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Disney's Jungle Cruise Reveals the Totem Pole of Diversity Pokemon Points
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But who is on the top? It kind of looks like a white woman, a “Karen” if you will. Is that really who we are? Is a white women named Karen truly on the Right Side of History?

 
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  1. If you’re at Disney Land to begin with, you’re part of the problem. I don’t care if you impale yourself on a unicorn at the merry-go-round. Quit financially backing your enemies!

    • Disagree: al gore rhythms
    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @PaceLaw
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, to be fair, if you are a family man with kids aged between 3 to 12, then going to Disneyland is damn-near socially obligatory in today’s America (especially if you’re at least middle class). What will your neighbors, in-laws, and co-workers say if you don’t take the kids at least once? And that’s not even taking into account the Disney movies . . . Yeah, peer-pressure is alive and well in these United States.

    Just being a realist about the situation on the ground folks . . .

    Replies: @Goddard, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Spect3r

    , @al gore rhythms
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don't really disagree. It's just rare to see a comment get the full range of reactions, and I coudn't pass up on the chance to make it happen.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Where I used to work a Black mother said Disney was her top destination because it was a "safe" place for her family.

  2. The digital age may be destroying real art, but at least the remains will be well preserved online.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Lisa F

    https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/digital_data.png

    Replies: @Paul Rise, @Spect3r

  3. This actually works against the oppression narrative. This guy is Colonel Klink.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @Reg Cæsar

    I never thought that I would search for the “no shit?” button on your comments. But here we are.

    Everyone has a bad day once in a while. I’m looking for Achmed Newman to announce that politicians are owned by whomever pays their advertising bills…

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  4. Disney is so broken from wokeness the only thing they can do is cannibalize their own properties.

  5. The quick summary is the Jungle Cruise got rid of pygmies and headhunters that had endured for decades. Replaced them with animatronic monkeys and other animals. They had to clean up their act because there is a Jungle Cruise movie coming out with The Rock and the usual cast of Hollywood idiots.
    Two woke females are behind this villainy, I want to see what they look like.

    Disneyland reopens the Jungle Cruise ride after removing its racist depictions of Indigenous people
    Gabrielle Sanchez
    Tue, July 20, 2021, 12:45 PM·2 min read
    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/disneyland-reopens-jungle-cruise-ride-164500500.html

    Since the opening of Disneyland in 1955, the Jungle Cruise adventure ride featured racist and colonialist depictions of Indigenous peoples in Africa. Now, ahead of the upcoming film release of Jungle Cruise on July 30, starring Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt, the famed amusement park showcases a new version of the ride, sans the tribal caricatures.

    Those who take a trip on the river through the replicated African jungle will no longer face head-hunting, spear-waving tribesmen who offer a trade of “two of his heads for one of yours.” Instead, chimpanzees and monkeys join the other animal animatronics in “slapstick” inspired scenes as the narrative for the ride shifts to the focusing on nature and the journey of a man who seeks to tame it.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @Clyde

    This sounds suspiciously like the replacement of our original gods by the “new and improved “ “God ‘n Son” holy Trinity (don’t bother with counting - 1+1=3 - it’s HOLY).

    But the success of Western Civilization is 100% down to the Jewish books about the putative (and rejected by most Jews) Messiah a couple thousand years ago.

    We could never have survived without the Jews’ holy books. We would have would up like the Andamanese or some tribe of uncontacted Indians! Thank YHWH that the Jews and their converts convinced my ancestors. I shudder to think of what might have become us without the godly guidance of the Chosen People.

    , @Stan d Mute
    @Clyde

    Okay, well, in that spirit I now formally announce the relaunch of Boblo Island!

    https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/1600/1*LOgTSYooIXWEqSzSw_30xQ.jpeg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5c/db/97/5cdb97f3d4476c42453c0b080712cf91.jpg

    https://media.blogto.com/uploads/2017/07/12/2017712-boblo-boats-2001.jpg?cmd=resize&quality=70&w=1400&height=2500

    http://media.clickondetroit.com/photo/2016/09/27/boblo%20boat_1474983195572_8057545_ver1.0_1280_720.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f8/4c/cd/f84ccd27ca5dc996c3ffb509f4894359.jpg

  6. Never taking my kids to Disneyland (or Disney World) now ranks up there with never having served in the military as one of those things I used to regret, but don’t anymore.

    • Agree: SimpleSong
  7. The full lowdown on this cultural heist. As far as I can tell these two monkeys are behind it >>> Jeanette Lomboy and Susana Tubert, creative director of live entertainment

    Why Disneyland’s Jungle Cruise cultural changes aren’t just ‘woke’ — they’re necessary
    Todd Martens
    Sun, July 18, 2021, 10:00 AM·14 min read
    https://news.yahoo.com/why-disneylands-jungle-cruise-cultural-140030343.html

  8. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    • Thanks: Morton's toes
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Anonymous

    "Poor Walt. A nostalgic look down memory lane to happier days"

    According to Who/Whom?

  9. Anonymous[202] • Disclaimer says:

    It be HBD. White dude slow and can’t jump. So, he da last one to make it on da pole.

    But if he gay, he done enjoy what poke his ass.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
  10. I actually met one of the original little mermaids about twenty years later. She was still hot.

    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
    @James Speaks

    Went a few years ago, Pocahontas was an absolute stunner.

  11. Is the rhino then shot by a poacher who sells the horn for Traditional Chinese Medicine?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Redneck farmer

    While the primary use of rhinoceros horn is fortraditional medicine, it is also greatly valued as material for the handles of jambiyas, the curved daggers worn men in Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Somalia.


    Until 1970 only the privileged elite could afford jambiyas with rhino horn handles. Then, beginning in the early 1970s, many Yemenis worked in Saudi Arabia during the oil boom years, earning much money which permitted them to buy new daggers with the revered rhino horn handles. Prices for rhino horn thus shot up in the 1970s and early 1980s. Most of eastern Africa's rhinos were poached to meet this increasing demand.... After 1991 many Yemenis were sent home and remittances fell on a per capita basis .... With a resultant declining economy in Yemen and a crackdown on rhino poaching in Africa, rhino horn imports into Yemen have gradually fallen. Nevertheless, Yemen remains one of the most significant markets for rhino horn in the world.
     

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

  12. @Lisa F
    The digital age may be destroying real art, but at least the remains will be well preserved online.

    Replies: @El Dato

    • Replies: @Paul Rise
    @El Dato

    We are one solar flare away from losing all this nonsense.

    Old books on acid free paper and film and film copies of old movies and photos in the Salt caves around Kansas City may be among the only recorded remnants of our culture left in this scenario.

    , @Spect3r
    @El Dato

    On the contrary, we are the ones who will fastest be forgotten and never found/remembered.
    Future archeologists can find the Egyptians, Romans, etc, but in case of a calamity of biblical proportions, or a massive solar flare, all our current records will be forever lost.
    Also, our buildings do not survive without maintenance, so on the contrary to Petra, Roman Colosseum, Pyramids, etc, which can stand for thousands of years, our modern constructions will all turn to dust within 100 years.

  13. In “Simulacra and Simulation” (1981, back when you didn’t get beaten to real death by real negros in theme parks) Jean Baudrillard wrote in the bizarre style adopted by writers of postmodern philosophy which is now forever be linked to hoax papers spit out by machine generators that passed peer review and got published in academic journals:

    THE HYPERREAL AND THE IMAGINARY

    [MORE]

    Disneyland is a perfect model of all the entangled orders of simulacra. It is first of all a play of illusions and phantasms: the Pirates, the Frontier, the Future World, etc. This imaginary world is supposed to ensure the success of the operation. But what attracts the crowds the most is without a doubt the social microcosm, the religious, miniaturized pleasure of real America, of its constraints and joys. One parks outside and stands in line inside, one is altogether abandoned at the exit. The only phantasmagoria in this imaginary world lies in the tenderness and warmth of the crowd, and in the sufficient and excessive number of gadgets necessary to create the multitudinous effect. The contrast with the absolute solitude of the parking lot – a veritable concentration camp – is total. Or,rather: inside, a whole panoply of gadgets magnetizes the crowd in directed flows -outside, solitude is directed at a single gadget: the automobile. By an extraordinary oincidence (but this derives without a doubt from the enchantment inherent to this universe), this frozen, childlike world is found to have been conceived and realized by a man who is himself now cryogenized: Walt Disney, who awaits his resurrection through an increase of 180 degrees centigrade.

    Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d’espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But this masks something else and this “ideological” blanket functions as a cover for a simulation of the third order: Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the “real” country, all of “real”
    America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

    The imaginary of Disneyland is neither true nor false, it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate the fiction of the real in the opposite camp. Whence the debility of this imaginary, its infantile degeneration. This world wants to be childish in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the “real” world, and to conceal the fact that true childishness is everywhere – that it is that of the adults themselves who come here to act the child in order to foster illusions as to their real childishness.

    Disneyland is not the only one, however. Enchanted Village, Magic Mountain, Marine World: Los Angeles is surrounded by these imaginary stations that feed reality, the energy of the real to a city whose mystery is precisely that of no longer being anything but a network of incessant, unreal circulation – a city of incredible proportions but without space, without dimension. As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms.

    Disneyland: a space of the regeneration of the imaginary as waste-treatment plants are elsewhere, and even here. Everywhere today one must recycle waste, and the dreams, the phantasms, the historical, fairylike, legendary imaginary of children and adults is a waste product, the first great toxic excrement of a hyperreal civilization. On a mental level, Disneyland is the prototype of this new function. But all the sexual, psychic, somatic recycling institutes, which proliferate in California, belong to the same order. People no longer look at each other, but there are institutes for that. They no longer touch each other, but there is contactotherapy. They no longer walk, but they go jogging, etc. Everywhere one recycles lost faculties, or lost bodies, or lost sociality, or the lost taste for food. One reinvents penury, asceticism, vanished savage naturalness: natural food, health food, yoga. Marshall Sahlins’s idea that it is the economy of the market, and not of nature at all, that secretes penury, is verified, but at a secondary level: here, in the sophisticated confines of a triumphal market economy is reinvented a penury/sign, a penury/simulacrum, a simulated behavior of the underdeveloped (including the adoption of Marxist tenets) that, in the guise of ecology, of energy crises and the critique of capital, adds a final esoteric aureole to the triumph of an esoteric culture.

    Nevertheless, maybe a mental catastrophe, a mental implosion and involution without precedent lies in wait for a system of this kind, whose visible signs would be those of this strange obesity, or the incredible coexistence of the most bizarre theories and practices, which correspond to the improbable coalition of luxury, heaven, and money, to the improbable luxurious materialization of life and to undiscoverable contradictions.

    • Thanks: Torn and Frayed
    • Replies: @black sea
    @El Dato

    I guess it's more meaningful in French.

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @Bardon Kaldian
    @El Dato

    One sign of worthlessness of (post)modern philosophy is that expatiates on trivial issues. Whether continental or analytical, they endlessly discuss consciousness (without really defining it), or "queer theory", or some pop-cultural fashionable rubbish.

    While Aristotle was writing on the purification/catharsis in tragedy and Kant on the sublime, these guys and gals are all into queers & (fe)male "gaze".

    I wouldn't mind if they addressed real issues like obesity or conformism, but they carefully construe "theories of ... nothing"

    , @Morton's toes
    @El Dato

    Umberto Eco and William Gibson also are brainy guys who consider Disneyland &c a rich metaphor.

    1. I have always thought Disney's frozen head the greatest story of genius stupidity
    2. Some pervert at the Onion needs to do something shocking with Disney babes like Miley Cyrus and Ariana Grande getting pawed by establishment goons like Epstein, Wexler, and Bronfman

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @El Dato

    That book was referenced in “The Matrix”.

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @El Dato
    @El Dato

    Here is Neal Stephenson back in '99 writing the protest screed In the Beginning was the Command Line (free on the internets (PDF); and the command line still rules!) at having his writer's effort ripped to shreds by unreliable Microsoft software that also seals data in undocumented proprietary formats, a mortal sin


    I was in Disney World recently, specifically the part of it called the Magic Kingdom, walking up Main Street USA. This is a perfect gingerbready Victorian small town that culminates in a Disney castle. It was very crowded; we shuffled rather than walked. Directly in front of me was a man with a camcorder. It was one of the new breed of camcorders where instead of peering through a viewfinder you gaze at a flat-panel color screen about the size of a playing card, which televises live coverage of whatever the camcorder is seeing. He was holding the appliance close to his face, so that it obstructed his view.

    Rather than go see a real small town for free, he had paid money to see a pretend one, and rather than see it with the naked eye he was watching it on television.

    And rather than stay home and read a book, I was watching him.

    Americans' preference for mediated experiences is obvious enough, and I'm not going to keep pounding it into the ground. I'm not even going to make snotty comments about it -- after all, I was at Disney World as a paying customer. But it clearly relates to the colossal success of GUIs and so I have to talk about it some. Disney does mediated experiences better than anyone. If they understood what OSes are, and
    why people use them, they could crush Microsoft in a year or two.

    In the part of Disney World called the Animal Kingdom there is a new attraction, slated to open in March 1999, called the Maharajah Jungle Trek. It was open for sneak previews when I was there. This is a complete stone-by-stone reproduction of a hypothetical ruin in the jungles of India. According to its backstory, it was built by a local rajah in the 16th Century as a game reserve. He would go there with his princely guests to hunt Bengal tigers. As time went on it fell into disrepair and the tigers and monkeys took it over; eventually, around the time of India's independence, it became a government wildlife reserve, now open to visitors.

    The place looks more like what I have just described than any actual building you might find in India. All the stones in the broken walls are weathered as if monsoon rains had been trickling down them for centuries, the paint on the gorgeous murals is flaked and faded just so, and Bengal tigers loll amid stumps of broken columns. Where modern repairs have been made to the ancient structure, they've been done, not as Disney's engineers would do them, but as thrifty Indian janitors would--with hunks of bamboo and rust-spotted hunks of rebar. The rust is painted on, or course, and protected from real rust by a plastic clear-coat, but you can't tell unless you get down on your knees.

    In one place you walk along a stone wall with a series of old pitted friezes carved into it. One end of the wall has broken off and settled into the earth, perhaps because of some long-forgotten earthquake, and so a broad jagged crack runs across a panel or two, but the story is still readable: first, primordial chaos leads to a flourishing of many animal species. Next, we see the Tree of Life surrounded by diverse animals. This is an obvious allusion (or, in showbiz lingo, a tie-in) to the gigantic Tree of Life that dominates the center of Disney's Animal Kingdom just as the Castle dominates the Magic Kingdom or the Sphere does Epcot. But it's rendered in historically correct style and could probably fool anyone who didn't have a Ph.D. in Indian art history.
    The next panel shows a mustachioed H. sapiens chopping down the Tree of Life with a scimitar, and the animals fleeing every which way. The one after that shows the misguided human getting walloped by a tidal wave, part of a latter-day Deluge presumably brought on by his stupidity.

    The final panel, then, portrays the Sapling of Life beginning to grow back, but now Man has ditched the edged weapon and joined the other animals in standing around to adore and praise it.

    It is, in other words, a prophecy of the Bottleneck: the scenario, commonly espoused among modern-day environmentalists, that the world faces an upcoming period of grave ecological tribulations that will last for a few decades or centuries and end when we find a new harmonious modus vivendi with Nature.

     

    ...

    If I can risk a broad generalization, most of the people who go to Disney World have zero interest in absorbing new ideas from books. Which sounds snide, but listen: they have no qualms about being presented with ideas in other forms. Disney World is stuffed with environmental messages now, and the guides at Animal Kingdom can talk your ear off about biology. If you followed those tourists home, you might find art, but it would be the sort of unsigned folk art that's for sale in Disney World's African- and Asian-themed stores. In general they only seem comfortable with media that have been ratified by great age, massive popular acceptance, or both. In this world, artists are like the anonymous, illiterate stone carvers who built the great cathedrals of Europe and then faded away into unmarked graves in the churchyard. The cathedral as a whole is awesome and stirring in spite, and possibly because, of the fact that we have no idea who built it. When we walk through it we are communing not with individual stone carvers but with an entire culture.

    Disney World works the same way. If you are an intellectual type, a reader or writer of books, the nicest thing you can say about this is that the execution is superb. But it's easy to find the whole environment a little creepy, because something is missing: the translation of all its content into clear explicit written words, the attribution of the ideas to specific people. You can't argue with it. It seems as if a hell of a lot might be being glossed over, as if Disney World might be putting one over on us, and possibly getting away with all kinds of buried assumptions and muddled thinking.

    But this is precisely the same as what is lost in the transition from the command-line interface to the GUI.
     

    Not quite, but ... let's let this stand.
  14. @Achmed E. Newman
    If you're at Disney Land to begin with, you're part of the problem. I don't care if you impale yourself on a unicorn at the merry-go-round. Quit financially backing your enemies!

    Replies: @PaceLaw, @al gore rhythms, @Joe Stalin

    Well, to be fair, if you are a family man with kids aged between 3 to 12, then going to Disneyland is damn-near socially obligatory in today’s America (especially if you’re at least middle class). What will your neighbors, in-laws, and co-workers say if you don’t take the kids at least once? And that’s not even taking into account the Disney movies . . . Yeah, peer-pressure is alive and well in these United States.

    Just being a realist about the situation on the ground folks . . .

    • Replies: @Goddard
    @PaceLaw

    You defeatist. Can’t even take a little ostracism. It’s either war or it’s not. Fight, you loser! Fight!

    If thy right hand offend thee, cut it off!

    Look within. Use your imagination. Give the kids something better than that expensive woke shit. Starve those fuckers into irrelevance. Use your fucking head!

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @PaceLaw

    Bardon, I was taught early on not to succumb to peer pressure, as hard as that is for a parent. I understand your point - "keeping up with the Joneses" is another way to put it. We have a kid in that age range, and we ain't going. The boy is very reasonable, and I do tell him that I spent so much time waiting in line, it was no fun overall anyway. (That was the truth of it.)

    For other parents, well, I'll tell you how it is now. When you find out that you'll be spending $500 a day, you tend to put a lid on that peer pressure!

    Replies: @Elli, @Barnard

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @PaceLaw

    My apologies for addressing you with the wrong name, PaceLaw. I just noticed - too late to edit.

    , @Spect3r
    @PaceLaw

    Its one more of those American things that I really cant understand.
    Disneyland, 6 flags, etc, etc is incredible how childish American society can be sometimes.

  15. @El Dato
    In "Simulacra and Simulation" (1981, back when you didn't get beaten to real death by real negros in theme parks) Jean Baudrillard wrote in the bizarre style adopted by writers of postmodern philosophy which is now forever be linked to hoax papers spit out by machine generators that passed peer review and got published in academic journals:

    THE HYPERREAL AND THE IMAGINARY


    Disneyland is a perfect model of all the entangled orders of simulacra. It is first of all a play of illusions and phantasms: the Pirates, the Frontier, the Future World, etc. This imaginary world is supposed to ensure the success of the operation. But what attracts the crowds the most is without a doubt the social microcosm, the religious, miniaturized pleasure of real America, of its constraints and joys. One parks outside and stands in line inside, one is altogether abandoned at the exit. The only phantasmagoria in this imaginary world lies in the tenderness and warmth of the crowd, and in the sufficient and excessive number of gadgets necessary to create the multitudinous effect. The contrast with the absolute solitude of the parking lot - a veritable concentration camp - is total. Or,rather: inside, a whole panoply of gadgets magnetizes the crowd in directed flows -outside, solitude is directed at a single gadget: the automobile. By an extraordinary oincidence (but this derives without a doubt from the enchantment inherent to this universe), this frozen, childlike world is found to have been conceived and realized by a man who is himself now cryogenized: Walt Disney, who awaits his resurrection through an increase of 180 degrees centigrade.

    Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d'espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But this masks something else and this "ideological" blanket functions as a cover for a simulation of the third order: Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the "real" country, all of "real"
    America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

    The imaginary of Disneyland is neither true nor false, it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate the fiction of the real in the opposite camp. Whence the debility of this imaginary, its infantile degeneration. This world wants to be childish in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the "real" world, and to conceal the fact that true childishness is everywhere - that it is that of the adults themselves who come here to act the child in order to foster illusions as to their real childishness.

    Disneyland is not the only one, however. Enchanted Village, Magic Mountain, Marine World: Los Angeles is surrounded by these imaginary stations that feed reality, the energy of the real to a city whose mystery is precisely that of no longer being anything but a network of incessant, unreal circulation - a city of incredible proportions but without space, without dimension. As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms.

    Disneyland: a space of the regeneration of the imaginary as waste-treatment plants are elsewhere, and even here. Everywhere today one must recycle waste, and the dreams, the phantasms, the historical, fairylike, legendary imaginary of children and adults is a waste product, the first great toxic excrement of a hyperreal civilization. On a mental level, Disneyland is the prototype of this new function. But all the sexual, psychic, somatic recycling institutes, which proliferate in California, belong to the same order. People no longer look at each other, but there are institutes for that. They no longer touch each other, but there is contactotherapy. They no longer walk, but they go jogging, etc. Everywhere one recycles lost faculties, or lost bodies, or lost sociality, or the lost taste for food. One reinvents penury, asceticism, vanished savage naturalness: natural food, health food, yoga. Marshall Sahlins's idea that it is the economy of the market, and not of nature at all, that secretes penury, is verified, but at a secondary level: here, in the sophisticated confines of a triumphal market economy is reinvented a penury/sign, a penury/simulacrum, a simulated behavior of the underdeveloped (including the adoption of Marxist tenets) that, in the guise of ecology, of energy crises and the critique of capital, adds a final esoteric aureole to the triumph of an esoteric culture.

    Nevertheless, maybe a mental catastrophe, a mental implosion and involution without precedent lies in wait for a system of this kind, whose visible signs would be those of this strange obesity, or the incredible coexistence of the most bizarre theories and practices, which correspond to the improbable coalition of luxury, heaven, and money, to the improbable luxurious materialization of life and to undiscoverable contradictions.

     

    Replies: @black sea, @Bardon Kaldian, @Morton's toes, @Hapalong Cassidy, @El Dato

    I guess it’s more meaningful in French.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @black sea

    No. That's the problem with that kind of prose. But I intend to read it to the end.

    I'm not in that community so I don't know what's going on but one feels that the text could advantageously be replaced by a small diagram from category theory plus a list of illustrative and enlightening examples. One could at least then debug the thoughts, point to the graph and productively state "ok with this part but this part makes no sense".

    As a comparative example, I have encountered the following in the latest edition of the "IEEE Annals of the History of Computing":

    Walking Instead of Working: Space Allocation, Automatic Architecture, and the Abstraction of Hospital Labor by Theodora Vardaouli and David Theodore

    which talks about very early attempts to use software for designing floor layout in the context of hospitals. This is a worthwhile subject and certainly of interest, but already the title is a warning sign that you will bump into unreasonably turgid blocks of text and cross-references to authors that no-one has ever read (this seems to be a common in-joke in social sciences texts). And indeed:

    In addition to shedding new light on the history of computing and architecture, this article deepens our understanding of the historical intersections of hospitals, computers, and work. To date, scholars have focused on the computerization of hospital operations, such as keeping and managing patient records, administering medications, and diagnosing illnesses.[6] For example, in a recent article in the Annals, Davies discusses resistance from medical professionals and other difficulties in the computerization of hospital practices in the U.K. British hospitals, he writes, lagged behind both US hospitals and other sectors in Britainin adopting computers for operation and management.[7] Our article presents a parallel story in which researchers promoted the adoption of computers to manage hospital labor by intervening on the activities of the laborers through the hospital building itself: not through computer terminals, but through the architecture [he means the floor plan layout]. Our intention is to tie the algorithmic automation of architectural work [why not just say generated plan] to the mathematical abstraction
    of hospital labor. [huh?]

    In recent years, historians of computing have also recognized the contingency of computer programs and their underlying algorithmic abstractions on the material circumstances and social situations in which they are developed[8]. Telling histories of software, as Mahoney has suggested [I know all about Mahoney], entails coming to terms with how communities recast their worlds of practice into algorithmic procedures and computational models.[10] [yeah, totally] Following appeals to decenter the computer [wuh?] so as to study computing’s multiple social and cultural manifestations, we discuss the entangled histories of architecture’s algorithmic automation and the mathematical reification of hospital labor [dafuck?] in computer-aided space allocation research.[9]

     

    I will have to pick the raisins out of that one.

    Another article in the same issue absolutely does not have such a problem:

    Consortium Computing and Time Slicing in the Banking Sector: Databank Systems Ltd New Zealand by Janet Toland

    Perhaps because, or in spite of this challenging situation, the trading banks in New Zealand adopted a collaborative approach to the introduction of computing; sharing their resources using consortium computing. Even though they were in competition with each other, they pooled their assets to buy computers together and cooperated to set up a company called Databank, which managed computing services for all five banks. Over the succeeding 25 years, Databank became the largest data processing company in the Southern Hemisphere and played a significant role in the New Zealand’s economic development.[12] [Note that this reference makes sense and I know what I will find there] It is interesting to consider the effect that regulation may have had on the way computing was adopted by New Zealand trading banks. The literature suggests that regulation can mitigate competition by making markets less contestable, and that changes in regulation and the advent of new technologies can result in new competitive strategies, such as competitive collaboration.[10] A degree of cooperation has been necessary in the banking sector ever since cheques first came into widespread use in the 18th century. Financial infrastructure in the form of the Clearing House was developed in the City of London to facilitate the process of exchanging the cheques deposited by customers with the issuing bank for cash.[7] Batiz-Lazo has researched collaboration in both savings and commercial banks in the UK, Spain, and Mexico.[13,14] He found that collaboration made sense in markets with only a small number of participants, as it enabled the sharing of both information and scarce resources. It was also used to overcome regulatory restrictions to greater market penetration. Collaboration was often driven by an external change, such as the introduction of a new technology. Batiz-Lazo’s examples illustrate how banks in different environments have successfully used cooperation to implement a strategic vision. However, they also demonstrate the difficulties banks faced in maintaining a cooperative approach over the long term, especially when participants had different goals and expectations.[13,14]

    The introduction has given a brief overview of the early use of computing in the banking sector and background on the New Zealand banking system. The article now moves on to describe the establishment of Databank and the drivers behind the development of consortium computing. The next section details the operational environment of Databank, in particular the courier system that was developed to ensure even the most remote bank branch was connected to the
    system. The article them (sic) moves on to a discussion of Gordon Hogg’s entrepreneurial management style and how Databank became regarded as “the” place to work. The penultimate section details the tensions that emerged as Hogg attempted to develop Databank into a computer services bureau despite the reluctance of the Board of Directors. The conclusion reflects on the outcomes and the impact of consortium computing on the banking sector, and the tensions that arose from cooperating in a competitive industry. The drivers behind the establishment of Databank, such as the heavily regulated banking environment, the unique way it developed in response to the local context and geography, the influence of the General Manager’s strong personality and the tensions resulting from the differing goals and values of participants in the consortium are themes that will be explored throughout the article.

     

    Clear and to the point, it's like being served in a Texan diner.
  16. Had the porters been on top of the pole it would have been racist too (implying cowardice) so let’s skip the porters altogether, and add a multicultural bunch of people instead.

    Come to think of a hilarious cartoon I once saw:
    A white hunter is facing a charging rhino. Calmly, focusing on the rhino, he reaches back and demands: “Hand me my double rifle, Ojimbo!” …only, Ojimbo is far behind, running away at full speed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr Mox

    Sounds like Tonto replying to the Lone Ranger while the Indians charge, "Who you calling "my friend," paleface?"

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @gandydancer

    , @OldCurmudgeon
    @Mr Mox

    >Had the porters been on top of the pole it would have been racist too (implying cowardice)

    Amusingly, it's more problematic than it was before. The bottom is where the "bravest/noblest" person will end up, who is now... a white male.

    As a bonus, the old bravely depicted the reality of structural racism.

  17. This is not the Tomorrowland Walt had in mind.

    • LOL: AnotherDad
    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Escher


    This is not the Tomorrowland Walt had in mind.
     
    Or the Battle of Toontown. Which come to think of it would make a great ride.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cTbip8STVo

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Escher

  18. I like the Asian guy on the pole

    Have you ever thought this is about making Chinese Males who Take their Families to Disneyworld feel a bit giddy inside at seeing a faggity (and I don’t mean homosexual) white man get a horn up his arse…extra credit since if the Asian guy looks up he can bury his face in the white females ass?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Thoughts

    That seems unlikely for several reasons;

    1.) Chinese men are unlikely to be married, with a marrage rate less than 1.5%

    2.) Those who are married are unlikely to have families or take them to disneyworld/land

    3.) Chinese men are not attracted to Western women

    4.) No one wants to bury their face in that woman's ass

    5.) Cbinese women are a much bigger audience at disneyland/world than men


    A more likely explanation is that Unz commenters are overreacting a bit (the rhino isn't goring anyone) and the pole was created by white women for the purpose of exhibiting their dyke-ness and general feelings of inferiority to the world.

    Replies: @gandydancer

    , @Anonymous
    @Thoughts

    Nah, this is clearly intended to assauge the feelings of inferioirty that upper middle class white women have to Asian women and white men.

    , @J.Ross
    @Thoughts

    You made me look, and, true to the stereotype, his face is nowhere near her seat -- it's within binding distance of her foot.

  19. @black sea
    @El Dato

    I guess it's more meaningful in French.

    Replies: @El Dato

    No. That’s the problem with that kind of prose. But I intend to read it to the end.

    I’m not in that community so I don’t know what’s going on but one feels that the text could advantageously be replaced by a small diagram from category theory plus a list of illustrative and enlightening examples. One could at least then debug the thoughts, point to the graph and productively state “ok with this part but this part makes no sense”.

    As a comparative example, I have encountered the following in the latest edition of the “IEEE Annals of the History of Computing”:

    [MORE]

    Walking Instead of Working: Space Allocation, Automatic Architecture, and the Abstraction of Hospital Labor by Theodora Vardaouli and David Theodore

    which talks about very early attempts to use software for designing floor layout in the context of hospitals. This is a worthwhile subject and certainly of interest, but already the title is a warning sign that you will bump into unreasonably turgid blocks of text and cross-references to authors that no-one has ever read (this seems to be a common in-joke in social sciences texts). And indeed:

    In addition to shedding new light on the history of computing and architecture, this article deepens our understanding of the historical intersections of hospitals, computers, and work. To date, scholars have focused on the computerization of hospital operations, such as keeping and managing patient records, administering medications, and diagnosing illnesses.[6] For example, in a recent article in the Annals, Davies discusses resistance from medical professionals and other difficulties in the computerization of hospital practices in the U.K. British hospitals, he writes, lagged behind both US hospitals and other sectors in Britainin adopting computers for operation and management.[7] Our article presents a parallel story in which researchers promoted the adoption of computers to manage hospital labor by intervening on the activities of the laborers through the hospital building itself: not through computer terminals, but through the architecture [he means the floor plan layout]. Our intention is to tie the algorithmic automation of architectural work [why not just say generated plan] to the mathematical abstraction
    of hospital labor. [huh?]

    In recent years, historians of computing have also recognized the contingency of computer programs and their underlying algorithmic abstractions on the material circumstances and social situations in which they are developed[8]. Telling histories of software, as Mahoney has suggested [I know all about Mahoney], entails coming to terms with how communities recast their worlds of practice into algorithmic procedures and computational models.[10] [yeah, totally] Following appeals to decenter the computer [wuh?] so as to study computing’s multiple social and cultural manifestations, we discuss the entangled histories of architecture’s algorithmic automation and the mathematical reification of hospital labor [dafuck?] in computer-aided space allocation research.[9]

    I will have to pick the raisins out of that one.

    Another article in the same issue absolutely does not have such a problem:

    Consortium Computing and Time Slicing in the Banking Sector: Databank Systems Ltd New Zealand by Janet Toland

    Perhaps because, or in spite of this challenging situation, the trading banks in New Zealand adopted a collaborative approach to the introduction of computing; sharing their resources using consortium computing. Even though they were in competition with each other, they pooled their assets to buy computers together and cooperated to set up a company called Databank, which managed computing services for all five banks. Over the succeeding 25 years, Databank became the largest data processing company in the Southern Hemisphere and played a significant role in the New Zealand’s economic development.[12] [Note that this reference makes sense and I know what I will find there] It is interesting to consider the effect that regulation may have had on the way computing was adopted by New Zealand trading banks. The literature suggests that regulation can mitigate competition by making markets less contestable, and that changes in regulation and the advent of new technologies can result in new competitive strategies, such as competitive collaboration.[10] A degree of cooperation has been necessary in the banking sector ever since cheques first came into widespread use in the 18th century. Financial infrastructure in the form of the Clearing House was developed in the City of London to facilitate the process of exchanging the cheques deposited by customers with the issuing bank for cash.[7] Batiz-Lazo has researched collaboration in both savings and commercial banks in the UK, Spain, and Mexico.[13,14] He found that collaboration made sense in markets with only a small number of participants, as it enabled the sharing of both information and scarce resources. It was also used to overcome regulatory restrictions to greater market penetration. Collaboration was often driven by an external change, such as the introduction of a new technology. Batiz-Lazo’s examples illustrate how banks in different environments have successfully used cooperation to implement a strategic vision. However, they also demonstrate the difficulties banks faced in maintaining a cooperative approach over the long term, especially when participants had different goals and expectations.[13,14]

    The introduction has given a brief overview of the early use of computing in the banking sector and background on the New Zealand banking system. The article now moves on to describe the establishment of Databank and the drivers behind the development of consortium computing. The next section details the operational environment of Databank, in particular the courier system that was developed to ensure even the most remote bank branch was connected to the
    system. The article them (sic) moves on to a discussion of Gordon Hogg’s entrepreneurial management style and how Databank became regarded as “the” place to work. The penultimate section details the tensions that emerged as Hogg attempted to develop Databank into a computer services bureau despite the reluctance of the Board of Directors. The conclusion reflects on the outcomes and the impact of consortium computing on the banking sector, and the tensions that arose from cooperating in a competitive industry. The drivers behind the establishment of Databank, such as the heavily regulated banking environment, the unique way it developed in response to the local context and geography, the influence of the General Manager’s strong personality and the tensions resulting from the differing goals and values of participants in the consortium are themes that will be explored throughout the article.

    Clear and to the point, it’s like being served in a Texan diner.

  20. @El Dato
    In "Simulacra and Simulation" (1981, back when you didn't get beaten to real death by real negros in theme parks) Jean Baudrillard wrote in the bizarre style adopted by writers of postmodern philosophy which is now forever be linked to hoax papers spit out by machine generators that passed peer review and got published in academic journals:

    THE HYPERREAL AND THE IMAGINARY


    Disneyland is a perfect model of all the entangled orders of simulacra. It is first of all a play of illusions and phantasms: the Pirates, the Frontier, the Future World, etc. This imaginary world is supposed to ensure the success of the operation. But what attracts the crowds the most is without a doubt the social microcosm, the religious, miniaturized pleasure of real America, of its constraints and joys. One parks outside and stands in line inside, one is altogether abandoned at the exit. The only phantasmagoria in this imaginary world lies in the tenderness and warmth of the crowd, and in the sufficient and excessive number of gadgets necessary to create the multitudinous effect. The contrast with the absolute solitude of the parking lot - a veritable concentration camp - is total. Or,rather: inside, a whole panoply of gadgets magnetizes the crowd in directed flows -outside, solitude is directed at a single gadget: the automobile. By an extraordinary oincidence (but this derives without a doubt from the enchantment inherent to this universe), this frozen, childlike world is found to have been conceived and realized by a man who is himself now cryogenized: Walt Disney, who awaits his resurrection through an increase of 180 degrees centigrade.

    Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d'espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But this masks something else and this "ideological" blanket functions as a cover for a simulation of the third order: Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the "real" country, all of "real"
    America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

    The imaginary of Disneyland is neither true nor false, it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate the fiction of the real in the opposite camp. Whence the debility of this imaginary, its infantile degeneration. This world wants to be childish in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the "real" world, and to conceal the fact that true childishness is everywhere - that it is that of the adults themselves who come here to act the child in order to foster illusions as to their real childishness.

    Disneyland is not the only one, however. Enchanted Village, Magic Mountain, Marine World: Los Angeles is surrounded by these imaginary stations that feed reality, the energy of the real to a city whose mystery is precisely that of no longer being anything but a network of incessant, unreal circulation - a city of incredible proportions but without space, without dimension. As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms.

    Disneyland: a space of the regeneration of the imaginary as waste-treatment plants are elsewhere, and even here. Everywhere today one must recycle waste, and the dreams, the phantasms, the historical, fairylike, legendary imaginary of children and adults is a waste product, the first great toxic excrement of a hyperreal civilization. On a mental level, Disneyland is the prototype of this new function. But all the sexual, psychic, somatic recycling institutes, which proliferate in California, belong to the same order. People no longer look at each other, but there are institutes for that. They no longer touch each other, but there is contactotherapy. They no longer walk, but they go jogging, etc. Everywhere one recycles lost faculties, or lost bodies, or lost sociality, or the lost taste for food. One reinvents penury, asceticism, vanished savage naturalness: natural food, health food, yoga. Marshall Sahlins's idea that it is the economy of the market, and not of nature at all, that secretes penury, is verified, but at a secondary level: here, in the sophisticated confines of a triumphal market economy is reinvented a penury/sign, a penury/simulacrum, a simulated behavior of the underdeveloped (including the adoption of Marxist tenets) that, in the guise of ecology, of energy crises and the critique of capital, adds a final esoteric aureole to the triumph of an esoteric culture.

    Nevertheless, maybe a mental catastrophe, a mental implosion and involution without precedent lies in wait for a system of this kind, whose visible signs would be those of this strange obesity, or the incredible coexistence of the most bizarre theories and practices, which correspond to the improbable coalition of luxury, heaven, and money, to the improbable luxurious materialization of life and to undiscoverable contradictions.

     

    Replies: @black sea, @Bardon Kaldian, @Morton's toes, @Hapalong Cassidy, @El Dato

    One sign of worthlessness of (post)modern philosophy is that expatiates on trivial issues. Whether continental or analytical, they endlessly discuss consciousness (without really defining it), or “queer theory”, or some pop-cultural fashionable rubbish.

    While Aristotle was writing on the purification/catharsis in tragedy and Kant on the sublime, these guys and gals are all into queers & (fe)male “gaze”.

    I wouldn’t mind if they addressed real issues like obesity or conformism, but they carefully construe “theories of … nothing”

  21. OT for later: Perceptive Nebojsa is perceptive

    United States of… Yugoslavia? Cartoon hints at next chapter of American civil war

    WaPo’s grayscale rendering doesn’t do justice to the original image, showing the divisions in vivid color. It turns out to have been published on July 10, authored by the political cartoonist Ratt for the leftist blog Crooks and Liars.

    “The whole is less than the sum of its parts,” said the sub-headline on the original post. Hashtags used in the tweet were “partisanship” and “balkanization.”

    At first I was confused. Have the Democrats at WaPo and Crooks and Liars finally come around to the realization that their policies are leading the US down the path of open, kinetic civil warfare? Have they heeded warnings from people like me, over the years, against just such a thing?

    Then I saw the first comment under the cartoon at Crooks and Liars: “Yep, the Republicans are the Serbs.” [There is no such tweet?] At which point I realized what it was supposed to mean. It wasn’t a warning or even introspection, but a foreshadowing of things to come.

    What Ratt is saying, and WaPo seems to agree, is that the Democrats intend to treat the Republicans as the US has treated the Serbs in the Western narrative about Yugoslavia’s demise. The largest of Yugoslavia’s ethnic groups was blamed for its destruction and accused of starting genocidal wars in order to prevent others and their federal states from leaving and creating free, independent, democratic NATO futures for themselves. When the Serbs tried to object, they were placed under an international blockade and silenced – censored, banned, deplatformed, in modern parlance.

    “Let’s talk about the self-destruct button”

  22. @Redneck farmer
    Is the rhino then shot by a poacher who sells the horn for Traditional Chinese Medicine?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    While the primary use of rhinoceros horn is fortraditional medicine, it is also greatly valued as material for the handles of jambiyas, the curved daggers worn men in Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Somalia.

    Until 1970 only the privileged elite could afford jambiyas with rhino horn handles. Then, beginning in the early 1970s, many Yemenis worked in Saudi Arabia during the oil boom years, earning much money which permitted them to buy new daggers with the revered rhino horn handles. Prices for rhino horn thus shot up in the 1970s and early 1980s. Most of eastern Africa’s rhinos were poached to meet this increasing demand…. After 1991 many Yemenis were sent home and remittances fell on a per capita basis …. With a resultant declining economy in Yemen and a crackdown on rhino poaching in Africa, rhino horn imports into Yemen have gradually fallen. Nevertheless, Yemen remains one of the most significant markets for rhino horn in the world.

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Harry Baldwin

    Wait’ll the rapper-Americans find out about rhino-handled daggers…

  23. @El Dato
    @Lisa F

    https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/digital_data.png

    Replies: @Paul Rise, @Spect3r

    We are one solar flare away from losing all this nonsense.

    Old books on acid free paper and film and film copies of old movies and photos in the Salt caves around Kansas City may be among the only recorded remnants of our culture left in this scenario.

  24. @Mr Mox
    Had the porters been on top of the pole it would have been racist too (implying cowardice) so let's skip the porters altogether, and add a multicultural bunch of people instead.

    Come to think of a hilarious cartoon I once saw:
    A white hunter is facing a charging rhino. Calmly, focusing on the rhino, he reaches back and demands: "Hand me my double rifle, Ojimbo!" ...only, Ojimbo is far behind, running away at full speed.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @OldCurmudgeon

    Sounds like Tonto replying to the Lone Ranger while the Indians charge, “Who you calling “my friend,” paleface?”

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    @Steve Sailer

    This is the position White liberals increasingly find themselves in. They had assumed their faithful friends of color would always stand by them.

    , @gandydancer
    @Steve Sailer

    MAD magazine (1958): https://www.indiewire.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/mad.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  25. @PaceLaw
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, to be fair, if you are a family man with kids aged between 3 to 12, then going to Disneyland is damn-near socially obligatory in today’s America (especially if you’re at least middle class). What will your neighbors, in-laws, and co-workers say if you don’t take the kids at least once? And that’s not even taking into account the Disney movies . . . Yeah, peer-pressure is alive and well in these United States.

    Just being a realist about the situation on the ground folks . . .

    Replies: @Goddard, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Spect3r

    You defeatist. Can’t even take a little ostracism. It’s either war or it’s not. Fight, you loser! Fight!

    If thy right hand offend thee, cut it off!

    Look within. Use your imagination. Give the kids something better than that expensive woke shit. Starve those fuckers into irrelevance. Use your fucking head!

  26. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr Mox

    Sounds like Tonto replying to the Lone Ranger while the Indians charge, "Who you calling "my friend," paleface?"

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @gandydancer

    This is the position White liberals increasingly find themselves in. They had assumed their faithful friends of color would always stand by them.

  27. @PaceLaw
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, to be fair, if you are a family man with kids aged between 3 to 12, then going to Disneyland is damn-near socially obligatory in today’s America (especially if you’re at least middle class). What will your neighbors, in-laws, and co-workers say if you don’t take the kids at least once? And that’s not even taking into account the Disney movies . . . Yeah, peer-pressure is alive and well in these United States.

    Just being a realist about the situation on the ground folks . . .

    Replies: @Goddard, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Spect3r

    Bardon, I was taught early on not to succumb to peer pressure, as hard as that is for a parent. I understand your point – “keeping up with the Joneses” is another way to put it. We have a kid in that age range, and we ain’t going. The boy is very reasonable, and I do tell him that I spent so much time waiting in line, it was no fun overall anyway. (That was the truth of it.)

    For other parents, well, I’ll tell you how it is now. When you find out that you’ll be spending $500 a day, you tend to put a lid on that peer pressure!

    • LOL: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Elli
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Expensive vacations limit family size in the Jones chasers. Disney World, Sanibel Island, Aspen, Machu Picchu.

    So do expensive birthday parties.

    And travel soccer.

    Maybe putting all your eggs in one egg isn't a good long term strategy.

    , @Barnard
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, I know a lot of people with kids that age who aren't even considering Disney vacations because of the expense. It is more than $500 bucks a day now for a family of 4. You are probably looking at close to $750 unless you go at really off peak times. The hardcore people seem to be what is driving their business, the people who would have done it a few times a down to once and the once in a lifetime for their kids have dropped it completely.

  28. @PaceLaw
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, to be fair, if you are a family man with kids aged between 3 to 12, then going to Disneyland is damn-near socially obligatory in today’s America (especially if you’re at least middle class). What will your neighbors, in-laws, and co-workers say if you don’t take the kids at least once? And that’s not even taking into account the Disney movies . . . Yeah, peer-pressure is alive and well in these United States.

    Just being a realist about the situation on the ground folks . . .

    Replies: @Goddard, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Spect3r

    My apologies for addressing you with the wrong name, PaceLaw. I just noticed – too late to edit.

  29. It’s Disney. A rainbow-clad poo-pusher should be at the bottom, smiling for the me-so-horny rhino.

  30. Anon[129] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thoughts
    I like the Asian guy on the pole

    Have you ever thought this is about making Chinese Males who Take their Families to Disneyworld feel a bit giddy inside at seeing a faggity (and I don't mean homosexual) white man get a horn up his arse...extra credit since if the Asian guy looks up he can bury his face in the white females ass?

    Replies: @Anon, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    That seems unlikely for several reasons;

    1.) Chinese men are unlikely to be married, with a marrage rate less than 1.5%

    2.) Those who are married are unlikely to have families or take them to disneyworld/land

    3.) Chinese men are not attracted to Western women

    4.) No one wants to bury their face in that woman’s ass

    5.) Cbinese women are a much bigger audience at disneyland/world than men

    A more likely explanation is that Unz commenters are overreacting a bit (the rhino isn’t goring anyone) and the pole was created by white women for the purpose of exhibiting their dyke-ness and general feelings of inferiority to the world.

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Anon


    Chinese men are unlikely to be married, with a marrage(sic) rate less than 1.5%
     
    This is, on its face, absurdly improbable. Someone told you this? And you believed it?
  31. @Achmed E. Newman
    @PaceLaw

    Bardon, I was taught early on not to succumb to peer pressure, as hard as that is for a parent. I understand your point - "keeping up with the Joneses" is another way to put it. We have a kid in that age range, and we ain't going. The boy is very reasonable, and I do tell him that I spent so much time waiting in line, it was no fun overall anyway. (That was the truth of it.)

    For other parents, well, I'll tell you how it is now. When you find out that you'll be spending $500 a day, you tend to put a lid on that peer pressure!

    Replies: @Elli, @Barnard

    Expensive vacations limit family size in the Jones chasers. Disney World, Sanibel Island, Aspen, Machu Picchu.

    So do expensive birthday parties.

    And travel soccer.

    Maybe putting all your eggs in one egg isn’t a good long term strategy.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
  32. @El Dato
    In "Simulacra and Simulation" (1981, back when you didn't get beaten to real death by real negros in theme parks) Jean Baudrillard wrote in the bizarre style adopted by writers of postmodern philosophy which is now forever be linked to hoax papers spit out by machine generators that passed peer review and got published in academic journals:

    THE HYPERREAL AND THE IMAGINARY


    Disneyland is a perfect model of all the entangled orders of simulacra. It is first of all a play of illusions and phantasms: the Pirates, the Frontier, the Future World, etc. This imaginary world is supposed to ensure the success of the operation. But what attracts the crowds the most is without a doubt the social microcosm, the religious, miniaturized pleasure of real America, of its constraints and joys. One parks outside and stands in line inside, one is altogether abandoned at the exit. The only phantasmagoria in this imaginary world lies in the tenderness and warmth of the crowd, and in the sufficient and excessive number of gadgets necessary to create the multitudinous effect. The contrast with the absolute solitude of the parking lot - a veritable concentration camp - is total. Or,rather: inside, a whole panoply of gadgets magnetizes the crowd in directed flows -outside, solitude is directed at a single gadget: the automobile. By an extraordinary oincidence (but this derives without a doubt from the enchantment inherent to this universe), this frozen, childlike world is found to have been conceived and realized by a man who is himself now cryogenized: Walt Disney, who awaits his resurrection through an increase of 180 degrees centigrade.

    Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d'espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But this masks something else and this "ideological" blanket functions as a cover for a simulation of the third order: Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the "real" country, all of "real"
    America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

    The imaginary of Disneyland is neither true nor false, it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate the fiction of the real in the opposite camp. Whence the debility of this imaginary, its infantile degeneration. This world wants to be childish in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the "real" world, and to conceal the fact that true childishness is everywhere - that it is that of the adults themselves who come here to act the child in order to foster illusions as to their real childishness.

    Disneyland is not the only one, however. Enchanted Village, Magic Mountain, Marine World: Los Angeles is surrounded by these imaginary stations that feed reality, the energy of the real to a city whose mystery is precisely that of no longer being anything but a network of incessant, unreal circulation - a city of incredible proportions but without space, without dimension. As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms.

    Disneyland: a space of the regeneration of the imaginary as waste-treatment plants are elsewhere, and even here. Everywhere today one must recycle waste, and the dreams, the phantasms, the historical, fairylike, legendary imaginary of children and adults is a waste product, the first great toxic excrement of a hyperreal civilization. On a mental level, Disneyland is the prototype of this new function. But all the sexual, psychic, somatic recycling institutes, which proliferate in California, belong to the same order. People no longer look at each other, but there are institutes for that. They no longer touch each other, but there is contactotherapy. They no longer walk, but they go jogging, etc. Everywhere one recycles lost faculties, or lost bodies, or lost sociality, or the lost taste for food. One reinvents penury, asceticism, vanished savage naturalness: natural food, health food, yoga. Marshall Sahlins's idea that it is the economy of the market, and not of nature at all, that secretes penury, is verified, but at a secondary level: here, in the sophisticated confines of a triumphal market economy is reinvented a penury/sign, a penury/simulacrum, a simulated behavior of the underdeveloped (including the adoption of Marxist tenets) that, in the guise of ecology, of energy crises and the critique of capital, adds a final esoteric aureole to the triumph of an esoteric culture.

    Nevertheless, maybe a mental catastrophe, a mental implosion and involution without precedent lies in wait for a system of this kind, whose visible signs would be those of this strange obesity, or the incredible coexistence of the most bizarre theories and practices, which correspond to the improbable coalition of luxury, heaven, and money, to the improbable luxurious materialization of life and to undiscoverable contradictions.

     

    Replies: @black sea, @Bardon Kaldian, @Morton's toes, @Hapalong Cassidy, @El Dato

    Umberto Eco and William Gibson also are brainy guys who consider Disneyland &c a rich metaphor.

    1. I have always thought Disney’s frozen head the greatest story of genius stupidity
    2. Some pervert at the Onion needs to do something shocking with Disney babes like Miley Cyrus and Ariana Grande getting pawed by establishment goons like Epstein, Wexler, and Bronfman

  33. @Harry Baldwin
    @Redneck farmer

    While the primary use of rhinoceros horn is fortraditional medicine, it is also greatly valued as material for the handles of jambiyas, the curved daggers worn men in Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Somalia.


    Until 1970 only the privileged elite could afford jambiyas with rhino horn handles. Then, beginning in the early 1970s, many Yemenis worked in Saudi Arabia during the oil boom years, earning much money which permitted them to buy new daggers with the revered rhino horn handles. Prices for rhino horn thus shot up in the 1970s and early 1980s. Most of eastern Africa's rhinos were poached to meet this increasing demand.... After 1991 many Yemenis were sent home and remittances fell on a per capita basis .... With a resultant declining economy in Yemen and a crackdown on rhino poaching in Africa, rhino horn imports into Yemen have gradually fallen. Nevertheless, Yemen remains one of the most significant markets for rhino horn in the world.
     

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Wait’ll the rapper-Americans find out about rhino-handled daggers…

  34. @El Dato
    In "Simulacra and Simulation" (1981, back when you didn't get beaten to real death by real negros in theme parks) Jean Baudrillard wrote in the bizarre style adopted by writers of postmodern philosophy which is now forever be linked to hoax papers spit out by machine generators that passed peer review and got published in academic journals:

    THE HYPERREAL AND THE IMAGINARY


    Disneyland is a perfect model of all the entangled orders of simulacra. It is first of all a play of illusions and phantasms: the Pirates, the Frontier, the Future World, etc. This imaginary world is supposed to ensure the success of the operation. But what attracts the crowds the most is without a doubt the social microcosm, the religious, miniaturized pleasure of real America, of its constraints and joys. One parks outside and stands in line inside, one is altogether abandoned at the exit. The only phantasmagoria in this imaginary world lies in the tenderness and warmth of the crowd, and in the sufficient and excessive number of gadgets necessary to create the multitudinous effect. The contrast with the absolute solitude of the parking lot - a veritable concentration camp - is total. Or,rather: inside, a whole panoply of gadgets magnetizes the crowd in directed flows -outside, solitude is directed at a single gadget: the automobile. By an extraordinary oincidence (but this derives without a doubt from the enchantment inherent to this universe), this frozen, childlike world is found to have been conceived and realized by a man who is himself now cryogenized: Walt Disney, who awaits his resurrection through an increase of 180 degrees centigrade.

    Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d'espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But this masks something else and this "ideological" blanket functions as a cover for a simulation of the third order: Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the "real" country, all of "real"
    America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

    The imaginary of Disneyland is neither true nor false, it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate the fiction of the real in the opposite camp. Whence the debility of this imaginary, its infantile degeneration. This world wants to be childish in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the "real" world, and to conceal the fact that true childishness is everywhere - that it is that of the adults themselves who come here to act the child in order to foster illusions as to their real childishness.

    Disneyland is not the only one, however. Enchanted Village, Magic Mountain, Marine World: Los Angeles is surrounded by these imaginary stations that feed reality, the energy of the real to a city whose mystery is precisely that of no longer being anything but a network of incessant, unreal circulation - a city of incredible proportions but without space, without dimension. As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms.

    Disneyland: a space of the regeneration of the imaginary as waste-treatment plants are elsewhere, and even here. Everywhere today one must recycle waste, and the dreams, the phantasms, the historical, fairylike, legendary imaginary of children and adults is a waste product, the first great toxic excrement of a hyperreal civilization. On a mental level, Disneyland is the prototype of this new function. But all the sexual, psychic, somatic recycling institutes, which proliferate in California, belong to the same order. People no longer look at each other, but there are institutes for that. They no longer touch each other, but there is contactotherapy. They no longer walk, but they go jogging, etc. Everywhere one recycles lost faculties, or lost bodies, or lost sociality, or the lost taste for food. One reinvents penury, asceticism, vanished savage naturalness: natural food, health food, yoga. Marshall Sahlins's idea that it is the economy of the market, and not of nature at all, that secretes penury, is verified, but at a secondary level: here, in the sophisticated confines of a triumphal market economy is reinvented a penury/sign, a penury/simulacrum, a simulated behavior of the underdeveloped (including the adoption of Marxist tenets) that, in the guise of ecology, of energy crises and the critique of capital, adds a final esoteric aureole to the triumph of an esoteric culture.

    Nevertheless, maybe a mental catastrophe, a mental implosion and involution without precedent lies in wait for a system of this kind, whose visible signs would be those of this strange obesity, or the incredible coexistence of the most bizarre theories and practices, which correspond to the improbable coalition of luxury, heaven, and money, to the improbable luxurious materialization of life and to undiscoverable contradictions.

     

    Replies: @black sea, @Bardon Kaldian, @Morton's toes, @Hapalong Cassidy, @El Dato

    That book was referenced in “The Matrix”.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I didn't know. Wikipedia says:


    The cast were required to be able to understand and explain The Matrix.[31] French philosopher Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulation was required reading for most of the principal cast and crew.[35] In early 1997, the Wachowskis had Reeves read Simulacra and Simulation, Kevin Kelly's Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World, and Dylan Evans's ideas on evolutionary psychology even before they opened up the script,[16] and eventually he was able to explain all the philosophical nuances involved.[31] Moss commented that she had difficulty with this process.[16]
     
    Poor Trinity.

    Replies: @Sick of Orcs, @anon

  35. Oh it’s much worse than you think. Disney has “backstories” for these rides, and all the characters have names and histories. From the top down.

    Siobhan “Puffin” Murphy
    Siobhan grew up in Dingle, Ireland, a seaside town where she took a liking to the puffins she watched nesting there. She is a distant cousin of Alberta Falls – the main character in the reimagined Jungle Cruise storyline.

    Dr. Kon Chunosuke
    An entomologist. Dr. Chunosuke is part of the famed Society and Explorers and Adventurers (S.E.A) – a group of diverse individuals from various Disney Parks worldwide who tie together a loose story of adventure and mystery.

    Rosa Soto Dominguez
    Celebrated Mexican artist Rosa Soto Dominguez is next up, and she is said to be a special friend of Alberta Falls. Rosa was said to be on her way back home to Mexico City from her latest gallery opening in Paris when she received a special invitation to go on a jungle cruise from her very close friend Alberta.

    Leonard Moss
    Leonard Moss is a noted botanist from Nova Scotia, Canada. Moss can be seen with a lot of camera gear as he intended to capture the diverse flora and fauna of Adventureland.

    Skipper Felix Pechman XIII (can you get any WASPier?)
    Skipper Felix Pechman is the low man on the pole and his surname really precedes him in our story. Pechman is a last name synonymous with bad luck, and his current predicament surely highlights the bad luck he’s had on his cruise.

    Wow, the poor bad luck whitey! Nothing goes right for him. Oh, and the ride guides are going to be insulting him!

    Pechman will be an audio-animatronic on the ride, and while there will still be live skippers on the boat, it’s said that they will be able to have some witty comments for Felix.

    Witty comments indeed.

    And that Alberta Falls that keeps getting mentioned? She’s the new “hero” of the Jungle Cruise ride. Her mother is an artist from India and her father a British art historian. Yay, a mixed-race hero!! Finally somebody who looks like me.

    This stuff is way, way more thought out and deliberate than you think.

    Deets here:
    https://blogmickey.com/jungle-cruise-new-characters/

    • Replies: @Matttt
    @peterike


    she is said to be a special friend of Alberta Falls
     
    Mexican and a lesbian: a woke two-fer. Maybe Alberta and Rose will adopt some little African kid on the way, then settle down in Brooklyn.
  36. Culturally “insensitive” mask and spears also removed.

    The old sign:

    The new sign:

    I, for one, feel much safer now.

  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    @PaceLaw

    Bardon, I was taught early on not to succumb to peer pressure, as hard as that is for a parent. I understand your point - "keeping up with the Joneses" is another way to put it. We have a kid in that age range, and we ain't going. The boy is very reasonable, and I do tell him that I spent so much time waiting in line, it was no fun overall anyway. (That was the truth of it.)

    For other parents, well, I'll tell you how it is now. When you find out that you'll be spending $500 a day, you tend to put a lid on that peer pressure!

    Replies: @Elli, @Barnard

    Yes, I know a lot of people with kids that age who aren’t even considering Disney vacations because of the expense. It is more than $500 bucks a day now for a family of 4. You are probably looking at close to $750 unless you go at really off peak times. The hardcore people seem to be what is driving their business, the people who would have done it a few times a down to once and the once in a lifetime for their kids have dropped it completely.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  38. @Anonymous
    Poor Walt. A nostalgic look down memory lane to happier days:
    https://creativefamilyfun.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Disney-Live-Action-2-Creative-Family-Fun.jpg
    https://originalvintagemovieposters.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/MARY-POPPINS-7643-scaled.jpg
    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-iz9bLe5fgoo/WTNNjSAR44I/AAAAAAAAIAo/iiv2vgwPdmw5dyE9P_zFooW8WC3ClnYhACLcB/s1600/Tim-Vanishing.JPG
    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/_f87JgPejaSU/TVDSpBywjRI/AAAAAAAAACI/HI6T_JgKOjU/s1600/kurtrussell.jpg

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Poor Walt. A nostalgic look down memory lane to happier days”

    According to Who/Whom?

  39. https://nypost.com/2021/07/22/buses-leaving-texas-border-town-packed-with-illegal-migrants/

    Buses leaving the Texas city at the heart of the border crisis are struggling to keep up with business — because they’re full of illegal immigrants released into the US by overwhelmed Border Patrol agents, The Post has learned.

    Since the crisis erupted following President Biden’s election, the four bus companies that operate out of the Central Station bus terminal in McAllen, Texas, have added as many as six daily routes, totaling 250 seats — but it’s still not enough, City Manager Roy Rodriguez said.

    “We don’t have enough private bus seats to get everyone out,” Rodriguez told The Post.

  40. @El Dato
    @Lisa F

    https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/digital_data.png

    Replies: @Paul Rise, @Spect3r

    On the contrary, we are the ones who will fastest be forgotten and never found/remembered.
    Future archeologists can find the Egyptians, Romans, etc, but in case of a calamity of biblical proportions, or a massive solar flare, all our current records will be forever lost.
    Also, our buildings do not survive without maintenance, so on the contrary to Petra, Roman Colosseum, Pyramids, etc, which can stand for thousands of years, our modern constructions will all turn to dust within 100 years.

  41. Anonymous[396] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thoughts
    I like the Asian guy on the pole

    Have you ever thought this is about making Chinese Males who Take their Families to Disneyworld feel a bit giddy inside at seeing a faggity (and I don't mean homosexual) white man get a horn up his arse...extra credit since if the Asian guy looks up he can bury his face in the white females ass?

    Replies: @Anon, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    Nah, this is clearly intended to assauge the feelings of inferioirty that upper middle class white women have to Asian women and white men.

  42. @PaceLaw
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, to be fair, if you are a family man with kids aged between 3 to 12, then going to Disneyland is damn-near socially obligatory in today’s America (especially if you’re at least middle class). What will your neighbors, in-laws, and co-workers say if you don’t take the kids at least once? And that’s not even taking into account the Disney movies . . . Yeah, peer-pressure is alive and well in these United States.

    Just being a realist about the situation on the ground folks . . .

    Replies: @Goddard, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Spect3r

    Its one more of those American things that I really cant understand.
    Disneyland, 6 flags, etc, etc is incredible how childish American society can be sometimes.

  43. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @El Dato

    That book was referenced in “The Matrix”.

    Replies: @El Dato

    I didn’t know. Wikipedia says:

    The cast were required to be able to understand and explain The Matrix.[31] French philosopher Jean Baudrillard’s Simulacra and Simulation was required reading for most of the principal cast and crew.[35] In early 1997, the Wachowskis had Reeves read Simulacra and Simulation, Kevin Kelly’s Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World, and Dylan Evans’s ideas on evolutionary psychology even before they opened up the script,[16] and eventually he was able to explain all the philosophical nuances involved.[31] Moss commented that she had difficulty with this process.[16]

    Poor Trinity.

    • Replies: @Sick of Orcs
    @El Dato

    If the Weirdchowski's hadn't made the prospective cast do the homework, Neo might've been played by (shudder) Will Smith.

    , @anon
    @El Dato

    And look at the Wachowskis now! Who says a little learning is a dangerous thing?

  44. @Escher
    This is not the Tomorrowland Walt had in mind.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    This is not the Tomorrowland Walt had in mind.

    Or the Battle of Toontown. Which come to think of it would make a great ride.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @William Badwhite

    Those silly fat negresses doing that old-timey Black Slapstick reminds me to of how much I miss the simpler, more serene days of Disneyland's "Aunt Jemima's Pancake House."

    I imagine if they pulled those saucy shenanigans in front of the Pancake House back in the day, Aunt Jemima would have come out with her old broom and set those city primitives straight, with Disneyland guests applauding her!

    Truth be told, I believe blacks and whites–hell, everybody–miss the old days, when everybody knew what they were supposed to do, based on nature. Back then, black folks didn’t disappoint everybody near as much as modern days.

    Fun Fact: Did you know the original image of Aunt Jemima was based on a fellow who was the spitting image of Eddie Murphy?

    https://youtu.be/jyEqYUMuF84

    , @Escher
    @William Badwhite

    He assaulted his sister, girlfriend and brother-in-law.
    Way to burn all bridges, homie..

  45. @El Dato
    In "Simulacra and Simulation" (1981, back when you didn't get beaten to real death by real negros in theme parks) Jean Baudrillard wrote in the bizarre style adopted by writers of postmodern philosophy which is now forever be linked to hoax papers spit out by machine generators that passed peer review and got published in academic journals:

    THE HYPERREAL AND THE IMAGINARY


    Disneyland is a perfect model of all the entangled orders of simulacra. It is first of all a play of illusions and phantasms: the Pirates, the Frontier, the Future World, etc. This imaginary world is supposed to ensure the success of the operation. But what attracts the crowds the most is without a doubt the social microcosm, the religious, miniaturized pleasure of real America, of its constraints and joys. One parks outside and stands in line inside, one is altogether abandoned at the exit. The only phantasmagoria in this imaginary world lies in the tenderness and warmth of the crowd, and in the sufficient and excessive number of gadgets necessary to create the multitudinous effect. The contrast with the absolute solitude of the parking lot - a veritable concentration camp - is total. Or,rather: inside, a whole panoply of gadgets magnetizes the crowd in directed flows -outside, solitude is directed at a single gadget: the automobile. By an extraordinary oincidence (but this derives without a doubt from the enchantment inherent to this universe), this frozen, childlike world is found to have been conceived and realized by a man who is himself now cryogenized: Walt Disney, who awaits his resurrection through an increase of 180 degrees centigrade.

    Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d'espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But this masks something else and this "ideological" blanket functions as a cover for a simulation of the third order: Disneyland exists in order to hide that it is the "real" country, all of "real"
    America that is Disneyland (a bit like prisons are there to hide that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, that is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology) but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

    The imaginary of Disneyland is neither true nor false, it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate the fiction of the real in the opposite camp. Whence the debility of this imaginary, its infantile degeneration. This world wants to be childish in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the "real" world, and to conceal the fact that true childishness is everywhere - that it is that of the adults themselves who come here to act the child in order to foster illusions as to their real childishness.

    Disneyland is not the only one, however. Enchanted Village, Magic Mountain, Marine World: Los Angeles is surrounded by these imaginary stations that feed reality, the energy of the real to a city whose mystery is precisely that of no longer being anything but a network of incessant, unreal circulation - a city of incredible proportions but without space, without dimension. As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms.

    Disneyland: a space of the regeneration of the imaginary as waste-treatment plants are elsewhere, and even here. Everywhere today one must recycle waste, and the dreams, the phantasms, the historical, fairylike, legendary imaginary of children and adults is a waste product, the first great toxic excrement of a hyperreal civilization. On a mental level, Disneyland is the prototype of this new function. But all the sexual, psychic, somatic recycling institutes, which proliferate in California, belong to the same order. People no longer look at each other, but there are institutes for that. They no longer touch each other, but there is contactotherapy. They no longer walk, but they go jogging, etc. Everywhere one recycles lost faculties, or lost bodies, or lost sociality, or the lost taste for food. One reinvents penury, asceticism, vanished savage naturalness: natural food, health food, yoga. Marshall Sahlins's idea that it is the economy of the market, and not of nature at all, that secretes penury, is verified, but at a secondary level: here, in the sophisticated confines of a triumphal market economy is reinvented a penury/sign, a penury/simulacrum, a simulated behavior of the underdeveloped (including the adoption of Marxist tenets) that, in the guise of ecology, of energy crises and the critique of capital, adds a final esoteric aureole to the triumph of an esoteric culture.

    Nevertheless, maybe a mental catastrophe, a mental implosion and involution without precedent lies in wait for a system of this kind, whose visible signs would be those of this strange obesity, or the incredible coexistence of the most bizarre theories and practices, which correspond to the improbable coalition of luxury, heaven, and money, to the improbable luxurious materialization of life and to undiscoverable contradictions.

     

    Replies: @black sea, @Bardon Kaldian, @Morton's toes, @Hapalong Cassidy, @El Dato

    Here is Neal Stephenson back in ’99 writing the protest screed In the Beginning was the Command Line (free on the internets (PDF); and the command line still rules!) at having his writer’s effort ripped to shreds by unreliable Microsoft software that also seals data in undocumented proprietary formats, a mortal sin

    [MORE]

    I was in Disney World recently, specifically the part of it called the Magic Kingdom, walking up Main Street USA. This is a perfect gingerbready Victorian small town that culminates in a Disney castle. It was very crowded; we shuffled rather than walked. Directly in front of me was a man with a camcorder. It was one of the new breed of camcorders where instead of peering through a viewfinder you gaze at a flat-panel color screen about the size of a playing card, which televises live coverage of whatever the camcorder is seeing. He was holding the appliance close to his face, so that it obstructed his view.

    Rather than go see a real small town for free, he had paid money to see a pretend one, and rather than see it with the naked eye he was watching it on television.

    And rather than stay home and read a book, I was watching him.

    Americans’ preference for mediated experiences is obvious enough, and I’m not going to keep pounding it into the ground. I’m not even going to make snotty comments about it — after all, I was at Disney World as a paying customer. But it clearly relates to the colossal success of GUIs and so I have to talk about it some. Disney does mediated experiences better than anyone. If they understood what OSes are, and
    why people use them, they could crush Microsoft in a year or two.

    In the part of Disney World called the Animal Kingdom there is a new attraction, slated to open in March 1999, called the Maharajah Jungle Trek. It was open for sneak previews when I was there. This is a complete stone-by-stone reproduction of a hypothetical ruin in the jungles of India. According to its backstory, it was built by a local rajah in the 16th Century as a game reserve. He would go there with his princely guests to hunt Bengal tigers. As time went on it fell into disrepair and the tigers and monkeys took it over; eventually, around the time of India’s independence, it became a government wildlife reserve, now open to visitors.

    The place looks more like what I have just described than any actual building you might find in India. All the stones in the broken walls are weathered as if monsoon rains had been trickling down them for centuries, the paint on the gorgeous murals is flaked and faded just so, and Bengal tigers loll amid stumps of broken columns. Where modern repairs have been made to the ancient structure, they’ve been done, not as Disney’s engineers would do them, but as thrifty Indian janitors would–with hunks of bamboo and rust-spotted hunks of rebar. The rust is painted on, or course, and protected from real rust by a plastic clear-coat, but you can’t tell unless you get down on your knees.

    In one place you walk along a stone wall with a series of old pitted friezes carved into it. One end of the wall has broken off and settled into the earth, perhaps because of some long-forgotten earthquake, and so a broad jagged crack runs across a panel or two, but the story is still readable: first, primordial chaos leads to a flourishing of many animal species. Next, we see the Tree of Life surrounded by diverse animals. This is an obvious allusion (or, in showbiz lingo, a tie-in) to the gigantic Tree of Life that dominates the center of Disney’s Animal Kingdom just as the Castle dominates the Magic Kingdom or the Sphere does Epcot. But it’s rendered in historically correct style and could probably fool anyone who didn’t have a Ph.D. in Indian art history.
    The next panel shows a mustachioed H. sapiens chopping down the Tree of Life with a scimitar, and the animals fleeing every which way. The one after that shows the misguided human getting walloped by a tidal wave, part of a latter-day Deluge presumably brought on by his stupidity.

    The final panel, then, portrays the Sapling of Life beginning to grow back, but now Man has ditched the edged weapon and joined the other animals in standing around to adore and praise it.

    It is, in other words, a prophecy of the Bottleneck: the scenario, commonly espoused among modern-day environmentalists, that the world faces an upcoming period of grave ecological tribulations that will last for a few decades or centuries and end when we find a new harmonious modus vivendi with Nature.

    If I can risk a broad generalization, most of the people who go to Disney World have zero interest in absorbing new ideas from books. Which sounds snide, but listen: they have no qualms about being presented with ideas in other forms. Disney World is stuffed with environmental messages now, and the guides at Animal Kingdom can talk your ear off about biology. If you followed those tourists home, you might find art, but it would be the sort of unsigned folk art that’s for sale in Disney World’s African- and Asian-themed stores. In general they only seem comfortable with media that have been ratified by great age, massive popular acceptance, or both. In this world, artists are like the anonymous, illiterate stone carvers who built the great cathedrals of Europe and then faded away into unmarked graves in the churchyard. The cathedral as a whole is awesome and stirring in spite, and possibly because, of the fact that we have no idea who built it. When we walk through it we are communing not with individual stone carvers but with an entire culture.

    Disney World works the same way. If you are an intellectual type, a reader or writer of books, the nicest thing you can say about this is that the execution is superb. But it’s easy to find the whole environment a little creepy, because something is missing: the translation of all its content into clear explicit written words, the attribution of the ideas to specific people. You can’t argue with it. It seems as if a hell of a lot might be being glossed over, as if Disney World might be putting one over on us, and possibly getting away with all kinds of buried assumptions and muddled thinking.

    But this is precisely the same as what is lost in the transition from the command-line interface to the GUI.

    Not quite, but … let’s let this stand.

  46. I’ve been to Disney Land, but never Disney World.

    Is it worth going to?

    Or should a “grown” (notice the quotation marks) adult man such as myself avoid going on children’s rides?

    If I go on Splash Mountain, will the ghost of Walt Disney pay me a visit?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I spent one of the longest days of my life in Disney world a few years ago. It’s hell on earth. An hour’s ride to the east takes you to Cape Canaveral. There you will find things much more worthy of your attention.

  47. @peterike
    Oh it's much worse than you think. Disney has "backstories" for these rides, and all the characters have names and histories. From the top down.

    Siobhan “Puffin” Murphy
    Siobhan grew up in Dingle, Ireland, a seaside town where she took a liking to the puffins she watched nesting there. She is a distant cousin of Alberta Falls – the main character in the reimagined Jungle Cruise storyline.

    Dr. Kon Chunosuke
    An entomologist. Dr. Chunosuke is part of the famed Society and Explorers and Adventurers (S.E.A) – a group of diverse individuals from various Disney Parks worldwide who tie together a loose story of adventure and mystery.

    Rosa Soto Dominguez
    Celebrated Mexican artist Rosa Soto Dominguez is next up, and she is said to be a special friend of Alberta Falls. Rosa was said to be on her way back home to Mexico City from her latest gallery opening in Paris when she received a special invitation to go on a jungle cruise from her very close friend Alberta.

    Leonard Moss
    Leonard Moss is a noted botanist from Nova Scotia, Canada. Moss can be seen with a lot of camera gear as he intended to capture the diverse flora and fauna of Adventureland.

    Skipper Felix Pechman XIII (can you get any WASPier?)
    Skipper Felix Pechman is the low man on the pole and his surname really precedes him in our story. Pechman is a last name synonymous with bad luck, and his current predicament surely highlights the bad luck he’s had on his cruise.

    Wow, the poor bad luck whitey! Nothing goes right for him. Oh, and the ride guides are going to be insulting him!

    Pechman will be an audio-animatronic on the ride, and while there will still be live skippers on the boat, it’s said that they will be able to have some witty comments for Felix.


    Witty comments indeed.

    And that Alberta Falls that keeps getting mentioned? She's the new “hero” of the Jungle Cruise ride. Her mother is an artist from India and her father a British art historian. Yay, a mixed-race hero!! Finally somebody who looks like me.

    This stuff is way, way more thought out and deliberate than you think.

    Deets here:
    https://blogmickey.com/jungle-cruise-new-characters/

    Replies: @Matttt

    she is said to be a special friend of Alberta Falls

    Mexican and a lesbian: a woke two-fer. Maybe Alberta and Rose will adopt some little African kid on the way, then settle down in Brooklyn.

  48. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @William Badwhite
    @Escher


    This is not the Tomorrowland Walt had in mind.
     
    Or the Battle of Toontown. Which come to think of it would make a great ride.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cTbip8STVo

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Escher

    Those silly fat negresses doing that old-timey Black Slapstick reminds me to of how much I miss the simpler, more serene days of Disneyland’s “Aunt Jemima’s Pancake House.”

    I imagine if they pulled those saucy shenanigans in front of the Pancake House back in the day, Aunt Jemima would have come out with her old broom and set those city primitives straight, with Disneyland guests applauding her!

    Truth be told, I believe blacks and whites–hell, everybody–miss the old days, when everybody knew what they were supposed to do, based on nature. Back then, black folks didn’t disappoint everybody near as much as modern days.

    Fun Fact: Did you know the original image of Aunt Jemima was based on a fellow who was the spitting image of Eddie Murphy?

  49. Take your kids to Universal in Florida instead. Better rides, plus Dr Seuss and JK Rowling are more based.

    • Agree: JMcG
  50. @Achmed E. Newman
    If you're at Disney Land to begin with, you're part of the problem. I don't care if you impale yourself on a unicorn at the merry-go-round. Quit financially backing your enemies!

    Replies: @PaceLaw, @al gore rhythms, @Joe Stalin

    I don’t really disagree. It’s just rare to see a comment get the full range of reactions, and I coudn’t pass up on the chance to make it happen.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • LOL: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @al gore rhythms

    Thanks for completing the quint-fecta, Mr. Rhythms. Also, without Corvinus, where would I be?

    Replies: @res

  51. @Mr Mox
    Had the porters been on top of the pole it would have been racist too (implying cowardice) so let's skip the porters altogether, and add a multicultural bunch of people instead.

    Come to think of a hilarious cartoon I once saw:
    A white hunter is facing a charging rhino. Calmly, focusing on the rhino, he reaches back and demands: "Hand me my double rifle, Ojimbo!" ...only, Ojimbo is far behind, running away at full speed.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @OldCurmudgeon

    >Had the porters been on top of the pole it would have been racist too (implying cowardice)

    Amusingly, it’s more problematic than it was before. The bottom is where the “bravest/noblest” person will end up, who is now… a white male.

    As a bonus, the old bravely depicted the reality of structural racism.

  52. @JohnnyWalker123
    I've been to Disney Land, but never Disney World.

    Is it worth going to?

    Or should a "grown" (notice the quotation marks) adult man such as myself avoid going on children's rides?

    If I go on Splash Mountain, will the ghost of Walt Disney pay me a visit?

    Replies: @JMcG

    I spent one of the longest days of my life in Disney world a few years ago. It’s hell on earth. An hour’s ride to the east takes you to Cape Canaveral. There you will find things much more worthy of your attention.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
  53. @al gore rhythms
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don't really disagree. It's just rare to see a comment get the full range of reactions, and I coudn't pass up on the chance to make it happen.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks for completing the quint-fecta, Mr. Rhythms. Also, without Corvinus, where would I be?

    • Replies: @res
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Corvinus' use of the troll flag (aka the Corvinus seal of approval) continues to be constructive. Just not in the way he intends ; )

  54. @El Dato
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I didn't know. Wikipedia says:


    The cast were required to be able to understand and explain The Matrix.[31] French philosopher Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulation was required reading for most of the principal cast and crew.[35] In early 1997, the Wachowskis had Reeves read Simulacra and Simulation, Kevin Kelly's Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World, and Dylan Evans's ideas on evolutionary psychology even before they opened up the script,[16] and eventually he was able to explain all the philosophical nuances involved.[31] Moss commented that she had difficulty with this process.[16]
     
    Poor Trinity.

    Replies: @Sick of Orcs, @anon

    If the Weirdchowski’s hadn’t made the prospective cast do the homework, Neo might’ve been played by (shudder) Will Smith.

  55. @Achmed E. Newman
    If you're at Disney Land to begin with, you're part of the problem. I don't care if you impale yourself on a unicorn at the merry-go-round. Quit financially backing your enemies!

    Replies: @PaceLaw, @al gore rhythms, @Joe Stalin

    Where I used to work a Black mother said Disney was her top destination because it was a “safe” place for her family.

  56. @Achmed E. Newman
    @al gore rhythms

    Thanks for completing the quint-fecta, Mr. Rhythms. Also, without Corvinus, where would I be?

    Replies: @res

    Corvinus’ use of the troll flag (aka the Corvinus seal of approval) continues to be constructive. Just not in the way he intends ; )

  57. Or maybe he is enjoying the poke. Don’t judge!

  58. @William Badwhite
    @Escher


    This is not the Tomorrowland Walt had in mind.
     
    Or the Battle of Toontown. Which come to think of it would make a great ride.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cTbip8STVo

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Escher

    He assaulted his sister, girlfriend and brother-in-law.
    Way to burn all bridges, homie..

  59. @Clyde
    The quick summary is the Jungle Cruise got rid of pygmies and headhunters that had endured for decades. Replaced them with animatronic monkeys and other animals. They had to clean up their act because there is a Jungle Cruise movie coming out with The Rock and the usual cast of Hollywood idiots.
    Two woke females are behind this villainy, I want to see what they look like.

    Disneyland reopens the Jungle Cruise ride after removing its racist depictions of Indigenous people
    Gabrielle Sanchez
    Tue, July 20, 2021, 12:45 PM·2 min read
    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/disneyland-reopens-jungle-cruise-ride-164500500.html

    Since the opening of Disneyland in 1955, the Jungle Cruise adventure ride featured racist and colonialist depictions of Indigenous peoples in Africa. Now, ahead of the upcoming film release of Jungle Cruise on July 30, starring Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt, the famed amusement park showcases a new version of the ride, sans the tribal caricatures.

    Those who take a trip on the river through the replicated African jungle will no longer face head-hunting, spear-waving tribesmen who offer a trade of “two of his heads for one of yours.” Instead, chimpanzees and monkeys join the other animal animatronics in “slapstick” inspired scenes as the narrative for the ride shifts to the focusing on nature and the journey of a man who seeks to tame it.
     

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Stan d Mute

    This sounds suspiciously like the replacement of our original gods by the “new and improved “ “God ‘n Son” holy Trinity (don’t bother with counting – 1+1=3 – it’s HOLY).

    But the success of Western Civilization is 100% down to the Jewish books about the putative (and rejected by most Jews) Messiah a couple thousand years ago.

    We could never have survived without the Jews’ holy books. We would have would up like the Andamanese or some tribe of uncontacted Indians! Thank YHWH that the Jews and their converts convinced my ancestors. I shudder to think of what might have become us without the godly guidance of the Chosen People.

  60. @Reg Cæsar
    This actually works against the oppression narrative. This guy is Colonel Klink.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    I never thought that I would search for the “no shit?” button on your comments. But here we are.

    Everyone has a bad day once in a while. I’m looking for Achmed Newman to announce that politicians are owned by whomever pays their advertising bills…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Stan d Mute

    Then we should spread this around. If it's as obvious as you claim, why did Disney do this at all? Are they secretly on our side? The ride designers, at least?


    politicians are owned by whomever
     
    Achmed knows when, and when not, to use whom. He also takes care to avoid split infinitives, cf. #27 above: "Bardon, I was taught early on not to succumb..."
  61. @Clyde
    The quick summary is the Jungle Cruise got rid of pygmies and headhunters that had endured for decades. Replaced them with animatronic monkeys and other animals. They had to clean up their act because there is a Jungle Cruise movie coming out with The Rock and the usual cast of Hollywood idiots.
    Two woke females are behind this villainy, I want to see what they look like.

    Disneyland reopens the Jungle Cruise ride after removing its racist depictions of Indigenous people
    Gabrielle Sanchez
    Tue, July 20, 2021, 12:45 PM·2 min read
    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/disneyland-reopens-jungle-cruise-ride-164500500.html

    Since the opening of Disneyland in 1955, the Jungle Cruise adventure ride featured racist and colonialist depictions of Indigenous peoples in Africa. Now, ahead of the upcoming film release of Jungle Cruise on July 30, starring Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt, the famed amusement park showcases a new version of the ride, sans the tribal caricatures.

    Those who take a trip on the river through the replicated African jungle will no longer face head-hunting, spear-waving tribesmen who offer a trade of “two of his heads for one of yours.” Instead, chimpanzees and monkeys join the other animal animatronics in “slapstick” inspired scenes as the narrative for the ride shifts to the focusing on nature and the journey of a man who seeks to tame it.
     

    Replies: @Stan d Mute, @Stan d Mute

    Okay, well, in that spirit I now formally announce the relaunch of Boblo Island!

    [MORE]

  62. @Stan d Mute
    @Reg Cæsar

    I never thought that I would search for the “no shit?” button on your comments. But here we are.

    Everyone has a bad day once in a while. I’m looking for Achmed Newman to announce that politicians are owned by whomever pays their advertising bills…

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Then we should spread this around. If it’s as obvious as you claim, why did Disney do this at all? Are they secretly on our side? The ride designers, at least?

    politicians are owned by whomever

    Achmed knows when, and when not, to use whom. He also takes care to avoid split infinitives, cf. #27 above: “Bardon, I was taught early on not to succumb…”

    • LOL: Stan d Mute
  63. @El Dato
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I didn't know. Wikipedia says:


    The cast were required to be able to understand and explain The Matrix.[31] French philosopher Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulation was required reading for most of the principal cast and crew.[35] In early 1997, the Wachowskis had Reeves read Simulacra and Simulation, Kevin Kelly's Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World, and Dylan Evans's ideas on evolutionary psychology even before they opened up the script,[16] and eventually he was able to explain all the philosophical nuances involved.[31] Moss commented that she had difficulty with this process.[16]
     
    Poor Trinity.

    Replies: @Sick of Orcs, @anon

    And look at the Wachowskis now! Who says a little learning is a dangerous thing?

  64. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr Mox

    Sounds like Tonto replying to the Lone Ranger while the Indians charge, "Who you calling "my friend," paleface?"

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @gandydancer

    MAD magazine (1958):

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @gandydancer

    I recall that punchline with Tonto telling the Lone Ranger, "What do you mean "we," paleface?"

    Replies: @gandydancer

  65. @Anon
    @Thoughts

    That seems unlikely for several reasons;

    1.) Chinese men are unlikely to be married, with a marrage rate less than 1.5%

    2.) Those who are married are unlikely to have families or take them to disneyworld/land

    3.) Chinese men are not attracted to Western women

    4.) No one wants to bury their face in that woman's ass

    5.) Cbinese women are a much bigger audience at disneyland/world than men


    A more likely explanation is that Unz commenters are overreacting a bit (the rhino isn't goring anyone) and the pole was created by white women for the purpose of exhibiting their dyke-ness and general feelings of inferiority to the world.

    Replies: @gandydancer

    Chinese men are unlikely to be married, with a marrage(sic) rate less than 1.5%

    This is, on its face, absurdly improbable. Someone told you this? And you believed it?

  66. @gandydancer
    @Steve Sailer

    MAD magazine (1958): https://www.indiewire.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/mad.jpg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I recall that punchline with Tonto telling the Lone Ranger, “What do you mean “we,” paleface?”

    • Replies: @gandydancer
    @Steve Sailer

    I can imagine MAD stealing it, but probably not leaving out "Paleface", so I suspect that that is a later improvement, kemosabe.

    The cartoon spells the salutation (name?) differently, I see. And it has the LR say it, which I don't recall ever happening in the TV show.

  67. @Steve Sailer
    @gandydancer

    I recall that punchline with Tonto telling the Lone Ranger, "What do you mean "we," paleface?"

    Replies: @gandydancer

    I can imagine MAD stealing it, but probably not leaving out “Paleface”, so I suspect that that is a later improvement, kemosabe.

    The cartoon spells the salutation (name?) differently, I see. And it has the LR say it, which I don’t recall ever happening in the TV show.

  68. @James Speaks
    I actually met one of the original little mermaids about twenty years later. She was still hot.

    Replies: @Gabe Ruth

    Went a few years ago, Pocahontas was an absolute stunner.

  69. @Thoughts
    I like the Asian guy on the pole

    Have you ever thought this is about making Chinese Males who Take their Families to Disneyworld feel a bit giddy inside at seeing a faggity (and I don't mean homosexual) white man get a horn up his arse...extra credit since if the Asian guy looks up he can bury his face in the white females ass?

    Replies: @Anon, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    You made me look, and, true to the stereotype, his face is nowhere near her seat — it’s within binding distance of her foot.

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