to have been a medical licensing requirement in some places long before that.

  44. @Anonymous
    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the "Dr", it's really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a "Dr", it's a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf


    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Flip, @Art Deco, @Carbon blob, @Anon

    Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    It’s absolutely standard on arts and sciences faculties, and for a reason. They spent a year or two taking classes and four or five years working on a research project to get that degree.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Art Deco

    "They spent a year or two taking classes and four or five years working on a research project to get that degree."


    https://youtu.be/J8rBDOMLtSU

    , @Anonymous
    @Art Deco

    No, of course it is not a standard. Quite the contrary - in fields where brains matter, nobody pays any attention that one went through the motions of getting a PhD. It is universally understood that it's a formal requirement in career advance, that's all.

    In my >30 years as a PhD nobody ever called me Dr other than in jest, nor I have ever heard any of my peers referring to themselves as Drs. Pretty much the same as no sane lawyer (Juris Doctor) insists on being called Dr.

    And Jill Biden is an Ed.D - that's got to as big a joke as all those "doctors" in women and race studies.

    Replies: @Crouchback

    , @TTSSYF
    @Art Deco

    Wouldn't it depend on the subject? A Ph.D. in physics or chemistry is a lot different than a Ph.D. in early Renaissance British history. The latter is more likely to make the person into a very good plumber.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  45. @Anonymous
    Medical doctors have appropriated and monopolized the "Dr." title, so effectively that most people exclusively or mainly associate it with medicine. But the original use of the title was for people with doctoral degrees.

    The medical guild, especially when it was quite a dodgy profession with very poor standards which was the case until the 20th century, insisted on being called doctors as a PR move to make themselves look better and more authoritative. Technically though, the medical degree was not and still isn't a doctoral degree. This is obscured in the US because med students are required to have a separate bachelor's degree as a prerequisite. But in the UK, Canada, and most countries elsewhere, the medical degree is a bachelor's degree. You get a bachelor's degree in medicine, surgery, etc.

    In other words, medical doctors don't have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called "doctors". They have bachelor's degrees. But they're members of a guild which successfully managed to usurp the label.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Art Deco, @for-the-record, @Ancient Briton

    In other words, medical doctors don’t have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called “doctors”. They have bachelor’s degrees.

    Medical degrees require four calendar years of study in a discrete body of knowledge. To enter medical school, you need a body of credits in a set of adjacent subjects, earned while you’re getting your BA degree or earned after in post-baccalaureate programs. Bachelor’s degrees run for four academic years and your course list is commonly a mishmash of stuff, with 1/3 or 1/2 devoted to your major. The MD is perfectly appropriate. (And, if I’m not mistaken, European universities added medical schools during the Renaissance and early modern period).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Art Deco

    You're describing medical degrees in the US. The point is that they're academically equivalent to bachelor's degrees. In the UK and many other countries, medical doctors and surgeons equivalent to those in the US have bachelor's degrees in medicine or surgery. They learn and train in the same things as American med students. They have identical curricula.

    In the US, instead of bachelor's degrees in medicine, med students earn doctor of medicine degrees, and they have to have a BA and some intro science courses as prerequisites. They're not academically equivalent to doctoral degrees.

    In the UK, the MD degree is more like a real doctoral degree. It's a postgraduate research degree in medicine. It is like a real PhD in science.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros, @Jon Orton

  46. On the other hand, Kayshon Boutte is an actual name.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    @Marty

    I can believe it. Other real names I've heard are Roshonda, Shakwenda and Danetter. That last one was a client of mine. I called her Danette, which I thought from her signature was her actual name. She corrected me.

  47. Anon[589] • Disclaimer says:

    In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly

    Is this why black women with Ph.D.s disproportionately insist on using the Dr. title?

    There was a brief Twitter erruption around the hashtag #ImmodestWomen a couple of years ago. Here’s a good entry from that exchange:

    Another tweet justified the use of Dr. by women Ph.D.s because it partially makes up for the fact that all women Ph.D.s were raped and abused by their advisors.

    A side observation: I do like the fun sort of titles that everybody knows are completely fake, like “Kentucky colonols.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_Colonel

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Anon

    Or "Doctor of Journalism"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Art Deco

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Anon


    I do like the fun sort of titles that everybody knows are completely fake, like “Kentucky colonols.”
     
    How dare you denegrate Colonel Sanders?
  48. I have three younger sisters. Recently Sister #1 related a phone conversation she had with Sister#2. She had expressed her annoyance with her professor husband’s insistence on being called ‘Dr.’ Sister #1 and I agreed that while our brother-in-law is kind of a pompous ass, Sister #2 was suffering from a case of professional jealousy. She had come within a whisker of earning her Phd. in the same field as her husband but just couldn’t get over the hump. She teaches the occasional online course at her husband’s university. Of course, it’s mainly the high regard the department head has for her husband that got her that opportunity, which causes even more resentment.

    Oh, and as for Sister #3, she doesn’t concern herself with such pettiness. Of course, our mother readily admits she was smoking a lot more during her last pregnancy.

    • LOL: Mr McKenna
  49. The relevant part at 1:20 of the clip.

  50. @Mr McKenna
    About the article? First time I can remember a WSJ op-ed producing over 1200 reader comments. Only read a few, but was delighted to learn (from one of her fans) that Jill's current title is "First Lady Elect"...and you thought you voted for...

    Replies: @B36

    Douglas Emhoff is the First Gentleman Elect-In-Waiting

  51. Drive on the Kensington Expressway into Buffalo from the airport and you pass under a sign designating a section as The Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King Jr. Hwy. Years ago the pastor at my parish church was titled The Right Reverend Monsignor and then his given name. If I had a Doctorate I would add the letters after my name, but not call myself Doctor. Thing is though, I thought she was an MD.

  52. White House staffer (I guess): Dr. Jill; it hurts when I do this.

    Dr. Jill: Well don’t do that.

    • Thanks: Gordo
  53. @Anon7
    Thirty years ago, when I worked in hospital administration, I don't believe there was one PhD who wanted to be called "doctor", no matter what science their degree was in. In hospitals, "doctor" establishes rank and precedence, and who actually holds the responsibility for the life and well-being of patients.

    Now, though, PhDs all insist on being called doctor, especially the women. Doctors of Nursing, Doctors of Public Health. In every field, no matter how unrelated to health care. And even when their doctorate is as useless as an education degree.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Gordo, @ScarletNumber, @Art Deco

    Okay, so if in a hospital, somebody says, “Get a doctor now!” they don’t have time for a discussion of whether a holder of a Ph.D. of Public Health or Education or whatever is or isn’t a real doctor.

    That makes sense.

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Steve Sailer

    They should learn how to say "get a physician". It's not hard.

    How about: "Get a doctor!" Here I am. "NO, I meant a real doctor, a black woman!"

    , @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    Forty years ago, doctors ran hospitals. Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military; they gave the orders and took responsibility, they didn't recognize authority outside their command structure. I met senior physicians at informal gatherings who, once they determined that I was not a physician, literally dismissed me from their minds. You were of no interest, and no account, regardless of your Professional and Administrative salary grade. I wasn't insulted; that was just how the game worked. If you wanted authority in a hospital, you went to medical school, just like guys who wanted authority aboard a naval ship went to Annapolis.

    PhDs didn't want to be called "doctor" because it would be like they were faking having more authority than they really had. Imagine what people would say - is that guy a narcissistic moron?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Nurses have agitated for the right to be called “doctors” in clinical settings by earning a “doctorate” in nursing practice (not a Ph.D. in nursing): https://onlinenursing.duq.edu/blog/whats-up-doc-addressing-dnp-educated-nurses-as-doctor/

    Then again, chiropractors call themselves “doctors” in “healthcare,” so... frankly, it’s a big joke and a giant insult to those with MDs.

    Yet another reason the vast majority of physicians discourage their own children from studying and entering medicine, which has become a low morale profession (declining income, lower autonomy, higher degree of regulatory control, massively more paper work, constant fear of litigation, less prestige, etc.).

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  54. @Lot
    Delaware’s bar exam pass rate is 68%, and is the 13th easiest by that measure in the USA.

    https://lawschooli.com/bar-exam-pass-rate-by-state/

    Likely under 15% of white males who take the exam fail it.

    Speaking of dim lawyers, more evidence Rudy really screwed up the Hunter laptop release.

    An e-mail admitting to underreporting the Burisma corrupt payments on taxes by $400,000 was on the drive in addition to all the pervy items.

    And Rudy is leaking it now after having it for months!

    https://hotair.com/headlines/archives/2020/12/email-hunter-biden-raises-fresh-questions-tax-dealings/

    Replies: @Redman, @Ed

    Article doesn’t say this was just leaked by Rudy. And the tax issue was never a major concern anyway. Nobody cares about the tax implications.

    Rudy and others were looking at the forrest not the trees.

  55. @RichardTaylor
    Having to call an education dummy like Jill Biden "doctor" is like having to wear a mask in public: something we are forced to do as sign of social submission.

    Literally, just like having to call some clown "Sir".

    It's enforced by the same crowd.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Buffalo Joe

    Buffalo Joe wrote:


    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.
     
    My father gave us "The Talk" when we were young and told us to show extreme courtesy to police officers in any situation. He said that if the cop was being a jerk, we should shut up and take it and later bring the matter up with the judge.

    They all carry guns and, given the experiences they have on the job, they are prone to get a bit nervous in contentious situations.

    I find it amusing that some black folks think only they have "The Talk" with their kids.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @black sea
    @Buffalo Joe


    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.
     
    Yes, a primate thing. You've acknowledged their status/dominance, whether you really believe in it or not. Cops encounter a lot of people who want to argue with them, and a few who want to fight them, so by calling them "Officer" or "Sir" you're signalling that you're not going to be one of those people. They can then relax a little and are more likely to let you go with a warning, assuming you were stopped for some minor infraction. It doesn't always work, but it works lot more often than challenging their authority.

    The same thing is true in work situations. I used to know a guy who had been fired several times, mostly from working class jobs where a certain amount of blunt honesty is accepted. He said that he finally realized that he needed to let his boss be his boss.

    Replies: @Cortes, @RichardTaylor

  56. It must be nice for Hunter to have a stepmom with a prescription pad.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  57. Hunter might be the smartest one of the gang, with a law degree from Yale. However, he is also the one with the smallest moral compass (and that’s saying a lot for this bunch) and this shows you that intelligence isn’t everything. If intelligence is not restrained by morality it can just as well be used to run scams as to do something useful.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Jack D

    Yale Law? What a joke. On Yale. He joined the naval reserves for no reason at the age of 43? Only losers do that.


    Mr. Biden acknowledged that in the testy exchange in New Hampshire, he had lost his temper. ”I exaggerate when I’m angry,” Mr. Biden said, ”but I’ve never gone around telling people things that aren’t true about me.” Mr. Biden’s questioner had made the query in a mild tone, but...
     
    Hard to believe this crack smoking loser was his father(
    , @Mike Tre
    @Jack D

    " If intelligence is not restrained by morality it can just as well be used to run scams as to do something useful. "

    https://beckyweltoncmp.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/stereotype-jew.gif

    , @Pericles
    @Jack D


    Hunter might be the smartest one of the gang, with a law degree from Yale.

     

    What's the failure rate once you're accepted at Yale Law?

    Replies: @Jack D

  58. When my kids were little, one of their friend’s moms, who happened to be a dentist herself, kept addressing me as “Dr. Miller.” I finally convinced her that just “Dave” was normal.

    My wife and I have known a lot of Ph.D.’s during the last few decades: I have not known one who expected people to call them “Doctor” in ordinary life. “Doctor” is used only in formal academic settings: e.g., I alternated between addressing Dick Feynman as “Dr. Feynman” or “Professor Feynman” when I knew him when I was an undergrad. And, in grad school, I was told to address even full professors by their first names, at least outside of the classroom.

    The one exception to all this was an Ed.D. I knew in high school: we were supposed to call him “Doctor.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    That's right - Jill Biden is a college teacher and so her undergrad (community college) students call her Dr. Biden. That's normal.

    But that's where it should end. I don't know whether the "doctor" thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter. ( Conversely, during the campaign, they insisted on calling the VP "Jobiden" and not by any title - apparently "Jobiden" polled the best. ) I think it has to do with Dem insecurity about the status of women and they feel by reciting the title it raises her status - instead of just a schoolteacher/mom, which is what she really is (not that there is anything wrong with that), you should know that she is a DOCTOR. I saw the same thing during the Kavanaugh hearings - instead of calling his crazy accuser Christine Ford or Ms. Ford she was constantly referred to by the Dems at the hearings (and their shills on TV) as Doktor-Professor Christine Blasey Ford, Ph.D. because they thought that would make her seem more credible. Based upon my knowledge of academics, especially psych professors, it just confirmed to me that she was mentally unstable like a lot of them are.

    On the archived Obama White House web page she is called "Dr. Jill Biden" so this crap goes back a while:

    https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/administration/jill-biden

    On her page she is referred to as Dr. Biden or Dr. Jill Biden 17 times on one short web page. It's tiresome, especially for someone who only has an Ed.D.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Harry Baldwin

  59. @Moral Stone
    @anon

    This is of course the same behavior the entire establishment would decry as unpresidential coming from Donald Trump. I do find it interesting that both Biden and Trump focus on “higher IQ” rather than saying “I guarantee I’m smarter than you are” or something similar in meaning.

    Also, I note that Joe Biden is the actual “mediocre white man” of leftist fever dreams. They must hate his ass for being necessary to their ambitions.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @David In TN

    “I do find it interesting that both Biden and Trump focus on “higher IQ” rather than saying “I guarantee I’m smarter than you are” or something similar in meaning.’

    It’s the influence of all the IQ nerds and HBD fetishists that congregate on Unz. Interesting how the “high IQ” types turn out to be Clintons or Trumps or Bidens. It’s almost as if IQ had nothing to do with competence or even being a decent human being.

    • Replies: @botazefa
    @Peter D. Bredon


    It’s the influence of all the IQ nerds and HBD fetishists that congregate on Unz. Interesting how the “high IQ” types turn out to be Clintons or Trumps or Bidens. It’s almost as if IQ had nothing to do with competence or even being a decent human being.
     
    IQ has nothing to do with competence or decency. At least, not directly. IQ is a measure of intelligence. Intelligence is the ability to solve problems.

    Basic coverage of IQ can be found here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_quotient

    Dr. Thompson discusses IQ here at Unz, https://www.unz.com/author/james-thompson/
  60. @Cato
    Surprise, surprise, Biden has more hair now than he had in 1988.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Indiana Jack

    He doesn’t actually have more hair, but his hair has been redistributed. He has more hair on the top of his head due to transplanting, but less in the donor area where the transplanted follicles came from (probably the back of his head).

  61. @Buffalo Joe
    @RichardTaylor

    Richard, good practice to calls cops, "Officer", seems to smooth the interaction.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @black sea

    Buffalo Joe wrote:

    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.

    My father gave us “The Talk” when we were young and told us to show extreme courtesy to police officers in any situation. He said that if the cop was being a jerk, we should shut up and take it and later bring the matter up with the judge.

    They all carry guns and, given the experiences they have on the job, they are prone to get a bit nervous in contentious situations.

    I find it amusing that some black folks think only they have “The Talk” with their kids.

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @PhysicistDave

    Not only do white families have The Talk with their children, but our version of The Talk includes instructions on how to deal with NAM's.

  62. Anonymous[170] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    In other words, medical doctors don’t have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called “doctors”. They have bachelor’s degrees.

    Medical degrees require four calendar years of study in a discrete body of knowledge. To enter medical school, you need a body of credits in a set of adjacent subjects, earned while you're getting your BA degree or earned after in post-baccalaureate programs. Bachelor's degrees run for four academic years and your course list is commonly a mishmash of stuff, with 1/3 or 1/2 devoted to your major. The MD is perfectly appropriate. (And, if I'm not mistaken, European universities added medical schools during the Renaissance and early modern period).

    Replies: @Anonymous

    You’re describing medical degrees in the US. The point is that they’re academically equivalent to bachelor’s degrees. In the UK and many other countries, medical doctors and surgeons equivalent to those in the US have bachelor’s degrees in medicine or surgery. They learn and train in the same things as American med students. They have identical curricula.

    In the US, instead of bachelor’s degrees in medicine, med students earn doctor of medicine degrees, and they have to have a BA and some intro science courses as prerequisites. They’re not academically equivalent to doctoral degrees.

    In the UK, the MD degree is more like a real doctoral degree. It’s a postgraduate research degree in medicine. It is like a real PhD in science.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Anonymous

    A large majority of UK (and German, and Romanian, and Indian, and Chinese) physicians do not hold a doctorate. Their schooling is slightly longer than a regular bachelor, and they are really bachelors in medicine. I fancy calling myself a doctor too, having gone to college before the Bologna reform and earning a 5-year BSc; it's as long as a contemporary Romanian MSc or an Indian Bachelor of Medicine.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @Jon Orton
    @Anonymous

    The Bachelor of Architecture degree takes (or used to take) the same time as a 'doctors' Bachelor of Medicine degree ie 5 years academic study and two years internship.

    However as education became more of a business than a vocation, architectural schools in Europe and Oceania reduced the Bachelor degree to 3 years, giving a BA in 'Architectural Studies'. Now 2 years post graduate study will give a 'Masters' in Architecture, which is the same thing as the old B.Arch.

    Just more smoke and mirrors flim flammery from university administrators to induce students into university. But very confusing for the general public which gets duped into thinking that the 3 year degree holder is an Architect, when that's not true.

  63. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    All right, bad on the U.S. sawbones guild I suppose, but didn't the J.D. come first? And M.D. in the states was soon joined by Pharm.D., O.D., D.D.S./D.M.D., and probably more crazy crap in the future, so I don't see how they're running as impostors in front of everybody.

    Psy.D. would seem to be of that same clique but 1) apparently requires as much work as a Ph.D. in psychology; and 2) isn't sufficient for psychiatric jobs that require the professional/M.D. cred

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Pericles

    but didn’t the J.D. come first?

    No. The traditional American law degree was LL.B. – bachelor of laws, although in most cases those attending law school already had undergrad degrees. At some point (the 1960s) law schools decided to call their degrees JD (Juris Doctor) and even allowed prior grads to upgrade their diplomas. The reason, I was once given to understand, was civil service pay scales which paid more for people with doctoral degrees. However it has never been the custom to call lawyers “doctor” and if you go back for another degree in say taxation after getting your JD, the next degree is a master of laws, LL.M., which makes no sense. And if you want to get a REAL doctorate in law, you have to get an SJD (Doctor of Juridical Science) degree.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Jack D

    However it has never been the custom to call lawyers “doctor”

    What is with that esquire/esq. thing, though? What is going on in the mind of the lawyer that appends esq. to his name?

    Replies: @Jack D, @International Jew

  64. It’s the defining mark of the bourgeois that they are terrified of death, and will do anything to avoid it, including dishonor (as opposed to “death before dishonor”)

    Hence, only physicians, Doctors of Medicine, are given the honorific of “Dr.”.

    In a truly cultured nation, such as pre-War II Germany, academic qualification was socially recognized. Even one’s wife rejoiced in “Frau Dr.” The idea that a Max Weber or Edmund Husserl was “not a real doctor” would be considered absurd, barbaric.

    Well, that’s why they had to be destroyed.

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/NotThatKindOfDoctor

    Now we’re all just Citizens and Comrades, eh, comrades?

    Of course, the Germans also had real academic qualifications, not bullshit degrees in Gender Studies or Oppression Studies.

    And you can believe me, because I have a Master’s Degree… in Science!

    • Replies: @Nathan
    @Peter D. Bredon

    "In a truly cultured nation, such as pre-War II Germany"

    Oh, shut up! Just shut up! I'm so sick of all the fetishizing of those sweet, saintly and oh-so-cultured Germans. Have you lived in Germany? Sprechen sie Deutsch? No??

    For your information, we owe all of this absurd degree and title inflation to the Germans and Johns Hopkins adopting their Ph.D system. The English didn't have them. Did that stop James Clerk Maxwell, Charles Darwin, or Newton? What a joke- Sir Isaac Newton, Ph.D!! Ha! But you don't know any of that because you bought into all of the dumb Unz Review German propaganda.

    "I think the Ph.D system is an abomination." -Freeman Dyson

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @Art Deco
    @Peter D. Bredon

    It’s the defining mark of the bourgeois that they are terrified of death,

    It isn't. Is it one of your hobbies to utter manifest bull$hit just to amuse yourself?

  65. @Moral Stone
    @anon

    This is of course the same behavior the entire establishment would decry as unpresidential coming from Donald Trump. I do find it interesting that both Biden and Trump focus on “higher IQ” rather than saying “I guarantee I’m smarter than you are” or something similar in meaning.

    Also, I note that Joe Biden is the actual “mediocre white man” of leftist fever dreams. They must hate his ass for being necessary to their ambitions.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @David In TN

    Yes, Never Trumpers like to call Donald Trump a “buffoon,” while backing a mediocrity known as a “buffoon” for 30 plus years.

    I saw the performance above on CSPAN at the time. Funny thing, I was a Democrat and was considering Joe Biden as my preferred candidate for the 1988 nomination. Soon after Biden was laughed out of the race for plagiarizing a Neal Kinnock speech and peddling a phony life story.

  66. @Abolish_public_education
    The more lightweight the doctoral program, the more the graduate will insist on being addressed as doctor.

    A notable exception was the prominent, public education critic William Cosby, EdD.

    I am so sick and tired of public union contracts that award pay raises (higher shares of government spending) to school teachers who accumulate graduate school credit-hours.

    Doctor of Babysitting.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @Daniel H, @John Up North

    I am so sick and tired of public union contracts that award pay raises (higher shares of government spending) to school teachers who accumulate graduate school credit-hours.

    This credential racket is a factor in most public employee advancement/compensation. I know a dude who started out as an $8 dollar/hour laborer for the city of North Las Vegas water department. Thirteen years later, just before he was fired, he was earning $110,000 per year, and that was ten years ago. I can only imagine how much he would be earning today if he hadn’t gotten himself fired.

    How did he advance? Creeping credentialism. A certificate here, another certificate there. A 2 day seminar every now and then…..No college degrees needed, just simple certifications. Contracts between the labor union and government mandated that his compensation be advanced for every certification earned. Get a government job. Just get a government job and much of life’s anxiety will ease up.

    • Agree: Orville H. Larson
  67. @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    It's absolutely standard on arts and sciences faculties, and for a reason. They spent a year or two taking classes and four or five years working on a research project to get that degree.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anonymous, @TTSSYF

    “They spent a year or two taking classes and four or five years working on a research project to get that degree.”

  68. Anon[391] • Disclaimer says:

    In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs (e.g., Beau, the late Good Son, failed the admittedly tough Delaware bar exam three times) who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly.

    Pence is at a similar intellectual level, but he’s more modest and his strategy for dealing with it seems to be to take the publicly virtuous Christian route.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/BL-LB-54152

    [Pence] tried to enter the Indiana University School of Law, but scored far too low on the admission test. So he spent the next two years traveling to what seemed like every town in the state as an admissions representative for Hanover–gaining a great education about Indiana, he said.

    The next whirl at the LSAT placed him in the 84th percentile, and Pence graduated in 1986 with a solid B average. It was tough.

    “No one I know likes law school. It was a bad experience. I wouldn’t wish it on a dog I didn’t like,” he laughed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    You almost never hear about Pence except every four years he wins the VP debate.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @D. K.
    @Anon

    Pence's "dream school" was the law school at the I.U. campus in Indianapolis, not the law school at the main campus in Bloomington. Although I scored much better, forty years ago, than Pence's second outing on the L.S.A.T., I had the same reaction to law school: I knew before my first academic quarter was over that I never wanted to practice law; only exigent circumstances, after I had taken the bar exam to kill the summer after graduation, led me to practice law for a few years. Unlike Pence, I did know someone who liked law school; my oldest brother had encouraged me to go, after my girlfriend had pushed me in that direction, instead of continuing on for my Ph.D., as I originally had planned.

    , @Jack D
    @Anon


    No one I know likes law school.
     
    You don't go to law school to have fun. You go there to learn about the law. I guess how much you like it depends on how much you like learning about the law and how good you are at it. It's certainly challenging but a challenge can be fun, at least if you are not in over your head. Is skiing down a double black diamond ski slope fun? If you are really good at skiing it's fun but if you're not then it's utterly terrifying. I'm reminded of what my daughter said when my wife asked her if she liked MIT after her first semester there. She said that she liked it but that it's not for everyone.

    Wikipedia gives remarkably short shrift to Pence's short legal career. I don't get the feeling that the law was for him.
  69. @Polynices
    Doctor is appropriate for PhDs in a professional setting but dumb to use in public. Plus everyone knows that EdDs are joke degrees that don't count as a real doctorate.

    Replies: @David In TN, @Crouchback

    Some years ago I read an article about John Carlos of 1968 Olympic fame. The writer called Carlos “Dr. Carlos” every other sentence. He apparently obtained a doctorate of some kind.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @David In TN


    Some years ago I read an article about John Carlos of 1968 Olympic fame. The writer called Carlos “Dr. Carlos” every other sentence. He apparently obtained a doctorate of some kind.
     
    They were honorary doctorates, the best kind. Easier than a Bill Cosby Edu PhD

    Wikipedia

    Carlos was awarded an honorary doctorate from California State University in 2008. In 2012, he was awarded honorary doctorates from his alma maters Texas A&M University-Commerce (formerly East Texas State University) and San Jose State University.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  70. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    Okay, so if in a hospital, somebody says, "Get a doctor now!" they don't have time for a discussion of whether a holder of a Ph.D. of Public Health or Education or whatever is or isn't a real doctor.

    That makes sense.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anon7, @Twinkie

    They should learn how to say “get a physician”. It’s not hard.

    How about: “Get a doctor!” Here I am. “NO, I meant a real doctor, a black woman!”

  71. In 1929, Wittgenstein submitted the Tractatus as a Ph.D. thesis at Cambridge, and underwent the formality of an oral examination upon it by Russell and Moore, to the embarrassment of all three of them. According to Braithwaite, Moore’s report to the degree committee concluded: “I myself consider that this is a work of genius; but even if I am completely mistaken and it is nothing of the sort, it is well above the standard required for the Ph.D. degree.”

    Amusing, though in fact Moore was an idiot and Wittgenstein a fraud.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @James O'Meara

    LOL.

    I guess every age has its celebrity culture.

    I like the quip from Keynes that captures the hype of the day when Wittgenstein showed up at Cambridge:

    “Well, God has arrived. I met him on the 5:15 train."

    Telling that then the celebs included Wittgenstein et al; today it is the Kardashians.

  72. @Jim Don Bob
    Awesome. He cut her up back down and sideways. I love good invective.

    The only good thing about Dr. (Ed.) Jill is that she may be that last person to keep Kamalaho at bay while she does Edith Wilson II with Joe.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @Clyde

    Dr. Jill will be the strongest force to keep mental decline Biden in the Presidency. I can see her being hooked into cabinet meetings via squawk box. Kamala is Obama’s stooge. When this duo come after Joe to get him to step aside, look for the battle of the 50ft tall women in DC. Susan Rice will also be in this fray for Obama.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Clyde


    Dr. Jill will be the strongest force to keep mental decline Biden in the Presidency.
     
    Good to know. We need to amp up our knowledge of the power behind the throne (moles from Xi Jingping land? Hunter's drug buddies?)

    But did "Dr." Jill sign off on Kamalallah for VP? Maybe should have went with Tim Kaine, LOL.

  73. @Mr McKenna
    @D. K.


    My experiences, as both a student and as an employee, in several institutions of higher education, was that faculty members indeed did tend to be very sensitive to their being slighted by their lessers who failed to address them as “Doctor.”
     
    That's weird to me. My grad school days were ~30 years ago but everyone used first names. To be sure, there were certain older 'legends in the field' types with whom one would use the honorific, but I can't imagine even them bristling if someone didn't. Perhaps a EuroProf or two, older and affecting a grand mien. Fortunately we didn't have too many of those. I never used it, but I certainly addressed legends as "Professor", at least until we had become familiar.

    What would you call Professor Ta-Nehisi? The day is coming. For many years I was one person removed from Dr K but the connection was a woman in a clearly subservient position, whom he always addressed by her first name. Why does Herr K run amok, anyway?

    Replies: @D. K.

    I worked at Purdue, in between my B.A. and starting graduate school, and I was generally (although certainly not universally) popular with both the staff and the faculty, in our department. I became close to a few of the faculty members, occasionally socializing with them off of campus; yet, I always addressed them as “Doctor” rather than familiarly by their given names. It never would have occurred to me to address a random professor by his first name, whether I was an undergraduate, staff member or graduate student. I am sure that many faculty members would have reported me to my superiors, if I had addressed one of the former by his first name, when I was a staff member. “Professor” also was acceptable usage, of course, but I found it more off-putting than “Doctor,” for some reason. Anyway, I even addressed my major professor as “Doctor,” during and after graduate school, even though we had been friends since I first started working in the department. I suppose that it comes down to the way that I had been raised, as a blue-collar boy in Gary, Indiana, more so than what actually was expected of me, by him and the others to whom I was close, during those few years.

  74. @David In TN
    @Polynices

    Some years ago I read an article about John Carlos of 1968 Olympic fame. The writer called Carlos "Dr. Carlos" every other sentence. He apparently obtained a doctorate of some kind.

    Replies: @Clyde

    Some years ago I read an article about John Carlos of 1968 Olympic fame. The writer called Carlos “Dr. Carlos” every other sentence. He apparently obtained a doctorate of some kind.

    They were honorary doctorates, the best kind. Easier than a Bill Cosby Edu PhD

    Wikipedia

    Carlos was awarded an honorary doctorate from California State University in 2008. In 2012, he was awarded honorary doctorates from his alma maters Texas A&M University-Commerce (formerly East Texas State University) and San Jose State University.

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Clyde

    Dr. Johnson's doctorate was honorary. Dr. Franklin's was too.

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @David In TN

  75. @Jack D
    @Anonymous


    but didn’t the J.D. come first?
     
    No. The traditional American law degree was LL.B. - bachelor of laws, although in most cases those attending law school already had undergrad degrees. At some point (the 1960s) law schools decided to call their degrees JD (Juris Doctor) and even allowed prior grads to upgrade their diplomas. The reason, I was once given to understand, was civil service pay scales which paid more for people with doctoral degrees. However it has never been the custom to call lawyers "doctor" and if you go back for another degree in say taxation after getting your JD, the next degree is a master of laws, LL.M., which makes no sense. And if you want to get a REAL doctorate in law, you have to get an SJD (Doctor of Juridical Science) degree.

    Replies: @Daniel H

    However it has never been the custom to call lawyers “doctor”

    What is with that esquire/esq. thing, though? What is going on in the mind of the lawyer that appends esq. to his name?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Daniel H


    The origins of esquire date to the Middle Ages, when it was a title conferred on candidates for knighthood in England. Later, the term was extended to other mid-level dignitaries, including sheriffs, sergeants, justices of the peace and “barristers at law.”

    In the United States, esquire over time came to refer “commonly and exclusively” to lawyers, stated the opinion, but how that happened is a mystery.
     
    https://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/tussle_over_titles/

    The shorter version is that in the US it's just the honorific title you give to lawyers just as MDs are called "doctor".

    I was taught that OTHER people may address you by appending Esq. to your name but that you should never refer to yourself that way.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @CA Lawyer

    , @International Jew
    @Daniel H

    It means he's into fancy suits and expensive stereo systems.

  76. https://github.com/iamadamdev/bypass-paywalls-chrome — Install this extension in Chrome and Brave to read the Wall Street Journal cited up above. Edge too I think. It works for many publications and many paywalls such as WaPost and NYT.

    Give it 5 minutes to understand the instructions.
    “No More Lockdowns” -Van Morrison ____No more media lockdowns we owe them nothing.

  77. @Clyde
    @David In TN


    Some years ago I read an article about John Carlos of 1968 Olympic fame. The writer called Carlos “Dr. Carlos” every other sentence. He apparently obtained a doctorate of some kind.
     
    They were honorary doctorates, the best kind. Easier than a Bill Cosby Edu PhD

    Wikipedia

    Carlos was awarded an honorary doctorate from California State University in 2008. In 2012, he was awarded honorary doctorates from his alma maters Texas A&M University-Commerce (formerly East Texas State University) and San Jose State University.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Dr. Johnson’s doctorate was honorary. Dr. Franklin’s was too.

    • Replies: @Indiana Jack
    @Steve Sailer

    At least Dr. Johnson and Dr. Franklin had each made contributions sufficient to justify such a degree.

    , @David In TN
    @Steve Sailer

    Regarding the article about John Carlos I mentioned, the writer inferred the former sprinter had a PHD for one of the most learned dissertations in history.

  78. @Anon

    In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs (e.g., Beau, the late Good Son, failed the admittedly tough Delaware bar exam three times) who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly.
     
    Pence is at a similar intellectual level, but he's more modest and his strategy for dealing with it seems to be to take the publicly virtuous Christian route.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/BL-LB-54152

    [Pence] tried to enter the Indiana University School of Law, but scored far too low on the admission test. So he spent the next two years traveling to what seemed like every town in the state as an admissions representative for Hanover--gaining a great education about Indiana, he said.

    The next whirl at the LSAT placed him in the 84th percentile, and Pence graduated in 1986 with a solid B average. It was tough.

    "No one I know likes law school. It was a bad experience. I wouldn't wish it on a dog I didn't like," he laughed.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @D. K., @Jack D

    You almost never hear about Pence except every four years he wins the VP debate.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer


    You almost never hear about Pence except every four years he wins the VP debate.
     
    I was too lazy/indifferent to watch it.

    But to me what Pence needed to do was not "win" but

    1) Wrap the Democrat riots around the Democrats. (And relate this to the importance of rule-of-law and our lives, freedom and prosperity.)

    2) Wrap "blood libel against white people" around Kamala and make her, and her presence on the ticket absolutely toxic. (This was electorally critical because Biden himself was running as return-to-normalcy mediocre white guy and had less of a negative profile than Hillary, especially to midwestern white guys. As turned out--fatally--to be the case.)


    Having not seen the debate, i assume Pence while "winning" did neither of these.

    This is sadly par for the course for Republicans. Instead of directly attacking the destructive minoritarian evil of the Democrats as ... destructive minoritarian evil, they try for some namby-pamby we're responsible and aren't the bad folks they say.

    Since they neve confront and name the evil and destruction the parasite party is doing, they never get most people actually *thinking* about the what is being served up. (The mad as hell people have figured it out for themselves.) They are just the boring stodgy alternative and continue to lose.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

  79. @Mr McKenna
    @Anonymous


    University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal" Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.
     
    Would you believe that this (somewhat outdated) stereotype has been called anti-semitic? (Not the use of the Ivy affiliation but the notion that Penn is substandard.)

    Replies: @black sea, @Abolish_public_education, @Old and Grumpy, @International Jew

    Probably, there’s a fair amount of confusion as to whether The University of Pennsylvania is a private or a public school, and people affiliated with Penn want to let the world know that it’s not a state institution.

  80. @Mr. Anon
    Biden looked like Peter Boyle's kid brother.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin

    “Biden looked like Peter Boyle’s kid brother.”

    You noticed that too? I’ve long thought of Biden’s doo as “the Frank Barone.”

  81. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do...
     
    It is amazing how many "historic" neighborhoods and towns there are in the Midwest. I don't remember any in the Northeast, even though theirs are 200 or so years older.


    https://www.explorebranson.com/sites/default/files/historic-branson-badge.png

    Replies: @newrouter, @black sea

    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @black sea


    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.
     
    But do they label them such? Do they feel inferior to Rome and Athens? If you really are historic, people already know.

    Actually, too many of NYC's neighborhoods take names from London. "Soho" is the most annoying.

    Replies: @black sea, @Ganderson, @Hibernian

    , @Dan Hayes
    @black sea

    As far as I know, New York City does not have any per se listed “historical” district!

    Replies: @black sea

  82. @LRFD
    My experience is anyone who gets a doctorate spends a few days making everyone call them, “Doctor.” This was largely just to be a dick about it. Afterwards, the title would be dropped except for siblings and whenever you need to pull rank. (“That’s Dr Jackass to you.”) I wonder if that means Jill considers Joe to be her little brother or someone who needs to be knocked down a few pegs.

    Replies: @Russ

    My experience is anyone who gets a doctorate spends a few days making everyone call them, “Doctor.” This was largely just to be a dick about it. Afterwards, the title would be dropped except for siblings and whenever you need to pull rank. (“That’s Dr Jackass to you.”)

    Twas certainly the case with my brother’s engineering doctorate. I addressed him as DAHHHK-TORRR Jim for a week until he cried uncle. He tells new colleagues to address him as Jim: If they suddenly begin bleeding all over the place, he warns that all he can do for them is faint.

    Whereas he and his peers spent 1-2 years out of industry to do deep-dive technical research, the currently popular scam is to work full time AND do doctoral research, with the lie-agreed-upon than the candidate has the energy and focus for advanced research after eight hours at the day job. Yeah, right.

    My brother also regarded his crowning achievement as getting the paper summarizing his dissertation published in an IEEE Transactions, post-graduation. One surmises that simply achieving graduation is the consummate and only goal today, with the “Dr. Jackass” immediately following. It’s regression, pure and simple.

  83. @John Milton’s Ghost
    I’ve disliked Joe Biden his entire career. His plagiarism, bullying, outright fabrications, and working-class schtick all piss me off, more than Barry O’s phony intellectualism-meets-numinous negro or the Squad’s insane leftism via identity politics of girl POCs. The fact that he enriched himself and his loser kids is just the icing on the cake.

    It seems most commentators around the political spectrum really do seem to like him and also think he is about as close an approximation to an average white guy that they like. Maybe that’s why it makes me so angry.

    Marx saved his most savage invective for the petit bourgeois, little guys who defended the system and truly believed in it even as they didn’t benefit from it. I suppose I hate Joe because he is the same way, at least in the sense that all working class whites have been gutted by his life’s work, even as he claims to be one of them. (Well, plus he has benefited, greatly.)

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Agreed. I have not seen much besides youtube clips of this guy, but he just seems like one overly aggressive son of a bitch way too often. I remember that some guy on his campaign trail up in Ohio (somewhere in the area anyway) asked him a tough question and Biden got in the guy’s face about it. That’s about 180 degrees from the way Ronald Reagan would have handled it.

    I ran out of [Agree]s for the day, but a round of them on me for all those who know that the Ed. PhD is a crock.

    Are you crazy, are you high, or just an ordinary guy?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I have not seen much besides youtube clips of this guy, but he just seems like one overly aggressive son of a bitch way too often. I remember that some guy on his campaign trail up in Ohio (somewhere in the area anyway) asked him a tough question and Biden got in the guy’s face about it.

    Joe wanted him to step outside, or maybe under the bleachers. Too bad no one has ever taken him up that. There are other doctoral traditions....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2RJTVPSOPc

    , @Ganderson
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Or just an ordinary guy...

  84. @Anon

    In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs (e.g., Beau, the late Good Son, failed the admittedly tough Delaware bar exam three times) who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly.
     
    Pence is at a similar intellectual level, but he's more modest and his strategy for dealing with it seems to be to take the publicly virtuous Christian route.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/BL-LB-54152

    [Pence] tried to enter the Indiana University School of Law, but scored far too low on the admission test. So he spent the next two years traveling to what seemed like every town in the state as an admissions representative for Hanover--gaining a great education about Indiana, he said.

    The next whirl at the LSAT placed him in the 84th percentile, and Pence graduated in 1986 with a solid B average. It was tough.

    "No one I know likes law school. It was a bad experience. I wouldn't wish it on a dog I didn't like," he laughed.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @D. K., @Jack D

    Pence’s “dream school” was the law school at the I.U. campus in Indianapolis, not the law school at the main campus in Bloomington. Although I scored much better, forty years ago, than Pence’s second outing on the L.S.A.T., I had the same reaction to law school: I knew before my first academic quarter was over that I never wanted to practice law; only exigent circumstances, after I had taken the bar exam to kill the summer after graduation, led me to practice law for a few years. Unlike Pence, I did know someone who liked law school; my oldest brother had encouraged me to go, after my girlfriend had pushed me in that direction, instead of continuing on for my Ph.D., as I originally had planned.

  85. @Mr McKenna
    @Anonymous


    University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal" Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.
     
    Would you believe that this (somewhat outdated) stereotype has been called anti-semitic? (Not the use of the Ivy affiliation but the notion that Penn is substandard.)

    Replies: @black sea, @Abolish_public_education, @Old and Grumpy, @International Jew

    When the Ivy knives come out ..

    I was once at a restaurant table with a couple of Ivies. In due course the waiter informed us that his job was part of his program at Cornell’s College of Hotel Management.

    That prompted my dinner companions to mention their alma maters, whereby the waiter immediately expressed his delight at serving fellow Ivies.

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that CCHM was not Ivy League.

    Thanks for the info.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Abolish_public_education


    That prompted my dinner companions to mention their alma maters, whereby the waiter immediately expressed his delight at serving fellow Ivies.

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that CCHM was not Ivy League.
     
    You should have excused yourself on some pretense, and then told the waiter exactly what your dinner companions said. And then remind him exactly what it was that you ordered.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Abolish_public_education


    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that [Cornell’s College of Hotel Management] was not Ivy League.
     
    This is reminiscent of Ann Coulter pointing out that Keith Olbermann is an alumnus of the Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, not the Cornell College of Arts and Sciences (i.e. the real Cornell) like herself.
  86. @Buffalo Joe
    @RichardTaylor

    Richard, good practice to calls cops, "Officer", seems to smooth the interaction.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @black sea

    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.

    Yes, a primate thing. You’ve acknowledged their status/dominance, whether you really believe in it or not. Cops encounter a lot of people who want to argue with them, and a few who want to fight them, so by calling them “Officer” or “Sir” you’re signalling that you’re not going to be one of those people. They can then relax a little and are more likely to let you go with a warning, assuming you were stopped for some minor infraction. It doesn’t always work, but it works lot more often than challenging their authority.

    The same thing is true in work situations. I used to know a guy who had been fired several times, mostly from working class jobs where a certain amount of blunt honesty is accepted. He said that he finally realized that he needed to let his boss be his boss.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @black sea

    My brother in law told me about how he managed to secure the house plot he and his wife (my sister) had been after. They’d been tracking the release of plots by the developers and had set their hearts on a site with open views on the south and west sides and one morning after coming off night shift - a busy shift for the Fire Service - had checked the online site and BINGO! the plot was free to be reserved on payment of £50 deposit at the development office on-site. BIL jumps in car with wallet and chequebook and speeds off over to the site office around five miles away and as he screeches to a halt in front of the site office, a traffic cop pulls up beside him and starts to tell him about the speeding, the non-functioning brake light on the left etc etc.

    The BIL acknowledged what the cop was saying and said “OK. Write it all up. Whatever you want. Whatever you do is fuck all compared to what she [sister] is going to do if I don’t make the deposit right now. Can we sort this out when I come back out?” The cop agreed.

    On coming back out the cop was gone. And no ticket.

    , @RichardTaylor
    @black sea


    I used to know a guy who had been fired several times, mostly from working class jobs where a certain amount of blunt honesty is accepted
     
    I think we need to face how submissive most white collar people are trained to be.

    Replies: @Up2Drew

  87. Well, to be frank, I draw the line at referring to Joe as “Mr. Biden”. It’s kind of like calling a donkey “Mister”.

  88. @R.G. Camara
    This is just part of the Left's War on Speech Control, where the Left tells you how you may address them, you peon. Hence the "pronouns in the profile" game, and the demanding you address them by their titles (whether real or imaginary), or where they give themselves hilarious monikers and insist that your not following that is hate (e.g. woke joke political commentator Toure Neblitt demanding that he be addressed by the mononym Toure instead of by his full name).

    This is about power to control speech. Very 1984.

    And Steve, good pick up on Biden's intellectual insecurity. Although no one who gets to be a senator is dumb, Biden was never the smartest guy in the room in any Senate meeting, and he got all upset about it. It seems he couldn't be happy being a corporate stooge and railroad pawn and decided he needed to "prove" his smarts when challenged.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @AndrewR, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb

    So, he’s definitely a dummy, I.Q.-wise. But… pretty darned successful, right? So… discuss. Thx.

    • Replies: @anon
    @JimDandy

    So… discuss. Thx.

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-x54GAEQkjws/X0v1zZlIMvI/AAAAAAAAQgI/tZDZaSu8PdAfdvHHd2q7T7KUl-zeUlYUwCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/biden%2Bpost_turtle.jpg

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  89. Somewhat OT. But the following will openly disenfranchise deserving and genuinely qualified whites with science PhD degrees, and deny them equal treatment under the law.

    The NIH style of religious fanaticism:

    “So the last shall be first, and the first last: for many be called, but few chosen.”

    Your tax dollars at work. From this week’s edition of the NIH Guide (to extramural research funding):

    NIH Faculty Institutional Recruitment for Sustainable Transformation (FIRST) Program: FIRST Cohort
    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-20-022.html

    NIH Faculty Institutional Recruitment for Sustainable Transformation (FIRST) Program: FIRST Coordination and Evaluation Center
    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-20-023.html

    Some excerpts from the first of these two funding solicitations:

    The purpose of the FIRST Cohort is to transform culture at NIH-funded extramural institutions by building a self-reinforcing community of scientists committed to diversity and inclusive excellence (defined below). Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence within the program has the potential to be transformational for biomedical research at the awardee institutions and beyond. This community will be built through recruitment of a diverse group of early-career faculty who are competitive for an advertised research tenure-track or equivalent faculty position and who have demonstrated strong commitment to promoting diversity and inclusive excellence.

    The program will test the primary hypothesis that a cohort model of faculty hiring, sponsorship, continual mentoring, and support for professional development, embedded within an institution implementing evidence-based practices to create academic cultures of inclusive excellence, will achieve significant improvements in metrics of institutional culture and scientific workforce diversity. Evidence supports that diversity positively impacts scientific discovery through improved problem-solving, innovation, prediction, evaluation, verification, and strategization (Page SE, 2017; Page SE, 2007). Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence within the program has the potential to be transformational for biomedical research at the awardee institutions and beyond. In addition, the program will test the impact of the cohort on institutional culture change. Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence at a range of academic institutions has the potential to be transformational for the biomedical research workforce.

    Establishing and maintaining scientific environments that can cultivate and benefit from a full range of talents is not only essential for the quality and impact of science, but it is also a matter of good stewardship of federal funds to ensure that the most talented researchers are recruited, supported, and advanced to become competitive research investigators. This initiative defines inclusive excellence consistent with the work of Williams et al., (2005) as the act of establishing hallmarks of excellence and organizational effectiveness; operationalizing inclusion across organizational functions; and creating education and professional development processes that have diversity, equity, and inclusion at their core. Achieving inclusive excellence at the national level must be preceded by transformation at the institutional level, through broad adoption of enhanced diversity of faculty and culture change, creating a welcoming environment to recruit and retain scientific talent. Thus, inclusive excellence hinges on both enhancing diversity and inclusion, as well as institutional culture change.

    Elevating social Lysenkoism to a state religion is now official US Government policy. Pathetic.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Voltarde


    The purpose of the FIRST Cohort is to transform culture at NIH-funded extramural institutions by building a self-reinforcing community of scientists committed to diversity and inclusive excellence (defined below). Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence within the program has the potential to be transformational for biomedical research at the awardee institutions and beyond.
     
    And so it will be. It will transform them from good research institutions into bad research institutions.
  90. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    Okay, so if in a hospital, somebody says, "Get a doctor now!" they don't have time for a discussion of whether a holder of a Ph.D. of Public Health or Education or whatever is or isn't a real doctor.

    That makes sense.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anon7, @Twinkie

    Forty years ago, doctors ran hospitals. Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military; they gave the orders and took responsibility, they didn’t recognize authority outside their command structure. I met senior physicians at informal gatherings who, once they determined that I was not a physician, literally dismissed me from their minds. You were of no interest, and no account, regardless of your Professional and Administrative salary grade. I wasn’t insulted; that was just how the game worked. If you wanted authority in a hospital, you went to medical school, just like guys who wanted authority aboard a naval ship went to Annapolis.

    PhDs didn’t want to be called “doctor” because it would be like they were faking having more authority than they really had. Imagine what people would say – is that guy a narcissistic moron?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EpGLKTYXUAAjXDq?format=jpg&name=medium

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon7

    Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military

    When my father enlisted in the army after Pearl Harbor, he had already completed medical school and an internship and so was sent immediately to officer's training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain. So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @ScarletNumber, @Anon7

  91. (Sir) Ben Kingsley apparently did use to insist on people calling him ‘Sir Ben’. And got pretty widely mocked for it in the British press.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @S Johnson

    I call him "Sir Ben" in movie reviews.

  92. @S Johnson
    (Sir) Ben Kingsley apparently did use to insist on people calling him ‘Sir Ben’. And got pretty widely mocked for it in the British press.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I call him “Sir Ben” in movie reviews.

  93. @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    Forty years ago, doctors ran hospitals. Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military; they gave the orders and took responsibility, they didn't recognize authority outside their command structure. I met senior physicians at informal gatherings who, once they determined that I was not a physician, literally dismissed me from their minds. You were of no interest, and no account, regardless of your Professional and Administrative salary grade. I wasn't insulted; that was just how the game worked. If you wanted authority in a hospital, you went to medical school, just like guys who wanted authority aboard a naval ship went to Annapolis.

    PhDs didn't want to be called "doctor" because it would be like they were faking having more authority than they really had. Imagine what people would say - is that guy a narcissistic moron?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Harry Baldwin

  94. anon[325] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Agreed. I have not seen much besides youtube clips of this guy, but he just seems like one overly aggressive son of a bitch way too often. I remember that some guy on his campaign trail up in Ohio (somewhere in the area anyway) asked him a tough question and Biden got in the guy's face about it. That's about 180 degrees from the way Ronald Reagan would have handled it.

    I ran out of [Agree]s for the day, but a round of them on me for all those who know that the Ed. PhD is a crock.

    Are you crazy, are you high, or just an ordinary guy?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w58E2S315a4

    Replies: @anon, @Ganderson

    I have not seen much besides youtube clips of this guy, but he just seems like one overly aggressive son of a bitch way too often. I remember that some guy on his campaign trail up in Ohio (somewhere in the area anyway) asked him a tough question and Biden got in the guy’s face about it.

    Joe wanted him to step outside, or maybe under the bleachers. Too bad no one has ever taken him up that. There are other doctoral traditions….

  95. @Clyde
    @Jim Don Bob

    Dr. Jill will be the strongest force to keep mental decline Biden in the Presidency. I can see her being hooked into cabinet meetings via squawk box. Kamala is Obama's stooge. When this duo come after Joe to get him to step aside, look for the battle of the 50ft tall women in DC. Susan Rice will also be in this fray for Obama.

    Replies: @bomag

    Dr. Jill will be the strongest force to keep mental decline Biden in the Presidency.

    Good to know. We need to amp up our knowledge of the power behind the throne (moles from Xi Jingping land? Hunter’s drug buddies?)

    But did “Dr.” Jill sign off on Kamalallah for VP? Maybe should have went with Tim Kaine, LOL.

  96. @Daniel H
    @Jack D

    However it has never been the custom to call lawyers “doctor”

    What is with that esquire/esq. thing, though? What is going on in the mind of the lawyer that appends esq. to his name?

    Replies: @Jack D, @International Jew

    The origins of esquire date to the Middle Ages, when it was a title conferred on candidates for knighthood in England. Later, the term was extended to other mid-level dignitaries, including sheriffs, sergeants, justices of the peace and “barristers at law.”

    In the United States, esquire over time came to refer “commonly and exclusively” to lawyers, stated the opinion, but how that happened is a mystery.

    https://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/tussle_over_titles/

    The shorter version is that in the US it’s just the honorific title you give to lawyers just as MDs are called “doctor”.

    I was taught that OTHER people may address you by appending Esq. to your name but that you should never refer to yourself that way.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Jack D

    I would not use a lawyer who appended Esq. to his name anymore than I would take advice from Jill Biden.

    , @CA Lawyer
    @Jack D

    In the US, "Esq." for lawyers is mostly used only in the course of work, and only in situations in which it is legally significant that a communication is from or to a lawyer (e.g., for purposes of evaluating a claim of attorney-client privilege). Virtually no one in the US other than Bill S. Preston uses "Esquire" to demonstrate to the general public that they are a lawyer.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  97. @Daniel H
    @Jack D

    However it has never been the custom to call lawyers “doctor”

    What is with that esquire/esq. thing, though? What is going on in the mind of the lawyer that appends esq. to his name?

    Replies: @Jack D, @International Jew

    It means he’s into fancy suits and expensive stereo systems.

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  98. @black sea
    @Reg Cæsar

    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dan Hayes

    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.

    But do they label them such? Do they feel inferior to Rome and Athens? If you really are historic, people already know.

    Actually, too many of NYC’s neighborhoods take names from London. “Soho” is the most annoying.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Reg Cæsar

    I meant formally designated historic districts, not just old neighborhoods. Designating them in this way introduces greater regulation as to what architectural changes may be made in that area. It may also bring in money for upkeep and restoration from institutional sources, foundations, etc.

    If Boston and New York feel inferior to Rome with regard to historical architecture, it is with good reason. There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @Stan Adams, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    Soho is short for “South of Houston”

    Doctor Al Stewart weighs in:

    https://youtu.be/33ryNmfQ3j0

    , @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar


    But do they label them such?
     
    Chicago does, and there's a sign advertising Hyde Park/Kenwood, where I live, painted on the electric commuter RR viaduct over 47th St. near the lake.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  99. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    It's absolutely standard on arts and sciences faculties, and for a reason. They spent a year or two taking classes and four or five years working on a research project to get that degree.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anonymous, @TTSSYF

    No, of course it is not a standard. Quite the contrary – in fields where brains matter, nobody pays any attention that one went through the motions of getting a PhD. It is universally understood that it’s a formal requirement in career advance, that’s all.

    In my >30 years as a PhD nobody ever called me Dr other than in jest, nor I have ever heard any of my peers referring to themselves as Drs. Pretty much the same as no sane lawyer (Juris Doctor) insists on being called Dr.

    And Jill Biden is an Ed.D – that’s got to as big a joke as all those “doctors” in women and race studies.

    • Replies: @Crouchback
    @Anonymous

    There may be a regional difference at play here. When I was on the East Coast professors were typically addressed at "Professor," but in the middle of the country "Dr." is common.

    I agree that Ed.D. is a joke.

  100. Biden crammed a startling number of lies into that rant, doing it with a smile and projecting total confidence. That’s psychopathic liar territory.

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @International Jew

    Biden’s statement sounded like a well-rehearsed pat answer that he had prepared for when anybody questioned his intellect. So it was a well-rehearsed pack of lies.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @International Jew

  101. @Anon

    In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs (e.g., Beau, the late Good Son, failed the admittedly tough Delaware bar exam three times) who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly.
     
    Pence is at a similar intellectual level, but he's more modest and his strategy for dealing with it seems to be to take the publicly virtuous Christian route.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/BL-LB-54152

    [Pence] tried to enter the Indiana University School of Law, but scored far too low on the admission test. So he spent the next two years traveling to what seemed like every town in the state as an admissions representative for Hanover--gaining a great education about Indiana, he said.

    The next whirl at the LSAT placed him in the 84th percentile, and Pence graduated in 1986 with a solid B average. It was tough.

    "No one I know likes law school. It was a bad experience. I wouldn't wish it on a dog I didn't like," he laughed.
     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @D. K., @Jack D

    No one I know likes law school.

    You don’t go to law school to have fun. You go there to learn about the law. I guess how much you like it depends on how much you like learning about the law and how good you are at it. It’s certainly challenging but a challenge can be fun, at least if you are not in over your head. Is skiing down a double black diamond ski slope fun? If you are really good at skiing it’s fun but if you’re not then it’s utterly terrifying. I’m reminded of what my daughter said when my wife asked her if she liked MIT after her first semester there. She said that she liked it but that it’s not for everyone.

    Wikipedia gives remarkably short shrift to Pence’s short legal career. I don’t get the feeling that the law was for him.

  102. @JimDandy
    @R.G. Camara

    So, he's definitely a dummy, I.Q.-wise. But... pretty darned successful, right? So... discuss. Thx.

    Replies: @anon

    So… discuss. Thx.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @anon

    Nailed it, but I can't resist including the story.


    An old rancher is talking about politics and compares a politician to a "post turtle." A listener asks him to explain.

    He says, "When you're driving down a country road and you see a fence post with a turtle balanced on top, that's a post turtle. You know he didn't get up there by himself. He doesn't belong there; you wonder who put him there; he can't get anything done while he's up there; and you just want to help the poor, dumb thing down."
     
  103. @Steve Sailer
    @Clyde

    Dr. Johnson's doctorate was honorary. Dr. Franklin's was too.

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @David In TN

    At least Dr. Johnson and Dr. Franklin had each made contributions sufficient to justify such a degree.

  104. @Voltarde
    Somewhat OT. But the following will openly disenfranchise deserving and genuinely qualified whites with science PhD degrees, and deny them equal treatment under the law.

    The NIH style of religious fanaticism:

    "So the last shall be first, and the first last: for many be called, but few chosen."

    Your tax dollars at work. From this week's edition of the NIH Guide (to extramural research funding):

    NIH Faculty Institutional Recruitment for Sustainable Transformation (FIRST) Program: FIRST Cohort
    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-20-022.html

    NIH Faculty Institutional Recruitment for Sustainable Transformation (FIRST) Program: FIRST Coordination and Evaluation Center
    https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-20-023.html

    Some excerpts from the first of these two funding solicitations:

    The purpose of the FIRST Cohort is to transform culture at NIH-funded extramural institutions by building a self-reinforcing community of scientists committed to diversity and inclusive excellence (defined below). Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence within the program has the potential to be transformational for biomedical research at the awardee institutions and beyond. This community will be built through recruitment of a diverse group of early-career faculty who are competitive for an advertised research tenure-track or equivalent faculty position and who have demonstrated strong commitment to promoting diversity and inclusive excellence.

    The program will test the primary hypothesis that a cohort model of faculty hiring, sponsorship, continual mentoring, and support for professional development, embedded within an institution implementing evidence-based practices to create academic cultures of inclusive excellence, will achieve significant improvements in metrics of institutional culture and scientific workforce diversity. Evidence supports that diversity positively impacts scientific discovery through improved problem-solving, innovation, prediction, evaluation, verification, and strategization (Page SE, 2017; Page SE, 2007). Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence within the program has the potential to be transformational for biomedical research at the awardee institutions and beyond. In addition, the program will test the impact of the cohort on institutional culture change. Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence at a range of academic institutions has the potential to be transformational for the biomedical research workforce.

    Establishing and maintaining scientific environments that can cultivate and benefit from a full range of talents is not only essential for the quality and impact of science, but it is also a matter of good stewardship of federal funds to ensure that the most talented researchers are recruited, supported, and advanced to become competitive research investigators. This initiative defines inclusive excellence consistent with the work of Williams et al., (2005) as the act of establishing hallmarks of excellence and organizational effectiveness; operationalizing inclusion across organizational functions; and creating education and professional development processes that have diversity, equity, and inclusion at their core. Achieving inclusive excellence at the national level must be preceded by transformation at the institutional level, through broad adoption of enhanced diversity of faculty and culture change, creating a welcoming environment to recruit and retain scientific talent. Thus, inclusive excellence hinges on both enhancing diversity and inclusion, as well as institutional culture change.
     
    Elevating social Lysenkoism to a state religion is now official US Government policy. Pathetic.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The purpose of the FIRST Cohort is to transform culture at NIH-funded extramural institutions by building a self-reinforcing community of scientists committed to diversity and inclusive excellence (defined below). Implementing and sustaining cultures of inclusive excellence within the program has the potential to be transformational for biomedical research at the awardee institutions and beyond.

    And so it will be. It will transform them from good research institutions into bad research institutions.

  105. @Abolish_public_education
    @Mr McKenna

    When the Ivy knives come out ..

    I was once at a restaurant table with a couple of Ivies. In due course the waiter informed us that his job was part of his program at Cornell’s College of Hotel Management.

    That prompted my dinner companions to mention their alma maters, whereby the waiter immediately expressed his delight at serving fellow Ivies.

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that CCHM was not Ivy League.

    Thanks for the info.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @ScarletNumber

    That prompted my dinner companions to mention their alma maters, whereby the waiter immediately expressed his delight at serving fellow Ivies.

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that CCHM was not Ivy League.

    You should have excused yourself on some pretense, and then told the waiter exactly what your dinner companions said. And then remind him exactly what it was that you ordered.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Mr. Anon

    To prevent another Jesse Jackson event?

  106. @Reg Cæsar
    @black sea


    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.
     
    But do they label them such? Do they feel inferior to Rome and Athens? If you really are historic, people already know.

    Actually, too many of NYC's neighborhoods take names from London. "Soho" is the most annoying.

    Replies: @black sea, @Ganderson, @Hibernian

    I meant formally designated historic districts, not just old neighborhoods. Designating them in this way introduces greater regulation as to what architectural changes may be made in that area. It may also bring in money for upkeep and restoration from institutional sources, foundations, etc.

    If Boston and New York feel inferior to Rome with regard to historical architecture, it is with good reason. There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @black sea


    There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.
     
    Oh, really? Nashville has a Parthenon, and Paris, Tennessee, has an Eiffel Tower.
    , @Stan Adams
    @black sea


    There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.
     
    Except for Vegas:



    https://media.lasvegasweekly.com/img/photos/2019/04/10/0411_The-Strip_Caesars-Colosseum_Courtesy_t1000.jpg

    https://img.theculturetrip.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/66688746_1e3cbc4757_b-1.jpg

    https://cf.bstatic.com/images/hotel/max1024x768/270/270286574.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7a/99/e8/7a99e8745693ab36b5d8c35db1c7f755.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Las_Vegas_%284583982142%29.jpg
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @black sea

    Man, this is pathetic-- who needs to be told?:


    http://www.katklockow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/IMG_0653-1024x683.jpg

    https://www.bcpl.org/undiscovered/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/20171013_133436-e1508444943368-169x300.jpg

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/10/5b/46/5e/welcome-to-historic-mexico.jpg

    https://images.pond5.com/welcome-historic-selma-alabama-sign-footage-119026362_prevstill.jpeg

    https://roadsidegallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Hibbing2560.jpg

    https://m.psecn.photoshelter.com/img-get/I0000tRrdYdlSWj4/s/1000/800/Welcome-to-Historic-Sixth-Street-is-a-famous-mural-located-at-6th-Street-and-I-35-frontage-road-Austin-Texas.jpg

    https://www.gannett-cdn.com/presto/2020/12/04/NNWF/f2e70982-3529-421c-90da-74460498f678-__5733.jpg?width=660&height=439&fit=crop&format=pjpg&auto=webp


    https://s3.amazonaws.com/gs-waymarking-images/2dad8b9d-74df-4686-8081-7bcb43c19cdb_l.jpg


    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0973/3246/files/carvedsign-greenmanville_large.jpg?v=1485891266


    https://mysticknotwork.com/


    (Is that "Mystic Knotwork" or "My stick not work"?

  107. @PhysicistDave
    When my kids were little, one of their friend's moms, who happened to be a dentist herself, kept addressing me as "Dr. Miller." I finally convinced her that just "Dave" was normal.

    My wife and I have known a lot of Ph.D.'s during the last few decades: I have not known one who expected people to call them "Doctor" in ordinary life. "Doctor" is used only in formal academic settings: e.g., I alternated between addressing Dick Feynman as "Dr. Feynman" or "Professor Feynman" when I knew him when I was an undergrad. And, in grad school, I was told to address even full professors by their first names, at least outside of the classroom.

    The one exception to all this was an Ed.D. I knew in high school: we were supposed to call him "Doctor."

    Replies: @Jack D

    That’s right – Jill Biden is a college teacher and so her undergrad (community college) students call her Dr. Biden. That’s normal.

    But that’s where it should end. I don’t know whether the “doctor” thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter. ( Conversely, during the campaign, they insisted on calling the VP “Jobiden” and not by any title – apparently “Jobiden” polled the best. ) I think it has to do with Dem insecurity about the status of women and they feel by reciting the title it raises her status – instead of just a schoolteacher/mom, which is what she really is (not that there is anything wrong with that), you should know that she is a DOCTOR. I saw the same thing during the Kavanaugh hearings – instead of calling his crazy accuser Christine Ford or Ms. Ford she was constantly referred to by the Dems at the hearings (and their shills on TV) as Doktor-Professor Christine Blasey Ford, Ph.D. because they thought that would make her seem more credible. Based upon my knowledge of academics, especially psych professors, it just confirmed to me that she was mentally unstable like a lot of them are.

    On the archived Obama White House web page she is called “Dr. Jill Biden” so this crap goes back a while:

    https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/administration/jill-biden

    On her page she is referred to as Dr. Biden or Dr. Jill Biden 17 times on one short web page. It’s tiresome, especially for someone who only has an Ed.D.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    Based upon my knowledge of academics, especially psych professors, it just confirmed to me that she was mentally unstable like a lot of them are.

    The vast majority of academic psychologists do not study psychopathology or child development or family relations. The arts-and-sciences faculty I've known best allocated two positions (out of the dozen they had at their disposal) to those subdisciplines. Ford was at one time in her life a specialist in child development. She hadn't at the time she surfaced run any of her own research projects in twenty years. Her name's on a lot of papers, but never first in the line up. She has done more extensive study in mathematical statistics than is usually the case, so other psychologists bring her on board to crunch the numbers.

    She wasn't credible for a reason no partisan Democrat would acknowledge: they weren't able to produce evidence that she'd ever in her life been in the same room with the two men she accused. (That and her proven lying about ancillary matters). No amount of title inflation is going to get past that for anyone with a functioning brain. And partisan Democrats didn't need title inflation to swallow her bilge. The svengalis in the Democratic / media complex switched to propagating the idea that Kavanaugh was an alcoholic who 'lied' about his drinking habits when they figured out the sexual assault allegation was one they couldn't sell to the median voter in Maine or in Alaska. At that point, they put James Roche on the tube. Roche is an architect in San Francisco who shared a dorm suite with Kavanaugh for a four month period in 1983 and 1984 and was in 2018 still enraged with Kavanaugh over banal disputes he Roche had had with the 3d man occupying the suite. You sometimes get the impression the Democratic Party is just a collecting pool of the world's assholes.

    Replies: @David In TN

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    I don’t know whether the “doctor” thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter.

    No, it's the former.


    Joe Biden, on the campaign trail, explained that his wife’s desire for the highest degree was in response to what she perceived as her second-class status on their mail.

    “She said, ‘I was so sick of the mail coming to Sen. and Mrs. Biden. I wanted to get mail addressed to Dr. and Sen. Biden.’ That’s the real reason she got her doctorate,” he said.
     
    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2009-feb-02-na-dr-jill-biden2-story.html

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Anon

  108. @D. K.
    I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, "Hello, Mr. Kissinger!" The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, "DOCTOR Kissinger!"

    When I was a graduate student in Psychology, forty years ago, I used to joke that I only wanted to earn a Ph.D. so that I could be the only one NOT to call myself "Doctor." My experiences, as both a student and as an employee, in several institutions of higher education, was that faculty members indeed did tend to be very sensitive to their being slighted by their lessers who failed to address them as "Doctor."

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Mr. Anon, @Cortes

    I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, “Hello, Mr. Kissinger!” The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, “DOCTOR Kissinger!”

    I’m sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    I’m sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    That's cute. The only men in uniform he ever commanded were the few seconded to his office staff. Prior to the summer of 1973, almost none of the Foreign Service reported to him either. The only war ongoing during his time in office was one the Nixon crew inherited from the previous administration. The terrain in Indochina was odd, and fighting a counter-partisan war and a conventional war at the same time was something unusual. I take it Harry Truman and Dean Acheson are also on your war criminal list.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    , @Orville H. Larson
    @Mr. Anon

    Piss on Kissinger, that insufferably pretentious Harvard know- it-all.

    As the saying goes: "You can always tell a Harvard man, but you can't tell him much."

  109. @Marty
    On the other hand, Kayshon Boutte is an actual name.

    Replies: @Twodees Partain

    I can believe it. Other real names I’ve heard are Roshonda, Shakwenda and Danetter. That last one was a client of mine. I called her Danette, which I thought from her signature was her actual name. She corrected me.


  110. Doctor David Duke…

  111. @Alden
    Off topic Californians I went to a small privately owned food market where I buy meat and fish. New sign in the door “ by order of the public health authorities only 8 persons can be in the store at the same time”

    I went in Only 1 other customer in the store on Saturday afternoon. Has anyone else seen a sign like this?

    Replies: @Flip, @binkyxz3, @Gordo

    Off off topic — “Dr.” Jill has a petite nastiness I find attractive.

  112. @Barnard
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The interim head coach must have thought this virtue signaling was his best path to another job. He had previously said he was going to play the kicker who best helped the team, that was a lie.

    Replies: @Curle

    In his defense, this is probably the only football story the disproportionately large number of lesbian college presidents have read in the last decade.

  113. The Bidens. According to the Encyclopedia Britanica, the Bidens are “a group of fraudsters working the area between Scranton, Pennsylvania and the Delaware basin. They are responsible for petty theft, pedophilia, grand theft, shoplifting, prostitution, political corruption and drug abuse.”

    Hunter Biden is a crack addict. Both Jill and Joe Biden have benefited financially by Hunter’s activities selling political access to foreign players. Hunter has been treasonous and the penalty for treason is death. So, there’s that. Chances are high that Jill Biden performed certain favors allowing her to reach the dizzying heights of doctor of education.

    I’ll say from a rather neutral position on Donald Trump, that Joe Biden is a horror. An individual with not a single authentic position on any topic, other than that which will benefit him personally in one way or another. A lifetime political parasite, having done not a single moment of actual productive work during his entire life on Earth.

    The best that can be said about Joe, is that he won’t last much longer. With his passing, his family members will be easy prey for ambitious prosecutors. But then there is Kamala. The Indian Goddess of total, ruinous, fire, death and destruction….

    • Agree: Old Prude, David In TN
  114. @ScarletNumber

    But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district), is pretty tacky.
     
    Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn't handle.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Kronos, @education realist, @gent, @Curle, @Stephen Paul Foster

    The only thing you have to pass to get one of these degrees is a credit check.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  115. @D. K.
    I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, "Hello, Mr. Kissinger!" The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, "DOCTOR Kissinger!"

    When I was a graduate student in Psychology, forty years ago, I used to joke that I only wanted to earn a Ph.D. so that I could be the only one NOT to call myself "Doctor." My experiences, as both a student and as an employee, in several institutions of higher education, was that faculty members indeed did tend to be very sensitive to their being slighted by their lessers who failed to address them as "Doctor."

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Mr. Anon, @Cortes

    Some NHS Consultants get very huffy if addressed as “Dr”; the preferred style is usually “Mr/Miss/Ms”, with “Dr” being a lower form of life: no cited papers, surgical techniques developed or hundreds of successful operations behind them, etc.

  116. @ScarletNumber

    But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district), is pretty tacky.
     
    Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn't handle.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Kronos, @education realist, @gent, @Curle, @Stephen Paul Foster

    “ it is still a lot of work that most people couldn’t handle.”

    When you meet, or worse, have to work with one of these doctors or, in my case, MBAs, with a degree from an effective diploma mill, you will learn that many profit seekers are working overtime to solve the unmanageable work load problem you describe. From my investigation it was revealed that my erstwhile credentialed associate received his degree from a place where the coursework was comprised of reading power point presentations.

    This article gives you some sense of the situation albeit written about undergrad degrees.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/06/in-the-basement-of-the-ivory-tower/306810/

  117. @Anon

    In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly
     
    Is this why black women with Ph.D.s disproportionately insist on using the Dr. title?

    There was a brief Twitter erruption around the hashtag #ImmodestWomen a couple of years ago. Here's a good entry from that exchange:

    https://twitter.com/katemond/status/1008627316694675456

    Another tweet justified the use of Dr. by women Ph.D.s because it partially makes up for the fact that all women Ph.D.s were raped and abused by their advisors.

    A side observation: I do like the fun sort of titles that everybody knows are completely fake, like "Kentucky colonols."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_Colonel

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @ScarletNumber

    Or “Doctor of Journalism”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Jill Biden should talk like Raoul Duke: "That bastard isn't gonna get away with this. I mean, what is going on in this country when a scumsucker like that can get away with sandbagging a doctor of education?"

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Thanks.

    , @Art Deco
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Surprisingly, some gaseous higher ed centers have begun to issue PhDs in journalism. About 25 were awarded in 2018

  118. Mr. Biden acknowledged that in the testy exchange in New Hampshire, he had lost his temper. ”I exaggerate when I’m angry,” Mr. Biden said, ”but I’ve never gone around telling people things that aren’t true about me.” Mr. Biden’s questioner had made the query in a mild tone, but provoked an explosive response from Mr. Biden.

    This is from back when the press weren’t on his side, I guess: his response was hardly “explosive”. This makes it sound like he went absolutely nuts.

    Also, isn’t it weird how he was a peevish nimrod in 1988, in the prime of his life, but in his 70’s, with dementia apparently starting to set in, he became more charismatic than Trump, Obama, Bill Clinton or JFK

  119. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Anon

    Or "Doctor of Journalism"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Art Deco

    Jill Biden should talk like Raoul Duke: “That bastard isn’t gonna get away with this. I mean, what is going on in this country when a scumsucker like that can get away with sandbagging a doctor of education?”

  120. @Anonymous
    Medical doctors have appropriated and monopolized the "Dr." title, so effectively that most people exclusively or mainly associate it with medicine. But the original use of the title was for people with doctoral degrees.

    The medical guild, especially when it was quite a dodgy profession with very poor standards which was the case until the 20th century, insisted on being called doctors as a PR move to make themselves look better and more authoritative. Technically though, the medical degree was not and still isn't a doctoral degree. This is obscured in the US because med students are required to have a separate bachelor's degree as a prerequisite. But in the UK, Canada, and most countries elsewhere, the medical degree is a bachelor's degree. You get a bachelor's degree in medicine, surgery, etc.

    In other words, medical doctors don't have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called "doctors". They have bachelor's degrees. But they're members of a guild which successfully managed to usurp the label.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Art Deco, @for-the-record, @Ancient Briton

    Medical doctors have appropriated and monopolized the “Dr.” title

    Here in Portugal anyone who has a university degree is entitled to be called “Doutor” (or Doutora). It’s presumably because in the “old days” university degrees in Portugal were extraordinarily rare — if I had gone to school in Portugal, obligatory schooling would have been to age 9.

  121. @International Jew
    Biden crammed a startling number of lies into that rant, doing it with a smile and projecting total confidence. That's psychopathic liar territory.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    Biden’s statement sounded like a well-rehearsed pat answer that he had prepared for when anybody questioned his intellect. So it was a well-rehearsed pack of lies.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @the one they call Desanex

    Psychopathic nevertheless. He may pack the full suite, or dark triad. A narcissistic, Machiavellian, psychopathic Mr. President.

    , @International Jew
    @the one they call Desanex

    Yeah, sounds about right. I don't think he ran it past any sharp consultants, though — especially the "I probably have a higher IQ than you", and the "bottom 2/3 of my class".

    Gerald Ford gave Dan Rather a better answer, less dramatic and more thoughtful. I don't remember if it was before or after Nixon's resignation, and I can't find it now on Youtube.

    Anyway, Rather asked something like, "Some people, um, question whether you are, um, intellectually up to the Presidency." Ford replied that he did well in his law school class at Yale (and maybe something else along those lines). Without getting belligerant, much less insulting Rather, Ford made Rather look pretty ridiculous.

    And we all remember how Rather blew up his own career (over the fake Bush Air National Guard letter) when he mistook the output of a laser printer for that of a 1960s typewriter!

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Stan Adams

  122. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Anon

    Or "Doctor of Journalism"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Art Deco

    Thanks.

  123. Anon[104] • Disclaimer says:

    I suspect Epstein, coming from an older Jewish generation in which your fond family always pushed you to be a either a doctor or a lawyer, feels strongly that Dr. should be reserved for the medical profession, because using Dr. was a quiet Jewish way of bragging you had a son who was both smart and rich. Jews have always been snippy about anyone non-doctor who calls themselves by the title because they wanted to reserve it for bragging.

    But it also shows an utter lack of knowledge about academia. In academia, you don’t use your title much in conversation, but it’s all over the paperwork.

    Being scornful about a PhD shows a real lack of class. Anyone who made their way through the whole PhD process deserves the title if they want to use it.

  124. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon7

    Okay, so if in a hospital, somebody says, "Get a doctor now!" they don't have time for a discussion of whether a holder of a Ph.D. of Public Health or Education or whatever is or isn't a real doctor.

    That makes sense.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anon7, @Twinkie

    Nurses have agitated for the right to be called “doctors” in clinical settings by earning a “doctorate” in nursing practice (not a Ph.D. in nursing): https://onlinenursing.duq.edu/blog/whats-up-doc-addressing-dnp-educated-nurses-as-doctor/

    Then again, chiropractors call themselves “doctors” in “healthcare,” so… frankly, it’s a big joke and a giant insult to those with MDs.

    Yet another reason the vast majority of physicians discourage their own children from studying and entering medicine, which has become a low morale profession (declining income, lower autonomy, higher degree of regulatory control, massively more paper work, constant fear of litigation, less prestige, etc.).

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    You should appreciate that the biggest joke is the martial arts instructors who refer to themselves as "professor", like in http://www.karaho.com

    " Professor Chow's Chinese Kara-ho Kempo Karate".

    LOL

    Replies: @Twinkie

  125. @anon
    That vid showing Biden in 1988 is like some of the vid from the current year, except he doesn't talk as fast anymore. Pretty obvious Joe's been an insecure cry-bully for his entire adult life.

    We can all rest easier once he's installed as President! The long national nightmare will be over!

    Replies: @Moral Stone, @Nachum

    Apart from the lack of hair. I’d completely forgotten about that. (And I’m bald!)

    • Replies: @Anon87
    @Nachum

    Will we ever see a bald president again? McCain only went as far as he did on the vet cred, but we all knew he was a destined loser.

    Look at the amount of impressive work that went into de-balding Biden. Is it his own horseshoe hair grafted up top? The color and texture blend is impressive. His face is pretty chopped up too, so HD television probably put the vanity of "making a president" on overdrive.

    Chuck Schumer also has the fear of being viewed as a bald guy. There is a reason he rarely is shot from behind, he cultivates a Hair-drian Wall for the cameras.

    People make fun of Trumps hair, but he never would have been elected if he looked like Lex Luthor (which from Photoshops it really doesn't look all that bad).

    Now I'd say it's obvious we will never have a bald female president, but who can't picture us being subjected to a bitter harpy like Ayanna Pressley? Flips the entire World War Hair on its head, no pun.

    Replies: @Up2Drew

  126. @Anon7
    Thirty years ago, when I worked in hospital administration, I don't believe there was one PhD who wanted to be called "doctor", no matter what science their degree was in. In hospitals, "doctor" establishes rank and precedence, and who actually holds the responsibility for the life and well-being of patients.

    Now, though, PhDs all insist on being called doctor, especially the women. Doctors of Nursing, Doctors of Public Health. In every field, no matter how unrelated to health care. And even when their doctorate is as useless as an education degree.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Gordo, @ScarletNumber, @Art Deco

    It’s when they’re stupid enough to use it booking a flight and half way across the Atlantic a stewardess comes up and whispers ‘can you help, someone in coach has had a heart attack?’

  127. She’s not only a doctor, she’s a bodyguard.

    • LOL: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I smell a caption contest coming on.

    "Get'cha own man, bitch! He mine!"

    Worst. Mud. Wrestling. Contest. Ever.

  128. @Alden
    Off topic Californians I went to a small privately owned food market where I buy meat and fish. New sign in the door “ by order of the public health authorities only 8 persons can be in the store at the same time”

    I went in Only 1 other customer in the store on Saturday afternoon. Has anyone else seen a sign like this?

    Replies: @Flip, @binkyxz3, @Gordo

    Pretty common in UK, bigger supermarkets have a security guard at the door with one of those clicky counting things.

  129. Trump didn’t even take his SATs. What more needs to be said?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @GreatSocialist

    The source for this is his disgruntled niece.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  130. @Lot
    Delaware’s bar exam pass rate is 68%, and is the 13th easiest by that measure in the USA.

    https://lawschooli.com/bar-exam-pass-rate-by-state/

    Likely under 15% of white males who take the exam fail it.

    Speaking of dim lawyers, more evidence Rudy really screwed up the Hunter laptop release.

    An e-mail admitting to underreporting the Burisma corrupt payments on taxes by $400,000 was on the drive in addition to all the pervy items.

    And Rudy is leaking it now after having it for months!

    https://hotair.com/headlines/archives/2020/12/email-hunter-biden-raises-fresh-questions-tax-dealings/

    Replies: @Redman, @Ed

    Trump was done in more by hiring friends instead of competent people. There is something admirable about elevating a 4th rate lawyer like Cohen to be your personal but at a certain level it just becomes dangerous once you become president.

    Worst staffing mistake was jettisoning Bannon.

    • Replies: @botazefa
    @Ed


    Worst staffing mistake was jettisoning Bannon.
     
    I think his continued reliance and trust in Javanka was a worse staffing mistake.
  131. @ScarletNumber

    But insisting that other people call you Doctor, especially when you got a doctorate in Education (which 95% of the time is just a way to pad your pay from the public school district), is pretty tacky.
     
    Even if your parenthetical is true, it is still a lot of work that most people couldn't handle.

    Replies: @newrouter, @Kronos, @education realist, @gent, @Curle, @Stephen Paul Foster

    Your average plumber, auto mechanic 0r fireman would score a standard deviation higher on a IQ test than one of these frauds.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Stephen Paul Foster


    Your average plumber, auto mechanic 0r fireman would score a standard deviation higher on a IQ test than one of these frauds
     
    I know in modern America it is declasse to make fun of people who work with their hands, but most of them aren't particularly bright. An IQ test tends to correlate with those skills that lead to success in the classroom. Plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen became those things because they hate school.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  132. @Anonymous
    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the "Dr", it's really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a "Dr", it's a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf


    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Flip, @Art Deco, @Carbon blob, @Anon

    I wouldn’t consider Penn a second-rate Ivy at all, I think they just get tired of being confused with a certain cow college in central PA.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Carbon blob

    Of course Penn is a second-rate Ivy, unless you consider them to be at a level of Harvard, Princeton, or Yale.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Carbon blob

    Apologies to any Penn grads here, but if your context for comparison is 'the Ivies', then Penn is the very definition of second-rate. The Penn name simply does not compare with HPY in terms of international rankings/recognition.

  133. It has truly been said that Political Correctness is a war on Noticing. (As well as on Remembering, but that’s not the issue here.) Anyone half lucid would have picked up on the “Dr. Biden” bit long ago, but we were forbidden from Noticing.

    I Noticed because I flipped the bird at PC decades ago. I actually originally thought she might be an MD, and when I found out the truth it evoked both horse laughs and nausea in me, to quote Tom Wolfe. (That their relationship’s start may well have a very, very sordid aspect just evokes nausea.)

    Back when I graduated law school- with a JD, or course- I told a friend to smack me if I ever insisted on “Dr.” And the same is true for Ed.D.s as well. The fact that so many people who would scorn an Ed.D. any other day are so worked up about this, calling it, incredibly, “sexism,” only goes to show how political the whole contretemps is, and how deep PC culture has infiltrated.

    Basically, if you’re not an MD, DDS, or PhD, you don’t get to insist on “Dr.”, and if you are one of those- particularly the last- and insist on it in a non-professional setting, you’re a jerk. (Not that PhDs mean much on their own. There’s been exactly one US president with a PhD, and he was a fascist disaster.) This brings to mind the incident back in the Bush years when Lawrence Summers got into a fight with Cornell West (and Henry Louis Gates) and people began noticing that in the New York Times, it was always “Mr. Summers” (who has a PhD in economics) and “Dr. West” (PhD, African-American Studies). People wondered if it was racism, anti-racism, condescension, or what. The Times told the truth: They give the “Dr.” to physicians and dentists, and everyone else based on their choice. Summers didn’t care (nor would Condoleeza Rice), while West, not surprisingly, did.

    (By the way, I’m married to a PhD, in psychology, who does use it at work, and never outside it.)

    There’s a scene in the movie Best in Show where Fred Willard’s character is interviewing Bob Balaban’s character:

    “We’re here with Dr. Millbank, President of the Mayflower Kennel Club. Doctor, let me ask you something. I got a little bursitis in my shoulder. Do you recommend heat or cold?”

    “I’m not that kind of doctor.”

    “I know that. I’m just kidding. He’s not that kind of doctor, but he’s got such a good sense of humor, we like to have a few laughs.”

    Seriously, someone should go up to Jill Biden and ask about their bursitis. Preferably in Joe’s presence. They would both probably explode. It would be beautiful.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Nachum


    Back when I graduated law school- with a JD, or course- I told a friend to smack me if I ever insisted on “Dr.”
     
    As they should have, as the proper honorific for lawyers is esquire, not doctor. However, the rest of your post is a non sequitur.

    Basically, if you’re not an MD, DDS, or PhD, you don’t get to insist on “Dr.”
     
    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD's can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD's. I call my dentist "doctor" when I'm in his office, but it would be silly to call a dentist one socially.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Nachum

  134. @James O'Meara
    In 1929, Wittgenstein submitted the Tractatus as a Ph.D. thesis at Cambridge, and underwent the formality of an oral examination upon it by Russell and Moore, to the embarrassment of all three of them. According to Braithwaite, Moore’s report to the degree committee concluded: “I myself consider that this is a work of genius; but even if I am completely mistaken and it is nothing of the sort, it is well above the standard required for the Ph.D. degree.”

    Amusing, though in fact Moore was an idiot and Wittgenstein a fraud.

    Replies: @bomag

    LOL.

    I guess every age has its celebrity culture.

    I like the quip from Keynes that captures the hype of the day when Wittgenstein showed up at Cambridge:

    “Well, God has arrived. I met him on the 5:15 train.”

    Telling that then the celebs included Wittgenstein et al; today it is the Kardashians.

  135. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    All right, bad on the U.S. sawbones guild I suppose, but didn't the J.D. come first? And M.D. in the states was soon joined by Pharm.D., O.D., D.D.S./D.M.D., and probably more crazy crap in the future, so I don't see how they're running as impostors in front of everybody.

    Psy.D. would seem to be of that same clique but 1) apparently requires as much work as a Ph.D. in psychology; and 2) isn't sufficient for psychiatric jobs that require the professional/M.D. cred

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Pericles

    All right, bad on the U.S. sawbones guild I suppose, but didn’t the J.D. come first?

    No, the juris doctor was atypical until some point after about 1950. The LLB was the order of the day before that. Not sure when law degrees came to be more common than office apprenticeships. In my home town, superior court judges prior to 1920 were generally men who read law. After that, law school was the mode.

  136. @Mr. Anon
    @D. K.


    I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, “Hello, Mr. Kissinger!” The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, “DOCTOR Kissinger!”
     
    I'm sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Orville H. Larson

    I’m sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    That’s cute. The only men in uniform he ever commanded were the few seconded to his office staff. Prior to the summer of 1973, almost none of the Foreign Service reported to him either. The only war ongoing during his time in office was one the Nixon crew inherited from the previous administration. The terrain in Indochina was odd, and fighting a counter-partisan war and a conventional war at the same time was something unusual. I take it Harry Truman and Dean Acheson are also on your war criminal list.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    I don't believe that Martin Borman or Alfred Rosenberg ever commanded any soldiers either, and yet the Nuremberg tribunal saw fit to label them as War Criminals.

    The moment I hit "publish comment", I knew that you - Art Deco - would reply to my comment, flying to the defence of Dr. New-World-Order. You are such a dutiful and predictable drone.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    Correction: I meant Julius Streicher, not Alfred Rosenberg.

  137. @education realist
    @ScarletNumber

    The parenthetical isn't true. No teachers get PhDs for the money. For one thing, you don't have to get a degree to get paid more--just go to school, in most cases. A PhD is a huge amount of work for zero benefit that couldn't be achieved in a hundred easier ways. It's flatly false.

    People who get doctorates in education want to teach in university ed schools. And those jobs are going away, like all tenured positions. The minute tenured positions started falling, so did Ed doctorates. In 1998 they were 15% of all degrees. By 2017, they were just 9%.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @Ron Mexico

    In my experience, it is true, although it’s more common that they pad their income with Masters degrees than with doctorates. Masters degrees in education can be completed in about a year and can be done part-time or in the evenings, without any loss of income. There’s more bang for the buck with getting a Masters versus a Ph.D. I’ve observed the same thing with other State agencies. In fact, many of them will pay for the person to get an advanced degree and then will give them a salary increase. That’s not to say that it isn’t always warranted or didn’t take a lot of effort to attain.

  138. @Art Deco
    1. If Biden required 4 attempts to pass the bar exam, he was below the 8th percentile among licensed attorneys. I believe Marilyn Mosby, the abusive state's attorney in Baltimore, required 3 attempts.

    2. "EdD" degrees are spurious as professional credentials. There's been a great deal of credential inflation in the last generation or two, but disciplines and practices like dentistry, physical and occupational therapy, and pharmacy are distinct bodies of knowledge and skill whose practitioners either know things physicians and surgeons do not or have a much more detailed understanding than you commonly find among medical practitioners. Clinical psychologists commonly have some tricks up their sleeve that psychiatrists do not. (Optometrists and podiatrists, perhaps not). There is no such profession as 'education'. There are public-sector apparatchiks, non-profit apparatchiks, public policy mavens, and tests-and-measurements psychologists.

    3. EdDs are spurious as research degrees as well. You can study psychology and you can study organizational behavior (under the heading of sociology or psychology or political science).


    Which is to say it's another humbug degree. Same deal with all the other teaching degrees, social work degrees, library science degrees, 'interdisciplinary' degrees in the arts-and-sciences, and (in many places) degrees in sociology and cultural anthropology. And when they're not humbug, they're nevertheless padded (as are nearly all baccalaureate degree programs, not to mention JD programs). Abolish all of them.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    I’ve always thought that a teacher should have a degree in whatever subject matter they intend to teach, supplemented with a few psychology course or other general management courses.; e.g., an eighth-grade science teacher should have a degree in some sort of hard science, not education with an “emphasis” on science.

  139. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    That's right - Jill Biden is a college teacher and so her undergrad (community college) students call her Dr. Biden. That's normal.

    But that's where it should end. I don't know whether the "doctor" thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter. ( Conversely, during the campaign, they insisted on calling the VP "Jobiden" and not by any title - apparently "Jobiden" polled the best. ) I think it has to do with Dem insecurity about the status of women and they feel by reciting the title it raises her status - instead of just a schoolteacher/mom, which is what she really is (not that there is anything wrong with that), you should know that she is a DOCTOR. I saw the same thing during the Kavanaugh hearings - instead of calling his crazy accuser Christine Ford or Ms. Ford she was constantly referred to by the Dems at the hearings (and their shills on TV) as Doktor-Professor Christine Blasey Ford, Ph.D. because they thought that would make her seem more credible. Based upon my knowledge of academics, especially psych professors, it just confirmed to me that she was mentally unstable like a lot of them are.

    On the archived Obama White House web page she is called "Dr. Jill Biden" so this crap goes back a while:

    https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/administration/jill-biden

    On her page she is referred to as Dr. Biden or Dr. Jill Biden 17 times on one short web page. It's tiresome, especially for someone who only has an Ed.D.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Harry Baldwin

    Based upon my knowledge of academics, especially psych professors, it just confirmed to me that she was mentally unstable like a lot of them are.

    The vast majority of academic psychologists do not study psychopathology or child development or family relations. The arts-and-sciences faculty I’ve known best allocated two positions (out of the dozen they had at their disposal) to those subdisciplines. Ford was at one time in her life a specialist in child development. She hadn’t at the time she surfaced run any of her own research projects in twenty years. Her name’s on a lot of papers, but never first in the line up. She has done more extensive study in mathematical statistics than is usually the case, so other psychologists bring her on board to crunch the numbers.

    She wasn’t credible for a reason no partisan Democrat would acknowledge: they weren’t able to produce evidence that she’d ever in her life been in the same room with the two men she accused. (That and her proven lying about ancillary matters). No amount of title inflation is going to get past that for anyone with a functioning brain. And partisan Democrats didn’t need title inflation to swallow her bilge. The svengalis in the Democratic / media complex switched to propagating the idea that Kavanaugh was an alcoholic who ‘lied’ about his drinking habits when they figured out the sexual assault allegation was one they couldn’t sell to the median voter in Maine or in Alaska. At that point, they put James Roche on the tube. Roche is an architect in San Francisco who shared a dorm suite with Kavanaugh for a four month period in 1983 and 1984 and was in 2018 still enraged with Kavanaugh over banal disputes he Roche had had with the 3d man occupying the suite. You sometimes get the impression the Democratic Party is just a collecting pool of the world’s assholes.

    • Agree: J.Ross, Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Art Deco

    "You sometimes get the impression the Democratic Party is just a collecting pool of the world's assholes."

    Well said. FWIW this is why I left the Democratic Party around 30 years ago.

  140. @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    It's absolutely standard on arts and sciences faculties, and for a reason. They spent a year or two taking classes and four or five years working on a research project to get that degree.

    Replies: @James O'Meara, @Anonymous, @TTSSYF

    Wouldn’t it depend on the subject? A Ph.D. in physics or chemistry is a lot different than a Ph.D. in early Renaissance British history. The latter is more likely to make the person into a very good plumber.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @TTSSYF


    Wouldn’t it depend on the subject? A Ph.D. in physics or chemistry is a lot different than a Ph.D. in early Renaissance British history. The latter is more likely to make the person into a very good plumber.
     
    You must not know very many plumbers.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

  141. And at the end we have the biggest lie of all: ”I exaggerate when I’m angry,” Mr. Biden said, ”but I’ve never gone around telling people things that aren’t true about me.”

  142. @R.G. Camara
    This is just part of the Left's War on Speech Control, where the Left tells you how you may address them, you peon. Hence the "pronouns in the profile" game, and the demanding you address them by their titles (whether real or imaginary), or where they give themselves hilarious monikers and insist that your not following that is hate (e.g. woke joke political commentator Toure Neblitt demanding that he be addressed by the mononym Toure instead of by his full name).

    This is about power to control speech. Very 1984.

    And Steve, good pick up on Biden's intellectual insecurity. Although no one who gets to be a senator is dumb, Biden was never the smartest guy in the room in any Senate meeting, and he got all upset about it. It seems he couldn't be happy being a corporate stooge and railroad pawn and decided he needed to "prove" his smarts when challenged.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @AndrewR, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb

    I shared this on another thread, but it’s worth noting how dumb “Dr” Biden is, along with all the TDS sycophants in that thread feigning indignation that Mr Epstein doesn’t worship Jill’s pseudocredentials.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/mattbramanti/status/1338031367704154112

    And the idea that US Senators are all bright is pretty silly. The Feinstein thing is the clearest example, even if she was still sharp back in 1992. We also have Little Marco and that dumb lady from Tennessee to show us just how stupid these people can be. In electoral politics, higher intelligence is probably a liability past a rather low point. Maybe 110. They want midwits in there.

  143. @Jack D
    @Daniel H


    The origins of esquire date to the Middle Ages, when it was a title conferred on candidates for knighthood in England. Later, the term was extended to other mid-level dignitaries, including sheriffs, sergeants, justices of the peace and “barristers at law.”

    In the United States, esquire over time came to refer “commonly and exclusively” to lawyers, stated the opinion, but how that happened is a mystery.
     
    https://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/tussle_over_titles/

    The shorter version is that in the US it's just the honorific title you give to lawyers just as MDs are called "doctor".

    I was taught that OTHER people may address you by appending Esq. to your name but that you should never refer to yourself that way.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @CA Lawyer

    I would not use a lawyer who appended Esq. to his name anymore than I would take advice from Jill Biden.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  144. @Houston 1992
    since the taxpayer subsidies almost all 3rd level education, can we require that dissertations etc need to be posted on a searchable online database. It might cause lefties to pause before embracing vitriol and for professors grading it

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Considering she went to a public university, I’m sure it is if you know where to look. A few weeks ago I posted the link to Ibram Kendi’s dissertation.

  145. @black sea
    @Reg Cæsar

    I meant formally designated historic districts, not just old neighborhoods. Designating them in this way introduces greater regulation as to what architectural changes may be made in that area. It may also bring in money for upkeep and restoration from institutional sources, foundations, etc.

    If Boston and New York feel inferior to Rome with regard to historical architecture, it is with good reason. There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @Stan Adams, @Reg Cæsar

    There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.

    Oh, really? Nashville has a Parthenon, and Paris, Tennessee, has an Eiffel Tower.

    • LOL: Hibernian
  146. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, sort of: here's a photo of the most overlooked, ignored, and neglected PoC in America today:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1200514937732370433/eYpTPab4_400x400.jpg

    That's Pierson Cooke, who seems to be the regular kicker on the Vanderbilt football team. He kicked a 39-yard field goal today in Vandy's 42-17 loss to Tennessee.

    But he's not making a lot of news, because on this day he wasn't needed to kick extra points -- that crucial duty was turned over to Sarah Fuller, who did indeed convert 2 for 2 chances.

    I love the way all of the news stories on Fuller emphasize the absolute NECESSITY of bringing her on to the team, because there JUST WAS NO OTHER CHOICE.

    But today their regular kicker was clearly available, and the actual kicking duties, other than the two gimmick extra points, were obviously turned back over to him.

    By the way, to bring this post back on topic, here's a Guardian article that suggests a new form of address for powerful GRRRLZ who deserve respect and recognition for their accomplishments that will no doubt soon enter the lexicon:

    Sarah Fuller: 'My male college football teammates call me Champ'

    Replies: @Barnard, @ScarletNumber, @mmack, @Neuday

    I love the way all of the news stories on Fuller emphasize the absolute NECESSITY of bringing her on to the team, because there JUST WAS NO OTHER CHOICE.

    Well teams generally carry two kickers in case one gets hurt in the middle of the game.

  147. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    You almost never hear about Pence except every four years he wins the VP debate.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    You almost never hear about Pence except every four years he wins the VP debate.

    I was too lazy/indifferent to watch it.

    But to me what Pence needed to do was not “win” but

    1) Wrap the Democrat riots around the Democrats. (And relate this to the importance of rule-of-law and our lives, freedom and prosperity.)

    2) Wrap “blood libel against white people” around Kamala and make her, and her presence on the ticket absolutely toxic. (This was electorally critical because Biden himself was running as return-to-normalcy mediocre white guy and had less of a negative profile than Hillary, especially to midwestern white guys. As turned out–fatally–to be the case.)

    Having not seen the debate, i assume Pence while “winning” did neither of these.

    This is sadly par for the course for Republicans. Instead of directly attacking the destructive minoritarian evil of the Democrats as … destructive minoritarian evil, they try for some namby-pamby we’re responsible and aren’t the bad folks they say.

    Since they neve confront and name the evil and destruction the parasite party is doing, they never get most people actually *thinking* about the what is being served up. (The mad as hell people have figured it out for themselves.) They are just the boring stodgy alternative and continue to lose.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    @AnotherDad

    I appreciate your sentiment, AD. But, preserving the original principles is no longer an option. I never liked fighting and am too old to fight at any rate, but the original principles, while valid, are no longer virile. Decades in forestry have taught me that sometimes it's best to burn it down. As I've said before, white people don't reproduce well under shade. Maybe you can thin the forest, but that's not possible with human populations. SCOTUS made its decision. States no longer have the right to demand that their peer states behave responsibly. We either age corruptly, as aging bodies do, or the younger bodies burn it down. But once the fire begins it will burn hot and long, and the land will be scorched and open to seed. How confident are you that the sown seed will pass your inspection?

  148. @Mr McKenna
    @Anonymous


    University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal" Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.
     
    Would you believe that this (somewhat outdated) stereotype has been called anti-semitic? (Not the use of the Ivy affiliation but the notion that Penn is substandard.)

    Replies: @black sea, @Abolish_public_education, @Old and Grumpy, @International Jew

    Penn is an Ivy League school. Now are you mixing up Penn State, who awhile a back purchased Dickinson’s Law School? I never heard Dickinson refer itself as an Ivy school, although it is like a lot of snooty small private colleges with dreams of grandeur. Funny thing is they needed the money from the sale of their law school. As for Penn State, it is PA’s land grant university. Thoroughly worthless these days as a land grant, which is very sad since at one time it was exceptional. It as definitely has become considerably pretentious in its attitude since I went there.

  149. The educated have become the American version of aristocrats. Just ask them. So the little serf just needs to respect the title, and not question their betters.

  150. On The Critic Kareem Abdul-Jabbar recognized Jon Lovitz’ PhD. (skip to 0:32 if you are impatient).

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @ScarletNumber

    “ The Critic” was a very funny show.

  151. @Steve Sailer
    @Clyde

    Dr. Johnson's doctorate was honorary. Dr. Franklin's was too.

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @David In TN

    Regarding the article about John Carlos I mentioned, the writer inferred the former sprinter had a PHD for one of the most learned dissertations in history.

  152. @Reg Cæsar
    @Cato


    Surprise, surprise, Biden has more hair now than he had in 1988.

     

    In his nose and ears.


    https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1EuI2X6DuK1Rjy1zjq6zraFXaG.jpg

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    If you want to avoid batteries and machines, I’ve found that bent chain nose jewelry pliers work well to remove both nose and ear hair.

  153. @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Nurses have agitated for the right to be called “doctors” in clinical settings by earning a “doctorate” in nursing practice (not a Ph.D. in nursing): https://onlinenursing.duq.edu/blog/whats-up-doc-addressing-dnp-educated-nurses-as-doctor/

    Then again, chiropractors call themselves “doctors” in “healthcare,” so... frankly, it’s a big joke and a giant insult to those with MDs.

    Yet another reason the vast majority of physicians discourage their own children from studying and entering medicine, which has become a low morale profession (declining income, lower autonomy, higher degree of regulatory control, massively more paper work, constant fear of litigation, less prestige, etc.).

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    You should appreciate that the biggest joke is the martial arts instructors who refer to themselves as “professor”, like in http://www.karaho.com

    ” Professor Chow’s Chinese Kara-ho Kempo Karate”.

    LOL

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Chrisnonymous


    You should appreciate that the biggest joke is the martial arts instructors who refer to themselves as “professor”
     
    I don't think that's a joke, because it is specifically a cultural thing in Brazil (hence Brazilian Jiujitsu instructors - so long as they are black belts - are addressed as "professor"). But I have never encountered a non-BJJ art that uses that term.

    What's really a joke is a title inflation in martial arts in general. I am okay with a high level instructor being called a "master" (from the East Asian tradition), but then there are "grand masters" these days. What's next, "great grand master"? "Ultimate great grand master"?

    I say keep it simple: "professor" in BJJ, "sensei" in Judo, and "master" in TKD and "sifu" in Kung Fu, and "guro" in Kali, etc. No adjectives ("grand," etc.). Or you could just go "California vibe" and call each other by first names (or "Coach" so and so) so long as the senior instructor is okay with it. To me, attitudes of the students and their receptivity to instruction have mattered much more than how they address me (whenever I have taught - though these day I only teach and coach my own children).
  154. @Anonymous
    @Art Deco

    You're describing medical degrees in the US. The point is that they're academically equivalent to bachelor's degrees. In the UK and many other countries, medical doctors and surgeons equivalent to those in the US have bachelor's degrees in medicine or surgery. They learn and train in the same things as American med students. They have identical curricula.

    In the US, instead of bachelor's degrees in medicine, med students earn doctor of medicine degrees, and they have to have a BA and some intro science courses as prerequisites. They're not academically equivalent to doctoral degrees.

    In the UK, the MD degree is more like a real doctoral degree. It's a postgraduate research degree in medicine. It is like a real PhD in science.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros, @Jon Orton

    A large majority of UK (and German, and Romanian, and Indian, and Chinese) physicians do not hold a doctorate. Their schooling is slightly longer than a regular bachelor, and they are really bachelors in medicine. I fancy calling myself a doctor too, having gone to college before the Bologna reform and earning a 5-year BSc; it’s as long as a contemporary Romanian MSc or an Indian Bachelor of Medicine.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Unless things changed radically since I left Germany, they don't have a bachelor's degree. In anything.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

  155. Someone made the point on Twitter earlier this year that Biden was chosen as Obama’s running mate partly because he was a dumb white guy. The logic being that dumb white guys would be less put out by an articulate, “uppity” black(ish) candidate if a dumb white guy was waiting in the wings. It made sense to me.

  156. @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    Based upon my knowledge of academics, especially psych professors, it just confirmed to me that she was mentally unstable like a lot of them are.

    The vast majority of academic psychologists do not study psychopathology or child development or family relations. The arts-and-sciences faculty I've known best allocated two positions (out of the dozen they had at their disposal) to those subdisciplines. Ford was at one time in her life a specialist in child development. She hadn't at the time she surfaced run any of her own research projects in twenty years. Her name's on a lot of papers, but never first in the line up. She has done more extensive study in mathematical statistics than is usually the case, so other psychologists bring her on board to crunch the numbers.

    She wasn't credible for a reason no partisan Democrat would acknowledge: they weren't able to produce evidence that she'd ever in her life been in the same room with the two men she accused. (That and her proven lying about ancillary matters). No amount of title inflation is going to get past that for anyone with a functioning brain. And partisan Democrats didn't need title inflation to swallow her bilge. The svengalis in the Democratic / media complex switched to propagating the idea that Kavanaugh was an alcoholic who 'lied' about his drinking habits when they figured out the sexual assault allegation was one they couldn't sell to the median voter in Maine or in Alaska. At that point, they put James Roche on the tube. Roche is an architect in San Francisco who shared a dorm suite with Kavanaugh for a four month period in 1983 and 1984 and was in 2018 still enraged with Kavanaugh over banal disputes he Roche had had with the 3d man occupying the suite. You sometimes get the impression the Democratic Party is just a collecting pool of the world's assholes.

    Replies: @David In TN

    “You sometimes get the impression the Democratic Party is just a collecting pool of the world’s assholes.”

    Well said. FWIW this is why I left the Democratic Party around 30 years ago.

  157. @Achmed E. Newman
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Agreed. I have not seen much besides youtube clips of this guy, but he just seems like one overly aggressive son of a bitch way too often. I remember that some guy on his campaign trail up in Ohio (somewhere in the area anyway) asked him a tough question and Biden got in the guy's face about it. That's about 180 degrees from the way Ronald Reagan would have handled it.

    I ran out of [Agree]s for the day, but a round of them on me for all those who know that the Ed. PhD is a crock.

    Are you crazy, are you high, or just an ordinary guy?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w58E2S315a4

    Replies: @anon, @Ganderson

    Or just an ordinary guy…

  158. @Anon7
    @Steve Sailer

    Forty years ago, doctors ran hospitals. Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military; they gave the orders and took responsibility, they didn't recognize authority outside their command structure. I met senior physicians at informal gatherings who, once they determined that I was not a physician, literally dismissed me from their minds. You were of no interest, and no account, regardless of your Professional and Administrative salary grade. I wasn't insulted; that was just how the game worked. If you wanted authority in a hospital, you went to medical school, just like guys who wanted authority aboard a naval ship went to Annapolis.

    PhDs didn't want to be called "doctor" because it would be like they were faking having more authority than they really had. Imagine what people would say - is that guy a narcissistic moron?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Harry Baldwin

    Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military

    When my father enlisted in the army after Pearl Harbor, he had already completed medical school and an internship and so was sent immediately to officer’s training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain. So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Harry Baldwin


    So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.
     
    Doctors are still commissioned officers in the military, and usually make captain if they do 20 years. Navy captain is the equivalent of full colonel and is where the promotion pyramid starts to get real steep. Most guys can expect to make Lieutenant Colonel if they do 20 years and keep their nose clean.

    Captains/colonels usually get some kind of command to see if they are fit for further promotion. Some black woman Obama made a four star commanded a couple of logistic ships.

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @Harry Baldwin

    In ‘42 he was commissioned as a 2nd Lt. and by ‘45 he had only made Cpt?

    Who did he piss off?

    By Vietnam I think the rule was that doctors go in as captains and quickly make major.

    But, rank inflation is such that a guy commanding the latrines can make brigadier.

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Harry Baldwin


    [My father] was sent immediately to officer’s training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain
     
    While captains are O-3 and outrank First lieutenants and Second lieutenants all Army doctors have this as their rank to start. It isn't anything to brag about.

    Remember, Hawkeye Pierce was a Captain, and the army wasn't going to promote him. As an aside the Fort Hood shooter was a Major. Also, that happened in 2009 and the fucker still hasn't been put to death.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @Anon7
    @Harry Baldwin

    In the army, captain is a relatively minor rank. My dad, who was mostly deaf from childhood, was eventually drafted in WWII and also made captain - I think he worked stateside in logistics.

    In the US Navy, aboard his ship, the Captain is God Almighty. My uncle was a Navy Captain; he was a formidable individual.

    Doctors, dentists and nurses are all officers in terms of rank; they don't go to any kind of boot camp or officer's training. In the military, they are staff officers, as opposed to line officers.

    I suppose I should have said that in hospitals before 1990, doctors were effectively the line officers; as I said, they had all the authority.

  159. @Jack D
    Hunter might be the smartest one of the gang, with a law degree from Yale. However, he is also the one with the smallest moral compass (and that's saying a lot for this bunch) and this shows you that intelligence isn't everything. If intelligence is not restrained by morality it can just as well be used to run scams as to do something useful.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Mike Tre, @Pericles

    Yale Law? What a joke. On Yale. He joined the naval reserves for no reason at the age of 43? Only losers do that.

    Mr. Biden acknowledged that in the testy exchange in New Hampshire, he had lost his temper. ”I exaggerate when I’m angry,” Mr. Biden said, ”but I’ve never gone around telling people things that aren’t true about me.” Mr. Biden’s questioner had made the query in a mild tone, but…

    Hard to believe this crack smoking loser was his father(

  160. @Reg Cæsar
    @black sea


    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.
     
    But do they label them such? Do they feel inferior to Rome and Athens? If you really are historic, people already know.

    Actually, too many of NYC's neighborhoods take names from London. "Soho" is the most annoying.

    Replies: @black sea, @Ganderson, @Hibernian

    Soho is short for “South of Houston”

    Doctor Al Stewart weighs in:

  161. @anon
    @JimDandy

    So… discuss. Thx.

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-x54GAEQkjws/X0v1zZlIMvI/AAAAAAAAQgI/tZDZaSu8PdAfdvHHd2q7T7KUl-zeUlYUwCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/biden%2Bpost_turtle.jpg

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Nailed it, but I can’t resist including the story.

    An old rancher is talking about politics and compares a politician to a “post turtle.” A listener asks him to explain.

    He says, “When you’re driving down a country road and you see a fence post with a turtle balanced on top, that’s a post turtle. You know he didn’t get up there by himself. He doesn’t belong there; you wonder who put him there; he can’t get anything done while he’s up there; and you just want to help the poor, dumb thing down.”

    • Thanks: Gabe Ruth
  162. @Jack D
    @PhysicistDave

    That's right - Jill Biden is a college teacher and so her undergrad (community college) students call her Dr. Biden. That's normal.

    But that's where it should end. I don't know whether the "doctor" thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter. ( Conversely, during the campaign, they insisted on calling the VP "Jobiden" and not by any title - apparently "Jobiden" polled the best. ) I think it has to do with Dem insecurity about the status of women and they feel by reciting the title it raises her status - instead of just a schoolteacher/mom, which is what she really is (not that there is anything wrong with that), you should know that she is a DOCTOR. I saw the same thing during the Kavanaugh hearings - instead of calling his crazy accuser Christine Ford or Ms. Ford she was constantly referred to by the Dems at the hearings (and their shills on TV) as Doktor-Professor Christine Blasey Ford, Ph.D. because they thought that would make her seem more credible. Based upon my knowledge of academics, especially psych professors, it just confirmed to me that she was mentally unstable like a lot of them are.

    On the archived Obama White House web page she is called "Dr. Jill Biden" so this crap goes back a while:

    https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/administration/jill-biden

    On her page she is referred to as Dr. Biden or Dr. Jill Biden 17 times on one short web page. It's tiresome, especially for someone who only has an Ed.D.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Harry Baldwin

    I don’t know whether the “doctor” thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter.

    No, it’s the former.

    Joe Biden, on the campaign trail, explained that his wife’s desire for the highest degree was in response to what she perceived as her second-class status on their mail.

    “She said, ‘I was so sick of the mail coming to Sen. and Mrs. Biden. I wanted to get mail addressed to Dr. and Sen. Biden.’ That’s the real reason she got her doctorate,” he said.

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2009-feb-02-na-dr-jill-biden2-story.html

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Harry Baldwin

    Wouldn't their mail be addressed to Senator and Doctor Biden?

    , @Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    Boy. Biden just can’t control himself in public, can he? Neither his hands nor his lies. That anecdote about his wife sounds like “my Dad told me back in 1880 that two gays kissing each other on the street was just love”.

  163. @Anon7
    Thirty years ago, when I worked in hospital administration, I don't believe there was one PhD who wanted to be called "doctor", no matter what science their degree was in. In hospitals, "doctor" establishes rank and precedence, and who actually holds the responsibility for the life and well-being of patients.

    Now, though, PhDs all insist on being called doctor, especially the women. Doctors of Nursing, Doctors of Public Health. In every field, no matter how unrelated to health care. And even when their doctorate is as useless as an education degree.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Gordo, @ScarletNumber, @Art Deco

    A hospital is the one place where one should have to be an MD or a DO in order to use the honorific. The consequences are too severe otherwise.

  164. @ScarletNumber
    On The Critic Kareem Abdul-Jabbar recognized Jon Lovitz' PhD. (skip to 0:32 if you are impatient).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaWyVjgBbnU

    Replies: @Ganderson

    “ The Critic” was a very funny show.

  165. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, sort of: here's a photo of the most overlooked, ignored, and neglected PoC in America today:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1200514937732370433/eYpTPab4_400x400.jpg

    That's Pierson Cooke, who seems to be the regular kicker on the Vanderbilt football team. He kicked a 39-yard field goal today in Vandy's 42-17 loss to Tennessee.

    But he's not making a lot of news, because on this day he wasn't needed to kick extra points -- that crucial duty was turned over to Sarah Fuller, who did indeed convert 2 for 2 chances.

    I love the way all of the news stories on Fuller emphasize the absolute NECESSITY of bringing her on to the team, because there JUST WAS NO OTHER CHOICE.

    But today their regular kicker was clearly available, and the actual kicking duties, other than the two gimmick extra points, were obviously turned back over to him.

    By the way, to bring this post back on topic, here's a Guardian article that suggests a new form of address for powerful GRRRLZ who deserve respect and recognition for their accomplishments that will no doubt soon enter the lexicon:

    Sarah Fuller: 'My male college football teammates call me Champ'

    Replies: @Barnard, @ScarletNumber, @mmack, @Neuday

    Does anyone want to tell Sarah when men call each other “Champ” and nobody has won a championship it’s a good bet we’re being sarcastic, or do we let her run with it? 🤔

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  166. @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon7

    Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military

    When my father enlisted in the army after Pearl Harbor, he had already completed medical school and an internship and so was sent immediately to officer's training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain. So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @ScarletNumber, @Anon7

    So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.

    Doctors are still commissioned officers in the military, and usually make captain if they do 20 years. Navy captain is the equivalent of full colonel and is where the promotion pyramid starts to get real steep. Most guys can expect to make Lieutenant Colonel if they do 20 years and keep their nose clean.

    Captains/colonels usually get some kind of command to see if they are fit for further promotion. Some black woman Obama made a four star commanded a couple of logistic ships.

  167. @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon7

    Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military

    When my father enlisted in the army after Pearl Harbor, he had already completed medical school and an internship and so was sent immediately to officer's training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain. So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @ScarletNumber, @Anon7

    In ‘42 he was commissioned as a 2nd Lt. and by ‘45 he had only made Cpt?

    Who did he piss off?

    By Vietnam I think the rule was that doctors go in as captains and quickly make major.

    But, rank inflation is such that a guy commanding the latrines can make brigadier.

  168. @R.G. Camara
    This is just part of the Left's War on Speech Control, where the Left tells you how you may address them, you peon. Hence the "pronouns in the profile" game, and the demanding you address them by their titles (whether real or imaginary), or where they give themselves hilarious monikers and insist that your not following that is hate (e.g. woke joke political commentator Toure Neblitt demanding that he be addressed by the mononym Toure instead of by his full name).

    This is about power to control speech. Very 1984.

    And Steve, good pick up on Biden's intellectual insecurity. Although no one who gets to be a senator is dumb, Biden was never the smartest guy in the room in any Senate meeting, and he got all upset about it. It seems he couldn't be happy being a corporate stooge and railroad pawn and decided he needed to "prove" his smarts when challenged.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @AndrewR, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb

    No, Biden’s poor performance at a 4th rate law school indicates that he is of barely average intelligence, and probably not a real hard worker either….

  169. @black sea
    @Reg Cæsar

    I meant formally designated historic districts, not just old neighborhoods. Designating them in this way introduces greater regulation as to what architectural changes may be made in that area. It may also bring in money for upkeep and restoration from institutional sources, foundations, etc.

    If Boston and New York feel inferior to Rome with regard to historical architecture, it is with good reason. There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @Stan Adams, @Reg Cæsar

    There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.

    Except for Vegas:

    [MORE]

  170. @Buzz Mohawk
    She's not only a doctor, she's a bodyguard.

    https://arc-anglerfish-washpost-prod-washpost.s3.amazonaws.com/public/PGCZAWC52MI6VLCQDBYB4FHANU.jpg

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    I smell a caption contest coming on.

    “Get’cha own man, bitch! He mine!”

    Worst. Mud. Wrestling. Contest. Ever.

  171. Out, out damned tackiness?

    Tacky has always been the Biden family brand – the killer app in a raw democracy – but Jill took things to a whole nother level.

    Dr. now equivalent to Lady then for that milieu.

  172. @Anon

    In general, the Bidens seem like people of run-of-the-mill IQs who are insecure about their merely normal brainpower, and overreact embarrassingly
     
    Is this why black women with Ph.D.s disproportionately insist on using the Dr. title?

    There was a brief Twitter erruption around the hashtag #ImmodestWomen a couple of years ago. Here's a good entry from that exchange:

    https://twitter.com/katemond/status/1008627316694675456

    Another tweet justified the use of Dr. by women Ph.D.s because it partially makes up for the fact that all women Ph.D.s were raped and abused by their advisors.

    A side observation: I do like the fun sort of titles that everybody knows are completely fake, like "Kentucky colonols."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_Colonel

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @ScarletNumber

    I do like the fun sort of titles that everybody knows are completely fake, like “Kentucky colonols.”

    How dare you denegrate Colonel Sanders?

  173. @Anon7
    Thirty years ago, when I worked in hospital administration, I don't believe there was one PhD who wanted to be called "doctor", no matter what science their degree was in. In hospitals, "doctor" establishes rank and precedence, and who actually holds the responsibility for the life and well-being of patients.

    Now, though, PhDs all insist on being called doctor, especially the women. Doctors of Nursing, Doctors of Public Health. In every field, no matter how unrelated to health care. And even when their doctorate is as useless as an education degree.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Gordo, @ScarletNumber, @Art Deco

    I used to work in a university medical center. It had a dental school appended to it and there might have been a sleep lab psychologist on the premises. These aside, I doubt you could have found a non-medical doctor around. (It was in the era before the Pharm.D. degree was common).

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @Art Deco

    I worked in a research center hospital, and there were plenty of PhDs in the various associated life sciences in the labs and ICUs, as well as nuclear medicine (radiology, medical imaging). But you're right, except for ICUs I saw them mostly in meetings where we all argued over facilities.

  174. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Anon

    Or "Doctor of Journalism"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer, @Art Deco

    Surprisingly, some gaseous higher ed centers have begun to issue PhDs in journalism. About 25 were awarded in 2018

  175. @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, sort of: here's a photo of the most overlooked, ignored, and neglected PoC in America today:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1200514937732370433/eYpTPab4_400x400.jpg

    That's Pierson Cooke, who seems to be the regular kicker on the Vanderbilt football team. He kicked a 39-yard field goal today in Vandy's 42-17 loss to Tennessee.

    But he's not making a lot of news, because on this day he wasn't needed to kick extra points -- that crucial duty was turned over to Sarah Fuller, who did indeed convert 2 for 2 chances.

    I love the way all of the news stories on Fuller emphasize the absolute NECESSITY of bringing her on to the team, because there JUST WAS NO OTHER CHOICE.

    But today their regular kicker was clearly available, and the actual kicking duties, other than the two gimmick extra points, were obviously turned back over to him.

    By the way, to bring this post back on topic, here's a Guardian article that suggests a new form of address for powerful GRRRLZ who deserve respect and recognition for their accomplishments that will no doubt soon enter the lexicon:

    Sarah Fuller: 'My male college football teammates call me Champ'

    Replies: @Barnard, @ScarletNumber, @mmack, @Neuday

    Sarah Fuller: ‘My male college football teammates call me Champ’

    Silly girl doesn’t realize that it’s a joke. She’s a backup kicker on a bad team who’s only good for squibs, PATs and buckets of publicity because vagina. Calling her Champ is perfect, and the guys calling her that know she’s too stupid to get it and she even repeats it to the fawning media. Brilliant.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  176. @Nachum
    @anon

    Apart from the lack of hair. I'd completely forgotten about that. (And I'm bald!)

    Replies: @Anon87

    Will we ever see a bald president again? McCain only went as far as he did on the vet cred, but we all knew he was a destined loser.

    Look at the amount of impressive work that went into de-balding Biden. Is it his own horseshoe hair grafted up top? The color and texture blend is impressive. His face is pretty chopped up too, so HD television probably put the vanity of “making a president” on overdrive.

    Chuck Schumer also has the fear of being viewed as a bald guy. There is a reason he rarely is shot from behind, he cultivates a Hair-drian Wall for the cameras.

    People make fun of Trumps hair, but he never would have been elected if he looked like Lex Luthor (which from Photoshops it really doesn’t look all that bad).

    Now I’d say it’s obvious we will never have a bald female president, but who can’t picture us being subjected to a bitter harpy like Ayanna Pressley? Flips the entire World War Hair on its head, no pun.

    • LOL: Nachum
    • Replies: @Up2Drew
    @Anon87

    We will not. I doubt we'll even have a non-photogenic President again. It's never a bad bet a to put your money on the better-looking candidate.

    How many CEOs of corporations do you see that are bald?

    Replies: @Anon87

  177. @PhysicistDave
    @Buffalo Joe

    Buffalo Joe wrote:


    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.
     
    My father gave us "The Talk" when we were young and told us to show extreme courtesy to police officers in any situation. He said that if the cop was being a jerk, we should shut up and take it and later bring the matter up with the judge.

    They all carry guns and, given the experiences they have on the job, they are prone to get a bit nervous in contentious situations.

    I find it amusing that some black folks think only they have "The Talk" with their kids.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Not only do white families have The Talk with their children, but our version of The Talk includes instructions on how to deal with NAM’s.

  178. @Jack D
    Hunter might be the smartest one of the gang, with a law degree from Yale. However, he is also the one with the smallest moral compass (and that's saying a lot for this bunch) and this shows you that intelligence isn't everything. If intelligence is not restrained by morality it can just as well be used to run scams as to do something useful.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Mike Tre, @Pericles

    ” If intelligence is not restrained by morality it can just as well be used to run scams as to do something useful. ”

  179. @Abolish_public_education
    @Mr McKenna

    When the Ivy knives come out ..

    I was once at a restaurant table with a couple of Ivies. In due course the waiter informed us that his job was part of his program at Cornell’s College of Hotel Management.

    That prompted my dinner companions to mention their alma maters, whereby the waiter immediately expressed his delight at serving fellow Ivies.

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that CCHM was not Ivy League.

    Thanks for the info.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @ScarletNumber

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that [Cornell’s College of Hotel Management] was not Ivy League.

    This is reminiscent of Ann Coulter pointing out that Keith Olbermann is an alumnus of the Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, not the Cornell College of Arts and Sciences (i.e. the real Cornell) like herself.

  180. Well I don’t go around expecting people to call me Doctor in “civilian life”. Except when dealing with the NHS, obviously.

  181. @R.G. Camara
    This is just part of the Left's War on Speech Control, where the Left tells you how you may address them, you peon. Hence the "pronouns in the profile" game, and the demanding you address them by their titles (whether real or imaginary), or where they give themselves hilarious monikers and insist that your not following that is hate (e.g. woke joke political commentator Toure Neblitt demanding that he be addressed by the mononym Toure instead of by his full name).

    This is about power to control speech. Very 1984.

    And Steve, good pick up on Biden's intellectual insecurity. Although no one who gets to be a senator is dumb, Biden was never the smartest guy in the room in any Senate meeting, and he got all upset about it. It seems he couldn't be happy being a corporate stooge and railroad pawn and decided he needed to "prove" his smarts when challenged.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @AndrewR, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb

    “never the smartest guy in the room”

    Clever quips at your expense. But you know they feel a tingle of fear if you look at them a certain way. You know if you approach them in the parking lot with a smile that’s not a smile their quip will gurgle in their gut like acid. Present day Neanderthal snaps smart guy’s neck.

  182. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    All right, bad on the U.S. sawbones guild I suppose, but didn't the J.D. come first? And M.D. in the states was soon joined by Pharm.D., O.D., D.D.S./D.M.D., and probably more crazy crap in the future, so I don't see how they're running as impostors in front of everybody.

    Psy.D. would seem to be of that same clique but 1) apparently requires as much work as a Ph.D. in psychology; and 2) isn't sufficient for psychiatric jobs that require the professional/M.D. cred

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Pericles

    Back in good old Europe, I believe the juris doctors and doctors of theology were first. Then the great umbrella of philosophy. The first medical doctor seems to have appeared in Glasgow 1703, though there seems to have been a medical licensing requirement in some places long before that.

  183. @Jack D
    Hunter might be the smartest one of the gang, with a law degree from Yale. However, he is also the one with the smallest moral compass (and that's saying a lot for this bunch) and this shows you that intelligence isn't everything. If intelligence is not restrained by morality it can just as well be used to run scams as to do something useful.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Mike Tre, @Pericles

    Hunter might be the smartest one of the gang, with a law degree from Yale.

    What’s the failure rate once you’re accepted at Yale Law?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pericles

    Law school is not like some undergrad studies major. The tests are graded anonymously and they don't hesitate to flunk you out if your grades fall too low.

    Replies: @Pericles

  184. @Peter D. Bredon
    @Moral Stone

    "I do find it interesting that both Biden and Trump focus on “higher IQ” rather than saying “I guarantee I’m smarter than you are” or something similar in meaning.'

    It's the influence of all the IQ nerds and HBD fetishists that congregate on Unz. Interesting how the "high IQ" types turn out to be Clintons or Trumps or Bidens. It's almost as if IQ had nothing to do with competence or even being a decent human being.

    Replies: @botazefa

    It’s the influence of all the IQ nerds and HBD fetishists that congregate on Unz. Interesting how the “high IQ” types turn out to be Clintons or Trumps or Bidens. It’s almost as if IQ had nothing to do with competence or even being a decent human being.

    IQ has nothing to do with competence or decency. At least, not directly. IQ is a measure of intelligence. Intelligence is the ability to solve problems.

    Basic coverage of IQ can be found here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_quotient

    Dr. Thompson discusses IQ here at Unz, https://www.unz.com/author/james-thompson/

  185. @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon7

    Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military

    When my father enlisted in the army after Pearl Harbor, he had already completed medical school and an internship and so was sent immediately to officer's training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain. So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @ScarletNumber, @Anon7

    [My father] was sent immediately to officer’s training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain

    While captains are O-3 and outrank First lieutenants and Second lieutenants all Army doctors have this as their rank to start. It isn’t anything to brag about.

    Remember, Hawkeye Pierce was a Captain, and the army wasn’t going to promote him. As an aside the Fort Hood shooter was a Major. Also, that happened in 2009 and the fucker still hasn’t been put to death.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @ScarletNumber

    It isn’t anything to brag about.

    In case it isn't clear, I wasn't bragging.

  186. @Ed
    @Lot

    Trump was done in more by hiring friends instead of competent people. There is something admirable about elevating a 4th rate lawyer like Cohen to be your personal but at a certain level it just becomes dangerous once you become president.

    Worst staffing mistake was jettisoning Bannon.

    Replies: @botazefa

    Worst staffing mistake was jettisoning Bannon.

    I think his continued reliance and trust in Javanka was a worse staffing mistake.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
  187. @Reg Cæsar
    @black sea


    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.
     
    But do they label them such? Do they feel inferior to Rome and Athens? If you really are historic, people already know.

    Actually, too many of NYC's neighborhoods take names from London. "Soho" is the most annoying.

    Replies: @black sea, @Ganderson, @Hibernian

    But do they label them such?

    Chicago does, and there’s a sign advertising Hyde Park/Kenwood, where I live, painted on the electric commuter RR viaduct over 47th St. near the lake.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hibernian

    Gaaa! You're right!


    https://chistockimages.com/wp-content/uploads/edd/2019/07/K-002-Welcome-To-The-Historic-Hyde-Park-And-Kenwood-Neighborhoods-Sign-preview.jpg

    Putting the word "historic" on a true historical area is like labeling a vodka "gluten-free".

    Yet Hyde Park does have a claim to history-- it's where Chesa Boudin debuted his neighbor Barack Obama to the world. Not quite as disastrous as that other Hyde Park's claim, but still pretty bad.

  188. This is fine journalism. Thank you.

  189. @Flip
    @Anonymous

    Isn’t it Dr. Kissinger?

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

    I would have thought he’d want to be known by his last held title as Secretary Kissinger.

  190. @Anonymous
    So Joe was first was at the bottom 2/3 of his class and then much improved and ended up at the top 1/2 of his class. LMAO. Very informative.

    Alas, we have his obvious onset of dementia to deal with on top of his mediocre mind to begin with.

    As for the "Dr", it's really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a "Dr", it's a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity). There is even an academic paper on this:

    https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.957.9114&rep=rep1&type=pdf


    We claim that entities (individuals, groups) that are just over the border on the positive side tend to exaggerate their membership on the positive side (asymmetrical social Mach bands). We demonstrate this by showing that (a) master’s-degree universities use the word university to describe themselves more than major graduate universities do, (b) small international airports use the word international to describe themselves more than major airports do, and (c) University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal” Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.

     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar, @Dr. X, @Flip, @Art Deco, @Carbon blob, @Anon

    “Tell me what you brag about and I will tell you what you lack.”

    Very old saying.

  191. Unless it’s in a STEM field, I always read PhD. as “Phony Doctor”.

  192. @the one they call Desanex
    @International Jew

    Biden’s statement sounded like a well-rehearsed pat answer that he had prepared for when anybody questioned his intellect. So it was a well-rehearsed pack of lies.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @International Jew

    Psychopathic nevertheless. He may pack the full suite, or dark triad. A narcissistic, Machiavellian, psychopathic Mr. President.

  193. Doc Jill is such a pill
    She’ll make sure ol’ Joe
    Does not spill
    To Kams and Obe
    Who have their knives out
    To create their new DC redoubt.

    Of 360 degrees blaque-atude
    You had better adjust you attitude
    White pygmies

  194. @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon7

    Doctors were like commissioned officers in the military

    When my father enlisted in the army after Pearl Harbor, he had already completed medical school and an internship and so was sent immediately to officer's training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain. So in the military at that time, doctors were commissioned officers in the military.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Abolish_public_education, @ScarletNumber, @Anon7

    In the army, captain is a relatively minor rank. My dad, who was mostly deaf from childhood, was eventually drafted in WWII and also made captain – I think he worked stateside in logistics.

    In the US Navy, aboard his ship, the Captain is God Almighty. My uncle was a Navy Captain; he was a formidable individual.

    Doctors, dentists and nurses are all officers in terms of rank; they don’t go to any kind of boot camp or officer’s training. In the military, they are staff officers, as opposed to line officers.

    I suppose I should have said that in hospitals before 1990, doctors were effectively the line officers; as I said, they had all the authority.

  195. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    I’m sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    That's cute. The only men in uniform he ever commanded were the few seconded to his office staff. Prior to the summer of 1973, almost none of the Foreign Service reported to him either. The only war ongoing during his time in office was one the Nixon crew inherited from the previous administration. The terrain in Indochina was odd, and fighting a counter-partisan war and a conventional war at the same time was something unusual. I take it Harry Truman and Dean Acheson are also on your war criminal list.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    I don’t believe that Martin Borman or Alfred Rosenberg ever commanded any soldiers either, and yet the Nuremberg tribunal saw fit to label them as War Criminals.

    The moment I hit “publish comment”, I knew that you – Art Deco – would reply to my comment, flying to the defence of Dr. New-World-Order. You are such a dutiful and predictable drone.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    I don’t believe that Martin Borman or Alfred Rosenberg ever commanded any soldiers either, and yet the Nuremberg tribunal saw fit to label them as War Criminals.

    They also tried the former director of the central bank, who spent the last years of the regime in a concentration camp. Another defendant was some random dude who worked in the propaganda ministry. Another was a navy admiral accused of 'waging aggressive war'. Your point is what, that prosecutors at Nuremberg brought humbug charges against a mess of people, ergo you get to say any nonsensical thing you care to?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    flying to the defence of Dr. New-World-Order

    A phrase which wasn't current until about 15 years after he left office. You might try criticizing something he did do or did not do rather than slime him as a 'war criminal'. Kissinger was (and I believe still is) and advocate of cautious reasons-of-state oriented foreign policy. Not sure why that puts a burr in your tailpipe.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  196. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    I’m sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    That's cute. The only men in uniform he ever commanded were the few seconded to his office staff. Prior to the summer of 1973, almost none of the Foreign Service reported to him either. The only war ongoing during his time in office was one the Nixon crew inherited from the previous administration. The terrain in Indochina was odd, and fighting a counter-partisan war and a conventional war at the same time was something unusual. I take it Harry Truman and Dean Acheson are also on your war criminal list.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Mr. Anon

    Correction: I meant Julius Streicher, not Alfred Rosenberg.

  197. @the one they call Desanex
    @International Jew

    Biden’s statement sounded like a well-rehearsed pat answer that he had prepared for when anybody questioned his intellect. So it was a well-rehearsed pack of lies.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton, @International Jew

    Yeah, sounds about right. I don’t think he ran it past any sharp consultants, though — especially the “I probably have a higher IQ than you”, and the “bottom 2/3 of my class”.

    Gerald Ford gave Dan Rather a better answer, less dramatic and more thoughtful. I don’t remember if it was before or after Nixon’s resignation, and I can’t find it now on Youtube.

    Anyway, Rather asked something like, “Some people, um, question whether you are, um, intellectually up to the Presidency.” Ford replied that he did well in his law school class at Yale (and maybe something else along those lines). Without getting belligerant, much less insulting Rather, Ford made Rather look pretty ridiculous.

    And we all remember how Rather blew up his own career (over the fake Bush Air National Guard letter) when he mistook the output of a laser printer for that of a 1960s typewriter!

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @International Jew


    And we all remember how Rather blew up his own career (over the fake Bush Air National Guard letter) when he mistook the output of a laser printer for that of a 1960s typewriter!
     
    Yes, some ideas are so dumb that only a journalist can believe them. Us lay people looked at that letter and saw it was a fraud at first glance.
    , @Stan Adams
    @International Jew

    It was not Dan Rather; it was Tom Brokaw. NBC broadcast the interview in prime time on January 23, 1975.

    I'm pretty good at tracking down old television newscasts. Unfortunately, I can't locate the video of this particular broadcast. Here is a transcript:

    https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/interview-with-john-chancellor-and-tom-brokaw-nbc-news


    MR. BROKAW. I have a question, Mr. President, that--it just isn't easy to phrase, so I will just have to bear straight ahead with it. As you know, I am certain, because I have been told that you have commented on this before, but it has been speculated on in print not only in Washington but elsewhere, and it crops up in conversation from time to time in this town--the question of whether or not you are intellectually up to the job of being the President of the United States. When you hear that kind of talk or read that in print, does it bother you?

    THE PRESIDENT. It really doesn't, Tom. And I suppose people wonder why it doesn't bother me. My answer is as hard as the question that you asked.

    If grades one gets in school are a criteria--and we have been doing it for years and are still doing it--whether I was in high school or at the University of Michigan or at Yale Law School, I was always in the upper third or the upper 10 percent of my class.

    Now, if I don't have the academic capability--being in either the upper third at Yale Law School or in the upper 20-some percent at the University of Michigan-there must be an awful lot of people much dumber than I.

    Now, I don't think that is the only way by which you judge people. I think grades are important, judgment is a pretty important factor, and a capability on the part of a person to work, to analyze problems is equally important.

    And I think the fact that I have done reasonably well, both in Congress, in first getting there, and number two, in getting to be a leader and retaining that post for five elections among my peers as a Member on our side of the aisle--I think that does show some feeling on the part of responsible people that I have the capability of doing the job.
     

    Replies: @International Jew

  198. @TTSSYF
    @Art Deco

    Wouldn't it depend on the subject? A Ph.D. in physics or chemistry is a lot different than a Ph.D. in early Renaissance British history. The latter is more likely to make the person into a very good plumber.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Wouldn’t it depend on the subject? A Ph.D. in physics or chemistry is a lot different than a Ph.D. in early Renaissance British history. The latter is more likely to make the person into a very good plumber.

    You must not know very many plumbers.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @Jim Don Bob

    Not all plumbers have doctorates in early Renaissance British history. But quite a few people with doctorates in early Renaissance British history or equivalent and for which there is not high demand are doing something else for a living...for example, plumbing.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

  199. @Kronos
    @ScarletNumber

    Also quite a bit of debt that most people couldn’t handle either.

    Does a Ph.D in Education actually cost effective?

    Replies: @Carol, @Mr. Anon, @unit472

    I remember my high school principal admonishing me that if I didn’t straighten up I’d never get into a good college. Since I was already in trouble I resisted the urge to comment on his college diploma hanging on the wall behind him. It was from North Carolina Appalachian State Teachers College!

    In fairness to the high school principal he did go on to become Superintendent of Schools for Fairfax County which is about as prestigious a post as one can aspire to in public education so. despite his alma mater’s lack of prestige, he rose to the top of his field.

  200. WSJ op-ed writer critical of ‘Dr.’ Jill Biden gets canceled by Northwestern University.

    https://hotair.com/archives/karen-townsend/2020/12/13/wsj-op-ed-writer-critical-dr-jill-biden-gets-canceled-northwestern-university/

    That didn’t take long.

  201. @Mr. Anon
    @Abolish_public_education


    That prompted my dinner companions to mention their alma maters, whereby the waiter immediately expressed his delight at serving fellow Ivies.

    Once the waiter left, my dinner companions quickly and indignantly pointed out that CCHM was not Ivy League.
     
    You should have excused yourself on some pretense, and then told the waiter exactly what your dinner companions said. And then remind him exactly what it was that you ordered.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    To prevent another Jesse Jackson event?

  202. @black sea
    @Reg Cæsar

    Boston, New York, and Philadelphia all have historic districts.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dan Hayes

    As far as I know, New York City does not have any per se listed “historical” district!

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Dan Hayes


    The neighborhood [Brooklyn Heights] was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1965, and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1966.
     
    https://tclf.org/brooklyn-heights-historic-district
  203. @black sea
    @Buffalo Joe


    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.
     
    Yes, a primate thing. You've acknowledged their status/dominance, whether you really believe in it or not. Cops encounter a lot of people who want to argue with them, and a few who want to fight them, so by calling them "Officer" or "Sir" you're signalling that you're not going to be one of those people. They can then relax a little and are more likely to let you go with a warning, assuming you were stopped for some minor infraction. It doesn't always work, but it works lot more often than challenging their authority.

    The same thing is true in work situations. I used to know a guy who had been fired several times, mostly from working class jobs where a certain amount of blunt honesty is accepted. He said that he finally realized that he needed to let his boss be his boss.

    Replies: @Cortes, @RichardTaylor

    My brother in law told me about how he managed to secure the house plot he and his wife (my sister) had been after. They’d been tracking the release of plots by the developers and had set their hearts on a site with open views on the south and west sides and one morning after coming off night shift – a busy shift for the Fire Service – had checked the online site and BINGO! the plot was free to be reserved on payment of £50 deposit at the development office on-site. BIL jumps in car with wallet and chequebook and speeds off over to the site office around five miles away and as he screeches to a halt in front of the site office, a traffic cop pulls up beside him and starts to tell him about the speeding, the non-functioning brake light on the left etc etc.

    The BIL acknowledged what the cop was saying and said “OK. Write it all up. Whatever you want. Whatever you do is fuck all compared to what she [sister] is going to do if I don’t make the deposit right now. Can we sort this out when I come back out?” The cop agreed.

    On coming back out the cop was gone. And no ticket.

  204. @Stephen Paul Foster
    @ScarletNumber

    Your average plumber, auto mechanic 0r fireman would score a standard deviation higher on a IQ test than one of these frauds.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Your average plumber, auto mechanic 0r fireman would score a standard deviation higher on a IQ test than one of these frauds

    I know in modern America it is declasse to make fun of people who work with their hands, but most of them aren’t particularly bright. An IQ test tends to correlate with those skills that lead to success in the classroom. Plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen became those things because they hate school.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber


    Plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen became those things because they hate school.
     
    All of the above, presently and in recent times, have has to spend a fair amount of time in a classroom, and for the firemen, also studying for promotional exams.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  205. @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    I don’t know whether the “doctor” thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter.

    No, it's the former.


    Joe Biden, on the campaign trail, explained that his wife’s desire for the highest degree was in response to what she perceived as her second-class status on their mail.

    “She said, ‘I was so sick of the mail coming to Sen. and Mrs. Biden. I wanted to get mail addressed to Dr. and Sen. Biden.’ That’s the real reason she got her doctorate,” he said.
     
    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2009-feb-02-na-dr-jill-biden2-story.html

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Anon

    Wouldn’t their mail be addressed to Senator and Doctor Biden?

  206. @Carbon blob
    @Anonymous

    I wouldn’t consider Penn a second-rate Ivy at all, I think they just get tired of being confused with a certain cow college in central PA.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @The Last Real Calvinist

    Of course Penn is a second-rate Ivy, unless you consider them to be at a level of Harvard, Princeton, or Yale.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber

    Neither Harvard nor Princeton nor Yale is all they're cracked up to be.

  207. @Abolish_public_education
    The more lightweight the doctoral program, the more the graduate will insist on being addressed as doctor.

    A notable exception was the prominent, public education critic William Cosby, EdD.

    I am so sick and tired of public union contracts that award pay raises (higher shares of government spending) to school teachers who accumulate graduate school credit-hours.

    Doctor of Babysitting.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @Daniel H, @John Up North

    For many years Chicago public school teachers would attend Chicago State University. Now that’s a school with a dodgy reputation. Teachers would get their Masters Degrees at CSU because was it was affordable and the course work was easy. The student teachers didn’t have to do a lot of writing. Last I heard Chicago State was endangered of losing it’s accreditation.

  208. @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    I don’t know whether the “doctor” thing is being driven by Jill herself or by the staff. I suspect the latter.

    No, it's the former.


    Joe Biden, on the campaign trail, explained that his wife’s desire for the highest degree was in response to what she perceived as her second-class status on their mail.

    “She said, ‘I was so sick of the mail coming to Sen. and Mrs. Biden. I wanted to get mail addressed to Dr. and Sen. Biden.’ That’s the real reason she got her doctorate,” he said.
     
    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2009-feb-02-na-dr-jill-biden2-story.html

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Anon

    Boy. Biden just can’t control himself in public, can he? Neither his hands nor his lies. That anecdote about his wife sounds like “my Dad told me back in 1880 that two gays kissing each other on the street was just love”.

  209. @GreatSocialist
    Trump didn't even take his SATs. What more needs to be said?

    Replies: @Hibernian

    The source for this is his disgruntled niece.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Hibernian

    She said his sister offered this tidbit. It turns out that the person Maryanne Trump named met him at the Wharton School and there's no reason to believe they were ever acquainted before that. The two families did not live near each other and the two men were enrolled in different high schools. So, Mary L. Trump retreats to a position that it must have been some other 'Joe Shapiro', which she insists is a common name in New York. (It actually is not that common).

    Just to point out her legal dispute with her family was not contra her uncle alone, but contra three of her father's four siblings. (The fourth, her aunt Elizabeth, gets a drive-by in her memoir as well). Her brother has said publicly and for attribution that he wants no trouble with his uncle. She was invited to some of the inaugural festivities. And she gaslighted her aunt into cutting up her uncle while surreptitiously recording the woman for 18 hours.

  210. @ScarletNumber
    @Stephen Paul Foster


    Your average plumber, auto mechanic 0r fireman would score a standard deviation higher on a IQ test than one of these frauds
     
    I know in modern America it is declasse to make fun of people who work with their hands, but most of them aren't particularly bright. An IQ test tends to correlate with those skills that lead to success in the classroom. Plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen became those things because they hate school.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen became those things because they hate school.

    All of the above, presently and in recent times, have has to spend a fair amount of time in a classroom, and for the firemen, also studying for promotional exams.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Hibernian


    All of the above, presently and in recent times, have has to spend a fair amount of time in a classroom
     
    So do literal retards.

    the firemen, also studying for promotional exams
     
    Who get the correct answers passed down to them from their uncles. Also, in the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

    Replies: @black sea

  211. @ScarletNumber
    @Carbon blob

    Of course Penn is a second-rate Ivy, unless you consider them to be at a level of Harvard, Princeton, or Yale.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Neither Harvard nor Princeton nor Yale is all they’re cracked up to be.

  212. @Nachum
    It has truly been said that Political Correctness is a war on Noticing. (As well as on Remembering, but that's not the issue here.) Anyone half lucid would have picked up on the "Dr. Biden" bit long ago, but we were forbidden from Noticing.

    I Noticed because I flipped the bird at PC decades ago. I actually originally thought she might be an MD, and when I found out the truth it evoked both horse laughs and nausea in me, to quote Tom Wolfe. (That their relationship's start may well have a very, very sordid aspect just evokes nausea.)

    Back when I graduated law school- with a JD, or course- I told a friend to smack me if I ever insisted on "Dr." And the same is true for Ed.D.s as well. The fact that so many people who would scorn an Ed.D. any other day are so worked up about this, calling it, incredibly, "sexism," only goes to show how political the whole contretemps is, and how deep PC culture has infiltrated.

    Basically, if you're not an MD, DDS, or PhD, you don't get to insist on "Dr.", and if you are one of those- particularly the last- and insist on it in a non-professional setting, you're a jerk. (Not that PhDs mean much on their own. There's been exactly one US president with a PhD, and he was a fascist disaster.) This brings to mind the incident back in the Bush years when Lawrence Summers got into a fight with Cornell West (and Henry Louis Gates) and people began noticing that in the New York Times, it was always "Mr. Summers" (who has a PhD in economics) and "Dr. West" (PhD, African-American Studies). People wondered if it was racism, anti-racism, condescension, or what. The Times told the truth: They give the "Dr." to physicians and dentists, and everyone else based on their choice. Summers didn't care (nor would Condoleeza Rice), while West, not surprisingly, did.

    (By the way, I'm married to a PhD, in psychology, who does use it at work, and never outside it.)

    There's a scene in the movie Best in Show where Fred Willard's character is interviewing Bob Balaban's character:

    "We're here with Dr. Millbank, President of the Mayflower Kennel Club. Doctor, let me ask you something. I got a little bursitis in my shoulder. Do you recommend heat or cold?"

    "I'm not that kind of doctor."

    "I know that. I'm just kidding. He's not that kind of doctor, but he's got such a good sense of humor, we like to have a few laughs."

    Seriously, someone should go up to Jill Biden and ask about their bursitis. Preferably in Joe's presence. They would both probably explode. It would be beautiful.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Back when I graduated law school- with a JD, or course- I told a friend to smack me if I ever insisted on “Dr.”

    As they should have, as the proper honorific for lawyers is esquire, not doctor. However, the rest of your post is a non sequitur.

    Basically, if you’re not an MD, DDS, or PhD, you don’t get to insist on “Dr.”

    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD’s can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD’s. I call my dentist “doctor” when I’m in his office, but it would be silly to call a dentist one socially.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @ScarletNumber

    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD’s can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD’s.

    Define 'practical difference'.

    Again, 'education' is not an authentic discipline and schools of education attract bloody clots. Also, see ED Hirsch on the chronic problems from which research in education suffers.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @ScarletNumber


    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD.
     
    This is simply not accurate.

    A PhD is a true research degree, with the expectation that the candidate will make some kind of original contribution to the field.

    An EdD is a 'professional' degree, which in practice means the research requirements are drastically reduced. An EdD thesis is in practical terms usually more on the scale of an (perhaps somewhat extended) MA thesis, not a PhD dissertation.

    I've worked in higher ed for 30 years, and at different points considered both PhD and EdD programs, but decided (thankfully) not to pursue either. I'm pretty familiar with how they work.

    That's not to say that PhD programs can't be dumbed down; of course they can, and are. But there really are no highly-rigorous EdD programs. That's not what they're meant to be. An EdD therefore is not respected nearly as much as a PhD within the academy.

    , @Nachum
    @ScarletNumber

    Don't misunderstand me: I'm not saying that every PhD is worthwhile, far from it, and I'm not saying that there's not a lot of work involved in professional doctorates- indeed, I'm pretty sure an MD, at least, take a lot more work than a PhD. Heck, even a DDS probably does. But regardless of quality or quantity, there is a real definitional difference between an MD, PsyD, EdD, JD, and so on on the one hand and a PhD on the other.

    Also, "Esquire" is only for lawyers who are members of the bar. "JD" is used for people who have graduated law school but don't practice.

    In any event, it's academic, no pun intended, as, again, outside of a professional context, I don't think *any* of them should be referred to as "Dr." We don't speak of "Dr. Woodrow Wilson."

  213. @International Jew
    @the one they call Desanex

    Yeah, sounds about right. I don't think he ran it past any sharp consultants, though — especially the "I probably have a higher IQ than you", and the "bottom 2/3 of my class".

    Gerald Ford gave Dan Rather a better answer, less dramatic and more thoughtful. I don't remember if it was before or after Nixon's resignation, and I can't find it now on Youtube.

    Anyway, Rather asked something like, "Some people, um, question whether you are, um, intellectually up to the Presidency." Ford replied that he did well in his law school class at Yale (and maybe something else along those lines). Without getting belligerant, much less insulting Rather, Ford made Rather look pretty ridiculous.

    And we all remember how Rather blew up his own career (over the fake Bush Air National Guard letter) when he mistook the output of a laser printer for that of a 1960s typewriter!

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Stan Adams

    And we all remember how Rather blew up his own career (over the fake Bush Air National Guard letter) when he mistook the output of a laser printer for that of a 1960s typewriter!

    Yes, some ideas are so dumb that only a journalist can believe them. Us lay people looked at that letter and saw it was a fraud at first glance.

  214. So how quickly are we to read an article by some journo-sleuth about the details of Dr. Jill’s path breaking dissertation on community college students?

    Had this flap been about someone in the Trump or GOP orbit, the plagiarism search engines would already be overheating. I suspect they’d find something there too.

    Maybe they are holding it for their Sunday editions.

    I read the original WSJ op-ed and it was very mild and not at all snarky or bullying. So it wasn’t done by a leftist to be sure. The author’s main point (and something everyone who is halfway intelligent already knows) is that in academia, non medical “doctors” don’t call themselves “Dr.”

    Many attorney’s are also “juris doctors” (doctors of law, technically, for some reason) but I know of none who style themselves “Dr.” so and such. It is an affectation done only by those lacking in actual self respect. In Europe (especially in the German tradition of credential-ism) it is common for non medical doctors, Ph.Ds to call themselves “Doctor so-and-so.” Not here.

    When you see that in the US it is usually done by insecure, rather dim people whose doctorates are from schools of divinity or as in this case education or other social work. “Look Ma, I’m a real doctor!”

  215. Dr. Biden is going to give us the news for 4 years. Agony doesn’t being to describe the prospect.

    Meanwhile, Robert Palmer should be called Dr. Dr. with his incredible vocal control, probably among others kinds of control he exhibited, given these great lines in the song.

    I know you like it, you like it on top
    Tell me mamma, are you gonna stop?

    Go here
    youtube.com/watch?v=NQ7WyP_qCZk

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Moon Mullins wrote Dr. Dr. but Palmer hit it out of the park.

  216. @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber


    Plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen became those things because they hate school.
     
    All of the above, presently and in recent times, have has to spend a fair amount of time in a classroom, and for the firemen, also studying for promotional exams.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    All of the above, presently and in recent times, have has to spend a fair amount of time in a classroom

    So do literal retards.

    the firemen, also studying for promotional exams

    Who get the correct answers passed down to them from their uncles. Also, in the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @ScarletNumber

    A lot of people take up the trades because that's what their fathers do. It pays well from a young age, and there's a business to run once dad gets tired or can no longer easily do the work. I'm not claiming that all they're all geniuses, but they're not all idiots either.

    Also, there are a lot of young men who, as you point out, hate school, and not just for the ideological reasons bandied about on this website. It's rather abnormal for a young man to sit contentedly at a desk all day. Doing hard, physical work, particularly if it also involves a component of genuine skill, is simply more gratifying.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

  217. Neither Harvard nor Princeton nor Yale is all they’re cracked up to be.

    And plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen are intelligent because they spend “a fair amount of time in a classroom”?!

    Boy those grapes must be really sour, huh?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber

    I graduated from a respectable state co-flagship school in chemical engineering. You routinely engage in the kind of snobbery that is characteristic of the Left, although that does not make you a Leftist. My school (Iowa State) is not in the same category as HYP, but a respectable case can be made that it is not as far behind as is widely assumed.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Pericles

  218. @Hibernian
    @GreatSocialist

    The source for this is his disgruntled niece.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    She said his sister offered this tidbit. It turns out that the person Maryanne Trump named met him at the Wharton School and there’s no reason to believe they were ever acquainted before that. The two families did not live near each other and the two men were enrolled in different high schools. So, Mary L. Trump retreats to a position that it must have been some other ‘Joe Shapiro’, which she insists is a common name in New York. (It actually is not that common).

    Just to point out her legal dispute with her family was not contra her uncle alone, but contra three of her father’s four siblings. (The fourth, her aunt Elizabeth, gets a drive-by in her memoir as well). Her brother has said publicly and for attribution that he wants no trouble with his uncle. She was invited to some of the inaugural festivities. And she gaslighted her aunt into cutting up her uncle while surreptitiously recording the woman for 18 hours.

  219. @ScarletNumber
    @Nachum


    Back when I graduated law school- with a JD, or course- I told a friend to smack me if I ever insisted on “Dr.”
     
    As they should have, as the proper honorific for lawyers is esquire, not doctor. However, the rest of your post is a non sequitur.

    Basically, if you’re not an MD, DDS, or PhD, you don’t get to insist on “Dr.”
     
    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD's can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD's. I call my dentist "doctor" when I'm in his office, but it would be silly to call a dentist one socially.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Nachum

    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD’s can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD’s.

    Define ‘practical difference’.

    Again, ‘education’ is not an authentic discipline and schools of education attract bloody clots. Also, see ED Hirsch on the chronic problems from which research in education suffers.

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Art Deco


    Define ‘practical difference’
     
    First, tell me what the difference is between the two degrees.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  220. @Dr. X
    @Anonymous


    As for the “Dr”, it’s really simple: Every time a PhD calls himself/herself a “Dr”, it’s a clear sign of insecurity (and, quite often, of stupidity).
     
    In my experience, that's true. Despite my handle (which refers to a couple of things other than the fact that I do have an academic doctorate) I never made anyone call me "Doctor" -- I preferred "Professor."

    Like Jill Biden, I actually taught at community colleges (an experience I wouldn't want to repeat) and faculty who used the honorific were often marginally qualified and were simply trying to inflate their importance and pull rank over the majority of the faculty who held only Master's degrees -- e.g., "I'm DOCTAH Sha-nay-nay Washington of the African-American Studies Department." The practice was most common among females, and among female administrators in particular who held Ed.Ds. Many who did this were in fact very stupid and/or insecure.

    In a four-year university where pretty much all faculty are Ph.Ds, it's redundant and pointless to go around calling people "Doctor," and everybody goes by "Professor" or just their first name unless they're getting introduced at a formal event or public lecture.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Despite my handle (which refers to a couple of things other than the fact that I do have an academic doctorate) I never made anyone call me “Doctor” — I preferred “Professor.”

    Yes, but did you ever build a creature?

    • Replies: @Dr. X
    @ScarletNumber

    Not yet... something I'll have to get after when I get the time.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  221. @Art Deco
    @ScarletNumber

    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD’s can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD’s.

    Define 'practical difference'.

    Again, 'education' is not an authentic discipline and schools of education attract bloody clots. Also, see ED Hirsch on the chronic problems from which research in education suffers.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Define ‘practical difference’

    First, tell me what the difference is between the two degrees.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @ScarletNumber

    First, tell

    Why, first?



    https://www.ohio.edu/education/ed-studies/ed-admin-doctorate

    Here's a sample program from Ohio University. NB, Ohio University and Miami University are Ohio's oldest public institutions. In re their undergraduate programs, Ohio University's entering classes tend to complete their degrees more rapidly than the ordinary run of Ohio institutions, trailing only Miami University and Ohio State.

    You'll notice the following:

    Most of the degree consists of course work, but they've hidden the course list. The dissertation as described appears to be more along the lines of a master's thesis. Note, for an academic research degree, you're advancing some sort of branch of knowledge - you're either studying the natural world, or you're studying texts, or you're studying human behavior and society. Outside of the arts and sciences, engineering schools and medical schools offer research degrees. Here, you're aspiring to advance knowledge in an area with a body of practitioners.

    Alternatively, professional doctorates are offered for certification of practitioners in demanding occupations. Conventionally, these programs offer a minimum of 85 credits of course work and commonly do not admit students without a BA degree.

    1. There is no indication that the degree program trains an aspirant practitioner for what school administrators actually do all day.

    2. It's isn't clear just what they're studying. Cognition? Communications? Social relations?

  222. @ScarletNumber
    @Harry Baldwin


    [My father] was sent immediately to officer’s training school. He eventually attained the rank of captain
     
    While captains are O-3 and outrank First lieutenants and Second lieutenants all Army doctors have this as their rank to start. It isn't anything to brag about.

    Remember, Hawkeye Pierce was a Captain, and the army wasn't going to promote him. As an aside the Fort Hood shooter was a Major. Also, that happened in 2009 and the fucker still hasn't been put to death.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    It isn’t anything to brag about.

    In case it isn’t clear, I wasn’t bragging.

  223. @International Jew
    @the one they call Desanex

    Yeah, sounds about right. I don't think he ran it past any sharp consultants, though — especially the "I probably have a higher IQ than you", and the "bottom 2/3 of my class".

    Gerald Ford gave Dan Rather a better answer, less dramatic and more thoughtful. I don't remember if it was before or after Nixon's resignation, and I can't find it now on Youtube.

    Anyway, Rather asked something like, "Some people, um, question whether you are, um, intellectually up to the Presidency." Ford replied that he did well in his law school class at Yale (and maybe something else along those lines). Without getting belligerant, much less insulting Rather, Ford made Rather look pretty ridiculous.

    And we all remember how Rather blew up his own career (over the fake Bush Air National Guard letter) when he mistook the output of a laser printer for that of a 1960s typewriter!

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Stan Adams

    It was not Dan Rather; it was Tom Brokaw. NBC broadcast the interview in prime time on January 23, 1975.

    I’m pretty good at tracking down old television newscasts. Unfortunately, I can’t locate the video of this particular broadcast. Here is a transcript:

    https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/interview-with-john-chancellor-and-tom-brokaw-nbc-news

    MR. BROKAW. I have a question, Mr. President, that–it just isn’t easy to phrase, so I will just have to bear straight ahead with it. As you know, I am certain, because I have been told that you have commented on this before, but it has been speculated on in print not only in Washington but elsewhere, and it crops up in conversation from time to time in this town–the question of whether or not you are intellectually up to the job of being the President of the United States. When you hear that kind of talk or read that in print, does it bother you?

    THE PRESIDENT. It really doesn’t, Tom. And I suppose people wonder why it doesn’t bother me. My answer is as hard as the question that you asked.

    If grades one gets in school are a criteria–and we have been doing it for years and are still doing it–whether I was in high school or at the University of Michigan or at Yale Law School, I was always in the upper third or the upper 10 percent of my class.

    Now, if I don’t have the academic capability–being in either the upper third at Yale Law School or in the upper 20-some percent at the University of Michigan-there must be an awful lot of people much dumber than I.

    Now, I don’t think that is the only way by which you judge people. I think grades are important, judgment is a pretty important factor, and a capability on the part of a person to work, to analyze problems is equally important.

    And I think the fact that I have done reasonably well, both in Congress, in first getting there, and number two, in getting to be a leader and retaining that post for five elections among my peers as a Member on our side of the aisle–I think that does show some feeling on the part of responsible people that I have the capability of doing the job.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Stan Adams

    Thanks for tracking that down. Ford's answer in this transcript sounds a lot like what I remember. But dang it, I'm really sure it was Dan Rather. Could there have been two similar interviews?

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  224. @Art Deco
    @Anon7

    I used to work in a university medical center. It had a dental school appended to it and there might have been a sleep lab psychologist on the premises. These aside, I doubt you could have found a non-medical doctor around. (It was in the era before the Pharm.D. degree was common).

    Replies: @Anon7

    I worked in a research center hospital, and there were plenty of PhDs in the various associated life sciences in the labs and ICUs, as well as nuclear medicine (radiology, medical imaging). But you’re right, except for ICUs I saw them mostly in meetings where we all argued over facilities.

  225. @ScarletNumber

    Neither Harvard nor Princeton nor Yale is all they’re cracked up to be.
     
    And plumbers, auto mechanics, and firemen are intelligent because they spend "a fair amount of time in a classroom"?!

    Boy those grapes must be really sour, huh?

    Replies: @Hibernian

    I graduated from a respectable state co-flagship school in chemical engineering. You routinely engage in the kind of snobbery that is characteristic of the Left, although that does not make you a Leftist. My school (Iowa State) is not in the same category as HYP, but a respectable case can be made that it is not as far behind as is widely assumed.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Hibernian

    Snobbery may be unpleasant but that doesn't make it misguided.

    , @Pericles
    @Hibernian

    The top universities recruit the top students and most promising faculty, so they have a human capital advantage. (Though it seems that Harvard mainly buys the top free agents, er professors, rather than drafting and raising faculty internally.)

    However, it also seems like HYP are living off their brands to a considerable extent. Not necessarily just the soft undergrad, which the students seem to take far more seriously than the universities themselves, if we consider the stories of exposed test cheaters. These universities probably need to instill from the start that the imprimatur is what is important (cf. Yale Law).

    Since I've already gone after HY, I'd here like to mention the laughable negronic PhD thesis that was approved by Princeton Math. You can do that once or twice in living memory but not too routinely, or you'll end up like Sorbonne, a tattered shadow of former glories. (As I remember it, famous Sorbonne was turned into an open admissions university by some French university reform, so now just the name sort of remains.)

  226. @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber

    I graduated from a respectable state co-flagship school in chemical engineering. You routinely engage in the kind of snobbery that is characteristic of the Left, although that does not make you a Leftist. My school (Iowa State) is not in the same category as HYP, but a respectable case can be made that it is not as far behind as is widely assumed.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Pericles

    Snobbery may be unpleasant but that doesn’t make it misguided.

  227. @ScarletNumber
    @Art Deco


    Define ‘practical difference’
     
    First, tell me what the difference is between the two degrees.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    First, tell

    Why, first?

    https://www.ohio.edu/education/ed-studies/ed-admin-doctorate

    Here’s a sample program from Ohio University. NB, Ohio University and Miami University are Ohio’s oldest public institutions. In re their undergraduate programs, Ohio University’s entering classes tend to complete their degrees more rapidly than the ordinary run of Ohio institutions, trailing only Miami University and Ohio State.

    You’ll notice the following:

    Most of the degree consists of course work, but they’ve hidden the course list. The dissertation as described appears to be more along the lines of a master’s thesis. Note, for an academic research degree, you’re advancing some sort of branch of knowledge – you’re either studying the natural world, or you’re studying texts, or you’re studying human behavior and society. Outside of the arts and sciences, engineering schools and medical schools offer research degrees. Here, you’re aspiring to advance knowledge in an area with a body of practitioners.

    Alternatively, professional doctorates are offered for certification of practitioners in demanding occupations. Conventionally, these programs offer a minimum of 85 credits of course work and commonly do not admit students without a BA degree.

    1. There is no indication that the degree program trains an aspirant practitioner for what school administrators actually do all day.

    2. It’s isn’t clear just what they’re studying. Cognition? Communications? Social relations?

  228. @Peter D. Bredon
    It's the defining mark of the bourgeois that they are terrified of death, and will do anything to avoid it, including dishonor (as opposed to "death before dishonor")

    Hence, only physicians, Doctors of Medicine, are given the honorific of "Dr.".

    In a truly cultured nation, such as pre-War II Germany, academic qualification was socially recognized. Even one's wife rejoiced in "Frau Dr." The idea that a Max Weber or Edmund Husserl was "not a real doctor" would be considered absurd, barbaric.

    Well, that's why they had to be destroyed.

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/NotThatKindOfDoctor

    Now we're all just Citizens and Comrades, eh, comrades?

    Of course, the Germans also had real academic qualifications, not bullshit degrees in Gender Studies or Oppression Studies.

    And you can believe me, because I have a Master's Degree... in Science!

    Replies: @Nathan, @Art Deco

    “In a truly cultured nation, such as pre-War II Germany”

    Oh, shut up! Just shut up! I’m so sick of all the fetishizing of those sweet, saintly and oh-so-cultured Germans. Have you lived in Germany? Sprechen sie Deutsch? No??

    For your information, we owe all of this absurd degree and title inflation to the Germans and Johns Hopkins adopting their Ph.D system. The English didn’t have them. Did that stop James Clerk Maxwell, Charles Darwin, or Newton? What a joke- Sir Isaac Newton, Ph.D!! Ha! But you don’t know any of that because you bought into all of the dumb Unz Review German propaganda.

    “I think the Ph.D system is an abomination.” -Freeman Dyson

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @Nathan

    Ich habe in Deutschland gewohnt.

    Das deutsche Hochschule System ist ein gutes System für Deutsche.

  229. @Anon
    I went to law school with Beau, seemed a pretty genuinely good guy. Al Damato’s son was at SU Law at the same time, a total douche. Both were pulling good tail, unlike me, but I ain’t no senator’s son.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    but I ain’t no senator’s son.

    Trump arriving at The Villages Florida 10/23/20 in Marine One

  230. @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer


    You almost never hear about Pence except every four years he wins the VP debate.
     
    I was too lazy/indifferent to watch it.

    But to me what Pence needed to do was not "win" but

    1) Wrap the Democrat riots around the Democrats. (And relate this to the importance of rule-of-law and our lives, freedom and prosperity.)

    2) Wrap "blood libel against white people" around Kamala and make her, and her presence on the ticket absolutely toxic. (This was electorally critical because Biden himself was running as return-to-normalcy mediocre white guy and had less of a negative profile than Hillary, especially to midwestern white guys. As turned out--fatally--to be the case.)


    Having not seen the debate, i assume Pence while "winning" did neither of these.

    This is sadly par for the course for Republicans. Instead of directly attacking the destructive minoritarian evil of the Democrats as ... destructive minoritarian evil, they try for some namby-pamby we're responsible and aren't the bad folks they say.

    Since they neve confront and name the evil and destruction the parasite party is doing, they never get most people actually *thinking* about the what is being served up. (The mad as hell people have figured it out for themselves.) They are just the boring stodgy alternative and continue to lose.

    Replies: @Neil Templeton

    I appreciate your sentiment, AD. But, preserving the original principles is no longer an option. I never liked fighting and am too old to fight at any rate, but the original principles, while valid, are no longer virile. Decades in forestry have taught me that sometimes it’s best to burn it down. As I’ve said before, white people don’t reproduce well under shade. Maybe you can thin the forest, but that’s not possible with human populations. SCOTUS made its decision. States no longer have the right to demand that their peer states behave responsibly. We either age corruptly, as aging bodies do, or the younger bodies burn it down. But once the fire begins it will burn hot and long, and the land will be scorched and open to seed. How confident are you that the sown seed will pass your inspection?

  231. @Carbon blob
    @Anonymous

    I wouldn’t consider Penn a second-rate Ivy at all, I think they just get tired of being confused with a certain cow college in central PA.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @The Last Real Calvinist

    Apologies to any Penn grads here, but if your context for comparison is ‘the Ivies’, then Penn is the very definition of second-rate. The Penn name simply does not compare with HPY in terms of international rankings/recognition.

  232. @ScarletNumber
    @Nachum


    Back when I graduated law school- with a JD, or course- I told a friend to smack me if I ever insisted on “Dr.”
     
    As they should have, as the proper honorific for lawyers is esquire, not doctor. However, the rest of your post is a non sequitur.

    Basically, if you’re not an MD, DDS, or PhD, you don’t get to insist on “Dr.”
     
    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD's can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD's. I call my dentist "doctor" when I'm in his office, but it would be silly to call a dentist one socially.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Nachum

    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD.

    This is simply not accurate.

    A PhD is a true research degree, with the expectation that the candidate will make some kind of original contribution to the field.

    An EdD is a ‘professional’ degree, which in practice means the research requirements are drastically reduced. An EdD thesis is in practical terms usually more on the scale of an (perhaps somewhat extended) MA thesis, not a PhD dissertation.

    I’ve worked in higher ed for 30 years, and at different points considered both PhD and EdD programs, but decided (thankfully) not to pursue either. I’m pretty familiar with how they work.

    That’s not to say that PhD programs can’t be dumbed down; of course they can, and are. But there really are no highly-rigorous EdD programs. That’s not what they’re meant to be. An EdD therefore is not respected nearly as much as a PhD within the academy.

  233. @Pericles
    @Jack D


    Hunter might be the smartest one of the gang, with a law degree from Yale.

     

    What's the failure rate once you're accepted at Yale Law?

    Replies: @Jack D

    Law school is not like some undergrad studies major. The tests are graded anonymously and they don’t hesitate to flunk you out if your grades fall too low.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Jack D

    Thanks, I've heard US STEM grad school can be tough too. But it doesn't answer the question.

    I didn't find any such information at Yale Law itself. They did mention that:



    In addition, Yale Law School fosters an environment of collaboration rather than competition. In the first term, all classes are ungraded. After that, classes are graded on an honors/pass/low pass basis with the option to take classes credit/fail. There is no curve and no class rank.

     

    The LSAT of the incoming class is 155-180, if I read the table correctly, and they appear quite selective. They use jargon with which I'm not familiar, so further analysis will have to wait. Oh, except that the class seems admirably diverse. I hadn't even heard of a few of the languages below.


    [The Class of 2023] can read and speak the following languages:

    American Sign Language, Arabic, Attic/Classical Greek, Bisaya, Cantonese, Dholuo, Esperanto, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Kichwa, Korean, Latin, Latvian, Malayalam, Mandarin, Marathi, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Shindzuani, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu.

     

    https://law.yale.edu/admissions/profiles-statistics

    The flunk rate at the other end is not available. However, the article "13 Schools Where It's Almost Impossible To Fail" is by chance headed by Yale Law School and Harvard Law School.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/13-schools-where-its-really-hard-to-fail-2013-5?r=US&IR=T

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  234. @Mr. Anon
    @D. K.


    I remember someone telling the story, on television, that he once had gotten onto an elevator where the only person already in it was Henry Kissinger. The storyteller had said, “Hello, Mr. Kissinger!” The heavily accented-but-deadpan response had been, “DOCTOR Kissinger!”
     
    I'm sorry. DOCTOR War Criminal.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Orville H. Larson

    Piss on Kissinger, that insufferably pretentious Harvard know- it-all.

    As the saying goes: “You can always tell a Harvard man, but you can’t tell him much.”

  235. @ScarletNumber
    @Dr. X


    Despite my handle (which refers to a couple of things other than the fact that I do have an academic doctorate) I never made anyone call me “Doctor” — I preferred “Professor.”
     
    Yes, but did you ever build a creature?

    Replies: @Dr. X

    Not yet… something I’ll have to get after when I get the time.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Dr. X

    Richard O'Brien is disappointed in you.

  236. @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia
    Dr. Biden is going to give us the news for 4 years. Agony doesn't being to describe the prospect.

    Meanwhile, Robert Palmer should be called Dr. Dr. with his incredible vocal control, probably among others kinds of control he exhibited, given these great lines in the song.


    I know you like it, you like it on top
    Tell me mamma, are you gonna stop?
     
    Go here
    youtube.com/watch?v=NQ7WyP_qCZk

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Moon Mullins wrote Dr. Dr. but Palmer hit it out of the park.

  237. @Dan Hayes
    @black sea

    As far as I know, New York City does not have any per se listed “historical” district!

    Replies: @black sea

    The neighborhood [Brooklyn Heights] was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1965, and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1966.

    https://tclf.org/brooklyn-heights-historic-district

    • Thanks: Dan Hayes
  238. @ScarletNumber
    @Hibernian


    All of the above, presently and in recent times, have has to spend a fair amount of time in a classroom
     
    So do literal retards.

    the firemen, also studying for promotional exams
     
    Who get the correct answers passed down to them from their uncles. Also, in the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

    Replies: @black sea

    A lot of people take up the trades because that’s what their fathers do. It pays well from a young age, and there’s a business to run once dad gets tired or can no longer easily do the work. I’m not claiming that all they’re all geniuses, but they’re not all idiots either.

    Also, there are a lot of young men who, as you point out, hate school, and not just for the ideological reasons bandied about on this website. It’s rather abnormal for a young man to sit contentedly at a desk all day. Doing hard, physical work, particularly if it also involves a component of genuine skill, is simply more gratifying.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @black sea

    And sadly most modern young men who eschew school are not doing it out of some earthy, instinctual need to physically labor with their hands and attain skills. Rather are ignoring school for the sweet dopamine rush of sitting on their ass and pushing buttons for 10 hours a day.

    Video games are one of the main reasons kids “hate” school.

  239. @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar


    But do they label them such?
     
    Chicago does, and there's a sign advertising Hyde Park/Kenwood, where I live, painted on the electric commuter RR viaduct over 47th St. near the lake.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Gaaa! You’re right!

    Putting the word “historic” on a true historical area is like labeling a vodka “gluten-free”.

    Yet Hyde Park does have a claim to history– it’s where Chesa Boudin debuted his neighbor Barack Obama to the world. Not quite as disastrous as that other Hyde Park’s claim, but still pretty bad.

  240. @education realist
    @ScarletNumber

    The parenthetical isn't true. No teachers get PhDs for the money. For one thing, you don't have to get a degree to get paid more--just go to school, in most cases. A PhD is a huge amount of work for zero benefit that couldn't be achieved in a hundred easier ways. It's flatly false.

    People who get doctorates in education want to teach in university ed schools. And those jobs are going away, like all tenured positions. The minute tenured positions started falling, so did Ed doctorates. In 1998 they were 15% of all degrees. By 2017, they were just 9%.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @Ron Mexico

    The Ed PhD has been replaced by Masters in Ed Leadership for those of us who want in on the Admin gravy train. Not for me. I have a bullshit Masters in Ed. Put me high up on the pay scale, but is an albatross when seeking a teaching job in another district. But you probably know all of this.

  241. @black sea
    @Reg Cæsar

    I meant formally designated historic districts, not just old neighborhoods. Designating them in this way introduces greater regulation as to what architectural changes may be made in that area. It may also bring in money for upkeep and restoration from institutional sources, foundations, etc.

    If Boston and New York feel inferior to Rome with regard to historical architecture, it is with good reason. There is no way that any city in the New World can compete with Rome, Paris, or Venice in terms of architectural history.

    Replies: @TTSSYF, @Stan Adams, @Reg Cæsar

    Man, this is pathetic– who needs to be told?:

    [MORE]



    https://mysticknotwork.com/

    (Is that “Mystic Knotwork” or “My stick not work”?

  242. @black sea
    @Buffalo Joe


    Richard, good practice to calls cops, “Officer”, seems to smooth the interaction.
     
    Yes, a primate thing. You've acknowledged their status/dominance, whether you really believe in it or not. Cops encounter a lot of people who want to argue with them, and a few who want to fight them, so by calling them "Officer" or "Sir" you're signalling that you're not going to be one of those people. They can then relax a little and are more likely to let you go with a warning, assuming you were stopped for some minor infraction. It doesn't always work, but it works lot more often than challenging their authority.

    The same thing is true in work situations. I used to know a guy who had been fired several times, mostly from working class jobs where a certain amount of blunt honesty is accepted. He said that he finally realized that he needed to let his boss be his boss.

    Replies: @Cortes, @RichardTaylor

    I used to know a guy who had been fired several times, mostly from working class jobs where a certain amount of blunt honesty is accepted

    I think we need to face how submissive most white collar people are trained to be.

    • Replies: @Up2Drew
    @RichardTaylor

    I worked construction jobs in the summer while going to college, and a couple years after, when the job market was pretty lousy in the early 80's. The crews rode me like a mule ("college boy, huh?") until I proved I could keep my mouth shut and give a solid 40 hours of work with the best of them. Not only was bluntness, and one's ability to deal with bluntness, a necessity - fistfights between bosses and subordinates were not uncommon.

    When I think back on that now after thirty years in corporate America ... the microaggressions that now result in a visit to the HR office, end your employment, ruin your career ... it seems so incredible that you once had to stand your ground and make the best of a situation for yourself.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  243. @ScarletNumber
    @Nachum


    Back when I graduated law school- with a JD, or course- I told a friend to smack me if I ever insisted on “Dr.”
     
    As they should have, as the proper honorific for lawyers is esquire, not doctor. However, the rest of your post is a non sequitur.

    Basically, if you’re not an MD, DDS, or PhD, you don’t get to insist on “Dr.”
     
    I hate to break this to you, but there is no practical difference between a PhD and an EdD. Therefore, if PhD's can insist on the honorific of doctor, so can EdD's. I call my dentist "doctor" when I'm in his office, but it would be silly to call a dentist one socially.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Nachum

    Don’t misunderstand me: I’m not saying that every PhD is worthwhile, far from it, and I’m not saying that there’s not a lot of work involved in professional doctorates- indeed, I’m pretty sure an MD, at least, take a lot more work than a PhD. Heck, even a DDS probably does. But regardless of quality or quantity, there is a real definitional difference between an MD, PsyD, EdD, JD, and so on on the one hand and a PhD on the other.

    Also, “Esquire” is only for lawyers who are members of the bar. “JD” is used for people who have graduated law school but don’t practice.

    In any event, it’s academic, no pun intended, as, again, outside of a professional context, I don’t think *any* of them should be referred to as “Dr.” We don’t speak of “Dr. Woodrow Wilson.”

  244. If you want to see shrieking snowflakes, just look at any comment thread on any of Northwestern’s current Facebook posts. My God.

  245. @Jack D
    @Pericles

    Law school is not like some undergrad studies major. The tests are graded anonymously and they don't hesitate to flunk you out if your grades fall too low.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Thanks, I’ve heard US STEM grad school can be tough too. But it doesn’t answer the question.

    I didn’t find any such information at Yale Law itself. They did mention that:

    In addition, Yale Law School fosters an environment of collaboration rather than competition. In the first term, all classes are ungraded. After that, classes are graded on an honors/pass/low pass basis with the option to take classes credit/fail. There is no curve and no class rank.

    The LSAT of the incoming class is 155-180, if I read the table correctly, and they appear quite selective. They use jargon with which I’m not familiar, so further analysis will have to wait. Oh, except that the class seems admirably diverse. I hadn’t even heard of a few of the languages below.

    [The Class of 2023] can read and speak the following languages:

    American Sign Language, Arabic, Attic/Classical Greek, Bisaya, Cantonese, Dholuo, Esperanto, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Kichwa, Korean, Latin, Latvian, Malayalam, Mandarin, Marathi, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Shindzuani, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu.

    https://law.yale.edu/admissions/profiles-statistics

    The flunk rate at the other end is not available. However, the article “13 Schools Where It’s Almost Impossible To Fail” is by chance headed by Yale Law School and Harvard Law School.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/13-schools-where-its-really-hard-to-fail-2013-5?r=US&IR=T

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Pericles

    My general impression as an outsider is that the Yale Law School is the most intellectual of all legal academies, with such rigorous admissions requirements that little effort is put into teaching anything terribly useful toward passing the bar exam or making a living as a lawyer because it's just assumed that anybody who gets into Yale Law School will be able to muster the sheer IQ to deal with any such mundane contingencies.

    Replies: @Pericles

  246. @black sea
    @ScarletNumber

    A lot of people take up the trades because that's what their fathers do. It pays well from a young age, and there's a business to run once dad gets tired or can no longer easily do the work. I'm not claiming that all they're all geniuses, but they're not all idiots either.

    Also, there are a lot of young men who, as you point out, hate school, and not just for the ideological reasons bandied about on this website. It's rather abnormal for a young man to sit contentedly at a desk all day. Doing hard, physical work, particularly if it also involves a component of genuine skill, is simply more gratifying.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    And sadly most modern young men who eschew school are not doing it out of some earthy, instinctual need to physically labor with their hands and attain skills. Rather are ignoring school for the sweet dopamine rush of sitting on their ass and pushing buttons for 10 hours a day.

    Video games are one of the main reasons kids “hate” school.

  247. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Anonymous

    A large majority of UK (and German, and Romanian, and Indian, and Chinese) physicians do not hold a doctorate. Their schooling is slightly longer than a regular bachelor, and they are really bachelors in medicine. I fancy calling myself a doctor too, having gone to college before the Bologna reform and earning a 5-year BSc; it's as long as a contemporary Romanian MSc or an Indian Bachelor of Medicine.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    Unless things changed radically since I left Germany, they don’t have a bachelor’s degree. In anything.

    • Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Nicholas Stix

    Medical school is 6 years in Germany and Romania, starting after 12 years of primary and secondary (that is, near-universal) schooling.

    In Europe, after the Bologna process, a doctoral degree requires 8 years of tertiary school (3 of college, 2 of masters, 3 of doctoral school), which is way more than the 6 above. Hence, like everywhere, an European medical doctor is really one of the least doctor-y doctors. The easiest way to join the Bologna process and to keep medical education as is is to place medical schools outside the system.

    In US, physicians spend 4 years in college and 4 years in medical school. Longer than a German physician, but again, shorter than a science doctorate in US (or anywhere outside the Bologna process).

    Germany and Russia have a second doctoral level (Habilitation), because the 3+2+3 system of Bologna is not enough for developing independent scientists.

    It's easy to understand why school takes longer in US when you recall that Jill Biden teaches "remedial writing" in college. Apparently, Americans can go to uni without being able to write, and without bothering to learn the esoteric skill outside the uni system.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Twinkie

  248. @Pericles
    @Jack D

    Thanks, I've heard US STEM grad school can be tough too. But it doesn't answer the question.

    I didn't find any such information at Yale Law itself. They did mention that:



    In addition, Yale Law School fosters an environment of collaboration rather than competition. In the first term, all classes are ungraded. After that, classes are graded on an honors/pass/low pass basis with the option to take classes credit/fail. There is no curve and no class rank.

     

    The LSAT of the incoming class is 155-180, if I read the table correctly, and they appear quite selective. They use jargon with which I'm not familiar, so further analysis will have to wait. Oh, except that the class seems admirably diverse. I hadn't even heard of a few of the languages below.


    [The Class of 2023] can read and speak the following languages:

    American Sign Language, Arabic, Attic/Classical Greek, Bisaya, Cantonese, Dholuo, Esperanto, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Kichwa, Korean, Latin, Latvian, Malayalam, Mandarin, Marathi, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Shindzuani, Spanish, Swahili, Tagalog, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu.

     

    https://law.yale.edu/admissions/profiles-statistics

    The flunk rate at the other end is not available. However, the article "13 Schools Where It's Almost Impossible To Fail" is by chance headed by Yale Law School and Harvard Law School.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/13-schools-where-its-really-hard-to-fail-2013-5?r=US&IR=T

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    My general impression as an outsider is that the Yale Law School is the most intellectual of all legal academies, with such rigorous admissions requirements that little effort is put into teaching anything terribly useful toward passing the bar exam or making a living as a lawyer because it’s just assumed that anybody who gets into Yale Law School will be able to muster the sheer IQ to deal with any such mundane contingencies.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Steve Sailer

    Yale Law is a bit like Tokyo or Harvard then, as the legends have it. Once you're in, you're golden. (Though the explicitly mentioned lack of grading curves and class ranks suggests a former unhealthy attitude to competition among the students.)

    However, LSAT 155 is not very exceptional as I understand it, with the average taker getting 150.

    Replies: @MC

  249. @Steve Sailer
    @Pericles

    My general impression as an outsider is that the Yale Law School is the most intellectual of all legal academies, with such rigorous admissions requirements that little effort is put into teaching anything terribly useful toward passing the bar exam or making a living as a lawyer because it's just assumed that anybody who gets into Yale Law School will be able to muster the sheer IQ to deal with any such mundane contingencies.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Yale Law is a bit like Tokyo or Harvard then, as the legends have it. Once you’re in, you’re golden. (Though the explicitly mentioned lack of grading curves and class ranks suggests a former unhealthy attitude to competition among the students.)

    However, LSAT 155 is not very exceptional as I understand it, with the average taker getting 150.

    • Replies: @MC
    @Pericles

    Whoever got 155 is an affirmative action admit. The average LSAT at Yale is usually around 173, and given that 1/4 or so of the class is AA and another 1/4 might be donor or political connections, you figure 173 is the minimum for a white kid with no connections.

    Replies: @Pericles

  250. @Jim Don Bob
    @TTSSYF


    Wouldn’t it depend on the subject? A Ph.D. in physics or chemistry is a lot different than a Ph.D. in early Renaissance British history. The latter is more likely to make the person into a very good plumber.
     
    You must not know very many plumbers.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    Not all plumbers have doctorates in early Renaissance British history. But quite a few people with doctorates in early Renaissance British history or equivalent and for which there is not high demand are doing something else for a living…for example, plumbing.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @TTSSYF

    I once met a FedEx driver who claimed to hold a PhD in English Lit.

    Possible. We discussed Rand.

    Replies: @black sea

  251. @Pericles
    @Steve Sailer

    Yale Law is a bit like Tokyo or Harvard then, as the legends have it. Once you're in, you're golden. (Though the explicitly mentioned lack of grading curves and class ranks suggests a former unhealthy attitude to competition among the students.)

    However, LSAT 155 is not very exceptional as I understand it, with the average taker getting 150.

    Replies: @MC

    Whoever got 155 is an affirmative action admit. The average LSAT at Yale is usually around 173, and given that 1/4 or so of the class is AA and another 1/4 might be donor or political connections, you figure 173 is the minimum for a white kid with no connections.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @MC

    True, the average LSAT of the class of 2003 is exactly 173, and 75% have LSAT 170 or more.

    But then Hunter Biden specifically (the origin of this little thread) probably belongs to the 1/4 with political connections. Also, his parents are low-wattage lightbulbs, academically speaking. So I think we can preliminarily place him in the sub-170 category.

  252. @Peter D. Bredon
    It's the defining mark of the bourgeois that they are terrified of death, and will do anything to avoid it, including dishonor (as opposed to "death before dishonor")

    Hence, only physicians, Doctors of Medicine, are given the honorific of "Dr.".

    In a truly cultured nation, such as pre-War II Germany, academic qualification was socially recognized. Even one's wife rejoiced in "Frau Dr." The idea that a Max Weber or Edmund Husserl was "not a real doctor" would be considered absurd, barbaric.

    Well, that's why they had to be destroyed.

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/NotThatKindOfDoctor

    Now we're all just Citizens and Comrades, eh, comrades?

    Of course, the Germans also had real academic qualifications, not bullshit degrees in Gender Studies or Oppression Studies.

    And you can believe me, because I have a Master's Degree... in Science!

    Replies: @Nathan, @Art Deco

    It’s the defining mark of the bourgeois that they are terrified of death,

    It isn’t. Is it one of your hobbies to utter manifest bull$hit just to amuse yourself?

  253. @MC
    @Pericles

    Whoever got 155 is an affirmative action admit. The average LSAT at Yale is usually around 173, and given that 1/4 or so of the class is AA and another 1/4 might be donor or political connections, you figure 173 is the minimum for a white kid with no connections.

    Replies: @Pericles

    True, the average LSAT of the class of 2003 is exactly 173, and 75% have LSAT 170 or more.

    But then Hunter Biden specifically (the origin of this little thread) probably belongs to the 1/4 with political connections. Also, his parents are low-wattage lightbulbs, academically speaking. So I think we can preliminarily place him in the sub-170 category.

  254. @Jack D
    @Daniel H


    The origins of esquire date to the Middle Ages, when it was a title conferred on candidates for knighthood in England. Later, the term was extended to other mid-level dignitaries, including sheriffs, sergeants, justices of the peace and “barristers at law.”

    In the United States, esquire over time came to refer “commonly and exclusively” to lawyers, stated the opinion, but how that happened is a mystery.
     
    https://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/tussle_over_titles/

    The shorter version is that in the US it's just the honorific title you give to lawyers just as MDs are called "doctor".

    I was taught that OTHER people may address you by appending Esq. to your name but that you should never refer to yourself that way.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @CA Lawyer

    In the US, “Esq.” for lawyers is mostly used only in the course of work, and only in situations in which it is legally significant that a communication is from or to a lawyer (e.g., for purposes of evaluating a claim of attorney-client privilege). Virtually no one in the US other than Bill S. Preston uses “Esquire” to demonstrate to the general public that they are a lawyer.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @CA Lawyer

    Plus Bill S Preston isn't an attorney; he is using the honorific ironically.

  255. @Dr. X
    @ScarletNumber

    Not yet... something I'll have to get after when I get the time.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Richard O’Brien is disappointed in you.

  256. @TTSSYF
    @Jim Don Bob

    Not all plumbers have doctorates in early Renaissance British history. But quite a few people with doctorates in early Renaissance British history or equivalent and for which there is not high demand are doing something else for a living...for example, plumbing.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    I once met a FedEx driver who claimed to hold a PhD in English Lit.

    Possible. We discussed Rand.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
    • Replies: @black sea
    @Abolish_public_education

    I used to know a guy who was a professor of English. When he was offered his first tenure-track job, he was working as a diesel mechanic in New Mexico. He said it was sort of a toss-up as to which job he preferred.

  257. @Stan Adams
    @International Jew

    It was not Dan Rather; it was Tom Brokaw. NBC broadcast the interview in prime time on January 23, 1975.

    I'm pretty good at tracking down old television newscasts. Unfortunately, I can't locate the video of this particular broadcast. Here is a transcript:

    https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/interview-with-john-chancellor-and-tom-brokaw-nbc-news


    MR. BROKAW. I have a question, Mr. President, that--it just isn't easy to phrase, so I will just have to bear straight ahead with it. As you know, I am certain, because I have been told that you have commented on this before, but it has been speculated on in print not only in Washington but elsewhere, and it crops up in conversation from time to time in this town--the question of whether or not you are intellectually up to the job of being the President of the United States. When you hear that kind of talk or read that in print, does it bother you?

    THE PRESIDENT. It really doesn't, Tom. And I suppose people wonder why it doesn't bother me. My answer is as hard as the question that you asked.

    If grades one gets in school are a criteria--and we have been doing it for years and are still doing it--whether I was in high school or at the University of Michigan or at Yale Law School, I was always in the upper third or the upper 10 percent of my class.

    Now, if I don't have the academic capability--being in either the upper third at Yale Law School or in the upper 20-some percent at the University of Michigan-there must be an awful lot of people much dumber than I.

    Now, I don't think that is the only way by which you judge people. I think grades are important, judgment is a pretty important factor, and a capability on the part of a person to work, to analyze problems is equally important.

    And I think the fact that I have done reasonably well, both in Congress, in first getting there, and number two, in getting to be a leader and retaining that post for five elections among my peers as a Member on our side of the aisle--I think that does show some feeling on the part of responsible people that I have the capability of doing the job.
     

    Replies: @International Jew

    Thanks for tracking that down. Ford’s answer in this transcript sounds a lot like what I remember. But dang it, I’m really sure it was Dan Rather. Could there have been two similar interviews?

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @International Jew

    It's possible, but I haven't been able to determine whether Rather ever interviewed Ford. I'll keep looking.

    Tom Brokaw was still the NBC White House correspondent at the time, so it made sense that he would have interviewed the sitting president.

    Dan Rather's tenure as CBS White House correspondent ended immediately after Nixon's resignation. He covered the presidency throughout the Johnson and Nixon years but was reassigned to the documentary unit after Ford took office. In the fall of '75 he joined 60 Minutes just as the program catapulted to the top of the ratings, giving his career a major boost.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  258. @CA Lawyer
    @Jack D

    In the US, "Esq." for lawyers is mostly used only in the course of work, and only in situations in which it is legally significant that a communication is from or to a lawyer (e.g., for purposes of evaluating a claim of attorney-client privilege). Virtually no one in the US other than Bill S. Preston uses "Esquire" to demonstrate to the general public that they are a lawyer.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Plus Bill S Preston isn’t an attorney; he is using the honorific ironically.

  259. @International Jew
    @Stan Adams

    Thanks for tracking that down. Ford's answer in this transcript sounds a lot like what I remember. But dang it, I'm really sure it was Dan Rather. Could there have been two similar interviews?

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    It’s possible, but I haven’t been able to determine whether Rather ever interviewed Ford. I’ll keep looking.

    Tom Brokaw was still the NBC White House correspondent at the time, so it made sense that he would have interviewed the sitting president.

    Dan Rather’s tenure as CBS White House correspondent ended immediately after Nixon’s resignation. He covered the presidency throughout the Johnson and Nixon years but was reassigned to the documentary unit after Ford took office. In the fall of ’75 he joined 60 Minutes just as the program catapulted to the top of the ratings, giving his career a major boost.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Stan Adams

    It was Tom Brokaw. Ron Nessen discusses the incident in passing in his memoir, as one of a series of incidents like this. Nessen said Ford was patient with this sort of thing. Ford's problem was that he was unintelligent per se, but that he had no avocational interest in ideas; he was an athlete and that's what he did with his free time. He had some biases as a Chamber-of-Commerce Republican from a 3d tier city, but really no ideology at all. Another problem was that he seemed to go into fugue states where he forgot what year it was. His WIN program seemed inspired by WWii era programs where people stockpiled scrap metal; it was irrelevant to its object and Alan Greenspan was most embarrassed. He also curried favor with liberal Republicans, putting Nelson Rockefeller and his retainers in charge of the domestic policy staff at the White House, not understanding that the segment in question was about to implode demographically. Rockefeller was 65 years old and had to be called out of retirement to take the VP slot; tapping him was plain strange.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN

  260. @Anon87
    @Nachum

    Will we ever see a bald president again? McCain only went as far as he did on the vet cred, but we all knew he was a destined loser.

    Look at the amount of impressive work that went into de-balding Biden. Is it his own horseshoe hair grafted up top? The color and texture blend is impressive. His face is pretty chopped up too, so HD television probably put the vanity of "making a president" on overdrive.

    Chuck Schumer also has the fear of being viewed as a bald guy. There is a reason he rarely is shot from behind, he cultivates a Hair-drian Wall for the cameras.

    People make fun of Trumps hair, but he never would have been elected if he looked like Lex Luthor (which from Photoshops it really doesn't look all that bad).

    Now I'd say it's obvious we will never have a bald female president, but who can't picture us being subjected to a bitter harpy like Ayanna Pressley? Flips the entire World War Hair on its head, no pun.

    Replies: @Up2Drew

    We will not. I doubt we’ll even have a non-photogenic President again. It’s never a bad bet a to put your money on the better-looking candidate.

    How many CEOs of corporations do you see that are bald?

    • Replies: @Anon87
    @Up2Drew

    I am ashamed to say it took me way too long to think of one, the most obvious one too..... Jeff Bezos!!

    There aren't many. This is McCain era old, but better to be bald than short? Sorry manlets.

    https://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=4449015&page=1

    I find that hard to believe, when so many people in the public eye are shorter than you think and it hasn't stopped them from advancing.

    Romney probably would have been elected if it wasn't for the Obama religion. He has the central casting look of a politician/CEO. Pre-woke era casting obviously.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  261. @RichardTaylor
    @black sea


    I used to know a guy who had been fired several times, mostly from working class jobs where a certain amount of blunt honesty is accepted
     
    I think we need to face how submissive most white collar people are trained to be.

    Replies: @Up2Drew

    I worked construction jobs in the summer while going to college, and a couple years after, when the job market was pretty lousy in the early 80’s. The crews rode me like a mule (“college boy, huh?”) until I proved I could keep my mouth shut and give a solid 40 hours of work with the best of them. Not only was bluntness, and one’s ability to deal with bluntness, a necessity – fistfights between bosses and subordinates were not uncommon.

    When I think back on that now after thirty years in corporate America … the microaggressions that now result in a visit to the HR office, end your employment, ruin your career … it seems so incredible that you once had to stand your ground and make the best of a situation for yourself.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Up2Drew

    I remember when I worked at a municipal water purification plant, a memo went out saying, "There is no good reason for a superior to strike a subordinate, except in self defense."

  262. @Up2Drew
    @Anon87

    We will not. I doubt we'll even have a non-photogenic President again. It's never a bad bet a to put your money on the better-looking candidate.

    How many CEOs of corporations do you see that are bald?

    Replies: @Anon87

    I am ashamed to say it took me way too long to think of one, the most obvious one too….. Jeff Bezos!!

    There aren’t many. This is McCain era old, but better to be bald than short? Sorry manlets.

    https://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=4449015&page=1

    I find that hard to believe, when so many people in the public eye are shorter than you think and it hasn’t stopped them from advancing.

    Romney probably would have been elected if it wasn’t for the Obama religion. He has the central casting look of a politician/CEO. Pre-woke era casting obviously.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon87

    Romney looks like the generic Presidential candidate whom Clint Eastwood saves from assassin John Malkovich in "In the Line of Fire."

    Replies: @Anon87

  263. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    I don't believe that Martin Borman or Alfred Rosenberg ever commanded any soldiers either, and yet the Nuremberg tribunal saw fit to label them as War Criminals.

    The moment I hit "publish comment", I knew that you - Art Deco - would reply to my comment, flying to the defence of Dr. New-World-Order. You are such a dutiful and predictable drone.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    I don’t believe that Martin Borman or Alfred Rosenberg ever commanded any soldiers either, and yet the Nuremberg tribunal saw fit to label them as War Criminals.

    They also tried the former director of the central bank, who spent the last years of the regime in a concentration camp. Another defendant was some random dude who worked in the propaganda ministry. Another was a navy admiral accused of ‘waging aggressive war’. Your point is what, that prosecutors at Nuremberg brought humbug charges against a mess of people, ergo you get to say any nonsensical thing you care to?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    Your point is what, that prosecutors at Nuremberg brought humbug charges against a mess of people, ergo you get to say any nonsensical thing you care to?
     
    Kissinger was an instrument in carrying out a lot of the American Empire's dirty work. That was my point, you ridiculous clown.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  264. @Anon87
    @Up2Drew

    I am ashamed to say it took me way too long to think of one, the most obvious one too..... Jeff Bezos!!

    There aren't many. This is McCain era old, but better to be bald than short? Sorry manlets.

    https://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=4449015&page=1

    I find that hard to believe, when so many people in the public eye are shorter than you think and it hasn't stopped them from advancing.

    Romney probably would have been elected if it wasn't for the Obama religion. He has the central casting look of a politician/CEO. Pre-woke era casting obviously.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Romney looks like the generic Presidential candidate whom Clint Eastwood saves from assassin John Malkovich in “In the Line of Fire.”

    • Replies: @Anon87
    @Steve Sailer

    And don't forget which of those three was bald!

  265. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    I don't believe that Martin Borman or Alfred Rosenberg ever commanded any soldiers either, and yet the Nuremberg tribunal saw fit to label them as War Criminals.

    The moment I hit "publish comment", I knew that you - Art Deco - would reply to my comment, flying to the defence of Dr. New-World-Order. You are such a dutiful and predictable drone.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    flying to the defence of Dr. New-World-Order

    A phrase which wasn’t current until about 15 years after he left office. You might try criticizing something he did do or did not do rather than slime him as a ‘war criminal’. Kissinger was (and I believe still is) and advocate of cautious reasons-of-state oriented foreign policy. Not sure why that puts a burr in your tailpipe.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    You would defend Kissinger, you supercilious humbug.


    A phrase which wasn’t current until about 15 years after he left office.
     
    From whom do you think George Bush learned it?

    "My country's history, Mr. President, tells us that it is possible to fashion unity while cherishing diversity, that common action is possible despite the variety of races, interests, and beliefs we see here in this chamber. Progress and peace and justice are attainable. So we say to all peoples and governments: Let us fashion together a new world order."

    —Henry Kissinger, in address before the General Assembly of the United Nations, October 1975)
     

    The concept existed long before Bush the Elder popularized it. Kissinger has long been part of the "global governance" crowd. He was one of the founding members of the Trilateral Commission and is a Bilderberg insider. He's a swine. And you're a nitwit.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  266. @Stan Adams
    @International Jew

    It's possible, but I haven't been able to determine whether Rather ever interviewed Ford. I'll keep looking.

    Tom Brokaw was still the NBC White House correspondent at the time, so it made sense that he would have interviewed the sitting president.

    Dan Rather's tenure as CBS White House correspondent ended immediately after Nixon's resignation. He covered the presidency throughout the Johnson and Nixon years but was reassigned to the documentary unit after Ford took office. In the fall of '75 he joined 60 Minutes just as the program catapulted to the top of the ratings, giving his career a major boost.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    It was Tom Brokaw. Ron Nessen discusses the incident in passing in his memoir, as one of a series of incidents like this. Nessen said Ford was patient with this sort of thing. Ford’s problem was that he was unintelligent per se, but that he had no avocational interest in ideas; he was an athlete and that’s what he did with his free time. He had some biases as a Chamber-of-Commerce Republican from a 3d tier city, but really no ideology at all. Another problem was that he seemed to go into fugue states where he forgot what year it was. His WIN program seemed inspired by WWii era programs where people stockpiled scrap metal; it was irrelevant to its object and Alan Greenspan was most embarrassed. He also curried favor with liberal Republicans, putting Nelson Rockefeller and his retainers in charge of the domestic policy staff at the White House, not understanding that the segment in question was about to implode demographically. Rockefeller was 65 years old and had to be called out of retirement to take the VP slot; tapping him was plain strange.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @Art Deco

    Funny thing is, I recall reading an op-ed in the nyt 20 or 30 years ago, in which Brokaw confessed to being a poor student.

    , @David In TN
    @Art Deco

    Gerald Ford seems to have picked Rockefeller to please the establishment. Ford was heavily praised by the MSM of the time for it.

    Back to our previous exchange about Jules Witcover's aversion to George H.W. Bush, Witcover (in his book on the 1976 election) asserted that even far-right GOP politicos thought Bush was incompetent and preferred Rockefeller as VP to him.

    In Witcover's book (Germond was co-author) on the 1980 election, he was surprised when one of the people who disliked Bush in 1976 was supporting him for President in 1980.


  267. [MORE]

  268. @Anonymous
    Medical doctors have appropriated and monopolized the "Dr." title, so effectively that most people exclusively or mainly associate it with medicine. But the original use of the title was for people with doctoral degrees.

    The medical guild, especially when it was quite a dodgy profession with very poor standards which was the case until the 20th century, insisted on being called doctors as a PR move to make themselves look better and more authoritative. Technically though, the medical degree was not and still isn't a doctoral degree. This is obscured in the US because med students are required to have a separate bachelor's degree as a prerequisite. But in the UK, Canada, and most countries elsewhere, the medical degree is a bachelor's degree. You get a bachelor's degree in medicine, surgery, etc.

    In other words, medical doctors don't have doctoral degrees, and thus should not be called "doctors". They have bachelor's degrees. But they're members of a guild which successfully managed to usurp the label.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Art Deco, @for-the-record, @Ancient Briton

    In the UK, surgeons (Ch.B or B.S.) are called Mr. (see sgu.edu for background.)

  269. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon87

    Romney looks like the generic Presidential candidate whom Clint Eastwood saves from assassin John Malkovich in "In the Line of Fire."

    Replies: @Anon87

    And don’t forget which of those three was bald!

  270. @Anonymous
    @Art Deco

    You're describing medical degrees in the US. The point is that they're academically equivalent to bachelor's degrees. In the UK and many other countries, medical doctors and surgeons equivalent to those in the US have bachelor's degrees in medicine or surgery. They learn and train in the same things as American med students. They have identical curricula.

    In the US, instead of bachelor's degrees in medicine, med students earn doctor of medicine degrees, and they have to have a BA and some intro science courses as prerequisites. They're not academically equivalent to doctoral degrees.

    In the UK, the MD degree is more like a real doctoral degree. It's a postgraduate research degree in medicine. It is like a real PhD in science.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros, @Jon Orton

    The Bachelor of Architecture degree takes (or used to take) the same time as a ‘doctors’ Bachelor of Medicine degree ie 5 years academic study and two years internship.

    However as education became more of a business than a vocation, architectural schools in Europe and Oceania reduced the Bachelor degree to 3 years, giving a BA in ‘Architectural Studies’. Now 2 years post graduate study will give a ‘Masters’ in Architecture, which is the same thing as the old B.Arch.

    Just more smoke and mirrors flim flammery from university administrators to induce students into university. But very confusing for the general public which gets duped into thinking that the 3 year degree holder is an Architect, when that’s not true.

  271. @Up2Drew
    @RichardTaylor

    I worked construction jobs in the summer while going to college, and a couple years after, when the job market was pretty lousy in the early 80's. The crews rode me like a mule ("college boy, huh?") until I proved I could keep my mouth shut and give a solid 40 hours of work with the best of them. Not only was bluntness, and one's ability to deal with bluntness, a necessity - fistfights between bosses and subordinates were not uncommon.

    When I think back on that now after thirty years in corporate America ... the microaggressions that now result in a visit to the HR office, end your employment, ruin your career ... it seems so incredible that you once had to stand your ground and make the best of a situation for yourself.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    I remember when I worked at a municipal water purification plant, a memo went out saying, “There is no good reason for a superior to strike a subordinate, except in self defense.”

  272. @Nathan
    @Peter D. Bredon

    "In a truly cultured nation, such as pre-War II Germany"

    Oh, shut up! Just shut up! I'm so sick of all the fetishizing of those sweet, saintly and oh-so-cultured Germans. Have you lived in Germany? Sprechen sie Deutsch? No??

    For your information, we owe all of this absurd degree and title inflation to the Germans and Johns Hopkins adopting their Ph.D system. The English didn't have them. Did that stop James Clerk Maxwell, Charles Darwin, or Newton? What a joke- Sir Isaac Newton, Ph.D!! Ha! But you don't know any of that because you bought into all of the dumb Unz Review German propaganda.

    "I think the Ph.D system is an abomination." -Freeman Dyson

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    Ich habe in Deutschland gewohnt.

    Das deutsche Hochschule System ist ein gutes System für Deutsche.

  273. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    flying to the defence of Dr. New-World-Order

    A phrase which wasn't current until about 15 years after he left office. You might try criticizing something he did do or did not do rather than slime him as a 'war criminal'. Kissinger was (and I believe still is) and advocate of cautious reasons-of-state oriented foreign policy. Not sure why that puts a burr in your tailpipe.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    You would defend Kissinger, you supercilious humbug.

    A phrase which wasn’t current until about 15 years after he left office.

    From whom do you think George Bush learned it?

    “My country’s history, Mr. President, tells us that it is possible to fashion unity while cherishing diversity, that common action is possible despite the variety of races, interests, and beliefs we see here in this chamber. Progress and peace and justice are attainable. So we say to all peoples and governments: Let us fashion together a new world order.”

    —Henry Kissinger, in address before the General Assembly of the United Nations, October 1975)

    The concept existed long before Bush the Elder popularized it. Kissinger has long been part of the “global governance” crowd. He was one of the founding members of the Trilateral Commission and is a Bilderberg insider. He’s a swine. And you’re a nitwit.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    The concept existed long before Bush the Elder popularized it. Kissinger has long been part of the “global governance” crowd. He was one of the founding members of the Trilateral Commission and is a Bilderberg insider. He’s a swine. And you’re a nitwit.

    I may be a nitwit, but, unlike Andrew Bacevich (and, apparently, you), my mental decline hasn't advanced to the point where I mistake public addresses at ceremonial occasions for inter-office memoranda or where I take the political fantasies of the John Birch Society seriously. (You forgot the Council on Foreign Relations).


    I wasn't aware that Kissinger had joined United World Federalists; I doubt he was either. He seems here to be at peace with Brexit

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jun/27/henry-kissinger-says-brexit-will-bring-britain-closer-to-the-us

    So, if 'global governance' is on his wish list, it's for the Keynesian long run, when we are all dead.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  274. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    I don’t believe that Martin Borman or Alfred Rosenberg ever commanded any soldiers either, and yet the Nuremberg tribunal saw fit to label them as War Criminals.

    They also tried the former director of the central bank, who spent the last years of the regime in a concentration camp. Another defendant was some random dude who worked in the propaganda ministry. Another was a navy admiral accused of 'waging aggressive war'. Your point is what, that prosecutors at Nuremberg brought humbug charges against a mess of people, ergo you get to say any nonsensical thing you care to?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Your point is what, that prosecutors at Nuremberg brought humbug charges against a mess of people, ergo you get to say any nonsensical thing you care to?

    Kissinger was an instrument in carrying out a lot of the American Empire’s dirty work. That was my point, you ridiculous clown.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Kissinger was an instrument in carrying out a lot of the American Empire’s dirty work.

    There isn't any empire, and the dirty work is of the banal sort any country of consequence in international relations will undertake. (And, no, he wasn't an instrument of that either. The intelligence agency he supervised as about 300 employees and uses public-source data for its analyses).

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  275. @Abolish_public_education
    @TTSSYF

    I once met a FedEx driver who claimed to hold a PhD in English Lit.

    Possible. We discussed Rand.

    Replies: @black sea

    I used to know a guy who was a professor of English. When he was offered his first tenure-track job, he was working as a diesel mechanic in New Mexico. He said it was sort of a toss-up as to which job he preferred.

  276. @Art Deco
    @Stan Adams

    It was Tom Brokaw. Ron Nessen discusses the incident in passing in his memoir, as one of a series of incidents like this. Nessen said Ford was patient with this sort of thing. Ford's problem was that he was unintelligent per se, but that he had no avocational interest in ideas; he was an athlete and that's what he did with his free time. He had some biases as a Chamber-of-Commerce Republican from a 3d tier city, but really no ideology at all. Another problem was that he seemed to go into fugue states where he forgot what year it was. His WIN program seemed inspired by WWii era programs where people stockpiled scrap metal; it was irrelevant to its object and Alan Greenspan was most embarrassed. He also curried favor with liberal Republicans, putting Nelson Rockefeller and his retainers in charge of the domestic policy staff at the White House, not understanding that the segment in question was about to implode demographically. Rockefeller was 65 years old and had to be called out of retirement to take the VP slot; tapping him was plain strange.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN

    Funny thing is, I recall reading an op-ed in the nyt 20 or 30 years ago, in which Brokaw confessed to being a poor student.

  277. @Mr McKenna
    @Anonymous


    University of Pennsylvania students, who are affiliated with a “marginal" Ivy League school, use the word Ivy to describe their school more than Harvard students do.
     
    Would you believe that this (somewhat outdated) stereotype has been called anti-semitic? (Not the use of the Ivy affiliation but the notion that Penn is substandard.)

    Replies: @black sea, @Abolish_public_education, @Old and Grumpy, @International Jew

    Back in the day (I’m Steve’s age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn. But that was before the tsunami of talented Chinese and Indian kids. Penn is more selective now, than Yale was back in ’76.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @International Jew

    Back in the day (I’m Steve’s age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn.

    It wasn't.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @International Jew


    Art Deco says:

    Back in the day (I’m Steve’s age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn.
     
    It wasn’t.
     
    I guess we now know where old Art went to school.
  278. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    You would defend Kissinger, you supercilious humbug.


    A phrase which wasn’t current until about 15 years after he left office.
     
    From whom do you think George Bush learned it?

    "My country's history, Mr. President, tells us that it is possible to fashion unity while cherishing diversity, that common action is possible despite the variety of races, interests, and beliefs we see here in this chamber. Progress and peace and justice are attainable. So we say to all peoples and governments: Let us fashion together a new world order."

    —Henry Kissinger, in address before the General Assembly of the United Nations, October 1975)
     

    The concept existed long before Bush the Elder popularized it. Kissinger has long been part of the "global governance" crowd. He was one of the founding members of the Trilateral Commission and is a Bilderberg insider. He's a swine. And you're a nitwit.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The concept existed long before Bush the Elder popularized it. Kissinger has long been part of the “global governance” crowd. He was one of the founding members of the Trilateral Commission and is a Bilderberg insider. He’s a swine. And you’re a nitwit.

    I may be a nitwit, but, unlike Andrew Bacevich (and, apparently, you), my mental decline hasn’t advanced to the point where I mistake public addresses at ceremonial occasions for inter-office memoranda or where I take the political fantasies of the John Birch Society seriously. (You forgot the Council on Foreign Relations).

    I wasn’t aware that Kissinger had joined United World Federalists; I doubt he was either. He seems here to be at peace with Brexit

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jun/27/henry-kissinger-says-brexit-will-bring-britain-closer-to-the-us

    So, if ‘global governance’ is on his wish list, it’s for the Keynesian long run, when we are all dead.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    I may be a nitwit,......
     
    You are. And you have already been proven wrong about the phrase "new world order".

    ...............or where I take the political fantasies of the John Birch Society seriously
     
    .

    So just what do these supra-national groups like Bilderberg, the Trilateral Commission, and WEF exist for? What goes on at these confabs where the wealthy, powerful, and influential meet, mostly in secret?

    It is perhaps unsurprising that an insignificant nobody like you - an annoying, socially inept internet pedant - thinks that the global overclass are as motiveless and un-enterprising as you yourself are.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  279. @International Jew
    @Mr McKenna

    Back in the day (I'm Steve's age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn. But that was before the tsunami of talented Chinese and Indian kids. Penn is more selective now, than Yale was back in '76.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    Back in the day (I’m Steve’s age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn.

    It wasn’t.

  280. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    Your point is what, that prosecutors at Nuremberg brought humbug charges against a mess of people, ergo you get to say any nonsensical thing you care to?
     
    Kissinger was an instrument in carrying out a lot of the American Empire's dirty work. That was my point, you ridiculous clown.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Kissinger was an instrument in carrying out a lot of the American Empire’s dirty work.

    There isn’t any empire, and the dirty work is of the banal sort any country of consequence in international relations will undertake. (And, no, he wasn’t an instrument of that either. The intelligence agency he supervised as about 300 employees and uses public-source data for its analyses).

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    There isn’t any empire,.......
     
    Of course there is, you stupid twit.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  281. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    The concept existed long before Bush the Elder popularized it. Kissinger has long been part of the “global governance” crowd. He was one of the founding members of the Trilateral Commission and is a Bilderberg insider. He’s a swine. And you’re a nitwit.

    I may be a nitwit, but, unlike Andrew Bacevich (and, apparently, you), my mental decline hasn't advanced to the point where I mistake public addresses at ceremonial occasions for inter-office memoranda or where I take the political fantasies of the John Birch Society seriously. (You forgot the Council on Foreign Relations).


    I wasn't aware that Kissinger had joined United World Federalists; I doubt he was either. He seems here to be at peace with Brexit

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jun/27/henry-kissinger-says-brexit-will-bring-britain-closer-to-the-us

    So, if 'global governance' is on his wish list, it's for the Keynesian long run, when we are all dead.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I may be a nitwit,……

    You are. And you have already been proven wrong about the phrase “new world order”.

    ……………or where I take the political fantasies of the John Birch Society seriously

    .

    So just what do these supra-national groups like Bilderberg, the Trilateral Commission, and WEF exist for? What goes on at these confabs where the wealthy, powerful, and influential meet, mostly in secret?

    It is perhaps unsurprising that an insignificant nobody like you – an annoying, socially inept internet pedant – thinks that the global overclass are as motiveless and un-enterprising as you yourself are.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    So just what do these supra-national groups like Bilderberg, the Trilateral Commission, and WEF exist for? What goes on at these confabs where the wealthy, powerful, and influential meet, mostly in secret?

    I'm not curious about other people's discussion circles. I'm curious about what they actually do. Kissinger has (bar a brief period ca. 1983) been out of office for more than 40 years.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  282. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Kissinger was an instrument in carrying out a lot of the American Empire’s dirty work.

    There isn't any empire, and the dirty work is of the banal sort any country of consequence in international relations will undertake. (And, no, he wasn't an instrument of that either. The intelligence agency he supervised as about 300 employees and uses public-source data for its analyses).

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    There isn’t any empire,…….

    Of course there is, you stupid twit.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    No there isn't. IR faculty bandy about terms like 'imperialism' and 'informal empire' as self-aggrandizing exercises. Manufacturing useless terms of art are what faculty do. These notions are half-baked and properly ignored.

  283. @International Jew
    @Mr McKenna

    Back in the day (I'm Steve's age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn. But that was before the tsunami of talented Chinese and Indian kids. Penn is more selective now, than Yale was back in '76.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    Art Deco says:

    Back in the day (I’m Steve’s age) it was pretty easy to get into Penn.

    It wasn’t.

    I guess we now know where old Art went to school.

  284. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    I may be a nitwit,......
     
    You are. And you have already been proven wrong about the phrase "new world order".

    ...............or where I take the political fantasies of the John Birch Society seriously
     
    .

    So just what do these supra-national groups like Bilderberg, the Trilateral Commission, and WEF exist for? What goes on at these confabs where the wealthy, powerful, and influential meet, mostly in secret?

    It is perhaps unsurprising that an insignificant nobody like you - an annoying, socially inept internet pedant - thinks that the global overclass are as motiveless and un-enterprising as you yourself are.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    So just what do these supra-national groups like Bilderberg, the Trilateral Commission, and WEF exist for? What goes on at these confabs where the wealthy, powerful, and influential meet, mostly in secret?

    I’m not curious about other people’s discussion circles. I’m curious about what they actually do. Kissinger has (bar a brief period ca. 1983) been out of office for more than 40 years.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    I’m not curious about other people’s discussion circles. I’m curious about what they actually do.
     
    Actually, you could have stopped with "I'm not curious". You display the typical incuriosity of a dullard.

    What they actually do is implement the policies that they actually discuss.

    Kissinger has (bar a brief period ca. 1983) been out of office for more than 40 years.
     
    As if only office-holders have power and influence.

    You are a blathering idiot.
  285. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    There isn’t any empire,.......
     
    Of course there is, you stupid twit.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    No there isn’t. IR faculty bandy about terms like ‘imperialism’ and ‘informal empire’ as self-aggrandizing exercises. Manufacturing useless terms of art are what faculty do. These notions are half-baked and properly ignored.

  286. @Art Deco
    @Stan Adams

    It was Tom Brokaw. Ron Nessen discusses the incident in passing in his memoir, as one of a series of incidents like this. Nessen said Ford was patient with this sort of thing. Ford's problem was that he was unintelligent per se, but that he had no avocational interest in ideas; he was an athlete and that's what he did with his free time. He had some biases as a Chamber-of-Commerce Republican from a 3d tier city, but really no ideology at all. Another problem was that he seemed to go into fugue states where he forgot what year it was. His WIN program seemed inspired by WWii era programs where people stockpiled scrap metal; it was irrelevant to its object and Alan Greenspan was most embarrassed. He also curried favor with liberal Republicans, putting Nelson Rockefeller and his retainers in charge of the domestic policy staff at the White House, not understanding that the segment in question was about to implode demographically. Rockefeller was 65 years old and had to be called out of retirement to take the VP slot; tapping him was plain strange.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix, @David In TN

    Gerald Ford seems to have picked Rockefeller to please the establishment. Ford was heavily praised by the MSM of the time for it.

    Back to our previous exchange about Jules Witcover’s aversion to George H.W. Bush, Witcover (in his book on the 1976 election) asserted that even far-right GOP politicos thought Bush was incompetent and preferred Rockefeller as VP to him.

    In Witcover’s book (Germond was co-author) on the 1980 election, he was surprised when one of the people who disliked Bush in 1976 was supporting him for President in 1980.

  287. @Nicholas Stix
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Unless things changed radically since I left Germany, they don't have a bachelor's degree. In anything.

    Replies: @Dacian Julien Soros

    Medical school is 6 years in Germany and Romania, starting after 12 years of primary and secondary (that is, near-universal) schooling.

    In Europe, after the Bologna process, a doctoral degree requires 8 years of tertiary school (3 of college, 2 of masters, 3 of doctoral school), which is way more than the 6 above. Hence, like everywhere, an European medical doctor is really one of the least doctor-y doctors. The easiest way to join the Bologna process and to keep medical education as is is to place medical schools outside the system.

    In US, physicians spend 4 years in college and 4 years in medical school. Longer than a German physician, but again, shorter than a science doctorate in US (or anywhere outside the Bologna process).

    Germany and Russia have a second doctoral level (Habilitation), because the 3+2+3 system of Bologna is not enough for developing independent scientists.

    It’s easy to understand why school takes longer in US when you recall that Jill Biden teaches “remedial writing” in college. Apparently, Americans can go to uni without being able to write, and without bothering to learn the esoteric skill outside the uni system.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    In Sweden, physician is an undergraduate degree that, I think, still gets the MD. The students afterwards get to specialize in the clinics for a few years more. I don't really see the point of a US doc needing a long and possibly unrelated undergrad before going to med school so this seems sound to me.

    By the way, here is a somewhat interesting (undramatic but sufficiently witty) diary on going through a US med school: http://fifthchance.com/MedicalSchool2020

    , @Twinkie
    @Dacian Julien Soros


    In US, physicians spend 4 years in college and 4 years in medical school. Longer than a German physician, but again, shorter than a science doctorate in US (or anywhere outside the Bologna process).
     
    Yes, but that doctorate in the U.S. means very little until the freshly minted M.D. has competed an internship and a residency program, which are minimum 1+3 years.

    So in reality, a fully practicing M.D. that passed the board certification tests (which most healthcare facilities require), has gone through 4 years of undergraduate education, 4 years of medical school, and 4 years of internship/residency, a total of 12 years of higher education.
  288. The author of the article was once a lecturer at Northwestern. Even though he hasn’t been there in 17 years and doesn’t claim any affiliation with the university, they felt the need to chime in.

    The key sentence:

    Northwestern is firmly committed to equity, diversity and inclusion, and strongly disagrees with Mr. Epstein’s misogynistic views.

    I don’t know how this turned into a DIE issue. Also, criticism of a woman isn’t misogynistic per se.

    https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2020/12/joseph-epstein-statement&fj=1

  289. @Polynices
    Doctor is appropriate for PhDs in a professional setting but dumb to use in public. Plus everyone knows that EdDs are joke degrees that don't count as a real doctorate.

    Replies: @David In TN, @Crouchback

    At my university we joke that acquiring the EdD means an automatic loss of 10 IQ points.

  290. @Anonymous
    @Art Deco

    No, of course it is not a standard. Quite the contrary - in fields where brains matter, nobody pays any attention that one went through the motions of getting a PhD. It is universally understood that it's a formal requirement in career advance, that's all.

    In my >30 years as a PhD nobody ever called me Dr other than in jest, nor I have ever heard any of my peers referring to themselves as Drs. Pretty much the same as no sane lawyer (Juris Doctor) insists on being called Dr.

    And Jill Biden is an Ed.D - that's got to as big a joke as all those "doctors" in women and race studies.

    Replies: @Crouchback

    There may be a regional difference at play here. When I was on the East Coast professors were typically addressed at “Professor,” but in the middle of the country “Dr.” is common.

    I agree that Ed.D. is a joke.

  291. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    So just what do these supra-national groups like Bilderberg, the Trilateral Commission, and WEF exist for? What goes on at these confabs where the wealthy, powerful, and influential meet, mostly in secret?

    I'm not curious about other people's discussion circles. I'm curious about what they actually do. Kissinger has (bar a brief period ca. 1983) been out of office for more than 40 years.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I’m not curious about other people’s discussion circles. I’m curious about what they actually do.

    Actually, you could have stopped with “I’m not curious”. You display the typical incuriosity of a dullard.

    What they actually do is implement the policies that they actually discuss.

    Kissinger has (bar a brief period ca. 1983) been out of office for more than 40 years.

    As if only office-holders have power and influence.

    You are a blathering idiot.

  292. @Hibernian
    @ScarletNumber

    I graduated from a respectable state co-flagship school in chemical engineering. You routinely engage in the kind of snobbery that is characteristic of the Left, although that does not make you a Leftist. My school (Iowa State) is not in the same category as HYP, but a respectable case can be made that it is not as far behind as is widely assumed.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Pericles

    The top universities recruit the top students and most promising faculty, so they have a human capital advantage. (Though it seems that Harvard mainly buys the top free agents, er professors, rather than drafting and raising faculty internally.)

    However, it also seems like HYP are living off their brands to a considerable extent. Not necessarily just the soft undergrad, which the students seem to take far more seriously than the universities themselves, if we consider the stories of exposed test cheaters. These universities probably need to instill from the start that the imprimatur is what is important (cf. Yale Law).

    Since I’ve already gone after HY, I’d here like to mention the laughable negronic PhD thesis that was approved by Princeton Math. You can do that once or twice in living memory but not too routinely, or you’ll end up like Sorbonne, a tattered shadow of former glories. (As I remember it, famous Sorbonne was turned into an open admissions university by some French university reform, so now just the name sort of remains.)

  293. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Nicholas Stix

    Medical school is 6 years in Germany and Romania, starting after 12 years of primary and secondary (that is, near-universal) schooling.

    In Europe, after the Bologna process, a doctoral degree requires 8 years of tertiary school (3 of college, 2 of masters, 3 of doctoral school), which is way more than the 6 above. Hence, like everywhere, an European medical doctor is really one of the least doctor-y doctors. The easiest way to join the Bologna process and to keep medical education as is is to place medical schools outside the system.

    In US, physicians spend 4 years in college and 4 years in medical school. Longer than a German physician, but again, shorter than a science doctorate in US (or anywhere outside the Bologna process).

    Germany and Russia have a second doctoral level (Habilitation), because the 3+2+3 system of Bologna is not enough for developing independent scientists.

    It's easy to understand why school takes longer in US when you recall that Jill Biden teaches "remedial writing" in college. Apparently, Americans can go to uni without being able to write, and without bothering to learn the esoteric skill outside the uni system.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Twinkie

    In Sweden, physician is an undergraduate degree that, I think, still gets the MD. The students afterwards get to specialize in the clinics for a few years more. I don’t really see the point of a US doc needing a long and possibly unrelated undergrad before going to med school so this seems sound to me.

    By the way, here is a somewhat interesting (undramatic but sufficiently witty) diary on going through a US med school: http://fifthchance.com/MedicalSchool2020

  294. @Chrisnonymous
    @Twinkie

    You should appreciate that the biggest joke is the martial arts instructors who refer to themselves as "professor", like in http://www.karaho.com

    " Professor Chow's Chinese Kara-ho Kempo Karate".

    LOL

    Replies: @Twinkie

    You should appreciate that the biggest joke is the martial arts instructors who refer to themselves as “professor”

    I don’t think that’s a joke, because it is specifically a cultural thing in Brazil (hence Brazilian Jiujitsu instructors – so long as they are black belts – are addressed as “professor”). But I have never encountered a non-BJJ art that uses that term.

    What’s really a joke is a title inflation in martial arts in general. I am okay with a high level instructor being called a “master” (from the East Asian tradition), but then there are “grand masters” these days. What’s next, “great grand master”? “Ultimate great grand master”?

    I say keep it simple: “professor” in BJJ, “sensei” in Judo, and “master” in TKD and “sifu” in Kung Fu, and “guro” in Kali, etc. No adjectives (“grand,” etc.). Or you could just go “California vibe” and call each other by first names (or “Coach” so and so) so long as the senior instructor is okay with it. To me, attitudes of the students and their receptivity to instruction have mattered much more than how they address me (whenever I have taught – though these day I only teach and coach my own children).

  295. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Nicholas Stix

    Medical school is 6 years in Germany and Romania, starting after 12 years of primary and secondary (that is, near-universal) schooling.

    In Europe, after the Bologna process, a doctoral degree requires 8 years of tertiary school (3 of college, 2 of masters, 3 of doctoral school), which is way more than the 6 above. Hence, like everywhere, an European medical doctor is really one of the least doctor-y doctors. The easiest way to join the Bologna process and to keep medical education as is is to place medical schools outside the system.

    In US, physicians spend 4 years in college and 4 years in medical school. Longer than a German physician, but again, shorter than a science doctorate in US (or anywhere outside the Bologna process).

    Germany and Russia have a second doctoral level (Habilitation), because the 3+2+3 system of Bologna is not enough for developing independent scientists.

    It's easy to understand why school takes longer in US when you recall that Jill Biden teaches "remedial writing" in college. Apparently, Americans can go to uni without being able to write, and without bothering to learn the esoteric skill outside the uni system.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Twinkie

    In US, physicians spend 4 years in college and 4 years in medical school. Longer than a German physician, but again, shorter than a science doctorate in US (or anywhere outside the Bologna process).

    Yes, but that doctorate in the U.S. means very little until the freshly minted M.D. has competed an internship and a residency program, which are minimum 1+3 years.

    So in reality, a fully practicing M.D. that passed the board certification tests (which most healthcare facilities require), has gone through 4 years of undergraduate education, 4 years of medical school, and 4 years of internship/residency, a total of 12 years of higher education.

    • Agree: Hibernian

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