The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
"Dogs Can Detect Malaria. How Useful Is That?"
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

An update on a theme that has long fascinated me. From the NYT:

Dogs Can Detect Malaria. How Useful Is That?

Canines can sniff out the socks worn by children carrying the mosquito-borne parasites, a study found.

More accurately, dogs may be able to do this. The pilot study only involved two dogs.

By Donald G. McNeil Jr., Nov. 5, 2018

… In itself, such canine prowess is not surprising. Since 2004, dogs have shown that they can detect bladder cancer in urine samples, lung cancer in breath samples and ovarian cancer in blood samples.

Trained dogs now warn owners with diabetes when their blood sugar has dropped dangerously low and owners with epilepsy when they are on the verge of a seizure. Other dogs are being taught to detect Parkinson’s disease years before symptoms appear.

The new study, its authors said, does not mean that dogs will replace laboratories. Inexpensive rapid tests for malaria have been available for over a decade; more than 200 million people in dozens of countries are infected each year.

But for sorting through crowds, malaria-sniffing dogs could potentially be very useful.

Some countries and regions that have eliminated the disease share heavily trafficked borders with others that have not. For example, South Africa, Sri Lanka and the island of Zanzibar have no cases but get streams of visitors from Mozambique, India and mainland Tanzania.

And when a region is close to eliminating malaria, dogs could sweep through villages, nosing out silent carriers — people who are not ill but have parasites in their blood that mosquitoes could pass on to others.

Dog noses are 10,000 to 100,000 times as sensitive as human noses. Scientists are not sure exactly what dogs are smelling, but it is known that malaria parasites produce volatile aldehydes like those found in perfumes.

The parasites may have evolved the ability to exude odoriferous chemicals in order to attract mosquitoes to carry them to new hosts. Studies have shown that mosquitoes prefer to bite people who have malaria.

If just one chemical indicated cancer or malaria, “we’d have discovered it by now,” said Claire Guest, who founded Medical Detection Dogs in 2008 and oversaw dog training in the study. “It’s more like a tune of many notes, and the dogs can pick it up.”

Most breeds have good noses, she said, but the best for this task are dogs bred to hunt — like pointers, spaniels and Labradors — and dogs with relaxed relationships with their owners.

I’ve never heard about anybody trying to create a new breed optimized for this type of skill. It would seem like the kind of idea that would have instantly occurred to top people in, say, Darwin’s time, but doesn’t seem to come up much now.

We have existing breeds with remarkable innate tendencies — like the powerful Newfoundland dog that will try to save anybody who looks like he might be drowning. But most dog breeding energies in recent decades seem oriented toward the aesthetic rather than the functional.

And perhaps the kind of far-seeing individuals who in the past created outstanding new breeds are now turned off by the kind of cruelty inherent in the process of culling puppies that don’t exhibit the desired trait, and thus avoid dog breeding.

In 19th Century Britain, elites tended to live in the countryside at least part of each year and have deep ties to the agricultural economy. The coming of railroads allowed people to get from city to country house and from country house to country house quickly, allowing a cultural efflorescence where people could gather face to face, like in urban centers, and yet still have room for non-urban pursuits: e.g., animal breeding, standardizing sports, the theory of evolution, etc.

Update: The Vapor Wake company affiliated with Auburn U. breeds and trains dogs to sniff for explosives. The idea is to get a dog so sensitive that he doesn’t have to sniff each concert-goer, he can just sniff the air in a 10,000 seat arena for explosives. So far they haven’t found any terrorists but they did find a man carrying nitroglycerin pills in case of a heart attack.

 
Hide 52 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Someone should have a trained dog sniff Hillary for Parkinson’s

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Zach

    Do animal cruelty laws mean nothing to you?

  2. Purebred puppy prices seem to be going up much faster than inflation, indicating people don’t like breeding dogs as much as they used to.

  3. now we know how scifi medical scanners work – miniaturized labradors

    also

    Most breeds have good noses, she said, but the best for this task are dogs bred to hunt — like pointers, spaniels and Labradors

    genetics > blank slate

    • Agree: trelane, NickG
    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
    @notanon

    How did they train the labradors to make that "wheedlewheedlewheedle" sound, I wonder?

  4. If only a breeder would look at refining the qualities of the pointer to enable its owner to have better returns on sports betting.

    • LOL: RadicalCenter
  5. Sounds like the limiting constraint is the reluctance to pay for the dogs and their support systems. Per the link in the article, https://www.medicaldetectiondogs.org.uk , they want to supply them. If someone could make enough money on it, it couldn’t be stopped.

  6. Every couple of years or so you hear about how wonderful dogs are at detecting cancer. And then you don’t hear about every hospital getting a cancer dog.

    • Agree: Futurethirdworlder
  7. There’s the Vapor Wake breed that’s been developed for explosive detection.
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/are-vapor-wake-dogs-the-future-of-concert-security-129781/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Ken52

    Thanks.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Ken52

    Thanks.

    Replies: @Couch Scientist

  8. Won’t the malaria be happening in countries where people will not let a dog near their socks?

  9. I’ve never heard about anybody trying to create a new breed optimized for this type of skill. It would seem like the kind of idea that would have instantly occurred to top people in, say, Darwin’s time, but doesn’t seem to come up much now.

    The Victorians were master dog breeders. But one of the reasons they were so effective is that they had no compunction about “culling” the progeny that failed to conform to their desired phenotype. Today, however, no one is going to mass murder all those puppies.

    So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of “surplus” dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hypnotoad666


    The Victorians were master dog breeders.
     
    As the Elizabethans were master dog baiters. And master bear baiters. And master bull baiters. (Long before Wall Street.)

    Indeed, they were master baiters in many fields.

    https://www.british-history.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/pubid-740/images/fig44.gif

    , @Colin Wright
    @Hypnotoad666

    '...So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of “surplus” dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.'

    You'd have a point if we were talking about kittens, but there's a decent market for puppies -- particularly pure-bred ones.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @Joe Schmoe
    @Hypnotoad666

    My goodness. You don't need to cull them, just sell them as pets because the new owners will spay and neuter them anyway. Breeders keep the best puppies to raise for the various jobs dogs do. Also, we have no problem culling either. The local shelters euthanize many more animals than Victorian England did.

    https://theirfo.com/2018/08/31/92-military-dogs-coming-home-from-afghanistan-after-a-job-well-done/?fbclid=IwAR2dJ6QjA0i0EYz2A98YkEPJcc3KCosK5Ycad0vLyoUacL4LKg0EPZtuk9k

    , @Coemgen
    @Hypnotoad666

    There is a culling scene in the film Poitin.

  10. @Ken52
    There’s the Vapor Wake breed that’s been developed for explosive detection.
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/are-vapor-wake-dogs-the-future-of-concert-security-129781/

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

  11. @Ken52
    There’s the Vapor Wake breed that’s been developed for explosive detection.
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/are-vapor-wake-dogs-the-future-of-concert-security-129781/

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    Thanks.

    • Replies: @Couch Scientist
    @Steve Sailer

    The Russians have been at this for a while. Jackal hybrids are the best for it, comrad.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulimov_dog

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/russia/1416227/Russians-breed-superdog-with-a-jackals-nose-for-bombs-and-drugs.html

  12. And when a region is close to eliminating malaria, dogs could sweep through villages, nosing out silent carriers — people who are not ill but have parasites in their blood that mosquitoes could pass on to others.

    And then what?

    Kill them?

    Or perhaps just treat them like they do Albinos in Africa.

    I suspect the originators of this idea have not thought it through.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Peripatetic commenter

    Feature, not a bug.

    , @Glaivester
    @Peripatetic commenter

    Give them pills to cure their malaria? I assume that asymptomatic malaria can be treated to cure it or to reduce its contagiousness?

  13. OT: Google honors another “PoC” who no one has ever heard of:

    Google Doodle honors Amanda Crowe, who led resurgence of Native American art

    https://www.cnet.com/news/google-doodle-honors-amanda-crowe-cherokee-artist/

    At least she’s a real Cherokee.

  14. More accurately, dogs may be able to do this. The pilot study only involved two dogs.

    In time, malaria will evolve to be able to sniff out dogs. Then we’re back to Checkerboard Square one.

    • Replies: @foolisholdman
    @Reg Cæsar

    Are Purina Chows dogs or dogfood?

  15. @Hypnotoad666

    I’ve never heard about anybody trying to create a new breed optimized for this type of skill. It would seem like the kind of idea that would have instantly occurred to top people in, say, Darwin’s time, but doesn’t seem to come up much now.
     
    The Victorians were master dog breeders. But one of the reasons they were so effective is that they had no compunction about "culling" the progeny that failed to conform to their desired phenotype. Today, however, no one is going to mass murder all those puppies.

    So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of "surplus" dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Colin Wright, @Joe Schmoe, @Coemgen

    The Victorians were master dog breeders.

    As the Elizabethans were master dog baiters. And master bear baiters. And master bull baiters. (Long before Wall Street.)

    Indeed, they were master baiters in many fields.

  16. I always imagined that the Bloodhound was bred for the sensitivity of its nose, perhaps that was just an unjustified assumption. I read a long time ago about a trial to find out how sensitive
    various breeds of dog were, in which a number of policemen each put a thumbprint on a microscope slide and then the dogs were asked to identify which slide had whose thumbprint on it. The slides were then left on the flat roof of New Scotland Yard and the dogs were asked at intervals to repeat the exercise. IMMSMC one Scotty Terrier could still give the correct answers up to six weeks later.

    More recently I read that dogs have some 700 genes concerned with their sense of smell, though not all of them may be active in any given dog. Perhaps dogs can be genetically engineered to be sensitive to particular smells?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @foolisholdman

    Bloodhounds can tell identical twins apart at 110 yards if they have the ability acted on.

    National geographic before it was takeover by riht on graduates had something interesting on dogs and their abilities.

  17. @Reg Cæsar

    More accurately, dogs may be able to do this. The pilot study only involved two dogs.
     
    In time, malaria will evolve to be able to sniff out dogs. Then we're back to Checkerboard Square one.



    https://www.davart.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/card07652_fr.jpg

    Replies: @foolisholdman

    Are Purina Chows dogs or dogfood?

  18. Every so many years, you hear about the race to develop a machine capable of doing what a dog does. I guess they haven’t cracked it yet, but you would think they would be cutting the noses off pigs and wiring them to microchips or something.

  19. @Hypnotoad666

    I’ve never heard about anybody trying to create a new breed optimized for this type of skill. It would seem like the kind of idea that would have instantly occurred to top people in, say, Darwin’s time, but doesn’t seem to come up much now.
     
    The Victorians were master dog breeders. But one of the reasons they were so effective is that they had no compunction about "culling" the progeny that failed to conform to their desired phenotype. Today, however, no one is going to mass murder all those puppies.

    So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of "surplus" dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Colin Wright, @Joe Schmoe, @Coemgen

    ‘…So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of “surplus” dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.’

    You’d have a point if we were talking about kittens, but there’s a decent market for puppies — particularly pure-bred ones.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Colin Wright


    "there’s a decent market for puppies — particularly pure-bred ones."
     
    Yeah, there is, but right now it's flooded with (ghetto bred) pit bulls soaking up all that philocaninist altruism.

    Kinda like those ghetto breeders and brethren are soaking up all the philanthopist altruism.
  20. San Antonio Weimaraner Club All Pointing Breed Field Trials

    Today, Nov. 9 in Hubbard, TX

    https://www.facebook.com/pg/SanAntonioWeimaranerClub/posts/

  21. @Hypnotoad666

    I’ve never heard about anybody trying to create a new breed optimized for this type of skill. It would seem like the kind of idea that would have instantly occurred to top people in, say, Darwin’s time, but doesn’t seem to come up much now.
     
    The Victorians were master dog breeders. But one of the reasons they were so effective is that they had no compunction about "culling" the progeny that failed to conform to their desired phenotype. Today, however, no one is going to mass murder all those puppies.

    So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of "surplus" dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Colin Wright, @Joe Schmoe, @Coemgen

    My goodness. You don’t need to cull them, just sell them as pets because the new owners will spay and neuter them anyway. Breeders keep the best puppies to raise for the various jobs dogs do. Also, we have no problem culling either. The local shelters euthanize many more animals than Victorian England did.

    https://theirfo.com/2018/08/31/92-military-dogs-coming-home-from-afghanistan-after-a-job-well-done/?fbclid=IwAR2dJ6QjA0i0EYz2A98YkEPJcc3KCosK5Ycad0vLyoUacL4LKg0EPZtuk9k

  22. How about dogs that can sniff out loser whites likely to vote for a someone like Stacey Abrams or Brenda Snipes?

  23. anon[246] • Disclaimer says:

    Never underestimate the nose of a beagle or a coonhound. A raccoon will run along the top of a barbed wire fence then leap across a road to loose the hounds, but they will find him.
    But hounds are not prudent. The raccoon will swim into a pond or lake and when the dog follows, he will turn on the poor hound and climb on his head to drown him.

  24. ‘… In 19th Century Britain, elites tended to live in the countryside at least part of each year and have deep ties to the agricultural economy…’

    And as a dog-breeding result: The unspeakable in pursuit of the uneatable. Such bravery.

  25. Does anybody try to breed dogs for longevity? The worst part about owning a dog – the only bad part, really, far as I’m concerned – is that their lives seem to be cut short so soon.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Mr. Anon

    A bloke rang in to ABC radio in Brisbane from Beenleigh about 1984 to report his Blue Heeler cross had died at the age of 32. He'd had it since he was ten.
    Anyway, his theory on it's longevity was that his family had been poor back in the Fifties,they couldn't afford meat often, so the dog was brought up getting the odd discarded chop bone and a few cooked vegetables.

    , @jim jones
    @Mr. Anon

    There is that and there is picking up the crap it drops when you take it for a walk.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @NickG
    @Mr. Anon


    Does anybody try to breed dogs for longevity?
     
    My family has a Jack Russel - Dachshund cross and she's a couple of months shy of turning 17, I called her Kylie after the antipodean singer, because she's cute, small and has no discernible talent. She's still very sprightly - our aging bitch, not the antipodean divaette - but now as deaf as a post. I never had her spade, until she had an emergency hysterectomy earlier this year.

    Smaller non freak type dogs tend to live longer. Cross breeds tend to be more healthy.

    , @Steve in Greensboro
    @Mr. Anon

    Kipling's "The Power of the Dog" (link below) is an apt caution (which no dog-lover will heed of course).

    http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_dog.htm

  26. @Zach
    Someone should have a trained dog sniff Hillary for Parkinson’s

    Replies: @tyrone

    Do animal cruelty laws mean nothing to you?

  27. A waste of g-d’s gift.

    Admittedly gift from a small, incomplete g-d.

    CAN the doggies sniff out anti smititism?

  28. @Peripatetic commenter

    And when a region is close to eliminating malaria, dogs could sweep through villages, nosing out silent carriers — people who are not ill but have parasites in their blood that mosquitoes could pass on to others.
     
    And then what?

    Kill them?

    Or perhaps just treat them like they do Albinos in Africa.

    I suspect the originators of this idea have not thought it through.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Glaivester

    Feature, not a bug.

  29. You can teach a cat to shit in a box.

  30. FWIW.

    Our family physician, when I was a kid in the 1960s, was an elderly gent retired from the Center for Communicable Disease (CDC). My brother and I both remember him once recounting that his boss could walk into a patient’s room and tell from the smell what major infectious disease the patient had.

  31. One of the icky aspects of dog breeding is that you have to mate grandfather dogs with granddaughter dogs to lock in a sought-after mutation. I mean, they’re dogs, so who cares. But as humans we tend to think of this as gross.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Good point.

    Darwin married his first cousin, so that aspect of animal breeding probably wouldn't have bothered him. But he started to worry about inbreeding due to poor health among his many children.

    Replies: @NickG

    , @Anon
    @Anon

    But that is so 'incestophobic'. Same Family Marriage now! It's Marriage Equality.

    , @NickG
    @Anon


    One of the icky aspects of dog breeding is that you have to mate grandfather dogs with granddaughter dogs to lock in a sought-after mutation. I mean, they’re dogs, so who cares. But as humans we tend to think of this as gross
     
    Of course the resulting strings of homozygous gene loci also 'locks in' health problems; no doubt why cross breeds tend to be healthier than pure breeds.
  32. @Anon
    One of the icky aspects of dog breeding is that you have to mate grandfather dogs with granddaughter dogs to lock in a sought-after mutation. I mean, they're dogs, so who cares. But as humans we tend to think of this as gross.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @NickG

    Good point.

    Darwin married his first cousin, so that aspect of animal breeding probably wouldn’t have bothered him. But he started to worry about inbreeding due to poor health among his many children.

    • Replies: @NickG
    @Steve Sailer

    If you're ever in Blighty - Down House - Darwin's residence, is worth a visit. It's just south of London in the village of Down just inside the London orbital M25 motorway. You might meet Nigel Farage in the pub, he lives in the village.

  33. @Anon
    One of the icky aspects of dog breeding is that you have to mate grandfather dogs with granddaughter dogs to lock in a sought-after mutation. I mean, they're dogs, so who cares. But as humans we tend to think of this as gross.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @NickG

    But that is so ‘incestophobic’. Same Family Marriage now! It’s Marriage Equality.

  34. @Colin Wright
    @Hypnotoad666

    '...So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of “surplus” dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.'

    You'd have a point if we were talking about kittens, but there's a decent market for puppies -- particularly pure-bred ones.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    “there’s a decent market for puppies — particularly pure-bred ones.”

    Yeah, there is, but right now it’s flooded with (ghetto bred) pit bulls soaking up all that philocaninist altruism.

    Kinda like those ghetto breeders and brethren are soaking up all the philanthopist altruism.

  35. anon[614] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon
    Does anybody try to breed dogs for longevity? The worst part about owning a dog - the only bad part, really, far as I'm concerned - is that their lives seem to be cut short so soon.

    Replies: @anon, @jim jones, @NickG, @Steve in Greensboro

    A bloke rang in to ABC radio in Brisbane from Beenleigh about 1984 to report his Blue Heeler cross had died at the age of 32. He’d had it since he was ten.
    Anyway, his theory on it’s longevity was that his family had been poor back in the Fifties,they couldn’t afford meat often, so the dog was brought up getting the odd discarded chop bone and a few cooked vegetables.

  36. @Mr. Anon
    Does anybody try to breed dogs for longevity? The worst part about owning a dog - the only bad part, really, far as I'm concerned - is that their lives seem to be cut short so soon.

    Replies: @anon, @jim jones, @NickG, @Steve in Greensboro

    There is that and there is picking up the crap it drops when you take it for a walk.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @jim jones


    There is that and there is picking up the crap it drops when you take it for a walk.
     
    It's a small price to pay for the good company of a loyal and noble friend.
  37. @Peripatetic commenter

    And when a region is close to eliminating malaria, dogs could sweep through villages, nosing out silent carriers — people who are not ill but have parasites in their blood that mosquitoes could pass on to others.
     
    And then what?

    Kill them?

    Or perhaps just treat them like they do Albinos in Africa.

    I suspect the originators of this idea have not thought it through.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Glaivester

    Give them pills to cure their malaria? I assume that asymptomatic malaria can be treated to cure it or to reduce its contagiousness?

  38. @jim jones
    @Mr. Anon

    There is that and there is picking up the crap it drops when you take it for a walk.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    There is that and there is picking up the crap it drops when you take it for a walk.

    It’s a small price to pay for the good company of a loyal and noble friend.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  39. Anonymous[121] • Disclaimer says:

    One thing that really upsets me is the use of dogs in vivisection .

    Mankind’s worst and greatest betrayal and act of perfidy.

    Unfortunately, it is the American vivisection establishment which ‘glories’ the most in its ‘right’ to torture and mutilate dogs to death.

    I would just like to state here that the people of the civilized cultured nations of north and western Europe would simply never tolerate the viciousness with which the American vivisection/medical establishment slices up dogs alive.

  40. “But most dog breeding energies in recent decades seem oriented toward the aesthetic rather than the functional.”

    This is an understatement: the vast majority of dog breeding of the past 50-60 years especially but back to at least the start of the 20th century has been ornamental. In fact, people have ruined breeds while trying to make them prettier: Collies, Irish Setters, and Poodles are 3 examples.

    When dog breeding became very much about wealthy people ‘showing’ dogs, it became a pastime for gays and women who are drawn to socialize with gays. And such people are always about superficial things.

  41. @Hypnotoad666

    I’ve never heard about anybody trying to create a new breed optimized for this type of skill. It would seem like the kind of idea that would have instantly occurred to top people in, say, Darwin’s time, but doesn’t seem to come up much now.
     
    The Victorians were master dog breeders. But one of the reasons they were so effective is that they had no compunction about "culling" the progeny that failed to conform to their desired phenotype. Today, however, no one is going to mass murder all those puppies.

    So any really effective selective breeding program is probably impractical today as it would produce thousands of "surplus" dogs that someone needs to feed and take care of for the rest of their lives.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Colin Wright, @Joe Schmoe, @Coemgen

    There is a culling scene in the film Poitin.

  42. 200 million people in dozens of [shithole] countries are infected each year

  43. For example, South Africa, Sri Lanka and the island of Zanzibar have no cases

    Not true.

    I’ve known personally a number of folks who have contracted Malaria in South Africa.

    Malaria – a mosquito transmitted single-celled parasite – is endemic in the far North, the North East of the Country, in the lowveld, in and around the Kruger National Park, in low lying around Swaziland and in Northern Natal.

    Larium anti Malarial pills work for occasional visitors to Malarial areas, but you can’t live on them. When I was a regular visors to Malarial areas – mainly on 4×4 trips – I took a risk management strategy. I’d seek to overnight in areas of low habitation – people being vectors, spray repellent on an hour before dusk, especially on ankles, sleep under a fan in rooms with mesh on windows or mosquito net equipped tents. After 25 years I’ve been lucky so far. Though as a 12 year old kid in Singapore I did catch dengue fever, also a mosquito born pathogen – a virus. That wasn’t much fun.

  44. @Mr. Anon
    Does anybody try to breed dogs for longevity? The worst part about owning a dog - the only bad part, really, far as I'm concerned - is that their lives seem to be cut short so soon.

    Replies: @anon, @jim jones, @NickG, @Steve in Greensboro

    Does anybody try to breed dogs for longevity?

    My family has a Jack Russel – Dachshund cross and she’s a couple of months shy of turning 17, I called her Kylie after the antipodean singer, because she’s cute, small and has no discernible talent. She’s still very sprightly – our aging bitch, not the antipodean divaette – but now as deaf as a post. I never had her spade, until she had an emergency hysterectomy earlier this year.

    Smaller non freak type dogs tend to live longer. Cross breeds tend to be more healthy.

  45. @Anon
    One of the icky aspects of dog breeding is that you have to mate grandfather dogs with granddaughter dogs to lock in a sought-after mutation. I mean, they're dogs, so who cares. But as humans we tend to think of this as gross.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon, @NickG

    One of the icky aspects of dog breeding is that you have to mate grandfather dogs with granddaughter dogs to lock in a sought-after mutation. I mean, they’re dogs, so who cares. But as humans we tend to think of this as gross

    Of course the resulting strings of homozygous gene loci also ‘locks in’ health problems; no doubt why cross breeds tend to be healthier than pure breeds.

  46. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Good point.

    Darwin married his first cousin, so that aspect of animal breeding probably wouldn't have bothered him. But he started to worry about inbreeding due to poor health among his many children.

    Replies: @NickG

    If you’re ever in Blighty – Down House – Darwin’s residence, is worth a visit. It’s just south of London in the village of Down just inside the London orbital M25 motorway. You might meet Nigel Farage in the pub, he lives in the village.

  47. Anonymous [AKA "E Hogan Harris"] says:
    @foolisholdman
    I always imagined that the Bloodhound was bred for the sensitivity of its nose, perhaps that was just an unjustified assumption. I read a long time ago about a trial to find out how sensitive
    various breeds of dog were, in which a number of policemen each put a thumbprint on a microscope slide and then the dogs were asked to identify which slide had whose thumbprint on it. The slides were then left on the flat roof of New Scotland Yard and the dogs were asked at intervals to repeat the exercise. IMMSMC one Scotty Terrier could still give the correct answers up to six weeks later.

    More recently I read that dogs have some 700 genes concerned with their sense of smell, though not all of them may be active in any given dog. Perhaps dogs can be genetically engineered to be sensitive to particular smells?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Bloodhounds can tell identical twins apart at 110 yards if they have the ability acted on.

    National geographic before it was takeover by riht on graduates had something interesting on dogs and their abilities.

  48. @notanon
    now we know how scifi medical scanners work - miniaturized labradors

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHd9bYGJtoI

    also

    Most breeds have good noses, she said, but the best for this task are dogs bred to hunt — like pointers, spaniels and Labradors
     
    genetics > blank slate

    Replies: @Steve in Greensboro

    How did they train the labradors to make that “wheedlewheedlewheedle” sound, I wonder?

  49. @Mr. Anon
    Does anybody try to breed dogs for longevity? The worst part about owning a dog - the only bad part, really, far as I'm concerned - is that their lives seem to be cut short so soon.

    Replies: @anon, @jim jones, @NickG, @Steve in Greensboro

    Kipling’s “The Power of the Dog” (link below) is an apt caution (which no dog-lover will heed of course).

    http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_dog.htm

  50. maybe this will clear?

    but

    can they sniff out an anti semite?

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS