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From the New York Times news section:

Journalists Rebel at NewsNation, a Newcomer in Cable News

I only watch the World Series, the Super Bowl, major golf championships, and local riots on TV, so I never heard of NewsNation, but apparently it’s a cable news network that is attempting to be what CNN used to be:

Two top editors at the channel’s new prime-time newscast resigned amid staff complaints of a right-wing tilt and concern over the involvement of the former Fox News chief Bill Shine.

By Katie Robertson
March 7, 2021

Last summer, a staff of more than 150 people started putting together “NewsNation,” a three-hour prime-time cable news show that was billed as a throwback to the just-the-facts news programs of TV’s golden age. Unlike the prime-time shows on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC filled with partisan monologues and fiery discussions, “NewsNation” would serve up unbiased news reports in a straightforward manner.

But now, six months after its debut, “NewsNation” has abysmal ratings and disaffected staff members who say it has not lived up to Mr. Compton’s billing. In recent weeks, the news director and managing editor have resigned. Six people at the network, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to reveal internal discussions, said “NewsNation” has increasingly become a venue for right-wing views. …

Staff members were also critical of a Feb. 3 appearance by Bo Dietl, a former New York Police Department detective and conservative pundit. Mr. Dietl appeared on “NewsNation” to comment on the fatal shooting of two F.B.I. agents in Florida. After a discussion of the case, Mr. Donlon, the anchor, asked Mr. Dietl why the murder rate had risen in some American cities. “It’s very simple,” Mr. Dietl said. “It’s the political liberal Democratic values that are being forced upon us.”

How dare this view be allowed on the air. Everybody knows that the huge increase in murders following George Floyd’s death on Memorial Day was a delayed reaction to covid and had nothing to do with the media-declared “racial reckoning.”

 
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  1. Bo Dietl is my type of guy. Old School Non Woke New York City Italian. Even though he is law enforcement he talks like a Wise Guy busting balls!

    • Replies: @lysias
    @Luzzatto

    Italian? Dietl looks like a German name.

  2. Sorry Steve, you probably already covered this somewhere, but I couldn’t find it in the archives.

    Who originated the description of last year’s events as a “racial reckoning”. I see a lot of journalists (a.k.a. leftists political agents) using the term, and you started using it, usually within quotation marks, last August, but where did it come from originally, or at least who has most promoted it as the justification for Burn Loot Murder?

    Thanks.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Almost Missouri

    Good questions.

  3. “NewsNation” would serve up unbiased news reports in a straightforward manner…

    Six people at the network, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to reveal internal discussions, said “NewsNation” has increasingly become a venue for right-wing views. …

    What was the old saying about how facts have some sort of bias? And speaking of, six anonymous sources said what? How many again?

  4. … a cable news network that is attempting to be what CNN used to be…

    Did the change at CNN happen right after Ted Turner mixed his network in with AOL Time Warner? That’s what it seems like. He is a “progresive” nut, but the ruination of his teevee project seemed to correlate with that merger.

    Nevermind the idiotic AOL angle to that deal. Anybody remember AOL?

    Or did Jane Fonda have something to do with it?

    Anyway, CNN seemed like a good idea when he started it. It had a “golden age” itself. It’s a shame it somehow disappeared and got absorbed by The Borg.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, I don't know about the mergers and all that, but here's the deal as far as I recall with the evolution of CNN:

    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch "the national news" at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day's slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    The latter would really piss people off, because when you missed 7 full minutes of Maude for some Guyanan murder/suicide story, you'd have to wait 1/2 a year for the reruns to find out what funny line she said to Walter and whether you missed some cleavage of their show-daughter.. Bastards!

    I'm pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn't have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don't know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You've got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Known Fact, @Inquiring Mind

    , @128
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How can a progressive nut produce a pro-Southern film like Gods and Generals or Gettysburg?

    Replies: @meh, @J.Ross

    , @Neuday
    @Buzz Mohawk

    CNN wasn't "absorbed by the borg", it was actively subverted.

    CNN launched in 1980 but the big break happened during the first Gulf War when they broadcasted front-line coverage and lots of it. Ted Turner stepped down in 1989 just prior to that war, and in 1990 they hired as President Tom Johnson, a former publisher of the L.A. Times and who, before that, was a flunkie of LBJ. I recall Rush Limbaugh calling it the Clinton News Network during the early 90's.

    Here's some more about Tom Johnson, from wikipedia:
    On the evening of April 4, 1968, it was Tom Johnson who walked into the Oval Office to hand President Johnson the news that Martin Luther King Jr. had been shot (it would be another hour before doctors in Memphis, Tennessee declared King dead). In the Oval Office with President Johnson at the time were former Georgia Governor Carl Sanders and former Coca-Cola CEO (and still a Board Member) Robert W. Woodruff.

    I kept that part about the Coca-Cola CEO as I'm trying to be more White.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

  5. Well, their ratings are low because I just now heard about it. I am going to take a look.

  6. “Everybody knows that the huge increase in murders following George Floyd’s death on Memorial Day was a delayed reaction to covid ”

    I have an idea, if coroners would start categorizing fatal gunshot wounds as “death from covid”, well by golly, we could eliminate gun related murders in the US altogether! I mean, it worked for heart disease, influenza, motorcycle accidents…

    Non fatal GSW could be counted as covid cases, which would do two things: Eliminate gun crime altogether, and increase the TFR for the covid! Who’s tired of all this winning??

  7. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... a cable news network that is attempting to be what CNN used to be...
     
    Did the change at CNN happen right after Ted Turner mixed his network in with AOL Time Warner? That's what it seems like. He is a "progresive" nut, but the ruination of his teevee project seemed to correlate with that merger.

    Nevermind the idiotic AOL angle to that deal. Anybody remember AOL?

    Or did Jane Fonda have something to do with it?

    Anyway, CNN seemed like a good idea when he started it. It had a "golden age" itself. It's a shame it somehow disappeared and got absorbed by The Borg.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @128, @Neuday

    Buzz, I don’t know about the mergers and all that, but here’s the deal as far as I recall with the evolution of CNN:

    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch “the national news” at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day’s slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    The latter would really piss people off, because when you missed 7 full minutes of Maude for some Guyanan murder/suicide story, you’d have to wait 1/2 a year for the reruns to find out what funny line she said to Walter and whether you missed some cleavage of their show-daughter.. Bastards!

    I’m pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn’t have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don’t know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You’ve got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Achmed E. Newman


    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch “the national news” at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day’s slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    * * *
    I’m pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn’t have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don’t know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You’ve got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.
     
    CNN seemed to make its bones during the first Gulf War when its coverage was more or less on par with that of the three major networks. It derived credibility that way, and wasn't viewed as a far second tier for news coverage after.

    I think the issue is that the CNN model lasted only as long as the internet was a hobby for weirdos. When the internet really took off as a mainstream tool used by average Americans to access information they didn't need to tune in to CNN to get the national news in a half hour segment anymore. You could go to a splash page and click the links that caught your attention and ignore that which didn't catch your attention. As the speed and coverage of internet service improved and you could view video online quickly the internet was able to utterly cannibalize broadcast/cable news.

    I think you are on to something in the infotainment analysis - they're under pressure to gain eyeballs and the best way for the cable networks to do this is to create the news and package it in a way that is compelling and dramatic. What came to mind as an early example of this prior to internet dominance was the baby Jessica who fell down the well. By any objective measure it wasn't a nationally newsworthy story but it was something that the "news" could serialize and exploit for dramatic effect.

    Replies: @Luzzatto, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Sam Malone

    , @Known Fact
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Other media pioneers of that era morphed and mutated much like CNN.

    -- ESPN found they couldn't fill 24/7 with actual sports events so they had to branch out into sports talk and "opinion," which of course trended left.

    -- USA Today was expressly created by the powerful Al Neuharth to play things down the middle, just the facts ma'am, but likewise drifted far left after he was gone. (Notice how I'm using USA Today-style bullet points here!)

    See Conquest's 2nd Law -- any organization that is not expressly hard-conservative eventually mutates toward liberalism. And journalism's changing demographics make this impossible to avoid.

    , @Inquiring Mind
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The break-in coverage of the car crash that took Diana Spencer's life was such a disruption.

    I was watching "The Cape", a drama staring Corbin Bernsen from LA Law as the Chief NASA astronaut.

    Corbin Bernsen was on the Shuttle trying to dock with the Space Station when his Russian astronaut counterpart went bonkers and crashed the docking arm into the tiles on the Shuttle.

    I never did find out the conclusion to this cliff-hanger episode on account of the Breaking Story coverage. If someone here was a fan of "The Cape", can you fill me in whether Bernsen was able to repair the Shuttle and land it safely? This information is not available online,

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  8. FYI: Bo Dietl is the personification of an illiterate NYC boobenheimer!

  9. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... a cable news network that is attempting to be what CNN used to be...
     
    Did the change at CNN happen right after Ted Turner mixed his network in with AOL Time Warner? That's what it seems like. He is a "progresive" nut, but the ruination of his teevee project seemed to correlate with that merger.

    Nevermind the idiotic AOL angle to that deal. Anybody remember AOL?

    Or did Jane Fonda have something to do with it?

    Anyway, CNN seemed like a good idea when he started it. It had a "golden age" itself. It's a shame it somehow disappeared and got absorbed by The Borg.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @128, @Neuday

    How can a progressive nut produce a pro-Southern film like Gods and Generals or Gettysburg?

    • Replies: @meh
    @128


    How can a progressive nut produce a pro-Southern film like Gods and Generals or Gettysburg?
     
    According to the wiki, Turner Entertainment/Turner Pictures was sold to Time Warner in 1996 (Gettysburg 1993, Gods and Generals 2003). And who knows how deeply involved in production decisions Ted Turner was, anyway, if at all.

    It's not as though progressive nuts can't also have counter-intuitive tribal prior loyalties however; consider the case of other progressive Southerners, like Woodrow Wilson.

    That's probably why a certain other tribe never trusted Ted Turner after they acquired his cable network, in spite of Ted Turner's quite well known progressive politics.

    Replies: @lysias

    , @J.Ross
    @128

    Name a progressive nut who doesn't have their private un-progressive delusion or who is actually consistent about being progressive. Turner is the textbook illustration of billionaire leftism, an exponent of corporate woke from before Occupy Wall Street. Leftism is billionaires using slogans and emotions to trick kids into embracing slavery to billionaires.

  10. anon[161] • Disclaimer says:

    Six people at the network, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to reveal internal discussions, said “NewsNation” has increasingly become a venue for right-wing views. …

    “Venue for right-wing views” is a phrase with pretty much no meaning.

    Anything that doesn’t match close to 100% with the Narrative is “far right”, ipso facto. That’s how a guy like Ted Geisel can be a liberal-lefty in the 1950’s and then a horrid rayciss 60+ years later…Narrative shift.

  11. “NewsNation” would serve up unbiased news reports in a straightforward manner.

    That right there is a sign of incipient white supremacy!

  12. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, I don't know about the mergers and all that, but here's the deal as far as I recall with the evolution of CNN:

    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch "the national news" at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day's slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    The latter would really piss people off, because when you missed 7 full minutes of Maude for some Guyanan murder/suicide story, you'd have to wait 1/2 a year for the reruns to find out what funny line she said to Walter and whether you missed some cleavage of their show-daughter.. Bastards!

    I'm pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn't have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don't know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You've got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Known Fact, @Inquiring Mind

    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch “the national news” at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day’s slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    * * *
    I’m pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn’t have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don’t know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You’ve got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.

    CNN seemed to make its bones during the first Gulf War when its coverage was more or less on par with that of the three major networks. It derived credibility that way, and wasn’t viewed as a far second tier for news coverage after.

    I think the issue is that the CNN model lasted only as long as the internet was a hobby for weirdos. When the internet really took off as a mainstream tool used by average Americans to access information they didn’t need to tune in to CNN to get the national news in a half hour segment anymore. You could go to a splash page and click the links that caught your attention and ignore that which didn’t catch your attention. As the speed and coverage of internet service improved and you could view video online quickly the internet was able to utterly cannibalize broadcast/cable news.

    I think you are on to something in the infotainment analysis – they’re under pressure to gain eyeballs and the best way for the cable networks to do this is to create the news and package it in a way that is compelling and dramatic. What came to mind as an early example of this prior to internet dominance was the baby Jessica who fell down the well. By any objective measure it wasn’t a nationally newsworthy story but it was something that the “news” could serialize and exploit for dramatic effect.

    • Replies: @Luzzatto
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    CNN is so Far Left that even their so-called token "Conservatives" like Ana Navarro and Rick Wilson for example are Far Left as well!

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    CNN seemed to make its bones during the first Gulf War when its coverage was more or less on par with that of the three major networks.
     
    CNN's First Gulf War coverage blew away the major networks.

    They're still coasting on their reputation from that era.
    , @Sam Malone
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    CNN hit the big time during its late 1990/early 1991 coverage of the Gulf War against Iraq, but maybe it didn’t entirely deserve to. I came across this strange footage a few years ago. They seem to have been staging/faking at least some of their coverage from the correspondents’ hotel, pretending to be very close to dangerous Scud missiles and possible gas attacks.

    There's a bit where the correspondent converses in real-time with an anchor in Atlanta, and I remember someone pointing out that this should have been impossible, since in 1990/1991 the gap between satellite transmissions that far away would have been a minute or more.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=isMtxbPdvzg&ab_channel=SageOfQuay

  13. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, I don't know about the mergers and all that, but here's the deal as far as I recall with the evolution of CNN:

    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch "the national news" at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day's slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    The latter would really piss people off, because when you missed 7 full minutes of Maude for some Guyanan murder/suicide story, you'd have to wait 1/2 a year for the reruns to find out what funny line she said to Walter and whether you missed some cleavage of their show-daughter.. Bastards!

    I'm pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn't have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don't know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You've got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Known Fact, @Inquiring Mind

    Other media pioneers of that era morphed and mutated much like CNN.

    — ESPN found they couldn’t fill 24/7 with actual sports events so they had to branch out into sports talk and “opinion,” which of course trended left.

    — USA Today was expressly created by the powerful Al Neuharth to play things down the middle, just the facts ma’am, but likewise drifted far left after he was gone. (Notice how I’m using USA Today-style bullet points here!)

    See Conquest’s 2nd Law — any organization that is not expressly hard-conservative eventually mutates toward liberalism. And journalism’s changing demographics make this impossible to avoid.

  14. I only watch the World Series, the Super Bowl, major golf championships, and local riots on TV….

    Perhaps ESPN should include rioting among the sports they cover.

    Or there could be a dedicated cable network to cover “mostly peaceful protests”.

    The Riot & Urban Insurrection Network: RUIN

    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @Mr. Anon


    Perhaps ESPN should include rioting among the sports they cover.
     
    If ESPN doesn't do it the second tier cable sports network (if it exists) absolutely should do this. If people could get famous enough torching cop cars with molatov cocktails to get nike endorsement contracts you could create a bonafide business model out of it. Kind of like Hunger Games except de-fanged a little bit.
  15. Somewhat OT, but what’s the deal with OAN news reporters? Why are some of them young enough to be considered a prime candidate to mow my lawn? And why is there such a turnover of these kids? Are they fresh from the journalism department at San Diego U? Then they eagerly take their first job, to later realize their first job may ensure they never work in journalism again, so they vamooski?

    Or is it just that OAN doesn’t pay well? I had a friend who read the news and was one of the anchors for a station out by Lancaster, CA, and was amazed to find out their lead anchor was making $18 an hour!

    I said, “so you create your own news copy, you also go out in the field to report on local happenings, you self-produce those reports. You could author a report on an issue that could remove the Mayor, and you make less than a manager at McDonald’s?! Apparently, that’s the case everywhere outside of major markets.

    Anyway, does anyone have any details of OAN’s hiring procedures.

    Who the hell ARE these damned kids?!

    These CONSERVATIVE damned kids, mind you!

  16. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... a cable news network that is attempting to be what CNN used to be...
     
    Did the change at CNN happen right after Ted Turner mixed his network in with AOL Time Warner? That's what it seems like. He is a "progresive" nut, but the ruination of his teevee project seemed to correlate with that merger.

    Nevermind the idiotic AOL angle to that deal. Anybody remember AOL?

    Or did Jane Fonda have something to do with it?

    Anyway, CNN seemed like a good idea when he started it. It had a "golden age" itself. It's a shame it somehow disappeared and got absorbed by The Borg.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @128, @Neuday

    CNN wasn’t “absorbed by the borg”, it was actively subverted.

    CNN launched in 1980 but the big break happened during the first Gulf War when they broadcasted front-line coverage and lots of it. Ted Turner stepped down in 1989 just prior to that war, and in 1990 they hired as President Tom Johnson, a former publisher of the L.A. Times and who, before that, was a flunkie of LBJ. I recall Rush Limbaugh calling it the Clinton News Network during the early 90’s.

    Here’s some more about Tom Johnson, from wikipedia:
    On the evening of April 4, 1968, it was Tom Johnson who walked into the Oval Office to hand President Johnson the news that Martin Luther King Jr. had been shot (it would be another hour before doctors in Memphis, Tennessee declared King dead). In the Oval Office with President Johnson at the time were former Georgia Governor Carl Sanders and former Coca-Cola CEO (and still a Board Member) Robert W. Woodruff.

    I kept that part about the Coca-Cola CEO as I’m trying to be more White.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Neuday

    "I kept that part about the Coca-Cola CEO as I’m trying to be more White."

    LOL

  17. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, I don't know about the mergers and all that, but here's the deal as far as I recall with the evolution of CNN:

    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch "the national news" at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day's slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    The latter would really piss people off, because when you missed 7 full minutes of Maude for some Guyanan murder/suicide story, you'd have to wait 1/2 a year for the reruns to find out what funny line she said to Walter and whether you missed some cleavage of their show-daughter.. Bastards!

    I'm pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn't have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don't know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You've got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Known Fact, @Inquiring Mind

    The break-in coverage of the car crash that took Diana Spencer’s life was such a disruption.

    I was watching “The Cape”, a drama staring Corbin Bernsen from LA Law as the Chief NASA astronaut.

    Corbin Bernsen was on the Shuttle trying to dock with the Space Station when his Russian astronaut counterpart went bonkers and crashed the docking arm into the tiles on the Shuttle.

    I never did find out the conclusion to this cliff-hanger episode on account of the Breaking Story coverage. If someone here was a fan of “The Cape”, can you fill me in whether Bernsen was able to repair the Shuttle and land it safely? This information is not available online,

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Inquiring Mind

    I.M., It's kind of coincidental that you mentioned the Diana thing, as I just commented on that here under the most recent unz J. Derbyshire post.

    I'll be glad to help you out on The Cape, though I've never heard of it. Corbin Bernsen is a White guy, right? Unless he had a black former LA Law partner as co-pilot of the shuttle to do an EVA with some JB Weld and duct tape to save the day, all involved died. You're welcome!

  18. The anchorman, Donlon, came from WGN Channel 9 in Chicago. WGN radio and tv is extremely woke. I would argue it’s the most woke of all Chicago media. Channel 9 will often lead off their newscast with an enlarged animated Covid virus accompanied by dramatic music.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @John Up North

    Ironically WGN was originally part of the Chicago Tribune media empire of the far right Colonel Mccormick.

    Replies: @John Up North

  19. After a discussion of the case, Mr. Donlon, the anchor, asked Mr. Dietl why the murder rate had risen in some American cities. “It’s very simple,” Mr. Dietl said. “It’s the political liberal Democratic values that are being forced upon us.”

    Many years ago, in S/E Washington DC, I received a call as a brand-new patrolman (white guy – grew up in a suburban area of a major county), for a ‘shots fired’ call at a low-rise apartment complex, slightly outside of my assigned patrol sector.

    This was before GPS, and my partner and I had to break out a paper map, and then consult a dispatcher, to even find the location. Upon my arrival, someone was firing what we later confirmed to be a .22 rifle out of a breezeway in the complex, but they stopped, and appear to have fled, as our squad arrived.

    Before I ever began to approach the building that the fire had originated from, I encountered the trash dumpster station in front of the building. What I saw was something that I recall vividly even today, and have never seen before, or since that time..

    Rats – literally hundreds of the largest Rats I have ever seen.. swarming like a singular mass all over this series of trash dumpsters – like a scene that you might have expected over the remains of the dead in the aftermath of WWI Trench warfare – however this was taking place not in a chaotic battle zone, but in a residential area (100% African American) located across the Anacostia from the seat of US Govt. Mind you.. the complainant never mentioned a plague of giant Rats in her call to Police, only the ongoing rifle fire.

    The .22 rifle shooter was not attempting to mow down passerby or engage in criminal activity, he was making a desperate attempt – alone – to diminish this swarm of vermin that had overtaken the commons area of this apartment complex. His rimfire casings walked back from the dumpster area onto the stairway, and up onto a breezeway as he retreated from the scene, likely as he heard the squad car approaching.

    In attempts to reach city govt to immediately seek a sanitation response, my dispatcher reported that she could not contact anyone in the appropriate chain of command, and suggested we drive out to the main roadway and wait for some passing sanitation truck, stop them, and basically hijack them into responding. We at one point even discussed setting the dumpster on fire ourselves, once it became clear no one was coming from Streets or Sanitation, but feared it would only disperse the swarm of gigantic rats toward the residences.

    The point is, something more is going on here, well beyond a simplistic adherence to deficient political ideology or party allegiance.

    To get to this point in the first place, multiple stages of complete failure, indifference and incompetence had to go unaddressed. This could not have been the first or a unique instance of encountering rats the size of a respectable Chihuahua in and around this location, but no one took any action or sought to address the problem, until it was completely out of control.

    The single individual who did attempt to control the vermin swarm, firing off a small caliber rifle in a dense urban area, made no significant impact with his chosen methodology, and apparently alarmed fellow residents more so than swarming rats taking over their communal refuse disposal area.

    In the world I grew up in, every dad in the complex would be out there cooperating to ensure that the swarm of vermin was eliminated, on their own initiative, if need be. In this housing complex, its highly unlikely that most households even had a dad resident in the apartment. At no point did even one resident of this complex approach my partner or I to offer any information or seek some solution, leaving us to figure out a public health and safety crisis that we had no resources to address.

    Everyone appears to have waited for someone else to do something, well past the point that the health and safety of the community was already compromised. While this incompetence / disinterest was also reflected in the municipal response, it could not have began or maintained itself without the complicity of every individual who could have done something, but chose not to.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Trial by Wombat


    In the world I grew up in, every dad in the complex would be out there cooperating to ensure that the swarm of vermin was eliminated, on their own initiative, if need be.
     
    White people would use their innate intelligence to terminate the DC rats like this group there:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijp_Bg7Lkpo
  20. @Inquiring Mind
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The break-in coverage of the car crash that took Diana Spencer's life was such a disruption.

    I was watching "The Cape", a drama staring Corbin Bernsen from LA Law as the Chief NASA astronaut.

    Corbin Bernsen was on the Shuttle trying to dock with the Space Station when his Russian astronaut counterpart went bonkers and crashed the docking arm into the tiles on the Shuttle.

    I never did find out the conclusion to this cliff-hanger episode on account of the Breaking Story coverage. If someone here was a fan of "The Cape", can you fill me in whether Bernsen was able to repair the Shuttle and land it safely? This information is not available online,

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I.M., It’s kind of coincidental that you mentioned the Diana thing, as I just commented on that here under the most recent unz J. Derbyshire post.

    I’ll be glad to help you out on The Cape, though I’ve never heard of it. Corbin Bernsen is a White guy, right? Unless he had a black former LA Law partner as co-pilot of the shuttle to do an EVA with some JB Weld and duct tape to save the day, all involved died. You’re welcome!

  21. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Achmed E. Newman


    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch “the national news” at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day’s slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    * * *
    I’m pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn’t have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don’t know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You’ve got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.
     
    CNN seemed to make its bones during the first Gulf War when its coverage was more or less on par with that of the three major networks. It derived credibility that way, and wasn't viewed as a far second tier for news coverage after.

    I think the issue is that the CNN model lasted only as long as the internet was a hobby for weirdos. When the internet really took off as a mainstream tool used by average Americans to access information they didn't need to tune in to CNN to get the national news in a half hour segment anymore. You could go to a splash page and click the links that caught your attention and ignore that which didn't catch your attention. As the speed and coverage of internet service improved and you could view video online quickly the internet was able to utterly cannibalize broadcast/cable news.

    I think you are on to something in the infotainment analysis - they're under pressure to gain eyeballs and the best way for the cable networks to do this is to create the news and package it in a way that is compelling and dramatic. What came to mind as an early example of this prior to internet dominance was the baby Jessica who fell down the well. By any objective measure it wasn't a nationally newsworthy story but it was something that the "news" could serialize and exploit for dramatic effect.

    Replies: @Luzzatto, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Sam Malone

    CNN is so Far Left that even their so-called token “Conservatives” like Ana Navarro and Rick Wilson for example are Far Left as well!

  22. @Mr. Anon

    I only watch the World Series, the Super Bowl, major golf championships, and local riots on TV....
     
    Perhaps ESPN should include rioting among the sports they cover.

    Or there could be a dedicated cable network to cover "mostly peaceful protests".

    The Riot & Urban Insurrection Network: RUIN

    Replies: @Morton's toes

    Perhaps ESPN should include rioting among the sports they cover.

    If ESPN doesn’t do it the second tier cable sports network (if it exists) absolutely should do this. If people could get famous enough torching cop cars with molatov cocktails to get nike endorsement contracts you could create a bonafide business model out of it. Kind of like Hunger Games except de-fanged a little bit.

  23. Why would any real news organization (or other company) care about whining from staffers about supposed political bias?

    There seem to be no such political bias complainers in the ranks of Woke prog media (namely, all of them).

    You can still fire complainers, esp for whining about supposed political bias. So fire these whiners and get the applicant lines going for replacements.

    First, fire the most outspoken agitators and listen to the soothing sound of crickets chirping. But before firings, compile lists of those who signed petitions about imaginary right-wing bias. Fire a few of them each month — you’ll find something.

    I imagine the interview lines for non Woke young news journalists would be pretty long.

    “No Ivy Leaguers Please!”

  24. Do they really cut off right at “political liberal Democrat ideas being forced on us,” and give no context after? If so it’s just like NPR, and for that matter the China Syndrome: they let through just enough to let sane people sound insane, and then give themselves credit for quoting both sides.

  25. @Neuday
    @Buzz Mohawk

    CNN wasn't "absorbed by the borg", it was actively subverted.

    CNN launched in 1980 but the big break happened during the first Gulf War when they broadcasted front-line coverage and lots of it. Ted Turner stepped down in 1989 just prior to that war, and in 1990 they hired as President Tom Johnson, a former publisher of the L.A. Times and who, before that, was a flunkie of LBJ. I recall Rush Limbaugh calling it the Clinton News Network during the early 90's.

    Here's some more about Tom Johnson, from wikipedia:
    On the evening of April 4, 1968, it was Tom Johnson who walked into the Oval Office to hand President Johnson the news that Martin Luther King Jr. had been shot (it would be another hour before doctors in Memphis, Tennessee declared King dead). In the Oval Office with President Johnson at the time were former Georgia Governor Carl Sanders and former Coca-Cola CEO (and still a Board Member) Robert W. Woodruff.

    I kept that part about the Coca-Cola CEO as I'm trying to be more White.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    “I kept that part about the Coca-Cola CEO as I’m trying to be more White.”

    LOL

  26. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Achmed E. Newman


    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch “the national news” at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day’s slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    * * *
    I’m pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn’t have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don’t know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You’ve got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.
     
    CNN seemed to make its bones during the first Gulf War when its coverage was more or less on par with that of the three major networks. It derived credibility that way, and wasn't viewed as a far second tier for news coverage after.

    I think the issue is that the CNN model lasted only as long as the internet was a hobby for weirdos. When the internet really took off as a mainstream tool used by average Americans to access information they didn't need to tune in to CNN to get the national news in a half hour segment anymore. You could go to a splash page and click the links that caught your attention and ignore that which didn't catch your attention. As the speed and coverage of internet service improved and you could view video online quickly the internet was able to utterly cannibalize broadcast/cable news.

    I think you are on to something in the infotainment analysis - they're under pressure to gain eyeballs and the best way for the cable networks to do this is to create the news and package it in a way that is compelling and dramatic. What came to mind as an early example of this prior to internet dominance was the baby Jessica who fell down the well. By any objective measure it wasn't a nationally newsworthy story but it was something that the "news" could serialize and exploit for dramatic effect.

    Replies: @Luzzatto, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Sam Malone

    CNN seemed to make its bones during the first Gulf War when its coverage was more or less on par with that of the three major networks.

    CNN’s First Gulf War coverage blew away the major networks.

    They’re still coasting on their reputation from that era.

  27. @Trial by Wombat

    After a discussion of the case, Mr. Donlon, the anchor, asked Mr. Dietl why the murder rate had risen in some American cities. “It’s very simple,” Mr. Dietl said. “It’s the political liberal Democratic values that are being forced upon us.”
     
    Many years ago, in S/E Washington DC, I received a call as a brand-new patrolman (white guy - grew up in a suburban area of a major county), for a 'shots fired' call at a low-rise apartment complex, slightly outside of my assigned patrol sector.

    This was before GPS, and my partner and I had to break out a paper map, and then consult a dispatcher, to even find the location. Upon my arrival, someone was firing what we later confirmed to be a .22 rifle out of a breezeway in the complex, but they stopped, and appear to have fled, as our squad arrived.

    Before I ever began to approach the building that the fire had originated from, I encountered the trash dumpster station in front of the building. What I saw was something that I recall vividly even today, and have never seen before, or since that time..

    Rats - literally hundreds of the largest Rats I have ever seen.. swarming like a singular mass all over this series of trash dumpsters - like a scene that you might have expected over the remains of the dead in the aftermath of WWI Trench warfare - however this was taking place not in a chaotic battle zone, but in a residential area (100% African American) located across the Anacostia from the seat of US Govt. Mind you.. the complainant never mentioned a plague of giant Rats in her call to Police, only the ongoing rifle fire.

    The .22 rifle shooter was not attempting to mow down passerby or engage in criminal activity, he was making a desperate attempt - alone - to diminish this swarm of vermin that had overtaken the commons area of this apartment complex. His rimfire casings walked back from the dumpster area onto the stairway, and up onto a breezeway as he retreated from the scene, likely as he heard the squad car approaching.

    In attempts to reach city govt to immediately seek a sanitation response, my dispatcher reported that she could not contact anyone in the appropriate chain of command, and suggested we drive out to the main roadway and wait for some passing sanitation truck, stop them, and basically hijack them into responding. We at one point even discussed setting the dumpster on fire ourselves, once it became clear no one was coming from Streets or Sanitation, but feared it would only disperse the swarm of gigantic rats toward the residences.

    The point is, something more is going on here, well beyond a simplistic adherence to deficient political ideology or party allegiance.

    To get to this point in the first place, multiple stages of complete failure, indifference and incompetence had to go unaddressed. This could not have been the first or a unique instance of encountering rats the size of a respectable Chihuahua in and around this location, but no one took any action or sought to address the problem, until it was completely out of control.

    The single individual who did attempt to control the vermin swarm, firing off a small caliber rifle in a dense urban area, made no significant impact with his chosen methodology, and apparently alarmed fellow residents more so than swarming rats taking over their communal refuse disposal area.

    In the world I grew up in, every dad in the complex would be out there cooperating to ensure that the swarm of vermin was eliminated, on their own initiative, if need be. In this housing complex, its highly unlikely that most households even had a dad resident in the apartment. At no point did even one resident of this complex approach my partner or I to offer any information or seek some solution, leaving us to figure out a public health and safety crisis that we had no resources to address.

    Everyone appears to have waited for someone else to do something, well past the point that the health and safety of the community was already compromised. While this incompetence / disinterest was also reflected in the municipal response, it could not have began or maintained itself without the complicity of every individual who could have done something, but chose not to.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    In the world I grew up in, every dad in the complex would be out there cooperating to ensure that the swarm of vermin was eliminated, on their own initiative, if need be.

    White people would use their innate intelligence to terminate the DC rats like this group there:

  28. meh says:
    @128
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How can a progressive nut produce a pro-Southern film like Gods and Generals or Gettysburg?

    Replies: @meh, @J.Ross

    How can a progressive nut produce a pro-Southern film like Gods and Generals or Gettysburg?

    According to the wiki, Turner Entertainment/Turner Pictures was sold to Time Warner in 1996 (Gettysburg 1993, Gods and Generals 2003). And who knows how deeply involved in production decisions Ted Turner was, anyway, if at all.

    It’s not as though progressive nuts can’t also have counter-intuitive tribal prior loyalties however; consider the case of other progressive Southerners, like Woodrow Wilson.

    That’s probably why a certain other tribe never trusted Ted Turner after they acquired his cable network, in spite of Ted Turner’s quite well known progressive politics.

    • Replies: @lysias
    @meh

    My recollection is that the commentary track of the DVD of Gettysburg says Turner had a big role in production decisions. And he did have a cameo role as a Confederate colonel in Pickett's charge.

  29. @John Up North
    The anchorman, Donlon, came from WGN Channel 9 in Chicago. WGN radio and tv is extremely woke. I would argue it's the most woke of all Chicago media. Channel 9 will often lead off their newscast with an enlarged animated Covid virus accompanied by dramatic music.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Ironically WGN was originally part of the Chicago Tribune media empire of the far right Colonel Mccormick.

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Hibernian

    Thanks, I forgot about McCormick. I think the Chicago media really scared the hell out of a lot of people with their 24/7 panic porn. The only sane voice of reason broadcasting in Chicago is Dan Proft.

  30. @128
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How can a progressive nut produce a pro-Southern film like Gods and Generals or Gettysburg?

    Replies: @meh, @J.Ross

    Name a progressive nut who doesn’t have their private un-progressive delusion or who is actually consistent about being progressive. Turner is the textbook illustration of billionaire leftism, an exponent of corporate woke from before Occupy Wall Street. Leftism is billionaires using slogans and emotions to trick kids into embracing slavery to billionaires.

  31. @Almost Missouri
    Sorry Steve, you probably already covered this somewhere, but I couldn't find it in the archives.

    Who originated the description of last year's events as a "racial reckoning". I see a lot of journalists (a.k.a. leftists political agents) using the term, and you started using it, usually within quotation marks, last August, but where did it come from originally, or at least who has most promoted it as the justification for Burn Loot Murder?

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Good questions.

  32. Adjacent headlines on the Des Moines Register site:

    Dozens of charges dismissed against protesters

    18-year-old charged with involuntary manslaughter in death of 16-year-old in Des Moines; victim identified

  33. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Achmed E. Newman


    When CNN started out, the idea was to just play the 1/2 hour news over and over so that people could watch “the national news” at other times than just 6:30P, Eastern, 5:30P Central, etc. Of course, they could update stories over the course of the day, while the big 3 networks had their whole schedule of TV shows for the day, so would have to wait until the next day’s slot, unless a President got shot or a a volcano blew up.

    * * *
    I’m pretty sure I was off TV already when CNN slowly morphed (or I didn’t have cable anyway), but they started making different types of news shows. I don’t know how much opinion was in them at the beginning vs. reporting, but now most shows now seem to be more opinion than reporting.

    Because they got so big, and they wanted to gain viewers, CNN realized that just news reporting was not enough. You’ve got 24 hours to fill, every day, on and on. The type of stories that would have been reported on 5 minutes one day, and then maybe had additional 2 minute follow-ups for a week back in 1975, became dragged out at 2 hours a day coverage for MONTHS. Much of that would have to be opinion to fill up that time. Dave Letterman used to kid with this word (I thought it was funny), but CNN programming is the very definition of Infotainment.
     
    CNN seemed to make its bones during the first Gulf War when its coverage was more or less on par with that of the three major networks. It derived credibility that way, and wasn't viewed as a far second tier for news coverage after.

    I think the issue is that the CNN model lasted only as long as the internet was a hobby for weirdos. When the internet really took off as a mainstream tool used by average Americans to access information they didn't need to tune in to CNN to get the national news in a half hour segment anymore. You could go to a splash page and click the links that caught your attention and ignore that which didn't catch your attention. As the speed and coverage of internet service improved and you could view video online quickly the internet was able to utterly cannibalize broadcast/cable news.

    I think you are on to something in the infotainment analysis - they're under pressure to gain eyeballs and the best way for the cable networks to do this is to create the news and package it in a way that is compelling and dramatic. What came to mind as an early example of this prior to internet dominance was the baby Jessica who fell down the well. By any objective measure it wasn't a nationally newsworthy story but it was something that the "news" could serialize and exploit for dramatic effect.

    Replies: @Luzzatto, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Sam Malone

    CNN hit the big time during its late 1990/early 1991 coverage of the Gulf War against Iraq, but maybe it didn’t entirely deserve to. I came across this strange footage a few years ago. They seem to have been staging/faking at least some of their coverage from the correspondents’ hotel, pretending to be very close to dangerous Scud missiles and possible gas attacks.

    There’s a bit where the correspondent converses in real-time with an anchor in Atlanta, and I remember someone pointing out that this should have been impossible, since in 1990/1991 the gap between satellite transmissions that far away would have been a minute or more.

  34. @Hibernian
    @John Up North

    Ironically WGN was originally part of the Chicago Tribune media empire of the far right Colonel Mccormick.

    Replies: @John Up North

    Thanks, I forgot about McCormick. I think the Chicago media really scared the hell out of a lot of people with their 24/7 panic porn. The only sane voice of reason broadcasting in Chicago is Dan Proft.

  35. @Luzzatto
    Bo Dietl is my type of guy. Old School Non Woke New York City Italian. Even though he is law enforcement he talks like a Wise Guy busting balls!

    Replies: @lysias

    Italian? Dietl looks like a German name.

  36. @meh
    @128


    How can a progressive nut produce a pro-Southern film like Gods and Generals or Gettysburg?
     
    According to the wiki, Turner Entertainment/Turner Pictures was sold to Time Warner in 1996 (Gettysburg 1993, Gods and Generals 2003). And who knows how deeply involved in production decisions Ted Turner was, anyway, if at all.

    It's not as though progressive nuts can't also have counter-intuitive tribal prior loyalties however; consider the case of other progressive Southerners, like Woodrow Wilson.

    That's probably why a certain other tribe never trusted Ted Turner after they acquired his cable network, in spite of Ted Turner's quite well known progressive politics.

    Replies: @lysias

    My recollection is that the commentary track of the DVD of Gettysburg says Turner had a big role in production decisions. And he did have a cameo role as a Confederate colonel in Pickett’s charge.

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