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Diversity vs. Dignity: Fukuyama's "Identity"
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From my book review in Taki’s Magazine:

Diversity vs. Dignity
by Steve Sailer

September 19, 2018

Do identity politics truly represent “the demand for dignity,” as centrist political philosopher Francis Fukuyama asserts in the subtitle of his new book, Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment?

Personally, “dignity” would strike me as an odd characterization of such recent manifestations of identity politics as your local gay pride parade, Ferguson’s bouts of undocumented shopping, Bruce Jenner in a ball gown, or the Asia Argento vs. Rose McGowan #MeToo spat. Nor do I expect the upcoming Supreme Court nomination hearing/teen sex comedy to be a high point in the history of American dignity.

If I were looking for an alliterative subtitle, I might try instead “The Demand for Dominance.” Contemporary identity politics seem far less about Jackie Robinson maintaining a stiff upper lip as he demonstrates his right to play baseball than about Serena Williams feeling entitled to go off on the tennis umpire.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. nebulafox says:

    I do think that not having any sense of basic respect and dignity, all kidding aside, drives a lot of dissatisfaction in modern society. It’s as fundamental as material needs in keeping you psychologically healthy. Many people-especially men-don’t want empathy, they want respect. They’ll be willing to do a lot to get it, and they will be spectacularly unmotivated if whatever they are engaged in won’t offer it. This is why crapping on non-collegiate jobs as unworthy of respect is a very dumb idea, as low-average/average IQ-ed people won’t go out for them. Aside from the whole college debate and the immense ramifications there, it could make a pretty big cumulative quality of life difference if the people doing all the basic things that keep your life going aren’t retarded.

    What quantum mechanics was 100 years ago, leading to the transistor a few decades later, genetics and biological engineering will probably be for our century. It’ll fundamentally change the world beyond anything we can imagine today. I envy those who have a career in those fields, they’ll really be forging the future. (I don’t envy the fact that they’ll have to deal with a lot of Theranos style hucksters, though.) But on some level, it’ll be even more significant, because it will destroy many of the basic axioms by which people who run modern Western societies govern-namely, those that stem from the idea that humans are more or less interchangeable, and that trying to improve the quality of your nation in the long run is both impossible and immoral. Neoliberalism, neoconservatism, and the dissenting left all have their roots in these assumptions implicitly, as do both major political parties in the United States since at least the Cold War ended. That’s going to die, whether the scientific revolutions come out of Shenzhen or Maryland.

  2. El Dato says:

    Fukuyama is cited as saying

    Karl Marx had suggested that the end of history would be a communist utopia, and I was simply suggesting that Hegel’s version, where development resulted in a liberal state linked to a market economy, was the more plausible outcome.

    I find the idea of Hegel emitting the thought that history vectors towards anything other than a Prussian State rather unbelievable. Citations?

    • Replies: @blank-misgivings
  3. Trevor H. says:

    If I were looking for an alliterative subtitle, I might try instead “The Demand for Dominance.”

    Good line. Trenchant, pithy, and dead-on accurate.

    It’s all a series of power plays. Every single bit of it.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @Desiderius
  4. Rosie says:
    @nebulafox

    They’ll be willing to do a lot to get it, and they will be spectacularly unmotivated if whatever they are engaged in won’t offer it.

    And the thing is, respect is cheap. I don’t buy the idea that status is a limited resource, and even if it is, there’s no reason we can’t “share the wealth.”

  5. @nebulafox

    No,people are interchangeable. If you don’t have my high status job, didn’t go to my or a similar college,can’t afford to give your children a proper preK-12 education, you’re subhuman and don’t count. Surely you’ve read enough essays to know this is what many of the elite in Western Democracies believe?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  6. I occasionally wondered while reading Identity if there is a whiff of self-parody about the frequent lapses of logic in it.

    That’s right – and that’s pretty Japanese, as far as societal matters are concerned, you’re supposed to avoid pure logic (in order to avoid offenses).

    (As an aside: Hegel might have stricken a chord in the young Fukuyama because his famous dialectical method was a reflection of the pietist Swabian (and German – Wuppertal, home of Friedrich Engels…) tradition; – and this method was a way of endlessly and carefully (in minute detail) discussing in public sessions the everyday consequences of faith – and the attempt to find out in doing so, whether this faith was real and in the end could be approved as being good (=reflecting the right and deep Christian way).

    Hegel’s dialectics therefor spring from a practice of trying to be inclusive, polite, earnest, serious and not too confrontative – and Dialectics therefor want to look untroubling and unconfrontative – at least in the eyes of fast readers (such as censors, for example – and they still were a thing for Hegel)).

    Fukuyama might well have liked that, because he saw the parallels of Hegel’ way of thinking and the Japanese one.

    • Replies: @Anonymous IV
    , @Desiderius
  7. Seems to me that the contemporary cult of victimhood has almost completely replaced the older culture of dignity, which had in turn displaced the even older honor cultures. You could make a case that current victimhood culture actually has a lot in common with honor cultures: in both cases, everyone is hyper alert to the smallest of slights and insults. The main difference is that in an honor culture, you’re supposed to sort out the person who insulted you by yourself, whereas in victimhood culture, the person who feel insulted appeals to a third party (say, the state, or the HR department, or the campus police) to settle the issue.

    Campbell and Manning’s book on victimhood culture spells out the argument in considerable detail:

    https://www.amazon.com/Rise-Victimhood-Culture-Microaggressions-Spaces/dp/3319703285/

    Interestingly, they have long discussions of e.g. hate hoaxes (and explicitly call them hate hoaxes). Rather unusual for a mainstream sociology book published by a respectable publisher. They do not go so far as to actually refer to Steve Sailer, but I would not be surprised if they are reading this blog. Anyway, it is a good book. If you have not read it yet, Steve, I reckon you’d enjoy it.

  8. Rob McX says:

    As a matter of political philosophy of relevance to immigration policy, Fukuyama argues that the United States Constitution fails to define adequately who “We, the People” are…

    This is a dishonest argument, unless you’re using it as a starting point for justifying an immigration restrictionist policy. Even without the “ourselves and our posterity” bit, nobody could argue that “we, the people” could potentially include anyone on earth.

    • Agree: NickG, densa
    • Replies: @Anon
  9. Robard says:

    Yeah, that is a nonsensical formulation since dignity isn’t something that can be demanded from someone, except perhaps in the formal sense of a title or a prize. What Fukuyama is probably thinking of is the demand for respect, or R-E-S-P-I-C-T the most reverend Al Sharpton spelt it out on television the other day. And the word respect connotes a sense of fear. As derived from Latin it literally means to watch your back, i.e. to fear the other person as someone who can harm you with impunity. So yes, dominance as well as – impunity.

  10. nebulafox says:
    @Rosie

    >And the thing is, respect is cheap.

    We disagree. It’s easy, but it isn’t the same thing as cheap. A smile is cheap, social manners are cheap, words in general are cheap. Respect isn’t-whether it is yourself or from others.

    >I don’t buy the idea that status is a limited resource, and even if it is, there’s no reason we can’t “share the wealth.”

    It’s not the same thing as status.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  11. Anon[394] • Disclaimer says:

    Mistake is a bit to overly judgmental to catch on in the media. Merkel’s Mingle? Merkel’s Magnet? Maybe not. I’ll keep thinking. Merkel’s Flood? Merkel’s Multitudes?

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  12. AndrewR says:

    “teen sex comedy”

    Lol more fodder for SPLC’s Sailer file

  13. Tulip says:

    Webster’s definition of “dignity”:

    1: formal reserve or seriousness of manner, appearance, or language
    2 : the quality or state of being worthy, honored, or esteemed
    3a : high rank, office, or position
    b : a legal title of nobility or honor

    Obviously, identity politics have zero to do with the first, but do seem very much concerned with personal and group elevation. “Dignity” in the old sense was very much intrinsic to a social system of ranking. In modern times, the theologians have deformed the concept into “human dignity”–which is the opposite of the traditional meaning.

    Fukuyama can be faulted for using this term because of the ambiguity involved, but the identity politics groups very much want their groups honored and esteemed, and the groups formerly honored and esteemed denigrated, and the leadership is very much concerned with attaining high ranking offices and positions. It is very much the war for Brahmin status and control of the clerisy.

  14. IHTG says:

    Hispanics don’t give a fuck, part N:

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
  15. kihowi says:
    @nebulafox

    You think an establishment that has actually convinced people there’s no such thing as race is going to have a hard time with that?

    Healthcare is not hate. It can’t possibly be compared to the institutionalized and historically entrenched racism of centuries. Genetic manipulation actually underscores the non-existence of race: no person’s body is less suitable to treatment than anybody else’s. We celebrate genetic freedom as a way of breaking out of the primitive physical stereotypes that some people still cling to. As the arbitrary details of birth fade into irrelevance we are reminded of Dr. King’s prophetic words: It’s the content of our character that counts.

    Easy peasy.

  16. Tyrion 2 says:

    There’s no room for inherent dignity in SJW identity politics. Inherent dignity is what we have for being able to think reasonably. Alternatively, it is the spark of the divine that is in all of us. It is the very opposite of the progressive project. It means that you’d very rarely “speak as a (insert privileged victim group here)” because it’d almost always be more important to speak as a rational being/one with a spark of the divine.

    And yes, progressive identity politics very clearly adds up to “a demand for dominance” even if, most disgracefully, it does so on the logic of each demanding group showing the least real world ability to rule.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    , @Tulip
  17. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:

    I like the analogy to shareholders/house rules. It’s a simple concept but it bedevils the legalistic ACLU mindset of a certain way of, ah, metropolitan ethnic thinking… Which same mindset has now spread to the fruited plain: “I want muh rights” automatically being construed to mean, “Hey government, gimme the stuff that other guy has.” This problem is basically sociological, not a political science software bug that can be patched.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  18. NickG says:

    Steve ends this with a paen to his citizenism:

    the 22-year-old me had never thought about it, this subtle but important logical distinction between current shareholders (or citizens) and future shareholders (or citizens) is not a particularly difficult concept to grasp once you’ve had it explained to you.

    I don’t think this is a starter as it isn’t visceral and tribal enough to be effective against the post-nation stater globalists. It’s too late for that, the neo Marxist post-modernist long-march through the institutions has already happened and it wasn’t even resisted. We – America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Western Europe, should have done 40 even 50 years ago, what Hungary and Poland are doing now.

    The only route forward to limit mass 3rd World immigration IS identity politics. And it’s going to nasty, very nasty. But that’s because we shouldn’t have gotten to the position of starting from here.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  19. I made this comment previously on another post.

    Deep dive into identity politics with Frances Fukuyama on NPR’s 1A. Fukuyama comes off as a basic NPR liberal. “Idenity politics practiced by my political enemies is bad because they are my enemies.” Identity politics by Black Lives Matter is justified, but other identity politics is evil because…. This is never explained. Not terribly enlightening.

    Populism is a boogeyman because it questions Fukuyama’s preferred social-political system. Diversity is a great thing, but the reason why Iraq, Afghanistan and Somalia are failed states is because they lack a sense of national identity. Okay…..

    This guy is Condoleeza Rice tier. Maybe there is a Straussian esotericism at work here, but I’m not smart enough to pick up on it.

    https://the1a.org/shows/2018-09-18/identity-politics-unmasked

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    , @ATBOTL
  20. Rosie says:
    @nebulafox

    It’s not the same thing as status.

    What’s the difference?

    • Replies: @Mike1
  21. Hodag says:

    In Northern Ireland the Protestants like to parade through Catholic areas, as an act of dominance. Who does what to whom, yes?

    The St. Patrick’s Day parade in the US served the same purpose for the Irish here, but nowadays the Irish are just white people and anyone in the Machine can march.

    • Agree: Charles Pewitt
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    , @Matra
  22. The globalists have heard our griping. They get that the gods of Progress and History can sometimes be cruel to those who do not please them. With that in mind, Prof. Fukuyama suggests “dying with dignity” as a new guiding credo for Europe and the European diaspora. That’s awfully thoughtful of him.

  23. Clyde says:

    Francis Fukuyama looks like a Hillary and Hussein voter. When has this guy even been right? He blew it on “The End of History”.

  24. utu says:

    If you want to challenge leftist arguments the analogy of corporation and stockholders will not work. What is needed is a moral argument which the left could appreciated. Unfortunately libertarians and HBDers are not capable of formulating moral arguments in a good faith.

    On the other hand the corporate analogy might be closer to the actual nature of the entity called the United States. The question is who are the shareholders of this corporation. Are they American citizens? I doubt it. More likely they are non physical persons like corporations who actually are quite interested in bringing people in as always they were staring with indenture servants and slavery even before the entity later called the United States got incorporated.

  25. utu says:

    If you want to challenge leftist arguments the analogy of corporation and stockholders will not work. What is needed is a moral argument which the left could appreciated. Unfortunately libertarians and HBDers are not capable of formulating moral arguments in a good faith.

    On the other hand the corporate analogy might be closer to the actual nature of the entity called the United States. The question is who are the shareholders of this corporation. Are they American citizens? I doubt it. More likely they are non physical persons like corporations who actually are quite interested in bringing people in as always they were staring with indenture servants and slavery even before the entity later called the United States got incorporated.

  26. Tex says:

    Dignity is more-or-less incompatible with modern, leftist identity politics and its rootedness in victimization.

    All identity politics has some base in victimhood, historical wrongs that serve as rallying cries. “Remember the Alamo” is a slogan to remind Texans of a defeat, salvaged by the dignity inherent in fighting to the last. It has a harsher echo in “Remember Goliad” which was a straight up massacre of helpless prisoners.

    You can speculate endlessly about how modern identity politics went into the pathetic mode, though it’s probably not too complex. Jackie Robinson wasn’t fighting a war, he was working in a business and appealing to the emotions of fans. American identity politics are mostly oriented toward using emotion to sway public opinion or business interests. Suffering nobly and silently only gets you so far.

    When you need fresh grievance to meet the needs of internet clickbait, tumblr outrage, and two-year election cycles, you get a lot less choosy. If all you got is some ‘roid rage on the court, you go with it.

    Where’s Santa Anna when you need him?

  27. Ibound1 says:

    Contemporary identity politics are the equivalent of being spoiled children. Or maybe they are the spoiled children now grown up. Badly behaved, whiny, entitled, yelling when they don’t get an extra piece of cake.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  28. Wilkey says:

    Somewhat OT, but related to diversity: somewhere recently I came across a mention of the diversity of Supreme Court law clerks. It came up in relation to the fact that Brett Kavanaugh’s law clerks at the DC Court of Appeals have actually been pretty diverse.

    Diversity of Supreme Court law clerks is actually quite a big topic in legal circles, because it’s often a stepping stone to much greater things. If you look at the Wikipedia list of former law clerks, a huge number of them have their own Wikipedia bios.

    Well, in her entire time at the court Ruth Bader Ginsburg has hired 112 law clerks, and only one has been (a very light skinned) black. Meanwhile at least 22 of them have been Jewish, but in all the articles discussing her law clerks that gets mentioned…nowhere (except perhaps the reader comments section, if the censor allows it).

    • Replies: @anon.
  29. @Rosie

    And the thing is, respect is cheap. I don’t buy the idea that status is a limited resource, and even if it is, there’s no reason we can’t “share the wealth.”

    I prefer the word “power” to “status” and “globalizer” to “globalist” because of how they sound and because it sounds more solid to use words that end in a growl rather than a hiss.

    I’ll be happy when this November’s election is over and the New Hampshire presidential primary kicks into high gear. The New Hampshire presidential primary has started already, but the day after November’s election it will really start rocking.

    Politicians on the campaign trail must use words that they are ready to use hundreds or thousands of times. It is interesting to watch, through the media and in person, as each candidate hones their campaign language down to something that is seamless and perfectly tailored to their target voter audience.

  30. Wilkey says:

    If I were looking for an alliterative subtitle, I might try instead “The Demand for Dominance.” Contemporary identity politics seem far less about Jackie Robinson maintaining a stiff upper lip as he demonstrates his right to play baseball than about Serena Williams feeling entitled to go off on the tennis umpire.

    Civil Rights milestones (the Civil Rights Act, gay marriage, etc.) are supposed to be like peace treaties: two or more nations sitting down and agreeing not to fight each other anymore and just getting along, with the oppressed (or “oppressed”) side getting the rights they were fighting for.

    Far more often they feel like a conquest, with one side deciding to unilaterally disarm and accept an occupation, while the winning side keeps on fighting as if a peace agreement had never happened.

    The entire argument for gay rights, when I was a teen, mostly consisted of “live and let live.” It was an argument which I bought into (and still do). Nowadays it has mutated into “you will accept me, or I will persecute you, get you fired, or shut your business down.”

    And I won’t get into the black and Hispanic “rights” movements, which have gone way beyond that, where Hispanic “rights” equals their right to invade our country in unlimited numbers.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Samuel Skinner
  31. Hockamaw says:

    This is really outstanding, important writing.

  32. Arclight says:

    Modern identity politics in America is about cobbling together a coalition that can override the electoral preferences of the nation’s largest racial group – while making them also pay for the stuff the minority coalition wants. I don’t think a political culture that is all about using resentment to enable the government to extract resources from those it considers less moral/deserving will end well.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Samuel Skinner
  33. I prefer to listen to people who have at least some bit of old stocker English ancestry.

    Why would anyone listen to a word from a Japanese baby boomer name Fukuyama about anything?

    Why should a Japanese federal judge out in some island in the Pacific have the ability to prevent the president of the United States from protecting and defending the safety and security of the United States in regards to matters of immigration?

    Now, I’ll provide a counter example to my claim that you shouldn’t listen to anyone who doesn’t have some old stocker English ancestry.

    This non-White guy writing in the New York Times hits a 500 foot home run to dead center when he says that Central Banks have run amok all over the world.

    Ruchir Sharma, who looks somewhat White, says:

    Markets have grown so large in part because every time they stumbled, central bankers rescued them with easy money. When markets rose sharply — as they have in recent years — the authorities stood by, saying they are not in the business of popping bubbles. Now, the markets are so large it is hard to see how policymakers can lower the risks they pose without precipitating a sharp decline that is bound to damage the economy. It’s a familiar problem: Like the big banks in 2008, the global markets have grown “too big to fail.”

  34. Thea says:

    Personal dignity come from self respect which comes from accepting accountability for most of what happens in your own life and rejects victim hood by replacing it with agency.

    • Replies: @Carol
  35. …. “short-shaming” men isn’t even a word. Our society indulges in quite a bit of pointless derision of short men for their genetic shortcomings, but nobody cares.

    I’ve always found the bad-mouthing of short men to be odd. As a man of slightly above average height, I’ve always known that short guys can be just as domineering in a social situation, or dangerous in a fight, as anyone else. I think it’s women who misunderstand this and, as we all know, we’re currently living in an era when the nasty side of females has full reign.

  36. @Wilkey

    The entire argument for gay rights, when I was a teen, mostly consisted of “live and let live.” It was an argument which I bought into (and still do). Nowadays it has mutated into “you will accept me, or I will persecute you, get you fired, or shut your business down.”

    It is an argument that requires cheap and readily available antibiotics. Those are starting to disappear. Once they are gone, so will the tolerance.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  37. @Arclight

    That is the essence of democracy- motivated minorities mobilizing and looting the public purse. It is one of the many reasons why democracies self destruct.

    • Replies: @Arclight
  38. @Hodag

    In Northern Ireland the Protestants like to parade through Catholic areas, as an act of dominance. Who does what to whom, yes?

    Orange marches were sometimes an act of dominance and sometimes an act of defiance. Ireland was a borderland, a frontier where Catholic Europe met up with Protestant Europe. The people at the sharp end were the Orangemen. At the scale of the farmer, the merchant and the policeman, it’s was an even match. Dead is dead. Arson, cattle mutilations, kidnapping and ambushes on rural roads happen to all, “like the gentle rain”. So Orangemen marching in places like Armagh are saying “you can’t drive us out, even though you killed ten of us last year”. That’s more than just asserting dominance.

    • Agree: Matra
    • Replies: @Fred Boynton
  39. @Dieter Kief

    Those “lapses of logic” Mr. Sailer mentions might be the Straussian in Fukuyama coming out. Leaving a trail of bread crumbs for the attentive reader to figure out what he really thinks vs. what he thinks it prudent to say publicly.

  40. Luke Lea says:

    Another argument for a slowdown in immigration you never hear is that the seventy million or so first- and second-generation immigrants who are already here come from societies with no, or very weak democratic traditions, whether they be from Latin America, China, the Middle East, or Africa. Whether they can be educated to accept the principles of a liberal society remains to be seen.

    • Agree: densa, Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Samuel Skinner
  41. After reading your review of Fukuyama’s new book, I’m left with the impression he was making a lukewarm appeal to his fellow “elites” to cut us petits Blancs a little slack as History rolls over us. We aren’t presenting the current ruling class of the West with a “demand for dignity”, we’re working to replace them. They do not have a mandate to govern us or our institutions and so they have to be benched. That’s what’s going on right now in Italy and in those “bad” countries in Central Europe, like Hungary. It’s really that simple.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
  42. If I were looking for an alliterative subtitle, I might try instead “The Demand for Dominance.”

    This points to the whole liberal (or Sargon’s “liberalist”) vs. power politics debate. Guys like Sargon think that if we just ridicule the special pleading around microaggressions and representation that the rising coalition of non-whites will just say “Yeah, you’re right, this doesn’t make sense,” and fall back into liberal “fairness” principles around color-blindness and equal opportunity. But once you put a big stick on the table marked “identity politics” and certain groups realize that big stick can: get them into college, get them a job, protect them from being fired, etc…. do you really think they are going to put that stick down just because white liberalists ask them nicely?

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    , @Lurker
  43. anon. says:

    In this context, his “dignity” and your “dominance” are synonymous. They feel a dignitary injury because they are not dominant. After all, if your group is not dominant, there are really only two explanations: 1) some other group was fitter, or 2) your group wuz robbed – but couldn’t do anything about it. Both of those are going to make a person feel a dignitary injury and a compulsion to flex some dominance.

  44. Mike1 says:
    @nebulafox

    You are right people’s sense of self respect is absent at almost all levels of society. Self regard, on the other hand, is at levels I doubt have ever previously existed.

  45. anon. says:
    @Wilkey

    22/112 Jewish is probably in line with the other justices and in line with the Jewish representation in the top law schools from which the SCOTUS clerkship pool is drawn. RBG’s record of black hiring, however, is legitimately jawdropping and surely the lowest on the Court since the Jim Crow era.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
  46. Anon[204] • Disclaimer says:

    The Dignity of the black man requires the Humiliation of the white man

    The new political leadership in Nelson Mandela Bay will channel the entire budget for the next financial year to its townships and northern areas – and should residents in more affluent areas report a sewerage problem‚ head of infrastructure and engineering Andile Lungisa will be told to ignore it.

    No taxation without represen…what???

    Bobani‚ who was caught on camera making the statement on Thursday‚ backtracked somewhat on Friday‚ saying he had been speaking figuratively and not literally.

    However‚ he had made no bones at the meeting about the fact that it was time residents in more affluent areas also experience blocked drains and sewage spills.

    You see, if you are white, you need your streets to be literally covered in shit. And yet the easily offended black ego complains when you call his country a shithole.

    https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/2018-09-17-municipal-budget-is-for-townships-only-says-nelson-mandela-bay-mayor/

    Such a pity there is not an Afrikaner AIPAC

    • Replies: @Whiskey
  47. Mike1 says:
    @Rosie

    I would say that respect is bestowed by those capable of understanding your expertise and capability. Status is given to you by people impressed by the social markers of success.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  48. @nebulafox

    I envy those who have a career in those fields, they’ll really be forging the future

    Its not too difficult to engage into one of those fields – I’ve always been fascinated by neuroscience and technology, and I’m surprised that its not more of a widely embraced field. The brain is a fascinating organ, and I truly do endorse everyone to try to comprehend it further in all of its mysteries.

  49. @Tyrion 2

    There’s no room for inherent dignity in SJW identity politics. Inherent dignity is what we have for being able to think reasonably. Alternatively, it is the spark of the divine that is in all of us. It is the very opposite of the progressive project. It means that you’d very rarely “speak as a (insert privileged victim group here)” because it’d almost always be more important to speak as a rational being/one with a spark of the divine.

    Excellent comment. I think it’s also what they’re trying to get away from. If we’re all rational beings with a spark of the divine then we can have common ground on which to engage. The identity commies want to do away with common ground in the revolution and start all over with only their ground. That way they can make up reality and morality to suit themselves at whim. Meanwhile the rest of us have lost our foundations and can barely assert that evil and good actually exist.

    Related: did you see that article in NR by the Swedish woman who made a big transformation after 9/11? She said that in Sweden… and this is my paraphrasing… there is no morality or judgment. It’s considered improper to condemn anyone, and it all goes back to their neutrality during WWII. That’s the standard for them and it’s the height of dignity: neutrality.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    , @Samuel Skinner
  50. Anon[315] • Disclaimer says:

    How dignified is a nation like Brazil or Venezuela?

    Dignity thrives in a closed cultural system of shared values. It’s hard to maintain dignity when you’re surrounded by peoples who have no use for your culture and its assumptions.

    This is why academia is exclusive. Its air of dignity as a center of learning depends on protecting its culture of scholarship. Of course, academia is hardly dignified these days. But how did that come to be? By allowing non-scholarship BS like women’s studies, homo studies, and black studies.
    And by infusing too much Pop Sensibility.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  51. @Trevor H.

    Fukuyama reminds me of Richard Florida – two guys who have been dining out on one cool sounding idea for a long time.

  52. Anon[204] • Disclaimer says:

    You will never find a more textbook example of Liberal Supremacy ™ than this:

    Matt, we do not need to ask your people for permission to exercise self-determination.

    If you cannot tolerate the Right having any power, please either agree to divorce this country, or else move to a country more suited to your hatreds.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Anon
  53. Francis Fukuyama is not Western. He is Asian. Granted, he is Japanese and thus intelligent, but he is not Caucasian/European. Deep down he knows this, hence the two-handed approach to identity politics. He does not have a Western identity. He would feel more comfortable in Japan.

    • Replies: @Anon
  54. OT:
    My aged mother is visiting at the moment and so the television has been on. I happened to see an ad (or whatever euphemism they use) on PBS for “Viking Longboat” riverboat tours of Europe. I have to say it really annoyed me to think of all those PBS watching people out there who would happily take a cruise down the Danube to soak in the culture but will proudly cheer on the EU as it tries to bring these same countries to heel. They gush over the parliament building in Budapest but think the people inside — who want to preserve the nation it represents — are deplorables.

  55. @Rosie

    ‘And the thing is, respect is cheap…

    It depends how you look at it, doesn’t it?

    I can always buy a big house. At least in theory, respect has to be earned — and you have to keep earning it.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  56. @Anonymous IV

    Sargon of Swindon also doesn’t seem to get that appealing to the English sense of fair play of current governing class is delusional. How much more proof does he need that the Wall Street and City people literally couldn’t care less if there were only a handful of Englishmen left in fifty years? They find it comical that anyone else cares either. Sargon himself even said as much, back when he was parroting all the right gin & tonic opinions a few months ago.

  57. Whiskey says: • Website
    @Anon

    This is why Steve’s citizenship is a failure. We already have calls like this by our enemies – Asian women like the woman who sits on the NYT editorial board, that Senator. White women like Anne Hathaway married to a billionaire. Melinda Gates. Keith Ellison X. Barack Obama. Maxine Waters and Kamala Harris.

    We need abject and quivering fear in our enemies. So that we not they get the lions share and we not they put the boot in not get it out into us.

    We have to fight, every single moment for dominance and can never give aninch. Mercy is a weakness as our enemies who are everywhere will show us none. Fighting of course must be smart. Distributed decentralized legal action. She Google for anti White male discrimination. Depose Pinchai on his favoritism for Indians. Hit Wohicki for anti White male bias under oath. Get creative and always strive to intimidate.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @L Woods
    , @Anon
    , @Anon
  58. @Anon

    ‘…This is why academia is exclusive. Its air of dignity as a center of learning depends on protecting its culture of scholarship. Of course, academia is hardly dignified these days. But how did that come to be? By allowing non-scholarship BS like women’s studies, homo studies, and black studies…’

    To be fair, all that debasement began somewhat earlier, with ‘Schools of Business Administration’ and such. After all, accounting is all very well, but ‘Hotel Management’ is not an academic discipline.

    Neither, incidentally, is Education. Teaching is one you (a) learn by doing, and (b) succeed at by doing what works for you. I never experienced an education course that wasn’t an almost perfect waste of time. Of course, to be fair, I went to extraordinary lengths to avoid taking any at all.

    I’d say what happened is that the bureaucracy of modern academia, like all bureaucracies, was happy to have more funds and more personnel to play with — so of course cheerfully agreed with every conceivable idea for a new field of ‘study.’ You could probably establish a ‘School of Sand Castle Engineering’ if everyone could just keep a straight face for long enough. I don’t see why not.

  59. ANON[254] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Hilarious, at the Atlantic:

    A DNA Test Says He’s 4 Percent African—Is He Black?
    A Washington lawsuit asks how the government can determine a person’s race.

    The government is hinting that you have to have personally been discriminated against to be government certified black.

    Will universities start to accept or demand 23 and Me reports? I see much hilarity ahead.

  60. @El Dato

    Citations? There are probably 500 books on Hegel’s idea of the state and probably 1000 conceptualizations of it in those books. One thing I’m sure of – he envisaged it neither as a neoliberal market economy of Gordon Gekkos, nor an ethno-nationalist Utopia. The state was seen as responding to the break down of traditional forms of order and to the division of labor under capitalism.

    The state offers a ‘resolution’ of sorts to that break down and fragmentation of roles at a higher level of order. But there can be no fixed or eternal form to the state. That’s what dialectics means. Fukuyama is a moron who’s not fit to shine Hegel’s proverbial shoes.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Dieter Kief
  61. Matra says:
    @Hodag

    In Northern Ireland the Protestants like to parade through Catholic areas, as an act of dominance

    Leftist and Catholic propaganda. (Most of the world’s media take their view from BBC Northern Ireland which, as everybody in NI knows, has always been completely dominated by the Catholic community and its English leftist sympathisers).

    Orangemen walk on traditional routes that their ancestors walked on. Some of those traditional routes have since been conquered by Catholics, often using terrorism and organised intimidation, though certainly not always. In areas where the only way to get from one Protestant area to another is through a Catholic neighbourhood there has been violence. Most of these routes have been abandoned or a compromise has been reached – ie. the marching bands go silent as they approach and go through the area.

    A problem though is the definition of a ‘Catholic neighbourhood’. The main flashpoint area in West Belfast doesn’t involve walking through an actual Catholic neighbourhood but the Orangemen can be seen by some of the Catholic residents from their houses as the parade passes the Protestant end of a short neutral zone of shops that separates the two communities. It’s not like America where there is lots of room to spare. The two communities are almost on top of one another.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  62. Shaq says:

    OT: cognitive function declines with higher temps.

    Stanford researcher, so it has to be true. I wonder what the optimal distance from the equator might be….

  63. Fukuyama’s writing shows at every turn the impossibility of doing good theorizing if one accepts as a basic premise that HBD can’t be a real and important thing.

    Why did he think back in the day that all nations would soon become welfare states like those in Europe?

    Because he thought that the model they represented for human happiness and success could be, and would be, quickly copied by all other nations. He could think this only because he thought all human groups were identical in potential.

    Why does he now go on an on about the dignity of identity in the way he does? Because he believes, again, that all human groups are essentially the same, and none can have more inherent problems in integrating into, and harmonizing with, our society than others. The problems, insofar as they exist, must lie in the dominant forces in society that put up obstacles to that integration and harmonization.

    Moral: if you start out in your theorizing with a basic premise that is flatly wrong, you will never get anything important right.

    And HBD is such a premise. If you get it wrong, you are basically worthless as a thinker on any social or political issue.

    Failure to accept HBD is the font of all ignorance.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Jason Liu
  64. @Cagey Beast

    The Protestant cries out in pain as he strikes you.

    • Troll: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  65. Matra says:

    Chronicles has John Lukacs’ scathing review, from 1992, of Fukuyama’s The End of History and the Last Man. Link

    It doesn’t seem as though Fukuyama has learned anything over the last three decades. Maybe his own lack of identity – a Japanese-American who isn’t really a member of either nation – prevents him from honestly looking at the premises he’s been relying on to come to his erroneous conclusions. As the linked review from Lukacs says “Nationalism is something that he does not, or cannot, consider”.

  66. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous IV

    Sargoy never seems troubled that the vast majority of his followers appear to be white. If his BS had any traction we would see a rainbow coalition hoisting him shoulder high.

    (He’s had his uses plucking the low-hanging SJW fruit but thats about it)

  67. @Trevor H.

    They feel themselves already dominant. The demand is for the fealty owed.

    • Agree: Kylie, Mr. Rational
  68. @Dieter Kief

    “That’s right – and that’s pretty Japanese, as far as societal matters are concerned, you’re supposed to avoid pure logic (in order to avoid offenses).”

    That is what rich progressives believe themselves to be doing if they ever allow themselves to reflect upon it.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  69. Although the 22-year-old me had never thought about it, this subtle but important logical distinction between current shareholders (or citizens) and future shareholders (or citizens) is not a particularly difficult concept to grasp once you’ve had it explained to you.

    (It is so obvious once stated that it drove open-borders economist Bryan Caplan into a paroxysm of rage when he heard it because he didn’t have a good response.)

    Steve Sailer is as happy as a butcher’s dog about driving shyster globalizer mass immigration fanatic Bryan Caplan into a paroxysm of rage?

    BIG WHOOP!

    I once drove the departed to the underworld US Senator John McCain into a paroxysm of rage of such fury that his face was the color of a baboon’s ass, but you don’t see me bragging about it!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  70. Hegel Didn’t Think Highly Of Africa.

    I don’t know crap about that Kraut, Hegel, but I read a translation of his writings that suggested he dismissed Sub-Saharan Africa, or maybe all of Africa, because of no written language or something.

    I got Hegel into a retort to a very powerful Irish woman who was complaining that somebody was dismissing or disrespecting the importance of the whole continent of Africa.

    Kathy Sullivan of New Hampshire is one of the world’s most important women. Trump, Putin, Theresa May, Macron and many others don’t do nothing if they don’t first clear it with Kathy.

    This is rather clever from 2015:

  71. Anon[128] • Disclaimer says:

    Identity politics is just tribalism by a different name. Blacks are a tribe, Hispanics are a tribe, leftwing women are a tribe, gays are a tribe, Jews are a tribe. They are using this tribalism to try to hog all the goodies for themselves, and they do things like hire only their own kind in getting jobs, etc. Look at all the Jews in the media who hire only Jews. Left-wing academics hire only more left-wing academics, and they try to force out or ruin the careers anyone who isn’t. Left-wing CEOs try to hire only left-wing employees, and they’ll fire anyone who is caught expressing belief in another variety of politics.

    They’re like children attempting to steal all the cookies from the plate, and who have never learned how to share. Whites are the only ones who ever shared the cookies.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  72. Arclight says:
    @Samuel Skinner

    Well, at least multi-cultural democracies…I could see a democratic country without the racial politics of our own doing better because just as the ‘haves’ are more comfortable with coughing up some of their money to help the less well off, those at the lower end are less motivated by ethnic resentment to try and kill the golden goose than here.

    • Replies: @Samuel Skinner
  73. tyrone says:

    Bad faith…….why do I get the feeling these “brilliant pundits” like fuckyomama are leading us down the primrose path? roger that.

  74. Jason Liu says:
    @candid_observer

    Good comment. Liberal democracy in its idealized form is the whitest, most Northern European thing ever. Assuming that other societies will want or become liberal democracies is an astounding display of arrogance, helped along by delusional beliefs in universalism.

  75. Tyrion 2 says:
    @stillCARealist

    Just looked it up. It is very good. It well captures the cosmopolitan political European consensus that I am perfectly familiar with.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/09/9-11-changed-european-radical-to-conservative-president-bush-speech/

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Carol
  76. Tim says:

    I agree with what Clifford Brown said (we must have been listening to the same NPR interview of Fukuyama).

    I was really surprised by just how UNINTERESTING Fukuyama was. Everything he said was just right down the middle NPR/Liberal Speak: If people democratically elect the people I don’t like, it will destroy . . . umm, democracy (he said that).

    We need an amnesty . . . then we can enforce the border. Black Lives Matter is good, “It’s okay to be white” is bad. Right down the line, it was, ‘my guys good, your guys bad.’

    It made me lose respect for the guy. It was graveling.

  77. @Luke Lea

    God I hope not. Liberal society has a TFR below replacement- getting them to accept its tenants is basically getting more people to sign up for a suicide cult. While those foreigners are not my people, I’d rather the US break then it succeed in getting everyone on the planet to kill themselves.

  78. Contemporary identity politics seem far less about Jackie Robinson maintaining a stiff upper lip as he demonstrates his right to play baseball than about Serena Williams feeling entitled to go off on the tennis umpire.

    That’s a very good way to put it.

    Much is said about the Chinese way of buckling down and working harder when life is unfair. Little credit is given anymore to the builders of the modern world for doing exactly the same thing and at the same time inventing systems of fairness.

    It’s called good sportsmanship.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @anon
  79. @stillCARealist

    If we’re all rational beings with a spark of the divine then we can have common ground on which to engage.

    And then you get murdered by commies because it turns out not everyone is a rational being and demagogues exploit this to gain power. There is no scenario where ‘leave a society weak to leftism’ doesn’t result in the left seizing power.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  80. @Arclight

    That requires the ability to keep demagogues and looters from gaining power by lies. In the long term that doesn’t work.

    those at the lower end are less motivated by ethnic resentment to try and kill the golden goose than here.

    http://www.electproject.org/home/voter-turnout/demographics

    Voting rates in off years
    Black 30-40%
    Hispanic 20-30%

    Ethnic resentment is part of the puzzle but if we didn’t have envy and spite of the white population willing to screw over other whites to get ahead it wouldn’t be significant.

  81. Carol says:
    @Thea

    That is my take, but apparently dignity is something the government buys for you.

  82. @Buzz Mohawk

    Much is said about the Chinese way of buckling down and working harder…

    Let’s just say East Asians in general have this reputation (rightly) since the author is a Mr. Fukuyama.

  83. @IHTG

    Amy Walter is a nice lady.

    I once told Walter about the Chris Christie supporting New Hampshire politician weasels at a campaign event. I pointed them out and described their particular politician villainy. Walter humored me in a pleasant manner. Amy Walter and the other recognizable presidential primary reporters have to contend with the voter gadflies who think they know it all. Sounds familiar.

    Chris Christie’s whole campaign was some kind of crybaby crap about drugged-out zombies and the September 11, 2001 ISLAMIC TERRORIST ATTACKS.

    Christie was going for the just slightly downscale crowd from Kasich. Kasich was going for the upper middle class and the GOP robots and Christie was going for the middle class and the boneheads susceptible to stale blarney.

    Kasich is an insufferable baby boomer shyster of the worst sort. I hope he runs against Trump. It will be great fun for somebody to rhetorically pulverize this baby boomer slob Kasich.

  84. Tulip says:
    @Tyrion 2

    But. . . “inherent dignity” is logically inconsistent baloney.

    Dignity means that you are “worthy, honored, esteemed”. . . which means you have to do something to be worthy, honored and esteemed vis a vis the hoi polloi. That is, only a few can have dignity, the many can not.

    Second, dignity is acquired through primarily through action, secondarily from birth (descent from the dignified). Its inherently elitist.

    “Inherent dignity” is a “round square”, unless we are talk about the “inherent dignity” of the natural aristocrats “the few, the proud”.

    What is strange about progressive politics is “inherent dignity” is supposed to apply to the losers, the idle, the “oppressed”, the cowards, the traitors, the deviant, the diseased, the disfigured and ugly, the parasites and criminals, the mad and disturbed***. That is to say, good shall become evil and evil good–and that is how it is supposed to be “socially constructed” by inverting language. This is the essence of Foucault–glorification of the bowels of the social order, where excrement is food, and food is excrement.

    Only excrement will never be food, no matter what you can coerce people to say.

    ***Commentators at Unz Review excepted, of course.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  85. Someone who grew up in an English-speaking country with the name Fukuyama might be speaking from experience when talking about maintaining one’s dignity in adverse circumstances.

    Some airline should start up a Fukuoka-Oshawa service, just for the baggage tags. Fukuoka to Tupelo, Bathpalathang to Fukuoka, Wenatchee to Shepparton, and Philadelphia to the Solomon Islands would also be fun.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airports_by_IATA_code:_F

    • Replies: @anon
  86. El Dato says:
    @Tyrion 2

    No it’s all bullshit.

    The author pretends to have woken up to the surrounding Matrix, then immediately plugs the tube back into the neck connector and reclines right next to Thomas Friedman.

    Soon enough, the narrative was clear. The end of the story had already been written: The U.S. was unjustly acting as the world police, once again. Bush was a moron and a puppet. America was killing innocent people for oil. It went on and on, and all I could think was that if I know that these things are not true, then what other lies have I accepted as truth throughout my life?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  87. Lagertha says:
    @Cagey Beast

    I don’t even want to read his book! It’s same old same old: “maybe we can make Cultural Marxism work, if we get rid of all the ordinary folks, and especially, men.” The reason human beings don’t get along with other human beings: they must constantly compete; are envious creatures; can be duplicitous as well as histrionic; can be lazy; can be condescending towards others…because humans have a primordial instinct to survive. What really bothers me about global elitists of all stripes, is that they can never accept this fact.

    Humans only have enough time and energy to take care of their family; their community, region, country. Humans are prone to worry about mortality, all the time. Humans are pack animals in many respects, and, forcefully, making a community; region; country provide for others, who have been foisted upon them, is never going to work. Smaller groups survive best; shared cooperation and values is paramount.

    Maybe this is the attraction of watching GOT: no one gets any relief for long; no one gets to enjoy their success for long, but we get to watch spectacular revenge and blistering deaths (against characters most of us hate)…sex at it’s most extremes, and then go to bed and get up to go to your job. Ordinary people will never lose their primordial instinct to survive…and, only like-minded, high-trust/low-corruption souls can band together and survive. New people who strive to put their cultural, ethnic, racial, economic preferences/views above a people already in a region, or view their preferences as better, usually don’t want to assimilate/cooperate or associate (prefer to be insular yet are often dependent on the people they despise) with the people who have built a time-tested, successful community. So, I don’t see any hope – brain fart finished!

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  88. @Clifford Brown

    Yeah, Fukuyama’s distinctions lack consequence and are therefore tiresome. The only fault in your analysis I can see is, that you think Fukuyama’s systematic indistinctiveness wouldn’t be his, but somehow your fault.

    (Which is kinda interesting, because it might indicate, that Fukuyama has a political trait, which indeed is of some importance, and that’s his ability, to get away with his thoughts (to succeed in the end…).

    ((Political discourse is (much) more about winning over an audience than bringing forward well thought out arguments in order to win a serious debate (Jonathan Haidt pointed in this direction lately when making a point for his preference of the way, in which philosophers discuss vs. the means and manners in psychology – – – thus he concluded: Real discourse strives for counter-arguments and knows, that without them, it loses its edge (Haidt then hinted at John Stewart Mill’s love of and fight even for heterodoxy…)).

  89. “Merkel’s Mistake” ???

    I thought Sailer’s original description, “Merkel’s Boner”, was better. The necessary recap of early baseball history is a feature not a bug.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  90. Carol says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Yet, don’t the euros think it’s “wrong” to not welcome all refugees and other migrants?

    Or is it just a matter of hospitality?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
  91. Anon[323] • Disclaimer says:

    Fukuyama’s song and dance

  92. @Desiderius

    I wrote: “That’s right – and that’s pretty Japanese, as far as societal matters are concerned, you’re supposed to avoid pure logic (in order to avoid offenses).”

    You commented:
    “That is what rich progressives believe themselves to be doing if they ever allow themselves to reflect upon it.”

    Same Same But Different

    The difference between those two ways of thinking is interesting. In the western case, the lack of logic subverts society, since our societies rest upon an open exchange of ideas (= rest on criticism), whereas in the Japanese case, the behavior stabilizes a social world which rests on strong traditional foundations.

    The societal costs for the structurally same behavior (=lack of logic) don’t yield the same results (= come at different prices).

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  93. @blank-misgivings

    I didn’t think too much of Fukuyama’s interpretation of Hegel as the proto-Fukuyama but didn’t want to get into it.

    Also, Fukuyama’s reading of Plato’s “The Republic” is dubious, but once again, not too germane.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  94. L Woods says:
    @Whiskey

    “But muh principles,” says the boomercon. When you’re right you’re right.

  95. Sean says:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master%E2%80%93slave_dialectic#Contradiction_and_Resolution
    Alexandre Kojève’s unique interpretation differs from this. For Kojève, people are born and history began with the first struggle, which ended with the first masters and slaves. A person is always either master or slave; and there are no real humans where there are no masters and slaves. History comes to an end when the difference between master and slave ends, when the master ceases to be master because there are no more slaves and the slave ceases to be a slave because there are no more masters. A synthesis takes place between master and slave: the integral citizen of the universal and homogenous state created by Napoleon.

    According to John Gray, for Kojève, the US is the model for the end of history.
    Louis Menand In the New Yorker review of says Fukiyama’s latest is largely a restatement of previous books and stems what he learned from Allan Bloom who along with Carl Strauss was the main promoter of Kojève’s idea in America.

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/09/03/francis-fukuyama-postpones-the-end-of-history
    For Kojève, the key concept in Hegel’s “Phenomenology” was recognition. Human beings want the recognition of other human beings in order to become self-conscious—to know themselves as autonomous individuals. As Kojève put it, humans desire, and what they desire is either something that other humans desire or the desire of other humans. “Human history,” he said, “is the history of desired desires.” What makes this complicated is that in the struggle for recognition there are winners and losers. The terms Hegel used for these can be translated as lords and servants, but also as masters and slaves, which are the terms Kojève used. The master wins the recognition of the slave, but his satisfaction is empty, since he does not recognize the slave as human in turn. The slave, lacking recognition from the master, must seek it in some other way.

    Kojève thought that the other way was through labor. The slave achieves his sense of self by work that transforms the natural world into a human world. But the slave is driven to labor in the first place because of the master’s refusal to recognize him. This “master-slave dialectic” is the motor of human history, and human history comes to an end when there are no more masters or slaves, and all are recognized equally.

    Hence Caplan “If allowing a peaceful worker to accept a job offer from a peaceful employer isn’t a fundamental moral obligation, what is?” is working to abolish slavery! Ron fought fire with fire and he really shook Caplan up

    How Diabolical is Unz’s Proposal?
    When I told Unz that I considered his plan “diabolical,” he chuckled that he took my assessment as a compliment.

    To be “diabolical” is to be cleverly evil. But Unz’s critics often deny that he’s even clever. If employers are willing to break immigration laws, why does Unz think they won’t break minimum wage laws as well? The truth, though, is that Unz anticipated this objection:

  96. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Tulip

    But. . . “inherent dignity” is logically inconsistent baloney.

    Dignity means that you are “worthy, honored, esteemed”. . . which means you have to do something to be worthy, honored and esteemed vis a vis the hoi polloi. That is, only a few can have dignity, the many can not.

    That God created each of us in his image/that we can each rationally consider the universe, is worthy enough for me.

    • Replies: @Tulip
    , @Tulip
  97. Lot says:

    Deplatform OR ELSE!

    Head Editor of NY Review of Books purged for letting a Indian-Canadian anchorman perv who was metoo’d write an article about his experience.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/19/arts/ian-buruma-out-jian-ghomeshi.html

    I noticed once the SJW mob started targeting this guy, he did exactly the wrong thing: gave interviews to MSM shrews.

    Best response when a twitter mob comes after you is either complete silence or a 2 sentence statement then complete silence. Quite often the mob gets bored and moves on when deprived of fresh outrage.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  98. Tyrion 2 says:
    @El Dato

    She’s right with what she wrote above though. There’s a lot of ground between the impression the European media give on GWB and America and any reasonable position. Objecting to the deranged reporting is not the same thing as endorsing.

  99. @Jus' Sayin'...

    “Merkel’s Mistake” ???

    I thought Sailer’s original description, “Merkel’s Boner”, was better. The necessary recap of early baseball history is a feature not a bug.

    How about “Merkel jerk”?

    Or would you rather not “recap” that?

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  100. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Carol

    The Euro media line is that the US is the fount of all racism and evil.

  101. @Charles Pewitt

    his face was the color of a baboon’s ass

    Aren’t you thinking of a mandrill?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  102. Aren’t you thinking of a mandrill?

    Baboon is funnier than mandrill and it has a couple of B’s in it.

    I’d like to see an 80 pound mandrill chasing some politicians around Benny Hill style, that would be funny.

  103. Tulip says:
    @Tyrion 2

    The image sure, but the likeness not so much.

    That is, we can affirm dignity as a potency, but not as an actuality. And, a potential nuclear war is a different kettle of fish from an actual nuclear war–policy wise.

  104. CCZ says:

    Add “Typographic Racism” to “Institutional Racism” and “Systematic Racism” as demeaning demographic dignity and “fontism” to the list of evil white behavior.

    https://www.nj.com/camden/index.ssf/2018/09/gop_dismisses_claim_of_shameful_racist_attack_in_n.html

  105. Tulip says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Its important also to note the real distortion when you move from a Christian theological affirmation of dignity (which we can call the potential to resemble Christ) to secular blather about human dignity.

    Human dignity is only possible through incorporation in the Body of Christ through the holy sacrament of baptism–where one receives dignity by virtue of a transference of identity with the ultimate and unique embodiment of dignity: Jesus Christ. And reclaiming that dignity is a long process of ascetic struggle in the form of regeneration.

    Take out Christ and the Body of Christ, and the whole thing is a joke. Christ can change water into wine through his mystical and supernatural powers, but calling excrement “food” or pretending that excrement is food is only going to get you and your society sick–in the absence of divinity or supernatural powers.

  106. Tulip says:

    I suppose you could say “inherent dignity” can only exist in a social order where everyone gratefully accepts their station.

  107. CCZ says:
    @Lot

    His family alleged racism and he won his new heart.

    ATLANTA (AP) — An Atlanta area teenager who said a heart transplant gave him a second chance at life died this week when he lost control of the car he was driving while fleeing police, according to police records.

    Anthony Stokes allegedly carjacked a Honda driver in Dunwoody and then tried to burglarize a home in Roswell. After the burglary, officers spotted the stolen Honda and pursued it. During the chase, Stokes clipped a car in an intersection, jumped the curb and hit a pedestrian before colliding with a sign,.

    Stokes had also been arrested in January and charged with possession of tools for the commission of a crime and criminal attempt, according to DeKalb County court records. He was released from jail a few weeks later after posting $5,000 bond.

    Jail records show Stokes was arrested in January for allegedly stealing a car in a Walmart parking lot. He was also arrested twice in Newton County. Stokes turned 17 last November, so the rest of his record is sealed as a juvenile.

    In August 2013, local news media quoted Stokes’ family as saying that doctors at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston refused to put Stokes on a transplant waiting list because of his troubled past and their belief he wouldn’t comply with the strict plan for medication and follow-up treatment.

    His mother said hospital authorities had unfairly stereotyped her son as a bad kid.

    Days later after a sympathetic media blitz, Stokes was put on the list for a transplant, and on Aug. 23, 2013, he underwent a five-hour surgery to get his new heart.

    In the two years Stokes had his donor heart, 697 people died waiting to get one.

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution, The (GA)
    April 2, 2015

    • Replies: @L Woods
  108. anon[396] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Esteemed Reg Caesar, you have way too much time on your hands, so keep posting!

  109. @Anonymous

    I like the analogy to shareholders/house rules.

    Steve’s shareholder analogy is quite useful.

    I honestly believe “immigration moratorium” is an outright winner right now if driven by competent articulate nationalists. Start with “the American people own America” and then drive it home with jobs, wages, housing, schools, traffic, welfare, taxes–stuff politicians of all stripes claim to care about.

    But a proposal of an actual transferrable “ownership” share–i.e. a saleable right to live in America–would be political dynamite.
    – It immediately highlights that open immigration is theft from Americans (or Britons, Canadians, French, Australians, Germans, Swedes, Italians, whomever) diluting their share, highlighting the corruption of politicians and the raising support for closed border.
    – It undermines the whole xenophobia! narrative against nationalists.
    – While “deconstructing” the whole “racism!” narrative as the anti-white fraud it is. If you don’t like the joint … leave! (No need for reparations.)
    – Whatever drastically reduced immigration flows remained would generally be of an improved quality–probably raising the nation’s IQ/conscientiousness. This would drive the left nuts, but it’s embarrassing for them when forced to actually articulate what they want: lots of incompetent state dependent peoples who are ethno-culturally incompatible with the natives. Forcing the left to reveal how thoroughly and fundamentally nasty their agenda is … goodness!

    BTW, a saleable “right of citizenship” or “right of residence” is what true libertarians–not driven by a hostile ethnic agenda–would be arguing for. When “libertarians” argue for taking something from people and *giving* it to someone else, there is some other agenda at work.

    Anyway, I think just tossing Steve’s “shareholder” analogy out there–”American citizens own this nation. Politicians who want to give that away are thieves”–has a lot of merit.

  110. Many stock market experts believe that much of the U.S. stock markets appreciation between 2009 to 2016 was due to companies buying back there own stock, reducing the supply of shares available. It’s a common strategy to look for companies buying there own shares back. Stock dilution is generally not taken well by the share holders. Just like most folks don’t like there diluted soft drinks after the ice cubes melt.

  111. @Fred Boynton

    A homosexual half-Indian gentleman is the current Tea Shack of Ireland. Meanwhile the current Bishop of Rome is such a flaky globalist the New York Times treats him as their guy. Irish Protestants are the least of your troubles (pardon the phrase).

  112. @Steve Sailer

    Also, Fukuyama’s reading of Plato’s “The Republic” is dubious, but once again, not too germane.

    You reminded me of a very good reading of Plato’s Republic done by an actor who played a Nazi bigwig in an episode of the original Star Trek. Patrick Horgan knocks it out of the park here:

    https://www.learnoutloud.com/podcaststream/listen.php?url=http://therepublic.audiobooks.libsynpro.com/rss&all=1&title=21931

  113. @Hippopotamusdrome

    The Orangemen also took the lead in burning down the Parliament of Canada:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burning_of_the_Parliament_Buildings_in_Montreal

    Ain’t it a crazy old world?

  114. Dtbb says:
    @Anon

    I thought it was settled as Merkel’s Boner.

  115. L Woods says:
    @CCZ

    In the two years Stokes had his donor heart, 697 people died waiting to get one.

    A fitting metaphor for America: the best suffer and die so that lowest elements of the human species can thrive.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  116. @L Woods

    Did they retrieve his heart to use in somebody else?

  117. Rosie says:
    @Colin Wright

    I can always buy a big house. At least in theory, respect has to be earned — and you have to keep earning it.

    I think that may be a guy thing. Women don’t have to fight other women to earn their respect. Respect is assumed. It’s yours to lose. Not so with men. You have to give them a good walloping, or at least give them a serious run for their money, before they’ll respect you. Of course, that’s just my impression FWIW.

    • Replies: @Anon
  118. Rosie says:
    @Mike1

    I would say that respect is bestowed by those capable of understanding your expertise and capability. Status is given to you by people impressed by the social markers of success.

    Hmmm. Kind of like how my kids’ peers like and respect me as an adult authority figure, but none would say I have much worldly status.

  119. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lot

    Buruma’s life story is pretty interesting, he’s as pure a Homo sovieticus of globalism as Obama had been before deciding to call himself black, except that Buruma’s a real intellectual. Purging him underscores that nobody is safe.

  120. Wilkey says:
    @anon.

    22/112 Jewish is probably in line with the other justices and in line with the Jewish representation in the top law schools from which the SCOTUS clerkship pool is drawn.

    You are free to do the research and get back to me. I linked to the list of Supreme Court law clerks. My count of Jewish law clerks was pretty consevasive. I only counted those whose bios listed them as Jewish or had reliably Jewish surnames. Add another six to that numbe (not at all unlikely) and that makes a solid 25% of her law clerks Jewish.

    My real point is that Ginsburg is a hardcore leftist who professes beliefs in racial quotas, affirmative action, and the idea that inequality of outcome = discrumination but, relative to their share of the population, Jews are 100x more likely than blacks to be hired by Ginsburg (I can do the math on that one for you if you’d like). If Ginsburg had been the only justice to hire any Jewish law clerks during her time on the SCOTUS that number alone would have been roughly equal to the Jewish share of the population.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Lot
  121. Anon[961] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    For whatever reason, a very large majority of people with top-notch LSAT scores are Democrats.

    Where does this come from? I’m not finding any research relating to this on Google. This is all that came up, from 2013:

    “Democrats had a higher education and ability than Republicans in Senate and House.”

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289613000263

  122. Lot says:
    @Wilkey

    Here are the top 5 students at Harvard Law one year:

    http://hlrecord.org/2002/09/five-win-sears-prize/

    Looks like three AJs, 1 italian-american, and a “michael shah” who is a NYC real estate mogul with operations in Israel, in other words likely a Persian or Indian Jew.

  123. Anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I don’t think they retransplant organs, although they have done heart lung transplants on people with bad lungs but a good heart and used the heart on another person, or something like that.

    IIRC, Lou Reed and Mickey Mantle each got a new liver despite being technically ineligible because of previous malignancies. I seem to remember they bent the rules for Steve Jobs a little as well.

  124. Lot says:
    @Wilkey

    “My real point is that Ginsburg is a hardcore leftist who professes beliefs in racial quotas”

    She thinks affirmative action should be legal, but I don’t think she believes it should be mandatory.

    Closest she got to that issue was voting to overturn the Michigan affirmative action ban. But the sole stated reason for this was that it was done by ballot initiative and took power away from another political institution (the individual university boards) in a way thay disadvantaged minorities.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/12-682#writing-12-682_DISSENT_7

    • Replies: @Anon
  125. anon[410] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Much is said about the Chinese way of buckling down and working harder when life is unfair

    As the karate sensei says, “Life is tough. Once you accept that life is tough it becomes less tough. It becomes joyful toughness instead of meaningless non-existence in life.”

  126. @blank-misgivings

    Your point is good, and what you write about Hegel is even better – except for the moron part as far as Fukuyama is concerned. A moron he ain’t.

    (I a. W. – it makes sense to think about and discuss and yep: Contradict Fukuyama, too. Steve is not wasting his (and his reader’s) time in doing so.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  127. “Dignity, always dignity.”

    –Gene Kelly as Don Lockwood in “Singin’ in the Rain”

  128. @Dieter Kief

    I wanted to just add here that I’ve always enjoyed your posts and your ability to distill Hegel into a much more understandable thesis.

  129. AndrewR says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Are all “Western Democracies” really so similar? I think Germany, for instance, does a much better job of tracking people into the right careers as opposed to the “everyone should go to college” mentality that seems to predominate in much of the US. But I’ve never spent any time there and my German isn’t good enough for me to feel comfortable lumping Germany into the monolithic “West” that many people do too often. All I know about Germany is what has been told to me in English. You can’t really pretend to understand a country unless you (at a minimum) speak its languages.

    I’m not saying that elitism doesn’t exist in Germany or other non-Anglo Western countries, but I do wonder why you feel so comfortable extrapolating from US/Anglo culture in this instance.

  130. AndrewR says:

    Edit feature broken or removed? I cannot edit even immediately after posting

    Edit: wtf I can edit this comment but not the one I posted literally two minutes ago

  131. @Samuel Skinner

    It won’t be the tolerance that goes.  It will be the entire gayborhood, relocated to the cemetary as it was on track to be in the DBA (Days Before AZT).

    Pan-drug resistant HIV is already the USA, I’m told.  If conventional antibiotics become ineffective then all the “safer” things like rimming will also wipe their practitioners out pretty quickly.  We won’t have to tolerate anything because there will be nothing we can do to prevent the whole bunch from simply dying.

    Being dead doesn’t seem to be a whole lot of fun, and will definitely discourage a lot of fun-seekers from following one’s example.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  132. @Steve Sailer

    It had shrunk three sizes too small.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational, Rosie
  133. @Mr. Rational

    How many hundreds of thousands of homos perished in the 70′s and 80′s, within a few years of their “liberation”? did it change their behavior? A little bit, maybe, but I think the lesson is unrestrained, perverted, and drug-abusing young men will take pretty much any risk to get off. Including death.

    Here’s a nice example of said behavior:

    http://thefederalist.com/2018/09/19/man-raped-doesnt-justify-punishing-people-without-due-process/

    Notice how these men behave and messed up everyone is.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Mr. Rational
  134. @Reg Cæsar

    I Googled images of “baboon’s ass” so you don’t have to. He’s right, trust me.

  135. ATBOTL says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Francis Fukuyama was the leading intellectual advocate of neoliberal globalism in the 90′s. It’s no shock that he is hostile to the interests of white people. Why were you surprised to learn this?

    Did you think he was some great thinker? His predictions about the world have been comically wrong.

  136. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rob McX

    There’s also immigrants should be free Whites of good character. One of the arguments for the revolution was England’s dumping of convicts beggars and indentured servants in the American colony.

    Should be noted here that as soon as we got free of England they created a new convict beggar excess population dumping ground, Australia.

    But who cares what the founders said about immigrants. The judges just make the laws up as they go along depending on the current fads or if they are gay or hetero. I noticed that it was gay state judges that first legalized gay marriage.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  137. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @stillCARealist

    There’s an ad on TV about some AIDS prevention testing. All the actors are black.

  138. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    Darts Vader Ginsburg is a commie anti White Jew who worked for the ACLU much of her life.

    She voted in favor of affirmative action discrimination against Whites. Who cares what crap her clerks write to justify her decision.
    She’s an anti White former ACLU Jew.

    Old French saying Dint listen to what he or she says. Watch what he or she does.

    Darts Vader voted anti White. Who cares about her justification. Her vote is responsible for further discrimination against Whites.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  139. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    Who cares if other people respect you?

    From kindergarten on I have never in my life cared what other people think of me.

  140. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @attilathehen

    So you’ve noticed Fukuyama is Japanese not Caucasian European

    Such a genius you are. Thank you so much for letting us know he’s Japanese. Otherwise we’d never know.

    • Troll: Mr. Rational
  141. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Whiskey

    Where have you been the last 65 years?
    We’ve lost. Lost lost lost the fight. Trump isn’t even going to build the wall.
    His ICE has done some workplace raids and arrested a few hundred illegal workers.

    But has one, just one employer of illegals been arrested No.

  142. @stillCARealist

    How many hundreds of thousands of homos perished in the 70′s and 80′s, within a few years of their “liberation”? did it change their behavior?

    The dead ones stopped… dead.  And for a while there was a big push for “safer sex”, until antiretrovirals were invented and got subsidized.  That’s the only reason the bathhouses are still in business.

    Shortly the situation will be as if those drugs never existed.  What’s going to happen rapidly thereafter is that the community which supports “gay culture” will largely disappear.  SF will not be a queer city for much longer; it may be a city where the thrill-seekers go to die, for a while.  “Leaving San Fransisco” may just be “Leaving Las Vegas” with a slightly longer timescale.

    And then all the queerness in Hollyweird and fashion and everything else will be radically attenuated, and the purveyors of poz will have to come up with a victim group that’s more sympathetic than walking skeletons with skin ulcers.  All the glamor will be gone.  I give it 10 years.

    No argument that they’re messed up.  Those unable to resist will be removed from society by their own hand, praise Darwin!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  143. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Whiskey

    How much are you able and willing to contribute to a Legal Foundation that files anti affirmative action lawsuits for White plaintiffs?

    I don’t mean a conservative legal foundation that files suits against abortion and for capitalists but a pro White legal foundation that will focus solely on affirmative action.

    How much can you contribute and are you willing?

  144. Anonymous[174] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Rational

    This is true. And we’ve been here before. I remember reading the biography of a famous homosexual who grew up in the homophobic era before the 1960s, and who thought the old prejudices were gone forever in the liberal 1970s–only to see them return with a vengeance in the 1980s. Homosexuals were suddenly hated in a way they hadn’t been for decades. AIDS was the reason. (He didn’t die of the disease, but wound up killing himself anyway in the late 1980s, and so never got to see the tolerance return again.)

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @Mr. Rational
  145. @Anonymous

    C’mon man! Nobody gives any more of a crap about poofters than they do about blacks. I wish all my fellow Americans nothing but the best, but I don’t want to hear about your sexual/racial/trans struggle all the f***ing time. STFU, get on with your life, and leave me the F alone!

  146. @Anonymous

    AIDS was the reason.

    Having some pervert kill you (and maybe your beloved spouse) with a blood transfusion, slowly and painfully, gets one’s dander up.

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