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Deep State & Immigration: Omar Mateen's Dad Was an FBI Informant
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From Breitbart:

Attorneys for Noor Salman, the wife of Pulse nightclub killer Omar Mateen, moved to dismiss the charges or declare a mistrial on Sunday night after the prosecution revealed on Saturday that Mateen’s father, Seddique Mateen, worked as an FBI informant from 2005 through the summer of 2016.

According to defense lawyers, Assistant U.S. Attorney Sara Sweeney sent them an email on Saturday night that revealed Seddique Mateen was a confidential FBI source and is also under investigation for suspicious money transfers to Turkey and Afghanistan, based on documents that were discovered in his home on the day of the nightclub massacre. Noor Salman’s trial had already been in progress for a week when this disclosure was made.

“It is apparent from the Government’s belated disclosure that Ms. Salman has been defending a case without a complete set of facts and evidence that the Government was required to disclose,” the defense attorneys declared.

The defense said the new revelations present two theories of the case that should have been on the table since the beginning of Salman’s trial: “1) Omar Mateen and his father, rather than Ms. Salman, conspired to support ISIS; or 2) the FBI’s focus on Ms. Salman was based on its own motive to avoid responsibility for its failures with its own informant, Seddique Mateen, as well as his son.”

The defense pointed out that one of the allegations against Noor Salman is that she helped Omar Mateen cook up a cover story to help him slip away and carry out the Pulse shooting, but if Seddique Mateen had “some level of foreknowledge” about the terror plot, such a cover story “would have been completely unnecessary.”

Salman’s attorneys also argued that Seddique Mateen used his connections with the FBI to block an investigation into his son in 2013. That investigation was launched after a joint operation between the FBI and the local sheriff’s department received a credible tip that Omar Mateen was planning a terrorist operation. After investigating him, putting him under surveillance, interviewing him twice, and even obtaining a written statement in which Omar Mateen admitted he lied to agents during the interviews, the operation concluded in March 2014 that he was not a threat.

Back in January, I wrote a Taki’s column called “Immigration and the Deep State” listing numerous examples of immigrants running amok who were in this country because somebody in Washington thought it would be a good idea for some Invade the World reason.

In my list, I didn’t even get to the Mateen family who are here for reasons related to America’s fundamental national interest of making sure that Afghanistan, with its strategic deposits of gravel, is within the American sphere of hegemony.

And then when they are here, the FBI can kill two birds with one stone by having them spy on other unstable potential terrorists. And if their sons flip out and murder Americans in an Islamist terror attack, well, that’s going to require some big budget boosts for all the agencies concerned that will drive Beltway real estate prices even higher.

So, it’s all good.

 
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  1. Perfectly phrased. Thanks.

    • Agree: DCThrowback
  2. Did she or did she not act as her husband’s accomplice?

  3. Are you sure this is a Deep State “thing” instead of a Known Wolf “thing”?

    Bear with me on this.

    WW-II England that this “thing” called Double Cross. They pretty much knew who every German spy was in their country — Germany’s spies, let’s just say, were a comical cultural mismatch and stuck out like the proverbial sore thumb. So what the British did is that they “turned” every last one of them to feed disinformation back to Germany. Wasn’t hard to do because they were spies and were told “You either go to the gallows or you do what we tell you.”

    From what can be guessed at from current-day affairs, it appears that the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, everybody on “our side” is doing the same thing with the Mateens within their borders. It is pretty obvious who they are because of the cultural mismatch that borders on the comical at times, and we “flip them” to turn Confidential Informant.

    Only because of whatever indoctrination, threats or other powers “the other side” has over the Mateens, they don’t stay “flipped”, rather, they “flip out.” When the media discloses “such-and-such Mateen had been ‘known to the authorities’”, they are not saying that we were spying on them when they flipped out. They are saying they were spying for us when they flipped out. They just didn’t stay flipped because our spooks don’t fully understand the depths of committment and hierarchy of motivation of “the other side.”

    So this is not a Deep State in cahoots with the Mateens. It is our spooks attempting to control the Mateens and losing that control. Think of Middle Eastern versions of Jason Bourne?

    • Replies: @Chase
    @Inquiring Mind

    The answer is: who knows? They’ve intentionally made it impossible to know, and because of that, it’s impossible to have self government. Which we haven’t had since at least 1913.

    At this point, as a long-time American defender and patriot, it’s seriously hard to come up with any way to respond to the left-wing critiques I’ve long scoffed at while continuing to maintain my more right-wing criticisms thereof.

    So: the current (((world order))) manages to piss off the left and the right, only to benefit a few people. Sounds about as unstable when I phrase it like that as it does watching this whole mess burn in real time.

    Replies: @Tim Howells

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Inquiring Mind

    Regarding Known Wolf “things” and the Double Cross: What you describe is a house of mirrors, and many of us have wondered about it in these times.

    Our first question should be, "Is is worth it to play this game when so many of our own citizens get hurt?" WWII is now the stuff of legend, but how many times did those known enemy agents cause such harm to British Civilians? Were there Known Wolves shooting up nightclubs in London and ramming vehicles into pedestrians on London Bridge? No. WWII is a whole other story with its own possible revisions needed, but no, there was not this kind of collateral damage in that particular house of mirrors, not like there is now in ours.

    Any layman in America with a mediocre education knows that Eisenhower warned us of the military industrial complex. He also said that someday The People are going to decide they just want to live their lives. Some of us even know that Washington -- not the town, but the man -- warned our ancestors against foreign entanglements. Isn't it time someone equally significant gave a speech suggesting we might want to trash the whole "intelligence" game, shatter the mirrors, and just work directly? Why not just imprison foreign agents instead of trying to use them as some kind of secret weapon -- a weapon that often blows up in our faces?

    Or is it that "our" people are not actually using Known Wolves but are in fact on the same, damned global team as all the rest of them? As Steve says, it raises the real estate values.

    , @Eagle Eye
    @Inquiring Mind

    Spies are like wigs.

    The obvious ones are obvious. The others maybe less so.

    Anthony Blunt - one of the "Cambridge Five" - was known to be a Soviet spy but was allowed to end his days quietly, mostly to avoid embarrassment to the secret services and to the establishment in general.

    What if young Lord X, nephew and heir apparent of the wealthy Duke of Y, and an afficionado of encounters with young boys, had been spying for the National Socialists? What if X later transferred his allegiance to the Soviets or their satellites?

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @Hanoi Paris Hilton
    @Inquiring Mind

    This certainly rings true, and if it is true, it's devastating! Much more important that we now get sucked into whether POTUS Trump twelve years ago did or did not wear a condom in his one-nighter with Stormy Whazerface. Probably something similar here to the Boston Marathon Bombing Freakout. But in that latter case it was the CIA (then still run by that whacko reverter-to-Islam Brennan, whose recent denunciations of Trump are astonishing for the depth of vituperation?)...rather than the FBI. Is nobody actually minding the store?

    , @PV van der Byl
    @Inquiring Mind

    Indeed, some of them may have "flipped out" mentally after having been flipped by the police.

    Another possibility is that they are flipped a second time, by their Islamist confreres, after their status as police informers is discovered by other Muslims.

    David Goldman, AKA "Spengler" describes this here:

    http://www.atimes.com/why-the-terrorists-are-winning-the-intelligence-war/

  4. “And if their sons flip out and murder Americans in an Islamist terror attack, well, that’s going to require some big budget boosts for all the agencies concerned that will drive Beltway real estate prices even higher.”

    Steve is right. No getting around it or wishing it just weren’t so: It always comes down to simply following the money.

    “money is not everything but it ranks right up there with oxygen”
    ― Zig Ziglar

  5. “And if their sons flip out and murder Americans in an Islamist terror attack, well, that’s going to require some big budget boosts for all the agencies concerned that will drive Beltway real estate prices even higher.”

    Plus you’ll also have excuses to crack down on the 2nd, 4th and possibly 1st Amendments in the name of public safety. Win all around.

    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @Corn

    Hell yeah! Murica the great!

    I must say we gots us some plush seats on this here bus being driven off the side of the cliff though. Lots of cake and sports ball to go around, free porn, casinos on every corner...

  6. >strategic gravel reserves

    Isn’t the reason for inviting that part of the world the fact that it lies between the Russkies and some warm water ports?

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @CTD

    No. They would have to go through Iran or Pakistan to make it to any warm water ports. Now that they annexed Crimea, the Russians don't need to worry about access to warm water ports. Even if Afghanistan did have its own warm water ports, that isn't a legitimate reason for the United States to meddle in its affairs. We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @CTD, @Hibernian, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Highlander

    , @unit472
    @CTD

    The Russians would first need a blue water navy which they don't have and cannot afford.

    , @Ivy
    @CTD

    The Grey Lady informed the world of that famous trillion dollar treasure trove of minerals awaiting the enterprising explorer, way back in 2010. So, what did Obama know and when did he know it?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/14/world/asia/14minerals.html



    WASHINGTON — The United States has discovered nearly $1 trillion in untapped mineral deposits in Afghanistan, far beyond any previously known reserves and enough to fundamentally alter the Afghan economy and perhaps the Afghan war itself, according to senior American government officials.
    The previously unknown deposits — including huge veins of iron, copper, cobalt, gold and critical industrial metals like lithium — are so big and include so many minerals that are essential to modern industry that Afghanistan could eventually be transformed into one of the most important mining centers in the world, the United States officials believe.
    An internal Pentagon memo, for example, states that Afghanistan could become the “Saudi Arabia of lithium,” a key raw material in the manufacture of batteries for laptops and BlackBerrys.
    The vast scale of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth was discovered by a small team of Pentagon officials and American geologists. The Afghan government and President Hamid Karzai were recently briefed, American officials said.
    While it could take many years to develop a mining industry, the potential is so great that officials and executives in the industry believe it could attract heavy investment even before mines are profitable, providing the possibility of jobs that could distract from generations of war.
    “There is stunning potential here,” Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the United States Central Command, said in an interview on Saturday. “There are a lot of ifs, of course, but I think potentially it is hugely significant.”
    The value of the newly discovered mineral deposits dwarfs the size of Afghanistan’s existing war-bedraggled economy, which is based largely on opium production and narcotics trafficking as well as aid from the United States and other industrialized countries. Afghanistan’s gross domestic product is only about $12 billion.
    “This will become the backbone of the Afghan economy,” said Jalil Jumriany, an adviser to the Afghan minister of mines.
    American and Afghan officials agreed to discuss the mineral discoveries at a difficult moment in the war in Afghanistan. The American-led offensive in Marja in southern Afghanistan has achieved only limited gains. Meanwhile, charges of corruption and favoritism continue to plague the Karzai government, and Mr. Karzai seems increasingly embittered toward the White House.
    So the Obama administration is hungry for some positive news to come out of Afghanistan. Yet the American officials also recognize that the mineral discoveries will almost certainly have a double-edged impact.
    Instead of bringing peace, the newfound mineral wealth could lead the Taliban to battle even more fiercely to regain control of the country.
    The corruption that is already rampant in the Karzai government could also be amplified by the new wealth, particularly if a handful of well-connected oligarchs, some with personal ties to the president, gain control of the resources. Just last year, Afghanistan’s minister of mines was accused by American officials of accepting a $30 million bribe to award China the rights to develop its copper mine. The minister has since been replaced.
    Endless fights could erupt between the central government in Kabul and provincial and tribal leaders in mineral-rich districts. Afghanistan has a national mining law, written with the help of advisers from the World Bank, but it has never faced a serious challenge.
    “No one has tested that law; no one knows how it will stand up in a fight between the central government and the provinces,” observed Paul A. Brinkley, deputy undersecretary of defense for business and leader of the Pentagon team that discovered the deposits.
    At the same time, American officials fear resource-hungry China will try to dominate the development of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth, which could upset the United States, given its heavy investment in the region. After winning the bid for its Aynak copper mine in Logar Province, China clearly wants more, American officials said.
    Another complication is that because Afghanistan has never had much heavy industry before, it has little or no history of environmental protection either. “The big question is, can this be developed in a responsible way, in a way that is environmentally and socially responsible?” Mr. Brinkley said. “No one knows how this will work.”
    With virtually no mining industry or infrastructure in place today, it will take decades for Afghanistan to exploit its mineral wealth fully. “This is a country that has no mining culture,” said Jack Medlin, a geologist in the United States Geological Survey’s international affairs program. “They’ve had some small artisanal mines, but now there could be some very, very large mines that will require more than just a gold pan.”
    The mineral deposits are scattered throughout the country, including in the southern and eastern regions along the border with Pakistan that have had some of the most intense combat in the American-led war against the Taliban insurgency.
    The Pentagon task force has already started trying to help the Afghans set up a system to deal with mineral development. International accounting firms that have expertise in mining contracts have been hired to consult with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, and technical data is being prepared to turn over to multinational mining companies and other potential foreign investors. The Pentagon is helping Afghan officials arrange to start seeking bids on mineral rights by next fall, officials said.
    “The Ministry of Mines is not ready to handle this,” Mr. Brinkley said. “We are trying to help them get ready.”
    Like much of the recent history of the country, the story of the discovery of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth is one of missed opportunities and the distractions of war.
    In 2004, American geologists, sent to Afghanistan as part of a broader reconstruction effort, stumbled across an intriguing series of old charts and data at the library of the Afghan Geological Survey in Kabul that hinted at major mineral deposits in the country. They soon learned that the data had been collected by Soviet mining experts during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s, but cast aside when the Soviets withdrew in 1989.
    During the chaos of the 1990s, when Afghanistan was mired in civil war and later ruled by the Taliban, a small group of Afghan geologists protected the charts by taking them home, and returned them to the Geological Survey’s library only after the American invasion and the ouster of the Taliban in 2001.
    “There were maps, but the development did not take place, because you had 30 to 35 years of war,” said Ahmad Hujabre, an Afghan engineer who worked for the Ministry of Mines in the 1970s.
    Armed with the old Russian charts, the United States Geological Survey began a series of aerial surveys of Afghanistan’s mineral resources in 2006, using advanced gravity and magnetic measuring equipment attached to an old Navy Orion P-3 aircraft that flew over about 70 percent of the country.
    The data from those flights was so promising that in 2007, the geologists returned for an even more sophisticated study, using an old British bomber equipped with instruments that offered a three-dimensional profile of mineral deposits below the earth’s surface. It was the most comprehensive geologic survey of Afghanistan ever conducted.
    The handful of American geologists who pored over the new data said the results were astonishing.
    But the results gathered dust for two more years, ignored by officials in both the American and Afghan governments. In 2009, a Pentagon task force that had created business development programs in Iraq was transferred to Afghanistan, and came upon the geological data. Until then, no one besides the geologists had bothered to look at the information — and no one had sought to translate the technical data to measure the potential economic value of the mineral deposits.
    Soon, the Pentagon business development task force brought in teams of American mining experts to validate the survey’s findings, and then briefed Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and Mr. Karzai.
    So far, the biggest mineral deposits discovered are of iron and copper, and the quantities are large enough to make Afghanistan a major world producer of both, United States officials said. Other finds include large deposits of niobium, a soft metal used in producing superconducting steel, rare earth elements and large gold deposits in Pashtun areas of southern Afghanistan.
    Just this month, American geologists working with the Pentagon team have been conducting ground surveys on dry salt lakes in western Afghanistan where they believe there are large deposits of lithium. Pentagon officials said that their initial analysis at one location in Ghazni Province showed the potential for lithium deposits as large of those of Bolivia, which now has the world’s largest known lithium reserves.
    For the geologists who are now scouring some of the most remote stretches of Afghanistan to complete the technical studies necessary before the international bidding process is begun, there is a growing sense that they are in the midst of one of the great discoveries of their careers.
    “On the ground, it’s very, very, promising,” Mr. Medlin said. “Actually, it’s pretty amazing.”

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    , @CK
    @CTD

    With the advent of icebreaker technology, all of Russia's ports are year round ports.
    The problem is not warm water, it is that all of Russia's ports and shipping have to pass through easily blockaded choke points. With the exception of the Northern route across the top of Asia, the latest addition to the OBOR initiative.
    If you would peruse a map you will see that the Bosporus and the Dardanelles are and have always been easily controlled choke points for shipping out of black sea ports just as the Gates of Hercules effectively control all shipping out of the Mediterranean sea.
    St. Petersburg international port traffic is controlled at the passage between Denmark and Sweden, Archangel and Murmansk are controlled at the Greenland passage and the Norwegian Sea, and Vladivostok is effectively controlled by the Japanese Islands.

    Replies: @Highlander

  7. Yes, you did point that all out (as many of us have known for a long time), but I don’t recall that you highlighted the absolute refusal of the MSM to connect the dots:

    Omar Mateen was protected because his father was connected, but every MSM outlet was blind.

    One of my favorites was this New Yorker article which detailed just how crazy young Omar was for years, all the while an armed employee of GS-4 “performing various (unstated) functions”. The second paragraph blames FBI incompetence for failing to stop young Omar.

    That it wasn’t incompetence, but policy that drove that was obvious to most of us, but the New Yorker magazine was blind.

    But they were in good company – so was every other major media outlet. And so today’s revelations are stunning to 99% of the country.

    But not to us Sailer fans.

    https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/the-security-firm-that-employed-the-orlando-shooter-protects-american-nuclear-facilities

  8. Great phrasing: “Afghanistan, with its strategic deposits of gravel”!

  9. After investigating him, putting him under surveillance, interviewing him twice, and even obtaining a written statement in which Omar Mateen admitted he lied to agents during the interviews, the operation concluded in March 2014 that he was not a threat.

    Heck of a job, Comey.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @anon


    Heck of a job, Comey
     
    The Comber is above reproach, don' t you know. Maybe you missed his apotheosis. To become one of the 'gods' while still living, well that was the realm of the Caesars, and Kaisers and Czars, and now dishonest FBI bureaucrats.

    We must learn to know our place, right plebeian?
    , @donut
    @anon

    " the operation concluded in March 2014 that he was not a threat."

    You're making the wrong assumption that the goal of the "investigation" was to determine if he was a threat to the unarmed and defenseless public .

  10. anon[302] • Disclaimer says:

    numerous examples of immigrants running amok who were in this country because somebody in Washington thought it would be a good idea for some Invade the World reason.

    The US has become like the brain sucking bug from Starship Troopers. We incorporate the brains of our victims, and use them to fashion strategies to better defeat them.

  11. @CTD
    >strategic gravel reserves

    Isn't the reason for inviting that part of the world the fact that it lies between the Russkies and some warm water ports?

    Replies: @Barnard, @unit472, @Ivy, @CK

    No. They would have to go through Iran or Pakistan to make it to any warm water ports. Now that they annexed Crimea, the Russians don’t need to worry about access to warm water ports. Even if Afghanistan did have its own warm water ports, that isn’t a legitimate reason for the United States to meddle in its affairs. We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Barnard

    It's The Great Game that young Kim played in Kipling's day.

    Replies: @Matthew McConnagay

    , @CTD
    @Barnard

    Sure, but the equation was a little different at the time when they let Mateen Senior in.

    , @Hibernian
    @Barnard

    Crimea is on the Black Sea and ships going to and from it generally must pass through such choke points as Bosporus, Dardanelles, the Suez Canal, and the Straits of Gibraltar.

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Barnard


    We have no national interest in Afghanistan.
     
    True.
    , @Highlander
    @Barnard

    The only logical explanation for our continued occupation of Afghanistan (or at least enough of it to control Kabul) is to provide a jumping off point for our troops to quickly secure Pakistans nuclear arsenal should it be threatened by the true Pashtun Islamic crazies of Taliban sympathies.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @LondonBob, @Charles Pewitt

  12. @Inquiring Mind
    Are you sure this is a Deep State "thing" instead of a Known Wolf "thing"?

    Bear with me on this.

    WW-II England that this "thing" called Double Cross. They pretty much knew who every German spy was in their country -- Germany's spies, let's just say, were a comical cultural mismatch and stuck out like the proverbial sore thumb. So what the British did is that they "turned" every last one of them to feed disinformation back to Germany. Wasn't hard to do because they were spies and were told "You either go to the gallows or you do what we tell you."

    From what can be guessed at from current-day affairs, it appears that the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, everybody on "our side" is doing the same thing with the Mateens within their borders. It is pretty obvious who they are because of the cultural mismatch that borders on the comical at times, and we "flip them" to turn Confidential Informant.

    Only because of whatever indoctrination, threats or other powers "the other side" has over the Mateens, they don't stay "flipped", rather, they "flip out." When the media discloses "such-and-such Mateen had been 'known to the authorities'", they are not saying that we were spying on them when they flipped out. They are saying they were spying for us when they flipped out. They just didn't stay flipped because our spooks don't fully understand the depths of committment and hierarchy of motivation of "the other side."

    So this is not a Deep State in cahoots with the Mateens. It is our spooks attempting to control the Mateens and losing that control. Think of Middle Eastern versions of Jason Bourne?

    Replies: @Chase, @Buzz Mohawk, @Eagle Eye, @Hanoi Paris Hilton, @PV van der Byl

    The answer is: who knows? They’ve intentionally made it impossible to know, and because of that, it’s impossible to have self government. Which we haven’t had since at least 1913.

    At this point, as a long-time American defender and patriot, it’s seriously hard to come up with any way to respond to the left-wing critiques I’ve long scoffed at while continuing to maintain my more right-wing criticisms thereof.

    So: the current (((world order))) manages to piss off the left and the right, only to benefit a few people. Sounds about as unstable when I phrase it like that as it does watching this whole mess burn in real time.

    • Replies: @Tim Howells
    @Chase


    At this point, as a long-time American defender and patriot, it’s seriously hard to come up with any way to respond to the left-wing critiques I’ve long scoffed at while continuing to maintain my more right-wing criticisms thereof.
     
    Yeah, agreed - we have a lot in common with the best of the left now. Unfortunately I don't see any progress yet on race realism and without that we can't get any kind of useful alliance. It's a shame though. For example here's Chris Hedges on "Occupy Wall Street":

    I would say that those who are protesting the rise of the corporate state are in fact on the political spectrum the true conservatives because they're calling for the restoration of the rule of law. The radicals have seized power and they have trashed all regulations and legal impediments to a corporate reconfiguration of American society into a form of neo-feudalism. And that's what we're really asking for - is the restoration of the rule of law.
    http://dailybail.com/home/chris-hedges-annihilates-wall-street-apologist-kevin-oleary.html
     
    This kind of thing goes back a long ways. Chomsky noted that his work on anarchism was well understood by the militant right, and for this reason his works could sometimes be found on sale at gun shows and militia meetings.
  13. What similar scam–and there’s been a pile–will finally encourage the rank and file conservative to disavow the racket of blunderers known as the federal gov’t of the US, and “law enforcement” in general? If one steps into a voting booth after this last 18 months, or gives the old “lotta good cops” speech, I question your sanity or your balls, maybe both. Shun the lot. We’ve been scammed since birth–Founder’s progeny on the campaign trail, RINO pinko collaborator in office. Get off your damn knees if you’re on ’em.

    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @schnellandine

    The term "Federal law enforcement" is so Orwellian now.

    Replies: @Lugash

  14. @Barnard
    @CTD

    No. They would have to go through Iran or Pakistan to make it to any warm water ports. Now that they annexed Crimea, the Russians don't need to worry about access to warm water ports. Even if Afghanistan did have its own warm water ports, that isn't a legitimate reason for the United States to meddle in its affairs. We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @CTD, @Hibernian, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Highlander

    It’s The Great Game that young Kim played in Kipling’s day.

    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, the British empire had a legitimate interest back then: they didn't want Russia biting into the profitable territories to the south, so it made sense to make sure they didn't get too close. Are you suggesting the US has been trying to keep Russia out of Pakistan these last twenty years?

  15. Does the FBI ever do any good?

    Do the alphabet agencies ever do anything good enough to justify all their blunders — or all the crap they seem connected to or to “miss” — and are never held accountable for?

    … Seddique Mateen was a confidential FBI source and is also under investigation for suspicious money transfers to Turkey and Afghanistan…

    This is very interesting stuff, reminiscent of the $100,000 wire transfer that came from Pakistani intelligence to Mohammed Atta in the days leading up to 11 September 2001.

    When is our flag true, and when is it false?

    • Replies: @Enochian
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Does the FBI ever do any good?
     
    They provide jobs for thousands of hard working Americans, and stock characters for lots of movies and tv about serial killers.
    , @Flip
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This country would be fine with no CIA, FBI, and NSA, and only 25% as much military. Who is going to attack us?

    These guys don't have enough to do since the end of the Cold War so they are setting fires like firemen who don't want to be laid off.

    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Law abiding middle class white guys gotta be harassed by someone.

  16. I’m going to hold off on judgment until some source other than The Right Wing Vox picks this up

    I’m not concern trolling; it genuinely saddens me that Breitbart articles so often turn out to be, well, unfounded propaganda.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Roderick Spode

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/26/us/omar-mateen-father-seddique.html

    , @unit472
    @Roderick Spode

    Is the Orlando Sentinel MSM enough for you? They broke this absolutely insane story!

    , @Roderick Spode
    @Roderick Spode

    Ha! Thanks.

    Replies: @CJ

  17. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    Back in January, I wrote a Taki’s column called “Immigration and the Deep State” listing numerous examples of immigrants running amok who were in this country because somebody in Washington thought it would be a good idea for some Invade the World reason.

    Steve, you’re a stats guy. What are the odds that the immigrants involved in these things also happen to be highly connected to the deep state? Rather than the millions of other random immigrants with no such connections? Is it just a coincidence? Because these things are one of the few major events covered heavily by the mainstream media that are favorable politically to the right, there’s a tremendous incentive not to wonder about such things and just run with it and try to capitalize on it politically. But after how routine such events seem to have become, it seems worthwhile wondering about.

    https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=588_1465936114

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Anonymous


    Is it just a coincidence?
     
    Only if you are a religiously materialist fanatic.
  18. @Barnard
    @CTD

    No. They would have to go through Iran or Pakistan to make it to any warm water ports. Now that they annexed Crimea, the Russians don't need to worry about access to warm water ports. Even if Afghanistan did have its own warm water ports, that isn't a legitimate reason for the United States to meddle in its affairs. We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @CTD, @Hibernian, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Highlander

    Sure, but the equation was a little different at the time when they let Mateen Senior in.

  19. @CTD
    >strategic gravel reserves

    Isn't the reason for inviting that part of the world the fact that it lies between the Russkies and some warm water ports?

    Replies: @Barnard, @unit472, @Ivy, @CK

    The Russians would first need a blue water navy which they don’t have and cannot afford.

  20. @Roderick Spode
    I'm going to hold off on judgment until some source other than The Right Wing Vox picks this up

    I'm not concern trolling; it genuinely saddens me that Breitbart articles so often turn out to be, well, unfounded propaganda.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @unit472, @Roderick Spode

  21. @Roderick Spode
    I'm going to hold off on judgment until some source other than The Right Wing Vox picks this up

    I'm not concern trolling; it genuinely saddens me that Breitbart articles so often turn out to be, well, unfounded propaganda.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @unit472, @Roderick Spode

    Is the Orlando Sentinel MSM enough for you? They broke this absolutely insane story!

  22. @Buzz Mohawk
    Does the FBI ever do any good?

    Do the alphabet agencies ever do anything good enough to justify all their blunders -- or all the crap they seem connected to or to "miss" -- and are never held accountable for?

    ... Seddique Mateen was a confidential FBI source and is also under investigation for suspicious money transfers to Turkey and Afghanistan...
     
    This is very interesting stuff, reminiscent of the $100,000 wire transfer that came from Pakistani intelligence to Mohammed Atta in the days leading up to 11 September 2001.

    http://www.hacer.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/9-11-flag.jpg

    When is our flag true, and when is it false?

    Replies: @Enochian, @Flip, @The preferred nomenclature is...

    Does the FBI ever do any good?

    They provide jobs for thousands of hard working Americans, and stock characters for lots of movies and tv about serial killers.

  23. I called this one. Omar Mateen’s father ran for President of Afghanistan and hosted a peculiar satellite program pushing for conflict with Pakistan. Check out that landscape behind him. Is it supposed to be inspiring? Worth fighting over?

    I was suspicious of this clown’s attractive Florida townhouse and the pair of brand new Mercedes in his driveway.

  24. @Buzz Mohawk
    Does the FBI ever do any good?

    Do the alphabet agencies ever do anything good enough to justify all their blunders -- or all the crap they seem connected to or to "miss" -- and are never held accountable for?

    ... Seddique Mateen was a confidential FBI source and is also under investigation for suspicious money transfers to Turkey and Afghanistan...
     
    This is very interesting stuff, reminiscent of the $100,000 wire transfer that came from Pakistani intelligence to Mohammed Atta in the days leading up to 11 September 2001.

    http://www.hacer.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/9-11-flag.jpg

    When is our flag true, and when is it false?

    Replies: @Enochian, @Flip, @The preferred nomenclature is...

    This country would be fine with no CIA, FBI, and NSA, and only 25% as much military. Who is going to attack us?

    These guys don’t have enough to do since the end of the Cold War so they are setting fires like firemen who don’t want to be laid off.

    • Agree: Highlander
  25. @Inquiring Mind
    Are you sure this is a Deep State "thing" instead of a Known Wolf "thing"?

    Bear with me on this.

    WW-II England that this "thing" called Double Cross. They pretty much knew who every German spy was in their country -- Germany's spies, let's just say, were a comical cultural mismatch and stuck out like the proverbial sore thumb. So what the British did is that they "turned" every last one of them to feed disinformation back to Germany. Wasn't hard to do because they were spies and were told "You either go to the gallows or you do what we tell you."

    From what can be guessed at from current-day affairs, it appears that the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, everybody on "our side" is doing the same thing with the Mateens within their borders. It is pretty obvious who they are because of the cultural mismatch that borders on the comical at times, and we "flip them" to turn Confidential Informant.

    Only because of whatever indoctrination, threats or other powers "the other side" has over the Mateens, they don't stay "flipped", rather, they "flip out." When the media discloses "such-and-such Mateen had been 'known to the authorities'", they are not saying that we were spying on them when they flipped out. They are saying they were spying for us when they flipped out. They just didn't stay flipped because our spooks don't fully understand the depths of committment and hierarchy of motivation of "the other side."

    So this is not a Deep State in cahoots with the Mateens. It is our spooks attempting to control the Mateens and losing that control. Think of Middle Eastern versions of Jason Bourne?

    Replies: @Chase, @Buzz Mohawk, @Eagle Eye, @Hanoi Paris Hilton, @PV van der Byl

    Regarding Known Wolf “things” and the Double Cross: What you describe is a house of mirrors, and many of us have wondered about it in these times.

    Our first question should be, “Is is worth it to play this game when so many of our own citizens get hurt?” WWII is now the stuff of legend, but how many times did those known enemy agents cause such harm to British Civilians? Were there Known Wolves shooting up nightclubs in London and ramming vehicles into pedestrians on London Bridge? No. WWII is a whole other story with its own possible revisions needed, but no, there was not this kind of collateral damage in that particular house of mirrors, not like there is now in ours.

    Any layman in America with a mediocre education knows that Eisenhower warned us of the military industrial complex. He also said that someday The People are going to decide they just want to live their lives. Some of us even know that Washington — not the town, but the man — warned our ancestors against foreign entanglements. Isn’t it time someone equally significant gave a speech suggesting we might want to trash the whole “intelligence” game, shatter the mirrors, and just work directly? Why not just imprison foreign agents instead of trying to use them as some kind of secret weapon — a weapon that often blows up in our faces?

    Or is it that “our” people are not actually using Known Wolves but are in fact on the same, damned global team as all the rest of them? As Steve says, it raises the real estate values.

  26. In my more paranoid moments I wonder if the resultant chaos of diversity is desired as a means to make the National Security panopticon more palatable. I wouldn’t put it past our government to be that evil and cynical, but in my rational moments it seems to be far too competent of a plan to be the brainchild of the U.S. government.

  27. @Barnard
    @CTD

    No. They would have to go through Iran or Pakistan to make it to any warm water ports. Now that they annexed Crimea, the Russians don't need to worry about access to warm water ports. Even if Afghanistan did have its own warm water ports, that isn't a legitimate reason for the United States to meddle in its affairs. We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @CTD, @Hibernian, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Highlander

    Crimea is on the Black Sea and ships going to and from it generally must pass through such choke points as Bosporus, Dardanelles, the Suez Canal, and the Straits of Gibraltar.

  28. @Roderick Spode
    I'm going to hold off on judgment until some source other than The Right Wing Vox picks this up

    I'm not concern trolling; it genuinely saddens me that Breitbart articles so often turn out to be, well, unfounded propaganda.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @unit472, @Roderick Spode

    Ha! Thanks.

    • Replies: @CJ
    @Roderick Spode

    A series of interesting accounts of the trial are up on the Sentinel website. There is one in particular that describes the judge’s consternation on learning that Mateen’s wife Noor Salman couldn’t have cased the Pulse nightclub before the attack, as the prosecution had assured him she did at the hearing where the judge revoked her bail.

    https://www.clickorlando.com/news/noor-salman-trial/feds-call-final-witnesses-in-noor-salman-trial

  29. Ivy says:
    @CTD
    >strategic gravel reserves

    Isn't the reason for inviting that part of the world the fact that it lies between the Russkies and some warm water ports?

    Replies: @Barnard, @unit472, @Ivy, @CK

    The Grey Lady informed the world of that famous trillion dollar treasure trove of minerals awaiting the enterprising explorer, way back in 2010. So, what did Obama know and when did he know it?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/14/world/asia/14minerals.html

    [MORE]

    WASHINGTON — The United States has discovered nearly $1 trillion in untapped mineral deposits in Afghanistan, far beyond any previously known reserves and enough to fundamentally alter the Afghan economy and perhaps the Afghan war itself, according to senior American government officials.
    The previously unknown deposits — including huge veins of iron, copper, cobalt, gold and critical industrial metals like lithium — are so big and include so many minerals that are essential to modern industry that Afghanistan could eventually be transformed into one of the most important mining centers in the world, the United States officials believe.
    An internal Pentagon memo, for example, states that Afghanistan could become the “Saudi Arabia of lithium,” a key raw material in the manufacture of batteries for laptops and BlackBerrys.
    The vast scale of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth was discovered by a small team of Pentagon officials and American geologists. The Afghan government and President Hamid Karzai were recently briefed, American officials said.
    While it could take many years to develop a mining industry, the potential is so great that officials and executives in the industry believe it could attract heavy investment even before mines are profitable, providing the possibility of jobs that could distract from generations of war.
    “There is stunning potential here,” Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the United States Central Command, said in an interview on Saturday. “There are a lot of ifs, of course, but I think potentially it is hugely significant.”
    The value of the newly discovered mineral deposits dwarfs the size of Afghanistan’s existing war-bedraggled economy, which is based largely on opium production and narcotics trafficking as well as aid from the United States and other industrialized countries. Afghanistan’s gross domestic product is only about $12 billion.
    “This will become the backbone of the Afghan economy,” said Jalil Jumriany, an adviser to the Afghan minister of mines.
    American and Afghan officials agreed to discuss the mineral discoveries at a difficult moment in the war in Afghanistan. The American-led offensive in Marja in southern Afghanistan has achieved only limited gains. Meanwhile, charges of corruption and favoritism continue to plague the Karzai government, and Mr. Karzai seems increasingly embittered toward the White House.
    So the Obama administration is hungry for some positive news to come out of Afghanistan. Yet the American officials also recognize that the mineral discoveries will almost certainly have a double-edged impact.
    Instead of bringing peace, the newfound mineral wealth could lead the Taliban to battle even more fiercely to regain control of the country.
    The corruption that is already rampant in the Karzai government could also be amplified by the new wealth, particularly if a handful of well-connected oligarchs, some with personal ties to the president, gain control of the resources. Just last year, Afghanistan’s minister of mines was accused by American officials of accepting a $30 million bribe to award China the rights to develop its copper mine. The minister has since been replaced.
    Endless fights could erupt between the central government in Kabul and provincial and tribal leaders in mineral-rich districts. Afghanistan has a national mining law, written with the help of advisers from the World Bank, but it has never faced a serious challenge.
    “No one has tested that law; no one knows how it will stand up in a fight between the central government and the provinces,” observed Paul A. Brinkley, deputy undersecretary of defense for business and leader of the Pentagon team that discovered the deposits.
    At the same time, American officials fear resource-hungry China will try to dominate the development of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth, which could upset the United States, given its heavy investment in the region. After winning the bid for its Aynak copper mine in Logar Province, China clearly wants more, American officials said.
    Another complication is that because Afghanistan has never had much heavy industry before, it has little or no history of environmental protection either. “The big question is, can this be developed in a responsible way, in a way that is environmentally and socially responsible?” Mr. Brinkley said. “No one knows how this will work.”
    With virtually no mining industry or infrastructure in place today, it will take decades for Afghanistan to exploit its mineral wealth fully. “This is a country that has no mining culture,” said Jack Medlin, a geologist in the United States Geological Survey’s international affairs program. “They’ve had some small artisanal mines, but now there could be some very, very large mines that will require more than just a gold pan.”
    The mineral deposits are scattered throughout the country, including in the southern and eastern regions along the border with Pakistan that have had some of the most intense combat in the American-led war against the Taliban insurgency.
    The Pentagon task force has already started trying to help the Afghans set up a system to deal with mineral development. International accounting firms that have expertise in mining contracts have been hired to consult with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, and technical data is being prepared to turn over to multinational mining companies and other potential foreign investors. The Pentagon is helping Afghan officials arrange to start seeking bids on mineral rights by next fall, officials said.
    “The Ministry of Mines is not ready to handle this,” Mr. Brinkley said. “We are trying to help them get ready.”
    Like much of the recent history of the country, the story of the discovery of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth is one of missed opportunities and the distractions of war.
    In 2004, American geologists, sent to Afghanistan as part of a broader reconstruction effort, stumbled across an intriguing series of old charts and data at the library of the Afghan Geological Survey in Kabul that hinted at major mineral deposits in the country. They soon learned that the data had been collected by Soviet mining experts during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s, but cast aside when the Soviets withdrew in 1989.
    During the chaos of the 1990s, when Afghanistan was mired in civil war and later ruled by the Taliban, a small group of Afghan geologists protected the charts by taking them home, and returned them to the Geological Survey’s library only after the American invasion and the ouster of the Taliban in 2001.
    “There were maps, but the development did not take place, because you had 30 to 35 years of war,” said Ahmad Hujabre, an Afghan engineer who worked for the Ministry of Mines in the 1970s.
    Armed with the old Russian charts, the United States Geological Survey began a series of aerial surveys of Afghanistan’s mineral resources in 2006, using advanced gravity and magnetic measuring equipment attached to an old Navy Orion P-3 aircraft that flew over about 70 percent of the country.
    The data from those flights was so promising that in 2007, the geologists returned for an even more sophisticated study, using an old British bomber equipped with instruments that offered a three-dimensional profile of mineral deposits below the earth’s surface. It was the most comprehensive geologic survey of Afghanistan ever conducted.
    The handful of American geologists who pored over the new data said the results were astonishing.
    But the results gathered dust for two more years, ignored by officials in both the American and Afghan governments. In 2009, a Pentagon task force that had created business development programs in Iraq was transferred to Afghanistan, and came upon the geological data. Until then, no one besides the geologists had bothered to look at the information — and no one had sought to translate the technical data to measure the potential economic value of the mineral deposits.
    Soon, the Pentagon business development task force brought in teams of American mining experts to validate the survey’s findings, and then briefed Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and Mr. Karzai.
    So far, the biggest mineral deposits discovered are of iron and copper, and the quantities are large enough to make Afghanistan a major world producer of both, United States officials said. Other finds include large deposits of niobium, a soft metal used in producing superconducting steel, rare earth elements and large gold deposits in Pashtun areas of southern Afghanistan.
    Just this month, American geologists working with the Pentagon team have been conducting ground surveys on dry salt lakes in western Afghanistan where they believe there are large deposits of lithium. Pentagon officials said that their initial analysis at one location in Ghazni Province showed the potential for lithium deposits as large of those of Bolivia, which now has the world’s largest known lithium reserves.
    For the geologists who are now scouring some of the most remote stretches of Afghanistan to complete the technical studies necessary before the international bidding process is begun, there is a growing sense that they are in the midst of one of the great discoveries of their careers.
    “On the ground, it’s very, very, promising,” Mr. Medlin said. “Actually, it’s pretty amazing.”

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @Ivy

    That was fascinating and I'd never read that before. Thanks for posting that NYT article.

    I always assumed we were there because we had a shortage of Afghan lady driving students . . .

    https://youtu.be/9SR5sJUDfsA

  30. Yet more fruit from the tree of Gladio B.

  31. anonymous[162] • Disclaimer says:

    One more reminder of how everything is so thoroughly infiltrated with snitches and agent provocateurs that one never knows who is really what. Much of what we see is fake.

  32. @Corn
    “And if their sons flip out and murder Americans in an Islamist terror attack, well, that’s going to require some big budget boosts for all the agencies concerned that will drive Beltway real estate prices even higher.”

    Plus you’ll also have excuses to crack down on the 2nd, 4th and possibly 1st Amendments in the name of public safety. Win all around.

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...

    Hell yeah! Murica the great!

    I must say we gots us some plush seats on this here bus being driven off the side of the cliff though. Lots of cake and sports ball to go around, free porn, casinos on every corner…

  33. @schnellandine
    What similar scam--and there's been a pile--will finally encourage the rank and file conservative to disavow the racket of blunderers known as the federal gov't of the US, and "law enforcement" in general? If one steps into a voting booth after this last 18 months, or gives the old "lotta good cops" speech, I question your sanity or your balls, maybe both. Shun the lot. We've been scammed since birth--Founder's progeny on the campaign trail, RINO pinko collaborator in office. Get off your damn knees if you're on 'em.

    Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...

    The term “Federal law enforcement” is so Orwellian now.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    @The preferred nomenclature is...


    The term “Federal law enforcement” is so Orwellian now.
     
    You're not being the least bit hyperbolic. The FBI at best dropped the ball on Mateen, at worst protected him from just, yet they persecute his wife for their failings,
  34. So, it’s all good.

    But not for American Patriots.

  35. @anon

    After investigating him, putting him under surveillance, interviewing him twice, and even obtaining a written statement in which Omar Mateen admitted he lied to agents during the interviews, the operation concluded in March 2014 that he was not a threat.
     
    Heck of a job, Comey.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @donut

    Heck of a job, Comey

    The Comber is above reproach, don’ t you know. Maybe you missed his apotheosis. To become one of the ‘gods’ while still living, well that was the realm of the Caesars, and Kaisers and Czars, and now dishonest FBI bureaucrats.

    We must learn to know our place, right plebeian?

  36. @Barnard
    @CTD

    No. They would have to go through Iran or Pakistan to make it to any warm water ports. Now that they annexed Crimea, the Russians don't need to worry about access to warm water ports. Even if Afghanistan did have its own warm water ports, that isn't a legitimate reason for the United States to meddle in its affairs. We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @CTD, @Hibernian, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Highlander

    We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    True.

  37. @Anonymous

    Back in January, I wrote a Taki’s column called “Immigration and the Deep State” listing numerous examples of immigrants running amok who were in this country because somebody in Washington thought it would be a good idea for some Invade the World reason.
     
    Steve, you're a stats guy. What are the odds that the immigrants involved in these things also happen to be highly connected to the deep state? Rather than the millions of other random immigrants with no such connections? Is it just a coincidence? Because these things are one of the few major events covered heavily by the mainstream media that are favorable politically to the right, there's a tremendous incentive not to wonder about such things and just run with it and try to capitalize on it politically. But after how routine such events seem to have become, it seems worthwhile wondering about.

    https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=588_1465936114

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Is it just a coincidence?

    Only if you are a religiously materialist fanatic.

  38. @Buzz Mohawk
    Does the FBI ever do any good?

    Do the alphabet agencies ever do anything good enough to justify all their blunders -- or all the crap they seem connected to or to "miss" -- and are never held accountable for?

    ... Seddique Mateen was a confidential FBI source and is also under investigation for suspicious money transfers to Turkey and Afghanistan...
     
    This is very interesting stuff, reminiscent of the $100,000 wire transfer that came from Pakistani intelligence to Mohammed Atta in the days leading up to 11 September 2001.

    http://www.hacer.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/9-11-flag.jpg

    When is our flag true, and when is it false?

    Replies: @Enochian, @Flip, @The preferred nomenclature is...

    Law abiding middle class white guys gotta be harassed by someone.

  39. BUUUTT CONSPIRACY LOONS! TINHATTERS! LOOK AWAY! NOTHING TO SEE HERE!

  40. i chalk this up to 2 things:
    1) immigrants in general are more likely to have mental problems than most…why leave your native land and go somewhere thousands of miles away? If you do, you are most likely than most to have mental illness…also, mental illness runs in families
    2) the FBI/CIA etc likes to find mentally ill people they can manipulate..

    • Replies: @Lugash
    @propagandist hacker

    1B) Moving to a foreign culture can be stressful. It can exacerbate mental illness.

  41. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    @schnellandine

    The term "Federal law enforcement" is so Orwellian now.

    Replies: @Lugash

    The term “Federal law enforcement” is so Orwellian now.

    You’re not being the least bit hyperbolic. The FBI at best dropped the ball on Mateen, at worst protected him from just, yet they persecute his wife for their failings,

  42. Tsarnaev brothers

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/the-boston-bombings-and-the-cia-connection-graham-fuller-and-uncle-ruslan-tsarnaev/5335416
    Ruslan Tsarnaev, the outspoken uncle of the brothers was married to Samantha A. Fuller until 2004. Samantha’s father is Graham Fuller, the senior CIA person who was the architect the Afghan Islamic fundamentalist Mujahideen war against the Soviets. He is also involved in creating a global jihad network, presumably acting on behalf of CIA interests.

    Ruslan Tsarnaev, who changed his name to Ruslan Tsarni, lives in a posh Washington DC suburb of Bethesda Maryland. He has worked in the past for companies tied to Dick Cheney’s Halliburton as well as a “consultant” in Kazakhstan with the State Department’s USAID which has been identified as a CIA front.

  43. “Never, ever go near power. Don’t become friends with anyone who has real power. It’s dangerous.” -Stanley Kubrick

    Tsarnaev brothers or Omar Mateen connections to dangerous powers.

  44. Does that help explain this weird news story from August 10, 2016?

    (CNN) The father of the Orlando gunman attended a Hillary Clinton rally in Florida Monday to show his support for the Democratic candidate.

    “Hillary Clinton is good for the United States versus Donald Trump, who has no solutions,” Seddique Mateen told WPTV. He could clearly be seen standing behind Clinton as she addressed the audience.

    His son, Omar, killed 49 people at the Pulse nightclub, a gay club in Orlando, in June in the worst incident of domestic terrorism since 9/11.

    Seddique Mateen, who said he was a Democrat, showed WPTV a sign he had made in support of Clinton, highlighting that he believes she is good for national security and citing gun control laws. Mateen told the reporter that he wants the U.S. to be a safer place.

    A Clinton aide said: “The rally was a 3,000-person, open-door event for the public. This individual wasn’t invited as a guest and the campaign was unaware of his attendance until after the event.”

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Harry Baldwin

    Here is one photograph of his endorsement. Notice bottom line: "Gun Control Laws"

    http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.2744017.1470751937!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/article_750/mateen10n-5-web.jpg

  45. @propagandist hacker
    i chalk this up to 2 things:
    1) immigrants in general are more likely to have mental problems than most...why leave your native land and go somewhere thousands of miles away? If you do, you are most likely than most to have mental illness...also, mental illness runs in families
    2) the FBI/CIA etc likes to find mentally ill people they can manipulate..

    Replies: @Lugash

    1B) Moving to a foreign culture can be stressful. It can exacerbate mental illness.

  46. Anonymous[346] • Disclaimer says:

    As a country we’ve traveled about one third of the trip to a Soviet style destination: mass extreme cynicism toward government and institutions.

    We still have along way to go. But increasingly putting one’s faith in the authorities invites mockery and that’s the way it should be.

    Still there are millions who just can’t wait to be bossed around by martial law military police after the next stage false flag event.

    Like an abused girlfriend about to be put out on the street as a prostitute the only kind of love they understand is pimp style like from Obama: “I love you, baby, I just need to change everything about you.”

  47. Just visited HuffPo out of curiosity.

    Zero mention of Omar Mateen or his dad. Just wall-to-wall Stormy Daniels.

    And I wonder why my friends on the Left are often so clueless.

  48. CJ says:
    @Roderick Spode
    @Roderick Spode

    Ha! Thanks.

    Replies: @CJ

    A series of interesting accounts of the trial are up on the Sentinel website. There is one in particular that describes the judge’s consternation on learning that Mateen’s wife Noor Salman couldn’t have cased the Pulse nightclub before the attack, as the prosecution had assured him she did at the hearing where the judge revoked her bail.

    https://www.clickorlando.com/news/noor-salman-trial/feds-call-final-witnesses-in-noor-salman-trial

  49. I am sure that Mateen Sr. will keep his head above water throughout all of this, somehow.

    After all, as the new American saying goes:

    “When the floodwaters reach your chin, put your son beneath your feet.”

  50. @Harry Baldwin
    Does that help explain this weird news story from August 10, 2016?

    (CNN) The father of the Orlando gunman attended a Hillary Clinton rally in Florida Monday to show his support for the Democratic candidate.

    "Hillary Clinton is good for the United States versus Donald Trump, who has no solutions," Seddique Mateen told WPTV. He could clearly be seen standing behind Clinton as she addressed the audience.

    His son, Omar, killed 49 people at the Pulse nightclub, a gay club in Orlando, in June in the worst incident of domestic terrorism since 9/11.

    Seddique Mateen, who said he was a Democrat, showed WPTV a sign he had made in support of Clinton, highlighting that he believes she is good for national security and citing gun control laws. Mateen told the reporter that he wants the U.S. to be a safer place.

    A Clinton aide said: "The rally was a 3,000-person, open-door event for the public. This individual wasn't invited as a guest and the campaign was unaware of his attendance until after the event."
     

    Replies: @CCZ

    Here is one photograph of his endorsement. Notice bottom line: “Gun Control Laws”

  51. The FBI & recent lethal events:

    FBI is warned about Tsarnaevs, does nothing, Boston Marathon is bombed.
    FBI agent interviews Tsarnaev associate Ibragim Todashev, shoots him dead.
    FBI investigates Omar Mateen for making jihadi threats, drops investigation.
    FBI hides fact that Orlando nightclub shooter’s father was FBI informant.
    FBI is warned twice beforehand about Parkland HS shooter, takes no action.
    FBI agent’s son David Hogg is Parkland media trainee who pushes gun control.

    • Replies: @Chuck
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Just a cohencidence goy!

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Defund the FBI. Reclassify and cut their salaries to 30% of what they earn now. Start a new agency to perform the useful tasks once undertaken by the FBI, don't let Democrats in at all. Once the FBI rats leave the ship shut down the agency altogether.

  52. Eagle Eye says:
    @Inquiring Mind
    Are you sure this is a Deep State "thing" instead of a Known Wolf "thing"?

    Bear with me on this.

    WW-II England that this "thing" called Double Cross. They pretty much knew who every German spy was in their country -- Germany's spies, let's just say, were a comical cultural mismatch and stuck out like the proverbial sore thumb. So what the British did is that they "turned" every last one of them to feed disinformation back to Germany. Wasn't hard to do because they were spies and were told "You either go to the gallows or you do what we tell you."

    From what can be guessed at from current-day affairs, it appears that the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, everybody on "our side" is doing the same thing with the Mateens within their borders. It is pretty obvious who they are because of the cultural mismatch that borders on the comical at times, and we "flip them" to turn Confidential Informant.

    Only because of whatever indoctrination, threats or other powers "the other side" has over the Mateens, they don't stay "flipped", rather, they "flip out." When the media discloses "such-and-such Mateen had been 'known to the authorities'", they are not saying that we were spying on them when they flipped out. They are saying they were spying for us when they flipped out. They just didn't stay flipped because our spooks don't fully understand the depths of committment and hierarchy of motivation of "the other side."

    So this is not a Deep State in cahoots with the Mateens. It is our spooks attempting to control the Mateens and losing that control. Think of Middle Eastern versions of Jason Bourne?

    Replies: @Chase, @Buzz Mohawk, @Eagle Eye, @Hanoi Paris Hilton, @PV van der Byl

    Spies are like wigs.

    The obvious ones are obvious. The others maybe less so.

    Anthony Blunt – one of the “Cambridge Five” – was known to be a Soviet spy but was allowed to end his days quietly, mostly to avoid embarrassment to the secret services and to the establishment in general.

    What if young Lord X, nephew and heir apparent of the wealthy Duke of Y, and an afficionado of encounters with young boys, had been spying for the National Socialists? What if X later transferred his allegiance to the Soviets or their satellites?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Eagle Eye

    Always remember that the Soviets and the Nazis were allied right up until June, 1941. Therefore the Comintern was pro German.

  53. @Barnard
    @CTD

    No. They would have to go through Iran or Pakistan to make it to any warm water ports. Now that they annexed Crimea, the Russians don't need to worry about access to warm water ports. Even if Afghanistan did have its own warm water ports, that isn't a legitimate reason for the United States to meddle in its affairs. We have no national interest in Afghanistan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @CTD, @Hibernian, @Charles Erwin Wilson, @Highlander

    The only logical explanation for our continued occupation of Afghanistan (or at least enough of it to control Kabul) is to provide a jumping off point for our troops to quickly secure Pakistans nuclear arsenal should it be threatened by the true Pashtun Islamic crazies of Taliban sympathies.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Highlander

    Wouldn't it be easier to come in via its coast on the Arabian Sea than trekking through mountain passes from Afghanistan?

    , @LondonBob
    @Highlander

    The justification for staying in Afghanistan is, from what I have read, is access to the Caspian Sea and the natural resources there.

    Replies: @Highlander

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @Highlander


    The only logical explanation for our continued occupation of Afghanistan (or at least enough of it to control Kabul) is to provide a jumping off point for our troops to quickly secure Pakistans nuclear arsenal should it be threatened by the true Pashtun Islamic crazies of Taliban sympathies.

     

    WASP / Jew ruling class plan to cripple Iran is why the American Empire is in Afghanistan:

    https://twitter.com/FULLY_BADASS/status/557620781744934914
  54. @anon

    After investigating him, putting him under surveillance, interviewing him twice, and even obtaining a written statement in which Omar Mateen admitted he lied to agents during the interviews, the operation concluded in March 2014 that he was not a threat.
     
    Heck of a job, Comey.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @donut

    ” the operation concluded in March 2014 that he was not a threat.”

    You’re making the wrong assumption that the goal of the “investigation” was to determine if he was a threat to the unarmed and defenseless public .

  55. @Chase
    @Inquiring Mind

    The answer is: who knows? They’ve intentionally made it impossible to know, and because of that, it’s impossible to have self government. Which we haven’t had since at least 1913.

    At this point, as a long-time American defender and patriot, it’s seriously hard to come up with any way to respond to the left-wing critiques I’ve long scoffed at while continuing to maintain my more right-wing criticisms thereof.

    So: the current (((world order))) manages to piss off the left and the right, only to benefit a few people. Sounds about as unstable when I phrase it like that as it does watching this whole mess burn in real time.

    Replies: @Tim Howells

    At this point, as a long-time American defender and patriot, it’s seriously hard to come up with any way to respond to the left-wing critiques I’ve long scoffed at while continuing to maintain my more right-wing criticisms thereof.

    Yeah, agreed – we have a lot in common with the best of the left now. Unfortunately I don’t see any progress yet on race realism and without that we can’t get any kind of useful alliance. It’s a shame though. For example here’s Chris Hedges on “Occupy Wall Street”:

    I would say that those who are protesting the rise of the corporate state are in fact on the political spectrum the true conservatives because they’re calling for the restoration of the rule of law. The radicals have seized power and they have trashed all regulations and legal impediments to a corporate reconfiguration of American society into a form of neo-feudalism. And that’s what we’re really asking for – is the restoration of the rule of law.
    http://dailybail.com/home/chris-hedges-annihilates-wall-street-apologist-kevin-oleary.html

    This kind of thing goes back a long ways. Chomsky noted that his work on anarchism was well understood by the militant right, and for this reason his works could sometimes be found on sale at gun shows and militia meetings.

  56. @Highlander
    @Barnard

    The only logical explanation for our continued occupation of Afghanistan (or at least enough of it to control Kabul) is to provide a jumping off point for our troops to quickly secure Pakistans nuclear arsenal should it be threatened by the true Pashtun Islamic crazies of Taliban sympathies.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @LondonBob, @Charles Pewitt

    Wouldn’t it be easier to come in via its coast on the Arabian Sea than trekking through mountain passes from Afghanistan?

  57. @Ivy
    @CTD

    The Grey Lady informed the world of that famous trillion dollar treasure trove of minerals awaiting the enterprising explorer, way back in 2010. So, what did Obama know and when did he know it?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/14/world/asia/14minerals.html



    WASHINGTON — The United States has discovered nearly $1 trillion in untapped mineral deposits in Afghanistan, far beyond any previously known reserves and enough to fundamentally alter the Afghan economy and perhaps the Afghan war itself, according to senior American government officials.
    The previously unknown deposits — including huge veins of iron, copper, cobalt, gold and critical industrial metals like lithium — are so big and include so many minerals that are essential to modern industry that Afghanistan could eventually be transformed into one of the most important mining centers in the world, the United States officials believe.
    An internal Pentagon memo, for example, states that Afghanistan could become the “Saudi Arabia of lithium,” a key raw material in the manufacture of batteries for laptops and BlackBerrys.
    The vast scale of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth was discovered by a small team of Pentagon officials and American geologists. The Afghan government and President Hamid Karzai were recently briefed, American officials said.
    While it could take many years to develop a mining industry, the potential is so great that officials and executives in the industry believe it could attract heavy investment even before mines are profitable, providing the possibility of jobs that could distract from generations of war.
    “There is stunning potential here,” Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the United States Central Command, said in an interview on Saturday. “There are a lot of ifs, of course, but I think potentially it is hugely significant.”
    The value of the newly discovered mineral deposits dwarfs the size of Afghanistan’s existing war-bedraggled economy, which is based largely on opium production and narcotics trafficking as well as aid from the United States and other industrialized countries. Afghanistan’s gross domestic product is only about $12 billion.
    “This will become the backbone of the Afghan economy,” said Jalil Jumriany, an adviser to the Afghan minister of mines.
    American and Afghan officials agreed to discuss the mineral discoveries at a difficult moment in the war in Afghanistan. The American-led offensive in Marja in southern Afghanistan has achieved only limited gains. Meanwhile, charges of corruption and favoritism continue to plague the Karzai government, and Mr. Karzai seems increasingly embittered toward the White House.
    So the Obama administration is hungry for some positive news to come out of Afghanistan. Yet the American officials also recognize that the mineral discoveries will almost certainly have a double-edged impact.
    Instead of bringing peace, the newfound mineral wealth could lead the Taliban to battle even more fiercely to regain control of the country.
    The corruption that is already rampant in the Karzai government could also be amplified by the new wealth, particularly if a handful of well-connected oligarchs, some with personal ties to the president, gain control of the resources. Just last year, Afghanistan’s minister of mines was accused by American officials of accepting a $30 million bribe to award China the rights to develop its copper mine. The minister has since been replaced.
    Endless fights could erupt between the central government in Kabul and provincial and tribal leaders in mineral-rich districts. Afghanistan has a national mining law, written with the help of advisers from the World Bank, but it has never faced a serious challenge.
    “No one has tested that law; no one knows how it will stand up in a fight between the central government and the provinces,” observed Paul A. Brinkley, deputy undersecretary of defense for business and leader of the Pentagon team that discovered the deposits.
    At the same time, American officials fear resource-hungry China will try to dominate the development of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth, which could upset the United States, given its heavy investment in the region. After winning the bid for its Aynak copper mine in Logar Province, China clearly wants more, American officials said.
    Another complication is that because Afghanistan has never had much heavy industry before, it has little or no history of environmental protection either. “The big question is, can this be developed in a responsible way, in a way that is environmentally and socially responsible?” Mr. Brinkley said. “No one knows how this will work.”
    With virtually no mining industry or infrastructure in place today, it will take decades for Afghanistan to exploit its mineral wealth fully. “This is a country that has no mining culture,” said Jack Medlin, a geologist in the United States Geological Survey’s international affairs program. “They’ve had some small artisanal mines, but now there could be some very, very large mines that will require more than just a gold pan.”
    The mineral deposits are scattered throughout the country, including in the southern and eastern regions along the border with Pakistan that have had some of the most intense combat in the American-led war against the Taliban insurgency.
    The Pentagon task force has already started trying to help the Afghans set up a system to deal with mineral development. International accounting firms that have expertise in mining contracts have been hired to consult with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, and technical data is being prepared to turn over to multinational mining companies and other potential foreign investors. The Pentagon is helping Afghan officials arrange to start seeking bids on mineral rights by next fall, officials said.
    “The Ministry of Mines is not ready to handle this,” Mr. Brinkley said. “We are trying to help them get ready.”
    Like much of the recent history of the country, the story of the discovery of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth is one of missed opportunities and the distractions of war.
    In 2004, American geologists, sent to Afghanistan as part of a broader reconstruction effort, stumbled across an intriguing series of old charts and data at the library of the Afghan Geological Survey in Kabul that hinted at major mineral deposits in the country. They soon learned that the data had been collected by Soviet mining experts during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s, but cast aside when the Soviets withdrew in 1989.
    During the chaos of the 1990s, when Afghanistan was mired in civil war and later ruled by the Taliban, a small group of Afghan geologists protected the charts by taking them home, and returned them to the Geological Survey’s library only after the American invasion and the ouster of the Taliban in 2001.
    “There were maps, but the development did not take place, because you had 30 to 35 years of war,” said Ahmad Hujabre, an Afghan engineer who worked for the Ministry of Mines in the 1970s.
    Armed with the old Russian charts, the United States Geological Survey began a series of aerial surveys of Afghanistan’s mineral resources in 2006, using advanced gravity and magnetic measuring equipment attached to an old Navy Orion P-3 aircraft that flew over about 70 percent of the country.
    The data from those flights was so promising that in 2007, the geologists returned for an even more sophisticated study, using an old British bomber equipped with instruments that offered a three-dimensional profile of mineral deposits below the earth’s surface. It was the most comprehensive geologic survey of Afghanistan ever conducted.
    The handful of American geologists who pored over the new data said the results were astonishing.
    But the results gathered dust for two more years, ignored by officials in both the American and Afghan governments. In 2009, a Pentagon task force that had created business development programs in Iraq was transferred to Afghanistan, and came upon the geological data. Until then, no one besides the geologists had bothered to look at the information — and no one had sought to translate the technical data to measure the potential economic value of the mineral deposits.
    Soon, the Pentagon business development task force brought in teams of American mining experts to validate the survey’s findings, and then briefed Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and Mr. Karzai.
    So far, the biggest mineral deposits discovered are of iron and copper, and the quantities are large enough to make Afghanistan a major world producer of both, United States officials said. Other finds include large deposits of niobium, a soft metal used in producing superconducting steel, rare earth elements and large gold deposits in Pashtun areas of southern Afghanistan.
    Just this month, American geologists working with the Pentagon team have been conducting ground surveys on dry salt lakes in western Afghanistan where they believe there are large deposits of lithium. Pentagon officials said that their initial analysis at one location in Ghazni Province showed the potential for lithium deposits as large of those of Bolivia, which now has the world’s largest known lithium reserves.
    For the geologists who are now scouring some of the most remote stretches of Afghanistan to complete the technical studies necessary before the international bidding process is begun, there is a growing sense that they are in the midst of one of the great discoveries of their careers.
    “On the ground, it’s very, very, promising,” Mr. Medlin said. “Actually, it’s pretty amazing.”

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    That was fascinating and I’d never read that before. Thanks for posting that NYT article.

    I always assumed we were there because we had a shortage of Afghan lady driving students . . .

  58. @Highlander
    @Barnard

    The only logical explanation for our continued occupation of Afghanistan (or at least enough of it to control Kabul) is to provide a jumping off point for our troops to quickly secure Pakistans nuclear arsenal should it be threatened by the true Pashtun Islamic crazies of Taliban sympathies.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @LondonBob, @Charles Pewitt

    The justification for staying in Afghanistan is, from what I have read, is access to the Caspian Sea and the natural resources there.

    • Replies: @Highlander
    @LondonBob

    Afghanistan is 500 miles away from the Caspian Sea as is Tehran. I don't see us invading Iran anytime soon if ever.

  59. What’s above all that gravel explains
    Why we’re stuck on Afghanistan’s plains.
    Farmer well off the road
    Sells a girl good as gold
    When she’s hot, she will blow out your brains.

  60. @Steve Sailer
    @Barnard

    It's The Great Game that young Kim played in Kipling's day.

    Replies: @Matthew McConnagay

    Well, the British empire had a legitimate interest back then: they didn’t want Russia biting into the profitable territories to the south, so it made sense to make sure they didn’t get too close. Are you suggesting the US has been trying to keep Russia out of Pakistan these last twenty years?

  61. @Eagle Eye
    @Inquiring Mind

    Spies are like wigs.

    The obvious ones are obvious. The others maybe less so.

    Anthony Blunt - one of the "Cambridge Five" - was known to be a Soviet spy but was allowed to end his days quietly, mostly to avoid embarrassment to the secret services and to the establishment in general.

    What if young Lord X, nephew and heir apparent of the wealthy Duke of Y, and an afficionado of encounters with young boys, had been spying for the National Socialists? What if X later transferred his allegiance to the Soviets or their satellites?

    Replies: @JMcG

    Always remember that the Soviets and the Nazis were allied right up until June, 1941. Therefore the Comintern was pro German.

  62. @Highlander
    @Barnard

    The only logical explanation for our continued occupation of Afghanistan (or at least enough of it to control Kabul) is to provide a jumping off point for our troops to quickly secure Pakistans nuclear arsenal should it be threatened by the true Pashtun Islamic crazies of Taliban sympathies.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @LondonBob, @Charles Pewitt

    The only logical explanation for our continued occupation of Afghanistan (or at least enough of it to control Kabul) is to provide a jumping off point for our troops to quickly secure Pakistans nuclear arsenal should it be threatened by the true Pashtun Islamic crazies of Taliban sympathies.

    WASP / Jew ruling class plan to cripple Iran is why the American Empire is in Afghanistan:

  63. CK says:
    @CTD
    >strategic gravel reserves

    Isn't the reason for inviting that part of the world the fact that it lies between the Russkies and some warm water ports?

    Replies: @Barnard, @unit472, @Ivy, @CK

    With the advent of icebreaker technology, all of Russia’s ports are year round ports.
    The problem is not warm water, it is that all of Russia’s ports and shipping have to pass through easily blockaded choke points. With the exception of the Northern route across the top of Asia, the latest addition to the OBOR initiative.
    If you would peruse a map you will see that the Bosporus and the Dardanelles are and have always been easily controlled choke points for shipping out of black sea ports just as the Gates of Hercules effectively control all shipping out of the Mediterranean sea.
    St. Petersburg international port traffic is controlled at the passage between Denmark and Sweden, Archangel and Murmansk are controlled at the Greenland passage and the Norwegian Sea, and Vladivostok is effectively controlled by the Japanese Islands.

    • Replies: @Highlander
    @CK


    all of Russia’s ports and shipping have to pass through easily blockaded choke points. With the exception of the Northern route across the top of Asia
     
    What? The Bering Straight isn't a choke point?

    Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not), @CK

  64. Are there any major terrorists (who have committed terrorist acts in America) who don’t have FBI or CIA connections?

  65. @LondonBob
    @Highlander

    The justification for staying in Afghanistan is, from what I have read, is access to the Caspian Sea and the natural resources there.

    Replies: @Highlander

    Afghanistan is 500 miles away from the Caspian Sea as is Tehran. I don’t see us invading Iran anytime soon if ever.

  66. @CK
    @CTD

    With the advent of icebreaker technology, all of Russia's ports are year round ports.
    The problem is not warm water, it is that all of Russia's ports and shipping have to pass through easily blockaded choke points. With the exception of the Northern route across the top of Asia, the latest addition to the OBOR initiative.
    If you would peruse a map you will see that the Bosporus and the Dardanelles are and have always been easily controlled choke points for shipping out of black sea ports just as the Gates of Hercules effectively control all shipping out of the Mediterranean sea.
    St. Petersburg international port traffic is controlled at the passage between Denmark and Sweden, Archangel and Murmansk are controlled at the Greenland passage and the Norwegian Sea, and Vladivostok is effectively controlled by the Japanese Islands.

    Replies: @Highlander

    all of Russia’s ports and shipping have to pass through easily blockaded choke points. With the exception of the Northern route across the top of Asia

    What? The Bering Straight isn’t a choke point?

    • Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not)
    @Highlander

    Though the Highlands be bonnie and great,
    Not so Highlander in a debate.
    Though Bering was straight,
    Not so is his Strait:
    It zig-zags to west of the State.

    Replies: @Highlander

    , @CK
    @Highlander

    Icebreaking technology. The northern route is a shore hugging route. Makes it harder to choke when you are facing a shore defense.

    Replies: @Highlander

  67. @Inquiring Mind
    Are you sure this is a Deep State "thing" instead of a Known Wolf "thing"?

    Bear with me on this.

    WW-II England that this "thing" called Double Cross. They pretty much knew who every German spy was in their country -- Germany's spies, let's just say, were a comical cultural mismatch and stuck out like the proverbial sore thumb. So what the British did is that they "turned" every last one of them to feed disinformation back to Germany. Wasn't hard to do because they were spies and were told "You either go to the gallows or you do what we tell you."

    From what can be guessed at from current-day affairs, it appears that the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, everybody on "our side" is doing the same thing with the Mateens within their borders. It is pretty obvious who they are because of the cultural mismatch that borders on the comical at times, and we "flip them" to turn Confidential Informant.

    Only because of whatever indoctrination, threats or other powers "the other side" has over the Mateens, they don't stay "flipped", rather, they "flip out." When the media discloses "such-and-such Mateen had been 'known to the authorities'", they are not saying that we were spying on them when they flipped out. They are saying they were spying for us when they flipped out. They just didn't stay flipped because our spooks don't fully understand the depths of committment and hierarchy of motivation of "the other side."

    So this is not a Deep State in cahoots with the Mateens. It is our spooks attempting to control the Mateens and losing that control. Think of Middle Eastern versions of Jason Bourne?

    Replies: @Chase, @Buzz Mohawk, @Eagle Eye, @Hanoi Paris Hilton, @PV van der Byl

    This certainly rings true, and if it is true, it’s devastating! Much more important that we now get sucked into whether POTUS Trump twelve years ago did or did not wear a condom in his one-nighter with Stormy Whazerface. Probably something similar here to the Boston Marathon Bombing Freakout. But in that latter case it was the CIA (then still run by that whacko reverter-to-Islam Brennan, whose recent denunciations of Trump are astonishing for the depth of vituperation?)…rather than the FBI. Is nobody actually minding the store?

  68. @Highlander
    @CK


    all of Russia’s ports and shipping have to pass through easily blockaded choke points. With the exception of the Northern route across the top of Asia
     
    What? The Bering Straight isn't a choke point?

    Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not), @CK

    Though the Highlands be bonnie and great,
    Not so Highlander in a debate.
    Though Bering was straight,
    Not so is his Strait:
    It zig-zags to west of the State.

    • Agree: Highlander
    • Replies: @Highlander
    @Eustace Tilley (not)

    Well said as usual. You zinged me good on that one.

  69. @Highlander
    @CK


    all of Russia’s ports and shipping have to pass through easily blockaded choke points. With the exception of the Northern route across the top of Asia
     
    What? The Bering Straight isn't a choke point?

    Replies: @Eustace Tilley (not), @CK

    Icebreaking technology. The northern route is a shore hugging route. Makes it harder to choke when you are facing a shore defense.

    • Replies: @Highlander
    @CK

    Yes, traveling from nowhere to nowhere along the northern Siberian coast. LOL!

  70. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    The FBI & recent lethal events:

    FBI is warned about Tsarnaevs, does nothing, Boston Marathon is bombed.
    FBI agent interviews Tsarnaev associate Ibragim Todashev, shoots him dead.
    FBI investigates Omar Mateen for making jihadi threats, drops investigation.
    FBI hides fact that Orlando nightclub shooter’s father was FBI informant.
    FBI is warned twice beforehand about Parkland HS shooter, takes no action.
    FBI agent’s son David Hogg is Parkland media trainee who pushes gun control.

    Replies: @Chuck, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Just a cohencidence goy!

  71. @CK
    @Highlander

    Icebreaking technology. The northern route is a shore hugging route. Makes it harder to choke when you are facing a shore defense.

    Replies: @Highlander

    Yes, traveling from nowhere to nowhere along the northern Siberian coast. LOL!

  72. It’s interesting to see how few degrees of separation there are between mass shootings and terrorist attacks to the FBI. I started tracking it after the FBI’s facilitation of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing was made public, and the connections are about 1 to 2 away from the perpetrators in half of these high profile incidents.

  73. And then when they are here, the FBI can kill two birds with one stone by having them spy on other unstable potential terrorists. And if their sons flip out and murder Americans in an Islamist terror attack, well, that’s going to require some big budget boosts for all the agencies concerned that will drive Beltway real estate prices even higher. So, it’s all good.

    There’s an added benefit:

    If one of the sons, in the process of his flipping out, happens to slaughter a few dozen gays at a gay nightclub, not only can you count on the media to make sure it causes zero damage to the Coalition of the Fringes, but you can also take comfort in the fact that the whole thing will be pawned off on Pat Robertson’s “homophobia.” Right before the self same media shove it all into the rabbit hole.

  74. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    @Highlander

    Though the Highlands be bonnie and great,
    Not so Highlander in a debate.
    Though Bering was straight,
    Not so is his Strait:
    It zig-zags to west of the State.

    Replies: @Highlander

    Well said as usual. You zinged me good on that one.

  75. @Inquiring Mind
    Are you sure this is a Deep State "thing" instead of a Known Wolf "thing"?

    Bear with me on this.

    WW-II England that this "thing" called Double Cross. They pretty much knew who every German spy was in their country -- Germany's spies, let's just say, were a comical cultural mismatch and stuck out like the proverbial sore thumb. So what the British did is that they "turned" every last one of them to feed disinformation back to Germany. Wasn't hard to do because they were spies and were told "You either go to the gallows or you do what we tell you."

    From what can be guessed at from current-day affairs, it appears that the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, everybody on "our side" is doing the same thing with the Mateens within their borders. It is pretty obvious who they are because of the cultural mismatch that borders on the comical at times, and we "flip them" to turn Confidential Informant.

    Only because of whatever indoctrination, threats or other powers "the other side" has over the Mateens, they don't stay "flipped", rather, they "flip out." When the media discloses "such-and-such Mateen had been 'known to the authorities'", they are not saying that we were spying on them when they flipped out. They are saying they were spying for us when they flipped out. They just didn't stay flipped because our spooks don't fully understand the depths of committment and hierarchy of motivation of "the other side."

    So this is not a Deep State in cahoots with the Mateens. It is our spooks attempting to control the Mateens and losing that control. Think of Middle Eastern versions of Jason Bourne?

    Replies: @Chase, @Buzz Mohawk, @Eagle Eye, @Hanoi Paris Hilton, @PV van der Byl

    Indeed, some of them may have “flipped out” mentally after having been flipped by the police.

    Another possibility is that they are flipped a second time, by their Islamist confreres, after their status as police informers is discovered by other Muslims.

    David Goldman, AKA “Spengler” describes this here:

    http://www.atimes.com/why-the-terrorists-are-winning-the-intelligence-war/

  76. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    The FBI & recent lethal events:

    FBI is warned about Tsarnaevs, does nothing, Boston Marathon is bombed.
    FBI agent interviews Tsarnaev associate Ibragim Todashev, shoots him dead.
    FBI investigates Omar Mateen for making jihadi threats, drops investigation.
    FBI hides fact that Orlando nightclub shooter’s father was FBI informant.
    FBI is warned twice beforehand about Parkland HS shooter, takes no action.
    FBI agent’s son David Hogg is Parkland media trainee who pushes gun control.

    Replies: @Chuck, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Defund the FBI. Reclassify and cut their salaries to 30% of what they earn now. Start a new agency to perform the useful tasks once undertaken by the FBI, don’t let Democrats in at all. Once the FBI rats leave the ship shut down the agency altogether.

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