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DNC Announces New Final Jeopardy Round Format for Next Democratic Debate
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The next Democratic presidential candidate debate will be November 20 at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta. To keep viewers from tuning out from boredom, the DNC has announced that the debate will conclude with a Final Jeopardy-style question in which the candidate who can name the most components of an acronym beginning LGBT will become the nominee.

 
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  1. SFG says:

    LGGBDTTTIQQAAPP
    Lesbian, Gay, Genderqueer, Bisexual, Demisexual, Transgender, Transsexual, Twospirit, Intersex, Queer, Questioning, Asexual, Allies, Pansexual and Polyamorous

    Cool, now I’m putting in Medicare for All, a carbon tax, and closing the borders. 😉

    (What, I gotta give ’em something…)

  2. Reality? The Onion? The Babylon Bee? A Steve Sailer flight of fancy? It’s getting hard to tell!

  3. Hey! Not only did they skip Double Jeopardy, but they also had no Daily Doubles!

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    , @reactionry
  4. @SFG

    The Frankfurt School is 90 years ahead of you.
    The ]prescriptionl for the Christian West is Polymorphous Perversion.

  5. dearieme says:

    GBLT is a mildly amusing abbreviation for a British bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich.

    GBLTPDQ means “a GBLT, please, Pretty Damn Quick”.

    GBLTSOSPDQ emphasises that the sandwich should contain Sod All Sausages.

    GBLTSOSPDQSPQR implies that the sandwich is intended for the delectation of visitors from Rome.

  6. What’s the spread for Turd Ferguson? Better than Sean Connery’s…?

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
  7. @SFG

    Flag on the play. Gotta start with “LGBT” and you forgot pedos, zoophiles, and necros. That dude who dunks his knob in cups of worms is Very Offended.

  8. … the debate will conclude with a Final Jeopardy-style question in which the candidate who can name the most components of an acronym beginning LGBT will become the nominee.

    So firstly, since this is Final Jeopardy, the question must be phrased as an answer, and the candidates must supply the answer as a question. This alone is tricky as there will be several candidates incapable of understanding the instructions.

    Secondly the contestants will have to write down their answers on a unreliable tablet screen using their finger and illegible answers will be ruled out. It might also be discriminatory, as elderly candidates with Parkinson disease will be at a disadvantage. Also most candidates will be unable to reduce their normal verbosity to a few words and will want a 200-word minimum.

    This is not a very good way to select the leader of our nation, but is possibly better than the existing method.

    Really the whole system needs to be reformed.

    Since it is all about looking good on TV, candidates should only be able to enter the primary process if they already have their own TV show with top ratings in their time slot, or are movie actors who have made at least 3 feature films as a lead. Actors from Saturday Night Live would not be qualified.

    Candidates would then be presented to a panel of billionaires who would decide which candidate they would like to finance for a run at the White House. No billionaire can sponsor more than one party.

    Elections would then be held on Black Friday and all voting would be online, with the vote tally for each state published as a running total. Candidates would be able to advertise on the voting page and spend their election budget offering voters BOGOs, discounts, and special offers in exchange for their votes.

  9. You can bet Tulsi Gabbard’s buzzer won’t work.

  10. Ano says:

    Tyler Perry Studios…

    I’d watch if all the candidates were to appear in drag and in blackface as Madea Simmons.

    Joe in blackface would (at last) get Obama’s endorsement.
    Pete would actually have shot a gun, instead of just posing in a photo with one.
    Bernie would come across as less scary and cray-cray.
    Kamala would discover she’s better off play-acting the role of black woman- instead of just pretending to be one.
    Cory would look macho.
    Liz would truly be a woman of color
    Andrew would be able to give away $1000 in free money every month to himself (and reparations too).

  11. I thought is your cash score was zero or less you couldn’t advance to the final round?

  12. bomag says:

    I’m waiting to see the categories for the earlier rounds:

    “Transferring money from Whites to Blacks.”

    “Funding illegal alien health care.”

    “More puberty blockers for male children.”

    “Expanding hate speech laws.”

    “Using real-time neural imaging to separate good-thinkers from bad-thinkers.”

    “Death penalty use to end disparate impact.”

    etc. etc.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
  13. Off topic…maybe not:

    Found on the Western Connecticut State Campus this morning the following poster:

    IT IS YOUR RACIAL OBLIGATION TO VOTE WHITE “AMERICANS” INTO A WHITE RACIAL

    MINORITY WITHIN THE BORDERS OF AMERICA….VOTE DEMOCRATIC ON NOV 7 2020…..

    What if this happened….how would President Clarke react?

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
  14. Buck says:

    Alex Trebek, “We’ve heard back from the judges and unfortunately Mr. Biden we will not accept Ladyboy, Buggerer, Transnational, fairy, or Q-tip. You will get credit for Gay and creating the new category of hairsmellsexual.”

  15. @SFG

    I was hoping that “final J” meant they would be arranged in a circular firing squad and would off each other with AK47s in a protest of both “global climate change” and “gun violence”. 😉

  16. OT:

    Asian immigration is transforming Australia and the country will soon become “more Asian than European”, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has predicted…

    Reminded of past comments where he described Australia as a European colony that was not part of Asia, and a deputy sheriff of the United States, Dr Mahathir said: “Whatever white Australians might think of it, the fact is geographically they are more in the Asian region than in Europe.

    “They can try and sustain their culture, their language, but the inflow of Asians into Australia will certainly change the character and distribution of population in Australia. And in the future, they are going to be more Asian than European.”

    http://www.smh.com.au/world/asia/malaysian-pm-says-australia-s-european-roots-will-give-way-to-asian-influence-20191102-p536uu.html

    For context, Australia’s immigration intake is nearly 300,000 per year. That’s in a country of 25 million. The bulk of new arrivals now come from Asia.

    • Agree: Charon
  17. Jack D says:

    OT-

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/04/health/china-nih-scientists.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage

    Scientists With Links to China May Be Stealing Biomedical Research, U.S. Says

    The article focuses on Biomedical research but dollars to donuts (I date myself – dollars and donuts are already selling at par) the Chinese are doing this wrt ALL scientific research.

    There are many aspects to the theft but one of the major ones relies on the scientific review process. The way this works is that when NIH is deciding whether to give out grants for cutting edge scientific work, they send the applicant’s proposal to other scientists for peer review. Peer review lies at the heart of the Western scientific system. It is the way that we sort the good from the bad. Implicit in peer review is that the person to whom you send your proposal is only looking at it to review it and not to steal your ideas. This is something than gentlemen just don’t do.

    If some of the other scientists happen to be Chinese, they might send your research proposal off to China and next thing you know, some biomed startup in China has beaten you to the results of (and a patent on) your own idea.

    The NIH response seems to be completely ineffectual:

    “The N.I.H. is clamping down, too. It recommends that reviewers of grant applications have limited ability to download or print them.” Yes that will work because Chinese spies would never take screen shots of the paper that they are reading on screen or photograph each page with their cell phone cameras in return for the large bribes they are being paid by the Chinese government. There’s no WAY the Chinese could get around this. NO WAY.

    Last line in the story:

    “We just are not used to systematic cheating.”

    High trust society, meet low trust society. And check that you still have your wallet when the meeting is over.

  18. anonymous[760] • Disclaimer says:

    OT Steve:

    You would probably find the latest issue of the Sierra Club’s magazine to be a gold mine.

    They start with an editorial instructing readers to stop caring about, but more importantly to stop talking about (“fixation” is the word they use), population growth in Africa:
    https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/2019-6-november-december/editor/time-fix-population-fixation

    The proximate cause is apparently that some deplorable-adjacent readers took issue with their previous positive portrayal of a Ugandan woman who has seven kids and counting.

    Then there is a “Dispatch from one millennial’s uterus” (actual article sub-title)
    https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/2019-6-november-december/feature/have-or-not-have-children-age-climate-change
    where, in contrast to our Ugandan model human with seven kids, this 34 year old SWF with a dog and student loans from a journalism degree is agonizing with a therapist over whether she should ever have any kids.

    And on it goes, from the hijabi Muslima glamour shot on the cover on down, it is clear that the John Muir days are over and the Club is now for people who have never set foot in a campground.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @El Dato
    , @Charon
    , @bomag
    , @Anon
    , @Anon
  19. tr says: • Website

    Can I buy a vowel?

  20. BenKenobi says:

    Biden will just write out the alphabet and then win, as it will be ruled it doesn’t matter what order the letters are in.

  21. @dearieme

    You seem to be running for the Emanuel Goldstein position.

  22. mmack says:

    I can see it now: Alex Trebek strides out on stage and announces “And tonight’s Final Jeopardy category is US Government. Here is your answer: ‘A body of electors established by the United States Constitution, constituted every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States.’ Thirty seconds on the clock ”

    (Jeopardy theme plays)

    “Alright we’ll start with South Bend, IN Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Mayor Pete you were in fourth place with 7% support. Did you get the correct answer? I see you entered The Supreme Court. I’m sorry, that’s not the correct answer. I see you wagered all of your support, that takes you to zero.”

    “Next we have Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont. Senator you were at 20% support. Did you get the correct answer? You entered The Popular Vote. No, I’m sorry that’s not the correct answer. I see you wagered all of your support and that takes you to zero.”

    “Now we move to Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Senator you were at 25% support. Did you enter the correct response? You entered Articles of Impeachment. I’m sorry, that’s not the correct answer. How much did you wager? All of your support, which takes you to zero.”

    “Finally we come to our defending champion former Senator and Vice President Joe Biden. Did he get the right answer? You entered Articles of Confederation. I’m sorry, the response we were looking for is the Electoral College. Electoral. College. And how much did you wager? 1% Support and that only takes you down to 28% and you are still the Democratic Jeopardy champion. See you tomorrow everyone.”

  23. @SFG

    Free stuff!!! Count me in!

  24. @Buzz Mohawk

    That’s assuming they will even let participate.

  25. The next Democratic presidential candidate debate will be November 20 at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta. To keep viewers from tuning out from boredom…

    … the debate will be officiated by Perry himself in costume as Madea, beloved matriarch of the fictional Simmons family first made famous in Perry’s 2005 film, Diary of a Mad Black Woman.

  26. @Jack D

    I talked to two different Chinese scientists who set up their own companies in the US. Both told me they would only hire Americans (strongly implying white Americans. One used the word “midwestern”). They both told me that if they hired fellow Chinese, they were scared their intellectual property would be stolen and taken back to China.

    So why are Chinese scientists so less trustful of their countrymen?

  27. Anonymous[145] • Disclaimer says:

    In case of a tie there will be a runoff. They will then be judged on the correctness of their pronunciation of “Latinx” as judged by Gabby Riveria.


    Gabby Rivera

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  28. It may take some of the Young Turds a while to catch on, as they may not know this show. Then again, the Old Pharts may be too slow on the switch and too senile to remember:

    “You must answer in the form of a question, dammit!”

    “OK, OK, what is soaking the working class … for 2 trillion dollars, Alex?”

  29. @dearieme

    Funny stuff! I’ve always thought of it as Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato, with a side of Guacamole. See K-12 LGBT.

  30. songbird says:

    If they had to buzz in, every time, I wonder if that would favor Asians, like the Yangster.

  31. @Buzz Mohawk

    Just like Steve’s.

    Norman Schwarzkopf had the same problem, but he put his foot down and insisted that they stop the tape and fix it.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  32. Neoconned says:

    I used to lurk on a message forum where this troll would call the acronym “LGBTABCDEFGHI……”

  33. Whatever happened to GLBT? Do American women wear the pants even in “the community”?

    GLBT = Graphic Lenny Bruce Term.

    LGBT = Let’s Get Beyond This.

    LGBTQ = Let’s Get Beyond This, Quickly!

  34. Alfa158 says:
    @The Alarmist

    The double jeopardy is that in case there is a tie, the tie-breaker will be “what is the correct pronunciation of Latinx?”

  35. See K-12 LGBT.

    How about K9 LGBT? (A.k.a. Gay-9.)

  36. @Reg Cæsar

    They can’t pay that trainer enough money, Reg.

  37. Jack D says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Because they know how they behave.

    Speaking of which, yesterday a Gypsy guy pulled into my driveway with a shiny new truck, rang my bell and tried the “my boss has some extra asphalt” scam on me. (google gypsy paving scam – 692,000 results). I politely declined his kind offer.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  38. I thought Hillary’s loss to Donald Trump was the the peak of second wave feminism. That will be confirmed with Elizabeth Warren’s drubbing. I just don’t think America was ready to be ruled by a raging cunt.

    • Replies: @anon
  39. @Reg Cæsar

    So, if a male dog hump’s a man’s leg, is that a Gay-9?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  40. @Paleo Liberal

    I talked to two different Chinese scientists who set up their own companies in the US…. They both told me that if they hired fellow Chinese, they were scared their intellectual property would be stolen and taken back to China

    What kind of business(es) are they in?

    The only Chinese businesses around where I live are buffet restaurants, although I note that Chinese companies are starting to buy up existing US companies like Smithfield bacon and sausages which could be a means to acquire valuable hog-farming technology and flood the world with pig emissions.

    [We in Florida, in our infinite wisdom, have passed a state constitutional amendment banning intensive pig farming, because it is cruel to the piggies, but we don’t mind importing and eating pork imported from other less pig-friendly states.]

  41. @Jonathan Mason

    These were scientists dealing with scientific software.

    Easy for a programmer to steal the software, run off to China and start his own competing company with no start up cost.

  42. anon[890] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    …this 34 year old SWF with a dog and student loans from a journalism degree is agonizing with a therapist over whether she should ever have any kids.

    That’s a part of the opening scene of “Idiocracy”, which is supposed to be fiction.

  43. @Jack D

    In my business, it is rare for ‘Americans’ to land Chinese start up business because 99% of the time they are intercepted first by Chinese speaking networks who specialize in selling only to that ethnic market. This is also true for other immigrant groups. To establish a business in the US, usually the first people they will talk to are attorneys that will incorporate the business and help with immigration and work visas. There are also bankers, accountants, and others who latch on quickly. There is a lot of self dealing.

    Frequently, these ‘professionals’ are incompetent,sloppy, and or overcharge their new clients. It is only afterwards when a monolingual white guy with a suit shows up and handles the case properly that they realize that their fellow co-ethnics were ripping them off.

    Unfortunately, I suspect this was also a big part of the subprime mortgage meltdown. Many of the high risk loans that failed were not sold by a bank per se, but by a mortgage broker that spoke the same language and had the same skin color as the borrower. This is business that very few white brokers made money on even if it was made to seem that Milburn Drysdale was the one cashing in.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @bomag
  44. J.Ross says:

    I saw Dolemite Is My Name last night, it’s the best movie of the year without a contest. It reminded me of another Eddie Murphy movie, not as tightly written or assembled, but with a similar overall character. Both DIMN and Pluto Nash are examples of the kind of movies that Hollywood used to not only make but take for granted, a movie by the old rules. There are no Marvel quips or Reddit hall monitors pointing out a meaningless irony. There are alternate lifestyle characters, but in supporting roles, and without worship. The plot works within an “American” idea that a better life is possible for the individual because of his efforts. DIMN is roll around on the floor funny without any of Murphy’s scat or flatulence preoccupations.
    Nobody is going to remember Joaquin Phoenix’s cynical exploitation propaganda hit, but DIMN is going to have the same legacy as Blazing Saddles or Young Frankenstein.

  45. Jack D says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Acquiring hog farming tech is not going to help the Chinese. There is a African Swine Fever epidemic in China which is killing all of their pigs. The virus is harmless to humans but it kills pigs.

    They are working on a vaccine but it is very challenging. Most virus have very simple genomes – the Ebola virus only codes for 7 proteins. The swine fever virus codes for 170. Thank god this is not a human disease because it is a nasty complex virus.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  46. @Paleo Liberal

    A K9 officer at a Minneapolis park event told us that they prefer working with male dogs, because bitches get too attached to a particular handler. That makes scheduling harder.

    As for Alsatian fornication, you’d have too ask a cop.

  47. anon[177] • Disclaimer says:
    @Prof. Woland

    I thought Hillary’s loss to Donald Trump was the the peak of second wave feminism.

    Dream on.

    • LOL: bomag
  48. I’m actually trying out for college Jeopardy.

    I made it past the online assessment and I have an in-person audition this weekend. Anyone have any advice on the sorts of categories I should cram?

    WWI, WWII, Shakespeare, geographic landmarks, etc.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Daniel Williams
  49. El Dato says:
    @anonymous

    Meanwhile on the light cruiser Deutschland:

    Germany: In 20 years, 1 in 3 people will have migrant roots

    The German economist said that an increasingly diverse population will be crucial to the security of Germany’s economy in the future. IAB figures suggest that Germany requires about 400,000 migrants per year until 2060 to avoid the economy shrinking.

    400’000 — per year — for the next 40 years. 16 million people (currently Germany counts 85 million). And what’s supposed to happen in 2060? Orgasmic diversity house party when 1 in 1 people will have migrant roots?

    However, the challenge for Germany is to continue to draw highly-skilled migrants to the country. Brücker said Germany would need to open itself up to other countries as the labor pool from southern and eastern European countries is exhausted.

    “Other countries” would be India and China then. That particular pool is also infinite for all practical purposes. Tap it!

    A study published last month suggested that children with a migrant background who obtain a German passport early in life tend to have increased access to opportunity for higher education.

    “access to opportunity” for an already-packed “higher education” … probably a good thing.

  50. @Reg Cæsar

    My experience with Shepherds is that there is a sexual polarity thing going. The female dogs attach to the men in the family and the male dogs attach to the women. Shepherds are really one person dogs although they are nice to the rest of the family.

  51. Jack D says:
    @Prof. Woland

    This is the way business has been done in immigrant communities since the 1st Irishman stepped off the boat. My wife’s grandfather sold life insurance as an agent of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company to his fellow immigrant Jews back in the 1920s. The Met had a huge network of agents – Italians to sell to the Italians, Jews to sell to the Jews, etc. Naturally if you don’t speak the language or understand the laws or culture you are going to rely on your paisans at first.

  52. J.Ross says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    This like children pretending to be adults or blind people using degrees of light to replace sight; very similar is the mainland Chinese practice of grabbing a random roundeye off the street to pose as a fully trained and vested executive so the company will look more trustworthy in a negotiation. Of course white people can be scum or idiots too. The real solution is to build a high-trust society. This is probably not possible for mainland Chinese, but most people would probably accept a characterization of “equally Chinese” people on Hong Kong as high-trust or near Western ethical standards.

  53. @Autochthon

    “Who is Andre the Giant?”

  54. @Jack D

    Are we really surprised, Jack?

  55. Charon says:
    @anonymous

    Really Sorry I ever contributed.

  56. Anonymous[271] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    African swine fever was used as a bioweapon during the Cold War. It’s particularly good as a bioweapon because it doesn’t affect humans directly but has a major economic impact, especially against poorer communist countries who tend to depend more on pork for protein because it’s much more efficient than beef for converting feed to protein. The fact that it doesn’t affect humans directly while having a significant economic impact means that it mitigates threat escalation. Your state adversary, even if it strongly suspects bioweapon use, is much less likely to directly retaliate militarily if it does not harm humans directly, whereas with a bioweapon that targets people directly, the state adversary is more likely to directly respond. The current African swine fever outbreak may be part of the burgeoning Cold War between the US and China. The US strategy over the past few years has been to exert economic pressure on China.

    http://www.maebrussell.com/Health/CIA%20Pig%20Virus.html

    CIA Link to Cuban Pig Virus Reported
    San Francisco Chronicle
    January 10, 1977

    With at least the tacit backing of U.S. Central Intelligence Agency officials, operatives linked to anti-Castro terrorists introduced African swine fever virus into Cuba in 1971.
    Six weeks later an outbreak of the disease forced the slaughter of 500,000 pigs to prevent a nationwide animal epidemic.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  57. @SFG

    Can I attend your inauguration, Mr. President?

    • Replies: @SFG
  58. anon[415] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, it’s about time!

  59. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Weird Al really does look like the 1979 College Bowl Steve picture on the right side of the page. Or vice versa.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  60. J.Ross says:

    This isn’t going to be news to anyone here but it’s a horrifying illustration of how snarking on clown world is not enough.
    https://thefederalist.com/2019/11/04/how-the-left-is-weaponizing-cancel-culture-to-politicize-childrens-books/

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @danand
  61. @Jimbo in OPKS

    Let me guess. LSMFT = “Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco”? Wow, that’s a blast from the remote past. I don’t like to admit I can remember it (from my early childhood).

    OPKS = Overland Park, Kansas?

  62. bomag says:
    @anonymous

    The first article excuses African fertility rates and possible/probable environmental impact with some weak arguments; it’s like they haven’t heard of math or immigration.

    In the second article, the woman pretty much admits that she would rather party than have kids.

  63. @El Dato

    However, the challenge for Germany is to continue to draw highly-skilled migrants to the country. Brücker said Germany would need to open itself up to other countries as the labor pool from southern and eastern European countries is exhausted.

    “Other countries” would be India and China then. That particular pool is also infinite for all practical purposes. Tap it!

    More likely, future Brücker characters will just define sub-Saharan Africans as highly skilled.

  64. bomag says:
    @Prof. Woland

    a big part of the subprime mortgage meltdown

    I believe Roissy had a post back in that day, where he joined a real estate sales firm, and the explicit strategy was to hire and send out people to sell to their ethnic group.

  65. El Dato says:
    @J.Ross

    The article is a bit a hodgedepoge and there is not much about cancel culture in there. Mostly about how libraries are being transformed into doctrine outlets resembling a Jehovah’s Witnesses reading room, only different, gayer and with more calls for aimless activism.

    Main conclusion: Peak Stupidity not reached yet. And for some reasons there are books starring mythological Greta Thunberg (Who finances that? I hope Greta receives money for those!)

    Anyway, no-one ever thought that librarians are particularly intelligent or immune from Red Guard Fervour. I remember some cases in the days after 9/11 where said librarians felt free to destroye literature and shred CD-ROMs about critical US infrastructure and water sources, fearing the terros might walk in and take a look.

    One children’s book executive editor at Penguin Random House Books for Young Readers, a division of the largest publisher in the country, also does not conceal her political views on Twitter. She frequently retweets comments by Elizabeth Warren, Nancy Pelosi, MSNBC, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rachel Maddow, and others.

    More like “Pengu Retard Haus Buggs” then.

    Meaningless outer party people:

    [[[Sadness intensifies]]]

  66. @Jack D

    Weird Al really does look like the 1979 College Bowl Steve picture on the right side of the page. Or vice versa.

    Ten months difference in age. Anyone ever see them together? G

    How far is Lynwood from Studio City?

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  67. @Anonymous

    Here in L.A. there is a widespread phenomenon of already-fugly Mexican young women going out of their way to look even uglier and less feminine — aided by even more blubber, odd piercings, dyed hair, and tattoos than the fat-ass white women are also so fond of.

  68. @Jack D

    Where do you live where there are Gypsies — Hungary, Slovakia?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  69. El Dato says:
    @Monsieur Psychosis

    Feminism Trivia, The History of Russian Atrocities in Oklahoma, and Big Contributions by Black Egyptians.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  70. notsaying says:

    Off-Topic

    We should ask the Democrats what their plans will be for the internal “climate refugees” we’re starting to have because of climate change.

    Given current estimates on sea-level rise and its threat to coastal communities, as many as 13 million Americans are projected to become climate refugees by the end of this century. That’s a lot of displacement and instability across our coasts.

    … For example, in the coming years, given predicted rates of sea-level rise and the increased frequency and severity of storms, several counties in Florida will need to relocate over 4 million residents to avoid climate disaster. New York, California and Louisiana will also face the possible migration of hundreds of thousands of their residents (New York City is one of the 10 cities in the world most vulnerable to sea level rise, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development).

    We are not prepared at all for this, in my opinion. For example, the article itself praises New York City for dealing with the problem but also says that one of the methods it’s planning to use won’t work.

    So maybe we should think about all the overseas people we are planning to bring in and ask ourselves: Will we have the room once we relocate our own people?

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/11/04/california-fires-climate-change-millions-refugees-by-2100-column/2452937001/

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  71. bomag says:
    @El Dato

    …suggest that Germany requires about 400,000 migrants per year until 2060 to avoid the economy shrinking

    If the Germans have any say in the matter, they are far, far better off with the imaginary shrinking economy vs. what the coming demographic replacement will bring.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  72. nebulafox says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    >So why are Chinese scientists so less trustful of their countrymen?

    For the same reason that the Russian and the Indian and the Iranian scientists don’t, either: when you come from a low-trust society and emigrate to a high-trust one, you can immediately detect the difference.

    There’s also the small matter that the PRC diaspora is notorious for having people working with intelligence back home (the degree of coercion vs genuine nationalism involved varies with the individual), and if you actually want a fresh start in a new country, you naturally don’t want to be near them. China’s far from alone here-Russia, Iran, Pakistan, and Israel also do it, off the top of my head-for but none of the others solely rely on the diaspora to the extent that the PRC does.

  73. Jack D says:
    @RadicalCenter

    I have news for you – there are Gypsies in America. Some say a million of them ( I doubt it):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romani_Americans

    In addition to paving scams they do fortune telling (yes really) , “distraction burglaries”, other home improvement scams, shoplifting, pickpocketing, stolen auto rings, welfare scams, and credit and insurance fraud (fake slip and falls). Their specialty is non-violent crime. There are also “Travelers” who are not genetically gypsy but live a similar lifestyle.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  74. Hail says: • Website
    @Buzz Mohawk

    – [Tulsi Gabbard arrives]

    Trebek: It’s time, boys. Bring out the ‘Steve Sailer’ buzzer.

  75. anon[415] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato

    If books do not match the reality of the current year, the Party has a duty to take care of that.

    Right? Who would disagree?

  76. @Ralphy Highroller

    If only Derek Zoolander had killed the prime minister of Malaysia like he was supposed to….

    • LOL: bomag
  77. nebulafox says:
    @notsaying

    US political culture has a strange aversion (I think it is a Baby Boomer thing) to admitting that there are real-life limits on what the US can and cannot do, and that not everybody is going to benefit from “X” policy.

    This is as much a problem in the GOP as it is the Democrats, particularly when it comes to taxation and foreign policy, but right now the judicial system, the bureaucracy, and the media ensure that there is no serious push-back against in vogue but out-of-touch-with-reality ideas among Democrats: for example, that the US can simultaneously afford a massive influx of new citizens and expand the already existing welfare state. The money has to come from somewhere, and nobody is giving serious suggestions as to where beyond (ironic) neoliberal platitudes about wealth generation.

  78. J.Ross says:
    @El Dato

    When Hillary was running there were about a half dozen “instant” children’s books propagandizing her, similar to the RBG set or the Greta set, it’s very inorganic, pat and polished.
    >not much cancel culture
    In the middle his point is that the people getting canceled are not household nanes and are getting canceled in advance by business pressure, but Scholastic and the ALA are examples.

    • Replies: @anon
  79. Hail says: • Website
    @nebulafox

    out-of-touch-with-reality ideas…that the US can simultaneously afford a massive influx of new citizens and expand the already existing welfare state

    Many European countries too, and earlier and more intensely.

    Since the 1940s, there has been a Europe-US political negative feedback loop, with each borrowing bad ideas from the other and seldom learning the right lessons from the other’s mistakes.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  80. anon[415] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    US political culture has a strange aversion (I think it is a Baby Boomer thing) to admitting that there are real-life limits on what the US can and cannot do, and that not everybody is going to benefit from “X” policy.

    “If we can put a man on the Moon, then we can [do some thing]” is not as common as it used to be. But it’s still around. A legacy of St. John the Martyr I suppose.

  81. J.Ross says:
    @nebulafox

    One attack we’re not seeing is grasshoppers and ants, and I expect that if it is allowed to develop within controlled channels it will be framed as “are your burdens too onerous” and not “exactly why am I carrying these burdens at all.” MSM did briefly try to argue that newly arrived “refugees” pay more in taxes than they take in benefits and more than ungrateful flyover country whites pay, but I think that fizzled because of laughter.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    , @anon
  82. nebulafox says:
    @Hail

    >In fairness, many European countries were there first.

    I think it is a matter of scale on both ends of the Atlantic. The rate of immigration did increase throughout the 1970s and 1980s after Hart-Celler, but it was nowhere near the levels seen after the Cold War, and particularly in the 21st Century. And this was back when the US was a) in far better fiscal shape to absorb the impact and b) more selective about who we let in.

    (Ironically enough, already by the 1990s, the majority of voters on both sides of the aisle wanted the immigration rate to be peeled back some-one example of how far the Overton Window has shifted in the last decade or two. Guess what Karl Rove and his brain trust did with this information? At least the Democrats had a political incentive to sell out their voters.)

    I’ll let a European talk about Europe, but I’d be very surprised if there wasn’t a visible difference in the fiscal strain that immigration policy in 1960 brought vs. 2015.

  83. Hail says: • Website
    @Ralphy Highroller

    Australia…will soon become “more Asian than European”, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has predicted

    A difference between the Australia’s MSM and the US’ MSM:

    Australia’s MSM published this. The US MSM would not.

    In the US, a similar story might make an appearance at InfoWars and maybe on VDare and the like (and the Unz Review). On cable news, Tucker Carlson might give it a segment — and no one else (maybe Laura Ingraham, but only as a latecomer). Otherwise, there would be a defacto coverage ban.

    So it goes with the “media-run state.” (To [re-]latinize something Ann Coulter has been saying: Media Delenda Est).

    I think the Australian MSM published this because the Australian ‘regime’ is getting seriously worried about China. The Australian MSM is much more hostile to China than the US’ MSM is; ours continues to indulge its paranoid delusions about Russia.

    • Agree: Houston 1992, HammerJack
  84. notsaying says:
    @nebulafox

    I agree with you. It is very discouraging because we just can’t do it.

    I myself want Americans to get more government help (unlike many here I am not conservative). I make a fuss over immigration for many reasons but one is that I want government help to be available to me when I need it. I don’t want us to have spent so much on newcomers that we can’t help our fellow Americans.

    Between the big deficits and the steady high numbers of new immigrants (along with other stupid decisions), we are committing self-sabotage on multiple fronts.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    , @Justvisiting
  85. Alfa158 says:
    @Jack D

    They seem more numerous than they are because most of them don’t spend their days ensconced in a workplace beavering away. They are roaming stores, and parking lots and ringing doorbells trying to commit petty crimes, therefore there is a disproportionate chance of having contact with the Zingari. I was approached by one in a parking lot asking me if I was Italian, and for directions to the airport. He then gave me a story about being a sales-rep for Armani, and he had too much luggage because of his samples and wanted to give me a free jacket. I switched to Italian and he quickly exhausted his supply of Italian so he gave up the scam and moved on.
    Coincidentally my brother was approached by another one in a parking lot who tried to give him the same story. I’ve also spotted them in front of stores, or at freeway ramps with children panhandling, so there could actually be a million of them in the US.

    • Agree: jim jones
  86. notsaying says:
    @J.Ross

    I still see people claiming that immigrants are necessary and beneficial and do all kinds of wonderful things for our economy and for our diversity (as if we weren’t diverse enough by now), etc., etc. That’s true of both illegal and legal immigrants. I get tired of reading it, I try to fight back against it when I can but most things you read don’t have a “Comments” section.

  87. bomag says:
    @El Dato

    I didn’t realize book burners would brag so much.

  88. nebulafox says:
    @notsaying

    The definition of “conservative” is a bit problematic: there’s not much “conservative”, in the old-school sense of actually conserving things and taking a cautious, pragmatic, inherently anti-ideological approach (its the job of liberals to be ideological, and I’m not mocking that-mostly-because that’s a necessary, vital role in societal evolution) to policy about the GOP’s weird mix of free-market evangelicalism, Wilsonian foreign policy, and being obsessed with stupid crap like preventing abortion while the United States encounters increasingly difficult levels of deeply entrenched structural issues.

    There are naturally liberal personalities, and naturally conservative ones. They fulfill different functions to keep a given society going, and typically, when one tries to ape the other, it gets a bit farcical. You need both. You get into trouble with an imbalance. Rarely, however, have I seen a political culture where the liberal party is into more censorship and authoritarianism, and the conservative party has a view of human nature out of Rousseau.

    And now the issue is for me: there’s little worth conserving in the current system. So, now what?

  89. anon[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    In the middle his point is that the people getting canceled are not household nanes and are getting canceled in advance by business pressure, but Scholastic and the ALA are examples.

    Laura Ingalls Wilder isn’t as much of a household name as she used to be, but Cancelling her is taking longer than one might expect.

    The US Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) has removed Laura Ingalls Wilder’s name from one of its awards over racist views and language. The association had received complaints for years over the Little House on the Prairie author’s ” anti-Native and anti-Black sentiments in her work” .

  90. anon[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    One attack we’re not seeing is grasshoppers and ants,

  91. J.Ross says:

    “I vote so I can get more money.” Captioning a picture of a violence-aged young black man. This is not racism. This is not a new media-savvy Klan. This is a campaign by the Democrat-aligned “Be The Change” organ, in their “I Am Be The Change” (again, this is not racism) campaign.
    https://iambethechange.org/allies/

  92. danand says:
    @J.Ross

    “thefederalist.com/2019/11/04/how-the-left-is-weaponizing-cancel-culture-to-politicize-childrens-books”
    J.Ross, looks like Governor Newsom just decided that he will “cancel” President Trump

    California governor Newsom responded on Twitter that “Trump doesn’t believe in climate change, so “you are excused from this conversation.””

    Kind of a shame, they were such good buddies.

    Newrump

    Have to wonder what Trumps angle is in raising Newsom’s profile? I’m still of the mind that Newson will be president a decade on.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @Anonymous
  93. more like a contest to give away the most free stuff the fastest.

  94. Anon[331] • Disclaimer says:

    Dear Mr. Sailer:

    We acknowledge receipt of your job application and sample satire piece.

    After careful consideration, you are no longer being considered for the position.

    We wish you success in your career endeavors.

    Sincerely,

    The Babylon Bee

  95. @Ralphy Highroller

    and a deputy sheriff of the United States

    Ha! Double hah!

    Malaysia is known for one thing, one thing only, namely the Petronas Towers. They were designed by César Pelli, an Argentine native who had been a US citizen for 55 years at his passing in July. Kuala Lumpur broke Chicago’s 45-year record, but only with an Illinois-trained architect.

    This man should be careful. His country sits in the protective eye of a ring of natural disaster zones. No doubt his neighbors tire of earthquakes, tsunamis, typhoons, and the like, and would love to settle in his safe, comfortable, and nearby country if they can’t have Australia.

    • Replies: @Hail
    , @reactionry
    , @reactionry
  96. Hail says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    This man should be careful.

    Recall also that it was Dr. M, the very same, who said in the early 2000s while still Prime Minister in his long first term, and I quote: “The Jews rule the world by proxy.” In a follow-up comment, he explained: “They get others to fight and die for them.”

  97. anon[123] • Disclaimer says:

    Everyone participating in the dog show debate should be required to arrive via clown car.
    I”m sure the Shriners could loan them sone.

  98. @danand

    Have to wonder what Trumps angle is in raising Newsom’s profile? I’m still of the mind that Newson will be president a decade on.

    Nah, Newsom is the Mayor John Lindsay of our era.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  99. @Jack D

    Let’s correct that headline:

    Scientists with Links to China Are Stealing Biomedical Research, U.S. Knows

    When major research universities in the USA have labs that recruit and employ Chinese nationals exclusively, you can see one of those damnable patterns so despised by our betters. If the Times opinion squad saw the numbers, they’d swoon. No trans, only Hans. And not a trace of the African diaspora to be found, excepting the janitorial staff. Who are now being replaced by refugees, BTW.

  100. J.Ross says:

    This is what we gave our children:

    A Swedish migrant ordered a native Swede, 18, to get down on his knees and apologize, or he will stab him. The incident in Örebro, Sweden.

    Two Swedes were pursued by the migrant gang while in the car. After half an hour, the two young people stopped their vehicles and got out to find out what the migrants wanted.

    “We asked them why they were following us. They claimed that we had disrespected them. One of the migrants then goes to my friend and threatens to ‘cut him up’.”

    The gang leader then pushed the Swede against a fence and forced him to get down on his knees and apologize.

    “Get on your knees and apologize! Get on your [euphemism] knees! Apologize! Apologize! On your knees, I said!” said the migrant.
    “I’m sorry. I ask your forgiveness. It won’t happen again. It was very stupid of me,” said the Swede.
    “Very good,” said the migrant.

    Satisfied with the apologies, the gang headed for the car with a scornful smile and left.

    https://nyheteridag.se/video-invandrare-fornedrar-och-mordhotar-svensk-ga-ner-pa-dina- [a euphemism for sex] -knan/

    https://samnytt.se/video-invandrare-mordhotar-och-tvingar-ned-svensk-kille-kna/

  101. Kronos says:
    @bomag

    The welfare costs alone…

  102. @El Dato

    I thought infinite debt was the path forward to grow the economy to infinity.

    Paraphrasing Madame Lagarde here.

    They couldn’t care less about growth of Germany’s economy. You know how Africanized bees are dangerous to bee colonies, Africanized Europe will be easier to control once the average IQ falls below 70.

    [Spellchecker wants to change “Africanized” to “Americanized”. Hooray for tech.]

  103. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous

    It’s particularly good as a bioweapon because it doesn’t affect humans directly but has a major economic impact, especially against poorer communist countries who tend to depend more on pork for protein because it’s much more efficient than beef for converting feed to protein. The fact that it doesn’t affect humans directly while having a significant economic impact means that it mitigates threat escalation.

    It sounds pretty foolish and reckless to me. Pigs are sufficiently similar to humans that that are often used in medical experiments. Who’s to say that a swine disease won’t eventually jump the species barrier?

  104. @J.Ross

    Apologize, pull out his eyes,
    Pull out his eyes, apologize…

    It’s always funny until someone wanders into a whorehouse and breaks a lampshade with a walking stick.

    Then what are we stuck with? Sixty years of Modernism.

  105. Anonymous[206] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    It’s Okay to be a Boomer

    • Disagree: Autochthon
  106. Anonymous[206] • Disclaimer says:
    @danand

    Though tall and disyllabically named, he’s not exactly the kind of guy you’d want to have a beer with. Fussy candidates have a bad track record (Stevenson, John Anderson, arguably Kerry)

  107. Kronos says:
    @El Dato

    Any idea what books were thrown out?

  108. OT:

    Blade Runner is set in November 2019.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  109. @The Alarmist

    [Hat tip to Steve Sailer]

    LGTBQGDR German Double Jeopardy Doppelgänger Gang Banger?

    A: Angela’s Speaker of the Bundestag

    Q: Who is Merkel’s Boehner?

    Substitute “Andrew” for “Ludwig” below:

    https://forvo.com/word/johann_ludwig_b%C3%B6hner/

  110. @Jack D

    Jack D wrote:

    If some of the other scientists happen to be Chinese, they might send your research proposal off to China and next thing you know, some biomed startup in China has beaten you to the results of (and a patent on) your own idea.

    Well, the whole idea of “intellectual property” is and always has been pretty dicey (I say this as someone with experience in the area — I’m co-inventor on several patents).

    First-come/first-served pretty much has to prevail in dealing with use of natural resources: it would make no sense to leave petroleum in the ground for a thousand years so that much later generations can use it. After all, by the same logic, they would have to leave it in the ground for another thousand years. And so on and so on. It would never get used by human beings.

    But, IP is a “public good”: just because Microsoft comes up with a clever idea (not that often, by the way), that does not mean they exhaust the idea and it is no longer there to be used by some new startup. Indeed, had Microsoft not come up with the supposed new idea, it is reasonable to think some Chinese firm would have come up with it a year or a decade later. Near simultaneous discoveries in STEM are so common as to be normal.

    The vagaries of history have inevitably given the West “first mover advantage” in a lot of fields: we just happened to be first to invent airplanes, discover petroleum deposits, and so on, and that naturally gives us certain advantages.

    But, in intellectual discoveries, it is not just an axiomatic fact of nature that the first guy who discovers an idea gets a fee from anyone who discovers or uses the idea later on: in fact we make no effort to enforce such a regime in terms of the discovery of laws of nature or theorems of mathematics.

    The Chinese are not only being reasonable in using “our” intellectual property without paying for it; they are in fact following the same tack that the US followed in “stealing” textile technology from Britain, despite onerous penalties imposed by the Brits to prevent such “stealing.”

    There is a name for a country that is obsessed with other countries stealing its intellectual property — loser. Real winners are always leading the pack, creating new advances so rapidly that no one can copy them fast enough to keep up. The US whining about China stealing our IP is one more sign of American decline.

  111. @Monsieur Psychosis

    A handful of topics seem to recur pretty often:

    • Seventies porno mag titles: be familiar with High Society, Screw, maybe Oui if you’ve got the time
    • Street drug slang: learn your bennies, reds, etc. Plus grams-to-ounces, the meaning of a “bird”, things like that.
    • Beers your uncle drank: know at least a bit about Stroh’s, Natural Bohemian, and Schlitz. You don’t have to actually drink the stuff, but the first name of each brand’s founder is usually enough.

    • LOL: Jack D
  112. @Reg Cæsar

    Petronas Bumiputera Blood & Soil Towers?

    If memory serves, many years ago Hugh Fitzgerald of The New English Review mentioned the below as an affirmative action *bad* thing:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumiputera_(Malaysia)

    However, if Whites came to be considered the favored “Sons of the Soil,” it could be a *good* thing for *them*, albeit with some risk that “Kama Sutra Harris” might go running Bumiputra Kto Kogo amok.
    Jump to Toolbar

  113. @PhysicistDave

    “I’m co-inventor on several patents”

    Then for heaven’s sakes, stick to what you’re good at — inventing patents on science stuff — and leave the business of managing a civilization to people who know about that. I don’t bother people with my ignorant and uninformed opinions about physics, please don’t bother the rest of us with your inane views about the geopolitical tactical dimensions of IP policy. Though I suppose at this point nearly all the horses have fled the barn, so who cares any more. Thanks to nitwits like you.

    It’s always fascinating seeing people who are so smart in one thing being complete contemptible retards in pretty much everything else. I’m sure that the grandees and librarians of Old Baghdad took great comfort in knowing that the Mongol hordes burning their city used similar tactics as their own revered prophet.

    • Agree: Charon
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  114. @Reg Cæsar

    bitches get too attached to a particular handler

    This is the 2019 iSteve understatement of the year

  115. Kronos says:
    @Stan Adams

    Well they nailed modern LA.

    • LOL: reactionry
  116. @Reg Cæsar

    For your younger readers, Art Fleming and Don Pardo were the actual host and announcer for Jeopardy before Alex Trebek took over.

    When Weird Al performed this song on The Merv Griffin Show, Merv told him that because of the popularity of the song and the video, he was going to relaunch Jeopardy. I don’t know if Merv meant it or was being polite, but three months later the Alex Trebek version appeared and is still going strong 35 years later. In any event, Al didn’t see any royalties, while Merv died a very rich man.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Anonymous
  117. @J.Ross

    Pluto Nash … such an awful tragedy.

    So the new ultra-woke Terminator flick is a resounding flop. Here’s hoping that the upcoming Soy Wars movie crashes and burns, as well.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  118. @ScarletNumber

    For your younger readers, Art Fleming and Don Pardo were the actual host and announcer for Jeopardy before Alex Trebek took over.

    For those even younger, Greg Kihn, whose song Al is parodying, is the groom you see in the final scene.

    Yankovic thinks it ironic that his career has lasted longer than many of his targets’. Kihn is good, but he’s a distant third at best, behind HL Mencken and George Herman Ruth, on the list of influential German Baltimoreans.

  119. This is the tenth anniversary of the Fort Hood “peaceful protest”. Didn’t make Drudge for some reason.

  120. @Reg Cæsar

    How far is Lynwood from Studio City?

    From Lynwood High School to Harvard-Westlake in Studio City is a solid 30 minute drive.

  121. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato

    I frequently check out “desirable” books from the library and return them so their “circ count” stays up. That doesn’t completely protect them from being weeded, but does tend to make it a little tougher. Also in especially egregious cases I have a way to do a little collection culling of my own, though my ways and means must remain secret. (Hint: they depend way too much on those RF based book control systems. This means they don’t manually check certain things.)

    I have donated a lot of items to libraries for their collections: sometimes it’s best to just buy the book and considering the poor resale value of them, just take the tax write off and give them away.

  122. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Old Merv knew the value of a good novelty tune;

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Jim Don Bob
  123. OT:

    The presidential election is now less than one year away: November 3, 2020.

    The calendar repeats every 28 years. The last time a presidential election fell on November 3 was 1992. Before that, 1964. Before that, 1936.

    The Democrats won all three of those elections. Roosevelt in ’36 and Johnson in ’64 scored historic landslides. Clinton in ’92 did no better than Dukakis had in ’88, but won anyway thanks to Ross Perot.

    In 2016, the election fell on November 8. The equivalent years were 1988 (Bush 41 won handily), 1960 (Kennedy squeaked by Nixon), and 1932 (FDR crushed Hoover).

    In 2012, we voted on November 6. Obama was re-elected, as were Reagan in 1984 and Eisenhower in 1956. Herbert Hoover won handily in 1928.

    2008/1980/1952 = November 4 = change elections. Obama, Reagan, Eisenhower. Coolidge won in 1924.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  124. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    The Germ Theory wrote to me:

    please don’t bother the rest of us with your inane views about the geopolitical tactical dimensions of IP policy

    I take it you don’t have any actual real-world experience with IP?

    It does not boost innovation. The companies I worked for who filed our patents did not engage in the R&D to get patents. They filed the patents partly for publicity purposes/bragging rights and partly defensively: when another company points to our company’s violation of their patents, our company would go through its sheaf of patents, find some obscure patent the other company violated, and then they’d agree to mutual disarmament.

    The main effect of the patent system is to inhibit invention: engineers have to think “Oh. God — what if someone else has already patented this?” when they come up with a clever idea. In an innovative industry, people are trying to be a couple years ahead of everyone else, not worrying about whether other people are using your outdated ideas from five years ago. I take it you have never worked in such an industry?

    While our patents were real inventions, the whole field has now become a sick joke, with, for example, amazon patenting “1-Click ordering.” The jokes nowadays run along the lines of who is going to patent the “grocery store” or the “shoe”?

    Germ also wrote:

    Though I suppose at this point nearly all the horses have fled the barn, so who cares any more. Thanks to nitwits like you.

    I’ve had nothing to do with it one way or another. Rising cultures ignore and evade restraints such as intellectual “property,” as the US did around 1800 and China does today.

    Dying cultures like the US today try to cling to their old position of power by erecting restraints on trade, such as government-created monopolies and cartels and patents. They always fail.

    By the way, the Chinese will solemnly promise Trump to enforce US IP laws in China, and, then, it will somehow turn out that in a big country like China they just cannot manage to do it. But, they will be very, very, very apologetic and will continually promise to try harder. Again and again and again. Do you know what the phrase “Da bizi” means?

    I suggest you study Mandarin — and learn how to say “Would you like soy sauce with that?” You are part of yesterday’s culture.

    It’s a shame: Western Civilization was once really something.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @donvonburg
    , @Jack D
  125. El Dato says:
    @Stan Adams

    Norman Schwarzkopf had the same problem, but he put his foot down and insisted that they stop the tape and fix it.

    What episode was that?

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  126. El Dato says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Interesting. Clearly, Russian colonization efforts were far less successful than US efforts.

  127. @PhysicistDave

    Intellectual property comes in many forms such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, trade dress, logos, etc, and the use or abuse of these varies.

    If you put out a book, the text of the book is copyright, but the basic information in it is not. That’s why there are a bunch of translations of the Bible, any done in the last century or so are still afforded copyright protection, but most of them are heavily influenced in style by both the old ones (primarily the KJV, in English) and by other newer ones still in copyright. A car repair manual is another example. They generate their own pictures and drawings from an actual car but the procedures are usually obviously rewrites of the OEM dealer manual.

    Patents cover various aspects of design and manufacture, but can be challenged (often on the basis of ‘prior art’) and can be gotten around by minor changes in many cases. A patent is simply a license to sue. In the case of Chinese manufacture the problem may be that there is no one on paper to sue-they are manufactured in ad hoc factory arrangements, and imported by fly by night retailers or sold on eBay from overseas. If Ford steals your intermittent windshield wiper patent you might have an outside chance but if a dozen outfits offer aftermarket modules via Alibaba, even if you could go to China and find out who’s making them and even if the government cooperated to shut them down someone else would make them in another city, or at least another plant.

    Trade secrets only protect you from copying by people that you yourself have provided information to under a NDA. If I figure out how it’s made by reverse engineering and forensics, you have no recourse against me. Whether I’m in China or across the street.

    Copyright and trademark are the biggest areas where China simply flaunts the law. The only fix is the threat of tariffs or outright bans on the import of certain products. If China were flatly locked out of the electric guitar business so long as Chinese made “Chibsons” keep turning up, the CCP would probably shoot a couple of violators, and no one would make Chibsons any more. They’d do the next closest thing, they’d make Gibson like guitars with oversized headstocks and let American hobbyists cut them down and put on an inkjet printed decal, but for Confucius’ sake they sure wouldn’t put Gibson on them any more.

    It’s interesting that there never seem to be any Vietnamese, Indonesian, or Korean, or other Pac Rim made phony American label guitars, only Chinese. It’s also interesting that about seven out of ten Chibsons are obviously made on the same hard tooling used to make licensed Epiphone versions under contract for Gibson themselves. Old Henry never caught on to that….or did he? Hmmm.

  128. SFG says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Of course! 😉

    Jokes aside, I always wanted to start an economically liberal, socially conservative party if only to give people a way to describe the ideas–libertarians have been able to push their ideas, IMHO, at least in part because fiscally conservative, socially liberal people are able to say ‘I lean libertarian’.

    Well, we’ve got Drag Queen Story Hour and billionaires controlling the government, and if you think both of these are problems there ought to be a word for that. You’ve seen the Voter Study Group chart (https://www.voterstudygroup.org/publication/political-divisions-in-2016-and-beyond), plenty of people would be open to that.

    I know, there’s the American Solidarity Party. They need a good name though. Catholic social thought? Doesn’t work for evangelicals. Christian Democracy, like in Europe? I guess, runs into the ‘church and state’ thing. Populist? That describes everyone from Bernie Sanders to Viktor Orban.

  129. @J.Ross

    It’s a good thing the Swedes didn’t have any nasty firearms, or there may have been unacceptable “gun violence.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  130. @War for Blair Mountain

    The Democratic Party is the modern Donner Party.

  131. @notsaying

    I don’t want us to have spent so much on newcomers that we can’t help our fellow Americans.

    Between the big deficits and the steady high numbers of new immigrants (along with other stupid decisions), we are committing self-sabotage on multiple fronts.

    The Democratic Party abandoned you–oh well.

    The notion of helping “Our fellow Americans” assumes a high trust society where almost everyone is playing by the rules (no substantial cheating) and is honest about their financial status (no substantial lying).

    Did we ever have such a society? Maybe in the 1950s–or maybe folks were just less brazen about the lying and the cheating.

    Charity begins at home.

  132. Jack D says:
    @PhysicistDave

    It’s one thing to question the modern patent system, which is admittedly imperfect (to say the least), but that is a topic for another day. Suffice it to say that we shouldn’t throw out the baby with the bath water. We need patent reform, not patent abolition. Patents are contemplated in the Constitution and for good reason. Every advanced nation has a system of IP protection and for good reason.

    But what the Chinese are doing here is not patent evasion or reverse engineering or anything like that – it is just theft, plain and simple. They are intercepting confidential grant proposals sent to reviewers for peer review and stealing the contents. This is no different than if they broke into the scientist’s labs and stole their proposals out of their file cabinets. There is a point where “free exchange of scientific ideas” crosses the line and becomes theft and the Chinese have crossed that line. The Communist idea of property has always been “what’s yours in mine and what’s mine is mine.”

    • Agree: res
  133. Jack D says:
    @donvonburg

    The solution for Chinese counterfeiting is not to be found in China but at the port. US Customs should be watching for this stuff as it comes off the boat or plane. The burden of proof should be on the importer that he is importing genuine merchandise. Anything counterfeit should be seized and destroyed. If it takes Customs six months to inspect the contents of every container with a fine toothed comb, that’s a feature and not a bug.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  134. @Anonymous

    Merv also wrote the Jeopardy theme, as if he needed even more money.

    He managed to repay England for the “Coconuts” boost when his own “Ed McMahon”, Arthur Treacher, licensed his name to the fish-and-chips chain.

  135. Jack D says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Da BiZi means Big Nose but it’s not really current slang. In the past (in the days of Soviet-Chinese friendship) it was used to refer to Russians, who were at that point just about the only Europeans to be seen in China. Of course the Chinese are always going to have pejorative nicknames for Westerners just like we call them Slant Eyes. That’s just human nature, especially since the Chinese are not as sensitive to PC as we are.

    The Chinese are never going to enthusiastically respect Western IP rights for numerous reasons both cultural and economic (ESPECIALLY economic). The best we are ever going to do is to force them to reluctantly enforce IP on pain of losing access to US markets, etc. but they are never going to have their heart in it.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  136. @Autochthon

    It’s a good thing the Swedes didn’t have any nasty firearms, or there may have been unacceptable “gun violence.”

    If you go hundreds of years with minimal street crime, people in cities tend not to have guns. Same in the UK. Law has little to do with it; indeed, the causation is reversed. Stricter laws affect few, so are easier to pass.

    Automatics might be of help in today’s Malmö. Sweden’s laws on those appear marginally more liberal than ours:

    A potential gun owner needs to meet requirements to be granted a license. Various forms of self-defence weapons or deadly weapons such as pepper-spray to full-automatic machine guns are technically legal. However, most licenses for gun ownership are for hunters, as wild life hunting is highly in vogue in this country.

    https://www.sweden.org.za/gun-laws-in-sweden.html

  137. Autochthon says: • Website
    @donvonburg

    With due respect, yours is a terrible explanation of copyright, and the principles you explain apply only to literary works of non-fiction.

  138. @Stan Adams

    The new Terminator movie is not bad, but it does serious damage to the ongoing story line. That damage I am sure angers fanboys and it will be hard to retcon.

    The you go girl stuff is ok. The biggest woke part is that the new John Conner is a young Mexican girl who is supposed to be early 20s. She is played by a 32 yo Columbian woman who looks every bit her age (and more), is not good looking and cannot act. Her uncle is a good hearted man who is a coyote. The movie goes out of its way to portray the USA holding these poor people in chain ling cages.

    The woke part could have been a lot worse, but it’s hard to see how they make money when the movie cost $150-200 million to make. I’ll be they spent $100 million on CGI alone.

    • Replies: @Tusk
    , @Autochthon
  139. @Anonymous

    Merv also created Wheel of Fortune.

  140. Anonymous[159] • Disclaimer says:

    The difference between early 19th century U.S. violations of British patents, and modern Chinese violations of U.S. patents, is that the British in those days had high import tariffs, so the Americans could copy British inventions, but they couldn’t then flood British markets with cheaper clones, driving British manufacturers out of business. That’s not the case with the U.S. and China today.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  141. @Stan Adams

    Are these facts meaningful to you?

    I remember in 1988 that the painfully pedantic George Will, then a regular on ABC’s This Week, kept pointing out the unlikelihood of George HW Bush’s election because the last sitting vice president to win the election after a president served two terms was Martin Van Buren. As I wondered at the time, “So what?”

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  142. @J.Ross

    Dolemite Is My Name

    Is this a reference to the Terence Hill films of years ago?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  143. Tusk says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    And probably that much again on marketing. I read it needs to make close to $500m just to break even.

  144. Anon[159] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    This used to be a great magazine in the early 1970s. I still remember a haunting photo essay on Glen Canyon before it was flooded.

  145. danand says:
    @donvonburg

    “In the case of Chinese manufacture the problem may be that there is no one on paper to sue-they are manufactured in ad hoc factory arrangements, and imported by fly by night retailers or sold on eBay from overseas.”

    Donvonburg,

    eBay makes at least some effort to “police” the sale of knockoff goods. If they are alerted/made aware of an infringement, they take relatively swift action. Often there will be untold listings for multiple generic clones of an item, then zap: all that remain are those (listings) for the trademarked original.

  146. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Re the second article cited:

    1. She’s 34 and just broke up with a guy she’d been seeing for 10 years. I’d like to know more about that and hear the guy’s side of the story.

    2. Her therapist, remarkably, has created an entire practice out of counseling women who are not sure they want to have children. She’s been doing this since 1991. Initially it was late-30s or early-40s career women during their final panic days. During the past five years her practice has started to shift towards career women in their mid-30s who explicitly cite “climate change” as a major motivator (reading between the lines, the therapist seems to think this is a faddish excuse to cover up the normal concerns that she has seen before),

    3. Hilariously, this writer is young enough that she is going to be able to read her moronic article in 30 years and see what a doofus she was.

    The fact that baby panic has shifted down from 40ish to 35ish women is probably a good sign. The myth that you were good to go up to 40 seems to be changing to a more reality-based knowledge that when you turn 30 your fertility/stillbirth/Downs/genetic situation enters an alarming downhill stage, that “freezing your eggs” and IVF don’t really work that reliably, even if you can afford it and don’t mind the perhaps minor genetic mutations of the resulting Frankenbabies, and that children produced with random donor semen grow up to be a bit fucked up, unanchored, confused, and bitter at mom.

  147. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    Katie’s evolving relationship history:

    Sierra Club Magazine, November 2019:

    I recently found myself single after ending a nearly decade-long relationship. For me, being back in the dating pool means spending long days at my day job … then going out afterward to meet dudes ….

    Bustle.com, “Why I’ll Never Date a Man Who isn’t a Feminist Again,” March 2015:

    As I got on a plane from New York to San Francisco last summer …. After eight long months of online dating, I’m no longer on any dating apps, and I don’t go to bars to meet guys. I don’t want to subject myself to more antagonism, sexism, or harassment…. And if I don’t find anyone for a while?

    The math doesn’t add up. It sounds like she was not in a relationship through about the end of 2015, and after that she seems to have taken a dating break. What’s with this supposed “decade-long relationship”? Does she make this stuff up to fit the slant of each article?

    By the way, her online dating guys sound pretty cool to me:

    Ben, a software engineer at a large tech company, seemed like a sensitive, progressive guy — until he responded to my explanation of my college thesis problematizing the gender binary with, “But you know men do have better spatial reasoning, right?”

    Michael, a visual effects designer who openly identified as a feminist, spent our third date trying to convince me that men have equal disadvantages to women. When I brought up rape culture as a counterexample, he retorted, “Who is going around raping people?”

    Andrew, a startup founder who volunteered at a school teaching girls to code, said he was worried I would “put a hex on him or something” when he read “feminist” on my profile.

  148. J.Ross says:
    @Neil Templeton

    … uh … it’s a reference to the Dolemite films of about thirty-five to forty years ago …

  149. @donvonburg

    donvonburg wrote to me:

    If you put out a book, the text of the book is copyright, but the basic information in it is not. That’s why there are a bunch of translations of the Bible, any done in the last century or so are still afforded copyright protection, but most of them are heavily influenced in style by both the old ones (primarily the KJV, in English) and by other newer ones still in copyright.

    The translations are legal because the original text is not under copyright — neither the KJV nor the urtext.

    But just try translating The Hunger Games without the copyright holder’s permission!

    don also wrote:

    Copyright and trademark are the biggest areas where China simply flaunts the law. The only fix is the threat of tariffs or outright bans on the import of certain products.

    As I pointed out, the Chinese will promise profusely to crack down, but they just won’t do it. Anyone who doubts this does not understand East Asian culture (or human nature).

    True trademark violation is fraud, and the people who are most harmed, if they really believe the false claims, are the buyers. Personally, I suspect they know what they are getting. A Rolex for five bucks? Yeah, right.

    Most IP is doomed. The digital world is killing copyright. China is killing patents. Vibrant firms better keep innovating instead of living off rents from their inventions from years back.

  150. @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to me:

    Da BiZi means Big Nose but it’s not really current slang.

    Yeah, I picked it up from immigrants who have been in the States quite a while.

    I was just being snarky to a guy who seems to think we can keep the Chinese in their place by Making Them Obey Our Rules. Not gonna happen. There are many sources of instability in China, and the West has always shown an unexpected ability to regenerate itself. Obviously, I do not know for sure what will happen.

    But the people who think we can just order the Chinese around and they will meekly obey are living in a fool’s paradise.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  151. @Anon

    You’d have to be out of your damn mind to date, or even talk to, any woman who identifies as a feminist. They are Trouble with a capital T.

  152. @Jim Don Bob

    She is played by a 32 yo Columbian woman….

    What part of Columbia is she from? Congress Heights? Foggy Bottom? Georgetown? Or was it someone from Vancouver? Somewhere along the river in Oregon? (Those are pretty leftist places….)

    It’s odd casting, anyway, since most Columbians are (racially) Negroes or Europeans, whereas most Mexicans are mestizos. Perhaps ironically (speaking of Columbia), there are a lot of mestizos from Colombia, though; maybe they should have cast a Colombian.

    They really should find one the correct age, though; you’re quite right about that….

  153. danand says:
    @J.Ross

    J.Ross,

    Thanks for the heads up on Dolemite. It was classic Eddie Murphy, the fun kind, with attributes just as you described! May, or may not, be the best picture of the year, but for me the most fun: infinitely better than Rudy Ray’s movies that were its inspiration.

  154. nebulafox says:
    @PhysicistDave

    There is this delusion in a lot of right-wing circles that if the US can somehow get its crap together, things are going to go back to the way they were circa 2000. That’s not going to happen. China is going to have its problems in the coming decades-debt, pollution, too many single men, and organized crime to name a few-but it is not going to somehow reverse into being an undeveloped place.

    China has gone back to being what they had been for thousands of years before an uncommonly nasty 150 year period of civilizational regression at a uniquely bad time to be having that. And had the Qing fallen “naturally” in the 1860s (who says the Mandate of Heaven doesn’t exist?) rather than being kept artificially alive 50 years past their due date, or had the Japanese not invaded and wrecked the KMT’s efforts to modernize beyond repair, it might not have taken so long. China’s rise is really more “things getting back to normal”, in the broad scheme of history. As the Renaissance flourished, the Ming were ruling in China. When the caliphate came knocking at Constantinople’s door in 717, the only other state on the planet that was similarly organized and formidable enough to pose a problem were the Tang. The Han were there with the Pax Romana. Etc, etc. They’ve been there since the beginning, parallel to the West.

    Nothing to freak out about, really. Until you realize US society, and particularly our governing elite, is aping the late Qing in some key, disturbing ways.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  155. @Anon

    To defend poor Michael, I’m sure he didn’t bring this up of his own volition. Katie wasn’t going to be happy until he answered.

  156. Muggles says:

    Since hunky Beto is out and wrinkly Bloomie is in, who will watch this anyway?

    Bloomie probably won’t qualify though, due to his late arrival. Holding the door open for La Hillary I guess. He will have to settle for buying CNN and have all Bloomie, all of the time. The stock quotes will be timely though…

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