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Domestic Air Travel Down 96%: Is the Economy Being Crushed by Government Diktat or by Consumer Choice?
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A big question is: How much of the decline in the economy is caused by government orders versus how much by consumer choice?

Consider air travel, which is usually treated as an essential service so it remains legally open. But domestic air travel is down 96%. This in part because of government-mandated shutdowns of accomodations, but also in part because of voluntary choices made by travelers and those they would visit.

For example, some traveling salesman would prefer to stay home, while some would prefer to hit the road again. But of the latter, many wouldn’t find it worthwhile to travel now because their customers are shut down by government order or their customers would rather deal with them over the phone than in person.

From CNN:

Airlines and TSA report 96% drop in air travel as pandemic continues

By Gregory Wallace

Updated 3:02 PM ET, Thu April 9, 2020

Washington (CNN) The number of people traveling by plane has dropped by about 96% amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to multiple metrics.

On Wednesday, Transportation Security Administration officers screened just shy of 95,000 people at airport checkpoints, a dramatic drop from the 2.3 million who passed through on the equivalent day in 2019. The numbers are at a 10-year low, according to the agency.

The drop in passengers and orders across much of the country to stay at home have caused airlines to cut 71% of their capacity, according to Airlines for America, an industry group that represents carriers such as American, Delta, Southwest and United.

Only about one in every 10 seats on the US domestic planes that do fly are occupied, the group says.

In other words, if all government agencies lifted all restrictions tomorrow, how much air travel would come back the next day, the next week, the next month, and the next year?

Difficult questions …

My impression is that getting the economy going again can be helped by businesses taking steps to reduce the chances of infection and publicizing what they are doing.

As I pointed out in my latest Taki’s column, the golf industry is suffering under probably overly-enthusiastic government rules banning fun, but it already has a set of plans for how to reduce the already low chance of infection on the golf course even further, so golf courses will likely once again appeal to old customers soon after government bans are lifted.

In contrast, the ski industry’s reputation as high risk for getting infected is only going to worsen as more data is collected on ski resorts’ role as superspreaders in February and early March. To successfully come back next winter, the ski industry needs not just government permission but a lot of intelligent technical reforms to reduce risk, plus a marketing campaign to communicate to potential customers how much safer skiing will be next year.

What this implies is that there is going to be a lot of randomness in which businesses recover first: e.g., optometrists might have a better second half of 2020 than dentists. It’s not fair some businesses will come back in customer favor faster than others, but that’s likely how it’s going to be.

 
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  1. Anonymous[970] • Disclaimer says:

    Social distancing from cop.

    • LOL: Bubba, Old Prude
  2. I haven’t looked into it ( but I’m sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport. What’s next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?

    • LOL: Sean
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I haven’t looked into it ( but I’m sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport. What’s next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?
     
    Oops!

    I can just imagine the conversation between the Rental Car executive and the guy who manages the lot.

    Lot Manager: Where should I park all these unused rental cars?

    Executive: How about over there - in that big field of dry grass. But wait till tomorrow. I hear it's supposed to be windy.
    , @danand

    "What’s next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?"
     
    Unit472, the two most sought after "professionals" will soon be Arsonist & Auto Thief. It won't just be the casinos, it'll spread to a bunch of newly built/half built structures.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    I haven’t looked into it ( but I’m sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport.

     

    When I wintered there 30 years ago, they couldn't have had 3500 cars in total:


    https://worldpopulationreview.com/us-counties/fl/lee-county-population/


    Cape Coral is now nearly 200,000, or almost triple what it was then. It's passed Fort Lauderdale and even with Tallahassee, which is also growing fast.
    , @Neoconned
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/04/05/us/airport-fires-cars-trnd/index.html

    I thought you were joking when this popped up but no.....i don't have cable any more so i get my news exclusively online.
  3. I miss the days when air travel was something ordinary people did very rarely, when the term “jet set” connoted great wealth and prestige. I miss the cheerier service, more legroom, and better food. I miss breezing through the concourse without the 2 hour security lines.

    The model that the airlines had been following recently needed to go away, with or without the virus.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    "Ah for the days when aviation was a gentleman's pursuit. Back before every Joe Sweatsock could wedge himself behind a lunch tray and jet off to Raleigh-Durham."

    https://youtu.be/RD77nyoEyug?t=98
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    You WOULD miss it were you a real jet-setter. Those who don't have 3 X the amount of money for air fare, would miss it too, because they couldn't afford to go very often. I have personal data, from having bought a ticket round-trip on a low-budget airline RT across the country 3 decades ago. I shopped around off-and-on for 3 weeks, which back then meant calling the 800 numbers in the yellow pages, going to a couple of travel agencies, etc., and way ahead of time.

    I was on a low budget, but the ticket was $450. Never mind the BLS BS inflation numbers - that is about $1,000 in today's money - for a cheap, cheap fare. Not even counting the super low fares available right now, one could get a X-country RT ticket for 300-odd bucks.

    The airlines have cut costs amazingly over the years, though, of course, the price of oil is a factor. It's gone up and down, but air fares have dropped pretty steadily in real dollars. However, the one thing that will suffer, though probably not a big factor for the young people that would rather deal on their phones than with people in person, is true customer service, by live people. You can only bring that down so far with call centers in the Philippines. The gate agents are swamped, and both they and the flight attendants burdened with new TSA rules.

    Speaking of the TSA, I completely agree with you on that security theatre show. That's not the airlines' fault, though. That airport screening mess is something you'd have to still put up with, I.D., but if you want to be treated nicely, buy a 1st-class ticket.
    , @anon
    Airline travel should be safe, legal, and rare.
    , @Pericles
    Oh, just get a private jet (or, sniff, a netjets card) and it will feel just like in the good old days.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Agreed, but the best days of all were before the jets came into service.

    First of all: the airports themselves. We'd drive right up to the single entrance of the San Francisco Airport, get out at our leisure (nobody glaring at us, guns at the ready), and walk straight to the waiting lounge. People came to us to check our tickets. The planes were never late. The pilots were mostly war heroes, or looked like it, while the stewardesses looked like the starlets in films about war heroes.
    Then: the passengers. Well, just look at a film by Hitchcock from the period. Distinguished, well-dressed, young and old, men and women, and well-behaved, often rather too self-aware children (like me I'm afraid). Sometimes I wonder: was Hitchcock copying us, or we were copying him?
    And finally: the flight. first of all, much more exciting than today. The takeoffs were bone-shaking, and the landings sometimes soul-searing. During the flight, bad weather could mean some really rough times, and at night it was always fun to look out at the engines, which seemed to be aflame. The food was certainly better than now, but by no means great. What was superb was the service, with real napkins and real silver. Best of all were the desserts (I was a child, remember) which were in some planes (experts here will know which models) taken, not in one's assigned seat, but in a special area in the tail of the plane. We set in a semi-circle, admiring the food, the service, and ourselves.
    Isn't that what it's all about?
  4. Anon[402] • Disclaimer says:

    Currently reading Defoe’s Journal of the Plague Year: another instance of China infecting the world, only this time in the 1660s.

    Similar then and now, when the government stops talking about imminent death to the citizenry, normality will return. The King returns to London, and business returns too.

    As a deplorable living in 2020 America, I know some in the government see all this as a grand opportunity.

    I have a close family member who nearly died from this and I say open the country in mid-May. No later. You will not eliminate this. There is always risk in life and corona is simply the reality check.

    Bubonic was around hundreds of years before they even knew how it was spread.I have accepted possibility we may not be able to “fix” this and that is just life.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @adreadline

    I have a close family member who nearly died from this and I say open the country in mid-May. No later. You will not eliminate this. There is always risk in life and corona is simply the reality check.

    Bubonic was around hundreds of years before they even knew how it was spread.I have accepted possibility we may not be able to “fix” this and that is just life.
     

    Why in mid-May? Why not tomorrow, this Easter (it's Saturday here already)? We'd have churches packed, at least. But really, why wait until then? You're asking for another whole month, maybe even a bit more, but no later -- June 1st cannot wait, then? Why? Your explanation seems incomplete, even vague to me. If it's unstoppable and unfixable, why wait ~30 more days rather than one or two weeks? You think people will be calmer by then, or more impatient instead?

    Also, I'm sorry for this, considering your situation... but you should then consider writing the president directly by May... and asking,


    President Trump, we have waited enough.
    This cannot go on, Mr. President.
    Mr. President, let it rip.
    Mr. President, OPEN THE GATES.
     
  5. • Replies: @Bubba
    He should have been executed like the Rosenbergs. Yet he wears his treason as a badge of honor and Israel extols the bastard.
    , @Sean
    There is a retired Federal supermax guard called Astheketurns on youtube about Pollard. Apparently he berated his mother all though visiting hour without asking how she was and the guard was so disgusted he had a word with him about improving his attitude lest he fall down the stairs. He also said one day he and a colleague were escorting her through tight security and the other fellow admitted he had forgotten the long code to punch in a door, Pollard's mother immediately piped up with it (causing the guards' eyes to meet as that meant it would have to be changed). I think Pollard's family may have had a lot to do with the campaign to free him.
    , @Jack D
    Pollard was released in 2015 after serving the maximum sentence permitted at the time he was sentenced.
  6. Hotel data for March 28-April 4 versus same week of 2019

    Prices down 42%
    Occupancy down 69%

    Revenue down 83%

    One of many major industries getting hit far worse than the Great Depression. Each of them with employees, suppliers, local governments relying on tax revenue, stock and bond holders.

    As Steve is now drifting away from Team #ShutItDown, American patriots should remember there’s a lot of room for reasonable differences of opinion among ourselves. Let’s keep sight of the real enemy:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-02-10/italy-s-hopes-for-closer-china-ties-hit-by-virus-flight-ban-rift

    China’s government is pushing back globally against virus-based travel restrictions, including efforts to convince Italy to rescind its ban.

    Vice Foreign Minister Qin Gang met with Italy’s ambassador on Feb. 6 to protest the halt to flights, and the Foreign Ministry later said in a statement that China is “strongly dissatisfied with the overreaction and restrictions of the Italian side.”

    My iSteve comment from April 2019:

    “Dear President Trump: Ramp up the China tariffs like you promised already. We don’t need their plastic junk anyway. We already have too much stuff, and despite the whining from the business lobby, the first round didn’t do a thing negative to our record breaking economy.

    Did anyone notice prices of things go up the past year? In reality, most Chinese products can also be made in the USA or elsewhere in Asia.”

    • Replies: @newrouter
    >In reality, most Chinese products can also be made in the USA or elsewhere in Asia.”<

    I don't see why pharmaceutical production was "shipped" to the Chicomms. It is bulk material handling with some chemistry. Not much labor . Apparently easier to export than to reform FDA.
    , @Rosie

    Hotel data for March 28-April 4 versus same week of 2019

    Prices down 42%
     
    I would probably do quite a bit more travelling if hotels were cheaper. If you have a lot of kids, and you want to take all of them to certain attractions at the appropriate age, you might wind up taking lots of extended weekends visiting places over and over again.

    But I just can't see paying Mr. Patel $200/night. I've never understood hotel room prices. They seem completely outrageous to me.
  7. No pleasure travel abroad or Cruises for our family in 2020 or 2021. We will revisit in 2022.

    Probably no domestic pleasure travel/hotel/restaurants/movies/shows/religious events in 2020 for us. We will see in 2021.

    2 consumers; multiply by some millions to see where economy will be in 2020/2021.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Right, I'm probably not going to the Pacific Opera Project for a year or so for minor league opera. It's a real pleasure to sit in the first row for a reasonable price, but I don't want professionally loud singers blasting away at me from 10 feet away.

    I sent them $100 to help them survive without me.

    , @Peterike
    “ Probably no domestic pleasure travel/hotel/restaurants/movies/shows/religious events in 2020 for us.“

    I can’t wait for restaurants to reopen. I’ll be first in line. If there are any left.
  8. eD says:

    A big reason people are not traveling is that it means going from one place where businesses, stores, and entertainment venues are closed, to another place where businesses, stores, and entertainment venues are closed. You are not going to travel to a place where you can do business, and if its a vacation it means paying to stay in a hotel and watch TV, which you can do at home.

    There is still visiting relatives (which my wife wants to do for some reason), but why not wait until this stuff is lifted and there is less hassle? If its never lifted then that is a huge adjustment.

  9. @Anon
    Currently reading Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year: another instance of China infecting the world, only this time in the 1660s.

    Similar then and now, when the government stops talking about imminent death to the citizenry, normality will return. The King returns to London, and business returns too.

    As a deplorable living in 2020 America, I know some in the government see all this as a grand opportunity.

    I have a close family member who nearly died from this and I say open the country in mid-May. No later. You will not eliminate this. There is always risk in life and corona is simply the reality check.

    Bubonic was around hundreds of years before they even knew how it was spread.I have accepted possibility we may not be able to "fix" this and that is just life.

    I have a close family member who nearly died from this and I say open the country in mid-May. No later. You will not eliminate this. There is always risk in life and corona is simply the reality check.

    Bubonic was around hundreds of years before they even knew how it was spread.I have accepted possibility we may not be able to “fix” this and that is just life.

    Why in mid-May? Why not tomorrow, this Easter (it’s Saturday here already)? We’d have churches packed, at least. But really, why wait until then? You’re asking for another whole month, maybe even a bit more, but no later — June 1st cannot wait, then? Why? Your explanation seems incomplete, even vague to me. If it’s unstoppable and unfixable, why wait ~30 more days rather than one or two weeks? You think people will be calmer by then, or more impatient instead?

    [MORE]

    Also, I’m sorry for this, considering your situation… but you should then consider writing the president directly by May… and asking,

    President Trump, we have waited enough.
    This cannot go on, Mr. President.
    Mr. President, let it rip.
    Mr. President, OPEN THE GATES.

    • Agree: Alice
    • Replies: @Anon
    To answer your question about mid-May, many states currently have their school closures and shelter-at-home orders sun setting in late-April to mid-May. Just let existing dictates expire is my proposal.

    I did enjoy your Mr. Smith-goes-to-Washington energy with the letter writing and Easter Sunday suggestions though.

    , @The Wild Geese Howard

    Why not tomorrow, this Easter (it’s Saturday here already)? We’d have churches packed, at least.
     
    I can't imagine that Trump hasn't thought of doing this simply for the incredible symbolism it would entail.

    You can't buy PR that good.

    Mr. President, let it rip.
     
    Coach Les Miles agrees:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9mKMJVxrk0
  10. @epebble
    No pleasure travel abroad or Cruises for our family in 2020 or 2021. We will revisit in 2022.

    Probably no domestic pleasure travel/hotel/restaurants/movies/shows/religious events in 2020 for us. We will see in 2021.

    2 consumers; multiply by some millions to see where economy will be in 2020/2021.

    Right, I’m probably not going to the Pacific Opera Project for a year or so for minor league opera. It’s a real pleasure to sit in the first row for a reasonable price, but I don’t want professionally loud singers blasting away at me from 10 feet away.

    I sent them $100 to help them survive without me.

    • Replies: @reactionry
    ATTN, ATTN: Mr. Sailer:

    I once knew a really rich guy who chartered a Gulfstream IV to fly himself and a pretty woman from LA to San Francisco to scope out (as in opera glasses) a major league performance of La Traviata (that choice was no accident). IMHO, it's a waste of money to spend more than a hundred bucks on a whore.

    As you noted earlier, "We can probably be more confident that salesmen earn their pay more than just about any other type of job." As one of my colleagues said with respect to working in commie virus hot spots, "Ya gotta know the territory" - otherwise it's your funeral, pal. Speaking of which, it's a credit to your classy website that nobody (to my knowledge) has made any tasteless "Janitor In A Drum" jokes.

    Anyhow, we salesmen are among the mostly unsung heroes taking great personal risks in maintaining the flow of essential goods and services. In our face-to-face biz, a mask ain't gonna' cut it. If one of us dies in the line of duty, attention must be paid. He’s not to be allowed to fall into his grave like an old dog. Attention, attention must be finally paid to such a person.

    Your Humble Solicitous Salesman,
    "Slick" Willy Loman
    Loma Linda, California
    (formerly Brooklyn)

  11. This in part because of government-mandated shutdowns of accomodations [sic], but also in part because of voluntary choices made by travelers and those they would visit.

    Seems obvious the former is larger than the latter. I am “voluntarily” not visiting Atlantic City because there is nothing to do there that I can’t do at home.

    Are you being obtuse?

    • Agree: Alice
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I am “voluntarily” not visiting Atlantic City because there is nothing to do there that I can’t do at home...
     
    ...on your on your dining room table.


    Touring the Abandoned Atlantic City Sites That Inspired the Monopoly Board

    https://i.redd.it/8dcbhxg3lvv21.jpg

  12. The number of people traveling by plane has dropped by about 96% amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to multiple metrics.

    The Northwest pilots’ strike in 1998 had a similar, if not as large, effect at its hubs in Detroit, Memphis, and especially its HQ Mpls/St Paul. It was easier for many to ride out the strike than shift to other airlines. For one thing, the competition’s flights would require a transfer, and everybody hates that.

    The hub system is a double-edged sword. Not to mention the fact that in hubs along the central spine of the country– MSP, Chicago, St Louis, Memphis, Dallas, and especially Houston (from all directions) everything arrives at the same time.The

    It’s like the Dr Pepper of noise– at 10, 2, and 4. And 6 and 8 and 10 again.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    2 words, Reg: Triple-paned windows. (or, is that 3 words, and you only need double-paned?)

    Also, St. Louis - not a hub anymore.
    Memphis - not a hub anymore, except at night when you're trying to sleep and FedEx (now redundantly renamed "FedEx Express"!) has their big push out after the sort.

    The freight boys have been going gangbusters. Even more stuff is being bought on-line, and even though some of the passenger-airline widebodies have been running some freight-only runs, they aren't really freighters with cargo doors on top, and the freight has gotta go, Kung Flu or no Kung Flu. I ran into a UPS pilot, and he told me some of their guys had a hard time getting out of China.

    Please, people, we've got to open it back up ourselves. Screw the Feds, screw the Governor, and screw the Mayor. I'm not putting up with but so much from these Kung Flutalitarians.


    .

    PS: The end of this comment reminded me of Charles Pewitt's style. Has anyone heard from him lately? I'm kind of worried about that guy.

  13. My son is in sales and he had house calls right up to the moment the governor shut down his state.

    Many pundits who are by nature introverts and germophobes are predicting that opening the eonomy back up wouldn’t do any good, that most people would stay holed up in their houses.

    I think that’s arrant nonsense. And it’d be a lot cheaper to subsidize businesses through reduced times while they collect money from the people who don’t fear the virus.

    I have a trip to Canada planned in June and one in Hawaii in August. I’m planning on both of them, if the idiots running things allow it.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I like your attitude, but I will say that people are just being cautious by not spending time on planes (even with the major virus fumigation deally they are doing, at least at the hubs) and at airports.

    What I've seen is that routes have been going from 8 flights daily to 1-3, or 15 daily to 4. Even after that, the flights are 10 to 25% full. You can't make money like that!

    Just as advice, E.R., one can get a ticket now, for the same low prices as before that has no change fees. That is due to flights are being cancelled just 2 days prior quite often now, so schedules are in real limbo. However, that means you can get a ticket for a one day, and be at ease in being flexible about your plans. It ain't like the next one will be full, not the way things will remain for quite some time. That can work out nice for you.
    , @Alice
    I can no longer travel to the beach because my state beaches were forced closed. I can't go to the state parks because they were forced closed. I am now uncomfortable traveling out of state because counties in my state are Vequiring Papers! Papers, please! to prove you're a resident, and so I'm not sure if I leave that I can come home.

    I've got 3 kids bored out of their minds with no swimming, fencing, archery, baseball, playgrounds, band, choir, jazz band, d and d, board games, or fun.

    We're not afraid to go out. I have already written every summer camp and program my kids are hoping goes on this summer saying we will be there, we will not cancel. if they do, I'm driving to South Dakota and camping at Custer State Park indefinitely.

    i can only hope others like me exist.
  14. @Lot
    Hotel data for March 28-April 4 versus same week of 2019

    Prices down 42%
    Occupancy down 69%

    Revenue down 83%

    One of many major industries getting hit far worse than the Great Depression. Each of them with employees, suppliers, local governments relying on tax revenue, stock and bond holders.

    As Steve is now drifting away from Team #ShutItDown, American patriots should remember there’s a lot of room for reasonable differences of opinion among ourselves. Let’s keep sight of the real enemy:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-02-10/italy-s-hopes-for-closer-china-ties-hit-by-virus-flight-ban-rift

    China’s government is pushing back globally against virus-based travel restrictions, including efforts to convince Italy to rescind its ban.

    Vice Foreign Minister Qin Gang met with Italy’s ambassador on Feb. 6 to protest the halt to flights, and the Foreign Ministry later said in a statement that China is “strongly dissatisfied with the overreaction and restrictions of the Italian side.”



    My iSteve comment from April 2019:

    “Dear President Trump: Ramp up the China tariffs like you promised already. We don’t need their plastic junk anyway. We already have too much stuff, and despite the whining from the business lobby, the first round didn’t do a thing negative to our record breaking economy.

    Did anyone notice prices of things go up the past year? In reality, most Chinese products can also be made in the USA or elsewhere in Asia.”

    >In reality, most Chinese products can also be made in the USA or elsewhere in Asia.”<

    I don't see why pharmaceutical production was "shipped" to the Chicomms. It is bulk material handling with some chemistry. Not much labor . Apparently easier to export than to reform FDA.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Correct, the USA is a big producer and big exporter of chemicals.

    Chemical production is capital intensive and labor light.

    Top 10 chemical exporters in 2018

    China: US$80 billion (13.7% of total exported chemicals)
    United States: $52.7 billion (9.1%)
    Belgium: $41.7 billion (7.2%)
    Germany: $36.3 billion (6.2%)

    Ireland: $34.1 billion (5.9%)
    South Korea: $30.9 billion (5.3%)
    Netherlands: $30.7 billion (5.3%)
    Japan: $24.8 billion (4.3%)
    Switzerland: $21.3 billion (3.7%)
    India: $19.8 billion (3.4%)
    Singapore: $17.5 billion (3%)
    Saudi Arabia: $17 billion (2.9%)
    France: $15.6 billion (2.7%)
    Taiwan: $13.7 billion (2.3%)
    United Kingdom: $12.7 billion (2.2%)
  15. @Intelligent Dasein
    I miss the days when air travel was something ordinary people did very rarely, when the term "jet set" connoted great wealth and prestige. I miss the cheerier service, more legroom, and better food. I miss breezing through the concourse without the 2 hour security lines.

    The model that the airlines had been following recently needed to go away, with or without the virus.

    “Ah for the days when aviation was a gentleman’s pursuit. Back before every Joe Sweatsock could wedge himself behind a lunch tray and jet off to Raleigh-Durham.”

    • LOL: Rosie
  16. @epebble
    No pleasure travel abroad or Cruises for our family in 2020 or 2021. We will revisit in 2022.

    Probably no domestic pleasure travel/hotel/restaurants/movies/shows/religious events in 2020 for us. We will see in 2021.

    2 consumers; multiply by some millions to see where economy will be in 2020/2021.

    “ Probably no domestic pleasure travel/hotel/restaurants/movies/shows/religious events in 2020 for us.“

    I can’t wait for restaurants to reopen. I’ll be first in line. If there are any left.

    • Agree: Alice, botazefa
  17. @ScarletNumber

    This in part because of government-mandated shutdowns of accomodations [sic], but also in part because of voluntary choices made by travelers and those they would visit.
     
    Seems obvious the former is larger than the latter. I am "voluntarily" not visiting Atlantic City because there is nothing to do there that I can't do at home.

    Are you being obtuse?

    I am “voluntarily” not visiting Atlantic City because there is nothing to do there that I can’t do at home…

    …on your on your dining room table.

    Touring the Abandoned Atlantic City Sites That Inspired the Monopoly Board

    • LOL: Bubba
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    I never noticed that properties with common colors are also in the same neighborhood in Atlantic City.

    Of course, Illinois Ave and St Charles Pl are now RIP, with the former now known as MLK Blvd and the latter being subsumed by the Showboat.

    This probably qualifies as common knowledge, but the actual property is spelled Marven Gardens. The "ven" comes from Ventnor, which is also a property in the game.
  18. Finally some real progress. Well now we can rest easy that the medical community will tame the covid crisis in short order. The medical community is focusing their efforts on marginalization, intersectionality, justice frameworks, power structures, and every other postmodern buzzword. I am impressed that the author managed to include all these buzzwords in the very first paragraph.

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30801-1/fulltext

    Centring sexual and reproductive health and justice in the global COVID-19 response

    Global responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are converging with pervasive, existing sexual and reproductive health and justice inequities to disproportionately impact the health, wellbeing, and economic stability of women, girls, and vulnerable populations. People whose human rights are least protected are likely to experience unique difficulties from COVID-19. Women, girls, and marginalised groups are likely to carry a heavier burden of what will be the devastating downstream economic and social consequences of this pandemic. A sexual and reproductive health and justice framework—one that centres human rights, acknowledges intersecting injustices, recognises power structures, and unites across identities—is essential for monitoring and addressing the inequitable gender, health, and social effects of COVID-19.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
    , @HammerJack
    Women and girls are disproportionately affected when men die in vastly larger numbers. Seems legit.
  19. My impression is that getting the economy going again can be helped by businesses taking steps to reduce the chances of infection and publicizing what they are doing.

    Agreed. Many of us (quasi-rational) elders think of going out in public to a crowded airport and catching COVID-19 the same as playing Russian Roulette, except instead of six cylinders there are nine. Odds are 89% you’ll make it with only a mild cough. But that 11% (death or debilitation) is too much of a chance to take.

    So, to get the economy rolling, it would help if we knew who had been infected. Big Brother can do that for us with five minute antibody tests, and whether we have recently caught the bug and it’s time to start taking remdisivir plus vitamins as a precaution.

    So, lessen the odds of catching it and improve the odds of surviving.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  20. @Intelligent Dasein
    I miss the days when air travel was something ordinary people did very rarely, when the term "jet set" connoted great wealth and prestige. I miss the cheerier service, more legroom, and better food. I miss breezing through the concourse without the 2 hour security lines.

    The model that the airlines had been following recently needed to go away, with or without the virus.

    You WOULD miss it were you a real jet-setter. Those who don’t have 3 X the amount of money for air fare, would miss it too, because they couldn’t afford to go very often. I have personal data, from having bought a ticket round-trip on a low-budget airline RT across the country 3 decades ago. I shopped around off-and-on for 3 weeks, which back then meant calling the 800 numbers in the yellow pages, going to a couple of travel agencies, etc., and way ahead of time.

    I was on a low budget, but the ticket was $450. Never mind the BLS BS inflation numbers – that is about $1,000 in today’s money – for a cheap, cheap fare. Not even counting the super low fares available right now, one could get a X-country RT ticket for 300-odd bucks.

    The airlines have cut costs amazingly over the years, though, of course, the price of oil is a factor. It’s gone up and down, but air fares have dropped pretty steadily in real dollars. However, the one thing that will suffer, though probably not a big factor for the young people that would rather deal on their phones than with people in person, is true customer service, by live people. You can only bring that down so far with call centers in the Philippines. The gate agents are swamped, and both they and the flight attendants burdened with new TSA rules.

    Speaking of the TSA, I completely agree with you on that security theatre show. That’s not the airlines’ fault, though. That airport screening mess is something you’d have to still put up with, I.D., but if you want to be treated nicely, buy a 1st-class ticket.

    • Replies: @danand

    "Speaking of the TSA, I completely agree with you on that security theater show."
     
    Just thought I'd mention that a nephew works for the TSA. His std shift had been 4, 10hr days. He currently is working 2 days, but still paid (salary) full. He's assigned to McCarran International.
  21. In other words, if all government agencies lifted all restrictions tomorrow, how much air travel would come back the next day, the next week, the next month, and the next year?

    It’s not the restrictions that are the problem, it’s the hysteria. People are staying in their homes through a combination of fear of arrest and fear of the Corona Plague.

    And both government and the media continue to fuel the hysteria.

    The only way the economy will bounce back is if the government acts to shut down the hysteria. But western governments show no signs of being willing to do that.

    • Agree: Brás Cubas
    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "And both government and the media continue to fuel the hysteria."

    I unplugged my DirecTV for The Duration. If you're rocking an IQ supra 115, unplugging from fakestream media will preserve your sanity.
  22. @education realist
    My son is in sales and he had house calls right up to the moment the governor shut down his state.

    Many pundits who are by nature introverts and germophobes are predicting that opening the eonomy back up wouldn't do any good, that most people would stay holed up in their houses.

    I think that's arrant nonsense. And it'd be a lot cheaper to subsidize businesses through reduced times while they collect money from the people who don't fear the virus.

    I have a trip to Canada planned in June and one in Hawaii in August. I'm planning on both of them, if the idiots running things allow it.

    I like your attitude, but I will say that people are just being cautious by not spending time on planes (even with the major virus fumigation deally they are doing, at least at the hubs) and at airports.

    What I’ve seen is that routes have been going from 8 flights daily to 1-3, or 15 daily to 4. Even after that, the flights are 10 to 25% full. You can’t make money like that!

    Just as advice, E.R., one can get a ticket now, for the same low prices as before that has no change fees. That is due to flights are being cancelled just 2 days prior quite often now, so schedules are in real limbo. However, that means you can get a ticket for a one day, and be at ease in being flexible about your plans. It ain’t like the next one will be full, not the way things will remain for quite some time. That can work out nice for you.

  23. @indocon
    Jonathan Pollard released!!
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/10/politics/exclusive-interview-bop-carjaval/index.html

    He should have been executed like the Rosenbergs. Yet he wears his treason as a badge of honor and Israel extols the bastard.

    • Agree: HammerJack, nebulafox, JMcG
    • Replies: @JMcG
    Jack D will be along shortly to educate us on why only one of the Rosenbergs should have been executed.
    , @Johann Ricke

    He should have been executed like the Rosenbergs. Yet he wears his treason as a badge of honor and Israel extols the bastard.
     
    Plenty of people have been arrested as spies. The Rosenbergs were literally the only two in America to be executed for espionage in the last 100 years. Given the gravity of their offense, the gift of a city-killing weapon to the Soviets, it made sense. For Pollard, who spied for an ally, it would be overkill, unless we also executed every single spy we convicted.
  24. @leterip
    Finally some real progress. Well now we can rest easy that the medical community will tame the covid crisis in short order. The medical community is focusing their efforts on marginalization, intersectionality, justice frameworks, power structures, and every other postmodern buzzword. I am impressed that the author managed to include all these buzzwords in the very first paragraph.

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30801-1/fulltext

    Centring sexual and reproductive health and justice in the global COVID-19 response

    Global responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are converging with pervasive, existing sexual and reproductive health and justice inequities to disproportionately impact the health, wellbeing, and economic stability of women, girls, and vulnerable populations. People whose human rights are least protected are likely to experience unique difficulties from COVID-19. Women, girls, and marginalised groups are likely to carry a heavier burden of what will be the devastating downstream economic and social consequences of this pandemic. A sexual and reproductive health and justice framework—one that centres human rights, acknowledges intersecting injustices, recognises power structures, and unites across identities—is essential for monitoring and addressing the inequitable gender, health, and social effects of COVID-19.
     

    Thanks.

  25. @Reg Cæsar

    The number of people traveling by plane has dropped by about 96% amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to multiple metrics.
     
    The Northwest pilots' strike in 1998 had a similar, if not as large, effect at its hubs in Detroit, Memphis, and especially its HQ Mpls/St Paul. It was easier for many to ride out the strike than shift to other airlines. For one thing, the competition's flights would require a transfer, and everybody hates that.

    The hub system is a double-edged sword. Not to mention the fact that in hubs along the central spine of the country-- MSP, Chicago, St Louis, Memphis, Dallas, and especially Houston (from all directions) everything arrives at the same time.The


    It's like the Dr Pepper of noise-- at 10, 2, and 4. And 6 and 8 and 10 again.



    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/nvMAAOSwn~tdrZsa/s-l640.jpg

    2 words, Reg: Triple-paned windows. (or, is that 3 words, and you only need double-paned?)

    Also, St. Louis – not a hub anymore.
    Memphis – not a hub anymore, except at night when you’re trying to sleep and FedEx (now redundantly renamed “FedEx Express”!) has their big push out after the sort.

    The freight boys have been going gangbusters. Even more stuff is being bought on-line, and even though some of the passenger-airline widebodies have been running some freight-only runs, they aren’t really freighters with cargo doors on top, and the freight has gotta go, Kung Flu or no Kung Flu. I ran into a UPS pilot, and he told me some of their guys had a hard time getting out of China.

    Please, people, we’ve got to open it back up ourselves. Screw the Feds, screw the Governor, and screw the Mayor. I’m not putting up with but so much from these Kung Flutalitarians.

    .

    PS: The end of this comment reminded me of Charles Pewitt’s style. Has anyone heard from him lately? I’m kind of worried about that guy.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    2 words, Reg: Triple-paned windows. (or, is that 3 words, and you only need double-paned?)

     

    When I lived across the river from the airport, the planes only came over our neighborhood in thick foggy weather. If we could hear them, we couldn't see them. And vice-versa.

    Triple, double... I just learned that Mozambique has the highest Scrabble score of any nation, followed by one of the -stans, I forget which. Probably Kyrgyzstan.
  26. Anonymous[403] • Disclaimer says:

    I had a conversation today with someone with a pretty bad case of Trump Derangement syndrome. We were not talking about Trump at all, but rather the COVID-19 mess and I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart. The person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good. Is TDS what is stopping the Raoult protocols from becoming the standard treatment in the United States?

    Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    • Replies: @MarkinPNW
    Yes, on fakebook, err, facebook conversations.
    , @anon

    what is stopping the Raoult protocols from becoming the standard treatment in the United States?
     
    As far as I can tell, nothing. The initial holdup on widespread adoption was that there were supply constraints and now that has been fixed by Peter Navarro, and the supply chain Taskforce.

    As far as serious cases, it has been widely used in hospitals and doesn't work with the sickest patients.

    If it was the silver bullet. we would be done.

    There is the argument that it works if given early. The problem is if 99 out of 100 people live without taking it (for example), you need a lot of data to prove it helps. You are going to have a lot of stories from people who think it helped them.

    Now some people are saying you need zinc also.

    So I think it was a good idea to make it available and see how it works.
    , @ic1000
    > The [TDS] person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good... Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    Yes.

    Here is a backgrounder from the Times of India on hydroxychloroquine; that country makes 70% of the world's supply which is 200 million 200 mg tablets per day. According to the article, the multiple generic companies that make the dug are able to ramp up production to meet increased demand.
    , @Corvinus
    "I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart."

    Yet another anony sockpuppet on this hydroxychloroquine kick. Are you a medical professional? Again, there has been anecdotal evidence of its effectiveness AND its ineffectiveness. Let’s pause before some people say it is a cure all. It MAY help. Then again...

    https://whyy.org/articles/possible-treatment-for-covid-19-enters-clinical-trial-at-penn/

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/victoriaforster/2020/04/05/researchers-warn-that-covid-19-treatment-touted-by-trump-may-be-toxic-when-combined-with-diabetes-drug/#4b2ffe5855f8

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/927954

    https://www.sciencealert.com/small-trial-found-antimalarial-is-not-effective-for-treating-coronavirus

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamhaseltine/2020/03/25/study-shows-hydroxy-chloroquine-is-ineffective-against-covid-19—so-what-now/#35751123409b

    While I am in favor of any medical solution to Covid-19, studies must be conducted to ferret out potential side effects. It’s not like you can dole out HCQ like a Pez dispenser. There is a small sample size regarding is effectiveness. The gold standard clinical trials in the United States only just got underway.
  27. No reason for recreational flights when Democratic governors shut down everything cool and interesting.

    No reason for business flights when Democratic governors destroyed all “””nonessential””” commerce.

    And with Democratic governors, the fakestream media, and Drs. Poochy and Scarfy threatening Americans with 18 months of forced disemployment whilst awaiting a nonexistent vaccine, people are scared shitless about their economic futures, so they won’t be spending money on air travel or much of anything.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite

    And with Democratic governors, the fakestream media, and Drs. Poochy and Scarfy threatening Americans with 18 months of forced disemployment
     
    Doctor "Its not just for gays. Everyone is equally susceptible to AIDS" Fauci casually threw out 18 months the other night without adding that he has a government job so won't miss a check and a government pension so my and everyone else's 401k imploding isn't a problem. Notice how many of the "lockdown for X months" advocates aren't going to be affected financially at all. "Sure, you common folk will be destroyed but that's a small price to pay. Nothing else to be done".
    , @anon
    Unfortunately, not just Democratic governors, many Republicans as well. The one in MD even shut down all recreational boating because, you know, boats often pass within 6 feet of one another. Or maybe it's the wind that blows the virus about.
    In rural New Hampshire that has had a handful of deaths, Gov. Sununu put residents under house arrest. So much for "Live free or die". I seem to recall his father was a Deep Stater in his day; I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
  28. I think skiing is getting a bad rap here on iSteve. When you’re actually skiing, you’re wearing gloves as a matter of course. And skiing skews very young.
    The superspreader was a barman. I’ve had myself some fun après ski days and agree it’s an important part of the ski ecology but for young families introducing kids to skiing, there’s NEVER been a better time. Cheap cheap cheap season passes and cheap equipment from vendors who are begging for your business.
    Skiing will do just fine.
    As with everything else Corona, what will suffer is 15-35 year olds having fun*gasp!*

    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    "When you’re actually skiing, you’re wearing gloves as a matter of course"

    I don't think anyone has suggested that skiers were picking up the corona virus whilst actually skiing.
  29. @education realist
    My son is in sales and he had house calls right up to the moment the governor shut down his state.

    Many pundits who are by nature introverts and germophobes are predicting that opening the eonomy back up wouldn't do any good, that most people would stay holed up in their houses.

    I think that's arrant nonsense. And it'd be a lot cheaper to subsidize businesses through reduced times while they collect money from the people who don't fear the virus.

    I have a trip to Canada planned in June and one in Hawaii in August. I'm planning on both of them, if the idiots running things allow it.

    I can no longer travel to the beach because my state beaches were forced closed. I can’t go to the state parks because they were forced closed. I am now uncomfortable traveling out of state because counties in my state are Vequiring Papers! Papers, please! to prove you’re a resident, and so I’m not sure if I leave that I can come home.

    I’ve got 3 kids bored out of their minds with no swimming, fencing, archery, baseball, playgrounds, band, choir, jazz band, d and d, board games, or fun.

    We’re not afraid to go out. I have already written every summer camp and program my kids are hoping goes on this summer saying we will be there, we will not cancel. if they do, I’m driving to South Dakota and camping at Custer State Park indefinitely.

    i can only hope others like me exist.

    • Agree: Lot, education realist
    • Replies: @education realist
    I share a house with my brother, and he's a frontline worker (manager of a rich folks' grocery store). I told him to take a few days off during my spring break and we'd go on a road trip to see his son, just see pretty things.

    Then I realized that bathrooms everywhere are closed, so no go. We're still going driving this weekend, just to get out.

    In my area, I am really pretty confident that people will be going out and about the minute this shutdown is lifted. Parking lots are crowded, only about 50% of people are wearing masks, and streets are buzzing with cars.

    Good luck with the kids! and if you can figure out how to buy a small portapotty, it'll be helpful in case things haven't opened up.
  30. @adreadline

    I have a close family member who nearly died from this and I say open the country in mid-May. No later. You will not eliminate this. There is always risk in life and corona is simply the reality check.

    Bubonic was around hundreds of years before they even knew how it was spread.I have accepted possibility we may not be able to “fix” this and that is just life.
     

    Why in mid-May? Why not tomorrow, this Easter (it's Saturday here already)? We'd have churches packed, at least. But really, why wait until then? You're asking for another whole month, maybe even a bit more, but no later -- June 1st cannot wait, then? Why? Your explanation seems incomplete, even vague to me. If it's unstoppable and unfixable, why wait ~30 more days rather than one or two weeks? You think people will be calmer by then, or more impatient instead?

    Also, I'm sorry for this, considering your situation... but you should then consider writing the president directly by May... and asking,


    President Trump, we have waited enough.
    This cannot go on, Mr. President.
    Mr. President, let it rip.
    Mr. President, OPEN THE GATES.
     

    To answer your question about mid-May, many states currently have their school closures and shelter-at-home orders sun setting in late-April to mid-May. Just let existing dictates expire is my proposal.

    I did enjoy your Mr. Smith-goes-to-Washington energy with the letter writing and Easter Sunday suggestions though.

    • Thanks: adreadline
    • Replies: @JMcG
    My window licking democrat governor, Tom Wolfe (spit) has already ordered all schools to remain closed for the rest of the year. For the first time, I sense a little rebellion brewing.
  31. @Reg Cæsar

    I am “voluntarily” not visiting Atlantic City because there is nothing to do there that I can’t do at home...
     
    ...on your on your dining room table.


    Touring the Abandoned Atlantic City Sites That Inspired the Monopoly Board

    https://i.redd.it/8dcbhxg3lvv21.jpg

    I never noticed that properties with common colors are also in the same neighborhood in Atlantic City.

    Of course, Illinois Ave and St Charles Pl are now RIP, with the former now known as MLK Blvd and the latter being subsumed by the Showboat.

    This probably qualifies as common knowledge, but the actual property is spelled Marven Gardens. The “ven” comes from Ventnor, which is also a property in the game.

    • Replies: @Bubba

    Of course, Illinois Ave and St Charles Pl are now RIP, with the former now known as MLK Blvd and the latter being subsumed by the Showboat.

     

    Touché!
  32. I live close enough to an international airport landing route that I can testify that the number of flights is absolutely not down 96%. I would estimate closer to 60%. Who is on these flights? One thing for sure is the deep state new world order middle managers have to get around.

    You fly when we tell you to fly.

    (Hypothetical quotation; I don’t even know anybody who admits to being a deep state new world order middle manager although I have my paranoid suspicions about a couple of people I know.)

    • Replies: @Anon87
    You are wrong, at least in regards to passenger flights. Those absolutely have dropped off by 90% at least for one major.

    What you are seeing and hearing is most likely cargo.
  33. @leterip
    Finally some real progress. Well now we can rest easy that the medical community will tame the covid crisis in short order. The medical community is focusing their efforts on marginalization, intersectionality, justice frameworks, power structures, and every other postmodern buzzword. I am impressed that the author managed to include all these buzzwords in the very first paragraph.

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30801-1/fulltext

    Centring sexual and reproductive health and justice in the global COVID-19 response

    Global responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic are converging with pervasive, existing sexual and reproductive health and justice inequities to disproportionately impact the health, wellbeing, and economic stability of women, girls, and vulnerable populations. People whose human rights are least protected are likely to experience unique difficulties from COVID-19. Women, girls, and marginalised groups are likely to carry a heavier burden of what will be the devastating downstream economic and social consequences of this pandemic. A sexual and reproductive health and justice framework—one that centres human rights, acknowledges intersecting injustices, recognises power structures, and unites across identities—is essential for monitoring and addressing the inequitable gender, health, and social effects of COVID-19.
     

    Women and girls are disproportionately affected when men die in vastly larger numbers. Seems legit.

  34. @Anonymous
    I had a conversation today with someone with a pretty bad case of Trump Derangement syndrome. We were not talking about Trump at all, but rather the COVID-19 mess and I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart. The person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good. Is TDS what is stopping the Raoult protocols from becoming the standard treatment in the United States?

    Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    Yes, on fakebook, err, facebook conversations.

  35. @unit472
    I haven't looked into it ( but I'm sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport. What's next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?

    I haven’t looked into it ( but I’m sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport. What’s next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?

    Oops!

    I can just imagine the conversation between the Rental Car executive and the guy who manages the lot.

    Lot Manager: Where should I park all these unused rental cars?

    Executive: How about over there – in that big field of dry grass. But wait till tomorrow. I hear it’s supposed to be windy.

  36. anon[385] • Disclaimer says:

    Japan begins moving supply chains out of China.

    https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/east-asia/article/3079126/japan-pay-firms-leave-china-relocate-production-elsewhere-part

    Japan has earmarked US$2.2 billion of its record economic stimulus package to help its manufacturers shift production out of China, as the coronavirus disrupts supply chains between the major trading partners.

    The extra budget, compiled to try to offset the devastating effects of the pandemic, includes 220 billion yen (US$2 billion) for companies shifting production back to Japan and 23.5 billion yen for those seeking to move production to other countries, according to details of the plan posted online.

    What price the wet markets now?

  37. Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?

    Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter. Many of you really thought 250,000 dead in the US was “a conservative estimate”. Now we have established precedent for mass house arrest and police drones following you taking a walk in the park, and gentle philanthropist Bill Gates pushing tattoo rfid chips.

    And hey dummies, those of us worried about the economy weren’t talking about wall street. We were talking about the ability for hard working healthy adults to give their kids a hot meal at night. You know, those things called JOBS provided by private industry in free market capitalism. Something that some who exist living on publically funded college campus salaries or donations from rich sponsors may have forgotten about!

    If there’s one accurate projection from all of this, it is that we are indeed living in the century of Communist China. Hope you nerdy, pearl clutching OCD cucks enjoy it. At least the Chinese have high IQs amiright?

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    'Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.'

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    An [Agree] is not good enough.

    BRAVO!
    , @Alice
    it wasn't even exponential. It's quadratic.

    the charts are cumulative charts, and the individual data is LINEAR. you integrate cx, you get cx^2/2. that curve is a freaking parabola over and over and over again. the people here are supposed to be smart enough to understand freshman calculus.

    anyway can't agree strongly enough with your sentiment.

    , @dfordoom

    Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?
     
    So how do you explain the fact that shutdown hysteria is happening across the entire western world?
  38. @ScarletNumber
    I never noticed that properties with common colors are also in the same neighborhood in Atlantic City.

    Of course, Illinois Ave and St Charles Pl are now RIP, with the former now known as MLK Blvd and the latter being subsumed by the Showboat.

    This probably qualifies as common knowledge, but the actual property is spelled Marven Gardens. The "ven" comes from Ventnor, which is also a property in the game.

    Of course, Illinois Ave and St Charles Pl are now RIP, with the former now known as MLK Blvd and the latter being subsumed by the Showboat.

    Touché!

  39. My advice on getting the economy started is don’t listen to those whose thinking shut it down in the first place.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  40. anon[797] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    I had a conversation today with someone with a pretty bad case of Trump Derangement syndrome. We were not talking about Trump at all, but rather the COVID-19 mess and I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart. The person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good. Is TDS what is stopping the Raoult protocols from becoming the standard treatment in the United States?

    Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    what is stopping the Raoult protocols from becoming the standard treatment in the United States?

    As far as I can tell, nothing. The initial holdup on widespread adoption was that there were supply constraints and now that has been fixed by Peter Navarro, and the supply chain Taskforce.

    As far as serious cases, it has been widely used in hospitals and doesn’t work with the sickest patients.

    If it was the silver bullet. we would be done.

    There is the argument that it works if given early. The problem is if 99 out of 100 people live without taking it (for example), you need a lot of data to prove it helps. You are going to have a lot of stories from people who think it helped them.

    Now some people are saying you need zinc also.

    So I think it was a good idea to make it available and see how it works.

  41. @Anonymous
    I had a conversation today with someone with a pretty bad case of Trump Derangement syndrome. We were not talking about Trump at all, but rather the COVID-19 mess and I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart. The person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good. Is TDS what is stopping the Raoult protocols from becoming the standard treatment in the United States?

    Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    > The [TDS] person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good… Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    Yes.

    Here is a backgrounder from the Times of India on hydroxychloroquine; that country makes 70% of the world’s supply which is 200 million 200 mg tablets per day. According to the article, the multiple generic companies that make the dug are able to ramp up production to meet increased demand.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    Here is a backgrounder from the Times of India on hydroxychloroquine; that country makes 70% of the world’s supply which is 200 million 200 mg tablets per day. According to the article, the multiple generic companies that make the dug are able to ramp up production to meet increased demand.
     
    And this is the real problem.

    There's no profit there for AbbeVie, Merck, GlaxoSK, etc.
  42. @newrouter
    >In reality, most Chinese products can also be made in the USA or elsewhere in Asia.”<

    I don't see why pharmaceutical production was "shipped" to the Chicomms. It is bulk material handling with some chemistry. Not much labor . Apparently easier to export than to reform FDA.

    Correct, the USA is a big producer and big exporter of chemicals.

    Chemical production is capital intensive and labor light.

    Top 10 chemical exporters in 2018

    China: US$80 billion (13.7% of total exported chemicals)
    United States: $52.7 billion (9.1%)
    Belgium: $41.7 billion (7.2%)
    Germany: $36.3 billion (6.2%)

    [MORE]

    Ireland: $34.1 billion (5.9%)
    South Korea: $30.9 billion (5.3%)
    Netherlands: $30.7 billion (5.3%)
    Japan: $24.8 billion (4.3%)
    Switzerland: $21.3 billion (3.7%)
    India: $19.8 billion (3.4%)
    Singapore: $17.5 billion (3%)
    Saudi Arabia: $17 billion (2.9%)
    France: $15.6 billion (2.7%)
    Taiwan: $13.7 billion (2.3%)
    United Kingdom: $12.7 billion (2.2%)

  43. I’m lucky to be retired, so that my excursions have neither increased, nor decreased. The only shutdown that grates on me is the closure of the public library, so I can’t get my weekly fix of a couple of good histories to read and a DVD or two for Friday & Saturday night “theater.”

    A few times a week I visit the Flightradar24 website, and over the last month my visits revealed a considerable decrease in air traffic, including a decrease in non-FedEx/non-UPS air freight flights. Passenger air traffic has greatly reduced, but I’ve seen very little decrease in private/corporate jet traffic. Here’s the site: https://www.flightradar24.com

    • Replies: @Simon Tugmutton

    my weekly fix of a couple of good histories to read
     
    Have you tried downloading ebooks from your library? You don't necessarily have to read them on a tablet -- a computer will do.

    And don't forget Project Gutenberg:

    https://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

    Also this is pretty cool:

    https://unglue.it/
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Though I've read Mr. Tugmutton's reply, I feel for you, Auntie. I'm not retired, but I was used to being able to go a couple of miles and pick out a few DVDs anytime. (Sometimes it takes 3 of them to get one watchable movie out of 'em.)

    I know, "Netfilx" "Hulu", whatever, ... you're probably right.
  44. The scary thing is that so many BELIEVE that tomorrow must be like today ,when for most of mankind’s history, tomorrow will be like yesterday. It was only 200 years ago when if you wanted to go anywhere you did it on the back of a horse. That was first class. Steerage you walked.

    Cross an ocean would take weeks on a ship. I don’t even want to think about sanitation and dining. It wasn’t a 100,000 ton steel dreadnaught with a casino onboard.

    I used to scoff at James Howard Kunstler’s thesis that we would return to a World Made By Hand but African birth rates and Chinese viruses show that is really where we are heading. You can’t make a modern world out of an African IQ or an Asiatic dictatorship.

  45. @Lot
    Hotel data for March 28-April 4 versus same week of 2019

    Prices down 42%
    Occupancy down 69%

    Revenue down 83%

    One of many major industries getting hit far worse than the Great Depression. Each of them with employees, suppliers, local governments relying on tax revenue, stock and bond holders.

    As Steve is now drifting away from Team #ShutItDown, American patriots should remember there’s a lot of room for reasonable differences of opinion among ourselves. Let’s keep sight of the real enemy:

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-02-10/italy-s-hopes-for-closer-china-ties-hit-by-virus-flight-ban-rift

    China’s government is pushing back globally against virus-based travel restrictions, including efforts to convince Italy to rescind its ban.

    Vice Foreign Minister Qin Gang met with Italy’s ambassador on Feb. 6 to protest the halt to flights, and the Foreign Ministry later said in a statement that China is “strongly dissatisfied with the overreaction and restrictions of the Italian side.”



    My iSteve comment from April 2019:

    “Dear President Trump: Ramp up the China tariffs like you promised already. We don’t need their plastic junk anyway. We already have too much stuff, and despite the whining from the business lobby, the first round didn’t do a thing negative to our record breaking economy.

    Did anyone notice prices of things go up the past year? In reality, most Chinese products can also be made in the USA or elsewhere in Asia.”

    Hotel data for March 28-April 4 versus same week of 2019

    Prices down 42%

    I would probably do quite a bit more travelling if hotels were cheaper. If you have a lot of kids, and you want to take all of them to certain attractions at the appropriate age, you might wind up taking lots of extended weekends visiting places over and over again.

    But I just can’t see paying Mr. Patel $200/night. I’ve never understood hotel room prices. They seem completely outrageous to me.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Rosie, I've always run into the .Indian owners at the lower-budget places, the ones that were around $60 to $80 a night. Cities tax the crap out of people at hotels/motels, so they don't make all that. That explains part of the ridiculously high prices.

    On the way across the country a few years back, I was in eastern Mississippi with a pick-up truck loaded up with lots of valuable stuff. There were no guests at this motel when I drove up at about midnight, so I bargained the .Indian lady down to $40 cash. ("Do you want to make ANY money tonight?" was my next line if she didn't go for it.) The problem was I didn't trust that area, and I couldn't get out all the valuable stuff to extract it without messing up a 2 hour packing job (tarps are a PITA). I backed the truck to within 3 ft. of my room window, but I didn't get all that much sleep. I didn't check for bugs.
    , @Hebrew National
    Motel 6. A lot of them (the corporate-owned ones anyway) have been fixed up and upgraded recently. At least in northern California.
  46. @dfordoom

    In other words, if all government agencies lifted all restrictions tomorrow, how much air travel would come back the next day, the next week, the next month, and the next year?
     
    It's not the restrictions that are the problem, it's the hysteria. People are staying in their homes through a combination of fear of arrest and fear of the Corona Plague.

    And both government and the media continue to fuel the hysteria.

    The only way the economy will bounce back is if the government acts to shut down the hysteria. But western governments show no signs of being willing to do that.

    “And both government and the media continue to fuel the hysteria.”

    I unplugged my DirecTV for The Duration. If you’re rocking an IQ supra 115, unplugging from fakestream media will preserve your sanity.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @adreadline

    I unplugged my DirecTV for The Duration. If you’re rocking an IQ supra 115, unplugging from fakestream media will preserve your sanity.
     
    I did so too, and I also uninstalled AOL from my computer so to not be brainwashed by the liberal lamestream media. I'm getting the real news through Myspace on my BlackBerry for The Duration and beyond.
  47. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    I think skiing is getting a bad rap here on iSteve. When you’re actually skiing, you’re wearing gloves as a matter of course. And skiing skews very young.
    The superspreader was a barman. I’ve had myself some fun après ski days and agree it’s an important part of the ski ecology but for young families introducing kids to skiing, there’s NEVER been a better time. Cheap cheap cheap season passes and cheap equipment from vendors who are begging for your business.
    Skiing will do just fine.
    As with everything else Corona, what will suffer is 15-35 year olds having fun*gasp!*

    “When you’re actually skiing, you’re wearing gloves as a matter of course”

    I don’t think anyone has suggested that skiers were picking up the corona virus whilst actually skiing.

  48. @Testing12
    Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?

    Shame on every one of the so called "conservative" commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter. Many of you really thought 250,000 dead in the US was "a conservative estimate". Now we have established precedent for mass house arrest and police drones following you taking a walk in the park, and gentle philanthropist Bill Gates pushing tattoo rfid chips.

    And hey dummies, those of us worried about the economy weren't talking about wall street. We were talking about the ability for hard working healthy adults to give their kids a hot meal at night. You know, those things called JOBS provided by private industry in free market capitalism. Something that some who exist living on publically funded college campus salaries or donations from rich sponsors may have forgotten about!

    If there's one accurate projection from all of this, it is that we are indeed living in the century of Communist China. Hope you nerdy, pearl clutching OCD cucks enjoy it. At least the Chinese have high IQs amiright?

    ‘Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.’

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.

    • Agree: Alice
    • Replies: @Rosie

    ‘Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.’

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.
     
    This is wierd. Is the economy really so fragile that we will come to ruin as a result of a few weeks forced vacation? If so, that's probably something we should think about remedying.
  49. @unit472
    I haven't looked into it ( but I'm sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport. What's next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?

    “What’s next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?”

    Unit472, the two most sought after “professionals” will soon be Arsonist & Auto Thief. It won’t just be the casinos, it’ll spread to a bunch of newly built/half built structures.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    Just don't use the term "Jewish lightning" or we'll hear from Jack.
  50. @Achmed E. Newman
    2 words, Reg: Triple-paned windows. (or, is that 3 words, and you only need double-paned?)

    Also, St. Louis - not a hub anymore.
    Memphis - not a hub anymore, except at night when you're trying to sleep and FedEx (now redundantly renamed "FedEx Express"!) has their big push out after the sort.

    The freight boys have been going gangbusters. Even more stuff is being bought on-line, and even though some of the passenger-airline widebodies have been running some freight-only runs, they aren't really freighters with cargo doors on top, and the freight has gotta go, Kung Flu or no Kung Flu. I ran into a UPS pilot, and he told me some of their guys had a hard time getting out of China.

    Please, people, we've got to open it back up ourselves. Screw the Feds, screw the Governor, and screw the Mayor. I'm not putting up with but so much from these Kung Flutalitarians.


    .

    PS: The end of this comment reminded me of Charles Pewitt's style. Has anyone heard from him lately? I'm kind of worried about that guy.

    2 words, Reg: Triple-paned windows. (or, is that 3 words, and you only need double-paned?)

    When I lived across the river from the airport, the planes only came over our neighborhood in thick foggy weather. If we could hear them, we couldn’t see them. And vice-versa.

    Triple, double… I just learned that Mozambique has the highest Scrabble score of any nation, followed by one of the -stans, I forget which. Probably Kyrgyzstan.

  51. @Bubba
    He should have been executed like the Rosenbergs. Yet he wears his treason as a badge of honor and Israel extols the bastard.

    Jack D will be along shortly to educate us on why only one of the Rosenbergs should have been executed.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Eisenhower considered giving Ethel a reprieve, because she was a woman. However, she was the mastermind.
  52. @Anon
    To answer your question about mid-May, many states currently have their school closures and shelter-at-home orders sun setting in late-April to mid-May. Just let existing dictates expire is my proposal.

    I did enjoy your Mr. Smith-goes-to-Washington energy with the letter writing and Easter Sunday suggestions though.

    My window licking democrat governor, Tom Wolfe (spit) has already ordered all schools to remain closed for the rest of the year. For the first time, I sense a little rebellion brewing.

  53. @unit472
    I haven't looked into it ( but I'm sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport. What's next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?

    I haven’t looked into it ( but I’m sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport.

    When I wintered there 30 years ago, they couldn’t have had 3500 cars in total:

    https://worldpopulationreview.com/us-counties/fl/lee-county-population/

    Cape Coral is now nearly 200,000, or almost triple what it was then. It’s passed Fort Lauderdale and even with Tallahassee, which is also growing fast.

  54. @Steve Sailer
    Right, I'm probably not going to the Pacific Opera Project for a year or so for minor league opera. It's a real pleasure to sit in the first row for a reasonable price, but I don't want professionally loud singers blasting away at me from 10 feet away.

    I sent them $100 to help them survive without me.

    ATTN, ATTN: Mr. Sailer:

    I once knew a really rich guy who chartered a Gulfstream IV to fly himself and a pretty woman from LA to San Francisco to scope out (as in opera glasses) a major league performance of La Traviata (that choice was no accident). IMHO, it’s a waste of money to spend more than a hundred bucks on a whore.

    [MORE]

    As you noted earlier, “We can probably be more confident that salesmen earn their pay more than just about any other type of job.” As one of my colleagues said with respect to working in commie virus hot spots, “Ya gotta know the territory” – otherwise it’s your funeral, pal. Speaking of which, it’s a credit to your classy website that nobody (to my knowledge) has made any tasteless “Janitor In A Drum” jokes.

    Anyhow, we salesmen are among the mostly unsung heroes taking great personal risks in maintaining the flow of essential goods and services. In our face-to-face biz, a mask ain’t gonna’ cut it. If one of us dies in the line of duty, attention must be paid. He’s not to be allowed to fall into his grave like an old dog. Attention, attention must be finally paid to such a person.

    Your Humble Solicitous Salesman,
    “Slick” Willy Loman
    Loma Linda, California
    (formerly Brooklyn)

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Didn't the Lomans live in the Bronx?
  55. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    'Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.'

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.

    ‘Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.’

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.

    This is wierd. Is the economy really so fragile that we will come to ruin as a result of a few weeks forced vacation? If so, that’s probably something we should think about remedying.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    This is wierd. Is the economy really so fragile that we will come to ruin as a result of a few weeks forced vacation?
     
    Yes, this is quite possible. The global economy has been designed around the concepts of, "just-in-time, " and, "lean." That means there is very little resilience in it. Steady cashflow for the purpose of servicing payments and debt is critical.

    If so, that’s probably something we should think about remedying.
     
    Yes, we should look at designing a more resilient system. I'm not sure how far that will go. Just-in-time can and should be dialed down, but it doesn't make sense for businesses to do a 180 and start carrying years of inventory.
    , @William Badwhite
    Total debt in the US (personal, corporate, government at all levels) is at about 3x GDP. It doesn't take a lot of disruption in cash flows for that house of cards to come down. Everyone (I don't mean literally everyone for the spergs here) is levered. For example see all the restaurants (search on "cheesecake factory rent strike") that have announced they're not going to pay rent. The problem is very few landlords are Scrooge McDuck and can wave their hands and say "that's fine, pay when you can". The landlords are levered as well. So they're going to have to default on loans. Follow the arrows the rest of the way.


    If so, that’s probably something we should think about remedying.
     
    The debt pile is something we should definitely think about remedying. However for that to happen politicians will need to 1) begin disregarding their owners (err, sorry banks) and 2) to start reining in government spending or else dramatically raise taxes. So in other words its not going to happen.
    , @Anon87
    And where do you work? 10-15 million Americans want to trade places with you.
  56. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "And both government and the media continue to fuel the hysteria."

    I unplugged my DirecTV for The Duration. If you're rocking an IQ supra 115, unplugging from fakestream media will preserve your sanity.

    I unplugged my DirecTV for The Duration. If you’re rocking an IQ supra 115, unplugging from fakestream media will preserve your sanity.

    I did so too, and I also uninstalled AOL from my computer so to not be brainwashed by the liberal lamestream media. I’m getting the real news through Myspace on my BlackBerry for The Duration and beyond.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "I also uninstalled AOL from my computer so to not be brainwashed by the liberal lamestream media. I’m getting the real news through Myspace on my BlackBerry for The Duration and beyond."

    LOL. I live in the sticks, my internet is slow, and so DirecTV is my only option. No Netflix or any of that newfangled Millennial stuff works out here.
  57. @Achmed E. Newman
    You WOULD miss it were you a real jet-setter. Those who don't have 3 X the amount of money for air fare, would miss it too, because they couldn't afford to go very often. I have personal data, from having bought a ticket round-trip on a low-budget airline RT across the country 3 decades ago. I shopped around off-and-on for 3 weeks, which back then meant calling the 800 numbers in the yellow pages, going to a couple of travel agencies, etc., and way ahead of time.

    I was on a low budget, but the ticket was $450. Never mind the BLS BS inflation numbers - that is about $1,000 in today's money - for a cheap, cheap fare. Not even counting the super low fares available right now, one could get a X-country RT ticket for 300-odd bucks.

    The airlines have cut costs amazingly over the years, though, of course, the price of oil is a factor. It's gone up and down, but air fares have dropped pretty steadily in real dollars. However, the one thing that will suffer, though probably not a big factor for the young people that would rather deal on their phones than with people in person, is true customer service, by live people. You can only bring that down so far with call centers in the Philippines. The gate agents are swamped, and both they and the flight attendants burdened with new TSA rules.

    Speaking of the TSA, I completely agree with you on that security theatre show. That's not the airlines' fault, though. That airport screening mess is something you'd have to still put up with, I.D., but if you want to be treated nicely, buy a 1st-class ticket.

    “Speaking of the TSA, I completely agree with you on that security theater show.”

    Just thought I’d mention that a nephew works for the TSA. His std shift had been 4, 10hr days. He currently is working 2 days, but still paid (salary) full. He’s assigned to McCarran International.

  58. Anonymous[970] • Disclaimer says:

    Surely, one side effect of this current plague is the demonstration that a huge part of the notional economy of western nations – notably the so called ‘service sector’ – is really just a superfluous, extraneous pile of useless garbage, a non essential side show that exists primarily for making a lot of noise.
    Of course, what really matters is actual production – as the mask shortage tells us.

    Interesting to note that whilst China has basically cornered the western world’s means of production to call it its own, The Economist magazine, and not to mention the vast bulk of the economics profession, has cheered and urged this process on.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Another fact that one must always bear in mind is this:

    Contemporary China is the biggest, most lucrative cash generating engine the world has ever seen. Forget the silver mines of Potosi, Victorian Britain, 20th century America, OPEC in the 1970s, etc etc, no, modern China beats them all hollow in terms of the sheer volume of lucre on tap.
    From this fact, another fact is *absolutely certain*, namely the political and business elites of the west, including the editorial board of certain execrable British weekly magazine, are being *paid off massively* in order to keep the present regime, the superlative China tap of endless cash, going. To repeat myself, that is an *absolute certainty*. If one studies history, or indeed life in general, in all nations, at all times, everywhere, such a pattern *always but always* asserts itself whenever the stewardship of vast, massive flows of cash are concentrated in the hands of the very few.

    Mark my words.
  59. @Intelligent Dasein
    I miss the days when air travel was something ordinary people did very rarely, when the term "jet set" connoted great wealth and prestige. I miss the cheerier service, more legroom, and better food. I miss breezing through the concourse without the 2 hour security lines.

    The model that the airlines had been following recently needed to go away, with or without the virus.

    Airline travel should be safe, legal, and rare.

  60. @Auntie Analogue
    I'm lucky to be retired, so that my excursions have neither increased, nor decreased. The only shutdown that grates on me is the closure of the public library, so I can't get my weekly fix of a couple of good histories to read and a DVD or two for Friday & Saturday night "theater."

    A few times a week I visit the Flightradar24 website, and over the last month my visits revealed a considerable decrease in air traffic, including a decrease in non-FedEx/non-UPS air freight flights. Passenger air traffic has greatly reduced, but I've seen very little decrease in private/corporate jet traffic. Here's the site: https://www.flightradar24.com

    my weekly fix of a couple of good histories to read

    Have you tried downloading ebooks from your library? You don’t necessarily have to read them on a tablet — a computer will do.

    And don’t forget Project Gutenberg:

    https://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

    Also this is pretty cool:

    https://unglue.it/

  61. Anon[174] • Disclaimer says:

    With all due respect, Steve, other than among your readers skiing has not acquired a particularly dangerous image with respect to coronavirus. This is something that you”noticed,” but the media hasn’t picked up on it. It doesn’t fit into any narrative, like “the dirty Chinks screwed us over,” or “our precious black citizens and immigrant Latinks work-we-won’t-do workers are DISPARATE” or “Trump has fubared everything, and he’s Hitler.”

    Rebranding your ski theory as “Elite Davos globalists in corporate jets spread plague at ski lodge Zionist confabs” might pull it out of obscurity.

  62. @indocon
    Jonathan Pollard released!!
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/10/politics/exclusive-interview-bop-carjaval/index.html

    There is a retired Federal supermax guard called Astheketurns on youtube about Pollard. Apparently he berated his mother all though visiting hour without asking how she was and the guard was so disgusted he had a word with him about improving his attitude lest he fall down the stairs. He also said one day he and a colleague were escorting her through tight security and the other fellow admitted he had forgotten the long code to punch in a door, Pollard’s mother immediately piped up with it (causing the guards’ eyes to meet as that meant it would have to be changed). I think Pollard’s family may have had a lot to do with the campaign to free him.

  63. @Testing12
    Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?

    Shame on every one of the so called "conservative" commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter. Many of you really thought 250,000 dead in the US was "a conservative estimate". Now we have established precedent for mass house arrest and police drones following you taking a walk in the park, and gentle philanthropist Bill Gates pushing tattoo rfid chips.

    And hey dummies, those of us worried about the economy weren't talking about wall street. We were talking about the ability for hard working healthy adults to give their kids a hot meal at night. You know, those things called JOBS provided by private industry in free market capitalism. Something that some who exist living on publically funded college campus salaries or donations from rich sponsors may have forgotten about!

    If there's one accurate projection from all of this, it is that we are indeed living in the century of Communist China. Hope you nerdy, pearl clutching OCD cucks enjoy it. At least the Chinese have high IQs amiright?

    An [Agree] is not good enough.

    BRAVO!

  64. @Auntie Analogue
    I'm lucky to be retired, so that my excursions have neither increased, nor decreased. The only shutdown that grates on me is the closure of the public library, so I can't get my weekly fix of a couple of good histories to read and a DVD or two for Friday & Saturday night "theater."

    A few times a week I visit the Flightradar24 website, and over the last month my visits revealed a considerable decrease in air traffic, including a decrease in non-FedEx/non-UPS air freight flights. Passenger air traffic has greatly reduced, but I've seen very little decrease in private/corporate jet traffic. Here's the site: https://www.flightradar24.com

    Though I’ve read Mr. Tugmutton’s reply, I feel for you, Auntie. I’m not retired, but I was used to being able to go a couple of miles and pick out a few DVDs anytime. (Sometimes it takes 3 of them to get one watchable movie out of ’em.)

    I know, “Netfilx” “Hulu”, whatever, … you’re probably right.

  65. @Rosie

    Hotel data for March 28-April 4 versus same week of 2019

    Prices down 42%
     
    I would probably do quite a bit more travelling if hotels were cheaper. If you have a lot of kids, and you want to take all of them to certain attractions at the appropriate age, you might wind up taking lots of extended weekends visiting places over and over again.

    But I just can't see paying Mr. Patel $200/night. I've never understood hotel room prices. They seem completely outrageous to me.

    Rosie, I’ve always run into the .Indian owners at the lower-budget places, the ones that were around $60 to $80 a night. Cities tax the crap out of people at hotels/motels, so they don’t make all that. That explains part of the ridiculously high prices.

    On the way across the country a few years back, I was in eastern Mississippi with a pick-up truck loaded up with lots of valuable stuff. There were no guests at this motel when I drove up at about midnight, so I bargained the .Indian lady down to $40 cash. (“Do you want to make ANY money tonight?” was my next line if she didn’t go for it.) The problem was I didn’t trust that area, and I couldn’t get out all the valuable stuff to extract it without messing up a 2 hour packing job (tarps are a PITA). I backed the truck to within 3 ft. of my room window, but I didn’t get all that much sleep. I didn’t check for bugs.

  66. Think of the poor people who own homes on a couple continents. This really sucks, and it has not been a choice.

  67. Anonymous[309] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Surely, one side effect of this current plague is the demonstration that a huge part of the notional economy of western nations - notably the so called 'service sector' - is really just a superfluous, extraneous pile of useless garbage, a non essential side show that exists primarily for making a lot of noise.
    Of course, what really matters is actual production - as the mask shortage tells us.

    Interesting to note that whilst China has basically cornered the western world's means of production to call it its own, The Economist magazine, and not to mention the vast bulk of the economics profession, has cheered and urged this process on.

    Another fact that one must always bear in mind is this:

    Contemporary China is the biggest, most lucrative cash generating engine the world has ever seen. Forget the silver mines of Potosi, Victorian Britain, 20th century America, OPEC in the 1970s, etc etc, no, modern China beats them all hollow in terms of the sheer volume of lucre on tap.
    From this fact, another fact is *absolutely certain*, namely the political and business elites of the west, including the editorial board of certain execrable British weekly magazine, are being *paid off massively* in order to keep the present regime, the superlative China tap of endless cash, going. To repeat myself, that is an *absolute certainty*. If one studies history, or indeed life in general, in all nations, at all times, everywhere, such a pattern *always but always* asserts itself whenever the stewardship of vast, massive flows of cash are concentrated in the hands of the very few.

    Mark my words.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Knowing the habitual and instinctive way subcon Indians act and behave, it is also *absolutely certain* that very senior US Congressmen and Senators are being secretly paid off - with astronomically large amounts of cash - to extend the so called 'H1b visa' program for Indians to the fullest extent possible.

    Count on it.
    , @Steve Sailer
    Saudi Arabia has generated a bit of cash too.

    South Africa's mines were lucrative as well. Churchill kept his house in 1938 because of a South African Jewish millionaire's intelligent generosity.

    Still, I suspect the Inner Party sells out cheap.

    Senator Robert Kerr (D-OK) back in the 1950s was known as the man who really ought to be President because he was so much smarter than everybody else in Washington, but he was just too crooked for the job.

    , @Steve Sailer
    Saudi Arabia has generated a bit of cash too.

    South Africa's mines were lucrative as well. Churchill kept his house in 1938 because of a South African Jewish millionaire's intelligent generosity.

    Still, I suspect the Inner Party sells out cheap.

    Senator Robert Kerr (D-OK) back in the 1950s was known as the man who really ought to be President because he was so much smarter than everybody else in Washington, but he was just too crooked for the job. It's not clear to me if he took more frequent bribes than the other politicians, but he apparently demanded bigger bribes.

  68. Anonymous[309] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Another fact that one must always bear in mind is this:

    Contemporary China is the biggest, most lucrative cash generating engine the world has ever seen. Forget the silver mines of Potosi, Victorian Britain, 20th century America, OPEC in the 1970s, etc etc, no, modern China beats them all hollow in terms of the sheer volume of lucre on tap.
    From this fact, another fact is *absolutely certain*, namely the political and business elites of the west, including the editorial board of certain execrable British weekly magazine, are being *paid off massively* in order to keep the present regime, the superlative China tap of endless cash, going. To repeat myself, that is an *absolute certainty*. If one studies history, or indeed life in general, in all nations, at all times, everywhere, such a pattern *always but always* asserts itself whenever the stewardship of vast, massive flows of cash are concentrated in the hands of the very few.

    Mark my words.

    Knowing the habitual and instinctive way subcon Indians act and behave, it is also *absolutely certain* that very senior US Congressmen and Senators are being secretly paid off – with astronomically large amounts of cash – to extend the so called ‘H1b visa’ program for Indians to the fullest extent possible.

    Count on it.

    • Agree: JMcG, Achmed E. Newman
  69. I was supposed to go to Vegas for the NFL Draft, not only is the Draft closed to the public, the hotels, casinos and of course entertainment venues are closed. So there’s no reason to go to Vegas. So I’m going to say air travel is down due to gov’t diktat.

    Now will people avoid air travel when things reopen, most likely, but the bulk of the demand drop is due to the gov’t.

  70. @JMcG
    Jack D will be along shortly to educate us on why only one of the Rosenbergs should have been executed.

    Eisenhower considered giving Ethel a reprieve, because she was a woman. However, she was the mastermind.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    The prosecutors sought the death penalty against Ethel thinking that they would use it as leverage against Julius - if he would talk then they would spare her life. But he was a loyal Communist and refused to talk. Her brother later admitted that he had lied on the witness stand in exchange for a lighter sentence and some of the actions he attributed to Ethel such as typing up notes didn't really happen.

    What proof do you have that she was "the mastermind"? Keep in mind that the past is a different country and the role of women in society in those days was quite different than it is today. And as we are caught up in a panic today, we should remember the panicked atmosphere of the Cold War. In times of panic, people (especially politicians) make really stupid decisions that they may later regret, but the death penalty is irreversible. In calmer times, I don't think that Ethel would have been executed.

    Then again, Stalin sent millions of complete innocents to their death so if the US wrongly executed only one person who clearly had at least some guilt (and we are still worrying about it almost 70 years later) that's a great tribute to our system.

  71. @reactionry
    ATTN, ATTN: Mr. Sailer:

    I once knew a really rich guy who chartered a Gulfstream IV to fly himself and a pretty woman from LA to San Francisco to scope out (as in opera glasses) a major league performance of La Traviata (that choice was no accident). IMHO, it's a waste of money to spend more than a hundred bucks on a whore.

    As you noted earlier, "We can probably be more confident that salesmen earn their pay more than just about any other type of job." As one of my colleagues said with respect to working in commie virus hot spots, "Ya gotta know the territory" - otherwise it's your funeral, pal. Speaking of which, it's a credit to your classy website that nobody (to my knowledge) has made any tasteless "Janitor In A Drum" jokes.

    Anyhow, we salesmen are among the mostly unsung heroes taking great personal risks in maintaining the flow of essential goods and services. In our face-to-face biz, a mask ain't gonna' cut it. If one of us dies in the line of duty, attention must be paid. He’s not to be allowed to fall into his grave like an old dog. Attention, attention must be finally paid to such a person.

    Your Humble Solicitous Salesman,
    "Slick" Willy Loman
    Loma Linda, California
    (formerly Brooklyn)

    Didn’t the Lomans live in the Bronx?

  72. @Anonymous
    Another fact that one must always bear in mind is this:

    Contemporary China is the biggest, most lucrative cash generating engine the world has ever seen. Forget the silver mines of Potosi, Victorian Britain, 20th century America, OPEC in the 1970s, etc etc, no, modern China beats them all hollow in terms of the sheer volume of lucre on tap.
    From this fact, another fact is *absolutely certain*, namely the political and business elites of the west, including the editorial board of certain execrable British weekly magazine, are being *paid off massively* in order to keep the present regime, the superlative China tap of endless cash, going. To repeat myself, that is an *absolute certainty*. If one studies history, or indeed life in general, in all nations, at all times, everywhere, such a pattern *always but always* asserts itself whenever the stewardship of vast, massive flows of cash are concentrated in the hands of the very few.

    Mark my words.

    Saudi Arabia has generated a bit of cash too.

    South Africa’s mines were lucrative as well. Churchill kept his house in 1938 because of a South African Jewish millionaire’s intelligent generosity.

    Still, I suspect the Inner Party sells out cheap.

    Senator Robert Kerr (D-OK) back in the 1950s was known as the man who really ought to be President because he was so much smarter than everybody else in Washington, but he was just too crooked for the job.

  73. @Anonymous
    Another fact that one must always bear in mind is this:

    Contemporary China is the biggest, most lucrative cash generating engine the world has ever seen. Forget the silver mines of Potosi, Victorian Britain, 20th century America, OPEC in the 1970s, etc etc, no, modern China beats them all hollow in terms of the sheer volume of lucre on tap.
    From this fact, another fact is *absolutely certain*, namely the political and business elites of the west, including the editorial board of certain execrable British weekly magazine, are being *paid off massively* in order to keep the present regime, the superlative China tap of endless cash, going. To repeat myself, that is an *absolute certainty*. If one studies history, or indeed life in general, in all nations, at all times, everywhere, such a pattern *always but always* asserts itself whenever the stewardship of vast, massive flows of cash are concentrated in the hands of the very few.

    Mark my words.

    Saudi Arabia has generated a bit of cash too.

    South Africa’s mines were lucrative as well. Churchill kept his house in 1938 because of a South African Jewish millionaire’s intelligent generosity.

    Still, I suspect the Inner Party sells out cheap.

    Senator Robert Kerr (D-OK) back in the 1950s was known as the man who really ought to be President because he was so much smarter than everybody else in Washington, but he was just too crooked for the job. It’s not clear to me if he took more frequent bribes than the other politicians, but he apparently demanded bigger bribes.

    • Replies: @Anon87
    Kerr couldn't have been that smart then? One only has to look at the dolts in DC getting stupid rich while avoiding jail. What ever happened to the insider WuFlu traders??
  74. @Intelligent Dasein
    I miss the days when air travel was something ordinary people did very rarely, when the term "jet set" connoted great wealth and prestige. I miss the cheerier service, more legroom, and better food. I miss breezing through the concourse without the 2 hour security lines.

    The model that the airlines had been following recently needed to go away, with or without the virus.

    Oh, just get a private jet (or, sniff, a netjets card) and it will feel just like in the good old days.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    I live comfortably, but a G-5 is still out of reach, and NetJets is less convenient than one might think. I've flown my Duchess (my aircraft, not my wife) across the pond a few times, but that's a five day trip if the weather coöperates, because you have to make stops in Scotland, Iceland, Greenland, Canada, and mid East-Coast USA. That leaves the airlines. What was really starting to annoy me pre-lockdown was the growing number of people who the flight attendants used to dispagingly refer to as "The Clampetts" riding up front in business class; I always wondered what they really paid for their seats, or if everyone in the US was maxing out their credit cards again.
  75. @Alice
    I can no longer travel to the beach because my state beaches were forced closed. I can't go to the state parks because they were forced closed. I am now uncomfortable traveling out of state because counties in my state are Vequiring Papers! Papers, please! to prove you're a resident, and so I'm not sure if I leave that I can come home.

    I've got 3 kids bored out of their minds with no swimming, fencing, archery, baseball, playgrounds, band, choir, jazz band, d and d, board games, or fun.

    We're not afraid to go out. I have already written every summer camp and program my kids are hoping goes on this summer saying we will be there, we will not cancel. if they do, I'm driving to South Dakota and camping at Custer State Park indefinitely.

    i can only hope others like me exist.

    I share a house with my brother, and he’s a frontline worker (manager of a rich folks’ grocery store). I told him to take a few days off during my spring break and we’d go on a road trip to see his son, just see pretty things.

    Then I realized that bathrooms everywhere are closed, so no go. We’re still going driving this weekend, just to get out.

    In my area, I am really pretty confident that people will be going out and about the minute this shutdown is lifted. Parking lots are crowded, only about 50% of people are wearing masks, and streets are buzzing with cars.

    Good luck with the kids! and if you can figure out how to buy a small portapotty, it’ll be helpful in case things haven’t opened up.

    • Replies: @ganderson
    Ed- your school doing remote learning? If so, re you going to re-open? My bet is that here in MA we don't.
  76. @Pericles
    Oh, just get a private jet (or, sniff, a netjets card) and it will feel just like in the good old days.

    I live comfortably, but a G-5 is still out of reach, and NetJets is less convenient than one might think. I’ve flown my Duchess (my aircraft, not my wife) across the pond a few times, but that’s a five day trip if the weather coöperates, because you have to make stops in Scotland, Iceland, Greenland, Canada, and mid East-Coast USA. That leaves the airlines. What was really starting to annoy me pre-lockdown was the growing number of people who the flight attendants used to dispagingly refer to as “The Clampetts” riding up front in business class; I always wondered what they really paid for their seats, or if everyone in the US was maxing out their credit cards again.

  77. @indocon
    Jonathan Pollard released!!
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/10/politics/exclusive-interview-bop-carjaval/index.html

    Pollard was released in 2015 after serving the maximum sentence permitted at the time he was sentenced.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    It’s almost like you wrote the Wikipedia entry. I hope he dies screaming.
  78. @Hibernian
    Eisenhower considered giving Ethel a reprieve, because she was a woman. However, she was the mastermind.

    The prosecutors sought the death penalty against Ethel thinking that they would use it as leverage against Julius – if he would talk then they would spare her life. But he was a loyal Communist and refused to talk. Her brother later admitted that he had lied on the witness stand in exchange for a lighter sentence and some of the actions he attributed to Ethel such as typing up notes didn’t really happen.

    What proof do you have that she was “the mastermind”? Keep in mind that the past is a different country and the role of women in society in those days was quite different than it is today. And as we are caught up in a panic today, we should remember the panicked atmosphere of the Cold War. In times of panic, people (especially politicians) make really stupid decisions that they may later regret, but the death penalty is irreversible. In calmer times, I don’t think that Ethel would have been executed.

    Then again, Stalin sent millions of complete innocents to their death so if the US wrongly executed only one person who clearly had at least some guilt (and we are still worrying about it almost 70 years later) that’s a great tribute to our system.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    [Ethel Rosenberg's] brother later admitted that he had lied on the witness stand in exchange for a lighter sentence and some of the actions he attributed to Ethel such as typing up notes didn’t really happen.
     
    If you want every negative stereotype you have about Jews to be validated, watch his 60 Minutes interview.
    , @Rob
    If she knew and didn’t contact the FBI, then she deserved her sentence. Nuclear weapons are a BFD, so I think they should have executed their kids, too. Not a very American thing to do, but they were demonstrably not fond of our system, and if there had been a nuclear war, it arguably would not have happened without the Rosenbergs, so I think non-standard punishments for Soviet spies would have been warranted. Sure, there hasn’t been a nuclear war (yet), but it was not obvious at the time that one wouldn’t happen
    , @Hibernian
    I think she recruited her husband rather than the other way around. I admit my source is my memory of what I read long ago in "The Autobiography of Roy Cohn, by Sidney Zion." (Zion quoting Cohn, I believe. Cohn was the prosecutor or one of them.) The book is either in a rented storage locker or I gave it away.
  79. @Testing12
    Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?

    Shame on every one of the so called "conservative" commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter. Many of you really thought 250,000 dead in the US was "a conservative estimate". Now we have established precedent for mass house arrest and police drones following you taking a walk in the park, and gentle philanthropist Bill Gates pushing tattoo rfid chips.

    And hey dummies, those of us worried about the economy weren't talking about wall street. We were talking about the ability for hard working healthy adults to give their kids a hot meal at night. You know, those things called JOBS provided by private industry in free market capitalism. Something that some who exist living on publically funded college campus salaries or donations from rich sponsors may have forgotten about!

    If there's one accurate projection from all of this, it is that we are indeed living in the century of Communist China. Hope you nerdy, pearl clutching OCD cucks enjoy it. At least the Chinese have high IQs amiright?

    it wasn’t even exponential. It’s quadratic.

    the charts are cumulative charts, and the individual data is LINEAR. you integrate cx, you get cx^2/2. that curve is a freaking parabola over and over and over again. the people here are supposed to be smart enough to understand freshman calculus.

    anyway can’t agree strongly enough with your sentiment.

  80. @Anonymous
    I had a conversation today with someone with a pretty bad case of Trump Derangement syndrome. We were not talking about Trump at all, but rather the COVID-19 mess and I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart. The person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good. Is TDS what is stopping the Raoult protocols from becoming the standard treatment in the United States?

    Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    “I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart.”

    Yet another anony sockpuppet on this hydroxychloroquine kick. Are you a medical professional? Again, there has been anecdotal evidence of its effectiveness AND its ineffectiveness. Let’s pause before some people say it is a cure all. It MAY help. Then again…

    https://whyy.org/articles/possible-treatment-for-covid-19-enters-clinical-trial-at-penn/

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/victoriaforster/2020/04/05/researchers-warn-that-covid-19-treatment-touted-by-trump-may-be-toxic-when-combined-with-diabetes-drug/#4b2ffe5855f8

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/927954

    https://www.sciencealert.com/small-trial-found-antimalarial-is-not-effective-for-treating-coronavirus

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamhaseltine/2020/03/25/study-shows-hydroxy-chloroquine-is-ineffective-against-covid-19—so-what-now/#35751123409b

    While I am in favor of any medical solution to Covid-19, studies must be conducted to ferret out potential side effects. It’s not like you can dole out HCQ like a Pez dispenser. There is a small sample size regarding is effectiveness. The gold standard clinical trials in the United States only just got underway.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    There's no doubt that studies should be conducted, but in the meantime if you are infected right now you can't afford to wait for the results of studies - by the time these results are available, you might be dead or have suffered for days or weeks longer than necessary if you had nipped your infection in the bud with hydroxychloroquine (or maybe not - in most cases hydroxychloroquine has few side effects, so for most people there is little to lose even if the studies don't ultimately pan out, especially in comparison with the risk of dying from Wuhan Virus if you are in a high risk group). Maybe it will be worth dying for some if it makes Trump look bad, but most people would opt for their lives. This is why the FDA allows doctors to prescribe medications for "off label" use.

    Obviously, every prescription should be discussed between you and your doctor (who hopefully is not a never-Trumper) but certainly if you are infected now you should discuss the possibility of taking hydroxychloroquine with your doctor and not necessarily wait for the results of the trials. If doctors followed a strict policy of never prescribing "off label" and waiting for the results of drug trials in all cases then many more people would die of various diseases.
  81. @Corvinus
    "I brought up the hydroxychloroquine protocols which i believe should be prescribed early to every adult case with a strong enough heart."

    Yet another anony sockpuppet on this hydroxychloroquine kick. Are you a medical professional? Again, there has been anecdotal evidence of its effectiveness AND its ineffectiveness. Let’s pause before some people say it is a cure all. It MAY help. Then again...

    https://whyy.org/articles/possible-treatment-for-covid-19-enters-clinical-trial-at-penn/

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/victoriaforster/2020/04/05/researchers-warn-that-covid-19-treatment-touted-by-trump-may-be-toxic-when-combined-with-diabetes-drug/#4b2ffe5855f8

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/927954

    https://www.sciencealert.com/small-trial-found-antimalarial-is-not-effective-for-treating-coronavirus

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamhaseltine/2020/03/25/study-shows-hydroxy-chloroquine-is-ineffective-against-covid-19—so-what-now/#35751123409b

    While I am in favor of any medical solution to Covid-19, studies must be conducted to ferret out potential side effects. It’s not like you can dole out HCQ like a Pez dispenser. There is a small sample size regarding is effectiveness. The gold standard clinical trials in the United States only just got underway.

    There’s no doubt that studies should be conducted, but in the meantime if you are infected right now you can’t afford to wait for the results of studies – by the time these results are available, you might be dead or have suffered for days or weeks longer than necessary if you had nipped your infection in the bud with hydroxychloroquine (or maybe not – in most cases hydroxychloroquine has few side effects, so for most people there is little to lose even if the studies don’t ultimately pan out, especially in comparison with the risk of dying from Wuhan Virus if you are in a high risk group). Maybe it will be worth dying for some if it makes Trump look bad, but most people would opt for their lives. This is why the FDA allows doctors to prescribe medications for “off label” use.

    Obviously, every prescription should be discussed between you and your doctor (who hopefully is not a never-Trumper) but certainly if you are infected now you should discuss the possibility of taking hydroxychloroquine with your doctor and not necessarily wait for the results of the trials. If doctors followed a strict policy of never prescribing “off label” and waiting for the results of drug trials in all cases then many more people would die of various diseases.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "but certainly if you are infected now you should discuss the possibility of taking hydroxychloroquine with your doctor and not necessarily wait for the results of the trials."

    Yes, discuss the possibility.
    Yes, conduct studies.
    Yes, provide "off-label" use.

    But Anony-bot is making it appear that hydroxychloroquine is a wonder drug. It's not.
  82. @adreadline

    I have a close family member who nearly died from this and I say open the country in mid-May. No later. You will not eliminate this. There is always risk in life and corona is simply the reality check.

    Bubonic was around hundreds of years before they even knew how it was spread.I have accepted possibility we may not be able to “fix” this and that is just life.
     

    Why in mid-May? Why not tomorrow, this Easter (it's Saturday here already)? We'd have churches packed, at least. But really, why wait until then? You're asking for another whole month, maybe even a bit more, but no later -- June 1st cannot wait, then? Why? Your explanation seems incomplete, even vague to me. If it's unstoppable and unfixable, why wait ~30 more days rather than one or two weeks? You think people will be calmer by then, or more impatient instead?

    Also, I'm sorry for this, considering your situation... but you should then consider writing the president directly by May... and asking,


    President Trump, we have waited enough.
    This cannot go on, Mr. President.
    Mr. President, let it rip.
    Mr. President, OPEN THE GATES.
     

    Why not tomorrow, this Easter (it’s Saturday here already)? We’d have churches packed, at least.

    I can’t imagine that Trump hasn’t thought of doing this simply for the incredible symbolism it would entail.

    You can’t buy PR that good.

    Mr. President, let it rip.

    Coach Les Miles agrees:

  83. @ic1000
    > The [TDS] person started spiralling about how Trump was just trying to get rich from it and he was ignorant and it did no good... Anyone else experience this in conversation?

    Yes.

    Here is a backgrounder from the Times of India on hydroxychloroquine; that country makes 70% of the world's supply which is 200 million 200 mg tablets per day. According to the article, the multiple generic companies that make the dug are able to ramp up production to meet increased demand.

    Here is a backgrounder from the Times of India on hydroxychloroquine; that country makes 70% of the world’s supply which is 200 million 200 mg tablets per day. According to the article, the multiple generic companies that make the dug are able to ramp up production to meet increased demand.

    And this is the real problem.

    There’s no profit there for AbbeVie, Merck, GlaxoSK, etc.

  84. @Rosie

    ‘Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.’

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.
     
    This is wierd. Is the economy really so fragile that we will come to ruin as a result of a few weeks forced vacation? If so, that's probably something we should think about remedying.

    This is wierd. Is the economy really so fragile that we will come to ruin as a result of a few weeks forced vacation?

    Yes, this is quite possible. The global economy has been designed around the concepts of, “just-in-time, ” and, “lean.” That means there is very little resilience in it. Steady cashflow for the purpose of servicing payments and debt is critical.

    If so, that’s probably something we should think about remedying.

    Yes, we should look at designing a more resilient system. I’m not sure how far that will go. Just-in-time can and should be dialed down, but it doesn’t make sense for businesses to do a 180 and start carrying years of inventory.

  85. @education realist
    I share a house with my brother, and he's a frontline worker (manager of a rich folks' grocery store). I told him to take a few days off during my spring break and we'd go on a road trip to see his son, just see pretty things.

    Then I realized that bathrooms everywhere are closed, so no go. We're still going driving this weekend, just to get out.

    In my area, I am really pretty confident that people will be going out and about the minute this shutdown is lifted. Parking lots are crowded, only about 50% of people are wearing masks, and streets are buzzing with cars.

    Good luck with the kids! and if you can figure out how to buy a small portapotty, it'll be helpful in case things haven't opened up.

    Ed- your school doing remote learning? If so, re you going to re-open? My bet is that here in MA we don’t.

  86. @Bubba
    He should have been executed like the Rosenbergs. Yet he wears his treason as a badge of honor and Israel extols the bastard.

    He should have been executed like the Rosenbergs. Yet he wears his treason as a badge of honor and Israel extols the bastard.

    Plenty of people have been arrested as spies. The Rosenbergs were literally the only two in America to be executed for espionage in the last 100 years. Given the gravity of their offense, the gift of a city-killing weapon to the Soviets, it made sense. For Pollard, who spied for an ally, it would be overkill, unless we also executed every single spy we convicted.

    • LOL: Bubba
    • Replies: @JMcG
    In what way is Israel an ally of the USA?
  87. @Jack D
    There's no doubt that studies should be conducted, but in the meantime if you are infected right now you can't afford to wait for the results of studies - by the time these results are available, you might be dead or have suffered for days or weeks longer than necessary if you had nipped your infection in the bud with hydroxychloroquine (or maybe not - in most cases hydroxychloroquine has few side effects, so for most people there is little to lose even if the studies don't ultimately pan out, especially in comparison with the risk of dying from Wuhan Virus if you are in a high risk group). Maybe it will be worth dying for some if it makes Trump look bad, but most people would opt for their lives. This is why the FDA allows doctors to prescribe medications for "off label" use.

    Obviously, every prescription should be discussed between you and your doctor (who hopefully is not a never-Trumper) but certainly if you are infected now you should discuss the possibility of taking hydroxychloroquine with your doctor and not necessarily wait for the results of the trials. If doctors followed a strict policy of never prescribing "off label" and waiting for the results of drug trials in all cases then many more people would die of various diseases.

    “but certainly if you are infected now you should discuss the possibility of taking hydroxychloroquine with your doctor and not necessarily wait for the results of the trials.”

    Yes, discuss the possibility.
    Yes, conduct studies.
    Yes, provide “off-label” use.

    But Anony-bot is making it appear that hydroxychloroquine is a wonder drug. It’s not.

  88. @Jack D
    The prosecutors sought the death penalty against Ethel thinking that they would use it as leverage against Julius - if he would talk then they would spare her life. But he was a loyal Communist and refused to talk. Her brother later admitted that he had lied on the witness stand in exchange for a lighter sentence and some of the actions he attributed to Ethel such as typing up notes didn't really happen.

    What proof do you have that she was "the mastermind"? Keep in mind that the past is a different country and the role of women in society in those days was quite different than it is today. And as we are caught up in a panic today, we should remember the panicked atmosphere of the Cold War. In times of panic, people (especially politicians) make really stupid decisions that they may later regret, but the death penalty is irreversible. In calmer times, I don't think that Ethel would have been executed.

    Then again, Stalin sent millions of complete innocents to their death so if the US wrongly executed only one person who clearly had at least some guilt (and we are still worrying about it almost 70 years later) that's a great tribute to our system.

    [Ethel Rosenberg’s] brother later admitted that he had lied on the witness stand in exchange for a lighter sentence and some of the actions he attributed to Ethel such as typing up notes didn’t really happen.

    If you want every negative stereotype you have about Jews to be validated, watch his 60 Minutes interview.

  89. @Jack D
    Pollard was released in 2015 after serving the maximum sentence permitted at the time he was sentenced.

    It’s almost like you wrote the Wikipedia entry. I hope he dies screaming.

  90. @Morton's toes
    I live close enough to an international airport landing route that I can testify that the number of flights is absolutely not down 96%. I would estimate closer to 60%. Who is on these flights? One thing for sure is the deep state new world order middle managers have to get around.

    You fly when we tell you to fly.

    (Hypothetical quotation; I don't even know anybody who admits to being a deep state new world order middle manager although I have my paranoid suspicions about a couple of people I know.)

    You are wrong, at least in regards to passenger flights. Those absolutely have dropped off by 90% at least for one major.

    What you are seeing and hearing is most likely cargo.

  91. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    No reason for recreational flights when Democratic governors shut down everything cool and interesting.

    No reason for business flights when Democratic governors destroyed all """nonessential""" commerce.

    And with Democratic governors, the fakestream media, and Drs. Poochy and Scarfy threatening Americans with 18 months of forced disemployment whilst awaiting a nonexistent vaccine, people are scared shitless about their economic futures, so they won't be spending money on air travel or much of anything.

    And with Democratic governors, the fakestream media, and Drs. Poochy and Scarfy threatening Americans with 18 months of forced disemployment

    Doctor “Its not just for gays. Everyone is equally susceptible to AIDS” Fauci casually threw out 18 months the other night without adding that he has a government job so won’t miss a check and a government pension so my and everyone else’s 401k imploding isn’t a problem. Notice how many of the “lockdown for X months” advocates aren’t going to be affected financially at all. “Sure, you common folk will be destroyed but that’s a small price to pay. Nothing else to be done”.

  92. @danand

    "What’s next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?"
     
    Unit472, the two most sought after "professionals" will soon be Arsonist & Auto Thief. It won't just be the casinos, it'll spread to a bunch of newly built/half built structures.

    Just don’t use the term “Jewish lightning” or we’ll hear from Jack.

  93. @Rosie

    ‘Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.’

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.
     
    This is wierd. Is the economy really so fragile that we will come to ruin as a result of a few weeks forced vacation? If so, that's probably something we should think about remedying.

    Total debt in the US (personal, corporate, government at all levels) is at about 3x GDP. It doesn’t take a lot of disruption in cash flows for that house of cards to come down. Everyone (I don’t mean literally everyone for the spergs here) is levered. For example see all the restaurants (search on “cheesecake factory rent strike”) that have announced they’re not going to pay rent. The problem is very few landlords are Scrooge McDuck and can wave their hands and say “that’s fine, pay when you can”. The landlords are levered as well. So they’re going to have to default on loans. Follow the arrows the rest of the way.

    If so, that’s probably something we should think about remedying.

    The debt pile is something we should definitely think about remedying. However for that to happen politicians will need to 1) begin disregarding their owners (err, sorry banks) and 2) to start reining in government spending or else dramatically raise taxes. So in other words its not going to happen.

  94. @Rosie

    ‘Shame on every one of the so called “conservative” commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter.’

    Preach it, brother. Ron Unz embarrassed himself profoundly on this point alone.
     
    This is wierd. Is the economy really so fragile that we will come to ruin as a result of a few weeks forced vacation? If so, that's probably something we should think about remedying.

    And where do you work? 10-15 million Americans want to trade places with you.

  95. @Steve Sailer
    Saudi Arabia has generated a bit of cash too.

    South Africa's mines were lucrative as well. Churchill kept his house in 1938 because of a South African Jewish millionaire's intelligent generosity.

    Still, I suspect the Inner Party sells out cheap.

    Senator Robert Kerr (D-OK) back in the 1950s was known as the man who really ought to be President because he was so much smarter than everybody else in Washington, but he was just too crooked for the job. It's not clear to me if he took more frequent bribes than the other politicians, but he apparently demanded bigger bribes.

    Kerr couldn’t have been that smart then? One only has to look at the dolts in DC getting stupid rich while avoiding jail. What ever happened to the insider WuFlu traders??

  96. @Johann Ricke

    He should have been executed like the Rosenbergs. Yet he wears his treason as a badge of honor and Israel extols the bastard.
     
    Plenty of people have been arrested as spies. The Rosenbergs were literally the only two in America to be executed for espionage in the last 100 years. Given the gravity of their offense, the gift of a city-killing weapon to the Soviets, it made sense. For Pollard, who spied for an ally, it would be overkill, unless we also executed every single spy we convicted.

    In what way is Israel an ally of the USA?

  97. @Jack D
    The prosecutors sought the death penalty against Ethel thinking that they would use it as leverage against Julius - if he would talk then they would spare her life. But he was a loyal Communist and refused to talk. Her brother later admitted that he had lied on the witness stand in exchange for a lighter sentence and some of the actions he attributed to Ethel such as typing up notes didn't really happen.

    What proof do you have that she was "the mastermind"? Keep in mind that the past is a different country and the role of women in society in those days was quite different than it is today. And as we are caught up in a panic today, we should remember the panicked atmosphere of the Cold War. In times of panic, people (especially politicians) make really stupid decisions that they may later regret, but the death penalty is irreversible. In calmer times, I don't think that Ethel would have been executed.

    Then again, Stalin sent millions of complete innocents to their death so if the US wrongly executed only one person who clearly had at least some guilt (and we are still worrying about it almost 70 years later) that's a great tribute to our system.

    If she knew and didn’t contact the FBI, then she deserved her sentence. Nuclear weapons are a BFD, so I think they should have executed their kids, too. Not a very American thing to do, but they were demonstrably not fond of our system, and if there had been a nuclear war, it arguably would not have happened without the Rosenbergs, so I think non-standard punishments for Soviet spies would have been warranted. Sure, there hasn’t been a nuclear war (yet), but it was not obvious at the time that one wouldn’t happen

  98. @Intelligent Dasein
    I miss the days when air travel was something ordinary people did very rarely, when the term "jet set" connoted great wealth and prestige. I miss the cheerier service, more legroom, and better food. I miss breezing through the concourse without the 2 hour security lines.

    The model that the airlines had been following recently needed to go away, with or without the virus.

    Agreed, but the best days of all were before the jets came into service.

    First of all: the airports themselves. We’d drive right up to the single entrance of the San Francisco Airport, get out at our leisure (nobody glaring at us, guns at the ready), and walk straight to the waiting lounge. People came to us to check our tickets. The planes were never late. The pilots were mostly war heroes, or looked like it, while the stewardesses looked like the starlets in films about war heroes.
    Then: the passengers. Well, just look at a film by Hitchcock from the period. Distinguished, well-dressed, young and old, men and women, and well-behaved, often rather too self-aware children (like me I’m afraid). Sometimes I wonder: was Hitchcock copying us, or we were copying him?
    And finally: the flight. first of all, much more exciting than today. The takeoffs were bone-shaking, and the landings sometimes soul-searing. During the flight, bad weather could mean some really rough times, and at night it was always fun to look out at the engines, which seemed to be aflame. The food was certainly better than now, but by no means great. What was superb was the service, with real napkins and real silver. Best of all were the desserts (I was a child, remember) which were in some planes (experts here will know which models) taken, not in one’s assigned seat, but in a special area in the tail of the plane. We set in a semi-circle, admiring the food, the service, and ourselves.
    Isn’t that what it’s all about?

  99. @adreadline

    I unplugged my DirecTV for The Duration. If you’re rocking an IQ supra 115, unplugging from fakestream media will preserve your sanity.
     
    I did so too, and I also uninstalled AOL from my computer so to not be brainwashed by the liberal lamestream media. I'm getting the real news through Myspace on my BlackBerry for The Duration and beyond.

    “I also uninstalled AOL from my computer so to not be brainwashed by the liberal lamestream media. I’m getting the real news through Myspace on my BlackBerry for The Duration and beyond.”

    LOL. I live in the sticks, my internet is slow, and so DirecTV is my only option. No Netflix or any of that newfangled Millennial stuff works out here.

  100. This pandemic may be a temporary disaster for the non-essential service economy, but from a production perspective the long term impact is likely to be modest. Most of the victims are elderly people on public welfare and most of the world’s farmers and manufacturing workers are still at work producing stuff. In Australia for example, our low-wage tourism sector has been put on welfare for a while, but our high-wage resource sector is still fully operational.

    If you’e an investor, avoid unprofitable, over-priced IT companies in developed countries and put your money in supermarkets, booze stocks, emerging market bond funds, and Chinese mid-caps.

  101. @Jack D
    The prosecutors sought the death penalty against Ethel thinking that they would use it as leverage against Julius - if he would talk then they would spare her life. But he was a loyal Communist and refused to talk. Her brother later admitted that he had lied on the witness stand in exchange for a lighter sentence and some of the actions he attributed to Ethel such as typing up notes didn't really happen.

    What proof do you have that she was "the mastermind"? Keep in mind that the past is a different country and the role of women in society in those days was quite different than it is today. And as we are caught up in a panic today, we should remember the panicked atmosphere of the Cold War. In times of panic, people (especially politicians) make really stupid decisions that they may later regret, but the death penalty is irreversible. In calmer times, I don't think that Ethel would have been executed.

    Then again, Stalin sent millions of complete innocents to their death so if the US wrongly executed only one person who clearly had at least some guilt (and we are still worrying about it almost 70 years later) that's a great tribute to our system.

    I think she recruited her husband rather than the other way around. I admit my source is my memory of what I read long ago in “The Autobiography of Roy Cohn, by Sidney Zion.” (Zion quoting Cohn, I believe. Cohn was the prosecutor or one of them.) The book is either in a rented storage locker or I gave it away.

  102. anon[636] • Disclaimer says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    No reason for recreational flights when Democratic governors shut down everything cool and interesting.

    No reason for business flights when Democratic governors destroyed all """nonessential""" commerce.

    And with Democratic governors, the fakestream media, and Drs. Poochy and Scarfy threatening Americans with 18 months of forced disemployment whilst awaiting a nonexistent vaccine, people are scared shitless about their economic futures, so they won't be spending money on air travel or much of anything.

    Unfortunately, not just Democratic governors, many Republicans as well. The one in MD even shut down all recreational boating because, you know, boats often pass within 6 feet of one another. Or maybe it’s the wind that blows the virus about.
    In rural New Hampshire that has had a handful of deaths, Gov. Sununu put residents under house arrest. So much for “Live free or die”. I seem to recall his father was a Deep Stater in his day; I guess the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

  103. @Testing12
    Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?

    Shame on every one of the so called "conservative" commentators who cheered this draconian lockdown from the sideline. You pissed your pants over exponential growth charts on twitter. Many of you really thought 250,000 dead in the US was "a conservative estimate". Now we have established precedent for mass house arrest and police drones following you taking a walk in the park, and gentle philanthropist Bill Gates pushing tattoo rfid chips.

    And hey dummies, those of us worried about the economy weren't talking about wall street. We were talking about the ability for hard working healthy adults to give their kids a hot meal at night. You know, those things called JOBS provided by private industry in free market capitalism. Something that some who exist living on publically funded college campus salaries or donations from rich sponsors may have forgotten about!

    If there's one accurate projection from all of this, it is that we are indeed living in the century of Communist China. Hope you nerdy, pearl clutching OCD cucks enjoy it. At least the Chinese have high IQs amiright?

    Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?

    So how do you explain the fact that shutdown hysteria is happening across the entire western world?

    • Replies: @anon
    Governments everywhere, left and right, are intoxicated with power? Well, Sweden hasn't shut down, and the UK is rethinking the shutdown again, because folks in those governments are actually thinking of the negative externalities, instead of just trying to benefit from their "tough leadership" appearances.

    Perhaps surprisingly, at least some of the so-called dictators (e.g., in Belarus, in many of the Central Asian 'Stans) haven't shut down their countries. I guess they don't need to grab even more power, since they already have plenty, and they don't need to appear 'tough' because they actually are tough?
  104. anon[203] • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    Can it possibly be more obvious at this point that those advocating extended shutdown are rabid deep state dems who want Trump out of office at any cost?
     
    So how do you explain the fact that shutdown hysteria is happening across the entire western world?

    Governments everywhere, left and right, are intoxicated with power? Well, Sweden hasn’t shut down, and the UK is rethinking the shutdown again, because folks in those governments are actually thinking of the negative externalities, instead of just trying to benefit from their “tough leadership” appearances.

    Perhaps surprisingly, at least some of the so-called dictators (e.g., in Belarus, in many of the Central Asian ‘Stans) haven’t shut down their countries. I guess they don’t need to grab even more power, since they already have plenty, and they don’t need to appear ‘tough’ because they actually are tough?

  105. Cross country skiing FTW.

  106. @Rosie

    Hotel data for March 28-April 4 versus same week of 2019

    Prices down 42%
     
    I would probably do quite a bit more travelling if hotels were cheaper. If you have a lot of kids, and you want to take all of them to certain attractions at the appropriate age, you might wind up taking lots of extended weekends visiting places over and over again.

    But I just can't see paying Mr. Patel $200/night. I've never understood hotel room prices. They seem completely outrageous to me.

    Motel 6. A lot of them (the corporate-owned ones anyway) have been fixed up and upgraded recently. At least in northern California.

  107. @unit472
    I haven't looked into it ( but I'm sure the insurance companies will) but somehow 3500 rental cars burned up in a fire at the Fort Myers airport. What's next? Bunch of 737 Max aircraft catching fire in Seattle? Las Vegas hotel/casino fires?

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/04/05/us/airport-fires-cars-trnd/index.html

    I thought you were joking when this popped up but no…..i don’t have cable any more so i get my news exclusively online.

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