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"Does This Pyramid Make Me Look Fat?"
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  1. I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @prosa123

    'I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.'

    It would. Avoid visiting countries with very poor people. Poor is okay -- but not very poor. Unless you intend to do something about it, raw desperation is unpleasant.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @HammerJack
    @prosa123

    And they're very big on animal abuse, if that's your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anon, @Ian Smith, @Dream

    , @SIMP simp
    @prosa123

    There are not more beggars and hustlers at the pyramids then what you would expect in a touristy area in Italy or France. But the hustlers at the pyramids have a hilarious scam. They offer horse and camel rides. It is easy for a foreign tourist to get on a camel when they are sitting down, but once the ride is over the camel driver asks for a big extra payment to make the camel lay down. Otherwise the tourist, which is usually far from fit, has to jump from the standing camel on the stony desert. Camels are much taller than horses so tourists always pay.
    I visited Egypt after the danish cartoons controversy and I was surprised to see all shops having in windows posters aimed at foreign customers about how disrespectful the Mohammed cartoons were. I thought it was extremely stupid to act hostile towards your patrons for ideological reasons, but now this is happening everywhere since all companies are woke.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Batman
    @prosa123

    That's all of Cairo. The abuse is even worse for women. I have never talked to someone who visited Cairo and had a good time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rohirrimborn, @Jim from Boston

    , @AnotherDad
    @prosa123


    I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.
     
    It's the usual hawkers. Mostly you'll be approached endlessly for camel rides. (Pretty much all the way in our case from the Sphinx up to the son's cooler looking ... but not quite as tall pyramid.)

    [Travel commentary: perhaps of interest if have not been, planning to go.]

    They uglified the south side of the Great Pyramid with some modern structure the purpose of which I never deduced. (Thought it was some viewing visitor thing ... that did not seem to be the case.)
    Still a good experience. AM, AC1, AC2 all went back in the mid-afternoon after doing the basic. But AnotherChild3 and I wandered on for another hour or two out to the 3rd pyramid with all the little wives' pyramids around it. Looped everything. Nice late afternoon stroll.

    BTW, I very much recommend staying right in Giza, rather than making a day trip in from Cairo. We had a good experience at the Great Pyramid Inn, right across from the light show setup. Both evenings we could just sip tea from the roof terrace and watch the light show in whatever languages were up that night. (It's usually English and something else. I think we drew one night with Polish? but maybe it was something else I did not recognize.) AnotherMom and I had and interior room but the kids had a view suite and could sit in their beds and watch the pyramids all night. In the morning the breakfast again on the terrace.

    It is not some great "can't miss this or your life won't be complete" experience. (I do not believe in such things. I like travel but my life would be great without any of the places I've been.) But it is worth the checkbox. Two days three nights covers it though. One day each for pyramids and the museum. When I was there, the museum itself was supposedly shortly to be moved to Giza. But if it is still in Cairo it is still "can't miss" (once you are there).

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar

    , @johnmark7
    @prosa123

    Mike Haduck, a stonemason, explains how he learned why pyramids were built. While in Saudi Arabia for the 1st Gulf War, he learned the way they buried people in the desert. Dig a hole, cover it with sand but get a bunch of rocks to put on top. But it’s easy to run out of rocks, so people would take the rocks from other graves for theirs.

    Well, then you’re going to need bigger rocks to keep someone from stealing grandpa’s. It escalated from there.

    , @Bardon Kaldlan
    @prosa123

    OK,so who built it? The black woman?🙂

  2. I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.
     
    Paging Philip Larkin!

    # of days from the release of the Beatles' first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles' first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645

    Of course, everybody knows by now that Joe Biden attained Ronald Reagan's record presidential age on Election Day, 2020.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Stan Adams

    , @Pixo
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    This ivory statue found in southern France is from around 23,000BC.

    https://www.ilcerchiodellaluna.it/immagini/27000-BC_Venus-of-Brassempouy_PLZ-011.jpg

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    , @AndrewR
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    The "yo mama" joke writes itself here...

    , @Rob
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I saw a meme along the lines of “T-rex is closer to the iPhone than t-rex is to the stegosaurus.” I may have flipped tyrannosaurus and stegosaurus in the timeline.

    There was a longer time from the first to the last dinosaurs than the last dinosaurs to now.

    Replies: @Rob

    , @nebulafox
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    When Xenophon and his men encountered the ruins of Biblical Nineveh, part of the reason it stunned them was because it was bigger than any city they knew of back in Greece-or probably anywhere else in the world at the time. Yet none of the locals out in the Assyrian desert could tell them much about who built them, or why they were there. This was already "ancient" history to them, our ancients.

    As another example: people often get confused when post-collapse Anatolians still referred to themselves as "Romans" in 700 AD. That's before you remember that Roman rule had gone back for nearly 1000 years by that point. It was all anybody knew or remembered. That they spoke Greek and worshiped in churches was irrelevant.

    , @R.G. Camara
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    To the ancient Romans, conquering Egypt was a monumental event. Not because it was difficult (spoiler: it was not), nor because it was a source of infinite wealth (spoiler: it was), and not because its conquest was simultaneous of the transition from Republic to Empire (spoiler it was, but because Egypt, to the Romans, was a mystical and full of history as China is to the United States.

    For the Romans, once the dust had settled on the Civil Wars, possession of Egypt was a sign from above that Rome truly was a monumental historical nation.

    Replies: @Franz

    , @Prester John
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Yeah! +/- 2100 years.

    Remarkable indeed!

  3. Hard to tell for sure, but could be a bit on the beefy side. But that’s kind of where we are in this day and age.

    • Replies: @reactionry
    @usNthem

    "...but could be a bit on the beefy side."

    Yeah, a lot of people put on some pounds during the Great Pandemic of Pizza, but you wouldn't want her to go to the opposite extreme of Thighless in Giza.


    tripling down on stupid...

    Hat tips to Garry Wills' Vixen Agonistes and the Hasbro Corp which not only funds our pro-Israel, mensch-splaining Jack D., but also manufacturers John Milton Bradley desert fighting vehicle toys.

    Also see: "Sodom and Begorrah" and Erin Go Hasbara!

    Replies: @slumber_j

  4. @prosa123
    I've heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @HammerJack, @SIMP simp, @Batman, @AnotherDad, @johnmark7, @Bardon Kaldlan

    ‘I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.’

    It would. Avoid visiting countries with very poor people. Poor is okay — but not very poor. Unless you intend to do something about it, raw desperation is unpleasant.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Colin Wright

    Egypt is a middle-income country, somewhat below average in real income per capita (which resembles that of the U.S. in the 1920s). Life expectancy at birth is 72 years, homicide rates are not elevated (about 2.5 per 100,000 per most recent assessment), income distribution satisfactory (like a European country - ratio of top 10% to bottom 10% is about 7-to-1). You could do a great deal worse than Egypt. India is less affluent and Latin America is much more crime-ridden. However, the pyramids are fairly near urban development and the populated parts of the country are abnormally densely settled.

    Replies: @Jack D

  5. Turns out Princeton Professor Joshua Katz married his student from the class of 2017, completely unrelated to the other student with whom he had a consensual relationship.

    https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/what-princeton-did-to-my-husband?fbclid=IwAR3teIqa_D-yTGeNyr01PIrQR7nf26FX7OC1Rxt0rselN6aX_l4RL1dEaqY&fs=e&s=cl

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @ginger bread man

    And... what's wrong with that?

    , @Dream
    @ginger bread man

    Good riddance.

    , @SFG
    @ginger bread man

    Not much room for alphas, even somewhat nerdy ones, in modern academia eh?

    It always attracted the opposite personality type anyway but they seem to be actively hunted nowadays.

    , @dearieme
    @ginger bread man

    She makes a fine point with this: the same people who think that children can consent to puberty blockers claim that a 21-year-old woman cannot possibly consent to a relationship with her professor.

  6. @prosa123
    I've heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @HammerJack, @SIMP simp, @Batman, @AnotherDad, @johnmark7, @Bardon Kaldlan

    And they’re very big on animal abuse, if that’s your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.

    • Replies: @JimB
    @HammerJack


    And they’re very big on animal abuse, if that’s your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.
     
    And cats, which Muhammad favored.
    , @Anon
    @HammerJack

    Muslim Uber and Lyft drivers don't like to transport people with service dogs. They consider dogs barnyard animals that belong outside like goats and poultry. Uber and Lyft often send out reminders to all drivers that they are required by law to accept passengers with service dogs or risk having their accounts deactivated.

    , @Ian Smith
    @HammerJack

    Are Arabs good at ANYTHING?

    Re: the pyramid woman, she looks like she has a nice figure. Some of us like women with breasts and a butt.

    , @Dream
    @HammerJack

    Its more of a poor country thing than an Islamic thing.

  7. EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Sam Malone


    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50's or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    Replies: @bomag, @prosa123, @kaganovitch, @Jack D, @Charles Pewitt, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    , @The Plutonium Kid
    @Sam Malone

    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it's cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar. Compared to bread in most of the rest of the world, bread in America is more like cake. You want real bread, buy the freshly baked stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @peterike, @Nervous in Stalingrad

    , @AnotherDad
    @Sam Malone


    We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    People always want some deep dark conspiracy. There isn't one. Americans eat too much--way, way, way too much--for our basically sedentary lifestyles.

    Sure. The medical establishment totally screwed the pooch with their dietary advice to the fattening post-War officer workers (like my dad) back in the 60s/70s. "Fat" or "saturated fat" isn't some demon. It's basically carbs--lots and lots of cheap and plentiful carbs--that yo-yo people's blood sugar help make them hungry again. People like fat. It makes people feel "full" and ready to stop eating. And yeah, the seed oil replacements seem to be worse for folks than the original--for Westerners--animal based fats.

    But the bottom line remains: Americans eat way too much for the sedentary lifestyles we have.

    Americans are no longer toting that barge or lifting that bale. But lots are eating like they do. If you do not want to be fat ... do not eat so much. (Particularly don't fill up on fast carbs. You'll just be hungry again in a couple hours.) But it is less what you eat than how much you stuff your maw.


    I'll put myself out there: I eat the same "processed food" from Walmart and Costco as a typical American. I weigh 160 (my scale which sucks just said 158). I'm an averaged sized American male--5'10'', not thin framed. I was 150-155 during most of my adult life ... when I was hitting the gym regularly after work. A bit chunkier in retirement. I need to lose about 10 pounds. And I am not "naturally thin". I was a fat kid, and if I overeat ... I get fat.

    But ... I don't eat breakfast. I try to give myself a good long eating break--evening meal to lunch around noon for ketosis. I snack a bit--love my chips. But I do not have a big dinner. (Sometimes no dinner or just a bit of peanut butter and pretzels and a cup of tea. I do not have any sort of "bedtime snack" (the dumbest possible eating). I do not have big bowls of fat and sugar. (I'm not putting up hay all day!) I had put on 5+ over the Christmas feasting season and since I've been fasting a day a week (usually Monday)--though I do have my tea with milk and sugar--and I've peeled back about 5 lbs this spring. And I walk. When here in Florida, usually AnotherMom and I do about a 3 mile beach walk, and I swim a bit (rarely more than 500) in the pool about every other day. So while not fit I'm not a completely sedentary blob.

    My point: I've reigned in my eating to more or less match my lifestyle. If I ate anything approaching 3 squares while sitting on my ass reading iSteve ... I'd be a 200 lb. blob of blubber and look like every other fat-assmerican.

    If you do not want to be fat ... stop eating so damn much.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @scrivener3
    @Sam Malone

    plus one. I look at old pictures of parades and people out in public and it looks like a different planet. The men have jackets and hats the women are in dresses and look dressed up. But the body mass is totally off the scale.

    Most of the men could be nicknamed "slim,"

    I can't believe people were just less hungry, more self disciplined, better at regulating food intake. Something in food nutrition has to have changed.

    , @Dave from Oz
    @Sam Malone

    Novel glutens in the wheat, engineered into existence in the 60's - no GMs required, just old-fashioned plant breeding.

  8. My best guess of what Steve is getting at by this photo and headline: For millennia, philosophers, historians, and poets – – and also ordinary tourists – – have been inspired to think deep thoughts when visiting the pyramids. It was almost like a religious experience. Today is different. For your typical aspiring YouTube influencer… for her… it’s all about herself.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow

    SafeNow, I also like to just BE somewhere old like this and imagine how long ago that was and what was actually going on then. No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in "The Ugly* Chinaman", the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls (of course).

    I ask people, such as my wife, "What is it? Do you think nobody will believe you went here? Just tell 'em you went, and there are a million pictures of this on the internet. Just BE here!" That's what it's about.

    But no, her sandstone-colored legs, at least, look pretty good. This picture has inspired me to see if we can go there too. 4,500 years!

    .

    * For those who don't get the reference, it's not a slur, so calm TF down.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @fish, @kaganovitch, @AndrewR, @Joe Stalin

  9. How’d you like to have spent a whole lifetime of backbreaking labor building 1% of this thing, just so the big boss can bring all his shit with him to heaven.

    4,500 years is something else, but at some point,

    Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
    Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
    Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
    The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

    • Replies: @reactionry
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Dust in the Wind"

    Soap Opera Socratics:

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=bill+and+ted+socrates+dust&ru=%2fsearch%3fq%3dbill%2520and%2520ted%2520socrates%2520dust%26form%3dSWAUA2&view=detail&mmscn=vwrc&mid=1641C1A244ADA353083E1641C1A244ADA353083E&FORM=WRVORC

    Replies: @Ganderson

  10. Off topic Mattel has proudly launched its first bi racial M to F transgender Barbie. Looks female standard Barbie body red prom dress caramel skin and long blonde wig.

    And yes, the border patrol agent who was the first to the school rescued his own 8 year old daughter and 20 classmates and teacher. Getting a hair cut when wife Trisha a teacher at the school texted him “ active shooter. Hero Dad is Jacob

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Alden


    Off topic Mattel has proudly launched its first bi racial M to F transgender Barbie.
     
    Stay on-topic!


    https://cdn.imgbin.com/13/14/3/imgbin-barbie-doll-toy-ancient-egypt-mattel-goddess-yB1UNE0EurDSQPE0TpEgSZSTY.jpg



    https://drsphinx.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/barbie-costume.jpg?w=584

    https://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/images1/1/0714/21/princess-nile-2002-barbie-doll-egypt_1_d6c0e06d62f5322f12308f3e1e2f7366.jpg


    https://live.staticflickr.com/7067/6985613035_6d3345433c_b.jpg

    https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48231756902_71ea3fc7e4_b.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/474x/b0/f2/11/b0f21104301de81719cf180b0cebb10c--blythe-dolls-big-eyes.jpg
  11. @SafeNow
    My best guess of what Steve is getting at by this photo and headline: For millennia, philosophers, historians, and poets - - and also ordinary tourists - - have been inspired to think deep thoughts when visiting the pyramids. It was almost like a religious experience. Today is different. For your typical aspiring YouTube influencer… for her… it’s all about herself.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    SafeNow, I also like to just BE somewhere old like this and imagine how long ago that was and what was actually going on then. No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in “The Ugly* Chinaman”, the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls (of course).

    I ask people, such as my wife, “What is it? Do you think nobody will believe you went here? Just tell ’em you went, and there are a million pictures of this on the internet. Just BE here!” That’s what it’s about.

    But no, her sandstone-colored legs, at least, look pretty good. This picture has inspired me to see if we can go there too. 4,500 years!

    .

    * For those who don’t get the reference, it’s not a slur, so calm TF down.

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
    • Thanks: SafeNow
    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve had similar thoughts, for instance seeing the throng of people around the Mona Lisa trying to take a picture of it. Why?

    If you’re going to take a picture, include yourself in it. Take a selfie. Prove you were there. What’s the point otherwise?

    Without your smiling face in it, your crappy snapshot is just a crappy snapshot of something that has already been professionally photographed 100’s or 1000’s of times.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Alfa158, @Harry Baldwin

    , @fish
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I do get the reference…..and it was brought home to me while on a tour of the Vatican and in the Sistine Chapel when after being admitted and requested rather strenuously to not take photos while there, as it was “a place of reflection and active worship” seemingly every Chinese in the place hoisted his cell phone and started snapping away.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in “The Ugly* Chinaman”, the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls


    Old Jewish joke: Max and Izzy from Brooklyn struck it rich building suburban developments after WW2. They sell the business for millions and decide they're going to travel the world to imbibe some culture. First stop of course is Italy. They tour the sites then they arrive at the Colosseum. They look around and Izzy tells Max "Max, dis illustrates vot I told you not vunce but a hundred times; If you don't hef sufficient kepital, you don't start to build!"

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @AndrewR
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Way too long to read

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Achmed E. Newman

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5y59cczqmM

  12. Off topic Mattel has created the first bi racial M to F trans gender Barbie. Standard Barbie body and face , red prom dress caramel skin and long blonde wig.

    And yes, the border patrol agent first on the scenes the Uvalde school shooting had an 8 year old daughter in the school. Jacob Albarado rescued daughter and her 20 classmates. He was getting a hair cut when wife Trisha a teacher at the school texted him “ active shooter help “

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Alden

    "trans gender Barbie"

    I don't recall genitals on my Kung Fu grip GI Joe. Equipped with the grip but nothing to grip. No wonder Joe was so violent.

  13. Someone I knew visited Cairo once. They said they saw a cow slaughtered in an alleyway.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @songbird

    I'd consider this okay.

    We'd probably do better to stay closer to nature in this fashion, instead of having an increasingly vulnerable supply chain.

    , @Hal E. Burton
    @songbird

    I was in Hurghada, Egypt in 1991 and saw a cart-pulling donkey keel over (while being brutally whipped by the cart driver) in a 4 way intersection. There was a handy butcher shop on one of the corners. Some loud bartering ensued and the donkey was unceremoniously unhitched and dragged screaming/braying by means of a few guys and kids with meat hooks to the butcher shop. Was slaughtered there on the curb and pieces hung up on the awning of the shop.

    Was in a cab on a ride back from playing tourist at the temple of Hatshepsut on that same trip and the cab driver left the asphalt to drive into the desert to run over a dog (not unlike Steve's "Standard Dog") and then stopped, got out, and threw it still breathing and twitching into the trunk. Ummm. No. Tip. Muhammad.
    I didn't feel at all bad dropping tons of bombs all over this fella's co-religionists in Kuwait/Iraq.
    Hurghada was an upscale tourist town, if you want some weirder stories I'll tell you about my week stuck in Alexandria.

  14. @HammerJack
    @prosa123

    And they're very big on animal abuse, if that's your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anon, @Ian Smith, @Dream

    And they’re very big on animal abuse, if that’s your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.

    And cats, which Muhammad favored.

  15. @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow

    SafeNow, I also like to just BE somewhere old like this and imagine how long ago that was and what was actually going on then. No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in "The Ugly* Chinaman", the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls (of course).

    I ask people, such as my wife, "What is it? Do you think nobody will believe you went here? Just tell 'em you went, and there are a million pictures of this on the internet. Just BE here!" That's what it's about.

    But no, her sandstone-colored legs, at least, look pretty good. This picture has inspired me to see if we can go there too. 4,500 years!

    .

    * For those who don't get the reference, it's not a slur, so calm TF down.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @fish, @kaganovitch, @AndrewR, @Joe Stalin

    I’ve had similar thoughts, for instance seeing the throng of people around the Mona Lisa trying to take a picture of it. Why?

    If you’re going to take a picture, include yourself in it. Take a selfie. Prove you were there. What’s the point otherwise?

    Without your smiling face in it, your crappy snapshot is just a crappy snapshot of something that has already been professionally photographed 100’s or 1000’s of times.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @JR Ewing

    I was talking about selfies, J.R. Even then, look, I've got friends and family who will believe me if I say I went to the Roman Colosseum, so I don't need any pictures.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Old Prude

    , @Alfa158
    @JR Ewing

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.
    In Rome the whole selfie thing was a pain not as much because of the people taking selfies, but because the tourist areas were infested with Tamil refugees aggressively hawking selfie sticks. If you walked a typical block you would pass four or five selfie stick salesman and about half as many Africans selling fake made in Southeast Asia “African” wood handicrafts.
    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid.

    Replies: @prosa123, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @JR Ewing

    There's an invented word for this.

    Vemödalen: The frustration of photographing something amazing when thousands of of identical photos already exist.

    From The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows.

  16. Anonymous[954] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sam Malone
    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp's face is? We've gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they're putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @The Plutonium Kid, @AnotherDad, @scrivener3, @Dave from Oz

    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50’s or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @bomag
    @Anonymous

    Thanks.

    I've heard it referred to as "perfection of the market", where food companies test and refine their product to make it tastier and tastier. Candy bars and such are quite a savory snack; I see racks and racks of them in the convenience stores; strikes me as rather creepy. I generally resist, but occasionally breakdown and buy a batch; limiting myself to one a day for awhile until the guilt builds up and I quit.

    , @prosa123
    @Anonymous

    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    I'd say that a random bunch of 62 y.o. women would do better than a random bunch of men the same age. Women in that age range are often into nutrition and fitness while way too many men just pork up and turn into blobs. In fairness, in those age ranges men are far more likely than women to have chronic medical conditions that makes it impossible to engage in physical activity.

    Replies: @anon

    , @kaganovitch
    @Anonymous

    I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down.

    Unless you're Tom Thumb, I'm not sure why you had to drop 5 feet down on the other side of a nine foot fence?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Jack D
    @Anonymous


    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it.
     
    I'm not sure that I could scale a nine foot fence, but then again I'm not so senile that I lock myself out of my house, so I'll call it a wash.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Zoos

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @Anonymous

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    I say:

    Okay. But how about spaghetti sauce with sugar and soda made with sugar and ice cream with 5 or so ingredients including sugar?

    Iced tea mix and lemonade and natural sugar in orange juice...

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Anonymous

    Cottonseed oil. That’s not even food.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  17. @ginger bread man
    Turns out Princeton Professor Joshua Katz married his student from the class of 2017, completely unrelated to the other student with whom he had a consensual relationship.

    https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/what-princeton-did-to-my-husband?fbclid=IwAR3teIqa_D-yTGeNyr01PIrQR7nf26FX7OC1Rxt0rselN6aX_l4RL1dEaqY&fs=e&s=cl

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Dream, @SFG, @dearieme

    And… what’s wrong with that?

  18. What will be left of America in that time frame?

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @J.Ross

    https://celoghnews.files.wordpress.com/2021/05/oracle-in-new-york-die-statue-ist-rund-25-fuss-hoch-.jpg

  19. @ginger bread man
    Turns out Princeton Professor Joshua Katz married his student from the class of 2017, completely unrelated to the other student with whom he had a consensual relationship.

    https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/what-princeton-did-to-my-husband?fbclid=IwAR3teIqa_D-yTGeNyr01PIrQR7nf26FX7OC1Rxt0rselN6aX_l4RL1dEaqY&fs=e&s=cl

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Dream, @SFG, @dearieme

    Good riddance.

  20. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pixo, @AndrewR, @Rob, @nebulafox, @R.G. Camara, @Prester John

    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Paging Philip Larkin!

    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645

    Of course, everybody knows by now that Joe Biden attained Ronald Reagan’s record presidential age on Election Day, 2020.

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Reg Cæsar


    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645
     
    When I was a senior in high school in 1991, I distinctly remember hearing "Paint It Black" by the Rolling Stones one time and my mom telling me she had listened to that song during her senior year of high school in 1968. 23 years seemed absolutely ancient to me. All of the songs on the "oldies" station sounded old.

    A couple of years ago that song came on the radio in the car and I started doing math in my head and about drove off the road when I realized that the music that I listened to in high school was now relatively older - 30 years - than that Stones song was when I had that discussion with my mom. None of my music is old! It still sounds like it was yesterday!

    Similarly, I have an uncle who was an All State football player in Texas in the late 1960's. he tried to talk to me about it a couple of times and I blew it off because in 1990 his career could have been in the leather helmet era to me. I can only imagine what my own son thinks about me now that he's playing high school football.

    Time doesn't stop.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan

    , @Stan Adams
    @Reg Cæsar

    21,645

    June 21, 1945 - Thursday

    End of the Okinawa campaign

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  21. @Alden
    Off topic Mattel has proudly launched its first bi racial M to F transgender Barbie. Looks female standard Barbie body red prom dress caramel skin and long blonde wig.

    And yes, the border patrol agent who was the first to the school rescued his own 8 year old daughter and 20 classmates and teacher. Getting a hair cut when wife Trisha a teacher at the school texted him “ active shooter. Hero Dad is Jacob

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Off topic Mattel has proudly launched its first bi racial M to F transgender Barbie.

    Stay on-topic!

    [MORE]

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Thanks: Alden, Right_On
  22. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pixo, @AndrewR, @Rob, @nebulafox, @R.G. Camara, @Prester John

    This ivory statue found in southern France is from around 23,000BC.

    • Replies: @G. Poulin
    @Pixo

    I didn't realize Pete Townsend was around back then.

  23. @usNthem
    Hard to tell for sure, but could be a bit on the beefy side. But that’s kind of where we are in this day and age.

    Replies: @reactionry

    “…but could be a bit on the beefy side.”

    Yeah, a lot of people put on some pounds during the Great Pandemic of Pizza, but you wouldn’t want her to go to the opposite extreme of Thighless in Giza.

    [MORE]

    tripling down on stupid…

    Hat tips to Garry Wills’ Vixen Agonistes and the Hasbro Corp which not only funds our pro-Israel, mensch-splaining Jack D., but also manufacturers John Milton Bradley desert fighting vehicle toys.

    Also see: “Sodom and Begorrah” and Erin Go Hasbara!

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @reactionry

    I think the expression you're looking for here is Erin Go Brazeltov.

  24. @prosa123
    I've heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @HammerJack, @SIMP simp, @Batman, @AnotherDad, @johnmark7, @Bardon Kaldlan

    There are not more beggars and hustlers at the pyramids then what you would expect in a touristy area in Italy or France. But the hustlers at the pyramids have a hilarious scam. They offer horse and camel rides. It is easy for a foreign tourist to get on a camel when they are sitting down, but once the ride is over the camel driver asks for a big extra payment to make the camel lay down. Otherwise the tourist, which is usually far from fit, has to jump from the standing camel on the stony desert. Camels are much taller than horses so tourists always pay.
    I visited Egypt after the danish cartoons controversy and I was surprised to see all shops having in windows posters aimed at foreign customers about how disrespectful the Mohammed cartoons were. I thought it was extremely stupid to act hostile towards your patrons for ideological reasons, but now this is happening everywhere since all companies are woke.

    • Thanks: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Alden
    @SIMP simp

    At least in Egypt the beggars are native Egyptians not foreign gypsies Africans and Arabs as in Europe.

  25. @Achmed E. Newman
    How'd you like to have spent a whole lifetime of backbreaking labor building 1% of this thing, just so the big boss can bring all his shit with him to heaven.

    4,500 years is something else, but at some point,

    Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
    Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
    Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
    The lone and level sands stretch far away.”


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tH2w6Oxx0kQ

    Replies: @reactionry

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @reactionry

    Soe- crates Johnson!

  26. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pixo, @AndrewR, @Rob, @nebulafox, @R.G. Camara, @Prester John

    The “yo mama” joke writes itself here…

  27. So what’s the point of this post? “We wuz Kangz”, or “it was aliens”?

  28. @Sam Malone
    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp's face is? We've gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they're putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @The Plutonium Kid, @AnotherDad, @scrivener3, @Dave from Oz

    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it’s cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar. Compared to bread in most of the rest of the world, bread in America is more like cake. You want real bread, buy the freshly baked stuff.

    • Agree: fish
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @The Plutonium Kid

    Don't you believe the science? Men in lab coats assured us that sugar gave quick energy, and the real bad guy was cholesterol from natural fats.

    , @peterike
    @The Plutonium Kid


    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it’s cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar.
     
    So is baby formula, which has been much in the news of late. It should more properly be labelled "baby poison," because it's garbage. What did people do before Big Pharma baby formula? Not everyone could breastfeed. I'm sure our grandmothers had plenty of sensible, healthy alternatives to this garbage (Similac ingredients):

    https://www.meghantelpner.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Similac-Label-Ingredients.jpg

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @Nervous in Stalingrad
    @The Plutonium Kid


    Whether it’s cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar.
     
    I am not sure juxtaposing cane sugar and HFCS is an apples-to-apples comparison. I have been told that cane sugar, in relative terms, is supposed to be easier on your body than HFCS.

    If you look at so-called "health food," you will find cane sugar in it as a sweetener. Look at the cheap food (e.g. soda, mass-produced baked goods) and you will find a great deal of HFCS in it.

    The nub of the problem seems to be that a) the human body cannot cope with HFCS very well and b) the fact that it is both cheap and sweet makes HFCS attractive to manufacturers of cheap food to use as an inexpensive sweetener.

    The widening of American waistlines seems to coincide with the rise in the use of HFCS in American food.
  29. OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.

    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
    • Troll: Pixo, Pixo
    • Replies: @WJ
    @PhysicistDave

    This was all too predictable. The odd obsession that many Americans have had with Ukraine is surprising since many are on the right. These people that have scoffed at the Russian collusion hoax and at the Vindman impeachment hoax , suddenly start believing the garbage media. Snake Island ant the ghost of Kiev are swallowed hook line and sinker. I can only imagine their impending disappointment.

    Replies: @mc23

    , @ic1000
    @PhysicistDave

    PhysicistDave, while I favor Kyiv in this war (on balance), I concur with your analysis.

    It has been difficult-to-impossible to know the ground truth of this war in detail. But it has been clear for weeks that Russia's strategy has been to attempt to encircle Ukrainian troops in the Donetsk salient around the city of Severodonetsk.

    Would the Ukrainians be strong enough to hold fast, given that this battlefield minimizes Russian weaknesses in logistics? The cited NBC report gives the answer to us spectators (which would have been obvious to both sides for some time): No.

    So the Ukrainian General Staff's choice has been between holding territory at the high risk of the forced surrender of the defending troops, or attempting a withdrawal in good order, westwards towards Dnipro, conceding the remainder of the Donbas to the Russians.

    Fighting withdrawals are extremely difficult. They require the sacrifice of units at the 'back,' and risk turning into sauve-qui-peut routs. Worse, for the past week there have been only two 2-lane paved roads open to the west from Severodonetsk, with one or both under observation by Russian artillery.

    The NBC article confirms that the Ukrainians have prioritized territory over soldiers, and are about to pay the price.

    The reporter mentions the prospect of sending "reinforcements" to the embattled troops, presumably to buoy the spirits of U.S./EU fans of Ukraine. General von Paulus was not available for comment.

    Replies: @Pixo, @Jack D, @Alfa158

    , @Pixo
    @PhysicistDave

    Hey Dave, in late February you told us Russia was taking Kharkiv, and would soon control half or Ukraine, and Zelensky would be captured and beg for his life.

    How’s that sick fantasy going?

    The reality is that despite a larger military and a cowardly surprise attack, this evil invasion is an unmitigated disaster for your hero Putin. He failed his bloody drive for Kiev, then was chased out of Kharkiv’s suburbs. The drive to Odessa was crushed, the Russian flagship sunk, and Russia retreated all around Kherson.

    Having lost the battle for the two largest cities, he’s throwing all his remaining forces on a few bombed out and abandoned small towns. And that’s not going too well either.

    You’re a consistent liar, but the maps don’t lie. Look at Russia’s zone of control in March versus today. They are losing. You know that feeling well, doncha?

    https://twitter.com/DefenceHQ/status/1508774299058020357

    https://twitter.com/DefenceHQ/status/1530129305618874370

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave

    , @PiltdownMan
    @PhysicistDave


    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime

     

    Boris Johnson has warned Russia is making 'palpable progress' in Donbas region

    "Boris Johnson today warned that Russia is 'chewing through ground' in eastern Ukraine as he urged more support for Kyiv's forces.

    The PM said Vladimir Putin's military is making 'palpable progress' in the Donbas region despite the 'incredible heroism' of the resistance."

     

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker

    , @AnotherDad
    @PhysicistDave

    Steve, looks like time for another Ukraine thread. Phys Dave is getting all breathless about his new most-important-thing-in-the-world--infatuation, Ukrainian conquest. We'll get no respite if he can't get some .... ah ... release.

    (PD--does your wife know about you and Vlad?)

    Replies: @Pixo, @Chrisnonymous

    , @Mark G.
    @PhysicistDave


    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

     

    As Vietnam and Afghanistan previously learned when they put their faith in long term American support. Americans are not an imperialist people and tire of these interventions. This is not a bad thing. With all the problems we have here, we should not be worrying about a regional war thousands of miles away. The elites, who do benefit from these interventions, can whip up a little war hysteria but they can't maintain it long term. A new AP poll of the American public shows a ten point drop, 55% down to 45%, since March prioritizing sanctioning Russia over protecting the U.S. economy.


    In addition to the NBC News report and the NYT giving up on a Ukrainian victory, the WaPo is now talking about catastrophic conditions and collapsing morale among Ukrainian forces.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/military/wapo-stunning-first-admits-catastrophic-conditions-collapsing-morale-ukraine-forces-front

    It appears a consensus is forming in the mainstream media that things are not going as well as previously claimed. Many of the same politicians who said support for Ukraine would help them beat the Russians were saying a year ago Covid vaccines would stop transmission of the disease. This was followed by eight hundred thousand cases a day last winter. Many of these politicians were also saying inflation was "transitory". It's now 8% and rising. We need to elect people with better prognostication skills.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @PhysicistDave

    "And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev."

    Hope that's an accurate analysis. But the NATO/Soros regime have a lot invested in Ukraine meaning its bloodlands are useful for bioweapons development, a money wash for American political elites, a hub for weapons, human, and narcotics trafficking so lucrative for crooked Western intelligence agencies, a staging area for NATO incursions into Russia and Central Asia.

    , @mc23
    @PhysicistDave

    I think the Russians are doing surprising well considering they're attacking with an inferior number of troops.

    The logistical supply of weapons, vehicles and other items and the organization of Ukrainian reserves should eventually turn the tide. I see tactical nukes on the horizon late summer/early fall destroying the ability of the Ukrainians to supply or move troops even feeding civilians. Hiroshima at 15 kilotons was a tactical nuke. I simply fail to see the downside to using tactical nukes if Russia suspects it might lose. Instead of sending 500 heavy bombers you drop one bomb. Fallout is minimal using smaller tactical nuclear weapons.

    Will Russia be a pariah state? Yes. They’ll just have to sell ICBM systems to 3rd world countries for spare Rubles. Arthur C Clark forecast China selling ICBM systems in the novel- “ 2001 A Space Odyssey”. He was a little off but maybe it’s an idea whose time has come.

  30. @ginger bread man
    Turns out Princeton Professor Joshua Katz married his student from the class of 2017, completely unrelated to the other student with whom he had a consensual relationship.

    https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/what-princeton-did-to-my-husband?fbclid=IwAR3teIqa_D-yTGeNyr01PIrQR7nf26FX7OC1Rxt0rselN6aX_l4RL1dEaqY&fs=e&s=cl

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Dream, @SFG, @dearieme

    Not much room for alphas, even somewhat nerdy ones, in modern academia eh?

    It always attracted the opposite personality type anyway but they seem to be actively hunted nowadays.

  31. Anon[225] • Disclaimer says:
    @HammerJack
    @prosa123

    And they're very big on animal abuse, if that's your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anon, @Ian Smith, @Dream

    Muslim Uber and Lyft drivers don’t like to transport people with service dogs. They consider dogs barnyard animals that belong outside like goats and poultry. Uber and Lyft often send out reminders to all drivers that they are required by law to accept passengers with service dogs or risk having their accounts deactivated.

  32. @Anonymous
    @Sam Malone


    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50's or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    Replies: @bomag, @prosa123, @kaganovitch, @Jack D, @Charles Pewitt, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Thanks.

    I’ve heard it referred to as “perfection of the market”, where food companies test and refine their product to make it tastier and tastier. Candy bars and such are quite a savory snack; I see racks and racks of them in the convenience stores; strikes me as rather creepy. I generally resist, but occasionally breakdown and buy a batch; limiting myself to one a day for awhile until the guilt builds up and I quit.

  33. @songbird
    Someone I knew visited Cairo once. They said they saw a cow slaughtered in an alleyway.

    Replies: @bomag, @Hal E. Burton

    I’d consider this okay.

    We’d probably do better to stay closer to nature in this fashion, instead of having an increasingly vulnerable supply chain.

  34. @prosa123
    I've heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @HammerJack, @SIMP simp, @Batman, @AnotherDad, @johnmark7, @Bardon Kaldlan

    That’s all of Cairo. The abuse is even worse for women. I have never talked to someone who visited Cairo and had a good time.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    Cairo is said to be the loudest city in the world.

    , @Rohirrimborn
    @Batman

    My female cousin rowed a boat solo down the Nile and lived to write a book about the adventure. https://www.amazon.com/Down-Nile-Alone-Fishermans-Skiff/dp/0316019011/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1C4J51DZSV8SB&keywords=rosemary+mahoney+down+the+nile&qid=1653763988&sprefix=rosemary+mahoney+down+the+nile%2Caps%2C315&sr=8-1

    Replies: @Batman

    , @Jim from Boston
    @Batman


    I have never talked to someone who visited Cairo and had a good time.
     
    We had fun in Cairo (and Alexandria and Luxor) over 40 yrs ago, on a detour from our European backpacking tour, which had taken on a 'Disneyland vibe'. Despite the extreme poverty and crowding, Cairo seemed like a relatively peaceable place, but this being only a few months before Sadat was shot by Islamists, which changed a lot of cultural trajectories in that region.

    Of course we visited the awesome Pyramids and Sphinx, which was kinda off-by-itself back then, with a hotel across the road. You got hassled for camel rides (told them that I was allergic) and guided tours, which we did take into the Pyramid, just a bunch of dimly-lit tunnels deep in the structure. The scale of everything was indeed mind-blowing.

    Also very memorable was the King Tut display in the National Museum in Cairo, which had toured the US on a train a few years earlier, where every piece was meticulously displayed and described. In Cairo, the priceless artifacts were just piled up, willynilly, with machine-gun-toting guards standing around.
  35. @reactionry
    @usNthem

    "...but could be a bit on the beefy side."

    Yeah, a lot of people put on some pounds during the Great Pandemic of Pizza, but you wouldn't want her to go to the opposite extreme of Thighless in Giza.


    tripling down on stupid...

    Hat tips to Garry Wills' Vixen Agonistes and the Hasbro Corp which not only funds our pro-Israel, mensch-splaining Jack D., but also manufacturers John Milton Bradley desert fighting vehicle toys.

    Also see: "Sodom and Begorrah" and Erin Go Hasbara!

    Replies: @slumber_j

    I think the expression you’re looking for here is Erin Go Brazeltov.

  36. WJ says:
    @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    This was all too predictable. The odd obsession that many Americans have had with Ukraine is surprising since many are on the right. These people that have scoffed at the Russian collusion hoax and at the Vindman impeachment hoax , suddenly start believing the garbage media. Snake Island ant the ghost of Kiev are swallowed hook line and sinker. I can only imagine their impending disappointment.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @mc23
    @WJ

    I found it stunning when our media described the surrender a Marioupol and said the prisoners were being evacuated to Russia.

  37. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pixo, @AndrewR, @Rob, @nebulafox, @R.G. Camara, @Prester John

    I saw a meme along the lines of “T-rex is closer to the iPhone than t-rex is to the stegosaurus.” I may have flipped tyrannosaurus and stegosaurus in the timeline.

    There was a longer time from the first to the last dinosaurs than the last dinosaurs to now.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Rob
    @Rob

    Yo, you trolled that? Are you a young-earth creationist or something?

    The dinosaur meme I really liked is along the lines of, “Stop saying dinosaurs ruled the earth. They existed. Stop giving them credit for administrative skills they probably didn’t have.”

  38. @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    PhysicistDave, while I favor Kyiv in this war (on balance), I concur with your analysis.

    It has been difficult-to-impossible to know the ground truth of this war in detail. But it has been clear for weeks that Russia’s strategy has been to attempt to encircle Ukrainian troops in the Donetsk salient around the city of Severodonetsk.

    Would the Ukrainians be strong enough to hold fast, given that this battlefield minimizes Russian weaknesses in logistics? The cited NBC report gives the answer to us spectators (which would have been obvious to both sides for some time): No.

    So the Ukrainian General Staff’s choice has been between holding territory at the high risk of the forced surrender of the defending troops, or attempting a withdrawal in good order, westwards towards Dnipro, conceding the remainder of the Donbas to the Russians.

    Fighting withdrawals are extremely difficult. They require the sacrifice of units at the ‘back,’ and risk turning into sauve-qui-peut routs. Worse, for the past week there have been only two 2-lane paved roads open to the west from Severodonetsk, with one or both under observation by Russian artillery.

    The NBC article confirms that the Ukrainians have prioritized territory over soldiers, and are about to pay the price.

    The reporter mentions the prospect of sending “reinforcements” to the embattled troops, presumably to buoy the spirits of U.S./EU fans of Ukraine. General von Paulus was not available for comment.

    • Replies: @Pixo
    @ic1000

    And Russia has lost so many of its tanks that it is now sending its T-62s from deep storage. They were produced from 1961-1975, so 47 years old at absolute best. And we know Russian are great at long term maintenance of old Soviet equipment, right?

    To complement Russia’s ancient tanks, it just raised the age for new military recruits from 40 to 50. Another thing you do when victory is at hand, right? And Russian men are known for their clean living and staying in great shape, so should make great soldiers at 50!

    Sure, if Putin insists on throwing everything into Severodonetsk, he will trade thousands of his soldiers lives for a bombed out and abandoned city, as he did with Mariupol. That’s not winning, that’s a vainglorious and evil dictator imposing his insanity on his unfortunate subjects.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Anonymous

    , @Jack D
    @ic1000

    There is no doubt that it's not going well for the Ukrainians at Severodonetsk. However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably. The "cauldron" was originally going to be the entire east and the whole Ukrainian army was going to be trapped inside of it. The pocket around Severodonetsk is more like a saucepan than a cauldron.

    The narratives in this war have gone back and forth - when the war started, everyone expected the mighty Russian Army to overrun the Ukrainians. Then it flipped and the Russians were complete incompetents who couldn't do anything right. The truth is somewhere in between and there is no question that they can score at least tactical victories in some places. They have a lot of heavy artillery that they can bring to bear on an area that is difficult to withstand.

    Note though that by the time they take over a city they are capturing rubble. Most of the people are gone, all the structures and industry are destroyed. So what have they captured? Does Russia need more land? Whatever short term tactical victories they can achieve, Putin has driven Russia into a strategic "cauldron". Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea. Putin has turned Russia into a pariah state and his prize is the rubble of Severodonetsk. Is this game really worth the candle?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Hypnotoad666, @R.G. Camara, @Joe Stalin

    , @Alfa158
    @ic1000

    It’s also possible that the Ukrainians realize that any territory currently being fought over will never be returned if the Russians take it. Since the Russian retreat from the area around Kiev, the contested ground is now all in ethnically Russian areas; the Donbass, Mariupol, Kherson etc. The so-called “cauldrons” are geographically enclosing the areas inside the original borders of the Luhansk and Donetsk provinces. In the areas already taken, the Russians are running up Russian flags, converting the local currency to rubles, issuing Russian passports to anyone who wants one, starting clean-up and restoration of services etc.
    The Ukrainians are fighting to hold ground because at least until the Russians start invading ethnically Ukrainian territory again, anything the Russians seize now is not going to be on the negotiation table, it’s going to be annexed.

  39. My wife and I toured the “Holy land” back in the 80s. At that time I was on a job erecting 40,000 tons of structural steel for a power house. I was singularly unimpressed with the pyramids, stone on top of stones, but the temples at Luxor and Karnak were impressive. When I mentioned that the pyramids were not a big deal to me, my wife said….”I knew you would say that.”

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Buffalo Joe

    The point with the pyramids is they didn’t have steel, structural or otherwise.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buffalo Joe

    , @Yahya
    @Buffalo Joe


    I was singularly unimpressed with the pyramids, stone on top of stones,

     

    "Stone on top of stones" is a bit uncharitable. The Great Pyramid of Giza was the tallest man-made structure in the world for 3,800 years - roughly 3/4 of recorded history. That's all you need to know.

    The inside of the pyramid is more impressive than the outside:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMzouTzim0o&ab_channel=BBC

  40. Are there ever avalanches on that thing? I wouldn’t sit there for longer than it takes to shoot a picture.

  41. It may be of some interest that Egypt was a popular tourist destination in ancient times too. As noted, the Old Kingdom was as remote to Classical Greece as Greece is to us. Athenians in particular, enjoying much leisure time because of the great silver mines at Laurium, were enchanted by the immense antiquity of that land. Plato’s story of Atlantis is a well-known Egyptian legacy. Greek travelers were also quite taken by Egypt’s elaborate death culture and the myth that life persisted after physical death in very specific ways, including final judgment and paradise, which they conceived of as a beautiful papyrus island. These beliefs became incorporated into Greek mythology; when the Macedonian prince Alexander, educated by the Athenian Aristotle, unified the known world, people throughout his great empire also adopted the comforting Egyptian belief. Even a faction of the stubborn Jews of Palestine began to think that life endured after death, and the appealing myth easily passed into Judaism’s most influential offspring, Christianity. Because of those long ago Athenian travelers, people today living on a continent unknown to the ancients think they too possess immortal souls, an interesting commentary on the perennial human condition.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  42. @J.Ross
    What will be left of America in that time frame?

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  43. Here is a very smart and pretty Asian lady talking about an off-the-wall and yet somehow not completely hare-brained theory about the pyramids. She offers evidence that they are mine tailings sites! Dumps! For an advanced ancient civilization that was mining on the Giza Plateau!

  44. Whenever I see pictures like that of the pyramids… that show their grandeur… I always feel a bit sorry for those ancient Egyptian taxpayers.

  45. fish says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow

    SafeNow, I also like to just BE somewhere old like this and imagine how long ago that was and what was actually going on then. No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in "The Ugly* Chinaman", the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls (of course).

    I ask people, such as my wife, "What is it? Do you think nobody will believe you went here? Just tell 'em you went, and there are a million pictures of this on the internet. Just BE here!" That's what it's about.

    But no, her sandstone-colored legs, at least, look pretty good. This picture has inspired me to see if we can go there too. 4,500 years!

    .

    * For those who don't get the reference, it's not a slur, so calm TF down.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @fish, @kaganovitch, @AndrewR, @Joe Stalin

    I do get the reference…..and it was brought home to me while on a tour of the Vatican and in the Sistine Chapel when after being admitted and requested rather strenuously to not take photos while there, as it was “a place of reflection and active worship” seemingly every Chinese in the place hoisted his cell phone and started snapping away.

  46. @prosa123
    I've heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @HammerJack, @SIMP simp, @Batman, @AnotherDad, @johnmark7, @Bardon Kaldlan

    I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    It’s the usual hawkers. Mostly you’ll be approached endlessly for camel rides. (Pretty much all the way in our case from the Sphinx up to the son’s cooler looking … but not quite as tall pyramid.)

    [Travel commentary: perhaps of interest if have not been, planning to go.]

    They uglified the south side of the Great Pyramid with some modern structure the purpose of which I never deduced. (Thought it was some viewing visitor thing … that did not seem to be the case.)
    Still a good experience. AM, AC1, AC2 all went back in the mid-afternoon after doing the basic. But AnotherChild3 and I wandered on for another hour or two out to the 3rd pyramid with all the little wives’ pyramids around it. Looped everything. Nice late afternoon stroll.

    BTW, I very much recommend staying right in Giza, rather than making a day trip in from Cairo. We had a good experience at the Great Pyramid Inn, right across from the light show setup. Both evenings we could just sip tea from the roof terrace and watch the light show in whatever languages were up that night. (It’s usually English and something else. I think we drew one night with Polish? but maybe it was something else I did not recognize.) AnotherMom and I had and interior room but the kids had a view suite and could sit in their beds and watch the pyramids all night. In the morning the breakfast again on the terrace.

    It is not some great “can’t miss this or your life won’t be complete” experience. (I do not believe in such things. I like travel but my life would be great without any of the places I’ve been.) But it is worth the checkbox. Two days three nights covers it though. One day each for pyramids and the museum. When I was there, the museum itself was supposedly shortly to be moved to Giza. But if it is still in Cairo it is still “can’t miss” (once you are there).

    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • Replies: @usNthem
    @AnotherDad

    I think one of the sad (but predictable) things is how many of these modern, ancient or natural wonders/marvels have been utterly commercialized. It’d been cool to see them before all that happened.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad



    I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.
     
    It’s the usual hawkers. Mostly you’ll be approached endlessly for camel rides.
     
    That's an improvement over the days when Cairenes would cripple their youngest and put them out on the street as mendicants.
  47. @Buffalo Joe
    My wife and I toured the "Holy land" back in the 80s. At that time I was on a job erecting 40,000 tons of structural steel for a power house. I was singularly unimpressed with the pyramids, stone on top of stones, but the temples at Luxor and Karnak were impressive. When I mentioned that the pyramids were not a big deal to me, my wife said...."I knew you would say that."

    Replies: @SFG, @Yahya

    The point with the pyramids is they didn’t have steel, structural or otherwise.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @SFG

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @AnotherDad, @Cido

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @SFG

    SFG, Jack D's comment to you is spot on. The pyramids in Egypt and Central and S America are stone on stone, the wider the base the higher the apex. The cathedrals are awe inspiring. Soaring domes, flying buttresses and stain glass windows over a cavernous interior. I can take Alden in my crew and the two of us can move a 3 ton block of limestone.

  48. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pixo, @AndrewR, @Rob, @nebulafox, @R.G. Camara, @Prester John

    When Xenophon and his men encountered the ruins of Biblical Nineveh, part of the reason it stunned them was because it was bigger than any city they knew of back in Greece-or probably anywhere else in the world at the time. Yet none of the locals out in the Assyrian desert could tell them much about who built them, or why they were there. This was already “ancient” history to them, our ancients.

    As another example: people often get confused when post-collapse Anatolians still referred to themselves as “Romans” in 700 AD. That’s before you remember that Roman rule had gone back for nearly 1000 years by that point. It was all anybody knew or remembered. That they spoke Greek and worshiped in churches was irrelevant.

  49. OT, but more stupid neoconnery:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/05/russia-putin-colonization-ukraine-chechnya/639428/

    I think they really believe all this postcolonial crap and aren’t afraid of starting WW3 with a nuclear power. Men without chests, indeed.

  50. @Reg Cæsar
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.
     
    Paging Philip Larkin!

    # of days from the release of the Beatles' first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles' first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645

    Of course, everybody knows by now that Joe Biden attained Ronald Reagan's record presidential age on Election Day, 2020.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Stan Adams

    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645

    When I was a senior in high school in 1991, I distinctly remember hearing “Paint It Black” by the Rolling Stones one time and my mom telling me she had listened to that song during her senior year of high school in 1968. 23 years seemed absolutely ancient to me. All of the songs on the “oldies” station sounded old.

    A couple of years ago that song came on the radio in the car and I started doing math in my head and about drove off the road when I realized that the music that I listened to in high school was now relatively older – 30 years – than that Stones song was when I had that discussion with my mom. None of my music is old! It still sounds like it was yesterday!

    Similarly, I have an uncle who was an All State football player in Texas in the late 1960’s. he tried to talk to me about it a couple of times and I blew it off because in 1990 his career could have been in the leather helmet era to me. I can only imagine what my own son thinks about me now that he’s playing high school football.

    Time doesn’t stop.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @JR Ewing

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cISm1BTvp80

    , @PiltdownMan
    @JR Ewing

    I thought a bit about this after reading this thread in personal terms, though I have a pretty good knowledge of historical dates and time spans.

    My grandmother was born in 1879. That means that any 90+ year olds who might have doted on her when she was a little girl were themselves children during Washington's presidency. Realizing that was a bit startling.

    Once you're getting to retirement age, personal and family memory, one step removed, can span a couple of centuries.

  51. @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve had similar thoughts, for instance seeing the throng of people around the Mona Lisa trying to take a picture of it. Why?

    If you’re going to take a picture, include yourself in it. Take a selfie. Prove you were there. What’s the point otherwise?

    Without your smiling face in it, your crappy snapshot is just a crappy snapshot of something that has already been professionally photographed 100’s or 1000’s of times.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Alfa158, @Harry Baldwin

    I was talking about selfies, J.R. Even then, look, I’ve got friends and family who will believe me if I say I went to the Roman Colosseum, so I don’t need any pictures.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Selfies ain't what they used to be.




    https://i.pinimg.com/236x/da/45/ed/da45ed5ff457e3a6f1cf01c708ceabe3--famous-self-portraits-dali.jpg

    https://mymodernmet.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/famous-self-portraits-thumbnail.jpg

    https://arthive.net/res/media/img/orig/article/ec0/[email protected]

    , @Old Prude
    @Achmed E. Newman

    When I visited Rome in the 80s I was astounded at the amount of ancient building fragments that were stuck in rock walls, or in the cobbles on the road. If one found a 600 year old arrow-head back in Indiana it would be a great thrill, and here were fragments more that twice that old treated as detritus.

    When I visited the Forum I took a couple pieces of it home with me. It was pretty obvious the Italians wouldn't miss it.

  52. @AnotherDad
    @prosa123


    I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.
     
    It's the usual hawkers. Mostly you'll be approached endlessly for camel rides. (Pretty much all the way in our case from the Sphinx up to the son's cooler looking ... but not quite as tall pyramid.)

    [Travel commentary: perhaps of interest if have not been, planning to go.]

    They uglified the south side of the Great Pyramid with some modern structure the purpose of which I never deduced. (Thought it was some viewing visitor thing ... that did not seem to be the case.)
    Still a good experience. AM, AC1, AC2 all went back in the mid-afternoon after doing the basic. But AnotherChild3 and I wandered on for another hour or two out to the 3rd pyramid with all the little wives' pyramids around it. Looped everything. Nice late afternoon stroll.

    BTW, I very much recommend staying right in Giza, rather than making a day trip in from Cairo. We had a good experience at the Great Pyramid Inn, right across from the light show setup. Both evenings we could just sip tea from the roof terrace and watch the light show in whatever languages were up that night. (It's usually English and something else. I think we drew one night with Polish? but maybe it was something else I did not recognize.) AnotherMom and I had and interior room but the kids had a view suite and could sit in their beds and watch the pyramids all night. In the morning the breakfast again on the terrace.

    It is not some great "can't miss this or your life won't be complete" experience. (I do not believe in such things. I like travel but my life would be great without any of the places I've been.) But it is worth the checkbox. Two days three nights covers it though. One day each for pyramids and the museum. When I was there, the museum itself was supposedly shortly to be moved to Giza. But if it is still in Cairo it is still "can't miss" (once you are there).

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar

    I think one of the sad (but predictable) things is how many of these modern, ancient or natural wonders/marvels have been utterly commercialized. It’d been cool to see them before all that happened.

  53. @ginger bread man
    Turns out Princeton Professor Joshua Katz married his student from the class of 2017, completely unrelated to the other student with whom he had a consensual relationship.

    https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/what-princeton-did-to-my-husband?fbclid=IwAR3teIqa_D-yTGeNyr01PIrQR7nf26FX7OC1Rxt0rselN6aX_l4RL1dEaqY&fs=e&s=cl

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Dream, @SFG, @dearieme

    She makes a fine point with this: the same people who think that children can consent to puberty blockers claim that a 21-year-old woman cannot possibly consent to a relationship with her professor.

  54. Pixo says:
    @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    Hey Dave, in late February you told us Russia was taking Kharkiv, and would soon control half or Ukraine, and Zelensky would be captured and beg for his life.

    How’s that sick fantasy going?

    The reality is that despite a larger military and a cowardly surprise attack, this evil invasion is an unmitigated disaster for your hero Putin. He failed his bloody drive for Kiev, then was chased out of Kharkiv’s suburbs. The drive to Odessa was crushed, the Russian flagship sunk, and Russia retreated all around Kherson.

    Having lost the battle for the two largest cities, he’s throwing all his remaining forces on a few bombed out and abandoned small towns. And that’s not going too well either.

    You’re a consistent liar, but the maps don’t lie. Look at Russia’s zone of control in March versus today. They are losing. You know that feeling well, doncha?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Pixo

    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately. As I pointed out in Taki's in March, the Soviets were ignominiously beaten badly in late 1939 invading Finland, but reorganized in 1940 under Zhukov and ground out an expensive conquest of a modest amount of terrain.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Pixo, @Bill Jones

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Pixo

    My little buddy Pixo wrote to me:


    You’re a consistent liar, but the maps don’t lie.
     
    Well, let's see...

    Early on, I argued that what Putin really wanted was independence for the Donbass and a neutral Ukraine.

    The Western media and ruling elite agree that now Putin is focusing on the Donbass.

    I hereby confess that I was indeed surprised that Putin did not use as much force in dealing with Kiev and Kharkov as he did in dealing with Mariupol (obviously, Putin felt that a full-on attack was needed in Mariupol to destroy the nest of neo-Nazis that were dug in there, which in fact has now been done).

    So, I hereby offer my formal apology to Vladimir Vladimirovich for my having underestimated his sense of decency, humanity, and restraint, as shown by his decision not to turn Kiev and Kharkov into rubble: I humbly apologize, Vladimir Vladimirovich!

    Does that make you feel better, Pixo?

    Pixo also wrote:

    Look at Russia’s zone of control in March versus today. They are losing. You know that feeling well, doncha?
     
    Well, over the decades, I've won some, I've lost some -- I know both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat.

    But I'll just note again that pro-Kiev observers, as I have documented above, ranging from the NYT to Henry the K to NBC News, disagree with your belief that Russia is losing.

    I
    don't care: I have no dog in this fight.

    All I care about, as I keep saying, is that the killing must stop.

    As I have said before, if that happens by Putin turning tail and running back to Moscow, that is okay with me.

    But I do not think that will happen.

    I think the killing will only stop when the Penis Piano Playing Puppet in Kiev (or whoever pulls his strings) decides to accept the inevitable -- an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    You get awfully angry in claiming that the NYT, Kissinger, NBC News, etc. are all wrong about Russian forces moving forward.

    But I am content to see what happens: time will tell.

    I only wish the killing would stop.

    You take care now, little buddy, y'hear!
  55. @Anonymous
    @Sam Malone


    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50's or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    Replies: @bomag, @prosa123, @kaganovitch, @Jack D, @Charles Pewitt, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    I’d say that a random bunch of 62 y.o. women would do better than a random bunch of men the same age. Women in that age range are often into nutrition and fitness while way too many men just pork up and turn into blobs. In fairness, in those age ranges men are far more likely than women to have chronic medical conditions that makes it impossible to engage in physical activity.

    • Replies: @anon
    @prosa123

    Based on what I've seen at the gym that I've lifted at for the last 12 years (I'm 68 ), you would be wrong. Anecdotal, yes, but I bet that your statement is purely anecdotal. Mileage tends to vary.

    Replies: @prosa123

  56. Pixo says:
    @ic1000
    @PhysicistDave

    PhysicistDave, while I favor Kyiv in this war (on balance), I concur with your analysis.

    It has been difficult-to-impossible to know the ground truth of this war in detail. But it has been clear for weeks that Russia's strategy has been to attempt to encircle Ukrainian troops in the Donetsk salient around the city of Severodonetsk.

    Would the Ukrainians be strong enough to hold fast, given that this battlefield minimizes Russian weaknesses in logistics? The cited NBC report gives the answer to us spectators (which would have been obvious to both sides for some time): No.

    So the Ukrainian General Staff's choice has been between holding territory at the high risk of the forced surrender of the defending troops, or attempting a withdrawal in good order, westwards towards Dnipro, conceding the remainder of the Donbas to the Russians.

    Fighting withdrawals are extremely difficult. They require the sacrifice of units at the 'back,' and risk turning into sauve-qui-peut routs. Worse, for the past week there have been only two 2-lane paved roads open to the west from Severodonetsk, with one or both under observation by Russian artillery.

    The NBC article confirms that the Ukrainians have prioritized territory over soldiers, and are about to pay the price.

    The reporter mentions the prospect of sending "reinforcements" to the embattled troops, presumably to buoy the spirits of U.S./EU fans of Ukraine. General von Paulus was not available for comment.

    Replies: @Pixo, @Jack D, @Alfa158

    And Russia has lost so many of its tanks that it is now sending its T-62s from deep storage. They were produced from 1961-1975, so 47 years old at absolute best. And we know Russian are great at long term maintenance of old Soviet equipment, right?

    To complement Russia’s ancient tanks, it just raised the age for new military recruits from 40 to 50. Another thing you do when victory is at hand, right? And Russian men are known for their clean living and staying in great shape, so should make great soldiers at 50!

    Sure, if Putin insists on throwing everything into Severodonetsk, he will trade thousands of his soldiers lives for a bombed out and abandoned city, as he did with Mariupol. That’s not winning, that’s a vainglorious and evil dictator imposing his insanity on his unfortunate subjects.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Pixo

    You didn’t know it, you didn’t think it could be done
    In the final end he won the war
    After losing every battle

    https://youtu.be/5E4ytUW8g_0

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan

    , @Anonymous
    @Pixo

    Every Russian supports President Putin. Materialistic Americans will never understand the bond that exists between the Russian people and their president. They will gladly die for him to the last man.

  57. @reactionry
    @Achmed E. Newman

    "Dust in the Wind"

    Soap Opera Socratics:

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=bill+and+ted+socrates+dust&ru=%2fsearch%3fq%3dbill%2520and%2520ted%2520socrates%2520dust%26form%3dSWAUA2&view=detail&mmscn=vwrc&mid=1641C1A244ADA353083E1641C1A244ADA353083E&FORM=WRVORC

    Replies: @Ganderson

    Soe- crates Johnson!

  58. @Buffalo Joe
    My wife and I toured the "Holy land" back in the 80s. At that time I was on a job erecting 40,000 tons of structural steel for a power house. I was singularly unimpressed with the pyramids, stone on top of stones, but the temples at Luxor and Karnak were impressive. When I mentioned that the pyramids were not a big deal to me, my wife said...."I knew you would say that."

    Replies: @SFG, @Yahya

    I was singularly unimpressed with the pyramids, stone on top of stones,

    “Stone on top of stones” is a bit uncharitable. The Great Pyramid of Giza was the tallest man-made structure in the world for 3,800 years – roughly 3/4 of recorded history. That’s all you need to know.

    [MORE]

    The inside of the pyramid is more impressive than the outside:

  59. @HammerJack
    @prosa123

    And they're very big on animal abuse, if that's your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anon, @Ian Smith, @Dream

    Are Arabs good at ANYTHING?

    Re: the pyramid woman, she looks like she has a nice figure. Some of us like women with breasts and a butt.

  60. @prosa123
    @Anonymous

    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    I'd say that a random bunch of 62 y.o. women would do better than a random bunch of men the same age. Women in that age range are often into nutrition and fitness while way too many men just pork up and turn into blobs. In fairness, in those age ranges men are far more likely than women to have chronic medical conditions that makes it impossible to engage in physical activity.

    Replies: @anon

    Based on what I’ve seen at the gym that I’ve lifted at for the last 12 years (I’m 68 ), you would be wrong. Anecdotal, yes, but I bet that your statement is purely anecdotal. Mileage tends to vary.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @anon

    You're looking at a self-selected population. Older men who go to gyms are not representative of men in that age range.

  61. @AnotherDad
    @prosa123


    I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.
     
    It's the usual hawkers. Mostly you'll be approached endlessly for camel rides. (Pretty much all the way in our case from the Sphinx up to the son's cooler looking ... but not quite as tall pyramid.)

    [Travel commentary: perhaps of interest if have not been, planning to go.]

    They uglified the south side of the Great Pyramid with some modern structure the purpose of which I never deduced. (Thought it was some viewing visitor thing ... that did not seem to be the case.)
    Still a good experience. AM, AC1, AC2 all went back in the mid-afternoon after doing the basic. But AnotherChild3 and I wandered on for another hour or two out to the 3rd pyramid with all the little wives' pyramids around it. Looped everything. Nice late afternoon stroll.

    BTW, I very much recommend staying right in Giza, rather than making a day trip in from Cairo. We had a good experience at the Great Pyramid Inn, right across from the light show setup. Both evenings we could just sip tea from the roof terrace and watch the light show in whatever languages were up that night. (It's usually English and something else. I think we drew one night with Polish? but maybe it was something else I did not recognize.) AnotherMom and I had and interior room but the kids had a view suite and could sit in their beds and watch the pyramids all night. In the morning the breakfast again on the terrace.

    It is not some great "can't miss this or your life won't be complete" experience. (I do not believe in such things. I like travel but my life would be great without any of the places I've been.) But it is worth the checkbox. Two days three nights covers it though. One day each for pyramids and the museum. When I was there, the museum itself was supposedly shortly to be moved to Giza. But if it is still in Cairo it is still "can't miss" (once you are there).

    Replies: @usNthem, @Reg Cæsar

    I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    It’s the usual hawkers. Mostly you’ll be approached endlessly for camel rides.

    That’s an improvement over the days when Cairenes would cripple their youngest and put them out on the street as mendicants.

  62. The reason why you take photos of a place that has 1000s of photos available online

    Is because it takes less time to Take the Photo and Post to Instagram/Facebook, then to do a Google Search

    Me and my spouse always upload a bunch of photos to facebook of our Day out Together, to let our friends and family see what we were up to

  63. @SFG
    @Buffalo Joe

    The point with the pyramids is they didn’t have steel, structural or otherwise.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buffalo Joe

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.
     
    Egyptians had too much open space at their disposal to be impressed by it. Narrow corridors would be the novelty. In Florence, Nuremberg, or York, the opposite would be true.


    Contrast this pair of photos from Braşov in Romania:

    https://romaniatourism.com/images/brasov/strada-sforii-brasov-romania-the-narrowest-street-large.jpg

    http://photos.wikimapia.org/p/00/02/21/11/80_big.jpg

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @SFG
    @Jack D

    Yeah, but the Egyptians were first and had less accumulated knowledge to build on. It’s like asking why Newton didn’t look up the laws of motion on Wikipedia. Someone had to be first.

    People in the past weren’t dumber, they knew less. (And were often in better shape!)

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.
     
    You are cavalierly dismissing the great achievements of that ancient Black civilization. Next, you will be impugning the greatness of the Great Zimbabwe ... racist!

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Cido
    @Jack D


    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.
     
    As another commenter said, Egyptians didn't have any previous knowledge about engineering , from any other civilization. They were the first. This is why they are so great. The magnitute of the ancient time when the pyramids were constructed is enormous. When Western civilization began to have historical significance, the pyramids already had something like 2000 years.
  64. @Anonymous
    @Sam Malone


    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50's or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    Replies: @bomag, @prosa123, @kaganovitch, @Jack D, @Charles Pewitt, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down.

    Unless you’re Tom Thumb, I’m not sure why you had to drop 5 feet down on the other side of a nine foot fence?

    • Agree: Cortes, AndrewR
    • LOL: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @kaganovitch

    Hanging onto the top after climbing over, he had 5 ft. between his feet and the ground when he jumped. That makes sense, because you've got to be bent over a ways to hang on with your feet against it.

    Nice job, #954. Just make sure you show up for your deportation hearing, mmmkaayy?

    Replies: @Jack D

  65. @ic1000
    @PhysicistDave

    PhysicistDave, while I favor Kyiv in this war (on balance), I concur with your analysis.

    It has been difficult-to-impossible to know the ground truth of this war in detail. But it has been clear for weeks that Russia's strategy has been to attempt to encircle Ukrainian troops in the Donetsk salient around the city of Severodonetsk.

    Would the Ukrainians be strong enough to hold fast, given that this battlefield minimizes Russian weaknesses in logistics? The cited NBC report gives the answer to us spectators (which would have been obvious to both sides for some time): No.

    So the Ukrainian General Staff's choice has been between holding territory at the high risk of the forced surrender of the defending troops, or attempting a withdrawal in good order, westwards towards Dnipro, conceding the remainder of the Donbas to the Russians.

    Fighting withdrawals are extremely difficult. They require the sacrifice of units at the 'back,' and risk turning into sauve-qui-peut routs. Worse, for the past week there have been only two 2-lane paved roads open to the west from Severodonetsk, with one or both under observation by Russian artillery.

    The NBC article confirms that the Ukrainians have prioritized territory over soldiers, and are about to pay the price.

    The reporter mentions the prospect of sending "reinforcements" to the embattled troops, presumably to buoy the spirits of U.S./EU fans of Ukraine. General von Paulus was not available for comment.

    Replies: @Pixo, @Jack D, @Alfa158

    There is no doubt that it’s not going well for the Ukrainians at Severodonetsk. However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably. The “cauldron” was originally going to be the entire east and the whole Ukrainian army was going to be trapped inside of it. The pocket around Severodonetsk is more like a saucepan than a cauldron.

    The narratives in this war have gone back and forth – when the war started, everyone expected the mighty Russian Army to overrun the Ukrainians. Then it flipped and the Russians were complete incompetents who couldn’t do anything right. The truth is somewhere in between and there is no question that they can score at least tactical victories in some places. They have a lot of heavy artillery that they can bring to bear on an area that is difficult to withstand.

    Note though that by the time they take over a city they are capturing rubble. Most of the people are gone, all the structures and industry are destroyed. So what have they captured? Does Russia need more land? Whatever short term tactical victories they can achieve, Putin has driven Russia into a strategic “cauldron”. Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea. Putin has turned Russia into a pariah state and his prize is the rubble of Severodonetsk. Is this game really worth the candle?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Jack D

    This war won't be over until the last Russian soldier is expelled from Ukraine (with the possible exception of Crimea, and now I am not even sure of that).

    Having in mind that Germans were cleansed from a much bigger area where even stones speak German, the home of Schopenhauer, Kant, Koch, Boehme, Hilbert, Behring, Virchow ....- I don't give a damn about some supposedly Russian historical & cultural traditions in these areas.

    You play, you pay.

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Jack D


    Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea.
     
    Sour grapes much. You've encapsulated the mindset that caused this debacle for Ukraine and the West -- that is, the hubristic fantasy that being in the good graces of the global elite is the only thing that matters.

    Hopefully, we can clear these neocon globalist losers out in 2024 and have a reality-based pro-American foreign policy for once.

    P.S., North Korea isn't the world's leading exporter of energy and food. They'll survive losing McDonalds and Starbucks.

    Replies: @Pixo

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Jack D


    However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably.
     
    lol. Glowie goonna glow.

    How long your boys going to push this narrative, fed?
    , @Joe Stalin
    @Jack D

    Ukrainians begging for long range missile artillery.

    https://twitter.com/DefenceU/status/1529398122069336066?cxt=HHwWhIC9oaXfwbkqAAAA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juAmsMSprFs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1XIfMy4M30

    And it looks like the Russkies might be getting some competition for their rocket artillery.

    https://twitter.com/McFaul/status/1530063176770850816

  66. @Anonymous
    @Sam Malone


    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50's or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    Replies: @bomag, @prosa123, @kaganovitch, @Jack D, @Charles Pewitt, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it.

    I’m not sure that I could scale a nine foot fence, but then again I’m not so senile that I lock myself out of my house, so I’ll call it a wash.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    LOL!, but never say never, Jack.

    After only about 3 hours sleep the night before, I got out of rent-a-car in the morning, checked to make sure my keys were in my jacket before I locked the car up, thought "what the? It's hot here in Florida", threw the jacket back into the car, and locked it freaking up!

    The Sheriff Deputy lady used a plastic wedge, so we got in in 30 seconds. I learned the wedge trick, and it has helped me once or twice since.

    I could scale a fence too, but 9 ft!? That's a doozy. I suppose I could hire an illegal alien to do it for me ...

    , @Zoos
    @Jack D


    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it.
     

    I’m not sure that I could scale a nine foot fence, but then again I’m not so senile that I lock myself out of my house, so I’ll call it a wash.
     
    But you are so senile that you provide a direct citation, then transcribe the word, "backyard" into "house" somewhere in your head, and carry on as if you’re thought process is just fine.

    I’m merely providing a "heads-up" for you, while reminding you that senility is a process. You aren’t fine one day, and senile the next.

    It begins by being contradictory for the sake of being contradictory. Poor reasoning, with a light patina of ill will. Later, the mini-tirades in private that frighten your wife begin. Then they'll become more public. Then the transcribing of the meaning of words. Then forgetting your grandsons name, etc.

    All this while believing you’re okay, and it’s the world that’s gone askew. Everyone's stupid. It’s 7 pm, where’s your breakfast? A backyard is the same thing as a house. It’s all on the same property. What is wrong with these people?

    Good luck with that.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  67. @Achmed E. Newman
    @JR Ewing

    I was talking about selfies, J.R. Even then, look, I've got friends and family who will believe me if I say I went to the Roman Colosseum, so I don't need any pictures.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Old Prude

    Selfies ain’t what they used to be.

  68. @Jack D
    @ic1000

    There is no doubt that it's not going well for the Ukrainians at Severodonetsk. However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably. The "cauldron" was originally going to be the entire east and the whole Ukrainian army was going to be trapped inside of it. The pocket around Severodonetsk is more like a saucepan than a cauldron.

    The narratives in this war have gone back and forth - when the war started, everyone expected the mighty Russian Army to overrun the Ukrainians. Then it flipped and the Russians were complete incompetents who couldn't do anything right. The truth is somewhere in between and there is no question that they can score at least tactical victories in some places. They have a lot of heavy artillery that they can bring to bear on an area that is difficult to withstand.

    Note though that by the time they take over a city they are capturing rubble. Most of the people are gone, all the structures and industry are destroyed. So what have they captured? Does Russia need more land? Whatever short term tactical victories they can achieve, Putin has driven Russia into a strategic "cauldron". Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea. Putin has turned Russia into a pariah state and his prize is the rubble of Severodonetsk. Is this game really worth the candle?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Hypnotoad666, @R.G. Camara, @Joe Stalin

    This war won’t be over until the last Russian soldier is expelled from Ukraine (with the possible exception of Crimea, and now I am not even sure of that).

    Having in mind that Germans were cleansed from a much bigger area where even stones speak German, the home of Schopenhauer, Kant, Koch, Boehme, Hilbert, Behring, Virchow ….- I don’t give a damn about some supposedly Russian historical & cultural traditions in these areas.

    You play, you pay.

  69. @Jack D
    @SFG

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @AnotherDad, @Cido

    One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    Egyptians had too much open space at their disposal to be impressed by it. Narrow corridors would be the novelty. In Florence, Nuremberg, or York, the opposite would be true.

    Contrast this pair of photos from Braşov in Romania:

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Reg Cæsar

    Contrast this pair of photos from Braşov in Romania:

    I only see one photo? Back in the day my great grandpaw lived in Brasov.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  70. @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow

    SafeNow, I also like to just BE somewhere old like this and imagine how long ago that was and what was actually going on then. No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in "The Ugly* Chinaman", the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls (of course).

    I ask people, such as my wife, "What is it? Do you think nobody will believe you went here? Just tell 'em you went, and there are a million pictures of this on the internet. Just BE here!" That's what it's about.

    But no, her sandstone-colored legs, at least, look pretty good. This picture has inspired me to see if we can go there too. 4,500 years!

    .

    * For those who don't get the reference, it's not a slur, so calm TF down.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @fish, @kaganovitch, @AndrewR, @Joe Stalin

    No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in “The Ugly* Chinaman”, the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls

    Old Jewish joke: Max and Izzy from Brooklyn struck it rich building suburban developments after WW2. They sell the business for millions and decide they’re going to travel the world to imbibe some culture. First stop of course is Italy. They tour the sites then they arrive at the Colosseum. They look around and Izzy tells Max “Max, dis illustrates vot I told you not vunce but a hundred times; If you don’t hef sufficient kepital, you don’t start to build!”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @kaganovitch

    Actually there are a lot of half-finished buildings in Rome for exactly that reason. There was a great building boom in the city after Italian unification in the 1860s, however this ended in a bust a few years later, and a lot of grand buildings never got finished.

  71. @Jack D
    @Anonymous


    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it.
     
    I'm not sure that I could scale a nine foot fence, but then again I'm not so senile that I lock myself out of my house, so I'll call it a wash.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Zoos

    LOL!, but never say never, Jack.

    After only about 3 hours sleep the night before, I got out of rent-a-car in the morning, checked to make sure my keys were in my jacket before I locked the car up, thought “what the? It’s hot here in Florida”, threw the jacket back into the car, and locked it freaking up!

    The Sheriff Deputy lady used a plastic wedge, so we got in in 30 seconds. I learned the wedge trick, and it has helped me once or twice since.

    I could scale a fence too, but 9 ft!? That’s a doozy. I suppose I could hire an illegal alien to do it for me …

  72. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.
     
    Egyptians had too much open space at their disposal to be impressed by it. Narrow corridors would be the novelty. In Florence, Nuremberg, or York, the opposite would be true.


    Contrast this pair of photos from Braşov in Romania:

    https://romaniatourism.com/images/brasov/strada-sforii-brasov-romania-the-narrowest-street-large.jpg

    http://photos.wikimapia.org/p/00/02/21/11/80_big.jpg

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Contrast this pair of photos from Braşov in Romania:

    I only see one photo? Back in the day my great grandpaw lived in Brasov.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @kaganovitch

    The first photo is from this site: https://romaniatourism.com/images/brasov/the-narrowest-street-in-europe.html





    The second is from here: http://wikimapia.org/2018026/The-Black-Church

  73. SFG says:
    @Jack D
    @SFG

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @AnotherDad, @Cido

    Yeah, but the Egyptians were first and had less accumulated knowledge to build on. It’s like asking why Newton didn’t look up the laws of motion on Wikipedia. Someone had to be first.

    People in the past weren’t dumber, they knew less. (And were often in better shape!)

    • Thanks: Yahya
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @SFG


    People in the past weren’t dumber, they knew less.
     
    I think I disagree with that. The total knowledge base of the time was much smaller but an educated man could know a hell of a lot of it not necessarily less in toto.
    If one could list "Things wot I no" their list would probably be impressively long and impressively bereft of brain blockers like which fat african whores are fucking which dope addled rap grunter.

    Kunstler touches on this very topic today.

    https://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/childhoods-end/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  74. @Jack D
    @SFG

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @AnotherDad, @Cido

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    You are cavalierly dismissing the great achievements of that ancient Black civilization. Next, you will be impugning the greatness of the Great Zimbabwe … racist!

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    I would never do that. The grain silo at Great Zimbabwe is over 30 feet tall and upwards of 18 feet in diameter!

    https://www.exploring-africa.com/sites/default/files/styles/full_page/public/uploads/article/325/cover/zimbabwe-africa-exploringafrica-safariadv-radio-raheem-great-zimbabwe.jpg?itok=Y0E33Ab-

    Great Zimbabwe compares favorably with the Gothic cathedrals that were built at the same time. The towers of the cathedrals were built for no good reason but a grain silo feeds the people.

    Replies: @peterike, @mc23

  75. @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve had similar thoughts, for instance seeing the throng of people around the Mona Lisa trying to take a picture of it. Why?

    If you’re going to take a picture, include yourself in it. Take a selfie. Prove you were there. What’s the point otherwise?

    Without your smiling face in it, your crappy snapshot is just a crappy snapshot of something that has already been professionally photographed 100’s or 1000’s of times.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Alfa158, @Harry Baldwin

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.
    In Rome the whole selfie thing was a pain not as much because of the people taking selfies, but because the tourist areas were infested with Tamil refugees aggressively hawking selfie sticks. If you walked a typical block you would pass four or five selfie stick salesman and about half as many Africans selling fake made in Southeast Asia “African” wood handicrafts.
    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Alfa158

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.

    Our experience too on our trip in late 2018. Can't understand why the Louvre doesn't ban selfie sticks.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Alfa158

    Why are there Tamil refugees at all, in 2022?The Tamils have their own, prosperous state in India, and the civil war in Sri Lanka has been over for over a dozen years, with the Tamil separatist leadership completely annihilated.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @AnotherDad
    @Alfa158


    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers.
     
    I hope they were fixed. This would be bad, but tolerable if all the "refugees" were fixed upon arrival. (If you're really fleeing for you life, that shouldn't be a big deal.)


    The last time I was in Europe in the mid-teens it was depressing. (I had not been in a few decades while I build my career and the kids grew up.) We were visiting some friends in Germany right when the Merkel's Madness was set loose. (A warming about women--even supposedly "tough" women--and rationality and leadership.) But even before the hordes arrived, waking around Munich and seeing some random black guys apparently settled there--depressing. And Paris ... LOL. I got on one train and thought I was in the Bronx.

    Talk about a boiled frog.

    How could Euros look at America and let this happen? ... That's right, they had their brains addled by our minoritarian b.s. Still ...
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Alfa158

    "One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid."

    Same on the ring road round Beziers in southern France, but by no means all black girls. Same on the coast road from France towards Barcelona. In Porto (Portugal) there were transvestite prostitutes across the road from our hotel. Lord knows who their clients were.

    Re Ukraine, I'm a tad worried that as the initial they-got-their-ass-kicked euphoria (produced by a vast propaganda campaign, but an effective one) wears off, and Russia grind west slowly but surely,

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/05/26/ukraine-frontline-russia-military-severodonetsk/

    that demands to DO SOMETHING OR RUSSIA WILL WIN will become louder (and they'll be amplified as if we are all Nulands/Jack Ds) - drawing the US/UK/EU closer to open confrontation with Russia.

    Now personally, I'd rather Ukraine and Russia were at peace, that NATO stopped expanding (who wants to die for North Macedonia?), that gas was flowing via NS2 to a grateful Europe, that I didn't need a bank loan to fill my car or the oil tank, and that the queues at the local food bank didn't get ever longer.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Old Prude

  76. @Alfa158
    @JR Ewing

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.
    In Rome the whole selfie thing was a pain not as much because of the people taking selfies, but because the tourist areas were infested with Tamil refugees aggressively hawking selfie sticks. If you walked a typical block you would pass four or five selfie stick salesman and about half as many Africans selling fake made in Southeast Asia “African” wood handicrafts.
    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid.

    Replies: @prosa123, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @YetAnotherAnon

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.

    Our experience too on our trip in late 2018. Can’t understand why the Louvre doesn’t ban selfie sticks.

    • Agree: Muggles
  77. @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow

    SafeNow, I also like to just BE somewhere old like this and imagine how long ago that was and what was actually going on then. No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in "The Ugly* Chinaman", the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls (of course).

    I ask people, such as my wife, "What is it? Do you think nobody will believe you went here? Just tell 'em you went, and there are a million pictures of this on the internet. Just BE here!" That's what it's about.

    But no, her sandstone-colored legs, at least, look pretty good. This picture has inspired me to see if we can go there too. 4,500 years!

    .

    * For those who don't get the reference, it's not a slur, so calm TF down.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @fish, @kaganovitch, @AndrewR, @Joe Stalin

    Way too long to read

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AndrewR

    ts/dc

  78. @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime

    Boris Johnson has warned Russia is making ‘palpable progress’ in Donbas region

    “Boris Johnson today warned that Russia is ‘chewing through ground’ in eastern Ukraine as he urged more support for Kyiv’s forces.

    The PM said Vladimir Putin’s military is making ‘palpable progress’ in the Donbas region despite the ‘incredible heroism’ of the resistance.”

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Joe S.Walker
    @PiltdownMan

    Boris has reasons for wanting to divert attention from himself just now. If the Ukraine business hadn't happened when it did, he might have already been driven out of office.

  79. @songbird
    Someone I knew visited Cairo once. They said they saw a cow slaughtered in an alleyway.

    Replies: @bomag, @Hal E. Burton

    I was in Hurghada, Egypt in 1991 and saw a cart-pulling donkey keel over (while being brutally whipped by the cart driver) in a 4 way intersection. There was a handy butcher shop on one of the corners. Some loud bartering ensued and the donkey was unceremoniously unhitched and dragged screaming/braying by means of a few guys and kids with meat hooks to the butcher shop. Was slaughtered there on the curb and pieces hung up on the awning of the shop.

    Was in a cab on a ride back from playing tourist at the temple of Hatshepsut on that same trip and the cab driver left the asphalt to drive into the desert to run over a dog (not unlike Steve’s “Standard Dog”) and then stopped, got out, and threw it still breathing and twitching into the trunk. Ummm. No. Tip. Muhammad.
    I didn’t feel at all bad dropping tons of bombs all over this fella’s co-religionists in Kuwait/Iraq.
    Hurghada was an upscale tourist town, if you want some weirder stories I’ll tell you about my week stuck in Alexandria.

    • Thanks: songbird
  80. @Alfa158
    @JR Ewing

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.
    In Rome the whole selfie thing was a pain not as much because of the people taking selfies, but because the tourist areas were infested with Tamil refugees aggressively hawking selfie sticks. If you walked a typical block you would pass four or five selfie stick salesman and about half as many Africans selling fake made in Southeast Asia “African” wood handicrafts.
    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid.

    Replies: @prosa123, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @YetAnotherAnon

    Why are there Tamil refugees at all, in 2022?The Tamils have their own, prosperous state in India, and the civil war in Sri Lanka has been over for over a dozen years, with the Tamil separatist leadership completely annihilated.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @PiltdownMan

    Things are still pretty hard for Tamils in Sri Lanka today. Calling them refugees might be a stretch, but those who can get out do. Tamil Nadu is among the richer, more pleasant places in India to live, and as you already probably know, the Tamils don't lack for diaspora communities around Southeast Asia.

    It's not just them. Sri Lanka used to have an small but visible ethnic Malay minority in urban areas. While they weren't outright targets in the same way the Tamils were (big religious fault line being Hindu vs. Buddhist rather than Hindu vs. Muslim as on the subcontinent proper), they've been leaving the country for decades when possible, often to Malaysia where they can qualify for racially favored rather than disfavored status.

  81. @Achmed E. Newman
    @JR Ewing

    I was talking about selfies, J.R. Even then, look, I've got friends and family who will believe me if I say I went to the Roman Colosseum, so I don't need any pictures.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Old Prude

    When I visited Rome in the 80s I was astounded at the amount of ancient building fragments that were stuck in rock walls, or in the cobbles on the road. If one found a 600 year old arrow-head back in Indiana it would be a great thrill, and here were fragments more that twice that old treated as detritus.

    When I visited the Forum I took a couple pieces of it home with me. It was pretty obvious the Italians wouldn’t miss it.

  82. @ic1000
    @PhysicistDave

    PhysicistDave, while I favor Kyiv in this war (on balance), I concur with your analysis.

    It has been difficult-to-impossible to know the ground truth of this war in detail. But it has been clear for weeks that Russia's strategy has been to attempt to encircle Ukrainian troops in the Donetsk salient around the city of Severodonetsk.

    Would the Ukrainians be strong enough to hold fast, given that this battlefield minimizes Russian weaknesses in logistics? The cited NBC report gives the answer to us spectators (which would have been obvious to both sides for some time): No.

    So the Ukrainian General Staff's choice has been between holding territory at the high risk of the forced surrender of the defending troops, or attempting a withdrawal in good order, westwards towards Dnipro, conceding the remainder of the Donbas to the Russians.

    Fighting withdrawals are extremely difficult. They require the sacrifice of units at the 'back,' and risk turning into sauve-qui-peut routs. Worse, for the past week there have been only two 2-lane paved roads open to the west from Severodonetsk, with one or both under observation by Russian artillery.

    The NBC article confirms that the Ukrainians have prioritized territory over soldiers, and are about to pay the price.

    The reporter mentions the prospect of sending "reinforcements" to the embattled troops, presumably to buoy the spirits of U.S./EU fans of Ukraine. General von Paulus was not available for comment.

    Replies: @Pixo, @Jack D, @Alfa158

    It’s also possible that the Ukrainians realize that any territory currently being fought over will never be returned if the Russians take it. Since the Russian retreat from the area around Kiev, the contested ground is now all in ethnically Russian areas; the Donbass, Mariupol, Kherson etc. The so-called “cauldrons” are geographically enclosing the areas inside the original borders of the Luhansk and Donetsk provinces. In the areas already taken, the Russians are running up Russian flags, converting the local currency to rubles, issuing Russian passports to anyone who wants one, starting clean-up and restoration of services etc.
    The Ukrainians are fighting to hold ground because at least until the Russians start invading ethnically Ukrainian territory again, anything the Russians seize now is not going to be on the negotiation table, it’s going to be annexed.

    • Agree: ic1000
  83. @Pixo
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    This ivory statue found in southern France is from around 23,000BC.

    https://www.ilcerchiodellaluna.it/immagini/27000-BC_Venus-of-Brassempouy_PLZ-011.jpg

    Replies: @G. Poulin

    I didn’t realize Pete Townsend was around back then.

  84. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pixo, @AndrewR, @Rob, @nebulafox, @R.G. Camara, @Prester John

    To the ancient Romans, conquering Egypt was a monumental event. Not because it was difficult (spoiler: it was not), nor because it was a source of infinite wealth (spoiler: it was), and not because its conquest was simultaneous of the transition from Republic to Empire (spoiler it was, but because Egypt, to the Romans, was a mystical and full of history as China is to the United States.

    For the Romans, once the dust had settled on the Civil Wars, possession of Egypt was a sign from above that Rome truly was a monumental historical nation.

    • Replies: @Franz
    @R.G. Camara


    For the Romans, once the dust had settled on the Civil Wars, possession of Egypt was a sign from above that Rome truly was a monumental historical nation.
     
    It was how the Romans shafted their own people. Cheap grain from the Nile delta made Italian farmers paupers. Sure the rich guys liked it. The way Bill Gates & company liked low wages in China. That's a short term bonanza for the tiny few that leads to extinction for everybody, eventually.

    They thought Taylor Caldwell was crazy 60 years ago when she said the USA was repeating every blunder the Romans made without even the pretense of a golden age. Now it seems like she was not only right on the republic-to-empire thing, but in all the particulars too.
  85. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.
     
    You are cavalierly dismissing the great achievements of that ancient Black civilization. Next, you will be impugning the greatness of the Great Zimbabwe ... racist!

    Replies: @Jack D

    I would never do that. The grain silo at Great Zimbabwe is over 30 feet tall and upwards of 18 feet in diameter!

    https://www.exploring-africa.com/sites/default/files/styles/full_page/public/uploads/article/325/cover/zimbabwe-africa-exploringafrica-safariadv-radio-raheem-great-zimbabwe.jpg?itok=Y0E33Ab-

    Great Zimbabwe compares favorably with the Gothic cathedrals that were built at the same time. The towers of the cathedrals were built for no good reason but a grain silo feeds the people.

    • Replies: @peterike
    @Jack D


    The towers of the cathedrals were built for no good reason but a grain silo feeds the people.

     

    No good reason at all Jack. Other than the worshipping God part.
    , @mc23
    @Jack D

    A thirty foot drywall tower? Impressive but I don't think it wouldn't have made a decent European Dark Ages keep. I suspect it wasn't a grain tower either. Grain silos are loaded from the top.

  86. @Sam Malone
    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp's face is? We've gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they're putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @The Plutonium Kid, @AnotherDad, @scrivener3, @Dave from Oz

    We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    People always want some deep dark conspiracy. There isn’t one. Americans eat too much–way, way, way too much–for our basically sedentary lifestyles.

    Sure. The medical establishment totally screwed the pooch with their dietary advice to the fattening post-War officer workers (like my dad) back in the 60s/70s. “Fat” or “saturated fat” isn’t some demon. It’s basically carbs–lots and lots of cheap and plentiful carbs–that yo-yo people’s blood sugar help make them hungry again. People like fat. It makes people feel “full” and ready to stop eating. And yeah, the seed oil replacements seem to be worse for folks than the original–for Westerners–animal based fats.

    But the bottom line remains: Americans eat way too much for the sedentary lifestyles we have.

    Americans are no longer toting that barge or lifting that bale. But lots are eating like they do. If you do not want to be fat … do not eat so much. (Particularly don’t fill up on fast carbs. You’ll just be hungry again in a couple hours.) But it is less what you eat than how much you stuff your maw.

    I’ll put myself out there: I eat the same “processed food” from Walmart and Costco as a typical American. I weigh 160 (my scale which sucks just said 158). I’m an averaged sized American male–5’10”, not thin framed. I was 150-155 during most of my adult life … when I was hitting the gym regularly after work. A bit chunkier in retirement. I need to lose about 10 pounds. And I am not “naturally thin”. I was a fat kid, and if I overeat … I get fat.

    But … I don’t eat breakfast. I try to give myself a good long eating break–evening meal to lunch around noon for ketosis. I snack a bit–love my chips. But I do not have a big dinner. (Sometimes no dinner or just a bit of peanut butter and pretzels and a cup of tea. I do not have any sort of “bedtime snack” (the dumbest possible eating). I do not have big bowls of fat and sugar. (I’m not putting up hay all day!) I had put on 5+ over the Christmas feasting season and since I’ve been fasting a day a week (usually Monday)–though I do have my tea with milk and sugar–and I’ve peeled back about 5 lbs this spring. And I walk. When here in Florida, usually AnotherMom and I do about a 3 mile beach walk, and I swim a bit (rarely more than 500) in the pool about every other day. So while not fit I’m not a completely sedentary blob.

    My point: I’ve reigned in my eating to more or less match my lifestyle. If I ate anything approaching 3 squares while sitting on my ass reading iSteve … I’d be a 200 lb. blob of blubber and look like every other fat-assmerican.

    If you do not want to be fat … stop eating so damn much.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer, Mark G.
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    And yeah, the seed oil replacements seem to be worse for folks than the original–for Westerners–animal based fats.
     
    I am not so sure that is true. Yeah, olive oil is probably better and a little animal fat is not going to kill you, but I haven't seen anything that really proves that the liquid seed oils are really bad for you in small quantities as part of a balanced diet.

    They are highly processed products because the raw oil has undesirable characteristics but by the time they are done processing them you have pretty much pure edible fats. These fats are present in the original seeds such as soybeans and corn which are healthy foods and they don't become toxic just because they are separated out. If the heavy processing really bothers you (it's rather gruesome - at some point in the process they basically dissolve the oil in gasoline, but then later they boil off the gasoline (which they recapture and reuse), you can buy "expeller pressed" oil that has very little processing, especially from certain seeds (peanuts, sesame and other nuts) are oily to begin with.

    There are people who will tell you to avoid almost every possible food. If you listened to them all you would starve but they all give contradictory advice.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  87. @The Plutonium Kid
    @Sam Malone

    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it's cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar. Compared to bread in most of the rest of the world, bread in America is more like cake. You want real bread, buy the freshly baked stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @peterike, @Nervous in Stalingrad

    Don’t you believe the science? Men in lab coats assured us that sugar gave quick energy, and the real bad guy was cholesterol from natural fats.

  88. Anonymous[361] • Disclaimer says:

    We are closer in time to Cleopatra (the one that copped off with Mark Antony) than she was to the building of the Great Pyramid.

    Pretty amazing.

  89. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    I would never do that. The grain silo at Great Zimbabwe is over 30 feet tall and upwards of 18 feet in diameter!

    https://www.exploring-africa.com/sites/default/files/styles/full_page/public/uploads/article/325/cover/zimbabwe-africa-exploringafrica-safariadv-radio-raheem-great-zimbabwe.jpg?itok=Y0E33Ab-

    Great Zimbabwe compares favorably with the Gothic cathedrals that were built at the same time. The towers of the cathedrals were built for no good reason but a grain silo feeds the people.

    Replies: @peterike, @mc23

    The towers of the cathedrals were built for no good reason but a grain silo feeds the people.

    No good reason at all Jack. Other than the worshipping God part.

  90. @The Plutonium Kid
    @Sam Malone

    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it's cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar. Compared to bread in most of the rest of the world, bread in America is more like cake. You want real bread, buy the freshly baked stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @peterike, @Nervous in Stalingrad

    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it’s cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar.

    So is baby formula, which has been much in the news of late. It should more properly be labelled “baby poison,” because it’s garbage. What did people do before Big Pharma baby formula? Not everyone could breastfeed. I’m sure our grandmothers had plenty of sensible, healthy alternatives to this garbage (Similac ingredients):

    • Agree: 3g4me
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @peterike


    What did people do before Big Pharma baby formula?
     
    They suffered high infant mortality, and sometimes employed wet nurses.

    An interviewee on an NPR science program today was raving about how great baby formula is, in that it is the only food aside from breast milk with the "perfect" blend of macro- and micro-nutrients for single-source infant nutrition.
    I don't recall hearing the term "42.6% corn syrup solids" in the discussion. To be fair, developing babies do need a lot of carbohydrates.

  91. @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    Steve, looks like time for another Ukraine thread. Phys Dave is getting all breathless about his new most-important-thing-in-the-world–infatuation, Ukrainian conquest. We’ll get no respite if he can’t get some …. ah … release.

    (PD–does your wife know about you and Vlad?)

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Pixo
    @AnotherDad

    https://www.azmemes.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Please-Be-Careful-Not-To-Fall.png

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @AnotherDad

    NATO, Russia, Ukraine, international monetary system, etc... all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA as the foreign policy drives lobbying, money, partisanship, etc. You can make fun of Dave, but your constant refrain that we should just focus on the home front is naive and counterproductive.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Pixo

  92. @The Plutonium Kid
    @Sam Malone

    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it's cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar. Compared to bread in most of the rest of the world, bread in America is more like cake. You want real bread, buy the freshly baked stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @peterike, @Nervous in Stalingrad

    Whether it’s cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar.

    I am not sure juxtaposing cane sugar and HFCS is an apples-to-apples comparison. I have been told that cane sugar, in relative terms, is supposed to be easier on your body than HFCS.

    If you look at so-called “health food,” you will find cane sugar in it as a sweetener. Look at the cheap food (e.g. soda, mass-produced baked goods) and you will find a great deal of HFCS in it.

    The nub of the problem seems to be that a) the human body cannot cope with HFCS very well and b) the fact that it is both cheap and sweet makes HFCS attractive to manufacturers of cheap food to use as an inexpensive sweetener.

    The widening of American waistlines seems to coincide with the rise in the use of HFCS in American food.

  93. @Alden
    Off topic Mattel has created the first bi racial M to F trans gender Barbie. Standard Barbie body and face , red prom dress caramel skin and long blonde wig.

    And yes, the border patrol agent first on the scenes the Uvalde school shooting had an 8 year old daughter in the school. Jacob Albarado rescued daughter and her 20 classmates. He was getting a hair cut when wife Trisha a teacher at the school texted him “ active shooter help “

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “trans gender Barbie”

    I don’t recall genitals on my Kung Fu grip GI Joe. Equipped with the grip but nothing to grip. No wonder Joe was so violent.

    • Agree: fish
  94. OT:

    In the pagan Greco-Roman world, it was taken for granted that men had the right to expose a newborn baby for any reason, or even no reason. Part of the reason early Christianity was popular among women was asserting that things like casual infanticide was, well… wrong. And in some societies-some of them very civilized, relatively advanced places to live like Tokugawa-era Japan, lest you get the wrong idea that this was the domain of cavemen-this remained true for far longer, until the last few centuries.

    A tacit return to paganism with all the devaluations that come with it reconciling with an attempt to assert the dominance of the prerogatives and geist of women, though? Don’t think we’ve seen that. That is going to be messy. Interesting, in that ol’ car-crash sense. But messy. Especially since if the Left doesn’t like the attitudes that married, Christian right-wing men in their 50s and 60s have toward their ideology and how it views them, they are *really* not going to like what unmarried, de-Christianized right-wing men in their 20s and 30s are going to start bringing to the table on that score.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @nebulafox

    I’ll post this again. It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man's tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.

    Legal abortion, as Hefner knew enabled men to squirt and scram and avoid supporting any children they didn’t want.

    Yes Hefner used feminazis as fronts for abortion that benefited promiscuous men far more than it benefited women. Just as Ford Rockefeller Carnegie and other Foundations that sent all the married women back to work by using feminazis as fronts.

    The naivety and ignorance of the MEN OF UNZ never ceases to amaze. Any anti or pro abortion activist continually discussing abortion who doesn’t know it was Hugh Hefner and his tax dodging Play Foundation who legalized abortion is ignorant about the subject.

    I was very very skeptical at the time about the plaintiff Jane Roe’s story. She claimed she was a waitress who was raped and got pregnant. Well that does happen.

    But she went on to say that she, a waitress was the sole support of her parents in their 60s. And that her father was disabled in an accident at work and that her parents had no income.

    Here’s my thinking about her ridiculous tale. How could a waitress at a humdrum diner support 3 people? If her father was disabled and in his 60s, shouldn’t he have been getting social security? And if things were so dire, why didn’t her mother go find a job instead of depending on a diner waitress meager earnings?

    And the media repeated and repeated that ridiculous soap opera story.

    Later it cane out that Jane Roe’s pregnancy was the result of consensual sex with a boyfriend that she already had kids and that she didn’t live with handicapped elderly parents at all.

    The media and people who believed the ridiculous story were incredibly naive.

    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.

    Idiots who believed Jane Roe’s lies. Men who are so ignorant of who and what was responsible for legalization of abortion; Hugh Hefner and his Playboy Foundation

    What’s the difference? Both are completely ignorant and believe the most ridiculous media tales

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @SFG, @Reg Cæsar, @R.G. Camara

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @nebulafox

    Paternal infanticide, as un-Christian as it is, works to cement the father's authority in the family. It isn't destabilizing in the way that elective abortion is. The poor child was often a product of adulterine bastardy, so it served to keep that in check.


    de-Christianized right-wing men in their 20s and 30s

     

    These fellows would be dangerous had they any talent, skill, or drive. Guys like this are reformable by a male élite, but we haven't had a male élite in a century or so.
  95. @Anonymous
    @Sam Malone


    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50's or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    Replies: @bomag, @prosa123, @kaganovitch, @Jack D, @Charles Pewitt, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    I say:

    Okay. But how about spaghetti sauce with sugar and soda made with sugar and ice cream with 5 or so ingredients including sugar?

    Iced tea mix and lemonade and natural sugar in orange juice…

  96. I once contracted malaria in Cairo. Mosquitoes from the Nile.

    The Giza pyramids are spectacular so the ancient Egyptians knew how to construct tourist attractions. Take that Dollywood!

    Cairo can be frenetic and is the largest city in the Arab world I believe.

    They have been hustling/accommodating tourists for about 5,000 years. Overall pretty friendly to visitors. Though the radical Islamists were a problem for a while.

    You see (or did) a lot of donkeys pulling carts in the streets there. Carts with car tires. The donkeys get hit with long sticks by their drivers.

    Has to be a tough life for them. The city (long ago) seemed pretty prosperous but some places were pretty threadbare, poor.

    Egyptians overall seemed to be pretty nice people. We should ship the illegal aliens here to Egypt and give them \$200/month for a while. And a plane ticket one way home (not refundable).

    They could get by on that for a while. Learn some skills, like donkey management…

    Home might not seem so bad.

    • Replies: @tyrone
    @Muggles


    Egyptians overall seemed to be pretty nice people
     
    .......as long as you're not a Coptic christian.....western tourist with dollars ,OK.
  97. @PiltdownMan
    @Alfa158

    Why are there Tamil refugees at all, in 2022?The Tamils have their own, prosperous state in India, and the civil war in Sri Lanka has been over for over a dozen years, with the Tamil separatist leadership completely annihilated.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Things are still pretty hard for Tamils in Sri Lanka today. Calling them refugees might be a stretch, but those who can get out do. Tamil Nadu is among the richer, more pleasant places in India to live, and as you already probably know, the Tamils don’t lack for diaspora communities around Southeast Asia.

    It’s not just them. Sri Lanka used to have an small but visible ethnic Malay minority in urban areas. While they weren’t outright targets in the same way the Tamils were (big religious fault line being Hindu vs. Buddhist rather than Hindu vs. Muslim as on the subcontinent proper), they’ve been leaving the country for decades when possible, often to Malaysia where they can qualify for racially favored rather than disfavored status.

    • Thanks: PiltdownMan
  98. @Alfa158
    @JR Ewing

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.
    In Rome the whole selfie thing was a pain not as much because of the people taking selfies, but because the tourist areas were infested with Tamil refugees aggressively hawking selfie sticks. If you walked a typical block you would pass four or five selfie stick salesman and about half as many Africans selling fake made in Southeast Asia “African” wood handicrafts.
    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid.

    Replies: @prosa123, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @YetAnotherAnon

    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers.

    I hope they were fixed. This would be bad, but tolerable if all the “refugees” were fixed upon arrival. (If you’re really fleeing for you life, that shouldn’t be a big deal.)

    The last time I was in Europe in the mid-teens it was depressing. (I had not been in a few decades while I build my career and the kids grew up.) We were visiting some friends in Germany right when the Merkel’s Madness was set loose. (A warming about women–even supposedly “tough” women–and rationality and leadership.) But even before the hordes arrived, waking around Munich and seeing some random black guys apparently settled there–depressing. And Paris … LOL. I got on one train and thought I was in the Bronx.

    Talk about a boiled frog.

    How could Euros look at America and let this happen? … That’s right, they had their brains addled by our minoritarian b.s. Still …

    • Agree: fish
  99. Anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @kaganovitch
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in “The Ugly* Chinaman”, the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls


    Old Jewish joke: Max and Izzy from Brooklyn struck it rich building suburban developments after WW2. They sell the business for millions and decide they're going to travel the world to imbibe some culture. First stop of course is Italy. They tour the sites then they arrive at the Colosseum. They look around and Izzy tells Max "Max, dis illustrates vot I told you not vunce but a hundred times; If you don't hef sufficient kepital, you don't start to build!"

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Actually there are a lot of half-finished buildings in Rome for exactly that reason. There was a great building boom in the city after Italian unification in the 1860s, however this ended in a bust a few years later, and a lot of grand buildings never got finished.

  100. Anonymous[105] • Disclaimer says:

    It does morphologically resemble the “Boys Taking a Picture of an Object / Girls Taking a Picture of an Object” meme cartoon but geologists typically use a hammer (or pencil) for close-ups and a person for landscape shots. There just aren’t a lot of convenient props to place at the macro scale.

    Some memorable photos of earthquake faults from 1906 have Alice Eastwood posing adjacent (no relation to Clint, AFAIK).

  101. @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    As Vietnam and Afghanistan previously learned when they put their faith in long term American support. Americans are not an imperialist people and tire of these interventions. This is not a bad thing. With all the problems we have here, we should not be worrying about a regional war thousands of miles away. The elites, who do benefit from these interventions, can whip up a little war hysteria but they can’t maintain it long term. A new AP poll of the American public shows a ten point drop, 55% down to 45%, since March prioritizing sanctioning Russia over protecting the U.S. economy.

    In addition to the NBC News report and the NYT giving up on a Ukrainian victory, the WaPo is now talking about catastrophic conditions and collapsing morale among Ukrainian forces.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/military/wapo-stunning-first-admits-catastrophic-conditions-collapsing-morale-ukraine-forces-front

    It appears a consensus is forming in the mainstream media that things are not going as well as previously claimed. Many of the same politicians who said support for Ukraine would help them beat the Russians were saying a year ago Covid vaccines would stop transmission of the disease. This was followed by eight hundred thousand cases a day last winter. Many of these politicians were also saying inflation was “transitory”. It’s now 8% and rising. We need to elect people with better prognostication skills.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Mark G.

    Mark,

    Here is a link to the WaPo story from Thursday (May 26, 2022) to which you referred that is (right now at least) not behind a paywall.

    It is worth reading the whole piece, which is truly heartbreaking: these are courageous men who have clearly been abandoned by the regime in Kiev.

    Highlights from the WaPo report:


    Ukrainian leaders have projected and nurtured a public image of military invulnerability — of their volunteer and professional forces triumphantly standing up to the Russian onslaught. Videos of assaults on Russian tanks or positions are posted daily on social media. Artists are creating patriotic posters, billboards and T-shirts. The postal service even released stamps commemorating the sinking of a Russian warship in the Black Sea.

    Ukrainian forces have succeeded in thwarting Russian efforts to seize Kyiv and Kharkiv and have scored battlefield victories in the east. But the experience of Lapko and his group of volunteers offers a rare and more realistic portrait of the conflict and Ukraine’s struggle to halt the Russian advance in parts of Donbas. Ukraine, like Russia, has provided scant information about deaths, injuries or losses of military equipment. But after three months of war, this company of 120 men is down to 54 because of deaths, injuries and desertions.

    The volunteers were civilians before Russia invaded on Feb. 24, and they never expected to be dispatched to one of the most dangerous front lines in eastern Ukraine. They quickly found themselves in the crosshairs of war, feeling abandoned by their military superiors and struggling to survive.

    “Our command takes no responsibility,” Lapko said. “They only take credit for our achievements. They give us no support.”

    When they could take it no longer, Lapko and his top lieutenant, Vitaliy Khrus, retreated with members of their company this week to a hotel away from the front. There, both men spoke to The Washington Post on the record, knowing they could face a court-martial and time in military prison.
     
    The Kiev regime's response:

    “War breaks people down,” said Serhiy Haidai, head of the regional war administration in Luhansk province, acknowledging many volunteers were not properly trained because Ukrainian authorities did not expect Russia to invade. But he maintained that all soldiers are taken care of: “They have enough medical supplies and food. The only thing is there are people that aren’t ready to fight.”

    But Lapko and Khrus’s concerns were echoed recently by a platoon of the 115th Brigade 3rd Battalion, based nearby in the besieged city of Severodonetsk. In a video uploaded to Telegram on May 24, and confirmed as authentic by an aide to Haidai, volunteers said they will no longer fight because they lacked proper weapons, rear support and military leadership.

    “We are being sent to certain death,” said a volunteer, reading from a prepared script, adding that a similar video was filmed by members of the 115th Brigade 1st Battalion. “We are not alone like this, we are many.”

    Ukraine’s military rebutted the volunteers’ claims in their own video posted online, saying the “deserters” had everything they needed to fight: “They thought they came for a vacation,” one service member said. “That’s why they left their positions.”
     
    The price paid being by these soldiers who told the truth to the WaPo:

    But on Monday, Ukraine’s military security services arrived at the hotel and took Khrus and other members of his platoon to a detention center for two days, accusing them of desertion. Lapko was stripped of his command, according to an order reviewed by The Post. He is being held at the base in Lysychansk, his future uncertain.

    Reached by phone Wednesday, he said two more of his men had been wounded on the front line.
     
    What will all our friends -- Jack D, Pixo, AP, utu, HA, Corvinus, etc. -- who are oh so eager to see Ukrainians die for the glory of the US Deep State say to all this?

    The WaPo is often known as the "CIA's newspaper." If the WaPo is now willing to report the truth, then the US Deep State is truly abandoning the Kiev puppet regime and the brave men who are dying on its behalf.

    Can any decent human being not weep?

    Replies: @SFG

  102. Rob says:

    I would be 100x more impressed by the pyramids if they were regular tetrahedra. If the sides would have had to be steeper than they could have built, they should have made low-rise tetrahedra and also left smaller regular tetrahedra to show that they realized they were a special shape.

    I mean, Egyptian magic-users had to roll hp somehow, right?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Rob

    I like the way you think.

    Bucky Fuller would tell you both shapes are good, though, because both occur in his vector equilibrium, which exists in "allspace" as lines (vectors) linking all equally spaced points. It is part of his geometry.

    It is also the strongest structure possible, but we don't build many of them because every angle is 60 degrees instead of 90, not so easy for crews to lay out efficiently.

    http://www.treeincarnation.com/images/jitterbug.gif

    Bucky and a Vector Equilibrium model

    It is the strongest structure possible, but when you isolate one unit and remove the internal structure, as he did there, it can be folded in and out.

    -- Buzz, fan of the regular tetrahedron

    Replies: @Rob

  103. @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    “And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.”

    Hope that’s an accurate analysis. But the NATO/Soros regime have a lot invested in Ukraine meaning its bloodlands are useful for bioweapons development, a money wash for American political elites, a hub for weapons, human, and narcotics trafficking so lucrative for crooked Western intelligence agencies, a staging area for NATO incursions into Russia and Central Asia.

  104. @Sam Malone
    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp's face is? We've gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they're putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @The Plutonium Kid, @AnotherDad, @scrivener3, @Dave from Oz

    plus one. I look at old pictures of parades and people out in public and it looks like a different planet. The men have jackets and hats the women are in dresses and look dressed up. But the body mass is totally off the scale.

    Most of the men could be nicknamed “slim,”

    I can’t believe people were just less hungry, more self disciplined, better at regulating food intake. Something in food nutrition has to have changed.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe, PiltdownMan
  105. Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    I say:

    Campbell’s Tomato Soup got the sugar out and put the corn syrup in because the food companies are greedy, Mammonite scum and they want to provide cheap and dangerous corn syrup Yum-Yums for the waddling walrus peasants of the American Empire. I’m waddling a bit too, but it’s winter weight. Almost June, folks, harder to lose weight as you get older!

    Tomato soup with corn syrup — Campbell’s — and processed foods of all types need to be eaten by active people who can burn that stuff off fast.

    Asset bubbles created by the globalized central banks and corn syrup in processed foods are the only things keeping the American Empire from imploding. The walruses waddling around Wal-Mart are in no danger of undergoing slimming implosion otherwise known as losing weight.

    Lisa Abramowicz is telling us the central banker’s hands are sweaty and they haven’t really even started quantitative tightening yet.

    The REAL ESTATE ASSET BUBBLE can be popped in 5 seconds by hiking the federal funds rate to 6 percent and then to 10 percent and then to twenty.

    The Fed should never have been electronically conjuring up dollars out of thin air to purchase mortgage-backed securities also.

  106. @SFG
    @Jack D

    Yeah, but the Egyptians were first and had less accumulated knowledge to build on. It’s like asking why Newton didn’t look up the laws of motion on Wikipedia. Someone had to be first.

    People in the past weren’t dumber, they knew less. (And were often in better shape!)

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    People in the past weren’t dumber, they knew less.

    I think I disagree with that. The total knowledge base of the time was much smaller but an educated man could know a hell of a lot of it not necessarily less in toto.
    If one could list “Things wot I no” their list would probably be impressively long and impressively bereft of brain blockers like which fat african whores are fucking which dope addled rap grunter.

    Kunstler touches on this very topic today.

    https://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/childhoods-end/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill Jones


    If one could list “Things wot I no” their list would probably be impressively long...
     
    Isaac Asimov addressed this years ago. Where do we find room in our heads for all this new knowledge? He then produced a litany of things the common man once was expected to know but no longer does. Arcane measurements, horse care, all kinds of stuff.
  107. @AnotherDad
    @Sam Malone


    We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    People always want some deep dark conspiracy. There isn't one. Americans eat too much--way, way, way too much--for our basically sedentary lifestyles.

    Sure. The medical establishment totally screwed the pooch with their dietary advice to the fattening post-War officer workers (like my dad) back in the 60s/70s. "Fat" or "saturated fat" isn't some demon. It's basically carbs--lots and lots of cheap and plentiful carbs--that yo-yo people's blood sugar help make them hungry again. People like fat. It makes people feel "full" and ready to stop eating. And yeah, the seed oil replacements seem to be worse for folks than the original--for Westerners--animal based fats.

    But the bottom line remains: Americans eat way too much for the sedentary lifestyles we have.

    Americans are no longer toting that barge or lifting that bale. But lots are eating like they do. If you do not want to be fat ... do not eat so much. (Particularly don't fill up on fast carbs. You'll just be hungry again in a couple hours.) But it is less what you eat than how much you stuff your maw.


    I'll put myself out there: I eat the same "processed food" from Walmart and Costco as a typical American. I weigh 160 (my scale which sucks just said 158). I'm an averaged sized American male--5'10'', not thin framed. I was 150-155 during most of my adult life ... when I was hitting the gym regularly after work. A bit chunkier in retirement. I need to lose about 10 pounds. And I am not "naturally thin". I was a fat kid, and if I overeat ... I get fat.

    But ... I don't eat breakfast. I try to give myself a good long eating break--evening meal to lunch around noon for ketosis. I snack a bit--love my chips. But I do not have a big dinner. (Sometimes no dinner or just a bit of peanut butter and pretzels and a cup of tea. I do not have any sort of "bedtime snack" (the dumbest possible eating). I do not have big bowls of fat and sugar. (I'm not putting up hay all day!) I had put on 5+ over the Christmas feasting season and since I've been fasting a day a week (usually Monday)--though I do have my tea with milk and sugar--and I've peeled back about 5 lbs this spring. And I walk. When here in Florida, usually AnotherMom and I do about a 3 mile beach walk, and I swim a bit (rarely more than 500) in the pool about every other day. So while not fit I'm not a completely sedentary blob.

    My point: I've reigned in my eating to more or less match my lifestyle. If I ate anything approaching 3 squares while sitting on my ass reading iSteve ... I'd be a 200 lb. blob of blubber and look like every other fat-assmerican.

    If you do not want to be fat ... stop eating so damn much.

    Replies: @Jack D

    And yeah, the seed oil replacements seem to be worse for folks than the original–for Westerners–animal based fats.

    I am not so sure that is true. Yeah, olive oil is probably better and a little animal fat is not going to kill you, but I haven’t seen anything that really proves that the liquid seed oils are really bad for you in small quantities as part of a balanced diet.

    They are highly processed products because the raw oil has undesirable characteristics but by the time they are done processing them you have pretty much pure edible fats. These fats are present in the original seeds such as soybeans and corn which are healthy foods and they don’t become toxic just because they are separated out. If the heavy processing really bothers you (it’s rather gruesome – at some point in the process they basically dissolve the oil in gasoline, but then later they boil off the gasoline (which they recapture and reuse), you can buy “expeller pressed” oil that has very little processing, especially from certain seeds (peanuts, sesame and other nuts) are oily to begin with.

    There are people who will tell you to avoid almost every possible food. If you listened to them all you would starve but they all give contradictory advice.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    I am not so sure that is true. Yeah, olive oil is probably better and a little animal fat is not going to kill you, but I haven’t seen anything that really proves that the liquid seed oils are really bad for you in small quantities as part of a balanced diet.
     
    Yeah, I don't know either. Transfats seem bad. The part I'm reasonably convinced about is the carb thing. The whole "low fat" thing was b.s. Fast carbs are what yo-yo blood sugar--we did not evolve a whole new carb metabolism in the last 10,000 years--and make people want to gobble. Lots of people do well when they do low carb and go ahead and eat their bacon.


    But anyway, my point is the conspiracy crap is basically b.s. Americans are fat because they eat too much and get little exercise. We men aren't putting up hay or keeping the plow in the furrow behind a mule. The gals aren't milking the cows, gardening and beating the clothes on the washboard. We drive, we sit, we wiggle our fingers ... and we eat.

    Honestly, I look at some of these people I see, and I can not even figure out how they can still do the other biologically pleasurable activity.

    Replies: @Jack D

  108. @NJ Transit Commuter
    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.

    Just remarkable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Pixo, @AndrewR, @Rob, @nebulafox, @R.G. Camara, @Prester John

    Yeah! +/- 2100 years.

    Remarkable indeed!

  109. @Reg Cæsar
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I had a great history teacher in high school. One time when he was trying to help us understand the time scale of history, he explained that it was a shorter time gap between us and Athens’ golden age than it was between Athens’ golden age and time when the pyramids were built.
     
    Paging Philip Larkin!

    # of days from the release of the Beatles' first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles' first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645

    Of course, everybody knows by now that Joe Biden attained Ronald Reagan's record presidential age on Election Day, 2020.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Stan Adams

    21,645

    June 21, 1945 – Thursday

    End of the Okinawa campaign

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Stan Adams


    June 21, 1945 – Thursday

    End of the Okinawa campaign
     

    The Okinawa campaign continues to this day:

    Okinawan women's civic group chronicles sex crimes by U.S. military

    NCIS CASE FILES REVEAL UNDISCLOSED U.S. MILITARY SEX CRIMES IN OKINAWA

    Okinawa women document U.S. military sex crimes in book

    How a Single Violent Crime Tells the Story of U.S.-Japan Relations in Okinawa

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape_during_the_occupation_of_Japan
     

  110. @Alfa158
    @JR Ewing

    We visited the Louvre pre-pandemic and there were literally 40-50 people at a time taking photos of Mona Lisa. Instead of taking a photo of the painting I stood in front of the crowd and took a shot of them all photographing the painting.
    In Rome the whole selfie thing was a pain not as much because of the people taking selfies, but because the tourist areas were infested with Tamil refugees aggressively hawking selfie sticks. If you walked a typical block you would pass four or five selfie stick salesman and about half as many Africans selling fake made in Southeast Asia “African” wood handicrafts.
    The whole scene in Europe has become strange. One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid.

    Replies: @prosa123, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @YetAnotherAnon

    “One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid.”

    Same on the ring road round Beziers in southern France, but by no means all black girls. Same on the coast road from France towards Barcelona. In Porto (Portugal) there were transvestite prostitutes across the road from our hotel. Lord knows who their clients were.

    Re Ukraine, I’m a tad worried that as the initial they-got-their-ass-kicked euphoria (produced by a vast propaganda campaign, but an effective one) wears off, and Russia grind west slowly but surely,

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/05/26/ukraine-frontline-russia-military-severodonetsk/

    that demands to DO SOMETHING OR RUSSIA WILL WIN will become louder (and they’ll be amplified as if we are all Nulands/Jack Ds) – drawing the US/UK/EU closer to open confrontation with Russia.

    Now personally, I’d rather Ukraine and Russia were at peace, that NATO stopped expanding (who wants to die for North Macedonia?), that gas was flowing via NS2 to a grateful Europe, that I didn’t need a bank loan to fill my car or the oil tank, and that the queues at the local food bank didn’t get ever longer.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon

    War is grim for the soldiers in the trenches on both sides, which is why it would have been better for everyone if Putin hadn't invaded. European civilization destroyed itself in the trenches of WWI and has never recovered and now this is being repeated in Ukraine on a smaller scale and for equally pointless reasons. (The last time also involved Russia).

    Germany was glad to buy Russia's oil and gas before the invasion. Putin had a pretty nice setup but he threw it all away for some rubble in Ukraine. Did Russia really need more land? About as much as Putin needed one more palace.

    Replies: @Anne Lid, @Old Prude

    , @Old Prude
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The crawl on the morning news says Biden is considering sending sophisticated long-range weapons to Ukraine.

    No word on trying negotiations. Unreal.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  111. @HammerJack
    @prosa123

    And they're very big on animal abuse, if that's your thing. Mainly horses and camels in that particular case, but Islam seems to favor abusing all animals, except maybe falcons.

    Replies: @JimB, @Anon, @Ian Smith, @Dream

    Its more of a poor country thing than an Islamic thing.

  112. @Muggles
    I once contracted malaria in Cairo. Mosquitoes from the Nile.

    The Giza pyramids are spectacular so the ancient Egyptians knew how to construct tourist attractions. Take that Dollywood!

    Cairo can be frenetic and is the largest city in the Arab world I believe.

    They have been hustling/accommodating tourists for about 5,000 years. Overall pretty friendly to visitors. Though the radical Islamists were a problem for a while.

    You see (or did) a lot of donkeys pulling carts in the streets there. Carts with car tires. The donkeys get hit with long sticks by their drivers.

    Has to be a tough life for them. The city (long ago) seemed pretty prosperous but some places were pretty threadbare, poor.

    Egyptians overall seemed to be pretty nice people. We should ship the illegal aliens here to Egypt and give them $200/month for a while. And a plane ticket one way home (not refundable).

    They could get by on that for a while. Learn some skills, like donkey management...

    Home might not seem so bad.

    Replies: @tyrone

    Egyptians overall seemed to be pretty nice people

    …….as long as you’re not a Coptic christian…..western tourist with dollars ,OK.

  113. @Colin Wright
    @prosa123

    'I’ve heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.'

    It would. Avoid visiting countries with very poor people. Poor is okay -- but not very poor. Unless you intend to do something about it, raw desperation is unpleasant.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Egypt is a middle-income country, somewhat below average in real income per capita (which resembles that of the U.S. in the 1920s). Life expectancy at birth is 72 years, homicide rates are not elevated (about 2.5 per 100,000 per most recent assessment), income distribution satisfactory (like a European country – ratio of top 10% to bottom 10% is about 7-to-1). You could do a great deal worse than Egypt. India is less affluent and Latin America is much more crime-ridden. However, the pyramids are fairly near urban development and the populated parts of the country are abnormally densely settled.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Art Deco


    and the populated parts of the country are abnormally densely settled.
     
    That's putting it mildly. Since ancient times, the entire population of Egypt has clung to a thin ribbon of green along the banks of the Nile and the delta at its mouth. As soon as you step outside of that ribbon it is trackless desert except for the oasis of Fayum, a natural basin.

    https://d2pn8kiwq2w21t.cloudfront.net/images/jpegPIA02647.width-1600.jpg

  114. @Art Deco
    @Colin Wright

    Egypt is a middle-income country, somewhat below average in real income per capita (which resembles that of the U.S. in the 1920s). Life expectancy at birth is 72 years, homicide rates are not elevated (about 2.5 per 100,000 per most recent assessment), income distribution satisfactory (like a European country - ratio of top 10% to bottom 10% is about 7-to-1). You could do a great deal worse than Egypt. India is less affluent and Latin America is much more crime-ridden. However, the pyramids are fairly near urban development and the populated parts of the country are abnormally densely settled.

    Replies: @Jack D

    and the populated parts of the country are abnormally densely settled.

    That’s putting it mildly. Since ancient times, the entire population of Egypt has clung to a thin ribbon of green along the banks of the Nile and the delta at its mouth. As soon as you step outside of that ribbon it is trackless desert except for the oasis of Fayum, a natural basin.

  115. Cido says:
    @Jack D
    @SFG

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @AnotherDad, @Cido

    Neither did the Romans but they built the Pantheon and the Coliseum and the aqueducts. And neither did the cathedral builders. One of the ways of judging the sophistication of a culture is seeing how far they can span open space with their structures. The Egyptians were not very good at that.

    As another commenter said, Egyptians didn’t have any previous knowledge about engineering , from any other civilization. They were the first. This is why they are so great. The magnitute of the ancient time when the pyramids were constructed is enormous. When Western civilization began to have historical significance, the pyramids already had something like 2000 years.

  116. @Rob
    I would be 100x more impressed by the pyramids if they were regular tetrahedra. If the sides would have had to be steeper than they could have built, they should have made low-rise tetrahedra and also left smaller regular tetrahedra to show that they realized they were a special shape.

    I mean, Egyptian magic-users had to roll hp somehow, right?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I like the way you think.

    Bucky Fuller would tell you both shapes are good, though, because both occur in his vector equilibrium, which exists in “allspace” as lines (vectors) linking all equally spaced points. It is part of his geometry.

    It is also the strongest structure possible, but we don’t build many of them because every angle is 60 degrees instead of 90, not so easy for crews to lay out efficiently.

    Bucky and a Vector Equilibrium model

    It is the strongest structure possible, but when you isolate one unit and remove the internal structure, as he did there, it can be folded in and out.

    — Buzz, fan of the regular tetrahedron

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Hey, don’t hear ‘bout Buckminster Fuller these days. Ever since graphene took the place of C60 Buckminster fullerenes as the weird material people are interested in.

    The thing with Fuller, reading stuff about his ideas, I go from “yep, yep, ok, I never thought about that” to “dimensions in synchronous vector spaces define the structure of the cosmos” Reasonable-seeming to nonsense in zero to sixty.

    VR-enhanced construction is a thing that either exists or is coming soon. Have glasses that can tell you if two things are at a 60° a 107.5° or any other angle could make Fuller’s staff (slightly) more practical. I mean, one dymaxion car was kinda neat, but could you imagine a city full of them?

    The thing I thought was cool. In theory, you could build a buckysphere a few miles across, then replace either some of the nitrogen in the air with helium or just keep it a few degrees warmer than ambient, and then your Fuller-city could float through the air. Rumor has it that there are layers in venus’ upper atmosphere where liquid wat would be normal, and air pressure would be earth-normal. Nitrogen gas is lighter than carbon dioxide, so your Venusian Bucky-city flits through the sky of a hellscape planet.

    Y’know. I don’t know why people focus on carbon and water as the things necessary for life to begin. A great majority (or so I was told) of biomolecules have nitrogens in the structure. Carbon and water are everywhere in the sky (far enough from the sun) but where did our nice, thick N2 blanket come from?

    See, I can from zero to pointless really fast too.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  117. @kaganovitch
    @Reg Cæsar

    Contrast this pair of photos from Braşov in Romania:

    I only see one photo? Back in the day my great grandpaw lived in Brasov.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
  118. @kaganovitch
    @Anonymous

    I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down.

    Unless you're Tom Thumb, I'm not sure why you had to drop 5 feet down on the other side of a nine foot fence?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Hanging onto the top after climbing over, he had 5 ft. between his feet and the ground when he jumped. That makes sense, because you’ve got to be bent over a ways to hang on with your feet against it.

    Nice job, #954. Just make sure you show up for your deportation hearing, mmmkaayy?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Isn't the last step that you hang from the top of the fence by your curled fingertips with your arms overhead and then you let go?

    If you do this on a 9' fence and you are say 6' tall, your arms should extend at least one more foot over your head and the soles of your feet should be no more than 2' from the ground at the time that you let go. If you are less than 6', then a few inches more but basically about the same as jumping from a desk top to the ground, not exactly a death defying height.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

  119. “Does This Pyramid Make Me Look Fat?”

    No, miss, but that stone makes you look incontinent.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Reg Cæsar

    The producers later admitted that this was fake:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ebBCmC8o1tA

  120. @PiltdownMan
    @PhysicistDave


    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime

     

    Boris Johnson has warned Russia is making 'palpable progress' in Donbas region

    "Boris Johnson today warned that Russia is 'chewing through ground' in eastern Ukraine as he urged more support for Kyiv's forces.

    The PM said Vladimir Putin's military is making 'palpable progress' in the Donbas region despite the 'incredible heroism' of the resistance."

     

    Replies: @Joe S.Walker

    Boris has reasons for wanting to divert attention from himself just now. If the Ukraine business hadn’t happened when it did, he might have already been driven out of office.

  121. @SIMP simp
    @prosa123

    There are not more beggars and hustlers at the pyramids then what you would expect in a touristy area in Italy or France. But the hustlers at the pyramids have a hilarious scam. They offer horse and camel rides. It is easy for a foreign tourist to get on a camel when they are sitting down, but once the ride is over the camel driver asks for a big extra payment to make the camel lay down. Otherwise the tourist, which is usually far from fit, has to jump from the standing camel on the stony desert. Camels are much taller than horses so tourists always pay.
    I visited Egypt after the danish cartoons controversy and I was surprised to see all shops having in windows posters aimed at foreign customers about how disrespectful the Mohammed cartoons were. I thought it was extremely stupid to act hostile towards your patrons for ideological reasons, but now this is happening everywhere since all companies are woke.

    Replies: @Alden

    At least in Egypt the beggars are native Egyptians not foreign gypsies Africans and Arabs as in Europe.

  122. @Reg Cæsar

    "Does This Pyramid Make Me Look Fat?"
     
    No, miss, but that stone makes you look incontinent.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    The producers later admitted that this was fake:

  123. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    And yeah, the seed oil replacements seem to be worse for folks than the original–for Westerners–animal based fats.
     
    I am not so sure that is true. Yeah, olive oil is probably better and a little animal fat is not going to kill you, but I haven't seen anything that really proves that the liquid seed oils are really bad for you in small quantities as part of a balanced diet.

    They are highly processed products because the raw oil has undesirable characteristics but by the time they are done processing them you have pretty much pure edible fats. These fats are present in the original seeds such as soybeans and corn which are healthy foods and they don't become toxic just because they are separated out. If the heavy processing really bothers you (it's rather gruesome - at some point in the process they basically dissolve the oil in gasoline, but then later they boil off the gasoline (which they recapture and reuse), you can buy "expeller pressed" oil that has very little processing, especially from certain seeds (peanuts, sesame and other nuts) are oily to begin with.

    There are people who will tell you to avoid almost every possible food. If you listened to them all you would starve but they all give contradictory advice.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    I am not so sure that is true. Yeah, olive oil is probably better and a little animal fat is not going to kill you, but I haven’t seen anything that really proves that the liquid seed oils are really bad for you in small quantities as part of a balanced diet.

    Yeah, I don’t know either. Transfats seem bad. The part I’m reasonably convinced about is the carb thing. The whole “low fat” thing was b.s. Fast carbs are what yo-yo blood sugar–we did not evolve a whole new carb metabolism in the last 10,000 years–and make people want to gobble. Lots of people do well when they do low carb and go ahead and eat their bacon.

    But anyway, my point is the conspiracy crap is basically b.s. Americans are fat because they eat too much and get little exercise. We men aren’t putting up hay or keeping the plow in the furrow behind a mule. The gals aren’t milking the cows, gardening and beating the clothes on the washboard. We drive, we sit, we wiggle our fingers … and we eat.

    Honestly, I look at some of these people I see, and I can not even figure out how they can still do the other biologically pleasurable activity.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    I agree with you that transfats are bad but they stopped making transfats several years ago. I was talking about liquid veg. oils such as canola, soybean, corn, etc.

    I also agree that the big problem is quantity in relation to your level of activity. If you weigh 300 lbs. you are eating too many calories period. I don't care if it is all carb or all protein or all whatever - the only way you are going to achieve that is by eating more food than your body needs. I'll bet that if you followed these people around you would be shocked by how much food they ate in the course of a day. Maybe if you are a marathon runner you can eat 6,000 calories/ day but not if you sit at a desk all day.

    A double quarter pounder with cheese plus a large coke and large fries is over 1500 calories, which is more calories than a sedentary person needs in a day, but which for a fatty is a typical lunch. Add a McFlurry for dessert and you are well over 2,000 calories and that's just lunch.

    (BTW, the classic McDonald's hamburger by itself is only 250 calories so even if you eat two of them for lunch but skip the fries and the coke, it's still a reasonable # of calories and has 1/2 your daily requirement for protein but only 22% of the daily allowance for fat and carbs). Ironically the most nutritionally empty items on the fast food menu (soda and fries) are also the most high profit. I don't think they even make any money on the $1.69 hamburger.

    Replies: @Alden

  124. @Achmed E. Newman
    @kaganovitch

    Hanging onto the top after climbing over, he had 5 ft. between his feet and the ground when he jumped. That makes sense, because you've got to be bent over a ways to hang on with your feet against it.

    Nice job, #954. Just make sure you show up for your deportation hearing, mmmkaayy?

    Replies: @Jack D

    Isn’t the last step that you hang from the top of the fence by your curled fingertips with your arms overhead and then you let go?

    If you do this on a 9′ fence and you are say 6′ tall, your arms should extend at least one more foot over your head and the soles of your feet should be no more than 2′ from the ground at the time that you let go. If you are less than 6′, then a few inches more but basically about the same as jumping from a desk top to the ground, not exactly a death defying height.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No, if you do that, you can't hang on that easy to get like that, and you're gonna scrape your fingers, chin, or something on the way down. Have you never done this?

    (I'm picturing a wooden fence, as for a chain link fence I'd climb at least most of the way down.) As I wrote, you need to be bent over with your feet against it, and I'd say the 6ft guy may take up 4 ft from the top. Ask him.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @kaganovitch

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    What are we arguing about climbing fences for anyway? Right here on The Unz Review, there's the ¡Ask a Mexican! column. Ron's got expertise of all kinds here.

    Replies: @Cortes

  125. @prosa123
    I've heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @HammerJack, @SIMP simp, @Batman, @AnotherDad, @johnmark7, @Bardon Kaldlan

    Mike Haduck, a stonemason, explains how he learned why pyramids were built. While in Saudi Arabia for the 1st Gulf War, he learned the way they buried people in the desert. Dig a hole, cover it with sand but get a bunch of rocks to put on top. But it’s easy to run out of rocks, so people would take the rocks from other graves for theirs.

    Well, then you’re going to need bigger rocks to keep someone from stealing grandpa’s. It escalated from there.

    • LOL: Old Prude
  126. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    I am not so sure that is true. Yeah, olive oil is probably better and a little animal fat is not going to kill you, but I haven’t seen anything that really proves that the liquid seed oils are really bad for you in small quantities as part of a balanced diet.
     
    Yeah, I don't know either. Transfats seem bad. The part I'm reasonably convinced about is the carb thing. The whole "low fat" thing was b.s. Fast carbs are what yo-yo blood sugar--we did not evolve a whole new carb metabolism in the last 10,000 years--and make people want to gobble. Lots of people do well when they do low carb and go ahead and eat their bacon.


    But anyway, my point is the conspiracy crap is basically b.s. Americans are fat because they eat too much and get little exercise. We men aren't putting up hay or keeping the plow in the furrow behind a mule. The gals aren't milking the cows, gardening and beating the clothes on the washboard. We drive, we sit, we wiggle our fingers ... and we eat.

    Honestly, I look at some of these people I see, and I can not even figure out how they can still do the other biologically pleasurable activity.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I agree with you that transfats are bad but they stopped making transfats several years ago. I was talking about liquid veg. oils such as canola, soybean, corn, etc.

    I also agree that the big problem is quantity in relation to your level of activity. If you weigh 300 lbs. you are eating too many calories period. I don’t care if it is all carb or all protein or all whatever – the only way you are going to achieve that is by eating more food than your body needs. I’ll bet that if you followed these people around you would be shocked by how much food they ate in the course of a day. Maybe if you are a marathon runner you can eat 6,000 calories/ day but not if you sit at a desk all day.

    A double quarter pounder with cheese plus a large coke and large fries is over 1500 calories, which is more calories than a sedentary person needs in a day, but which for a fatty is a typical lunch. Add a McFlurry for dessert and you are well over 2,000 calories and that’s just lunch.

    (BTW, the classic McDonald’s hamburger by itself is only 250 calories so even if you eat two of them for lunch but skip the fries and the coke, it’s still a reasonable # of calories and has 1/2 your daily requirement for protein but only 22% of the daily allowance for fat and carbs). Ironically the most nutritionally empty items on the fast food menu (soda and fries) are also the most high profit. I don’t think they even make any money on the \$1.69 hamburger.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Jack D

    Popular Asian and Mexican food is very fattening. Basically starch and spice. Rice beans noodles tortillas egg roll and mushu wraps.
    Nutritionists who are idiots claim Asian food isn’t fattening because it’s mostly vegetables with a few meat scraps. They forget it’s on a thousand calories of rice and or noodles. . And rice is very high glycemic. Meaning it’s quickly digested and goes straight to the fat cells. And I don’t believe stir frying doesn’t add fat to the meal.

    Every time I look at a Mexican or Asian restaurant I think high calorie low protein fat fat fat.

  127. @nebulafox
    OT:

    https://twitter.com/libsoftiktok/status/1529616896303276032

    In the pagan Greco-Roman world, it was taken for granted that men had the right to expose a newborn baby for any reason, or even no reason. Part of the reason early Christianity was popular among women was asserting that things like casual infanticide was, well... wrong. And in some societies-some of them very civilized, relatively advanced places to live like Tokugawa-era Japan, lest you get the wrong idea that this was the domain of cavemen-this remained true for far longer, until the last few centuries.

    A tacit return to paganism with all the devaluations that come with it reconciling with an attempt to assert the dominance of the prerogatives and geist of women, though? Don't think we've seen that. That is going to be messy. Interesting, in that ol' car-crash sense. But messy. Especially since if the Left doesn't like the attitudes that married, Christian right-wing men in their 50s and 60s have toward their ideology and how it views them, they are *really* not going to like what unmarried, de-Christianized right-wing men in their 20s and 30s are going to start bringing to the table on that score.

    Replies: @Alden, @Reg Cæsar

    I’ll post this again. It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man’s tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.

    Legal abortion, as Hefner knew enabled men to squirt and scram and avoid supporting any children they didn’t want.

    Yes Hefner used feminazis as fronts for abortion that benefited promiscuous men far more than it benefited women. Just as Ford Rockefeller Carnegie and other Foundations that sent all the married women back to work by using feminazis as fronts.

    The naivety and ignorance of the MEN OF UNZ never ceases to amaze. Any anti or pro abortion activist continually discussing abortion who doesn’t know it was Hugh Hefner and his tax dodging Play Foundation who legalized abortion is ignorant about the subject.

    I was very very skeptical at the time about the plaintiff Jane Roe’s story. She claimed she was a waitress who was raped and got pregnant. Well that does happen.

    But she went on to say that she, a waitress was the sole support of her parents in their 60s. And that her father was disabled in an accident at work and that her parents had no income.

    Here’s my thinking about her ridiculous tale. How could a waitress at a humdrum diner support 3 people? If her father was disabled and in his 60s, shouldn’t he have been getting social security? And if things were so dire, why didn’t her mother go find a job instead of depending on a diner waitress meager earnings?

    And the media repeated and repeated that ridiculous soap opera story.

    Later it cane out that Jane Roe’s pregnancy was the result of consensual sex with a boyfriend that she already had kids and that she didn’t live with handicapped elderly parents at all.

    The media and people who believed the ridiculous story were incredibly naive.

    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.

    Idiots who believed Jane Roe’s lies. Men who are so ignorant of who and what was responsible for legalization of abortion; Hugh Hefner and his Playboy Foundation

    What’s the difference? Both are completely ignorant and believe the most ridiculous media tales

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    Taking you at your word, you have outlined Hefner's strategy, but you haven't proven him wrong. You also assign motivation to him based on your own projection or interpretation. The man was a libertine who knew sex was fun and that people have always engaged in it and that accidents happen.

    FWIW I know that Roe v. Wade is wrong, a poor judgement by an overreaching court. Abortion is not in the constitution, and the court went through contortions to pretend that the Bill of Rights covered it.

    It is reserved for the People and their States to legislate this, or for Congress and 2/3 of the States to approve a Constitutional amendment about it.

    As for me, I am in favor of legal abortion only during the first two or three months, but everybody else is an absolutist who can't think in subtleties or shades of gray. A human does not exist at conception, and babies beyond the first third or less of pregnancy are too human for anyone with a conscience to kill. The truth, The Way, is in the middle or outside the dichotomy, as with many things...

    And Hefner is not the issue, whether you like him or not.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @PhysicistDave

    , @SFG
    @Alden

    I actually would believe the feminist movement was supported initially by men who wanted to sleep around. However, in the half century since all that it’s mostly about getting you fired if you look at a woman the wrong way and making you feel bad for being attracted to women at all. A couple of Silent generation guys screwing around for a few decades is going to be ancient history to anyone under 60. For younger men nowadays, feminism is about hostile authority figures who can end your career.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Alden


    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.
     
    This may be true of some of the rank-and-file, but every experienced "activist" in the life movement is well aware of the contribution of Hefner and his friends. As with women's suffrage, legal elective abortion was always more popular with men than with women, who know better.

    "Choice"-- hers-- rewards bad men and penalizes good men. So don't complain that good men are hard to find. Why wouldn't they be?
    , @R.G. Camara
    @Alden


    It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man’s tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.
     
    Hefner was an Epstein: a deep state blackmail machine, controlled and protected by the Deep State the way Epstein was. How do you think a pornographer was normalized and given 40+ years of light-touch, what-a-rascal media coverage and a huge sex mansion in LA that he used to throw wild public orgies every weekend?

    Answer: every bit of it was recorded as kompromat and handed over to the feds. If you were a celebrity and did anything at the Mansion ---even once---its on audio and video tape, as well as photographed.

    I can't believe that, after Epstein, anyone would think Hefner was his own man or was doing anything but being a good servant to his Deep State masters.

  128. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    I agree with you that transfats are bad but they stopped making transfats several years ago. I was talking about liquid veg. oils such as canola, soybean, corn, etc.

    I also agree that the big problem is quantity in relation to your level of activity. If you weigh 300 lbs. you are eating too many calories period. I don't care if it is all carb or all protein or all whatever - the only way you are going to achieve that is by eating more food than your body needs. I'll bet that if you followed these people around you would be shocked by how much food they ate in the course of a day. Maybe if you are a marathon runner you can eat 6,000 calories/ day but not if you sit at a desk all day.

    A double quarter pounder with cheese plus a large coke and large fries is over 1500 calories, which is more calories than a sedentary person needs in a day, but which for a fatty is a typical lunch. Add a McFlurry for dessert and you are well over 2,000 calories and that's just lunch.

    (BTW, the classic McDonald's hamburger by itself is only 250 calories so even if you eat two of them for lunch but skip the fries and the coke, it's still a reasonable # of calories and has 1/2 your daily requirement for protein but only 22% of the daily allowance for fat and carbs). Ironically the most nutritionally empty items on the fast food menu (soda and fries) are also the most high profit. I don't think they even make any money on the $1.69 hamburger.

    Replies: @Alden

    Popular Asian and Mexican food is very fattening. Basically starch and spice. Rice beans noodles tortillas egg roll and mushu wraps.
    Nutritionists who are idiots claim Asian food isn’t fattening because it’s mostly vegetables with a few meat scraps. They forget it’s on a thousand calories of rice and or noodles. . And rice is very high glycemic. Meaning it’s quickly digested and goes straight to the fat cells. And I don’t believe stir frying doesn’t add fat to the meal.

    Every time I look at a Mexican or Asian restaurant I think high calorie low protein fat fat fat.

  129. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Alfa158

    "One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid."

    Same on the ring road round Beziers in southern France, but by no means all black girls. Same on the coast road from France towards Barcelona. In Porto (Portugal) there were transvestite prostitutes across the road from our hotel. Lord knows who their clients were.

    Re Ukraine, I'm a tad worried that as the initial they-got-their-ass-kicked euphoria (produced by a vast propaganda campaign, but an effective one) wears off, and Russia grind west slowly but surely,

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/05/26/ukraine-frontline-russia-military-severodonetsk/

    that demands to DO SOMETHING OR RUSSIA WILL WIN will become louder (and they'll be amplified as if we are all Nulands/Jack Ds) - drawing the US/UK/EU closer to open confrontation with Russia.

    Now personally, I'd rather Ukraine and Russia were at peace, that NATO stopped expanding (who wants to die for North Macedonia?), that gas was flowing via NS2 to a grateful Europe, that I didn't need a bank loan to fill my car or the oil tank, and that the queues at the local food bank didn't get ever longer.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Old Prude

    War is grim for the soldiers in the trenches on both sides, which is why it would have been better for everyone if Putin hadn’t invaded. European civilization destroyed itself in the trenches of WWI and has never recovered and now this is being repeated in Ukraine on a smaller scale and for equally pointless reasons. (The last time also involved Russia).

    Germany was glad to buy Russia’s oil and gas before the invasion. Putin had a pretty nice setup but he threw it all away for some rubble in Ukraine. Did Russia really need more land? About as much as Putin needed one more palace.

    • Replies: @Anne Lid
    @Jack D

    Please stop pretending to be dim. Thanks.

    (Yes, Russia was happy to sell and Germany was happy to buy and Russia indeed did not need more land. The source of this war/operation is outside of these countries.)

    , @Old Prude
    @Jack D

    Yeah, we got it JD: Putin started this thing. Good Point about WWI. If the Brits, and French had decided to negotiate at some point instead of going full Kaiser is the devil, maybe a few million lives would have been spared. Not to mention maybe WWII could have been avoided.

    "Putin started this thing" and "Putin is Evil" preclude a negotiated ending. Bad plan. If not a negotiated ending, what will be the ending? Negotiations allow some control of the situation. As it is, with both sides pouring weapons into the zone, things are under no-0ne's control. Folly. Utter folly.

    Replies: @Jack D

  130. @Alden
    @nebulafox

    I’ll post this again. It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man's tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.

    Legal abortion, as Hefner knew enabled men to squirt and scram and avoid supporting any children they didn’t want.

    Yes Hefner used feminazis as fronts for abortion that benefited promiscuous men far more than it benefited women. Just as Ford Rockefeller Carnegie and other Foundations that sent all the married women back to work by using feminazis as fronts.

    The naivety and ignorance of the MEN OF UNZ never ceases to amaze. Any anti or pro abortion activist continually discussing abortion who doesn’t know it was Hugh Hefner and his tax dodging Play Foundation who legalized abortion is ignorant about the subject.

    I was very very skeptical at the time about the plaintiff Jane Roe’s story. She claimed she was a waitress who was raped and got pregnant. Well that does happen.

    But she went on to say that she, a waitress was the sole support of her parents in their 60s. And that her father was disabled in an accident at work and that her parents had no income.

    Here’s my thinking about her ridiculous tale. How could a waitress at a humdrum diner support 3 people? If her father was disabled and in his 60s, shouldn’t he have been getting social security? And if things were so dire, why didn’t her mother go find a job instead of depending on a diner waitress meager earnings?

    And the media repeated and repeated that ridiculous soap opera story.

    Later it cane out that Jane Roe’s pregnancy was the result of consensual sex with a boyfriend that she already had kids and that she didn’t live with handicapped elderly parents at all.

    The media and people who believed the ridiculous story were incredibly naive.

    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.

    Idiots who believed Jane Roe’s lies. Men who are so ignorant of who and what was responsible for legalization of abortion; Hugh Hefner and his Playboy Foundation

    What’s the difference? Both are completely ignorant and believe the most ridiculous media tales

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @SFG, @Reg Cæsar, @R.G. Camara

    Taking you at your word, you have outlined Hefner’s strategy, but you haven’t proven him wrong. You also assign motivation to him based on your own projection or interpretation. The man was a libertine who knew sex was fun and that people have always engaged in it and that accidents happen.

    FWIW I know that Roe v. Wade is wrong, a poor judgement by an overreaching court. Abortion is not in the constitution, and the court went through contortions to pretend that the Bill of Rights covered it.

    It is reserved for the People and their States to legislate this, or for Congress and 2/3 of the States to approve a Constitutional amendment about it.

    As for me, I am in favor of legal abortion only during the first two or three months, but everybody else is an absolutist who can’t think in subtleties or shades of gray. A human does not exist at conception, and babies beyond the first third or less of pregnancy are too human for anyone with a conscience to kill. The truth, The Way, is in the middle or outside the dichotomy, as with many things…

    And Hefner is not the issue, whether you like him or not.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Buzz Mohawk

    You know your society screwed up pretty badly teaching its young when the foibles of the other sex produce genuine disdain rather than a smile and a desire to fraternize.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    As for me, I am in favor of legal abortion only during the first two or three months, but everybody else is an absolutist who can’t think in subtleties or shades of gray. A human does not exist at conception, and babies beyond the first third or less of pregnancy are too human for anyone with a conscience to kill.
     
    Actually, both the polls and my own personal experience show that that is more or less where most of the American people are at.

    In the last few weeks, I have chatted about this with an ultra-liberal Jewish neighbor and a moderate -conservative Republican African-American lady. Both are basically where you described: the Jewish liberal actually suggested, on his own, a national 15-week limit, which of course is what the Mississippi law provides!

    The rub of course is that there will not be one national standard, simply because we have a federal system. That means no one is completely satisfied, but then no one is completely dissatisfied, either.

    It never should have been a national political issue.
  131. @SFG
    @Buffalo Joe

    The point with the pyramids is they didn’t have steel, structural or otherwise.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Buffalo Joe

    SFG, Jack D’s comment to you is spot on. The pyramids in Egypt and Central and S America are stone on stone, the wider the base the higher the apex. The cathedrals are awe inspiring. Soaring domes, flying buttresses and stain glass windows over a cavernous interior. I can take Alden in my crew and the two of us can move a 3 ton block of limestone.

  132. anonymous[585] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterike
    @The Plutonium Kid


    What are they putting in the food? Sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. Whether it’s cane sugar or high fructose corn syrup, American food is drenched in sugar.
     
    So is baby formula, which has been much in the news of late. It should more properly be labelled "baby poison," because it's garbage. What did people do before Big Pharma baby formula? Not everyone could breastfeed. I'm sure our grandmothers had plenty of sensible, healthy alternatives to this garbage (Similac ingredients):

    https://www.meghantelpner.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Similac-Label-Ingredients.jpg

    Replies: @anonymous

    What did people do before Big Pharma baby formula?

    They suffered high infant mortality, and sometimes employed wet nurses.

    An interviewee on an NPR science program today was raving about how great baby formula is, in that it is the only food aside from breast milk with the “perfect” blend of macro- and micro-nutrients for single-source infant nutrition.
    I don’t recall hearing the term “42.6% corn syrup solids” in the discussion. To be fair, developing babies do need a lot of carbohydrates.

  133. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    Taking you at your word, you have outlined Hefner's strategy, but you haven't proven him wrong. You also assign motivation to him based on your own projection or interpretation. The man was a libertine who knew sex was fun and that people have always engaged in it and that accidents happen.

    FWIW I know that Roe v. Wade is wrong, a poor judgement by an overreaching court. Abortion is not in the constitution, and the court went through contortions to pretend that the Bill of Rights covered it.

    It is reserved for the People and their States to legislate this, or for Congress and 2/3 of the States to approve a Constitutional amendment about it.

    As for me, I am in favor of legal abortion only during the first two or three months, but everybody else is an absolutist who can't think in subtleties or shades of gray. A human does not exist at conception, and babies beyond the first third or less of pregnancy are too human for anyone with a conscience to kill. The truth, The Way, is in the middle or outside the dichotomy, as with many things...

    And Hefner is not the issue, whether you like him or not.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @PhysicistDave

    You know your society screwed up pretty badly teaching its young when the foibles of the other sex produce genuine disdain rather than a smile and a desire to fraternize.

  134. @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon

    War is grim for the soldiers in the trenches on both sides, which is why it would have been better for everyone if Putin hadn't invaded. European civilization destroyed itself in the trenches of WWI and has never recovered and now this is being repeated in Ukraine on a smaller scale and for equally pointless reasons. (The last time also involved Russia).

    Germany was glad to buy Russia's oil and gas before the invasion. Putin had a pretty nice setup but he threw it all away for some rubble in Ukraine. Did Russia really need more land? About as much as Putin needed one more palace.

    Replies: @Anne Lid, @Old Prude

    Please stop pretending to be dim. Thanks.

    (Yes, Russia was happy to sell and Germany was happy to buy and Russia indeed did not need more land. The source of this war/operation is outside of these countries.)

  135. @R.G. Camara
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    To the ancient Romans, conquering Egypt was a monumental event. Not because it was difficult (spoiler: it was not), nor because it was a source of infinite wealth (spoiler: it was), and not because its conquest was simultaneous of the transition from Republic to Empire (spoiler it was, but because Egypt, to the Romans, was a mystical and full of history as China is to the United States.

    For the Romans, once the dust had settled on the Civil Wars, possession of Egypt was a sign from above that Rome truly was a monumental historical nation.

    Replies: @Franz

    For the Romans, once the dust had settled on the Civil Wars, possession of Egypt was a sign from above that Rome truly was a monumental historical nation.

    It was how the Romans shafted their own people. Cheap grain from the Nile delta made Italian farmers paupers. Sure the rich guys liked it. The way Bill Gates & company liked low wages in China. That’s a short term bonanza for the tiny few that leads to extinction for everybody, eventually.

    They thought Taylor Caldwell was crazy 60 years ago when she said the USA was repeating every blunder the Romans made without even the pretense of a golden age. Now it seems like she was not only right on the republic-to-empire thing, but in all the particulars too.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  136. @Pixo
    @PhysicistDave

    Hey Dave, in late February you told us Russia was taking Kharkiv, and would soon control half or Ukraine, and Zelensky would be captured and beg for his life.

    How’s that sick fantasy going?

    The reality is that despite a larger military and a cowardly surprise attack, this evil invasion is an unmitigated disaster for your hero Putin. He failed his bloody drive for Kiev, then was chased out of Kharkiv’s suburbs. The drive to Odessa was crushed, the Russian flagship sunk, and Russia retreated all around Kherson.

    Having lost the battle for the two largest cities, he’s throwing all his remaining forces on a few bombed out and abandoned small towns. And that’s not going too well either.

    You’re a consistent liar, but the maps don’t lie. Look at Russia’s zone of control in March versus today. They are losing. You know that feeling well, doncha?

    https://twitter.com/DefenceHQ/status/1508774299058020357

    https://twitter.com/DefenceHQ/status/1530129305618874370

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave

    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately. As I pointed out in Taki’s in March, the Soviets were ignominiously beaten badly in late 1939 invading Finland, but reorganized in 1940 under Zhukov and ground out an expensive conquest of a modest amount of terrain.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer


    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately.
     
    lol. This was always the Russian goal, but Western media (controlled by the Deep State) made it seem the otherwise---until their masters told them to give up the ghost and admit, well, yeah, Ukrainians are losing. So now, in order to save face, their argument is "Well, the Russians were losing, but now they've changed their goals in the face of it. So we were right all along!"

    Steve, serious question: why do you keep believing what the Western media is saying on this topic?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Pixo

    , @Pixo
    @Steve Sailer

    “Russians … are doing better lately”

    Severodonetsk’s population is down to about 12k, down from 100k, and 90% of the buildings are damaged.

    That’s not worth fighting for. Every day Russia remains in Ukraine, it loses. Same for our similarly stupid and evil invasion of Iraq.

    Which subtype of eastern slav rules depopulating Donbass rustbelts isn’t worth killing for.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Bill Jones
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks for the laugh. Russia's stated territorial goals were limited to freeing the two republics to preempt the announced genocide, and whatever was necessary to destroy your Nazi Banderite friends.

    Were I Putin I'd be thinking of rolling West along the coast, taking Odessa and leaving whatever bit of Ukraine is left after the Poles have finished with it as a landlocked rump.

    You've never mentioned just where your source of Putin's Secret Real Goals got his info, despite being asked some thirty times by a number of people.
    Pray, Do Tell.

  137. @Batman
    @prosa123

    That's all of Cairo. The abuse is even worse for women. I have never talked to someone who visited Cairo and had a good time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rohirrimborn, @Jim from Boston

    Cairo is said to be the loudest city in the world.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  138. SFG says:
    @Alden
    @nebulafox

    I’ll post this again. It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man's tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.

    Legal abortion, as Hefner knew enabled men to squirt and scram and avoid supporting any children they didn’t want.

    Yes Hefner used feminazis as fronts for abortion that benefited promiscuous men far more than it benefited women. Just as Ford Rockefeller Carnegie and other Foundations that sent all the married women back to work by using feminazis as fronts.

    The naivety and ignorance of the MEN OF UNZ never ceases to amaze. Any anti or pro abortion activist continually discussing abortion who doesn’t know it was Hugh Hefner and his tax dodging Play Foundation who legalized abortion is ignorant about the subject.

    I was very very skeptical at the time about the plaintiff Jane Roe’s story. She claimed she was a waitress who was raped and got pregnant. Well that does happen.

    But she went on to say that she, a waitress was the sole support of her parents in their 60s. And that her father was disabled in an accident at work and that her parents had no income.

    Here’s my thinking about her ridiculous tale. How could a waitress at a humdrum diner support 3 people? If her father was disabled and in his 60s, shouldn’t he have been getting social security? And if things were so dire, why didn’t her mother go find a job instead of depending on a diner waitress meager earnings?

    And the media repeated and repeated that ridiculous soap opera story.

    Later it cane out that Jane Roe’s pregnancy was the result of consensual sex with a boyfriend that she already had kids and that she didn’t live with handicapped elderly parents at all.

    The media and people who believed the ridiculous story were incredibly naive.

    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.

    Idiots who believed Jane Roe’s lies. Men who are so ignorant of who and what was responsible for legalization of abortion; Hugh Hefner and his Playboy Foundation

    What’s the difference? Both are completely ignorant and believe the most ridiculous media tales

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @SFG, @Reg Cæsar, @R.G. Camara

    I actually would believe the feminist movement was supported initially by men who wanted to sleep around. However, in the half century since all that it’s mostly about getting you fired if you look at a woman the wrong way and making you feel bad for being attracted to women at all. A couple of Silent generation guys screwing around for a few decades is going to be ancient history to anyone under 60. For younger men nowadays, feminism is about hostile authority figures who can end your career.

  139. @Jack D
    @ic1000

    There is no doubt that it's not going well for the Ukrainians at Severodonetsk. However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably. The "cauldron" was originally going to be the entire east and the whole Ukrainian army was going to be trapped inside of it. The pocket around Severodonetsk is more like a saucepan than a cauldron.

    The narratives in this war have gone back and forth - when the war started, everyone expected the mighty Russian Army to overrun the Ukrainians. Then it flipped and the Russians were complete incompetents who couldn't do anything right. The truth is somewhere in between and there is no question that they can score at least tactical victories in some places. They have a lot of heavy artillery that they can bring to bear on an area that is difficult to withstand.

    Note though that by the time they take over a city they are capturing rubble. Most of the people are gone, all the structures and industry are destroyed. So what have they captured? Does Russia need more land? Whatever short term tactical victories they can achieve, Putin has driven Russia into a strategic "cauldron". Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea. Putin has turned Russia into a pariah state and his prize is the rubble of Severodonetsk. Is this game really worth the candle?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Hypnotoad666, @R.G. Camara, @Joe Stalin

    Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea.

    Sour grapes much. You’ve encapsulated the mindset that caused this debacle for Ukraine and the West — that is, the hubristic fantasy that being in the good graces of the global elite is the only thing that matters.

    Hopefully, we can clear these neocon globalist losers out in 2024 and have a reality-based pro-American foreign policy for once.

    P.S., North Korea isn’t the world’s leading exporter of energy and food. They’ll survive losing McDonalds and Starbucks.

    • Replies: @Pixo
    @Hypnotoad666

    “ Hopefully, we can clear these neocon globalist losers out in 2024 and have a reality-based pro-American foreign policy for once.”

    Your hopes are hopeless.

    Support for Ukraine is wildly popular in the USA.

    You got Ilhan Omar on your side though!

    On the GOP side, you have the pedo Matt Gaetz to complement the Russophile favorite pedo Scott Ritter, plus the low IQ adulteress MTG.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/8-republicans-vote-against-suspending-trade-relations-with-russia-2022-3

  140. @PhysicistDave
    OT, but I think everyone, including Sailer, needs to read this current report from NBC News, citing multiple pro-Ukraine sources, including official spokesmen for the Kiev regime. Highlights include:

    Russia is tightening the noose on Ukrainian troops in the country’s east.

    Moscow’s forces have advanced in a fierce ground and artillery assault, and they now appear close to encircling the last two holdout cities in Luhansk province. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk form the Donbas region, which has become the key focus of the Kremlin’s war.

    As Ukrainian officials voice concern that their troops are now outmanned and outgunned, the Russian push could prove decisive in the conflict.

    Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, said Ukrainian defenses were struggling to keep up with Russia’s onslaught.

    “We’ve now lost to the Russian army in terms of pace,” he said in an interview with an independent Russian media outlet.

    “The Russian side managed to gather its reserves before we did. We’re lagging behind, which makes the situation at the front extremely difficult.”

    After months of battlefield setbacks and the grinding siege of the Black Sea port of Mariupol, Russia’s brutal advance in Luhansk has renewed concerns about the conflict’s endgame.

    If Russia is able to secure control of a large slice of the east, might Ukraine be better off accepting that as the price of survival?

    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger suggested exactly that at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week as he called for a resumption of peace talks between Moscow and Kyiv, warning that failing to engage Russia diplomatically would have long-term consequences for European stability.
     
    Again, note that all of the sources cited by the reporters are pro-Ukraine.

    If this is the prognosis from the pro-Ukraine side, then it is obvious that the Kiev puppet regime is in an enormous amount of trouble.

    The US Deep State needed this war to go on long enough to completely alienate Western Europe from Russia and to solidify the dependence of the US satellites on the US regime.

    Those goals have now been achieved, and the US Deep State is coming to see that Russia is on the path to not only liberating the Donbass but also to seizing the entire Black Sea coast and leaving a land-locked rump Ukraine.

    And so, the Western ruling elite — as typified by the NYT and Kissinger — is now, at last, calling for a negotiated peace along the lines that were always going to be part of the final result — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    It is tragic, indeed deeply evil, that the Western elite engineered this horrific war to serve their geopolitical ends.

    And now the Western elite is abandoning the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

    Replies: @WJ, @ic1000, @Pixo, @PiltdownMan, @AnotherDad, @Mark G., @SunBakedSuburb, @mc23

    I think the Russians are doing surprising well considering they’re attacking with an inferior number of troops.

    The logistical supply of weapons, vehicles and other items and the organization of Ukrainian reserves should eventually turn the tide. I see tactical nukes on the horizon late summer/early fall destroying the ability of the Ukrainians to supply or move troops even feeding civilians. Hiroshima at 15 kilotons was a tactical nuke. I simply fail to see the downside to using tactical nukes if Russia suspects it might lose. Instead of sending 500 heavy bombers you drop one bomb. Fallout is minimal using smaller tactical nuclear weapons.

    Will Russia be a pariah state? Yes. They’ll just have to sell ICBM systems to 3rd world countries for spare Rubles. Arthur C Clark forecast China selling ICBM systems in the novel- “ 2001 A Space Odyssey”. He was a little off but maybe it’s an idea whose time has come.

  141. Rob says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Rob

    I like the way you think.

    Bucky Fuller would tell you both shapes are good, though, because both occur in his vector equilibrium, which exists in "allspace" as lines (vectors) linking all equally spaced points. It is part of his geometry.

    It is also the strongest structure possible, but we don't build many of them because every angle is 60 degrees instead of 90, not so easy for crews to lay out efficiently.

    http://www.treeincarnation.com/images/jitterbug.gif

    Bucky and a Vector Equilibrium model

    It is the strongest structure possible, but when you isolate one unit and remove the internal structure, as he did there, it can be folded in and out.

    -- Buzz, fan of the regular tetrahedron

    Replies: @Rob

    Hey, don’t hear ‘bout Buckminster Fuller these days. Ever since graphene took the place of C60 Buckminster fullerenes as the weird material people are interested in.

    The thing with Fuller, reading stuff about his ideas, I go from “yep, yep, ok, I never thought about that” to “dimensions in synchronous vector spaces define the structure of the cosmos” Reasonable-seeming to nonsense in zero to sixty.

    VR-enhanced construction is a thing that either exists or is coming soon. Have glasses that can tell you if two things are at a 60° a 107.5° or any other angle could make Fuller’s staff (slightly) more practical. I mean, one dymaxion car was kinda neat, but could you imagine a city full of them?

    The thing I thought was cool. In theory, you could build a buckysphere a few miles across, then replace either some of the nitrogen in the air with helium or just keep it a few degrees warmer than ambient, and then your Fuller-city could float through the air. Rumor has it that there are layers in venus’ upper atmosphere where liquid wat would be normal, and air pressure would be earth-normal. Nitrogen gas is lighter than carbon dioxide, so your Venusian Bucky-city flits through the sky of a hellscape planet.

    Y’know. I don’t know why people focus on carbon and water as the things necessary for life to begin. A great majority (or so I was told) of biomolecules have nitrogens in the structure. Carbon and water are everywhere in the sky (far enough from the sun) but where did our nice, thick N2 blanket come from?

    See, I can from zero to pointless really fast too.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Rob

    “dimensions in synchronous vector spaces define the structure of the cosmos”

    LOL. Try his magnum opus, Synergetics sometime. It's full of stuff like that. I've had the book for decades, and I've read many different chapters throughout, but if I were to go the whole distance I would probably end up crazier than I already am.

    His point, though, as I understand it anyway, is that just maybe we should consider a new way of representing things, one that is not based on 3 dimensions at 90 degrees, but rather something like the 60 degree, 6 dimensional vector equilibrium that comes about when you connect equally-spaced points with line segments of equal length. He thought this was the structure of space or that it could be the basis of a true graphic representation of space.

    In other words, look at oranges stacked in a grocery store. They naturally settle into this spacial arrangement because they are spheres of the same size. Spheres of equal size, they represent points arranged in space equidistant from each other in all directions. Connect the center of each orange with the centers of every orange next to it and voilà, you have a vector equilibrium that could continue to infinity in "allspace." Things don't naturally fall into 90 degree squares and cubes (or rarely, maybe things like sodium chloride crystals.)

    Nor does "non-Euclidian geometry" satisfy this, simply because it too is described with mathematic's customary x,y,z space.

    Space is not arranged at 90 degrees, and there are no straight lines, perfectly flat planes or perfectly square cubes -- but our math and science systems measure and describe everything that way (yes, even curved space) perhaps because the world always seemed flat and perpendicular to men on the ground, and because it is practical to work as if it is so. Imagine a mathematics in which your 2D and 3D graphs of space and functions, etc. were not square and cubic but tetrahedral or vector equal...

    ?

    ... or something.

    Maybe the reason he got so far out is because it is just impossible to describe terms in which we never have thought, spaces we didn't even know we inhabited.

    Then again, he was kind of a crackpot whose New England Brahmin origins made it easier for him to go around the world that way than it would be for most other people.

    "See, I can from zero to pointless really fast too."

    Me too.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  142. @Steve Sailer
    @Pixo

    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately. As I pointed out in Taki's in March, the Soviets were ignominiously beaten badly in late 1939 invading Finland, but reorganized in 1940 under Zhukov and ground out an expensive conquest of a modest amount of terrain.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Pixo, @Bill Jones

    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately.

    lol. This was always the Russian goal, but Western media (controlled by the Deep State) made it seem the otherwise—until their masters told them to give up the ghost and admit, well, yeah, Ukrainians are losing. So now, in order to save face, their argument is “Well, the Russians were losing, but now they’ve changed their goals in the face of it. So we were right all along!”

    Steve, serious question: why do you keep believing what the Western media is saying on this topic?

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @R.G. Camara

    R.G - In Russia it was very clear the original goal was to take Kiev. Russian media figures have been fairly open about admitting the March offensive was a failure. Everyone in Russia read Gerasimov‘s absence from the Victory Day celebration as commentary on Gerasimov‘s failure. You should try to read actual Russian commentary and not the Russian propaganda targeted at useful idiots in the West.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Pixo
    @R.G. Camara

    So why did Russia surround Kiev for a month and then retreat? Why did all the Putinbots crow about Kiev’s imminent fall? Why did Russia take the Kiev airport at huge cost of its elite paratroopers?

    The way Team Russia insists Everyone Is Going Exactly As Planned is creepily reminiscent of Stalin’s fellow-travelers.

    The Putinists do frequently tend to admit “Ukraine is winning the propaganda war.” That’s because Russia’s propaganda consists of transparent lies.

    You, Dave Physics, Dave Pinson, and the rest degrade yourselves parroting it.

  143. A PRC geochemist had posited that the earliest Chinese dynasty, Xia (2070 – 1600 BC), recorded in Sima Qian’s Records of the Grand Historian but still not confirmed by archeological discoveries, has a non-Chinese origin–

    He conceived of this connection in the 1990s while performing radiometric dating of ancient Chinese bronzes; to his surprise, their chemical composition more closely resembled those of ancient Egyptian bronzes than native Chinese ores.

    Sun argues that China’s Bronze Age technology, widely thought by scholars to have first entered the northwest of the country through the prehistoric Silk Road, actually came by sea. According to him, its bearers were the Hyksos, the Western Asian people who ruled parts of northern Egypt as foreigners between the 17th and 16th centuries B.C.,

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2016/09/02/did-chinese-civilization-come-from-ancient-egypt-archeological-debate-at-heart-of-china-national-identity/

    So kind of a reverse “We wuz kangz n shiet” theory, and of course anathema to PRC nationalists. But shouldn’t be dismissed out of hand, since the official script of Qing China, Manchu, originated from Egyptian hieroglyphs.

    A bilingual sign in Chinese (l.) and Manchu (r.) in the Forbidden City
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchu_alphabet

  144. @WJ
    @PhysicistDave

    This was all too predictable. The odd obsession that many Americans have had with Ukraine is surprising since many are on the right. These people that have scoffed at the Russian collusion hoax and at the Vindman impeachment hoax , suddenly start believing the garbage media. Snake Island ant the ghost of Kiev are swallowed hook line and sinker. I can only imagine their impending disappointment.

    Replies: @mc23

    I found it stunning when our media described the surrender a Marioupol and said the prisoners were being evacuated to Russia.

  145. @anon
    @prosa123

    Based on what I've seen at the gym that I've lifted at for the last 12 years (I'm 68 ), you would be wrong. Anecdotal, yes, but I bet that your statement is purely anecdotal. Mileage tends to vary.

    Replies: @prosa123

    You’re looking at a self-selected population. Older men who go to gyms are not representative of men in that age range.

  146. @nebulafox
    OT:

    https://twitter.com/libsoftiktok/status/1529616896303276032

    In the pagan Greco-Roman world, it was taken for granted that men had the right to expose a newborn baby for any reason, or even no reason. Part of the reason early Christianity was popular among women was asserting that things like casual infanticide was, well... wrong. And in some societies-some of them very civilized, relatively advanced places to live like Tokugawa-era Japan, lest you get the wrong idea that this was the domain of cavemen-this remained true for far longer, until the last few centuries.

    A tacit return to paganism with all the devaluations that come with it reconciling with an attempt to assert the dominance of the prerogatives and geist of women, though? Don't think we've seen that. That is going to be messy. Interesting, in that ol' car-crash sense. But messy. Especially since if the Left doesn't like the attitudes that married, Christian right-wing men in their 50s and 60s have toward their ideology and how it views them, they are *really* not going to like what unmarried, de-Christianized right-wing men in their 20s and 30s are going to start bringing to the table on that score.

    Replies: @Alden, @Reg Cæsar

    Paternal infanticide, as un-Christian as it is, works to cement the father’s authority in the family. It isn’t destabilizing in the way that elective abortion is. The poor child was often a product of adulterine bastardy, so it served to keep that in check.

    de-Christianized right-wing men in their 20s and 30s

    These fellows would be dangerous had they any talent, skill, or drive. Guys like this are reformable by a male élite, but we haven’t had a male élite in a century or so.

  147. @Jack D
    @AnotherDad

    I would never do that. The grain silo at Great Zimbabwe is over 30 feet tall and upwards of 18 feet in diameter!

    https://www.exploring-africa.com/sites/default/files/styles/full_page/public/uploads/article/325/cover/zimbabwe-africa-exploringafrica-safariadv-radio-raheem-great-zimbabwe.jpg?itok=Y0E33Ab-

    Great Zimbabwe compares favorably with the Gothic cathedrals that were built at the same time. The towers of the cathedrals were built for no good reason but a grain silo feeds the people.

    Replies: @peterike, @mc23

    A thirty foot drywall tower? Impressive but I don’t think it wouldn’t have made a decent European Dark Ages keep. I suspect it wasn’t a grain tower either. Grain silos are loaded from the top.

  148. @Alden
    @nebulafox

    I’ll post this again. It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man's tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.

    Legal abortion, as Hefner knew enabled men to squirt and scram and avoid supporting any children they didn’t want.

    Yes Hefner used feminazis as fronts for abortion that benefited promiscuous men far more than it benefited women. Just as Ford Rockefeller Carnegie and other Foundations that sent all the married women back to work by using feminazis as fronts.

    The naivety and ignorance of the MEN OF UNZ never ceases to amaze. Any anti or pro abortion activist continually discussing abortion who doesn’t know it was Hugh Hefner and his tax dodging Play Foundation who legalized abortion is ignorant about the subject.

    I was very very skeptical at the time about the plaintiff Jane Roe’s story. She claimed she was a waitress who was raped and got pregnant. Well that does happen.

    But she went on to say that she, a waitress was the sole support of her parents in their 60s. And that her father was disabled in an accident at work and that her parents had no income.

    Here’s my thinking about her ridiculous tale. How could a waitress at a humdrum diner support 3 people? If her father was disabled and in his 60s, shouldn’t he have been getting social security? And if things were so dire, why didn’t her mother go find a job instead of depending on a diner waitress meager earnings?

    And the media repeated and repeated that ridiculous soap opera story.

    Later it cane out that Jane Roe’s pregnancy was the result of consensual sex with a boyfriend that she already had kids and that she didn’t live with handicapped elderly parents at all.

    The media and people who believed the ridiculous story were incredibly naive.

    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.

    Idiots who believed Jane Roe’s lies. Men who are so ignorant of who and what was responsible for legalization of abortion; Hugh Hefner and his Playboy Foundation

    What’s the difference? Both are completely ignorant and believe the most ridiculous media tales

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @SFG, @Reg Cæsar, @R.G. Camara

    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.

    This may be true of some of the rank-and-file, but every experienced “activist” in the life movement is well aware of the contribution of Hefner and his friends. As with women’s suffrage, legal elective abortion was always more popular with men than with women, who know better.

    “Choice”– hers– rewards bad men and penalizes good men. So don’t complain that good men are hard to find. Why wouldn’t they be?

  149. @Jack D
    @ic1000

    There is no doubt that it's not going well for the Ukrainians at Severodonetsk. However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably. The "cauldron" was originally going to be the entire east and the whole Ukrainian army was going to be trapped inside of it. The pocket around Severodonetsk is more like a saucepan than a cauldron.

    The narratives in this war have gone back and forth - when the war started, everyone expected the mighty Russian Army to overrun the Ukrainians. Then it flipped and the Russians were complete incompetents who couldn't do anything right. The truth is somewhere in between and there is no question that they can score at least tactical victories in some places. They have a lot of heavy artillery that they can bring to bear on an area that is difficult to withstand.

    Note though that by the time they take over a city they are capturing rubble. Most of the people are gone, all the structures and industry are destroyed. So what have they captured? Does Russia need more land? Whatever short term tactical victories they can achieve, Putin has driven Russia into a strategic "cauldron". Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea. Putin has turned Russia into a pariah state and his prize is the rubble of Severodonetsk. Is this game really worth the candle?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Hypnotoad666, @R.G. Camara, @Joe Stalin

    However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably.

    lol. Glowie goonna glow.

    How long your boys going to push this narrative, fed?

  150. @Alden
    @nebulafox

    I’ll post this again. It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man's tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.

    Legal abortion, as Hefner knew enabled men to squirt and scram and avoid supporting any children they didn’t want.

    Yes Hefner used feminazis as fronts for abortion that benefited promiscuous men far more than it benefited women. Just as Ford Rockefeller Carnegie and other Foundations that sent all the married women back to work by using feminazis as fronts.

    The naivety and ignorance of the MEN OF UNZ never ceases to amaze. Any anti or pro abortion activist continually discussing abortion who doesn’t know it was Hugh Hefner and his tax dodging Play Foundation who legalized abortion is ignorant about the subject.

    I was very very skeptical at the time about the plaintiff Jane Roe’s story. She claimed she was a waitress who was raped and got pregnant. Well that does happen.

    But she went on to say that she, a waitress was the sole support of her parents in their 60s. And that her father was disabled in an accident at work and that her parents had no income.

    Here’s my thinking about her ridiculous tale. How could a waitress at a humdrum diner support 3 people? If her father was disabled and in his 60s, shouldn’t he have been getting social security? And if things were so dire, why didn’t her mother go find a job instead of depending on a diner waitress meager earnings?

    And the media repeated and repeated that ridiculous soap opera story.

    Later it cane out that Jane Roe’s pregnancy was the result of consensual sex with a boyfriend that she already had kids and that she didn’t live with handicapped elderly parents at all.

    The media and people who believed the ridiculous story were incredibly naive.

    And so are the anti abortion people who believe legal abortion was solely the project of evil upper class White women who wanted to kill babies to outrage conservative men.

    Idiots who believed Jane Roe’s lies. Men who are so ignorant of who and what was responsible for legalization of abortion; Hugh Hefner and his Playboy Foundation

    What’s the difference? Both are completely ignorant and believe the most ridiculous media tales

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @SFG, @Reg Cæsar, @R.G. Camara

    It was one man, Hugh Hefner, using the money he made from other men buying his porn magazine Playboy. It was Hefner’s Playboy Foundation a typical rich man’s tax dodge that funded the entire legalize abortion movement. And paid the expenses of the feminazi law firm that filed and litigated Roe vs Wade.

    Hefner was an Epstein: a deep state blackmail machine, controlled and protected by the Deep State the way Epstein was. How do you think a pornographer was normalized and given 40+ years of light-touch, what-a-rascal media coverage and a huge sex mansion in LA that he used to throw wild public orgies every weekend?

    Answer: every bit of it was recorded as kompromat and handed over to the feds. If you were a celebrity and did anything at the Mansion —even once—its on audio and video tape, as well as photographed.

    I can’t believe that, after Epstein, anyone would think Hefner was his own man or was doing anything but being a good servant to his Deep State masters.

  151. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Isn't the last step that you hang from the top of the fence by your curled fingertips with your arms overhead and then you let go?

    If you do this on a 9' fence and you are say 6' tall, your arms should extend at least one more foot over your head and the soles of your feet should be no more than 2' from the ground at the time that you let go. If you are less than 6', then a few inches more but basically about the same as jumping from a desk top to the ground, not exactly a death defying height.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    No, if you do that, you can’t hang on that easy to get like that, and you’re gonna scrape your fingers, chin, or something on the way down. Have you never done this?

    (I’m picturing a wooden fence, as for a chain link fence I’d climb at least most of the way down.) As I wrote, you need to be bent over with your feet against it, and I’d say the 6ft guy may take up 4 ft from the top. Ask him.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You guys are all pathetic, and you call yourself men? Anytime I need to scale a 9 foot wall, I just swing my d*ck over the top and use it like a rope.

    , @kaganovitch
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No, if you do that, you can’t hang on that easy to get like that, and you’re gonna scrape your fingers, chin, or something on the way down. Have you never done this?

    I've done it lots of times. All you need to do to avoid scraping is to push off slightly from the fence with your feet when you let go.

  152. @AndrewR
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Way too long to read

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    ts/dc

  153. @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow

    SafeNow, I also like to just BE somewhere old like this and imagine how long ago that was and what was actually going on then. No pictures are necessary. I ran into this at the ruins in Rome a few years back. As I described in "The Ugly* Chinaman", the Chinese seem to be the worst about this, especially the girls (of course).

    I ask people, such as my wife, "What is it? Do you think nobody will believe you went here? Just tell 'em you went, and there are a million pictures of this on the internet. Just BE here!" That's what it's about.

    But no, her sandstone-colored legs, at least, look pretty good. This picture has inspired me to see if we can go there too. 4,500 years!

    .

    * For those who don't get the reference, it's not a slur, so calm TF down.

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @fish, @kaganovitch, @AndrewR, @Joe Stalin

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  154. @Jack D
    @Anonymous


    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it.
     
    I'm not sure that I could scale a nine foot fence, but then again I'm not so senile that I lock myself out of my house, so I'll call it a wash.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Zoos

    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it.

    I’m not sure that I could scale a nine foot fence, but then again I’m not so senile that I lock myself out of my house, so I’ll call it a wash.

    But you are so senile that you provide a direct citation, then transcribe the word, “backyard” into “house” somewhere in your head, and carry on as if you’re thought process is just fine.

    I’m merely providing a “heads-up” for you, while reminding you that senility is a process. You aren’t fine one day, and senile the next.

    It begins by being contradictory for the sake of being contradictory. Poor reasoning, with a light patina of ill will. Later, the mini-tirades in private that frighten your wife begin. Then they’ll become more public. Then the transcribing of the meaning of words. Then forgetting your grandsons name, etc.

    All this while believing you’re okay, and it’s the world that’s gone askew. Everyone’s stupid. It’s 7 pm, where’s your breakfast? A backyard is the same thing as a house. It’s all on the same property. What is wrong with these people?

    Good luck with that.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Zoos

    A backyard is the same thing as a house. It’s all on the same property. What is wrong with these people?

    Don't all ,or almost all, backyards have access from the house? If so, Jack doubtless assumed that most 60 year old men would walk around the corner and access the backyard through the house rather than climb the fence. Hence his conclusion that he was locked out of house and was using the backyard to access the house rather than the reverse.

  155. @Pixo
    @ic1000

    And Russia has lost so many of its tanks that it is now sending its T-62s from deep storage. They were produced from 1961-1975, so 47 years old at absolute best. And we know Russian are great at long term maintenance of old Soviet equipment, right?

    To complement Russia’s ancient tanks, it just raised the age for new military recruits from 40 to 50. Another thing you do when victory is at hand, right? And Russian men are known for their clean living and staying in great shape, so should make great soldiers at 50!

    Sure, if Putin insists on throwing everything into Severodonetsk, he will trade thousands of his soldiers lives for a bombed out and abandoned city, as he did with Mariupol. That’s not winning, that’s a vainglorious and evil dictator imposing his insanity on his unfortunate subjects.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Anonymous

    You didn’t know it, you didn’t think it could be done
    In the final end he won the war
    After losing every battle

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan
    @James Speaks

    Dylan was at his peak then. One of my favorite lines: "They say I shot a man named Gray,and took his wife to Italy..."
    And bordering on being handsome,too.
    But why are they all wearing Ay-rab hats?

    Replies: @James Speaks

  156. Walk of shame time: I do have some photos of an impossibly slim and handsome young guy at Teotihuacan at a pyramid (or maybe two) circa 1981. Taken the old-fashioned way – by asking strangers to help.

    The steps were interesting. It was fairly easy to climb but terrifying to descend – the rise was perhaps 8” but the depth of the steps was much shorter – maybe 5.5”.

  157. @Rob
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Hey, don’t hear ‘bout Buckminster Fuller these days. Ever since graphene took the place of C60 Buckminster fullerenes as the weird material people are interested in.

    The thing with Fuller, reading stuff about his ideas, I go from “yep, yep, ok, I never thought about that” to “dimensions in synchronous vector spaces define the structure of the cosmos” Reasonable-seeming to nonsense in zero to sixty.

    VR-enhanced construction is a thing that either exists or is coming soon. Have glasses that can tell you if two things are at a 60° a 107.5° or any other angle could make Fuller’s staff (slightly) more practical. I mean, one dymaxion car was kinda neat, but could you imagine a city full of them?

    The thing I thought was cool. In theory, you could build a buckysphere a few miles across, then replace either some of the nitrogen in the air with helium or just keep it a few degrees warmer than ambient, and then your Fuller-city could float through the air. Rumor has it that there are layers in venus’ upper atmosphere where liquid wat would be normal, and air pressure would be earth-normal. Nitrogen gas is lighter than carbon dioxide, so your Venusian Bucky-city flits through the sky of a hellscape planet.

    Y’know. I don’t know why people focus on carbon and water as the things necessary for life to begin. A great majority (or so I was told) of biomolecules have nitrogens in the structure. Carbon and water are everywhere in the sky (far enough from the sun) but where did our nice, thick N2 blanket come from?

    See, I can from zero to pointless really fast too.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    “dimensions in synchronous vector spaces define the structure of the cosmos”

    LOL. Try his magnum opus, Synergetics sometime. It’s full of stuff like that. I’ve had the book for decades, and I’ve read many different chapters throughout, but if I were to go the whole distance I would probably end up crazier than I already am.

    His point, though, as I understand it anyway, is that just maybe we should consider a new way of representing things, one that is not based on 3 dimensions at 90 degrees, but rather something like the 60 degree, 6 dimensional vector equilibrium that comes about when you connect equally-spaced points with line segments of equal length. He thought this was the structure of space or that it could be the basis of a true graphic representation of space.

    In other words, look at oranges stacked in a grocery store. They naturally settle into this spacial arrangement because they are spheres of the same size. Spheres of equal size, they represent points arranged in space equidistant from each other in all directions. Connect the center of each orange with the centers of every orange next to it and voilà, you have a vector equilibrium that could continue to infinity in “allspace.” Things don’t naturally fall into 90 degree squares and cubes (or rarely, maybe things like sodium chloride crystals.)

    Nor does “non-Euclidian geometry” satisfy this, simply because it too is described with mathematic’s customary x,y,z space.

    Space is not arranged at 90 degrees, and there are no straight lines, perfectly flat planes or perfectly square cubes — but our math and science systems measure and describe everything that way (yes, even curved space) perhaps because the world always seemed flat and perpendicular to men on the ground, and because it is practical to work as if it is so. Imagine a mathematics in which your 2D and 3D graphs of space and functions, etc. were not square and cubic but tetrahedral or vector equal…

    ?

    … or something.

    Maybe the reason he got so far out is because it is just impossible to describe terms in which we never have thought, spaces we didn’t even know we inhabited.

    Then again, he was kind of a crackpot whose New England Brahmin origins made it easier for him to go around the world that way than it would be for most other people.

    “See, I can from zero to pointless really fast too.”

    Me too.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    Then again, [Bucky Fuller] was kind of a crackpot whose New England Brahmin origins made it easier for him to go around the world that way than it would be for most other people.
     
    Back around 1970, when I was in high school, the older brother of a friend, who was in college, convinced me to read Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth.

    After I read it, I tried to explain to the college dude that Bucky did not understand some very elementary physics.

    The college dude was not into STEM and really did not want to hear about boring things like Bucky's ignorance of physics. He preferred talking about marijuana (which I found boring). I lost touch with him.

    But at least I learned not to take Bucky Fuller seriously.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

  158. @Jack D
    @ic1000

    There is no doubt that it's not going well for the Ukrainians at Severodonetsk. However, keep in mind that the Russians have lowered their sights considerably. The "cauldron" was originally going to be the entire east and the whole Ukrainian army was going to be trapped inside of it. The pocket around Severodonetsk is more like a saucepan than a cauldron.

    The narratives in this war have gone back and forth - when the war started, everyone expected the mighty Russian Army to overrun the Ukrainians. Then it flipped and the Russians were complete incompetents who couldn't do anything right. The truth is somewhere in between and there is no question that they can score at least tactical victories in some places. They have a lot of heavy artillery that they can bring to bear on an area that is difficult to withstand.

    Note though that by the time they take over a city they are capturing rubble. Most of the people are gone, all the structures and industry are destroyed. So what have they captured? Does Russia need more land? Whatever short term tactical victories they can achieve, Putin has driven Russia into a strategic "cauldron". Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea. Putin has turned Russia into a pariah state and his prize is the rubble of Severodonetsk. Is this game really worth the candle?

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Hypnotoad666, @R.G. Camara, @Joe Stalin

    Ukrainians begging for long range missile artillery.

    And it looks like the Russkies might be getting some competition for their rocket artillery.

  159. @prosa123
    I've heard that visiting the Pyramids requires wading through a sea of aggressive beggars.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @HammerJack, @SIMP simp, @Batman, @AnotherDad, @johnmark7, @Bardon Kaldlan

    OK,so who built it? The black woman?🙂

  160. @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer


    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately.
     
    lol. This was always the Russian goal, but Western media (controlled by the Deep State) made it seem the otherwise---until their masters told them to give up the ghost and admit, well, yeah, Ukrainians are losing. So now, in order to save face, their argument is "Well, the Russians were losing, but now they've changed their goals in the face of it. So we were right all along!"

    Steve, serious question: why do you keep believing what the Western media is saying on this topic?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Pixo

    R.G – In Russia it was very clear the original goal was to take Kiev. Russian media figures have been fairly open about admitting the March offensive was a failure. Everyone in Russia read Gerasimov‘s absence from the Victory Day celebration as commentary on Gerasimov‘s failure. You should try to read actual Russian commentary and not the Russian propaganda targeted at useful idiots in the West.

    • Thanks: Jack D
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Peter Akuleyev

    My impression was that it was a reasonable gamble to take - would Kiev fall as easily as Crimea?

    But of course there was a long interval of years during which the Ukrainian armed forces were strengthened and pro-Russian people sidelined (or worse). So it didn't work.

    My understanding (quite recent, from reading translated Russian nationalists) is that people like Strelkov/Girkin believed there was never any chance of the Minsk accords being implemented by Ukraine, that the post-coup Kiev government was wholly a US creature. Such people thought the RU government was both wasting its time and also making an inevitable conflict harder to win and more costly in both Russian and Ukrainian lives, as every year the Uke forces grew stronger. This view has IMHO turned out to be correct. (They also alleged Russia gave no aid to the Donbass people when it kicked off in 2014, that they were armed with looted Ukrainian Army kit, but that Russia SHOULD have forcefully intervened at the time).

    OTOH the Russian Government has been able to say to its people "We didn't want this, we negotiated, we had an agreement, Ukraine failed to implement and instead have aligned with NATO, constituting an existential threat - only then did we act". But the nationalist critics say the war would have been a lot easier and a lot less bloody in 2014.

    Incidentally there's a US Army personnel plane at Rzeszow today, and a US Hercules (08-5683) has just left.

    https://www.jetphotos.com/registration/84-00173

  161. @James Speaks
    @Pixo

    You didn’t know it, you didn’t think it could be done
    In the final end he won the war
    After losing every battle

    https://youtu.be/5E4ytUW8g_0

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan

    Dylan was at his peak then. One of my favorite lines: “They say I shot a man named Gray,and took his wife to Italy…”
    And bordering on being handsome,too.
    But why are they all wearing Ay-rab hats?

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    Once more, without the animus.

  162. “Does this picture make us look racist?”

  163. Pixo says:
    @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer


    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately.
     
    lol. This was always the Russian goal, but Western media (controlled by the Deep State) made it seem the otherwise---until their masters told them to give up the ghost and admit, well, yeah, Ukrainians are losing. So now, in order to save face, their argument is "Well, the Russians were losing, but now they've changed their goals in the face of it. So we were right all along!"

    Steve, serious question: why do you keep believing what the Western media is saying on this topic?

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Pixo

    So why did Russia surround Kiev for a month and then retreat? Why did all the Putinbots crow about Kiev’s imminent fall? Why did Russia take the Kiev airport at huge cost of its elite paratroopers?

    The way Team Russia insists Everyone Is Going Exactly As Planned is creepily reminiscent of Stalin’s fellow-travelers.

    The Putinists do frequently tend to admit “Ukraine is winning the propaganda war.” That’s because Russia’s propaganda consists of transparent lies.

    You, Dave Physics, Dave Pinson, and the rest degrade yourselves parroting it.

  164. Pixo says:
    @Hypnotoad666
    @Jack D


    Unless they give up their gains in Ukraine, they are going to be a giant version of N. Korea.
     
    Sour grapes much. You've encapsulated the mindset that caused this debacle for Ukraine and the West -- that is, the hubristic fantasy that being in the good graces of the global elite is the only thing that matters.

    Hopefully, we can clear these neocon globalist losers out in 2024 and have a reality-based pro-American foreign policy for once.

    P.S., North Korea isn't the world's leading exporter of energy and food. They'll survive losing McDonalds and Starbucks.

    Replies: @Pixo

    “ Hopefully, we can clear these neocon globalist losers out in 2024 and have a reality-based pro-American foreign policy for once.”

    Your hopes are hopeless.

    Support for Ukraine is wildly popular in the USA.

    You got Ilhan Omar on your side though!

    On the GOP side, you have the pedo Matt Gaetz to complement the Russophile favorite pedo Scott Ritter, plus the low IQ adulteress MTG.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/8-republicans-vote-against-suspending-trade-relations-with-russia-2022-3

  165. @JR Ewing
    @Reg Cæsar


    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645
     
    When I was a senior in high school in 1991, I distinctly remember hearing "Paint It Black" by the Rolling Stones one time and my mom telling me she had listened to that song during her senior year of high school in 1968. 23 years seemed absolutely ancient to me. All of the songs on the "oldies" station sounded old.

    A couple of years ago that song came on the radio in the car and I started doing math in my head and about drove off the road when I realized that the music that I listened to in high school was now relatively older - 30 years - than that Stones song was when I had that discussion with my mom. None of my music is old! It still sounds like it was yesterday!

    Similarly, I have an uncle who was an All State football player in Texas in the late 1960's. he tried to talk to me about it a couple of times and I blew it off because in 1990 his career could have been in the leather helmet era to me. I can only imagine what my own son thinks about me now that he's playing high school football.

    Time doesn't stop.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan

    • Thanks: JR Ewing
  166. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Isn't the last step that you hang from the top of the fence by your curled fingertips with your arms overhead and then you let go?

    If you do this on a 9' fence and you are say 6' tall, your arms should extend at least one more foot over your head and the soles of your feet should be no more than 2' from the ground at the time that you let go. If you are less than 6', then a few inches more but basically about the same as jumping from a desk top to the ground, not exactly a death defying height.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    What are we arguing about climbing fences for anyway? Right here on The Unz Review, there’s the ¡Ask a Mexican! column. Ron’s got expertise of all kinds here.

    • LOL: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Achmed E. Newman

    That’s what’s wrong with US culture, man! Where’s the self-reliance? Bushcraft? Good old-fashioned get-er-done?

    Seems like it’s high time for a re-run of

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/MacGyver

    [space for the Leatherman ad]

  167. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    What are we arguing about climbing fences for anyway? Right here on The Unz Review, there's the ¡Ask a Mexican! column. Ron's got expertise of all kinds here.

    Replies: @Cortes

    That’s what’s wrong with US culture, man! Where’s the self-reliance? Bushcraft? Good old-fashioned get-er-done?

    Seems like it’s high time for a re-run of

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/MacGyver

    [space for the Leatherman ad]

  168. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No, if you do that, you can't hang on that easy to get like that, and you're gonna scrape your fingers, chin, or something on the way down. Have you never done this?

    (I'm picturing a wooden fence, as for a chain link fence I'd climb at least most of the way down.) As I wrote, you need to be bent over with your feet against it, and I'd say the 6ft guy may take up 4 ft from the top. Ask him.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @kaganovitch

    You guys are all pathetic, and you call yourself men? Anytime I need to scale a 9 foot wall, I just swing my d*ck over the top and use it like a rope.

    • LOL: JR Ewing
  169. @Anonymous
    @Sam Malone


    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp’s face is? We’ve gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they’re putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?
     
    You’re correct. Processed seed oils became popular by the late 50's or so, then things slowly got shitty until America became a nation of unapologetic lame fat-asses. Avoid empty carbs, all rice, and processed seed oils, especially canola oil. The shit is poison. Check the ingredients in everything you typically buy. It’s loaded with the stuff. Also soybean, safflower oils and the like. Avoid commercial bread. Same problem. Did you know one beer is equivalent to four slices of cheap bread? So four beers means you’re bearing down on eating a full loaf of bread. That’ll kill ya early, while making you as fat as Steve’s giant calve pyramid chick.

    Also, get white sugar out of your house. Don’t eat it.

    Do that, eat vegetables, supplement, and you can be like me: Same weight I was in college, that means thin, resting pulse is 58, blood pressure 107/64, and in far better shape than most people my age, 62. A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it. It would be hilarious.

    Replies: @bomag, @prosa123, @kaganovitch, @Jack D, @Charles Pewitt, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Cottonseed oil. That’s not even food.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    Cottonseed oil. That’s not even food.
     
    When I was a little bitty baby
    Momma fed me with a bottle
    Of that old cottonseed oil back home


    Down in Lou'siana
    We would get our bile from Texarkana
    'N' bring that raw cottonseed oil back home...
  170. @Bill Jones
    @SFG


    People in the past weren’t dumber, they knew less.
     
    I think I disagree with that. The total knowledge base of the time was much smaller but an educated man could know a hell of a lot of it not necessarily less in toto.
    If one could list "Things wot I no" their list would probably be impressively long and impressively bereft of brain blockers like which fat african whores are fucking which dope addled rap grunter.

    Kunstler touches on this very topic today.

    https://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/childhoods-end/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If one could list “Things wot I no” their list would probably be impressively long…

    Isaac Asimov addressed this years ago. Where do we find room in our heads for all this new knowledge? He then produced a litany of things the common man once was expected to know but no longer does. Arcane measurements, horse care, all kinds of stuff.

  171. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Anonymous

    Cottonseed oil. That’s not even food.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Cottonseed oil. That’s not even food.

    When I was a little bitty baby
    Momma fed me with a bottle
    Of that old cottonseed oil back home

    Down in Lou’siana
    We would get our bile from Texarkana
    ‘N’ bring that raw cottonseed oil back home…

  172. You guys are all pathetic, and you call yourself men? Anytime I need to scale a 9 foot wall, I just swing my d*ck over the top and use it like a rope.

    I bet you do it with– [ahem]– stile.

    Stiles ban to clear way for fat ramblers: COUNTRY stiles are set to be banned from one of Britain’s most famous beauty spots – in a bid to help overweight walkers.

    (No, a “fat rambler” is not an AMC Pacer.)

  173. @Pixo
    @PhysicistDave

    Hey Dave, in late February you told us Russia was taking Kharkiv, and would soon control half or Ukraine, and Zelensky would be captured and beg for his life.

    How’s that sick fantasy going?

    The reality is that despite a larger military and a cowardly surprise attack, this evil invasion is an unmitigated disaster for your hero Putin. He failed his bloody drive for Kiev, then was chased out of Kharkiv’s suburbs. The drive to Odessa was crushed, the Russian flagship sunk, and Russia retreated all around Kherson.

    Having lost the battle for the two largest cities, he’s throwing all his remaining forces on a few bombed out and abandoned small towns. And that’s not going too well either.

    You’re a consistent liar, but the maps don’t lie. Look at Russia’s zone of control in March versus today. They are losing. You know that feeling well, doncha?

    https://twitter.com/DefenceHQ/status/1508774299058020357

    https://twitter.com/DefenceHQ/status/1530129305618874370

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave

    My little buddy Pixo wrote to me:

    You’re a consistent liar, but the maps don’t lie.

    Well, let’s see…

    Early on, I argued that what Putin really wanted was independence for the Donbass and a neutral Ukraine.

    The Western media and ruling elite agree that now Putin is focusing on the Donbass.

    I hereby confess that I was indeed surprised that Putin did not use as much force in dealing with Kiev and Kharkov as he did in dealing with Mariupol (obviously, Putin felt that a full-on attack was needed in Mariupol to destroy the nest of neo-Nazis that were dug in there, which in fact has now been done).

    So, I hereby offer my formal apology to Vladimir Vladimirovich for my having underestimated his sense of decency, humanity, and restraint, as shown by his decision not to turn Kiev and Kharkov into rubble: I humbly apologize, Vladimir Vladimirovich!

    Does that make you feel better, Pixo?

    Pixo also wrote:

    Look at Russia’s zone of control in March versus today. They are losing. You know that feeling well, doncha?

    Well, over the decades, I’ve won some, I’ve lost some — I know both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat.

    But I’ll just note again that pro-Kiev observers, as I have documented above, ranging from the NYT to Henry the K to NBC News, disagree with your belief that Russia is losing.

    I
    don’t care: I have no dog in this fight.

    All I care about, as I keep saying, is that the killing must stop.

    As I have said before, if that happens by Putin turning tail and running back to Moscow, that is okay with me.

    But I do not think that will happen.

    I think the killing will only stop when the Penis Piano Playing Puppet in Kiev (or whoever pulls his strings) decides to accept the inevitable — an independent Donbass and a neutral rump Ukraine.

    You get awfully angry in claiming that the NYT, Kissinger, NBC News, etc. are all wrong about Russian forces moving forward.

    But I am content to see what happens: time will tell.

    I only wish the killing would stop.

    You take care now, little buddy, y’hear!

  174. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Rob

    “dimensions in synchronous vector spaces define the structure of the cosmos”

    LOL. Try his magnum opus, Synergetics sometime. It's full of stuff like that. I've had the book for decades, and I've read many different chapters throughout, but if I were to go the whole distance I would probably end up crazier than I already am.

    His point, though, as I understand it anyway, is that just maybe we should consider a new way of representing things, one that is not based on 3 dimensions at 90 degrees, but rather something like the 60 degree, 6 dimensional vector equilibrium that comes about when you connect equally-spaced points with line segments of equal length. He thought this was the structure of space or that it could be the basis of a true graphic representation of space.

    In other words, look at oranges stacked in a grocery store. They naturally settle into this spacial arrangement because they are spheres of the same size. Spheres of equal size, they represent points arranged in space equidistant from each other in all directions. Connect the center of each orange with the centers of every orange next to it and voilà, you have a vector equilibrium that could continue to infinity in "allspace." Things don't naturally fall into 90 degree squares and cubes (or rarely, maybe things like sodium chloride crystals.)

    Nor does "non-Euclidian geometry" satisfy this, simply because it too is described with mathematic's customary x,y,z space.

    Space is not arranged at 90 degrees, and there are no straight lines, perfectly flat planes or perfectly square cubes -- but our math and science systems measure and describe everything that way (yes, even curved space) perhaps because the world always seemed flat and perpendicular to men on the ground, and because it is practical to work as if it is so. Imagine a mathematics in which your 2D and 3D graphs of space and functions, etc. were not square and cubic but tetrahedral or vector equal...

    ?

    ... or something.

    Maybe the reason he got so far out is because it is just impossible to describe terms in which we never have thought, spaces we didn't even know we inhabited.

    Then again, he was kind of a crackpot whose New England Brahmin origins made it easier for him to go around the world that way than it would be for most other people.

    "See, I can from zero to pointless really fast too."

    Me too.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:

    Then again, [Bucky Fuller] was kind of a crackpot whose New England Brahmin origins made it easier for him to go around the world that way than it would be for most other people.

    Back around 1970, when I was in high school, the older brother of a friend, who was in college, convinced me to read Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth.

    After I read it, I tried to explain to the college dude that Bucky did not understand some very elementary physics.

    The college dude was not into STEM and really did not want to hear about boring things like Bucky’s ignorance of physics. He preferred talking about marijuana (which I found boring). I lost touch with him.

    But at least I learned not to take Bucky Fuller seriously.

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @PhysicistDave

    Buckminster Fuller dropped out of Harvard, after having declared philosophy as his major. There's no evidence at all that he had the rudiments of a physics or even a civil or mechanical engineering education. He was, however, good at hanging around more famous and talented people, like Isamu Noguchi, and coming up with modish terms like "dymaxion" and "geodesic", with the root words borrowed from physics and geometry. He didn't even invent the geodesic dome, for that matter. A German, the Zeiss engineer Walther Bauersfeld, who designed the first working modern planetarium and projector, patented it a quarter of a century before Fuller.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  175. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Alden

    Taking you at your word, you have outlined Hefner's strategy, but you haven't proven him wrong. You also assign motivation to him based on your own projection or interpretation. The man was a libertine who knew sex was fun and that people have always engaged in it and that accidents happen.

    FWIW I know that Roe v. Wade is wrong, a poor judgement by an overreaching court. Abortion is not in the constitution, and the court went through contortions to pretend that the Bill of Rights covered it.

    It is reserved for the People and their States to legislate this, or for Congress and 2/3 of the States to approve a Constitutional amendment about it.

    As for me, I am in favor of legal abortion only during the first two or three months, but everybody else is an absolutist who can't think in subtleties or shades of gray. A human does not exist at conception, and babies beyond the first third or less of pregnancy are too human for anyone with a conscience to kill. The truth, The Way, is in the middle or outside the dichotomy, as with many things...

    And Hefner is not the issue, whether you like him or not.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @PhysicistDave

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:

    As for me, I am in favor of legal abortion only during the first two or three months, but everybody else is an absolutist who can’t think in subtleties or shades of gray. A human does not exist at conception, and babies beyond the first third or less of pregnancy are too human for anyone with a conscience to kill.

    Actually, both the polls and my own personal experience show that that is more or less where most of the American people are at.

    In the last few weeks, I have chatted about this with an ultra-liberal Jewish neighbor and a moderate -conservative Republican African-American lady. Both are basically where you described: the Jewish liberal actually suggested, on his own, a national 15-week limit, which of course is what the Mississippi law provides!

    The rub of course is that there will not be one national standard, simply because we have a federal system. That means no one is completely satisfied, but then no one is completely dissatisfied, either.

    It never should have been a national political issue.

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
  176. Anonymous[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pixo
    @ic1000

    And Russia has lost so many of its tanks that it is now sending its T-62s from deep storage. They were produced from 1961-1975, so 47 years old at absolute best. And we know Russian are great at long term maintenance of old Soviet equipment, right?

    To complement Russia’s ancient tanks, it just raised the age for new military recruits from 40 to 50. Another thing you do when victory is at hand, right? And Russian men are known for their clean living and staying in great shape, so should make great soldiers at 50!

    Sure, if Putin insists on throwing everything into Severodonetsk, he will trade thousands of his soldiers lives for a bombed out and abandoned city, as he did with Mariupol. That’s not winning, that’s a vainglorious and evil dictator imposing his insanity on his unfortunate subjects.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Anonymous

    Every Russian supports President Putin. Materialistic Americans will never understand the bond that exists between the Russian people and their president. They will gladly die for him to the last man.

  177. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Alfa158

    "One time we were driving along a side road in rural Tuscany and there was suddenly a couple of hundred meter stretch with African prostitutes spaced out along the road waiting for customers. I presume it was known among the locals that was where you went if you wanted to get laid."

    Same on the ring road round Beziers in southern France, but by no means all black girls. Same on the coast road from France towards Barcelona. In Porto (Portugal) there were transvestite prostitutes across the road from our hotel. Lord knows who their clients were.

    Re Ukraine, I'm a tad worried that as the initial they-got-their-ass-kicked euphoria (produced by a vast propaganda campaign, but an effective one) wears off, and Russia grind west slowly but surely,

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/05/26/ukraine-frontline-russia-military-severodonetsk/

    that demands to DO SOMETHING OR RUSSIA WILL WIN will become louder (and they'll be amplified as if we are all Nulands/Jack Ds) - drawing the US/UK/EU closer to open confrontation with Russia.

    Now personally, I'd rather Ukraine and Russia were at peace, that NATO stopped expanding (who wants to die for North Macedonia?), that gas was flowing via NS2 to a grateful Europe, that I didn't need a bank loan to fill my car or the oil tank, and that the queues at the local food bank didn't get ever longer.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Old Prude

    The crawl on the morning news says Biden is considering sending sophisticated long-range weapons to Ukraine.

    No word on trying negotiations. Unreal.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Old Prude

    "No word on trying negotiations. Unreal."

    Au contraire - extremely real. This is what they wanted, worked for and sought to provoke. The point now is to prolong the war and weaken Russia, as US politicians have explicitly said.

    Now why they want to declare economic, quasi-military and political war on Russia is an interesting question. Surely a prosperous Europe economically integrated with Russia would be the greatest dividend of the fall of Communism?

    But apparently not so, to our ruling elites. They are driving Russia headlong towards China. Nation #1 (but falling) is driving nation #3 into the arms of nation #2 (and rising). Seems daft to me. Their use of the banking system as a weapon against Russia stands a non-negligible chance of backfiring big time.

    Maybe our elites know something we don't. Or is it hubris? "Who the gods want to destroy, they first make mad."

    I'm just a trifle worried that the thing they know is "Cossacks looted great-great-grandpa's shop in 1882!".

  178. @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon

    War is grim for the soldiers in the trenches on both sides, which is why it would have been better for everyone if Putin hadn't invaded. European civilization destroyed itself in the trenches of WWI and has never recovered and now this is being repeated in Ukraine on a smaller scale and for equally pointless reasons. (The last time also involved Russia).

    Germany was glad to buy Russia's oil and gas before the invasion. Putin had a pretty nice setup but he threw it all away for some rubble in Ukraine. Did Russia really need more land? About as much as Putin needed one more palace.

    Replies: @Anne Lid, @Old Prude

    Yeah, we got it JD: Putin started this thing. Good Point about WWI. If the Brits, and French had decided to negotiate at some point instead of going full Kaiser is the devil, maybe a few million lives would have been spared. Not to mention maybe WWII could have been avoided.

    “Putin started this thing” and “Putin is Evil” preclude a negotiated ending. Bad plan. If not a negotiated ending, what will be the ending? Negotiations allow some control of the situation. As it is, with both sides pouring weapons into the zone, things are under no-0ne’s control. Folly. Utter folly.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Old Prude

    Everyone knows that there will be a negotiated ending because neither side is strong enough to defeat the other side. The question is what will the deal be?

    The best deal that Russia would be willing give right now is not good enough for Ukraine. So there isn't going to be a deal in the short run. All the "killing has to stop" folks have in mind a cease fire where Russia then gets to keep all the territory that it has conquered. This is not acceptable to the Ukrainians nor is it a good idea to offer up your country to your neighbors on the "all you can eat" plan. It pretty much ensures that your customer will come back for seconds.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @PhysicistDave

  179. @Mark G.
    @PhysicistDave


    Ukraine is now about to learn what happens to those who put their faith in the US Deep State.

     

    As Vietnam and Afghanistan previously learned when they put their faith in long term American support. Americans are not an imperialist people and tire of these interventions. This is not a bad thing. With all the problems we have here, we should not be worrying about a regional war thousands of miles away. The elites, who do benefit from these interventions, can whip up a little war hysteria but they can't maintain it long term. A new AP poll of the American public shows a ten point drop, 55% down to 45%, since March prioritizing sanctioning Russia over protecting the U.S. economy.


    In addition to the NBC News report and the NYT giving up on a Ukrainian victory, the WaPo is now talking about catastrophic conditions and collapsing morale among Ukrainian forces.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/military/wapo-stunning-first-admits-catastrophic-conditions-collapsing-morale-ukraine-forces-front

    It appears a consensus is forming in the mainstream media that things are not going as well as previously claimed. Many of the same politicians who said support for Ukraine would help them beat the Russians were saying a year ago Covid vaccines would stop transmission of the disease. This was followed by eight hundred thousand cases a day last winter. Many of these politicians were also saying inflation was "transitory". It's now 8% and rising. We need to elect people with better prognostication skills.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Mark,

    Here is a link to the WaPo story from Thursday (May 26, 2022) to which you referred that is (right now at least) not behind a paywall.

    It is worth reading the whole piece, which is truly heartbreaking: these are courageous men who have clearly been abandoned by the regime in Kiev.

    Highlights from the WaPo report:

    Ukrainian leaders have projected and nurtured a public image of military invulnerability — of their volunteer and professional forces triumphantly standing up to the Russian onslaught. Videos of assaults on Russian tanks or positions are posted daily on social media. Artists are creating patriotic posters, billboards and T-shirts. The postal service even released stamps commemorating the sinking of a Russian warship in the Black Sea.

    Ukrainian forces have succeeded in thwarting Russian efforts to seize Kyiv and Kharkiv and have scored battlefield victories in the east. But the experience of Lapko and his group of volunteers offers a rare and more realistic portrait of the conflict and Ukraine’s struggle to halt the Russian advance in parts of Donbas. Ukraine, like Russia, has provided scant information about deaths, injuries or losses of military equipment. But after three months of war, this company of 120 men is down to 54 because of deaths, injuries and desertions.

    The volunteers were civilians before Russia invaded on Feb. 24, and they never expected to be dispatched to one of the most dangerous front lines in eastern Ukraine. They quickly found themselves in the crosshairs of war, feeling abandoned by their military superiors and struggling to survive.

    “Our command takes no responsibility,” Lapko said. “They only take credit for our achievements. They give us no support.”

    When they could take it no longer, Lapko and his top lieutenant, Vitaliy Khrus, retreated with members of their company this week to a hotel away from the front. There, both men spoke to The Washington Post on the record, knowing they could face a court-martial and time in military prison.

    The Kiev regime’s response:

    “War breaks people down,” said Serhiy Haidai, head of the regional war administration in Luhansk province, acknowledging many volunteers were not properly trained because Ukrainian authorities did not expect Russia to invade. But he maintained that all soldiers are taken care of: “They have enough medical supplies and food. The only thing is there are people that aren’t ready to fight.”

    But Lapko and Khrus’s concerns were echoed recently by a platoon of the 115th Brigade 3rd Battalion, based nearby in the besieged city of Severodonetsk. In a video uploaded to Telegram on May 24, and confirmed as authentic by an aide to Haidai, volunteers said they will no longer fight because they lacked proper weapons, rear support and military leadership.

    “We are being sent to certain death,” said a volunteer, reading from a prepared script, adding that a similar video was filmed by members of the 115th Brigade 1st Battalion. “We are not alone like this, we are many.”

    Ukraine’s military rebutted the volunteers’ claims in their own video posted online, saying the “deserters” had everything they needed to fight: “They thought they came for a vacation,” one service member said. “That’s why they left their positions.”

    The price paid being by these soldiers who told the truth to the WaPo:

    But on Monday, Ukraine’s military security services arrived at the hotel and took Khrus and other members of his platoon to a detention center for two days, accusing them of desertion. Lapko was stripped of his command, according to an order reviewed by The Post. He is being held at the base in Lysychansk, his future uncertain.

    Reached by phone Wednesday, he said two more of his men had been wounded on the front line.

    What will all our friends — Jack D, Pixo, AP, utu, HA, Corvinus, etc. — who are oh so eager to see Ukrainians die for the glory of the US Deep State say to all this?

    The WaPo is often known as the “CIA’s newspaper.” If the WaPo is now willing to report the truth, then the US Deep State is truly abandoning the Kiev puppet regime and the brave men who are dying on its behalf.

    Can any decent human being not weep?

    • Replies: @SFG
    @PhysicistDave

    I’m kind of in the middle-I think Putin is the aggressor but am loath to start WW3.

    I also am reluctant to start dictating military strategy to the Ukrainians-I’m going to have opinions about what a country on the other side of the world should be doing in a war? I am hearing that the USA is pushing Ukrainians to prolong the war to weaken Russia, and that I am very much against. But absent that…it’s up to Kiev. I’m not there, it’s not my war, it’s up to the Ukrainian people to decide how long and how far they want to fight. They are the ones dying over there, not me.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  180. @JR Ewing
    @Reg Cæsar


    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP come June 25: 21,645
    # of days from the release of the Beatles’ first LP to Kitty Hawk: 21,645
     
    When I was a senior in high school in 1991, I distinctly remember hearing "Paint It Black" by the Rolling Stones one time and my mom telling me she had listened to that song during her senior year of high school in 1968. 23 years seemed absolutely ancient to me. All of the songs on the "oldies" station sounded old.

    A couple of years ago that song came on the radio in the car and I started doing math in my head and about drove off the road when I realized that the music that I listened to in high school was now relatively older - 30 years - than that Stones song was when I had that discussion with my mom. None of my music is old! It still sounds like it was yesterday!

    Similarly, I have an uncle who was an All State football player in Texas in the late 1960's. he tried to talk to me about it a couple of times and I blew it off because in 1990 his career could have been in the leather helmet era to me. I can only imagine what my own son thinks about me now that he's playing high school football.

    Time doesn't stop.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan

    I thought a bit about this after reading this thread in personal terms, though I have a pretty good knowledge of historical dates and time spans.

    My grandmother was born in 1879. That means that any 90+ year olds who might have doted on her when she was a little girl were themselves children during Washington’s presidency. Realizing that was a bit startling.

    Once you’re getting to retirement age, personal and family memory, one step removed, can span a couple of centuries.

  181. @PhysicistDave
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz Mohawk wrote:


    Then again, [Bucky Fuller] was kind of a crackpot whose New England Brahmin origins made it easier for him to go around the world that way than it would be for most other people.
     
    Back around 1970, when I was in high school, the older brother of a friend, who was in college, convinced me to read Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth.

    After I read it, I tried to explain to the college dude that Bucky did not understand some very elementary physics.

    The college dude was not into STEM and really did not want to hear about boring things like Bucky's ignorance of physics. He preferred talking about marijuana (which I found boring). I lost touch with him.

    But at least I learned not to take Bucky Fuller seriously.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Buckminster Fuller dropped out of Harvard, after having declared philosophy as his major. There’s no evidence at all that he had the rudiments of a physics or even a civil or mechanical engineering education. He was, however, good at hanging around more famous and talented people, like Isamu Noguchi, and coming up with modish terms like “dymaxion” and “geodesic”, with the root words borrowed from physics and geometry. He didn’t even invent the geodesic dome, for that matter. A German, the Zeiss engineer Walther Bauersfeld, who designed the first working modern planetarium and projector, patented it a quarter of a century before Fuller.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @PiltdownMan

    Reportedly he also stole his "tensegrity" from artist Kenneth Snelson who was at the college where Fuller was lecturing. It's a cool thing, but like many cool things it had a history before someone like Fuller came along, co-opted it and gave it a catchy name.


    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Z_fMYELd2Ok/TF1gQNdOqDI/AAAAAAAAAyw/l4X9nQCvvWk/s1600/easy_land4x5.jpg
    Tensegrity sculpture by Kenneth Snelson
    With tension and compression working together (+ and -, yin and yang, male and female, rods and cables) the structural members seem to float in space with no rigid connection to each other.

  182. @Peter Akuleyev
    @R.G. Camara

    R.G - In Russia it was very clear the original goal was to take Kiev. Russian media figures have been fairly open about admitting the March offensive was a failure. Everyone in Russia read Gerasimov‘s absence from the Victory Day celebration as commentary on Gerasimov‘s failure. You should try to read actual Russian commentary and not the Russian propaganda targeted at useful idiots in the West.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    My impression was that it was a reasonable gamble to take – would Kiev fall as easily as Crimea?

    But of course there was a long interval of years during which the Ukrainian armed forces were strengthened and pro-Russian people sidelined (or worse). So it didn’t work.

    My understanding (quite recent, from reading translated Russian nationalists) is that people like Strelkov/Girkin believed there was never any chance of the Minsk accords being implemented by Ukraine, that the post-coup Kiev government was wholly a US creature. Such people thought the RU government was both wasting its time and also making an inevitable conflict harder to win and more costly in both Russian and Ukrainian lives, as every year the Uke forces grew stronger. This view has IMHO turned out to be correct. (They also alleged Russia gave no aid to the Donbass people when it kicked off in 2014, that they were armed with looted Ukrainian Army kit, but that Russia SHOULD have forcefully intervened at the time).

    OTOH the Russian Government has been able to say to its people “We didn’t want this, we negotiated, we had an agreement, Ukraine failed to implement and instead have aligned with NATO, constituting an existential threat – only then did we act“. But the nationalist critics say the war would have been a lot easier and a lot less bloody in 2014.

    Incidentally there’s a US Army personnel plane at Rzeszow today, and a US Hercules (08-5683) has just left.

    https://www.jetphotos.com/registration/84-00173

  183. @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve had similar thoughts, for instance seeing the throng of people around the Mona Lisa trying to take a picture of it. Why?

    If you’re going to take a picture, include yourself in it. Take a selfie. Prove you were there. What’s the point otherwise?

    Without your smiling face in it, your crappy snapshot is just a crappy snapshot of something that has already been professionally photographed 100’s or 1000’s of times.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Alfa158, @Harry Baldwin

    There’s an invented word for this.

    Vemödalen: The frustration of photographing something amazing when thousands of of identical photos already exist.

    From The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows.

    • Thanks: Cortes
  184. Pixo says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Pixo

    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately. As I pointed out in Taki's in March, the Soviets were ignominiously beaten badly in late 1939 invading Finland, but reorganized in 1940 under Zhukov and ground out an expensive conquest of a modest amount of terrain.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Pixo, @Bill Jones

    “Russians … are doing better lately”

    Severodonetsk’s population is down to about 12k, down from 100k, and 90% of the buildings are damaged.

    That’s not worth fighting for. Every day Russia remains in Ukraine, it loses. Same for our similarly stupid and evil invasion of Iraq.

    Which subtype of eastern slav rules depopulating Donbass rustbelts isn’t worth killing for.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Pixo

    Same for our similarly stupid and evil invasion of Iraq.

    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?

    Replies: @Mark G., @PhysicistDave

  185. SFG says:
    @PhysicistDave
    @Mark G.

    Mark,

    Here is a link to the WaPo story from Thursday (May 26, 2022) to which you referred that is (right now at least) not behind a paywall.

    It is worth reading the whole piece, which is truly heartbreaking: these are courageous men who have clearly been abandoned by the regime in Kiev.

    Highlights from the WaPo report:


    Ukrainian leaders have projected and nurtured a public image of military invulnerability — of their volunteer and professional forces triumphantly standing up to the Russian onslaught. Videos of assaults on Russian tanks or positions are posted daily on social media. Artists are creating patriotic posters, billboards and T-shirts. The postal service even released stamps commemorating the sinking of a Russian warship in the Black Sea.

    Ukrainian forces have succeeded in thwarting Russian efforts to seize Kyiv and Kharkiv and have scored battlefield victories in the east. But the experience of Lapko and his group of volunteers offers a rare and more realistic portrait of the conflict and Ukraine’s struggle to halt the Russian advance in parts of Donbas. Ukraine, like Russia, has provided scant information about deaths, injuries or losses of military equipment. But after three months of war, this company of 120 men is down to 54 because of deaths, injuries and desertions.

    The volunteers were civilians before Russia invaded on Feb. 24, and they never expected to be dispatched to one of the most dangerous front lines in eastern Ukraine. They quickly found themselves in the crosshairs of war, feeling abandoned by their military superiors and struggling to survive.

    “Our command takes no responsibility,” Lapko said. “They only take credit for our achievements. They give us no support.”

    When they could take it no longer, Lapko and his top lieutenant, Vitaliy Khrus, retreated with members of their company this week to a hotel away from the front. There, both men spoke to The Washington Post on the record, knowing they could face a court-martial and time in military prison.
     
    The Kiev regime's response:

    “War breaks people down,” said Serhiy Haidai, head of the regional war administration in Luhansk province, acknowledging many volunteers were not properly trained because Ukrainian authorities did not expect Russia to invade. But he maintained that all soldiers are taken care of: “They have enough medical supplies and food. The only thing is there are people that aren’t ready to fight.”

    But Lapko and Khrus’s concerns were echoed recently by a platoon of the 115th Brigade 3rd Battalion, based nearby in the besieged city of Severodonetsk. In a video uploaded to Telegram on May 24, and confirmed as authentic by an aide to Haidai, volunteers said they will no longer fight because they lacked proper weapons, rear support and military leadership.

    “We are being sent to certain death,” said a volunteer, reading from a prepared script, adding that a similar video was filmed by members of the 115th Brigade 1st Battalion. “We are not alone like this, we are many.”

    Ukraine’s military rebutted the volunteers’ claims in their own video posted online, saying the “deserters” had everything they needed to fight: “They thought they came for a vacation,” one service member said. “That’s why they left their positions.”
     
    The price paid being by these soldiers who told the truth to the WaPo:

    But on Monday, Ukraine’s military security services arrived at the hotel and took Khrus and other members of his platoon to a detention center for two days, accusing them of desertion. Lapko was stripped of his command, according to an order reviewed by The Post. He is being held at the base in Lysychansk, his future uncertain.

    Reached by phone Wednesday, he said two more of his men had been wounded on the front line.
     
    What will all our friends -- Jack D, Pixo, AP, utu, HA, Corvinus, etc. -- who are oh so eager to see Ukrainians die for the glory of the US Deep State say to all this?

    The WaPo is often known as the "CIA's newspaper." If the WaPo is now willing to report the truth, then the US Deep State is truly abandoning the Kiev puppet regime and the brave men who are dying on its behalf.

    Can any decent human being not weep?

    Replies: @SFG

    I’m kind of in the middle-I think Putin is the aggressor but am loath to start WW3.

    I also am reluctant to start dictating military strategy to the Ukrainians-I’m going to have opinions about what a country on the other side of the world should be doing in a war? I am hearing that the USA is pushing Ukrainians to prolong the war to weaken Russia, and that I am very much against. But absent that…it’s up to Kiev. I’m not there, it’s not my war, it’s up to the Ukrainian people to decide how long and how far they want to fight. They are the ones dying over there, not me.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @SFG

    SFG wrote to me:


    I also am reluctant to start dictating military strategy to the Ukrainians-I’m going to have opinions about what a country on the other side of the world should be doing in a war?
     
    Well, that is really the point.

    Sensible Americans do not think themselves responsible for madmen in power half-way around the world.

    Unfortunately, in the case of Ukraine, the US Deep State has been intensely, and quite publicly, involved in this mess for most of the last decade.

    US Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland engineered the 2014 coup that overthrew the legally elected president of Ukraine. When the Donbass refused to submit to the new puppet government, the US supported Kiev in its (now longer than eight year) war against the Donbass with weapons and training.

    Just a few days before Putin invaded, our moronic VP Kamala was still encouraging Ukraine to join NATO, one of the main issues that provoked the Russian invasion.

    And of course Congress has appropriated tens of billions during the last couple months to prop up the puppet regime in Kiev.

    So, alas, we Americans are not in a position to say, "Let the Ukrainians resolve their problems as they wish." The US Deep State, from 2014 and continuing to this day, has made sure we are deeply involved in this conflict.

    And since our government produced this tragedy, we Americans have a moral obligation to push for an end of the conflict so that the killing will stop.

    Bizarrely, when I and others here have pointed out these well-documented and publicly known facts, some of our friends -- HA, Jack D, Pixo, utu, AP, et al. -- accuse us of being tools of Putin, fanboys of Putin, etc.

    The Big Lie.

    SFG also wrote:


    I am hearing that the USA is pushing Ukrainians to prolong the war to weaken Russia, and that I am very much against.
     
    Yes, that is the central issue.

    None of us Americans, after all, is urging that the US intervene on Putin's side, which would be the case if we were actually tools of Putin!

    We just want the US Deep State to stop propping up the puppet regime in Kiev and stop urging the Kiev puppet regime to continue fighting a conflict that is killing so many innocent people, in pursuit of the geopolitical goals of the US Deep State.

    SFG also wrote:


    But absent that…it’s up to Kiev. I’m not there, it’s not my war, it’s up to the Ukrainian people to decide how long and how far they want to fight. They are the ones dying over there, not me.
     
    I'm not sure the Ukrainian people any longer have any say. Zelensky has shut down opposition parties, former president Poroshenko has been prevented from leaving the country; the news media have been nationalized.

    Zelensky won the presidency on a promise of respecting the Minsk agreements regarding autonomy in the Donbass and of reaching a rapprochement with Moscow.

    He lied.

    I don't know if it is the corrupt Ukrainian oligarchs (such as Zelensky's controller Kolomoisky) or the US Deep State or the Azov Battalion that is now calling the shots in Ukraine.

    But it is not the Ukrainian people.

  186. @PiltdownMan
    @PhysicistDave

    Buckminster Fuller dropped out of Harvard, after having declared philosophy as his major. There's no evidence at all that he had the rudiments of a physics or even a civil or mechanical engineering education. He was, however, good at hanging around more famous and talented people, like Isamu Noguchi, and coming up with modish terms like "dymaxion" and "geodesic", with the root words borrowed from physics and geometry. He didn't even invent the geodesic dome, for that matter. A German, the Zeiss engineer Walther Bauersfeld, who designed the first working modern planetarium and projector, patented it a quarter of a century before Fuller.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Reportedly he also stole his “tensegrity” from artist Kenneth Snelson who was at the college where Fuller was lecturing. It’s a cool thing, but like many cool things it had a history before someone like Fuller came along, co-opted it and gave it a catchy name.

    Tensegrity sculpture by Kenneth Snelson
    With tension and compression working together (+ and -, yin and yang, male and female, rods and cables) the structural members seem to float in space with no rigid connection to each other.

    • Thanks: PiltdownMan
  187. @Batman
    @prosa123

    That's all of Cairo. The abuse is even worse for women. I have never talked to someone who visited Cairo and had a good time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rohirrimborn, @Jim from Boston

    • Replies: @Batman
    @Rohirrimborn

    I'll never understand white women. Half the time they're living in terror of men, and the other half of the time they're doing life threatening things like taking in rescue pitbulls and traveling alone through Muslim countries. Looks like a cool trip though. I'm happy she survived.

  188. @Old Prude
    @Jack D

    Yeah, we got it JD: Putin started this thing. Good Point about WWI. If the Brits, and French had decided to negotiate at some point instead of going full Kaiser is the devil, maybe a few million lives would have been spared. Not to mention maybe WWII could have been avoided.

    "Putin started this thing" and "Putin is Evil" preclude a negotiated ending. Bad plan. If not a negotiated ending, what will be the ending? Negotiations allow some control of the situation. As it is, with both sides pouring weapons into the zone, things are under no-0ne's control. Folly. Utter folly.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Everyone knows that there will be a negotiated ending because neither side is strong enough to defeat the other side. The question is what will the deal be?

    The best deal that Russia would be willing give right now is not good enough for Ukraine. So there isn’t going to be a deal in the short run. All the “killing has to stop” folks have in mind a cease fire where Russia then gets to keep all the territory that it has conquered. This is not acceptable to the Ukrainians nor is it a good idea to offer up your country to your neighbors on the “all you can eat” plan. It pretty much ensures that your customer will come back for seconds.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Jack D

    No. Everyone does not know there will be a negotiated deal... No one knows jack sh*t. Waiting for the first tactical nuke to go off... Sheer folly. Fools...

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:


    The best deal that Russia would be willing give right now is not good enough for Ukraine. So there isn’t going to be a deal in the short run. All the “killing has to stop” folks have in mind a cease fire where Russia then gets to keep all the territory that it has conquered. This is not acceptable to the Ukrainians nor is it a good idea to offer up your country to your neighbors on the “all you can eat” plan.
     
    Russian-language reports indicate that Russian forces have just taken Severodonetsk.

    The longer this goes on, the worse it goes for Kiev.

    We are reaching a tipping point at which Putin will have the power to insist not only on the Donbass but also the entire Black Sea coast, including Odessa.

    I don't really care who rules Odessa one way or another, but I do care about the killing.

    Those of us who, unlike you, oppose the US Deep State are not advocating that our views be imposed on Kiev. We are simply urging that the US taxpayers no longer be forced to support the insane goals of the US Deep State, via the subsidies to the Kiev regime, the sanctions, and all the rest.

    If we were really on Putin's side, we would want the US to support Putin, which no one here has advocated.

    But the publicly stated goals of the US Deep State -- e.g., SecDef Austin's statement about weakening Russia -- make very clear that the goal here is not to help Ukraine or aid the Ukrainian people.

    Again, the longer this goes on, the more likely Ukraine will lose the whole Black Sea coast.

    And the more Ukrainians will die.

    The killing must stop.


    The publicly stated murderous plans of the US Deep State must be defeated, simply because those plans involve an enormously greater death toll of innocent people in Ukraine.

    Replies: @Pixo

  189. @Rob
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I saw a meme along the lines of “T-rex is closer to the iPhone than t-rex is to the stegosaurus.” I may have flipped tyrannosaurus and stegosaurus in the timeline.

    There was a longer time from the first to the last dinosaurs than the last dinosaurs to now.

    Replies: @Rob

    Yo, you trolled that? Are you a young-earth creationist or something?

    The dinosaur meme I really liked is along the lines of, “Stop saying dinosaurs ruled the earth. They existed. Stop giving them credit for administrative skills they probably didn’t have.”

    • LOL: bomag
  190. @Old Prude
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The crawl on the morning news says Biden is considering sending sophisticated long-range weapons to Ukraine.

    No word on trying negotiations. Unreal.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “No word on trying negotiations. Unreal.”

    Au contraire – extremely real. This is what they wanted, worked for and sought to provoke. The point now is to prolong the war and weaken Russia, as US politicians have explicitly said.

    Now why they want to declare economic, quasi-military and political war on Russia is an interesting question. Surely a prosperous Europe economically integrated with Russia would be the greatest dividend of the fall of Communism?

    But apparently not so, to our ruling elites. They are driving Russia headlong towards China. Nation #1 (but falling) is driving nation #3 into the arms of nation #2 (and rising). Seems daft to me. Their use of the banking system as a weapon against Russia stands a non-negligible chance of backfiring big time.

    Maybe our elites know something we don’t. Or is it hubris? “Who the gods want to destroy, they first make mad.”

    I’m just a trifle worried that the thing they know is “Cossacks looted great-great-grandpa’s shop in 1882!“.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  191. @AnotherDad
    @PhysicistDave

    Steve, looks like time for another Ukraine thread. Phys Dave is getting all breathless about his new most-important-thing-in-the-world--infatuation, Ukrainian conquest. We'll get no respite if he can't get some .... ah ... release.

    (PD--does your wife know about you and Vlad?)

    Replies: @Pixo, @Chrisnonymous

  192. @Steve Sailer
    @Pixo

    But the Russians, having cut down to realistic goals of taking some territory in the east, are doing better lately. As I pointed out in Taki's in March, the Soviets were ignominiously beaten badly in late 1939 invading Finland, but reorganized in 1940 under Zhukov and ground out an expensive conquest of a modest amount of terrain.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @Pixo, @Bill Jones

    Thanks for the laugh. Russia’s stated territorial goals were limited to freeing the two republics to preempt the announced genocide, and whatever was necessary to destroy your Nazi Banderite friends.

    Were I Putin I’d be thinking of rolling West along the coast, taking Odessa and leaving whatever bit of Ukraine is left after the Poles have finished with it as a landlocked rump.

    You’ve never mentioned just where your source of Putin’s Secret Real Goals got his info, despite being asked some thirty times by a number of people.
    Pray, Do Tell.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  193. @Jack D
    @Old Prude

    Everyone knows that there will be a negotiated ending because neither side is strong enough to defeat the other side. The question is what will the deal be?

    The best deal that Russia would be willing give right now is not good enough for Ukraine. So there isn't going to be a deal in the short run. All the "killing has to stop" folks have in mind a cease fire where Russia then gets to keep all the territory that it has conquered. This is not acceptable to the Ukrainians nor is it a good idea to offer up your country to your neighbors on the "all you can eat" plan. It pretty much ensures that your customer will come back for seconds.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @PhysicistDave

    No. Everyone does not know there will be a negotiated deal… No one knows jack sh*t. Waiting for the first tactical nuke to go off… Sheer folly. Fools…

  194. @AnotherDad
    @PhysicistDave

    Steve, looks like time for another Ukraine thread. Phys Dave is getting all breathless about his new most-important-thing-in-the-world--infatuation, Ukrainian conquest. We'll get no respite if he can't get some .... ah ... release.

    (PD--does your wife know about you and Vlad?)

    Replies: @Pixo, @Chrisnonymous

    NATO, Russia, Ukraine, international monetary system, etc… all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA as the foreign policy drives lobbying, money, partisanship, etc. You can make fun of Dave, but your constant refrain that we should just focus on the home front is naive and counterproductive.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Chrisnonymous


    "NATO, Russia, Ukraine, international monetary system, etc… all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA as the foreign policy drives lobbying, money, partisanship, etc. "
     
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FT5DcyWXwAEOm9q.jpg
    , @Pixo
    @Chrisnonymous

    “ all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA”

    Yeah everything in politics is connected to everything. Woowooowoo.

    Ukraine is fairly unimportant in politics because there’s a near-unanimous popular and elite consensus that we should provide them with ample humanitarian and military aid but go no further.

    You Putinists have been whining and warning for months “OMG the neocons are gonna send in ground troops and start a nuclear war!!!!”

    If you really look hard you can find people with direct ties to Ukraine itself advocating for direct intervention. You know who isn’t? The President, his staff, his proxies, Fox News, the leadership of either party.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  195. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No, if you do that, you can't hang on that easy to get like that, and you're gonna scrape your fingers, chin, or something on the way down. Have you never done this?

    (I'm picturing a wooden fence, as for a chain link fence I'd climb at least most of the way down.) As I wrote, you need to be bent over with your feet against it, and I'd say the 6ft guy may take up 4 ft from the top. Ask him.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @kaganovitch

    No, if you do that, you can’t hang on that easy to get like that, and you’re gonna scrape your fingers, chin, or something on the way down. Have you never done this?

    I’ve done it lots of times. All you need to do to avoid scraping is to push off slightly from the fence with your feet when you let go.

  196. @Zoos
    @Jack D


    A month ago, I locked myself out of my backyard, so I had to scale a nine foot fence. Had to drop five feet on my way down. Not a problem. I’d love to watch a randomly picked bunch of 62 year olds try to do it.
     

    I’m not sure that I could scale a nine foot fence, but then again I’m not so senile that I lock myself out of my house, so I’ll call it a wash.
     
    But you are so senile that you provide a direct citation, then transcribe the word, "backyard" into "house" somewhere in your head, and carry on as if you’re thought process is just fine.

    I’m merely providing a "heads-up" for you, while reminding you that senility is a process. You aren’t fine one day, and senile the next.

    It begins by being contradictory for the sake of being contradictory. Poor reasoning, with a light patina of ill will. Later, the mini-tirades in private that frighten your wife begin. Then they'll become more public. Then the transcribing of the meaning of words. Then forgetting your grandsons name, etc.

    All this while believing you’re okay, and it’s the world that’s gone askew. Everyone's stupid. It’s 7 pm, where’s your breakfast? A backyard is the same thing as a house. It’s all on the same property. What is wrong with these people?

    Good luck with that.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    A backyard is the same thing as a house. It’s all on the same property. What is wrong with these people?

    Don’t all ,or almost all, backyards have access from the house? If so, Jack doubtless assumed that most 60 year old men would walk around the corner and access the backyard through the house rather than climb the fence. Hence his conclusion that he was locked out of house and was using the backyard to access the house rather than the reverse.

    • Thanks: Jack D
  197. @SFG
    @PhysicistDave

    I’m kind of in the middle-I think Putin is the aggressor but am loath to start WW3.

    I also am reluctant to start dictating military strategy to the Ukrainians-I’m going to have opinions about what a country on the other side of the world should be doing in a war? I am hearing that the USA is pushing Ukrainians to prolong the war to weaken Russia, and that I am very much against. But absent that…it’s up to Kiev. I’m not there, it’s not my war, it’s up to the Ukrainian people to decide how long and how far they want to fight. They are the ones dying over there, not me.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    SFG wrote to me:

    I also am reluctant to start dictating military strategy to the Ukrainians-I’m going to have opinions about what a country on the other side of the world should be doing in a war?

    Well, that is really the point.

    Sensible Americans do not think themselves responsible for madmen in power half-way around the world.

    Unfortunately, in the case of Ukraine, the US Deep State has been intensely, and quite publicly, involved in this mess for most of the last decade.

    US Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland engineered the 2014 coup that overthrew the legally elected president of Ukraine. When the Donbass refused to submit to the new puppet government, the US supported Kiev in its (now longer than eight year) war against the Donbass with weapons and training.

    Just a few days before Putin invaded, our moronic VP Kamala was still encouraging Ukraine to join NATO, one of the main issues that provoked the Russian invasion.

    And of course Congress has appropriated tens of billions during the last couple months to prop up the puppet regime in Kiev.

    So, alas, we Americans are not in a position to say, “Let the Ukrainians resolve their problems as they wish.” The US Deep State, from 2014 and continuing to this day, has made sure we are deeply involved in this conflict.

    And since our government produced this tragedy, we Americans have a moral obligation to push for an end of the conflict so that the killing will stop.

    Bizarrely, when I and others here have pointed out these well-documented and publicly known facts, some of our friends — HA, Jack D, Pixo, utu, AP, et al. — accuse us of being tools of Putin, fanboys of Putin, etc.

    The Big Lie.

    SFG also wrote:

    I am hearing that the USA is pushing Ukrainians to prolong the war to weaken Russia, and that I am very much against.

    Yes, that is the central issue.

    None of us Americans, after all, is urging that the US intervene on Putin’s side, which would be the case if we were actually tools of Putin!

    We just want the US Deep State to stop propping up the puppet regime in Kiev and stop urging the Kiev puppet regime to continue fighting a conflict that is killing so many innocent people, in pursuit of the geopolitical goals of the US Deep State.

    SFG also wrote:

    But absent that…it’s up to Kiev. I’m not there, it’s not my war, it’s up to the Ukrainian people to decide how long and how far they want to fight. They are the ones dying over there, not me.

    I’m not sure the Ukrainian people any longer have any say. Zelensky has shut down opposition parties, former president Poroshenko has been prevented from leaving the country; the news media have been nationalized.

    Zelensky won the presidency on a promise of respecting the Minsk agreements regarding autonomy in the Donbass and of reaching a rapprochement with Moscow.

    He lied.

    I don’t know if it is the corrupt Ukrainian oligarchs (such as Zelensky’s controller Kolomoisky) or the US Deep State or the Azov Battalion that is now calling the shots in Ukraine.

    But it is not the Ukrainian people.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones, Old Prude
  198. @Chrisnonymous
    @AnotherDad

    NATO, Russia, Ukraine, international monetary system, etc... all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA as the foreign policy drives lobbying, money, partisanship, etc. You can make fun of Dave, but your constant refrain that we should just focus on the home front is naive and counterproductive.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Pixo

    “NATO, Russia, Ukraine, international monetary system, etc… all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA as the foreign policy drives lobbying, money, partisanship, etc. ”

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  199. @Jack D
    @Old Prude

    Everyone knows that there will be a negotiated ending because neither side is strong enough to defeat the other side. The question is what will the deal be?

    The best deal that Russia would be willing give right now is not good enough for Ukraine. So there isn't going to be a deal in the short run. All the "killing has to stop" folks have in mind a cease fire where Russia then gets to keep all the territory that it has conquered. This is not acceptable to the Ukrainians nor is it a good idea to offer up your country to your neighbors on the "all you can eat" plan. It pretty much ensures that your customer will come back for seconds.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @PhysicistDave

    Jack D wrote:

    The best deal that Russia would be willing give right now is not good enough for Ukraine. So there isn’t going to be a deal in the short run. All the “killing has to stop” folks have in mind a cease fire where Russia then gets to keep all the territory that it has conquered. This is not acceptable to the Ukrainians nor is it a good idea to offer up your country to your neighbors on the “all you can eat” plan.

    Russian-language reports indicate that Russian forces have just taken Severodonetsk.

    The longer this goes on, the worse it goes for Kiev.

    We are reaching a tipping point at which Putin will have the power to insist not only on the Donbass but also the entire Black Sea coast, including Odessa.

    I don’t really care who rules Odessa one way or another, but I do care about the killing.

    Those of us who, unlike you, oppose the US Deep State are not advocating that our views be imposed on Kiev. We are simply urging that the US taxpayers no longer be forced to support the insane goals of the US Deep State, via the subsidies to the Kiev regime, the sanctions, and all the rest.

    If we were really on Putin’s side, we would want the US to support Putin, which no one here has advocated.

    But the publicly stated goals of the US Deep State — e.g., SecDef Austin’s statement about weakening Russia — make very clear that the goal here is not to help Ukraine or aid the Ukrainian people.

    Again, the longer this goes on, the more likely Ukraine will lose the whole Black Sea coast.

    And the more Ukrainians will die.

    The killing must stop.

    The publicly stated murderous plans of the US Deep State must be defeated, simply because those plans involve an enormously greater death toll of innocent people in Ukraine.

    • Thanks: usNthem
    • Replies: @Pixo
    @PhysicistDave

    You’ve been barfing up those same hilariously wrong Putinist takes since February.

    Most people would feel shame, but PhysicsDave is incapable of such feeling.

    Here’s Dave in February, barfing his trademark “Imminent Russian Victory!” spam mixed with his obsessive braying for Zelensky’s death:

    “The Russians are in the process of taking Kharkov.”

    “Russian marines have now landed in Odessa.”

    “Russia seems to have stopped the bombardment around Kiev, now that they have taken out local military assets and command and control capabilities, and are saying that they have no desire to attack civilian populations.
    I assume they will soon be seizing radio and television broadcast facilities.

    Now, anyone want to bet on how soon Zelensky — the Stephen Colbert of the Ukraine — flees the country?”

    “That alone makes the Kiev regime war criminals who can justly be put to death.”

    “In current news, has anyone noticed that the forty-mile long Russian convoy that Western media keep talking about that is just north of Kiev and that never seems to get much closer is just a bunch of sitting ducks for Ukrainian attackers?

    That is, if there actually is any significant Ukrainian military presence left in the area of Kiev?”

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave

  200. Pixo says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    @AnotherDad

    NATO, Russia, Ukraine, international monetary system, etc... all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA as the foreign policy drives lobbying, money, partisanship, etc. You can make fun of Dave, but your constant refrain that we should just focus on the home front is naive and counterproductive.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Pixo

    “ all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA”

    Yeah everything in politics is connected to everything. Woowooowoo.

    Ukraine is fairly unimportant in politics because there’s a near-unanimous popular and elite consensus that we should provide them with ample humanitarian and military aid but go no further.

    You Putinists have been whining and warning for months “OMG the neocons are gonna send in ground troops and start a nuclear war!!!!”

    If you really look hard you can find people with direct ties to Ukraine itself advocating for direct intervention. You know who isn’t? The President, his staff, his proxies, Fox News, the leadership of either party.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Pixo

    My little buddy Pixo wrote:


    Ukraine is fairly unimportant in politics because there’s a near-unanimous popular and elite consensus that we should provide them with ample humanitarian and military aid but go no further.
     
    The US Deep State has been intervening in Ukraine at least since 2014 when Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland engineered the overthrow of the legally elected president who was friendly towards Russia.

    SecDef Austin recently admitted the purpose: to weaken Russia.

    More broadly, in the long-term Russia was likely to become the dominant power in Europe, given its population, its natural resources, its military strength, etc.

    But the US Deep State, by encouraging the Kiev puppet regime in its brutal war against the Donbas, forced Russia to intervene, and thereby alienated Russia from Europe and strengthened the ties of the US satellites to NATO.

    Win-win for the US Deep State, if, of course, Ukrainian lives count for nothing.

    Of course, the other result is to cement a long-term alliance between Moscow and Beijing.

    But the US Deep State seems not to care, as long as they can maintain their control over their European satellites.

    I'm not sure this is what most Americans really desire.

    Be careful what you wish for, little buddy!
  201. Pixo says:
    @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:


    The best deal that Russia would be willing give right now is not good enough for Ukraine. So there isn’t going to be a deal in the short run. All the “killing has to stop” folks have in mind a cease fire where Russia then gets to keep all the territory that it has conquered. This is not acceptable to the Ukrainians nor is it a good idea to offer up your country to your neighbors on the “all you can eat” plan.
     
    Russian-language reports indicate that Russian forces have just taken Severodonetsk.

    The longer this goes on, the worse it goes for Kiev.

    We are reaching a tipping point at which Putin will have the power to insist not only on the Donbass but also the entire Black Sea coast, including Odessa.

    I don't really care who rules Odessa one way or another, but I do care about the killing.

    Those of us who, unlike you, oppose the US Deep State are not advocating that our views be imposed on Kiev. We are simply urging that the US taxpayers no longer be forced to support the insane goals of the US Deep State, via the subsidies to the Kiev regime, the sanctions, and all the rest.

    If we were really on Putin's side, we would want the US to support Putin, which no one here has advocated.

    But the publicly stated goals of the US Deep State -- e.g., SecDef Austin's statement about weakening Russia -- make very clear that the goal here is not to help Ukraine or aid the Ukrainian people.

    Again, the longer this goes on, the more likely Ukraine will lose the whole Black Sea coast.

    And the more Ukrainians will die.

    The killing must stop.


    The publicly stated murderous plans of the US Deep State must be defeated, simply because those plans involve an enormously greater death toll of innocent people in Ukraine.

    Replies: @Pixo

    You’ve been barfing up those same hilariously wrong Putinist takes since February.

    Most people would feel shame, but PhysicsDave is incapable of such feeling.

    Here’s Dave in February, barfing his trademark “Imminent Russian Victory!” spam mixed with his obsessive braying for Zelensky’s death:

    “The Russians are in the process of taking Kharkov.”

    “Russian marines have now landed in Odessa.”

    “Russia seems to have stopped the bombardment around Kiev, now that they have taken out local military assets and command and control capabilities, and are saying that they have no desire to attack civilian populations.
    I assume they will soon be seizing radio and television broadcast facilities.

    Now, anyone want to bet on how soon Zelensky — the Stephen Colbert of the Ukraine — flees the country?”

    “That alone makes the Kiev regime war criminals who can justly be put to death.”

    “In current news, has anyone noticed that the forty-mile long Russian convoy that Western media keep talking about that is just north of Kiev and that never seems to get much closer is just a bunch of sitting ducks for Ukrainian attackers?

    That is, if there actually is any significant Ukrainian military presence left in the area of Kiev?”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pixo

    In PD's defense, this time he said "Russian language reports indicate", which seems to indicate some awareness that Russian language reports may not exactly be pravda (in Russian, ''pravda'' means truth and ''izvestia'' means news and Pravda and Izvestia were the two main Soviet newspapers, and the old joke in Russia was that there's no truth in Pravda and no news in Izvestia - I guess the good old days are back in Russia.) I'm guessing (0r at least hoping) that he's learned not to depend completely on Russian language reports (at least those that are based inside Russia - there are some excellent Russian language sources that have now moved outside of the country for obvious reasons).


    Despite the "Russian language reports" it does not appear that Severodonetsk has fallen quite yet, but it may still fall. The Russian have concentrated much of their remaining forces on this one point. As I said earlier, the "cauldron" is now more like a small saucepan and even the incompetent Russian Army may be able to get this little saucepan to boil by concentrating their fire power on it. But many defense experts think that this is the "culmination" of the Russian campaign, which has a technical meaning. Win or lose, it's all downhill for them from here. I'd like to think that is true but I'm not a defense expert. However, this is what some experts think:

    https://www.understandingwar.org/backgrounder/russian-offensive-campaign-assessment-may-28

    The Putinists seem to alternate back and forth between a humble "please, everyone, let's give peace a chance" (aimed at the Western pacifist or neutrality aligned reader like the Soviet promoted "nuclear freeze" movement in the late Soviet period) and "Russia should crush the vile scum Azov Nazis who are running Kiev and their gay Jewish leader Zelensky like bugs". This all seems rather schizophrenic.

    Replies: @Pixo, @PhysicistDave

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Pixo

    My little buddy Pixo wrote to me:


    [quoting a comment from me from a while back] “In current news, has anyone noticed that the forty-mile long Russian convoy that Western media keep talking about that is just north of Kiev and that never seems to get much closer is just a bunch of sitting ducks for Ukrainian attackers?

    That is, if there actually is any significant Ukrainian military presence left in the area of Kiev?”
     
    Hey, little buddy, hope you are well.

    Yeah, I was right on, wasn't I?

    If there had been a functioning Ukrainian military in the Kiev area, they would have annihilated that convoy column north of Kiev.

    They didn't. No one claims they did.

    The Russian convoy just sat there, day after day after day, until, in their own sweet time, the Russians decided to move.

    One of the strangest things I have ever heard of in a war!

    That the puppet regime could not annihilate that sitting-duck column pretty much tells you that Kiev had already, for all practical purposes, lost the war.

    So why on earth did Russia leave that convoy sitting there?

    The experts seem to think the Russians hoped to tie up some Kievan forces while the Russians concentrated on liberating the Azov coast, particularly Mariupol.

    I guess it worked.

    As to your other quotes from me, did you see where I have humbly confessed that I woefully under-estimated Putin's sense of decency, restraint, and humanity in not launching direct attacks against Kharkov and Kiev? The Russians could have done to Kiev and Kharkov what they did in fact do to Mariupol -- I suppose they felt they had to root out the Nazis who were based in Mariupol.

    But happily, Putin did refrain from wreaking the murderous devastation on Kharkov and Kiev that he could have wreaked. Do you think Putin was wrong to show that restraint?

    In any case, the endgame is now playing out in the Donbass. The Donbass will be liberated and Ukraine will not join NATO: as I and other have documented here, the mainstream media in the West -- from the NYT and the WaPo to NBC and CNN -- are now accepting that reality. As has the grand old man of the foreign-policy Establishment, Dr. Kissinger.

    I only wish the puppet regime in Kiev had accepted those results before so many thousands had died.

    Some pundits are speculating that Putin will soon be in a position to demand all of eastern Ukraine up to the left bank of the Dnieper. Personally, I think that would be unwise -- Russia should not bite off more than it can chew.

    It does seem likely, however, that Moscow will now demand the entire Black Sea coast. Of course, I would rather see an immediate end to the killing, but I can understand that Putin may feel that Russia has paid such a high price to defeat the puppet regime in Kiev and their puppet masters, the US Deep State, that politically he has to take Odessa.

    Anyway, no matter what all of you Penis Piano Player Puppet worshipers say, reality will triumph.

    All of us who said that Russia has the strength to liberate the Donbass will be proven right.

    Unfortunately, a lot of people will have died in the process because of all of you who refused to face up to that reality.

    Take care, little buddy!
  202. @Pixo
    @PhysicistDave

    You’ve been barfing up those same hilariously wrong Putinist takes since February.

    Most people would feel shame, but PhysicsDave is incapable of such feeling.

    Here’s Dave in February, barfing his trademark “Imminent Russian Victory!” spam mixed with his obsessive braying for Zelensky’s death:

    “The Russians are in the process of taking Kharkov.”

    “Russian marines have now landed in Odessa.”

    “Russia seems to have stopped the bombardment around Kiev, now that they have taken out local military assets and command and control capabilities, and are saying that they have no desire to attack civilian populations.
    I assume they will soon be seizing radio and television broadcast facilities.

    Now, anyone want to bet on how soon Zelensky — the Stephen Colbert of the Ukraine — flees the country?”

    “That alone makes the Kiev regime war criminals who can justly be put to death.”

    “In current news, has anyone noticed that the forty-mile long Russian convoy that Western media keep talking about that is just north of Kiev and that never seems to get much closer is just a bunch of sitting ducks for Ukrainian attackers?

    That is, if there actually is any significant Ukrainian military presence left in the area of Kiev?”

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave

    In PD’s defense, this time he said “Russian language reports indicate”, which seems to indicate some awareness that Russian language reports may not exactly be pravda (in Russian, ”pravda” means truth and ”izvestia” means news and Pravda and Izvestia were the two main Soviet newspapers, and the old joke in Russia was that there’s no truth in Pravda and no news in Izvestia – I guess the good old days are back in Russia.) I’m guessing (0r at least hoping) that he’s learned not to depend completely on Russian language reports (at least those that are based inside Russia – there are some excellent Russian language sources that have now moved outside of the country for obvious reasons).

    Despite the “Russian language reports” it does not appear that Severodonetsk has fallen quite yet, but it may still fall. The Russian have concentrated much of their remaining forces on this one point. As I said earlier, the “cauldron” is now more like a small saucepan and even the incompetent Russian Army may be able to get this little saucepan to boil by concentrating their fire power on it. But many defense experts think that this is the “culmination” of the Russian campaign, which has a technical meaning. Win or lose, it’s all downhill for them from here. I’d like to think that is true but I’m not a defense expert. However, this is what some experts think:

    https://www.understandingwar.org/backgrounder/russian-offensive-campaign-assessment-may-28

    The Putinists seem to alternate back and forth between a humble “please, everyone, let’s give peace a chance” (aimed at the Western pacifist or neutrality aligned reader like the Soviet promoted “nuclear freeze” movement in the late Soviet period) and “Russia should crush the vile scum Azov Nazis who are running Kiev and their gay Jewish leader Zelensky like bugs”. This all seems rather schizophrenic.

    • Replies: @Pixo
    @Jack D

    Russian-funded Western propagandists do a fairly good job when they are focused on criticizing the West. We do a lot of things wrong.

    But once the Ukraine invasion started, the orders came do defend it, and they lost their credibility.

    Actually they started losing it right before the war. The US government kept saying an invasion was imminent, and the Putinists on the left and right started making fun of them saying the Russians aren’t going to invade and it was just neocon scaremongering.

    You could always tell a Western leftwing journalist was on the Russian payroll when they had an odd obsession with hating on Ukraine and defending Assad and Chavez/Maduro. Non-compromised anti-American leftists had no interest in Ukraine before 2022 and tended to be embarrassed by how the Venezuelan communists destroyed the nation, and care 100x more about Israel/Palestine than Syria.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Just so everyone knows, the Institute for the Study of War, to which Jack D linked, is run by Kim Kagan, Victorian Nuland's sister-in-law.

    It's the go-to site for those who find most neocons to be too peace-loving!

    A bit like getting one's information from Dr. Goebbels because Himmler is not sufficiently pro-Hitler.

    But even ISW concedes:


    Ukrainian forces continue to maintain defenses across eastern Ukraine and have slowed most Russian lines of advance. Russian forces will likely continue to make incremental advances...
     
    Kievan forces have "slowed" (not "stopped") "most" (not "all") Russian advances, though the Russians do continue to "make... advances."

    This is the propagandistic way of saying, "The Kiev puppet regime is really totally screwed, but the two-minute warning hasn't been called quite yet."
  203. Pixo says:
    @Jack D
    @Pixo

    In PD's defense, this time he said "Russian language reports indicate", which seems to indicate some awareness that Russian language reports may not exactly be pravda (in Russian, ''pravda'' means truth and ''izvestia'' means news and Pravda and Izvestia were the two main Soviet newspapers, and the old joke in Russia was that there's no truth in Pravda and no news in Izvestia - I guess the good old days are back in Russia.) I'm guessing (0r at least hoping) that he's learned not to depend completely on Russian language reports (at least those that are based inside Russia - there are some excellent Russian language sources that have now moved outside of the country for obvious reasons).


    Despite the "Russian language reports" it does not appear that Severodonetsk has fallen quite yet, but it may still fall. The Russian have concentrated much of their remaining forces on this one point. As I said earlier, the "cauldron" is now more like a small saucepan and even the incompetent Russian Army may be able to get this little saucepan to boil by concentrating their fire power on it. But many defense experts think that this is the "culmination" of the Russian campaign, which has a technical meaning. Win or lose, it's all downhill for them from here. I'd like to think that is true but I'm not a defense expert. However, this is what some experts think:

    https://www.understandingwar.org/backgrounder/russian-offensive-campaign-assessment-may-28

    The Putinists seem to alternate back and forth between a humble "please, everyone, let's give peace a chance" (aimed at the Western pacifist or neutrality aligned reader like the Soviet promoted "nuclear freeze" movement in the late Soviet period) and "Russia should crush the vile scum Azov Nazis who are running Kiev and their gay Jewish leader Zelensky like bugs". This all seems rather schizophrenic.

    Replies: @Pixo, @PhysicistDave

    Russian-funded Western propagandists do a fairly good job when they are focused on criticizing the West. We do a lot of things wrong.

    But once the Ukraine invasion started, the orders came do defend it, and they lost their credibility.

    Actually they started losing it right before the war. The US government kept saying an invasion was imminent, and the Putinists on the left and right started making fun of them saying the Russians aren’t going to invade and it was just neocon scaremongering.

    You could always tell a Western leftwing journalist was on the Russian payroll when they had an odd obsession with hating on Ukraine and defending Assad and Chavez/Maduro. Non-compromised anti-American leftists had no interest in Ukraine before 2022 and tended to be embarrassed by how the Venezuelan communists destroyed the nation, and care 100x more about Israel/Palestine than Syria.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Pixo

    Russia was never any good at propaganda, it fact they tended to be clumsy. The communists were okay at it but not because of ethnic Russians. Communists had the support of other ethnicities around the world who were media savvy.

  204. @Pixo
    @Steve Sailer

    “Russians … are doing better lately”

    Severodonetsk’s population is down to about 12k, down from 100k, and 90% of the buildings are damaged.

    That’s not worth fighting for. Every day Russia remains in Ukraine, it loses. Same for our similarly stupid and evil invasion of Iraq.

    Which subtype of eastern slav rules depopulating Donbass rustbelts isn’t worth killing for.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Same for our similarly stupid and evil invasion of Iraq.

    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?

    • Disagree: PhysicistDave
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Mark G.
    @Art Deco


    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?
     
    A hundred thousand Iraqi civilians- half of them women and children- were killed by our invasion.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/oct/29/iraq.sarahboseley

    The Iraq war cost the U.S. two trillion dollars.

    https://www.militarytimes.com/opinion/commentary/2020/02/06/the-iraq-war-has-cost-the-us-nearly-2-trillion/
    , @PhysicistDave
    @Art Deco

    Art Deco asked Pixo:


    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?
     
    You mean, aside from fewer people dead?
  205. @Pixo
    @Jack D

    Russian-funded Western propagandists do a fairly good job when they are focused on criticizing the West. We do a lot of things wrong.

    But once the Ukraine invasion started, the orders came do defend it, and they lost their credibility.

    Actually they started losing it right before the war. The US government kept saying an invasion was imminent, and the Putinists on the left and right started making fun of them saying the Russians aren’t going to invade and it was just neocon scaremongering.

    You could always tell a Western leftwing journalist was on the Russian payroll when they had an odd obsession with hating on Ukraine and defending Assad and Chavez/Maduro. Non-compromised anti-American leftists had no interest in Ukraine before 2022 and tended to be embarrassed by how the Venezuelan communists destroyed the nation, and care 100x more about Israel/Palestine than Syria.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Russia was never any good at propaganda, it fact they tended to be clumsy. The communists were okay at it but not because of ethnic Russians. Communists had the support of other ethnicities around the world who were media savvy.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  206. @Pixo
    @PhysicistDave

    You’ve been barfing up those same hilariously wrong Putinist takes since February.

    Most people would feel shame, but PhysicsDave is incapable of such feeling.

    Here’s Dave in February, barfing his trademark “Imminent Russian Victory!” spam mixed with his obsessive braying for Zelensky’s death:

    “The Russians are in the process of taking Kharkov.”

    “Russian marines have now landed in Odessa.”

    “Russia seems to have stopped the bombardment around Kiev, now that they have taken out local military assets and command and control capabilities, and are saying that they have no desire to attack civilian populations.
    I assume they will soon be seizing radio and television broadcast facilities.

    Now, anyone want to bet on how soon Zelensky — the Stephen Colbert of the Ukraine — flees the country?”

    “That alone makes the Kiev regime war criminals who can justly be put to death.”

    “In current news, has anyone noticed that the forty-mile long Russian convoy that Western media keep talking about that is just north of Kiev and that never seems to get much closer is just a bunch of sitting ducks for Ukrainian attackers?

    That is, if there actually is any significant Ukrainian military presence left in the area of Kiev?”

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave

    My little buddy Pixo wrote to me:

    [quoting a comment from me from a while back] “In current news, has anyone noticed that the forty-mile long Russian convoy that Western media keep talking about that is just north of Kiev and that never seems to get much closer is just a bunch of sitting ducks for Ukrainian attackers?

    That is, if there actually is any significant Ukrainian military presence left in the area of Kiev?”

    Hey, little buddy, hope you are well.

    Yeah, I was right on, wasn’t I?

    If there had been a functioning Ukrainian military in the Kiev area, they would have annihilated that convoy column north of Kiev.

    They didn’t. No one claims they did.

    The Russian convoy just sat there, day after day after day, until, in their own sweet time, the Russians decided to move.

    One of the strangest things I have ever heard of in a war!

    That the puppet regime could not annihilate that sitting-duck column pretty much tells you that Kiev had already, for all practical purposes, lost the war.

    So why on earth did Russia leave that convoy sitting there?

    The experts seem to think the Russians hoped to tie up some Kievan forces while the Russians concentrated on liberating the Azov coast, particularly Mariupol.

    I guess it worked.

    As to your other quotes from me, did you see where I have humbly confessed that I woefully under-estimated Putin’s sense of decency, restraint, and humanity in not launching direct attacks against Kharkov and Kiev? The Russians could have done to Kiev and Kharkov what they did in fact do to Mariupol — I suppose they felt they had to root out the Nazis who were based in Mariupol.

    But happily, Putin did refrain from wreaking the murderous devastation on Kharkov and Kiev that he could have wreaked. Do you think Putin was wrong to show that restraint?

    In any case, the endgame is now playing out in the Donbass. The Donbass will be liberated and Ukraine will not join NATO: as I and other have documented here, the mainstream media in the West — from the NYT and the WaPo to NBC and CNN — are now accepting that reality. As has the grand old man of the foreign-policy Establishment, Dr. Kissinger.

    I only wish the puppet regime in Kiev had accepted those results before so many thousands had died.

    Some pundits are speculating that Putin will soon be in a position to demand all of eastern Ukraine up to the left bank of the Dnieper. Personally, I think that would be unwise — Russia should not bite off more than it can chew.

    It does seem likely, however, that Moscow will now demand the entire Black Sea coast. Of course, I would rather see an immediate end to the killing, but I can understand that Putin may feel that Russia has paid such a high price to defeat the puppet regime in Kiev and their puppet masters, the US Deep State, that politically he has to take Odessa.

    Anyway, no matter what all of you Penis Piano Player Puppet worshipers say, reality will triumph.

    All of us who said that Russia has the strength to liberate the Donbass will be proven right.

    Unfortunately, a lot of people will have died in the process because of all of you who refused to face up to that reality.

    Take care, little buddy!

    • Thanks: James Speaks
  207. @Jack D
    @Pixo

    In PD's defense, this time he said "Russian language reports indicate", which seems to indicate some awareness that Russian language reports may not exactly be pravda (in Russian, ''pravda'' means truth and ''izvestia'' means news and Pravda and Izvestia were the two main Soviet newspapers, and the old joke in Russia was that there's no truth in Pravda and no news in Izvestia - I guess the good old days are back in Russia.) I'm guessing (0r at least hoping) that he's learned not to depend completely on Russian language reports (at least those that are based inside Russia - there are some excellent Russian language sources that have now moved outside of the country for obvious reasons).


    Despite the "Russian language reports" it does not appear that Severodonetsk has fallen quite yet, but it may still fall. The Russian have concentrated much of their remaining forces on this one point. As I said earlier, the "cauldron" is now more like a small saucepan and even the incompetent Russian Army may be able to get this little saucepan to boil by concentrating their fire power on it. But many defense experts think that this is the "culmination" of the Russian campaign, which has a technical meaning. Win or lose, it's all downhill for them from here. I'd like to think that is true but I'm not a defense expert. However, this is what some experts think:

    https://www.understandingwar.org/backgrounder/russian-offensive-campaign-assessment-may-28

    The Putinists seem to alternate back and forth between a humble "please, everyone, let's give peace a chance" (aimed at the Western pacifist or neutrality aligned reader like the Soviet promoted "nuclear freeze" movement in the late Soviet period) and "Russia should crush the vile scum Azov Nazis who are running Kiev and their gay Jewish leader Zelensky like bugs". This all seems rather schizophrenic.

    Replies: @Pixo, @PhysicistDave

    Just so everyone knows, the Institute for the Study of War, to which Jack D linked, is run by Kim Kagan, Victorian Nuland’s sister-in-law.

    It’s the go-to site for those who find most neocons to be too peace-loving!

    A bit like getting one’s information from Dr. Goebbels because Himmler is not sufficiently pro-Hitler.

    But even ISW concedes:

    Ukrainian forces continue to maintain defenses across eastern Ukraine and have slowed most Russian lines of advance. Russian forces will likely continue to make incremental advances…

    Kievan forces have “slowed” (not “stopped”) “most” (not “all”) Russian advances, though the Russians do continue to “make… advances.”

    This is the propagandistic way of saying, “The Kiev puppet regime is really totally screwed, but the two-minute warning hasn’t been called quite yet.”

  208. @Pixo
    @Chrisnonymous

    “ all the things tied to this conflict are intimately connected to the domestic politics of the USA”

    Yeah everything in politics is connected to everything. Woowooowoo.

    Ukraine is fairly unimportant in politics because there’s a near-unanimous popular and elite consensus that we should provide them with ample humanitarian and military aid but go no further.

    You Putinists have been whining and warning for months “OMG the neocons are gonna send in ground troops and start a nuclear war!!!!”

    If you really look hard you can find people with direct ties to Ukraine itself advocating for direct intervention. You know who isn’t? The President, his staff, his proxies, Fox News, the leadership of either party.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    My little buddy Pixo wrote:

    Ukraine is fairly unimportant in politics because there’s a near-unanimous popular and elite consensus that we should provide them with ample humanitarian and military aid but go no further.

    The US Deep State has been intervening in Ukraine at least since 2014 when Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland engineered the overthrow of the legally elected president who was friendly towards Russia.

    SecDef Austin recently admitted the purpose: to weaken Russia.

    More broadly, in the long-term Russia was likely to become the dominant power in Europe, given its population, its natural resources, its military strength, etc.

    But the US Deep State, by encouraging the Kiev puppet regime in its brutal war against the Donbas, forced Russia to intervene, and thereby alienated Russia from Europe and strengthened the ties of the US satellites to NATO.

    Win-win for the US Deep State, if, of course, Ukrainian lives count for nothing.

    Of course, the other result is to cement a long-term alliance between Moscow and Beijing.

    But the US Deep State seems not to care, as long as they can maintain their control over their European satellites.

    I’m not sure this is what most Americans really desire.

    Be careful what you wish for, little buddy!

  209. @Batman
    @prosa123

    That's all of Cairo. The abuse is even worse for women. I have never talked to someone who visited Cairo and had a good time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Rohirrimborn, @Jim from Boston

    I have never talked to someone who visited Cairo and had a good time.

    We had fun in Cairo (and Alexandria and Luxor) over 40 yrs ago, on a detour from our European backpacking tour, which had taken on a ‘Disneyland vibe’. Despite the extreme poverty and crowding, Cairo seemed like a relatively peaceable place, but this being only a few months before Sadat was shot by Islamists, which changed a lot of cultural trajectories in that region.

    Of course we visited the awesome Pyramids and Sphinx, which was kinda off-by-itself back then, with a hotel across the road. You got hassled for camel rides (told them that I was allergic) and guided tours, which we did take into the Pyramid, just a bunch of dimly-lit tunnels deep in the structure. The scale of everything was indeed mind-blowing.

    Also very memorable was the King Tut display in the National Museum in Cairo, which had toured the US on a train a few years earlier, where every piece was meticulously displayed and described. In Cairo, the priceless artifacts were just piled up, willynilly, with machine-gun-toting guards standing around.

  210. @Rohirrimborn
    @Batman

    My female cousin rowed a boat solo down the Nile and lived to write a book about the adventure. https://www.amazon.com/Down-Nile-Alone-Fishermans-Skiff/dp/0316019011/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1C4J51DZSV8SB&keywords=rosemary+mahoney+down+the+nile&qid=1653763988&sprefix=rosemary+mahoney+down+the+nile%2Caps%2C315&sr=8-1

    Replies: @Batman

    I’ll never understand white women. Half the time they’re living in terror of men, and the other half of the time they’re doing life threatening things like taking in rescue pitbulls and traveling alone through Muslim countries. Looks like a cool trip though. I’m happy she survived.

  211. @Bardon Kaldlan
    @James Speaks

    Dylan was at his peak then. One of my favorite lines: "They say I shot a man named Gray,and took his wife to Italy..."
    And bordering on being handsome,too.
    But why are they all wearing Ay-rab hats?

    Replies: @James Speaks

    Once more, without the animus.

  212. @Art Deco
    @Pixo

    Same for our similarly stupid and evil invasion of Iraq.

    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?

    Replies: @Mark G., @PhysicistDave

    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?

    A hundred thousand Iraqi civilians- half of them women and children- were killed by our invasion.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/oct/29/iraq.sarahboseley

    The Iraq war cost the U.S. two trillion dollars.

    https://www.militarytimes.com/opinion/commentary/2020/02/06/the-iraq-war-has-cost-the-us-nearly-2-trillion/

  213. @Art Deco
    @Pixo

    Same for our similarly stupid and evil invasion of Iraq.

    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?

    Replies: @Mark G., @PhysicistDave

    Art Deco asked Pixo:

    What would be improved about Iraq had we not been there?

    You mean, aside from fewer people dead?

  214. @Sam Malone
    EVERYONE in America is noticeably fatter now than just 20 years ago, when we were already plenty dissolute and fucked up as a country. Have you seen how much wider and fuller Johnny Depp's face is? We've gotten really lazy, but tell me that what they're putting in the food is also partly to blame, right?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @The Plutonium Kid, @AnotherDad, @scrivener3, @Dave from Oz

    Novel glutens in the wheat, engineered into existence in the 60’s – no GMs required, just old-fashioned plant breeding.

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