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Density Was Destiny in 2016 Election
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The New York Times has characterized every voting tract in the country on density/development from 1 (e.g., Area 51) to 10 (e.g., Chinatown).

Back in 2004-2005 I worked out much of the current day voting theory based on my observation that Republicans did better where land was cheap and Democrats where land was expensive.

 
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  1. The Ant People have metastacised. It’s okay, though: think of the diapers and asswipe to be sold!

  2. Maybe George McFly was on to something: “You are my density!”

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @Richard of Melbourne

    Or Paul Anka?

  3. Every square mile should have an equal vote.

  4. The New York Times has characterized every voting tract in the country on density/development from 1 (e.g., Area 51) to 10 (e.g., Chinatown).

    I would have assumed that Area 51 would be pro-illegal alien.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Clifford Brown

    Area 51 is also a massive superfund sight.

    https://science.howstuffworks.com/space/aliens-ufos/area-5111.htm

    Unfortunately, most people don’t realize the sexy aliens and life extension technology is kept further down the road at Area 69.

    Replies: @El Dato, @The Alarmist

  5. This Destiny is the epitome of density:

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Reg Cæsar

    What happened to her skin? Did she fall into a cheese wheel stamping machine??

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Jack Henson
    @Reg Cæsar

    SSRI eyes + looking like a first grader's desk.

    GJ Billy Ray. Hope it was worth it.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    , @JimB
    @Reg Cæsar

    I see a fentanyl overdose in her future.

    , @the one they call Desanex
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, hope you don’t mind if I take a stab at your gimmick.

    Destiny Hope Cyrus =

    “Cyder? Yes, no?” “Shit up!”

    Nude pic? Yes, Shorty!

    Yonder pusy itches.

    Hey, no pussy credit!

    “Yoni spurt!” she cryed.

  6. Really, it’s just an artefact of blacks and other non white ‘minorities’ being, these days, almost exclusively creatures of the inner cities.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Anonymous

    Is that true? Don't a lot of blacks in the southeast and hispanics in the southwest live in pretty rural communities?

    , @Carol
    @Anonymous

    I'm in whiteopia yet see this trend in every part of town. In fact I was more liberal myself when I lived in a denser, older part of downtown.

    And when the small-lot subdivisions are built, they quickly turn blue. It's conformity, plus Dems are younger more energetic organizers.

  7. Density Was And Will Be Trinitite?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinitite
    (or maybe not, but there’s a lot of sand
    in most concrete and cement)

    Various and sundry Cis Neros and Trans Neros do more than fiddle with our language by grotesquely expanding the use of “they” as a singular pronoun and they’re (plural) also burning our republic to the ground. HUDdled masses fester, grow and yearn to make Josef Mengele look like Florence Nightingale.

    [MORE]

    It’s high time for we Gringos, Round-Eyes , Honkeys and the very small domestic tribes of non-racist non-whites opposed to our genocide, to seize the “nuclear football” from our well-meaning, but fumbling President in order to reestablish our unique national sport – which gave us two big, game-changing wins about three quarters of a century ago. That should quickly lead to massive reductions in urban blight and density.

    A nuclear winter from, say, a thousand nukes, would likely be mild (cooling the planet a tad wouldn’t be so bad) and we could, as was said at Thermopylae, “Fight in the shade.” Environments favorable to family formation might be reestablished within a decade or so. According to Wiki the population of Nagasaki in 2017 was 425,723 with a population density of about 1000 persons per km2 and the population of Hiroshima was 1,185,327 with a density of 1321 per km2.

    Nagasaki, Magasaki, any saki would do for a toast after toasting and crisping around a hundred million scumbuckets.

  8. Makes sense. The more expensive the land in my current town (Salt Lake) has gotten, the more to the Left it has moved. Obama won Salt Lake County in 2008 (though just barely), and Hillary managed to win by a wide margin (41.5%-33%) in 2016, though with Egg McMuffin sucking up 19% of the vote.

    The idea of either winning Salt Lake County, say, 20 years ago was laughable, but here we are. The northwest corner of the county is now more Hispanic and Polynesian than not.

  9. Anonymous[921] • Disclaimer says:

    If it were only inner cities that made the difference, we wouldn’t see the trend for the lower level densities.

    A question: are there any particular demographics that show a different trend? Possibly Jews, thanks to the dense Republican-voting Orthodox communities in NY (not sure if there are enough yet to swing things.)

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Anonymous

    There’s always the hope for a true schism within the Democratic Party. It might buy the Republicans some time.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  10. @Clifford Brown

    The New York Times has characterized every voting tract in the country on density/development from 1 (e.g., Area 51) to 10 (e.g., Chinatown).
     
    I would have assumed that Area 51 would be pro-illegal alien.

    Replies: @Kronos

    Area 51 is also a massive superfund sight.

    https://science.howstuffworks.com/space/aliens-ufos/area-5111.htm

    Unfortunately, most people don’t realize the sexy aliens and life extension technology is kept further down the road at Area 69.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Kronos

    Burn pits is the most retarded thing (we are not in the Napoleonic wars anymore), and dumping on military personnel who then come down with lung cancer and symptoms of dioxin poisoning is even worse.

    A lot in the fatass lazy military brass should be hung by their balls and manhandled by ISIS survivors. If you can't properly manage material disposal on a budget of 600 billion dollar plus, you ain't got no right to be alive.

    , @The Alarmist
    @Kronos

    Still, it's a site to be seen.

  11. @Anonymous
    If it were only inner cities that made the difference, we wouldn't see the trend for the lower level densities.

    A question: are there any particular demographics that show a different trend? Possibly Jews, thanks to the dense Republican-voting Orthodox communities in NY (not sure if there are enough yet to swing things.)

    Replies: @Kronos

    There’s always the hope for a true schism within the Democratic Party. It might buy the Republicans some time.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Kronos


    There’s always the hope for a true schism within the Democratic Party. It might buy the Republicans some time.
     
    The only hope for GOP is a nuclear war with Russia which obliterates the Acela corridor and the coast of California.

    The only thing we’d notice if the GOP became defunct is less political theatre and the pretense that they weren’t controlled by the same oligarchic interests as the Democrats.

    https://youtu.be/LK9m3Ncrchw

     

  12. @Kronos
    @Clifford Brown

    Area 51 is also a massive superfund sight.

    https://science.howstuffworks.com/space/aliens-ufos/area-5111.htm

    Unfortunately, most people don’t realize the sexy aliens and life extension technology is kept further down the road at Area 69.

    Replies: @El Dato, @The Alarmist

    Burn pits is the most retarded thing (we are not in the Napoleonic wars anymore), and dumping on military personnel who then come down with lung cancer and symptoms of dioxin poisoning is even worse.

    A lot in the fatass lazy military brass should be hung by their balls and manhandled by ISIS survivors. If you can’t properly manage material disposal on a budget of 600 billion dollar plus, you ain’t got no right to be alive.

  13. This NYT article is accompanied by one of the most wholesome pictures I have seen in some time.

  14. There’s nothing so wrong with America that it can’t be fixed by someone like Pol Pot.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @The Alarmist

    Unfortunately that's akin to calling in Victor the Cleaner.

    It solves a lot of problems but then it transpires that you really aren't better off afterwards.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZCaCk2rzeo

  15. @Kronos
    @Clifford Brown

    Area 51 is also a massive superfund sight.

    https://science.howstuffworks.com/space/aliens-ufos/area-5111.htm

    Unfortunately, most people don’t realize the sexy aliens and life extension technology is kept further down the road at Area 69.

    Replies: @El Dato, @The Alarmist

    Still, it’s a site to be seen.

  16. @Reg Cæsar
    This Destiny is the epitome of density:


    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2018/12/12/12-miley.w330.h412.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jack Henson, @JimB, @the one they call Desanex

    What happened to her skin? Did she fall into a cheese wheel stamping machine??

    • LOL: Carol
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @El Dato

    Oh the pity of it!

  17. @Anonymous
    Really, it's just an artefact of blacks and other non white 'minorities' being, these days, almost exclusively creatures of the inner cities.

    Replies: @jon, @Carol

    Is that true? Don’t a lot of blacks in the southeast and hispanics in the southwest live in pretty rural communities?

  18. @The Alarmist
    There's nothing so wrong with America that it can't be fixed by someone like Pol Pot.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qr6NOsluHYg

    Replies: @El Dato

    Unfortunately that’s akin to calling in Victor the Cleaner.

    It solves a lot of problems but then it transpires that you really aren’t better off afterwards.

  19. “What happened to her skin? Did she fall into a cheese wheel stamping machine??” Caught between the sprockets of a greasy bicycle chain.

  20. Anonymous[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kronos
    @Anonymous

    There’s always the hope for a true schism within the Democratic Party. It might buy the Republicans some time.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    There’s always the hope for a true schism within the Democratic Party. It might buy the Republicans some time.

    The only hope for GOP is a nuclear war with Russia which obliterates the Acela corridor and the coast of California.

    The only thing we’d notice if the GOP became defunct is less political theatre and the pretense that they weren’t controlled by the same oligarchic interests as the Democrats.

  21. Who prepared that graph of density deciles versus Clinton and Trump voting percentages, and why is it so incompetently presented? On the x-axis, shouldn’t the dots be positioned in the middle of the ten (nine?) deciles? And on the y-axis, shouldn’t the 0, 20, 40, 60, 80% labels be aligned with the horizontal lines?

  22. @Anonymous
    Really, it's just an artefact of blacks and other non white 'minorities' being, these days, almost exclusively creatures of the inner cities.

    Replies: @jon, @Carol

    I’m in whiteopia yet see this trend in every part of town. In fact I was more liberal myself when I lived in a denser, older part of downtown.

    And when the small-lot subdivisions are built, they quickly turn blue. It’s conformity, plus Dems are younger more energetic organizers.

  23. @Reg Cæsar
    This Destiny is the epitome of density:


    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2018/12/12/12-miley.w330.h412.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jack Henson, @JimB, @the one they call Desanex

    SSRI eyes + looking like a first grader’s desk.

    GJ Billy Ray. Hope it was worth it.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Jack Henson


    SSRI eyes
     
    Most people have simply not understood how big a problem that is.

    Folks on this site often express bewilderment at some of the stupid shit that bubbles to the surface in the vortex of bullshit.


    It becomes less bewildering when you consider that 1 in 6 Americans are on one or more psychotropics (anxiolytics, anti-psychotics and other brain-altering shit).

    Since women are roughly twice as likely as men to be on them, that implies that it's between 1-in-5 and 1-in-4 women.

    So if bitches ain't already crazy, the side effects of the shit they're on will soon make them so.

    In time, psychotropics will have the same reputation as Vioxx.

    Replies: @anon

  24. @Reg Cæsar
    This Destiny is the epitome of density:


    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2018/12/12/12-miley.w330.h412.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jack Henson, @JimB, @the one they call Desanex

    I see a fentanyl overdose in her future.

  25. For some reason, this note reminded me of the rat and mouse studies which tried to assess the impacts of crowding on those species. Here’s an overview of the pioneer in this area, John B. Calhoun. Generally speaking, crowding resulted in breakdowns in social structure and normal social behavior.

    https://psychology.wikia.org/wiki/John_B._Calhoun

    So the dysfunction in the big U.S. cities might very well be driven at least in part by the crowding. Having lived in NYC, L.A. and Seattle (larger cities where crime is rife and interpersonal interactions are more or less uniformly hostile) as well as in smaller cities and towns where that isn’t true, it seems that there is at least a correlation.

    Of course in the rat studies, the rats did not volunteer to participate, so in the case of rats, one can say that crowding causes social breakdown. Of course human do voluntarily choose to move into or remain in overcrowded conditions, so maybe in our case the causation runs the other way.

    • Replies: @Hank Archer
    @Steve in Greensboro

    I was ready to make this same comment, although the voluntary/non-voluntary aspect escaped me.

    , @Adam Smith
    @Steve in Greensboro

    It's like the city mouse and the country mouse are different after all...


    Generally speaking, crowding resulted in breakdowns in social structure and normal social behavior.
     

    Of course humans do voluntarily choose to move into or remain in overcrowded conditions, so maybe in our case the causation runs the other way.
     
    Some of us country mice voluntarily choose to leave the rotting dystopian city we were born in because of the overcrowding, the pollution and the insanity.

    Sometimes it seems like city people really do prefer drinking each others recycled poop water laced with a cocktail of metals and other people's medications.

    https://health.howstuffworks.com/food-nutrition/poop-drinking-water.htm
  26. Now you know why the left pushes for policies that result in more expensive urban real estate.

    • Replies: @Haole
    @countenance

    I was going to mention Boulder colorado, classic liberal college town on the edge of the rockies. real estate is as expensive as anywhere in the USA. They have a huge green belt around the city to stop development. Drive 30 or 40 miles east out on the prairie and housing prices are cheap and voters are republican.

    Rich white liberals like cheap immigrant labor. In boulder colorado you can eat food from all over the world but try to find a restaurant serving mashed potatoes and gravy. Republicans stay away from immigrant labor because it is their competition.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @anon
    @countenance

    Yep.

    There are a lot of pretty lying ways to refer to expensive, high density, but it does come down to "infill housing". Fill in every block, tear down anything that's merely 3 stories high, wreck historical buildings, just get those 10 to 20 story mouse utopias built! Because progress! Make sure to create only apartment buildings that are designed for one-child families, bearable for two child families and unpleasant for 3 or more children. Turning every city and town into a version of Manhattan complete with gayborhood and tiny parks spaced far apart.

    "infill housing" is America's version of China's 1-child policy. It's kinder and gentler, but the intended effects are the same. Richard Florida has a lot to answer for.

    Replies: @Jack D

  27. Spot-on, Steve, though not surprising at all.

    On a whim, I checked out the population increases by decade. See

    https://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h980.html

    The above site ends with the 2000 census as you shall see, but in Googling the 2010 Census it appears that the population was 309M. If memory serves, effective +/- the 1920 Census, for the first time in its (relatively young) history, the United States went from being a predominantly rural society to a predominantly urban society–and the trend has continued unabated. Note that the level of urban population has grown inversely to the rural population in a fairly constant rate. And the population continues to grow. From the numbers I’ve seen, the current US population is believed to be around 330M–and remember that these numbers do NOT include illegals whose numbers no one really knows for sure but are thought to be “around” 20M.

    There are many reasons why this country is so screwed-up, but I would suggest that at least one reason is because economic growth in the US is unable to keep up with the constant growth in population.

    Put another way, in terms of population the United States has long since far, far exceeded its “carrying capacity” if you will. And with predictable consequences.

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @Prester John

    Most of the US is empty space.

    We have plenty of carrying capacity for hard-working productive high-trust people.

    We have no carrying capacity for leeches on the system/criminals/con artists. The carrying capacity for such folks is zero--anywhere and always.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nachos 'n Beer

  28. @Richard of Melbourne
    Maybe George McFly was on to something: "You are my density!"

    Replies: @Prester John

    Or Paul Anka?

  29. Is that because there are more illegals in high-density regions whose illegal votes the Democrats can harvest?

  30. @Steve in Greensboro
    For some reason, this note reminded me of the rat and mouse studies which tried to assess the impacts of crowding on those species. Here's an overview of the pioneer in this area, John B. Calhoun. Generally speaking, crowding resulted in breakdowns in social structure and normal social behavior.

    https://psychology.wikia.org/wiki/John_B._Calhoun

    So the dysfunction in the big U.S. cities might very well be driven at least in part by the crowding. Having lived in NYC, L.A. and Seattle (larger cities where crime is rife and interpersonal interactions are more or less uniformly hostile) as well as in smaller cities and towns where that isn't true, it seems that there is at least a correlation.

    Of course in the rat studies, the rats did not volunteer to participate, so in the case of rats, one can say that crowding causes social breakdown. Of course human do voluntarily choose to move into or remain in overcrowded conditions, so maybe in our case the causation runs the other way.

    Replies: @Hank Archer, @Adam Smith

    I was ready to make this same comment, although the voluntary/non-voluntary aspect escaped me.

  31. Will the local leaders (mostly white Republican) of suburban counties in sunbelt realize that they are signing their own political death warrant with every new housing sub-division they approve?

  32. @countenance
    Now you know why the left pushes for policies that result in more expensive urban real estate.

    Replies: @Haole, @anon

    I was going to mention Boulder colorado, classic liberal college town on the edge of the rockies. real estate is as expensive as anywhere in the USA. They have a huge green belt around the city to stop development. Drive 30 or 40 miles east out on the prairie and housing prices are cheap and voters are republican.

    Rich white liberals like cheap immigrant labor. In boulder colorado you can eat food from all over the world but try to find a restaurant serving mashed potatoes and gravy. Republicans stay away from immigrant labor because it is their competition.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Haole

    Is boulder colorado anything like Boulder, Colorado?

    We all make mistakes from time to time, but lazy-assed writing can often – as here – be distinguished from typographical errors.

    Replies: @anon

  33. @Steve in Greensboro
    For some reason, this note reminded me of the rat and mouse studies which tried to assess the impacts of crowding on those species. Here's an overview of the pioneer in this area, John B. Calhoun. Generally speaking, crowding resulted in breakdowns in social structure and normal social behavior.

    https://psychology.wikia.org/wiki/John_B._Calhoun

    So the dysfunction in the big U.S. cities might very well be driven at least in part by the crowding. Having lived in NYC, L.A. and Seattle (larger cities where crime is rife and interpersonal interactions are more or less uniformly hostile) as well as in smaller cities and towns where that isn't true, it seems that there is at least a correlation.

    Of course in the rat studies, the rats did not volunteer to participate, so in the case of rats, one can say that crowding causes social breakdown. Of course human do voluntarily choose to move into or remain in overcrowded conditions, so maybe in our case the causation runs the other way.

    Replies: @Hank Archer, @Adam Smith

    It’s like the city mouse and the country mouse are different after all…

    Generally speaking, crowding resulted in breakdowns in social structure and normal social behavior.

    Of course humans do voluntarily choose to move into or remain in overcrowded conditions, so maybe in our case the causation runs the other way.

    Some of us country mice voluntarily choose to leave the rotting dystopian city we were born in because of the overcrowding, the pollution and the insanity.

    Sometimes it seems like city people really do prefer drinking each others recycled poop water laced with a cocktail of metals and other people’s medications.

    https://health.howstuffworks.com/food-nutrition/poop-drinking-water.htm

  34. anonymous[252] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s odd when you consider that major US cities and urban areas are generally still very underdense compared to world cities. LA, Phoenix, Seattle, San Jose, Northern Virginia, etc etc have the population density, and single family home percentage, more like a European country’s countryside and villages rather than its cities. Density must just be a correlate instead of a cause, otherwise Seattle should be as conservative as Essex or Salisbury.

  35. anon[162] • Disclaimer says:
    @countenance
    Now you know why the left pushes for policies that result in more expensive urban real estate.

    Replies: @Haole, @anon

    Yep.

    There are a lot of pretty lying ways to refer to expensive, high density, but it does come down to “infill housing”. Fill in every block, tear down anything that’s merely 3 stories high, wreck historical buildings, just get those 10 to 20 story mouse utopias built! Because progress! Make sure to create only apartment buildings that are designed for one-child families, bearable for two child families and unpleasant for 3 or more children. Turning every city and town into a version of Manhattan complete with gayborhood and tiny parks spaced far apart.

    “infill housing” is America’s version of China’s 1-child policy. It’s kinder and gentler, but the intended effects are the same. Richard Florida has a lot to answer for.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @anon

    Why would you create apartment buildings for large families when (non-welfare) large families in America don't want to live in apartment buildings and very few of such families exist in the 1st place? Who is going to rent or buy these apartments? If the market was calling for 5 bedroom apartments then builders would be building them - they don't create the market, they respond to what the market demands. If you build the wrong thing the market will punish you.

    Replies: @anon

  36. @Jack Henson
    @Reg Cæsar

    SSRI eyes + looking like a first grader's desk.

    GJ Billy Ray. Hope it was worth it.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    SSRI eyes

    Most people have simply not understood how big a problem that is.

    Folks on this site often express bewilderment at some of the stupid shit that bubbles to the surface in the vortex of bullshit.

    It becomes less bewildering when you consider that 1 in 6 Americans are on one or more psychotropics (anxiolytics, anti-psychotics and other brain-altering shit).

    Since women are roughly twice as likely as men to be on them, that implies that it’s between 1-in-5 and 1-in-4 women.

    So if bitches ain’t already crazy, the side effects of the shit they’re on will soon make them so.

    In time, psychotropics will have the same reputation as Vioxx.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Kratoklastes

    1-in-5 and 1-in-4 women.

    20% to 25% of women on SSRI / psychotropics is probably close as an entire group. But it skews heavily to the over-35 demographic. Over 40 women? 40% is probably not unreasonable.

    We already get a fair amount of estrogen and pseudo estrogen in the drinking water. Remember when male fish in the Rhine and gators near Miami were found with partial female development? When did that stop being an issue?

    Anyway, I wonder what percentage of SSRI's wind up being excreted in urine, flushing into the water supply too?

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Reg Cæsar

  37. @El Dato
    @Reg Cæsar

    What happened to her skin? Did she fall into a cheese wheel stamping machine??

    Replies: @International Jew

    Oh the pity of it!

  38. @Reg Cæsar
    This Destiny is the epitome of density:


    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/daily/vulture/2018/12/12/12-miley.w330.h412.jpg

    Replies: @El Dato, @Jack Henson, @JimB, @the one they call Desanex

    Reg, hope you don’t mind if I take a stab at your gimmick.

    Destiny Hope Cyrus =

    “Cyder? Yes, no?” “Shit up!”

    Nude pic? Yes, Shorty!

    Yonder pusy itches.

    Hey, no pussy credit!

    “Yoni spurt!” she cryed.

  39. this graph is the ESSENCE of why the democrats and whiny left needs/wants to do away with the electoral college.

    in fact this graph is WHY the founder created the electoral college. otherwise philadpelhia/nyc/boston in 1806 would have decided who became president.

    same s–t different century

  40. And now you know why they’re so eager to get rid of the electoral college. As with everything else they propose, there’s no principle involved, they don’t care about how “democratic” the system is, it’s just pure political calculation.

  41. Scatter plot of counties by population density vs per capita Clinton votes.

    Above a population density of about 2000/square mile, a county did not vote for Trump in 2016.

    Government is working to depopulate rural areas. How do I know this? I’m working on getting water treatment technology into production with which rural communities can affordably meet rising EPA standards. Government regulation is blocking its deployment to those communities, including Shenandoah, IA, which faces an $18M bond issue to comply with State regulations imposing old wastewater treatment technology after having just been saddled with a $20M bill for a new water works. Shen now has one of the highest property tax rates of any rural community in Iowa. The old technologies are affordable only at scale, meaning high population density places like Des Moines which turned my congressional district Democrat in the last election.

    It should not escape the notice of those engaged in the elimination of The Nation of Settlers to replace them with The Nation of Immigrants, that one Nebraska farm boy, William Norris, returned from cryptography work during WW II to found the supercomputer company that beat IBM using only a small team (under 30 people), located in a rural office in Wisconsin, only one of which was a PhD (and he a junior programmer). Norris plowed the fortune of his company into trying to reverse the urbanization trend that he saw as centralizing population in a way that made it vulnerable to military attack.

    Since The Nation of Settlers is still the backbone of the US military…

    • Agree: Lurker, Nachos 'n Beer
  42. anon[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kratoklastes
    @Jack Henson


    SSRI eyes
     
    Most people have simply not understood how big a problem that is.

    Folks on this site often express bewilderment at some of the stupid shit that bubbles to the surface in the vortex of bullshit.


    It becomes less bewildering when you consider that 1 in 6 Americans are on one or more psychotropics (anxiolytics, anti-psychotics and other brain-altering shit).

    Since women are roughly twice as likely as men to be on them, that implies that it's between 1-in-5 and 1-in-4 women.

    So if bitches ain't already crazy, the side effects of the shit they're on will soon make them so.

    In time, psychotropics will have the same reputation as Vioxx.

    Replies: @anon

    1-in-5 and 1-in-4 women.

    20% to 25% of women on SSRI / psychotropics is probably close as an entire group. But it skews heavily to the over-35 demographic. Over 40 women? 40% is probably not unreasonable.

    We already get a fair amount of estrogen and pseudo estrogen in the drinking water. Remember when male fish in the Rhine and gators near Miami were found with partial female development? When did that stop being an issue?

    Anyway, I wonder what percentage of SSRI’s wind up being excreted in urine, flushing into the water supply too?

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @anon

    You're absolutely right about SSRIs and other psychotropics finding their way into the natural environment and interfering with the entire ecosystem. it even has a name: "Antidepressant Pollution"

    It's altering behaviour as well as morphology. One recent study found that platypi (platypuses) in rivers near me were getting the bodyweight-equivalent of half a human dose per day.

    For the most part, most of the research has focused on benzodiazipenes - e.g., Valium - but SSRIs are going to become more of an issue as the longer-term effects are monitored.

    I also think that your guess that it's concentrated in women over 40 probably has a bias because of benzos: benzo prescription rates rise almost linearly with age.

    But the stuff that's of far greater concern are tricyclics, SSRIs, and SNRIs (and buproprion).

    Those are more focused in younger women: more than half of all prescriptions for the most-prescribed (Sertraline, Fluoxetine, Amitriptyline, Trazodone, Citalopram and Escitalopram) are prescribed to women under 35.

    They're also the things that have the worst long-term side effects.

    .
    .

    Also, 22-25% of all women, might well translate to 40% (or more) of urban, relatively-affluent white women (who tilt liberal as well).

    Thinkng about which women (as a group) would have greater uptake of SSRIs, that conclusion seems in escapable.

    I haven't looked at a single skerrick of data on this (yet) - so for the moment it's just musings, and my "pulled out of my ass" guesses. My guesses go something like:

    • Black women - not likely to be big users of SSRIs (the black-white Odds Ratio is ~0.29 - in other words white women are more than 3x more likely to use an SSRI).
    • Conservative/religious women (Ortho-Jews, Baptists, Mormons etc) - also not likely.
    • Poor urban and rural whites - Nope (no medical coverage; more likely to use other forms of self-medication - booze, weed, meth, molly, opioids).

    Taking those groups together, would imply that almost 40% of women who don't fall into those categories, are on some form of psychotropic.

    And that's before winnowing it down by age group (it's not going to be uniform by age cohort).

    It might well be that half of women 18-40 are on them.

    That makes the hair on my neck stand up, considering what those things to to people's cognitive capacities.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @anon


    20% to 25% of women on SSRI / psychotropics is probably close as an entire group. But it skews heavily to the over-35 demographic. Over 40 women? 40% is probably not unreasonable.
     
    I can just imagine what a psychotropical cruise would look like. Club Meds.


    https://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/crime/2019/01/07/holy-ship-edm-cruise-passengers-arrested-drug-charges/2502737002/
  43. @anon
    @countenance

    Yep.

    There are a lot of pretty lying ways to refer to expensive, high density, but it does come down to "infill housing". Fill in every block, tear down anything that's merely 3 stories high, wreck historical buildings, just get those 10 to 20 story mouse utopias built! Because progress! Make sure to create only apartment buildings that are designed for one-child families, bearable for two child families and unpleasant for 3 or more children. Turning every city and town into a version of Manhattan complete with gayborhood and tiny parks spaced far apart.

    "infill housing" is America's version of China's 1-child policy. It's kinder and gentler, but the intended effects are the same. Richard Florida has a lot to answer for.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Why would you create apartment buildings for large families when (non-welfare) large families in America don’t want to live in apartment buildings and very few of such families exist in the 1st place? Who is going to rent or buy these apartments? If the market was calling for 5 bedroom apartments then builders would be building them – they don’t create the market, they respond to what the market demands. If you build the wrong thing the market will punish you.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jack D

    Why would you create apartment buildings for large families when (non-welfare) large families in America don’t want to live in apartment buildings and very few of such families exist in the 1st place?

    Well, ok, why would anyone ever build 3 BR 2 Bath houses on 1/4 acre lots? It's a challenge to house more than 10 or 12 illegal aliens in them. So wasteful. Dirty dishes will be rotting in the sinks just for a start.

    If you build the wrong thing the market will punish you.

    Maybe. For some definition of "wrong thing". Of course, local, state and federal government agencies are quite ready to reward some contractors in some areas for building infill housing, especially studio or 1 BR apartments. Even if they remain empty for a couple of years, oddly.

    I wonder, does your concept of "the market" include HUD, special zero interest loans, and other government meddling assistance?

  44. @Prester John
    Spot-on, Steve, though not surprising at all.

    On a whim, I checked out the population increases by decade. See

    https://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h980.html

    The above site ends with the 2000 census as you shall see, but in Googling the 2010 Census it appears that the population was 309M. If memory serves, effective +/- the 1920 Census, for the first time in its (relatively young) history, the United States went from being a predominantly rural society to a predominantly urban society--and the trend has continued unabated. Note that the level of urban population has grown inversely to the rural population in a fairly constant rate. And the population continues to grow. From the numbers I've seen, the current US population is believed to be around 330M--and remember that these numbers do NOT include illegals whose numbers no one really knows for sure but are thought to be "around" 20M.

    There are many reasons why this country is so screwed-up, but I would suggest that at least one reason is because economic growth in the US is unable to keep up with the constant growth in population.

    Put another way, in terms of population the United States has long since far, far exceeded its "carrying capacity" if you will. And with predictable consequences.

    Replies: @Justvisiting

    Most of the US is empty space.

    We have plenty of carrying capacity for hard-working productive high-trust people.

    We have no carrying capacity for leeches on the system/criminals/con artists. The carrying capacity for such folks is zero–anywhere and always.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Justvisiting

    Much of the empty space is empty for a reason. Mountains, deserts, no water, etc.

    And what is left is owned by the feds.

    Replies: @Justvisiting

    , @Nachos 'n Beer
    @Justvisiting

    In addition to immigration-driven over population -
    Development distribution is skewed by gummint meddling. Flood and storm insurance is a Federal Monopoly (i.e. taxpayer burden). The next Hurricane Sandy will probably be lower intensity of a hurricane but more $$$ damages and more deaths due to foolishly building full time residences, etc., on storm-prone seashores.

    It is interesting that both Barack Hussein Obama and Rush Limbaugh have residences essentially at sea level.

    Not to mention we cannot "solve" other problems that mass immigration worsens such as highway traffic jams in metro regions - because the enrichments of vibrant diversity do not maintain the trust and order needed for mass transit - commuter trains, subways, etc. Who wants to be exposed to those vibrant MS-13 gangs or diverse knife attackers when they can instead sit safe inside a locked steel box of a car? With stereo, beverage in the drink holder, snack, A/C or heat, smart phone to call for help if needed, etc.

  45. @Justvisiting
    @Prester John

    Most of the US is empty space.

    We have plenty of carrying capacity for hard-working productive high-trust people.

    We have no carrying capacity for leeches on the system/criminals/con artists. The carrying capacity for such folks is zero--anywhere and always.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nachos 'n Beer

    Much of the empty space is empty for a reason. Mountains, deserts, no water, etc.

    And what is left is owned by the feds.

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @Anonymous

    I remember they used to say that about Phoenix--desert, can't build on it, etc.:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix,_Arizona

    100K people lived there in 1950, now 1.6M--and that is just the city limits.

    Most "limits" exist in the human mind.

  46. anon[147] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @anon

    Why would you create apartment buildings for large families when (non-welfare) large families in America don't want to live in apartment buildings and very few of such families exist in the 1st place? Who is going to rent or buy these apartments? If the market was calling for 5 bedroom apartments then builders would be building them - they don't create the market, they respond to what the market demands. If you build the wrong thing the market will punish you.

    Replies: @anon

    Why would you create apartment buildings for large families when (non-welfare) large families in America don’t want to live in apartment buildings and very few of such families exist in the 1st place?

    Well, ok, why would anyone ever build 3 BR 2 Bath houses on 1/4 acre lots? It’s a challenge to house more than 10 or 12 illegal aliens in them. So wasteful. Dirty dishes will be rotting in the sinks just for a start.

    If you build the wrong thing the market will punish you.

    Maybe. For some definition of “wrong thing”. Of course, local, state and federal government agencies are quite ready to reward some contractors in some areas for building infill housing, especially studio or 1 BR apartments. Even if they remain empty for a couple of years, oddly.

    I wonder, does your concept of “the market” include HUD, special zero interest loans, and other government meddling assistance?

  47. @Anonymous
    @Justvisiting

    Much of the empty space is empty for a reason. Mountains, deserts, no water, etc.

    And what is left is owned by the feds.

    Replies: @Justvisiting

    I remember they used to say that about Phoenix–desert, can’t build on it, etc.:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix,_Arizona

    100K people lived there in 1950, now 1.6M–and that is just the city limits.

    Most “limits” exist in the human mind.

  48. @anon
    @Kratoklastes

    1-in-5 and 1-in-4 women.

    20% to 25% of women on SSRI / psychotropics is probably close as an entire group. But it skews heavily to the over-35 demographic. Over 40 women? 40% is probably not unreasonable.

    We already get a fair amount of estrogen and pseudo estrogen in the drinking water. Remember when male fish in the Rhine and gators near Miami were found with partial female development? When did that stop being an issue?

    Anyway, I wonder what percentage of SSRI's wind up being excreted in urine, flushing into the water supply too?

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Reg Cæsar

    You’re absolutely right about SSRIs and other psychotropics finding their way into the natural environment and interfering with the entire ecosystem. it even has a name: “Antidepressant Pollution”

    It’s altering behaviour as well as morphology. One recent study found that platypi (platypuses) in rivers near me were getting the bodyweight-equivalent of half a human dose per day.

    For the most part, most of the research has focused on benzodiazipenes – e.g., Valium – but SSRIs are going to become more of an issue as the longer-term effects are monitored.

    I also think that your guess that it’s concentrated in women over 40 probably has a bias because of benzos: benzo prescription rates rise almost linearly with age.

    But the stuff that’s of far greater concern are tricyclics, SSRIs, and SNRIs (and buproprion).

    Those are more focused in younger women: more than half of all prescriptions for the most-prescribed (Sertraline, Fluoxetine, Amitriptyline, Trazodone, Citalopram and Escitalopram) are prescribed to women under 35.

    They’re also the things that have the worst long-term side effects.

    .
    .

    Also, 22-25% of all women, might well translate to 40% (or more) of urban, relatively-affluent white women (who tilt liberal as well).

    Thinkng about which women (as a group) would have greater uptake of SSRIs, that conclusion seems in escapable.

    I haven’t looked at a single skerrick of data on this (yet) – so for the moment it’s just musings, and my “pulled out of my ass” guesses. My guesses go something like:

    • Black women – not likely to be big users of SSRIs (the black-white Odds Ratio is ~0.29 – in other words white women are more than 3x more likely to use an SSRI).
    • Conservative/religious women (Ortho-Jews, Baptists, Mormons etc) – also not likely.
    • Poor urban and rural whites – Nope (no medical coverage; more likely to use other forms of self-medication – booze, weed, meth, molly, opioids).

    Taking those groups together, would imply that almost 40% of women who don’t fall into those categories, are on some form of psychotropic.

    And that’s before winnowing it down by age group (it’s not going to be uniform by age cohort).

    It might well be that half of women 18-40 are on them.

    That makes the hair on my neck stand up, considering what those things to to people’s cognitive capacities.

  49. This sentence is small but the meaning is vast that density was destiny, thanks for sharing this. I here also wanna share a piece of information with you that we provide SEO training, digital marketing training for making your career.

  50. @Justvisiting
    @Prester John

    Most of the US is empty space.

    We have plenty of carrying capacity for hard-working productive high-trust people.

    We have no carrying capacity for leeches on the system/criminals/con artists. The carrying capacity for such folks is zero--anywhere and always.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nachos 'n Beer

    In addition to immigration-driven over population –
    Development distribution is skewed by gummint meddling. Flood and storm insurance is a Federal Monopoly (i.e. taxpayer burden). The next Hurricane Sandy will probably be lower intensity of a hurricane but more $$$ damages and more deaths due to foolishly building full time residences, etc., on storm-prone seashores.

    It is interesting that both Barack Hussein Obama and Rush Limbaugh have residences essentially at sea level.

    Not to mention we cannot “solve” other problems that mass immigration worsens such as highway traffic jams in metro regions – because the enrichments of vibrant diversity do not maintain the trust and order needed for mass transit – commuter trains, subways, etc. Who wants to be exposed to those vibrant MS-13 gangs or diverse knife attackers when they can instead sit safe inside a locked steel box of a car? With stereo, beverage in the drink holder, snack, A/C or heat, smart phone to call for help if needed, etc.

  51. @Haole
    @countenance

    I was going to mention Boulder colorado, classic liberal college town on the edge of the rockies. real estate is as expensive as anywhere in the USA. They have a huge green belt around the city to stop development. Drive 30 or 40 miles east out on the prairie and housing prices are cheap and voters are republican.

    Rich white liberals like cheap immigrant labor. In boulder colorado you can eat food from all over the world but try to find a restaurant serving mashed potatoes and gravy. Republicans stay away from immigrant labor because it is their competition.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Is boulder colorado anything like Boulder, Colorado?

    We all make mistakes from time to time, but lazy-assed writing can often – as here – be distinguished from typographical errors.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Autochthon

    Is boulder colorado anything like Boulder, Colorado?

    Well...

    https://rereno2.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/boulder.jpg?w=640

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7e/BoulderBearPeak.jpg/1200px-BoulderBearPeak.jpg

  52. @Autochthon
    @Haole

    Is boulder colorado anything like Boulder, Colorado?

    We all make mistakes from time to time, but lazy-assed writing can often – as here – be distinguished from typographical errors.

    Replies: @anon

    Is boulder colorado anything like Boulder, Colorado?

    Well…

  53. @anon
    @Kratoklastes

    1-in-5 and 1-in-4 women.

    20% to 25% of women on SSRI / psychotropics is probably close as an entire group. But it skews heavily to the over-35 demographic. Over 40 women? 40% is probably not unreasonable.

    We already get a fair amount of estrogen and pseudo estrogen in the drinking water. Remember when male fish in the Rhine and gators near Miami were found with partial female development? When did that stop being an issue?

    Anyway, I wonder what percentage of SSRI's wind up being excreted in urine, flushing into the water supply too?

    Replies: @Kratoklastes, @Reg Cæsar

    20% to 25% of women on SSRI / psychotropics is probably close as an entire group. But it skews heavily to the over-35 demographic. Over 40 women? 40% is probably not unreasonable.

    I can just imagine what a psychotropical cruise would look like. Club Meds.

    https://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/crime/2019/01/07/holy-ship-edm-cruise-passengers-arrested-drug-charges/2502737002/

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