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Deaths of Exuberance
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Deaton and Case coined the term Deaths of Despair in 2015 for the depressing ways working class whites were dying in the 21st Century: overdoses, suicides, and cirrhosis. Since the “racial reckoning” and de-policing began on May 25, 2020, we’ve been seeing more blacks dying Deaths of Exuberance (homicides and car crashes).

This crash that killed six was at the corner of La Brea and Slauson not too far from Los Angeles International airport. View Park-Windsor Hills is a fairly upscale neighborhood that’s 70% black. The three victims whose names have been made public so far were black, as was the causer of the crash, an ICU neuro ward travel nurse (i.e., well-paid) from Texas driving a Mercedes. Unlike her half dozen victims, she escaped with minor injuries.

Obviously, no one traffic accident can be confidently attributed to a massive social trend. But, it sure looks like blacks have been driving much worse since The Establishment decided after George Floyd’s demise that America’s big problem was too much rule of law. When cops stopped stopping blacks so much after Floyd Day, black traffic deaths shot up by about 50% from May 2020 to June 2020:

A reader sends me this new Cadillac ad:

 
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  1. Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is. Only two people seem to do anything.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AKAHorace

    My impression from watching the local news in Chicago in the 1990s was that the people most likely to do something useful in an emergency were white yuppies: e.g., if you were laying on the pavement bleeding, you were most likely to survive if a a 30 year old Purdue grad was driving by.

    There aren't that many Rice grads in Chicago, but I rescued a lady who was hit by car in 1993 and a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    In the first instance, I sat in my car thinking, "Wow, if I weren't so much further away than so many other people, I'd run out there and help that woman to the sidewalk before she is run over by a second car." But after two seconds of nobody doing anything, I ran over and got her out of the street.

    A half dozen years later when I saw a woman fall 53 feet from the Madison Street Bridge into the cold Chicago River in front of several thousand Rush Hour commuters at 6:10 PM in early May, I immediately started running 500 yards to the life preserver on the far side of the bridge because I knew nobody else had ever noticed it. I yelled at the gawkers to call 911. I'm a slow runner, but when I got to the life preserver, nobody else had thought the same thing. Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live, and grabbed on until the cops arrived in a speedboat ten minutes later.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Anon, @EdwardM, @Luddite in Chief, @james wilson

    , @Daniel Dravot
    @AKAHorace

    It's basically like the person drowning in The Time Machine movie when everyone is just standing watching.
    You see similar scenes in China where people seemingly just watch people drowning or dying They make no effort to help.
    I'll avoid drawing any further, obvious conclusions.

    Replies: @james wilson

    , @Mike Tre
    @AKAHorace

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief, @Chris Mallory

    , @Unit472
    @AKAHorace

    Good Samaritan laws vary by state. In some the exemption from liability is pretty broad, i.e. you don't have to be medically trained to give CPR if you pull someone out of the water and they aren't breathing. In fact, in some states, it is illegal not to render aid.

    Of course the trial lawyers like to have the option to sue a rescuer if the rescue goes south so Congress won't clean this patchwork of state laws up with a federal statute waiving liability for a good faith effort to assist an injured person thus even a cardiologist might stand by and watch a person die after a car accident because he is not a licensed EMT and could be liable if the dying person claimed he suffered a soft tissue injury to his back as a result of being pulled from the vehicle by the doctor.

    , @Mark G.
    @AKAHorace


    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is.
     
    When I was younger, I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people. One time I was walking along a downtown street on a hot summer day. I saw an old black man slumped over in a wheelchair with unconcerned looking people walking by him. I stopped and asked if he was ok. He said he was looking for a charity giving out free school backpacks and wanted some for his grandkids. He got lost and then became dehydrated. I got the address from him. I walked down the street, found where it was, and bought a bottle of water out of a vending machine in the building. Then I went back. I told him how to get there and gave him the water and offered to help him get where he wanted to go. He said he could make it and thanked me, and I left. It just surprised me so much that I was the only person who stopped and offered to help him.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon

  2. Unlike despair exuberance is a self correcting issue.

    • Replies: @David Jones
    @SIMP simp

    Unfortunately, so is despair.

  3. Here’s the perp.

    That’s such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Rob McX

    Running to the ER?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Rob McX

    If drunken exuberance or maniacal rage, kill her. If clotshot heart attack, kill Fauci.

    Actually, kill Fauci anyway.

    , @Joe Sweet
    @Rob McX

    Suicide attempt is plausible. Perhaps she lost her mind, wracked with guilt for her complicity in Operation Covid, the greatest crime against humanity ever perpetrated.

    Or...

    Maybe she was going to blow the whistle on Big Pharma criminality and she got Micheal Hastings-ed in that totally hackable Mercedes.

    Replies: @anon

    , @epebble
    @Rob McX

    she may have been impaired following a fight with her boyfriend.

    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/a-child-was-in-the-street-bystanders-rush-to-help-victims-of-fiery-crash-in-windsor-hills-area/

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Rob McX

    She seems to share an alma mater with our Vice President. Maybe with that and the California connection someone can persuade Kamala to issue a statement?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    , @james wilson
    @Rob McX

    I'd be surprised if she was not totally engaged in social media at that moment.

    , @David In TN
    @Rob McX

    Typical for this type incident, the perp killed six people while receiving minor injuries.

    , @ben tillman
    @Rob McX

    Exactly. It's murder.

    Replies: @Jack D

  4. Deaton and Case coined the term Deaths of Despair in 2015 for the depressing ways working class whites were dying in the 21st Century: overdoses, suicides, and cirrhosis.

    Since the “racial reckoning” and de-policing began on May 25, 2020, we’ve been seeing more blacks dying Deaths of Exuberance (homicides and car crashes).

    We need to focus on how we can ameliorate the effects of our technology on other-skinned, balm it so that only “our” people are able to die quietly forgotten. By bringing other-skinned deaths to media attention there will be a trickle down effect which will revive the rust belt Whites into a final deracinated rump the rest of the remaining nation can unite in opposition and annihilate.

    A sort of final despairing ghasp of “hhhhurrahh!”

    The statistical elite will lament the fact that there are no further people left to read their posts and send them bitcoin. Once the bitcoin generators die out, there will be a long thousand year rein of silence … can humanity survive this period of no statistical calculation? Who will make the pie chart charts? Wherefore goest gantt?

    Without a centralised political class are statistics even real? Or will they go the way of laid out chicken entrails, omens and rolled dice?

  5. Nobody is dying from deaths of despair. Both blacks and whites are dying from deaths of overindulgence. Drugs and booze are things people do when they want to party.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Disagree: ben tillman, West reanimator
    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @Anon

    That's the spirit!

    The American Spirit!

    We're all individuals, sprouted up in in a magical land where no one brought up anyone else and no one helped anyone, there was no such thing as child birth and no one one helped anyone else save for in a mutually beneficial contract situation, in which case everyone won, everything was transactional, rent, loan, mortgage, everything as it always was: neo-liberal, and there was no such thing as society!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_msHpEa3_Y

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anon

    That's one reason to do drugs and booze. Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There's even an old saying about it: "drown your sorrows."

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Anonymous, @Detroit Refugee

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Anon

    Whites don't party that much these days.

    If you meet a White who's heavily into drugs & alcohol (it's important to remember that it's only a small subset of Whites who abuse substances), he's probably trying to medicate away the pain and cope with life. It's likely that he uses these substances in the privacy of his home, by himself or maybe with a spouse. He's not using these substances with large numbers of friends, at a fun party or nightclub.

    Interestingly, that wasn't always true.

    From the mid 1940s up through the early 90s, Whites partied a lot. More generally speaking, they enjoyed socializing, meeting people, and having fun with large groups of people. Especially during the 60-80s, the party/social scene was epic. Often to a point of destroying people. Back then, people recklessly abused alcohol, marijuana, LSD, cocaine, etc.

    While some of the substance back then was related to coping with depression, much of it was due to wanting to be "the life of the party." Back then, people want to party like the kids of "Ridgemont High."

    Things changed sometime during the early/mid 90s. By the early 2000s, the party/social scene had declined significantly. Over the last 15 years, whatever remained basically collapsed. These days it's rare for Whites to attempt to be "the life of the party."

    There are still Whites who like to party, but they are outliers. Some may occasionally get together in small groups, but they're not having huge parties every weekend. Not even close. The social/party scene is now small & quiet.

    The decline of social extraversion among American Whites is a very interesting phenomenon that needs to be studied more closely.

    When Whites abused drugs & alcohol in past decades, it was often due to exuberant partying. Not always, but often. Nowadays, the substance abuse is almost always due to depression or anxiety. Especially in hard-hit communities in the Rustbelt, Appalachia, and Ozarks. Those areas have been devastated by deindustrialization, obesity, illegal immigration, and the popularization of trashy pop culture. Affluent Whites have it much easier than working-class Whites, but even they often drink to cope with the anxieties of modern life (especially job & financial stress).

    Some people here assume that population groups stay the same over time. In reality, populations are dynamic. They change. Whites have changed a lot over the decades, as have their motivations for substance abuse.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Danindc

  6. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    Running to the ER?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Redneck farmer

    It's scary to think she was a ICU neuro ward nurse. At least her "nursing" days are now over.

    Replies: @David In TN

  7. There was a thoughtful story about a witness/bystander to the similar Henry Ruggs (raiders WR) collision in Las Vegas on si.com . Ruggs had a girlfriend and one year old in the car who somehow survived, unlike the girl he ran into.

    https://www.si.com/nfl/2022/03/29/henry-ruggs-iii-tony-rodriguez-crash-daily-cover

    • Thanks: Jim Christian
  8. @Anon
    Nobody is dying from deaths of despair. Both blacks and whites are dying from deaths of overindulgence. Drugs and booze are things people do when they want to party.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @The Anti-Gnostic, @JohnnyWalker123

    That’s the spirit!

    The American Spirit!

    We’re all individuals, sprouted up in in a magical land where no one brought up anyone else and no one helped anyone, there was no such thing as child birth and no one one helped anyone else save for in a mutually beneficial contract situation, in which case everyone won, everything was transactional, rent, loan, mortgage, everything as it always was: neo-liberal, and there was no such thing as society!

  9. @AKAHorace
    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is. Only two people seem to do anything.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Daniel Dravot, @Mike Tre, @Unit472, @Mark G.

    My impression from watching the local news in Chicago in the 1990s was that the people most likely to do something useful in an emergency were white yuppies: e.g., if you were laying on the pavement bleeding, you were most likely to survive if a a 30 year old Purdue grad was driving by.

    There aren’t that many Rice grads in Chicago, but I rescued a lady who was hit by car in 1993 and a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    In the first instance, I sat in my car thinking, “Wow, if I weren’t so much further away than so many other people, I’d run out there and help that woman to the sidewalk before she is run over by a second car.” But after two seconds of nobody doing anything, I ran over and got her out of the street.

    A half dozen years later when I saw a woman fall 53 feet from the Madison Street Bridge into the cold Chicago River in front of several thousand Rush Hour commuters at 6:10 PM in early May, I immediately started running 500 yards to the life preserver on the far side of the bridge because I knew nobody else had ever noticed it. I yelled at the gawkers to call 911. I’m a slow runner, but when I got to the life preserver, nobody else had thought the same thing. Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live, and grabbed on until the cops arrived in a speedboat ten minutes later.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    @Steve Sailer

    Good for you.

    I live in an area with a lot of white, upper middle class, woke liberals. For all their faults, they are pretty good in situations like this.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Clyde, @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @My Comment

    , @EdwardM
    @Steve Sailer


    I rescued ... a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.
     
    Wait, wut? Do tell us more please. If it was in January or February '99 I will be especially impressed.
    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Steve Sailer


    Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live
     
    I have often wondered how many bridge suicides regret what they have just done in mid-air.

    One of the most horrifying things I have ever read was an account of a Golden Gate Bridge suicide survivor (Ken Baldwin) who said:

    “I wanted to disappear,” he said. “So the Golden Gate was the spot. I’d heard that the water just sweeps you under.” On the bridge, Baldwin counted to ten and stayed frozen. He counted to ten again, then vaulted over. “I still see my hands coming off the railing,” he said. As he crossed the chord* in flight, Baldwin recalls, “I instantly realized that everything in my life that I’d thought was unfixable was totally fixable—except for having just jumped.

    I cannot imagine what that must have felt like. Imagine being given such an insight at the exact moment when it would not do you any good.

    No doubt the woman you saved is anxious not to draw attention to herself (and I cannot say I blame her), but it would be interesting to know what she is up to today. Most people do not get a second chance and I can only hope she chose to make the most of hers.




    *The chord is a steel beam that forms the outermost portion of the bridge. Most jumpers stand on the chord for some time before they jump.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Sick n' Tired

    , @james wilson
    @Steve Sailer

    "All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped." https://ennyman.medium.com/a-lesson-from-29-golden-gate-suicide-attempts-a42f4ef3f970

    Suicides think things will be less messy if the jump into water. The trouble with that is you will not die when you hit the water. You will be first be distorted into unnatural and incredibly painful positions, and then you will drown.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @Intelligent Dasein

  10. @Steve Sailer
    @AKAHorace

    My impression from watching the local news in Chicago in the 1990s was that the people most likely to do something useful in an emergency were white yuppies: e.g., if you were laying on the pavement bleeding, you were most likely to survive if a a 30 year old Purdue grad was driving by.

    There aren't that many Rice grads in Chicago, but I rescued a lady who was hit by car in 1993 and a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    In the first instance, I sat in my car thinking, "Wow, if I weren't so much further away than so many other people, I'd run out there and help that woman to the sidewalk before she is run over by a second car." But after two seconds of nobody doing anything, I ran over and got her out of the street.

    A half dozen years later when I saw a woman fall 53 feet from the Madison Street Bridge into the cold Chicago River in front of several thousand Rush Hour commuters at 6:10 PM in early May, I immediately started running 500 yards to the life preserver on the far side of the bridge because I knew nobody else had ever noticed it. I yelled at the gawkers to call 911. I'm a slow runner, but when I got to the life preserver, nobody else had thought the same thing. Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live, and grabbed on until the cops arrived in a speedboat ten minutes later.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Anon, @EdwardM, @Luddite in Chief, @james wilson

    Good for you.

    I live in an area with a lot of white, upper middle class, woke liberals. For all their faults, they are pretty good in situations like this.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @AKAHorace

    I live in a woke White (“WW”) Seattle neighborhood. My big issue is litter. WW might be second only to the the Japanese in picking up other people’s litter. When I lived in a Chinese neighborhood in California (extremely safe, btw), I would go around with a trash grabber and a plastic bag. In my current neighborhood there just isn’t any trash to pick up. Of course, WW have their many, many downsides. In Seattle - and many other cities - WW pathological altruism has allowed homeless encampments to go unchecked. But yes, if I’m bleeding out on the sidewalk I trust my doctor/tech bro/engineer PhD neighbors (literally these are our neighbors) to be Good Samaritans. On a side note, I recall that the US is unique in the West in not having any Good Samaritan laws.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @AKAHorace

    Twice I have had to rescue people from car wrecks. The first time was pretty straightforward: the accident was not severe, and the driver was conscious and not seriously injured.

    The second time was a bloody mess -- literally. Broken glass, unconscious passengers, the works. I was first on the scene so I felt obliged to act, but a little scared and reluctant. As I approached the wreck, I heard a voice from behind me: "Step out of the way, I'm an off-duty EMT, I'll handle this. Just stand back and do what I tell you." I never felt more relieved in my life.

    A third one ended weirdly: I was driving on the highway at 4 AM, viz the only car on the road, when I came across an upside-down vehicle on fire. I grabbed the fire extinguisher out of my trunk (ALWAYS keep in your trunk a fire extinguisher, a crowbar, a first aid kit and an auto tool kit --- Boy Scout law!) and ran toward the vehicle. Suddenly I heard a voice from the side of the road: "It's OK, don't bother, we all got out okay!" There was an entire family sitting safely by the roadside. How they got out OK., I never figured out.

    PS -- it's wise to carry a sharp but legal pocket knife, because you often have to cut the seatbelt off the passenger in order to get them out safely.

    Replies: @Anon

  11. @Anon
    Nobody is dying from deaths of despair. Both blacks and whites are dying from deaths of overindulgence. Drugs and booze are things people do when they want to party.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @The Anti-Gnostic, @JohnnyWalker123

    That’s one reason to do drugs and booze. Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There’s even an old saying about it: “drown your sorrows.”

    • Agree: bomag, Adam Smith
    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There’s even an old saying about it: “drown your sorrows.”
     

    Welp, to paraphrase O.W. Holmes Jr. Your "psychic pain" ends where my nose begins. Kill yourself, not others.

    Sad stories are like arseholes--everyone has one.

    Also, FYI,sorrows can swim. Quite well. They'll be there treading water when you come to from your binge.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Anonymous
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    That’s one reason to do drugs and booze. Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There’s even an old saying about it: “drown your sorrows.”
     
    For the most part, they aren't exactly Dostoyevskeyian existentialists or something. They don't drugs and booze because they're tortured souls. They do it for the same reason they watch lots of TV.

    The real reason we have this problem is the decline of paternalism from elites that set standards and punishments for indulging in booze and drugs. It's now considered acceptable, legal, and there's no longer public shaming and strict enforcement of drug use.

    Working/lower class people will spend most of their time watching TV and eating, drinking, and abusing drugs to excess if they can get away with it. Here are workers with good UAW union jobs:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eJ_8fxy_8I
    , @Detroit Refugee
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Suicide Solution by Ozzy Ozbourne and Randy Rhoads.

  12. @AKAHorace
    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is. Only two people seem to do anything.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Daniel Dravot, @Mike Tre, @Unit472, @Mark G.

    It’s basically like the person drowning in The Time Machine movie when everyone is just standing watching.
    You see similar scenes in China where people seemingly just watch people drowning or dying They make no effort to help.
    I’ll avoid drawing any further, obvious conclusions.

    • Replies: @james wilson
    @Daniel Dravot

    I'd be surprised if she was not totally engaged in social media at that moment.

  13. @SIMP simp
    Unlike despair exuberance is a self correcting issue.

    Replies: @David Jones

    Unfortunately, so is despair.

  14. How about them Injuns! Puttin’ da’ Bruthuhs to shame.

    Are their dips in ’19 & ’20 due to fire water not being available? Are the spikes due to cops whuppin’ on Tonto? Or, did they get depressed by the Cleveland baseball team announcing they were sending Chief Wahoo to the showers?

    Asking for a friend…

  15. @AKAHorace
    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is. Only two people seem to do anything.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Daniel Dravot, @Mike Tre, @Unit472, @Mark G.

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Mike Tre

    What a ridiculous, cowardly thing to say. That was an anecdotal story 25 years ago. You should help people in distress. Hope that clears things up.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike Tre

    We came around a corner one time, and I saw a body flying in the air. He was on the way down. A car had just hit him, because the 84 y/o man had tried to cross the street between parked cars and almost certainly looked left first - but this was a one-way street the other way.

    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He'd never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later. (The guy died a couple of hours later in the hospital though anyway.)

    Doing what iSteve did is admirable, and I don't know exactly how one could get in trouble with lawyers, but who knows? One time in Baldwin Hills, California, I saw an ~ 10 y/o girl out of control going downhill on a bike (her feet got off the pedals) hit a pole and break her arm. I went into the neighborhood to get someone to call an ambulance - this was before cell phones - and it took a couple of houses before anyone would talk to me. They thought this honky was up to no good or was a salesman or something.

    I finally got back around onto that big road and just ended up telling the ambulance guys what happened.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Mike Tre


    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.
     
    Does this mean the lawyers have found a way around the "Good Samaritan" laws designed to prevent exactly this sort of thing?

    (I would hate to think someone could be sued after trying their best to help a fellow human, but, unfortunately, I can believe it.)

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Mike Tre

    All 50 states have versions of "Good Samaritan" laws limiting the liability of a person giving aid in an emergency.

  16. I can’t help but think that electronics were a contributing factor in this one. She may have been drunk off her ass, but 30 years ago, she’d still have been looking out the window, eventually scared shitless at that speed. (An article mentioned “not seeing the red light”. Yeah, well at 100 mph, 2-3 times the speed of everyone else, red or green, you’re gonna hit something or somebody soon enough.)

    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking? (I’ve been in a car in which someone panicked and mashed the wrong pedal.)

    • Replies: @JR Ewing
    @Achmed E. Newman

    First thing I thought was that she was down looking at her phone.

    Driving (way) too fast already and then not paying attention.

    , @Paul Jolliffe
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s certainly possible.

    However with today’s voice and fingertip controls on the steering wheel, there’s really no reason to take one’s eyes off the road.

    Modern navigation tools are audio (Siri tells me to take a right in 500 feet, for example) so even the map screen is redundant.

    (All the more reason for Steve to consider buying a late model if not brand new vehicle. Pony up, people!)

    , @Jim Christian
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking?
     
    Accurate take, Acchie. Fingertip controls and bluetooth touch screens in new cars are a ferocious distraction. My 2004 Subaru has a basic radio and a cruise control stalk. simple, works great. My 2018 Taurus has a half dozen pairs of function buttons built into the steering wheel on one layer, if you switch to the other layer, a half dozen more. Not intuitive at all. My daughter's new Acura is worse. Try to make use of it, you HAVE to take your eyes off the road. I have my cruise and radio volume in layer one and ignore all the rest. I don't answer the phone or texts even with the bluetooth, which itself screws up answering, so I severed THAT link. These are distractions, these rear-enders occur all over the place in the Boston region on the Interstates and a couple of times a week, collisions with police cars on the side of the road. They're distracted and like you said, electronics.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

  17. @Steve Sailer
    @AKAHorace

    My impression from watching the local news in Chicago in the 1990s was that the people most likely to do something useful in an emergency were white yuppies: e.g., if you were laying on the pavement bleeding, you were most likely to survive if a a 30 year old Purdue grad was driving by.

    There aren't that many Rice grads in Chicago, but I rescued a lady who was hit by car in 1993 and a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    In the first instance, I sat in my car thinking, "Wow, if I weren't so much further away than so many other people, I'd run out there and help that woman to the sidewalk before she is run over by a second car." But after two seconds of nobody doing anything, I ran over and got her out of the street.

    A half dozen years later when I saw a woman fall 53 feet from the Madison Street Bridge into the cold Chicago River in front of several thousand Rush Hour commuters at 6:10 PM in early May, I immediately started running 500 yards to the life preserver on the far side of the bridge because I knew nobody else had ever noticed it. I yelled at the gawkers to call 911. I'm a slow runner, but when I got to the life preserver, nobody else had thought the same thing. Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live, and grabbed on until the cops arrived in a speedboat ten minutes later.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Anon, @EdwardM, @Luddite in Chief, @james wilson

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.
     
    It is a low trust society. Western Christianity is pretty unique in creating high trust-at-scale societies. (The Japanese are about the only top flight competitor.)

    This is one of the great advantages that America (and the West) has over China. Unfortunately, our "elites" have this ravening desire to turn us into a dumpy multi-cultural, ergo low-trust, marketplace empire.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Clyde
    @Anon

    Youtubers -- Serpentza and friend. ---- https://www.youtube.com/c/serpentza/videos --- He should be marketing his hair grow back formula. Prolly some obscure Chinese herbal brew.

    , @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @Anon


    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.
     
    It's all part of a peculiar Oriental philosophy that says, "If I'm not looking at you, you don't exist." I think it comes from living in close quarters with millions of your neighbors. Makes for some hilarious accident videos.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @My Comment
    @Anon

    A lot of the Chinese reluctantance to help strangers is attributed to a famous case where a man helped a woman who fell getting off of a bus. She claimed he caused the problem (even though he was a good sammaritan) and sued him for damages. She won a fortune. The judge ruled that if he didn't cause it, he would not have helped her.

  18. Now you can turn to the far larger number of recent deaths with causes like “Sudden Adult Death Syndrome” or “Causes Unknown,” as well as the large uptick in spontaneous abortions and stillbirths. Maybe the large number of athletes dropping on the pitch will make this more interesting for you.

    We don’t know if it’s the vaxxes … but it is the vaxxes.

    • Agree: Adam Smith, Clyde
    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  19. Windsor Hills also happens to be the home of Meghan Markles mother.

    There was another horrific accident last Sunday in NW Illinois. A women with her 4 children plus a teen friend of the oldest daughter were all killed by a 22 year old wrong way driver, Jennifer Fernandez, a little after 2 AM on Interstate 90. Thomas Dobosz, 32, the husband and father of the deceased family has also died from injuries he suffered in the crash.

    So far, no explanation has been given as to why Ms. Fernandez was driving the wrong way though witnesses report she had made a U turn and changed direction shortly before the crash. I have also not been able to find a picture of Fernandez. A blood alcohol level problem would have been known by now so maybe police are waiting for a toxicology report but no criminal charges have been filed. The good news is the Chicago DA is not conducting the investigation.

    Earlier this year, a 59 year old negro with an absolutely horrible driving history, Gary Dean Robinson, killed himself and his passenger, as well as 7 members of an hispanic family when he blew through a red light at 100+ plus mph in North Las Vegas, Nevada and the van the family was travelling in.

    I found Mr. Robinson’s driving history but, so far, have not been able to find the driving records for the LA nurse or Jennifer Fernandez. In Florida, it is pretty routine to make those public in felony driving cases but Illinois and California are deep blue states who do not like to make public public records. Embarrassing for Judges and Prosecutors when we find out why someone with repeated drunkng driving or reckless driving offenses still has a drivers license when they are involved in a major accident.

    • Replies: @OFWHAP
    @Unit472


    Embarrassing for Judges and Prosecutors when we find out why someone with repeated drunkng driving or reckless driving offenses still has a drivers license when they are involved in a major accident.
     
    Just because someone is driving a car does not mean they have a valid drivers license.
  20. @AKAHorace
    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is. Only two people seem to do anything.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Daniel Dravot, @Mike Tre, @Unit472, @Mark G.

    Good Samaritan laws vary by state. In some the exemption from liability is pretty broad, i.e. you don’t have to be medically trained to give CPR if you pull someone out of the water and they aren’t breathing. In fact, in some states, it is illegal not to render aid.

    Of course the trial lawyers like to have the option to sue a rescuer if the rescue goes south so Congress won’t clean this patchwork of state laws up with a federal statute waiving liability for a good faith effort to assist an injured person thus even a cardiologist might stand by and watch a person die after a car accident because he is not a licensed EMT and could be liable if the dying person claimed he suffered a soft tissue injury to his back as a result of being pulled from the vehicle by the doctor.

  21. anonymous[170] • Disclaimer says:

    They say the woman driver is also being charged with the death of the unborn baby (8 1/2 mos.) in the dead mother, who was on her way to see her doctor. Legally isn’t it still a ‘cluster of cells with a heartbeat’ in the State? And let’s say the pregnant woman was on her way to the doctor, but it was an abortion doctor?

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @anonymous

    Sam Waterston's character gave a law-school-type hypothetical in an episode of Law & Order: if someone jumps off of a 50-story building, and you standing at the window on the third floor and shoot him dead while he is falling past you, you are guilty of murder.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  22. @Achmed E. Newman
    I can't help but think that electronics were a contributing factor in this one. She may have been drunk off her ass, but 30 years ago, she'd still have been looking out the window, eventually scared shitless at that speed. (An article mentioned "not seeing the red light". Yeah, well at 100 mph, 2-3 times the speed of everyone else, red or green, you're gonna hit something or somebody soon enough.)

    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking? (I've been in a car in which someone panicked and mashed the wrong pedal.)

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Paul Jolliffe, @Jim Christian

    First thing I thought was that she was down looking at her phone.

    Driving (way) too fast already and then not paying attention.

  23. I guess, but “exuberance”, while it can have a negative connotation (excessive, inappropriate, etc.) seems generally positive, as a quality, within reason and common sense. It’s kind of like the original meaning of “gay” before it was hijacked by homos, or the word “diversity”, a perfectly fine word until a few decades ago.

    I would describe negroes not as “exuberant” but as “emotionally incontinent”.

    • Agree: James Speaks
  24. That was fucking nuts. Stuck throttle?

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Thanks.

    That’s what came to my mind. Many years ago I had a near-thing when the hook on the throttle control spring on the ancient Citroen 2CV snapped off as I tried to brake for a signposted roadworks contraflow. As the lane switch approached scarily fast, I spotted a lay-by (rest/parking area) and managed to swerve in and bring the car to a halt with the engine going crazy. That 2CV had a top speed of 72mph. In a more powerful vehicle I doubt if I could have controlled the car. The whole episode lasted perhaps 20-25 seconds.

  25. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anon

    That's one reason to do drugs and booze. Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There's even an old saying about it: "drown your sorrows."

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Anonymous, @Detroit Refugee

    Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There’s even an old saying about it: “drown your sorrows.”

    Welp, to paraphrase O.W. Holmes Jr. Your “psychic pain” ends where my nose begins. Kill yourself, not others.

    Sad stories are like arseholes–everyone has one.

    Also, FYI,sorrows can swim. Quite well. They’ll be there treading water when you come to from your binge.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @AceDeuce

    Well, I definitely agree with that. If it's been a rough day why can't you just pick up a bottle of wine on the way home from work.

    Some drunks seem really motivated to get behind the wheel of a car once they get tanked. No idea why.

  26. I just completed a long road trip through the southeastern states, mostly on interstates, and I will say that both blacks and whites have drivers who like to speed faster than the other cars. I don’t usually say “too fast” on a controlled access highway, because I think most speed limits in interstates are too low. If they want to drive fast, that’s fine with me. I just wish they’d do it a little more courteously to other drivers instead of acting – especially the blacks – like other drivers are an obstacle to avoid.

    That being said, the blacks and the whites speed differently. Whites are usually redneck “dad” types in large Ford pickups or Chevy suburbans and they will roar up behind left lane traffic and slow down and cruise in the left lane for a while, I supposed hoping at first that the left lane will clear, but then, eventually, they’ll start looking for an opportunity to more or less safely pass in the right lane. Then they’ll do an unsafe weave or two and be on their way.

    A black speeder is usually in a Nissan or lower end American sedan, very occasionally a C Class (lower end) Mercedes, and they will roar right up behind traffic in the left lane and immediately attempt to weave in and out without changing speed. They will only hit the brakes if they have no choice and then they’ll do the same thing as the white speeder, but a lot more aggressively and impatiently. I am surprised that I didn’t see more accidents considering the way that they try to slide into very small spaces in between cars, and, given that these are smaller cars and lower to the ground, they are harder to see sometimes than the big pickups. Plus, the drivers are situated lower and have a smaller field of view.

    This is consistent with what I’ve seen in other parts of the country too, except for the very middle – from Texas north in to the Great Plains and over to the mountains – because there aren’t as many blacks in those areas. The whites still speed the same way there.

    I find it interesting that not only can you very accurately tell the race of the driver by what type of car it is, they also have very specific driving styles.

  27. @Mike Tre
    @AKAHorace

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief, @Chris Mallory

    What a ridiculous, cowardly thing to say. That was an anecdotal story 25 years ago. You should help people in distress. Hope that clears things up.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Danindc

    What's ridiculous is that it is true:

    https://abcnews.go.com/TheLaw/story?id=6498405&page=1

    I'm just pointing it out. Calm down. You have no idea what my inclinations are in an emergency situation, so save your hollow life lectures for your fellow desk humping spergs that overpopulate this comment section.

    Replies: @Danindc

  28. Heather Mac Donald has spotted another way BLM has found to kill blacks: more black preferences in admission to medical schools. No one has asked ordinary blacks, the people who actually go to doctors to be treated, whether they prefer: a) black doctors; or b) the most competent doctors available.

    It’s almost as if BLM’s aim and the Democrats’ aim are to get rid of all that embarrassing black trash.

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @Henry Canaday

    Heh. Last year one of our office assistants was on the phone with a black lady who wanted to file a complaint of racial discrimination against her employer...when she was told that she could be represented by a government agency attorney, she responded "Hell no! I want an angry Jew!"

    Ed, a fellow in our office of the Hebraic persuasion, has since been known as the Angry Jew, a nickname which amuses him.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  29. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    If drunken exuberance or maniacal rage, kill her. If clotshot heart attack, kill Fauci.

    Actually, kill Fauci anyway.

  30. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    Suicide attempt is plausible. Perhaps she lost her mind, wracked with guilt for her complicity in Operation Covid, the greatest crime against humanity ever perpetrated.

    Or…

    Maybe she was going to blow the whistle on Big Pharma criminality and she got Micheal Hastings-ed in that totally hackable Mercedes.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Joe Sweet

    Hey, Paul Walker was "accidentally" killed in such a way. I doubt she was going to put herself on the line for the covid hoax though. Just a hunch.

  31. I wonder what the driver of that light blue Prius is thinking?

    • Replies: @Director95
    @International Jew

    Who knows? If it were me, I would get on my knees and give thanks to my Guardian Angel. She loves me after all these years and my many sins.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @International Jew

    "Right turn on red is legal in California—no wait, not if there is a three-car inferno on the corner ... or is it? Man, I wish they covered this in driving school. Where my cannabis?"

    Replies: @International Jew

  32. Are you sure this was a death of exuberance? They haven’t released a cause of the crash yet but I find it almost incomprehensible for anyone to have run that fast into an obvious wall of traffic like that unless they encountered a mechanical fault with the car or were attempting the world’s most violent and painful suicide. (Which given it was a middle aged woman seems unlikely)

    You’d need to be on some serious drugs. Which is, I suppose a roundabout death of exuberance.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Altai

    Yeah, I'm wondering the same thing. My first guess was: "Domestic dispute on the cell phone, leading to instant low-impulse-control rage-suicide/murder."

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Altai


    You’d need to be on some serious drugs. Which is, I suppose a roundabout death of exuberance.
     
    I have had anything but exuberance when it comes to round-abouts recently. It's bad enough driving on the left, but then you've got to circle CW (which fits with that) and there's one of those fockers every 1/4 mile. "Take the 2nd exist", i.e. go in a straight line, if there weren't this stupid chunk of grass in the way!

    It was one of the few times I truly depended on my wife and the GPS for navigation, as it was all I could do to concentrate on the driving. Serious drugs could have only helped.
  33. Apparently very white actress Anne Heche also suffers from exuberance (possibly the kind of exuberance you get by drinking vodka for breakfast).

    She was doing 90 before she drove her car into someone’s house – she drove thru the front and ended up near the back and survived the crash (those 1950s LA tract houses were kind of flimsy so you can drive thru the walls without hurting much – it’s just a few 2x4s and some drywall) but was pinned in the wreckage. Meanwhile, she had set the house on fire and the flames were really getting going with her stuck in the car. A whole bunch of firemen showed up but it still took like 1/2 hr to put out the flames enough to get her out of the car. By some miracle she was still alive after all this (barely) and didn’t kill anyone else. The house was a total loss.

    Heche was once the “girlfriend” of Ellen DeGeneres despite not being gay. Some women are attracted to money and power, never mind the arrangement of the organs. Back then she was cute with the little butch pixie haircut she wore for her girlfriend but boy has she hit the Wall (first figuratively and now literally).

    • Replies: @C. Van Carter
    @Jack D

    Anne Heche says she was ''insane'' for 31 years:


    Heche’s problems began with childhood sexual abuse at the hands of her father. A church choir director who lived a secret gay life, he infected her with herpes and died of AIDS when she was 12. To cope, she developed a second personality, a heavenly alien named Celestia. ”I believed I was from another planet. I think I was insane,” she says. Celestia was a presence throughout Heche’s adult life — during her two-year relationship with friendly father-figure Steve Martin (who was 24 years her senior) and her three years with Ellen DeGeneres.

    A day after their break-up, Heche’s inner voice told her to board a spaceship and take a hit of Ecstasy; she was found wandering in a daze in Fresno, Calif. She says, ”Fresno was the culmination of a journey and a world that I thought I needed to escape to in order to find love.”
     
    https://ew.com/article/2001/09/07/anne-heche-says-she-was-insane-31-years/

    Replies: @Prester John

  34. I once had a guy end up with his car in my driveway with the car on its side and facing the street. When I first came out (after hearing a boom) I couldn’t understand what had happened. The engine was still running and the motor oil was dripping out of the dipstick hole onto the hot manifold so it was starting to smoke pretty good but was not on fire. I yelled to the guy to turn off the motor but he was dazed (and as it turned out drunk) and didn’t listen at first. The cops soon showed up and got him out of the car (the door now facing the sky) and after determining he was unhurt, put him in cuffs. This made a big impression on my son who was then like 5 or 6 and saw all of this live – being arrested for drunk driving was not just something you see on TV.

    Afterward, I figured out that the guy was going up the street at high speed and crossed the centerline (luckily no one was coming in the other direction) and then hit the curb which “tripped” the car onto its side and the car then skidded some distance on its side, burning off speed without actually hitting anything other than the curb and landed in my driveway as neatly as if this was a planned Hollywood stunt. The guy literally did not have a scratch on him. God watches out for fools and drunkards.

    • Replies: @OFWHAP
    @Jack D


    The guy literally did not have a scratch on him. God watches out for fools and drunkards.

     

    Drunks are less likely to tense up due to the poor reaction time/reflexes from the alcohol. Tensing up before a major collision causes more injuries than being limp. Or so I have been told.
    , @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    Afterward, I figured out that the guy was going up the street at high speed
     
    I keep hearing a version of "in vino veritas". Drunks who are innately incautious become more incautious, whereas those who are innately cautious become even more cautious. Other say in lowers inhibitions for the incautious and cautious alike. Gotta wonder which version is true in reality.

    Replies: @Unintended Consequence

  35. Look up “geofencing.”

    It’s going to happen, whether we like it or not, and how much we protest.

    It’s because of things like this, and here on this continent, the Truck Drivers of Peace.

  36. Steve is still trying to meme his stupid “Deaths of Exuberance” idea into existence as if it were a real thing, the same way he is trying to meme his Basil Fawlty understanding of the Ukrainian war into an astute anti-Russian observation. In neither case is there any substance behind the slogan.

    If you really were skilled at noticing anything, you would notice that society is cracking. People of all shapes and skin tones are behaving worse and worse, not just on the road but in person, at the shopping centers, on the phone, at the doctor’s office, at work, and everywhere else.

    Why is this? Because the bills are coming due, that’s why.

    Here in America, we do not bother even thinking about fundamental problems let alone solving them, and our society was never set up to be sustainable. We have a cumulative legacy of decades of tolerating every sort of misbehavior and not enforcing any kind of standard, and papering over the symptoms of our insanity with a wall of unearned money derived from exorbitant dollar privilege. Now that the privilege is breaking down, all that remains is the rot at the core.

    This should be fairly obvious to everyone, but to a man with a hammer everything looks like a nail, and to an amateur statistician with a 30-year-old, half-baked HBD theory forged at the height of American prosperity, everything looks like a triple bank shot Moneyball monkeyball problem.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Troll: Inquiring Mind
    • Replies: @New Dealer
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Could you please express your incoherent resentment somewhere else, like maybe r/politics on reddit? Thanks!

  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    I can't help but think that electronics were a contributing factor in this one. She may have been drunk off her ass, but 30 years ago, she'd still have been looking out the window, eventually scared shitless at that speed. (An article mentioned "not seeing the red light". Yeah, well at 100 mph, 2-3 times the speed of everyone else, red or green, you're gonna hit something or somebody soon enough.)

    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking? (I've been in a car in which someone panicked and mashed the wrong pedal.)

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Paul Jolliffe, @Jim Christian

    It’s certainly possible.

    However with today’s voice and fingertip controls on the steering wheel, there’s really no reason to take one’s eyes off the road.

    Modern navigation tools are audio (Siri tells me to take a right in 500 feet, for example) so even the map screen is redundant.

    (All the more reason for Steve to consider buying a late model if not brand new vehicle. Pony up, people!)

  38. @Unit472
    Windsor Hills also happens to be the home of Meghan Markles mother.

    There was another horrific accident last Sunday in NW Illinois. A women with her 4 children plus a teen friend of the oldest daughter were all killed by a 22 year old wrong way driver, Jennifer Fernandez, a little after 2 AM on Interstate 90. Thomas Dobosz, 32, the husband and father of the deceased family has also died from injuries he suffered in the crash.

    So far, no explanation has been given as to why Ms. Fernandez was driving the wrong way though witnesses report she had made a U turn and changed direction shortly before the crash. I have also not been able to find a picture of Fernandez. A blood alcohol level problem would have been known by now so maybe police are waiting for a toxicology report but no criminal charges have been filed. The good news is the Chicago DA is not conducting the investigation.

    Earlier this year, a 59 year old negro with an absolutely horrible driving history, Gary Dean Robinson, killed himself and his passenger, as well as 7 members of an hispanic family when he blew through a red light at 100+ plus mph in North Las Vegas, Nevada and the van the family was travelling in.

    I found Mr. Robinson's driving history but, so far, have not been able to find the driving records for the LA nurse or Jennifer Fernandez. In Florida, it is pretty routine to make those public in felony driving cases but Illinois and California are deep blue states who do not like to make public public records. Embarrassing for Judges and Prosecutors when we find out why someone with repeated drunkng driving or reckless driving offenses still has a drivers license when they are involved in a major accident.

    Replies: @OFWHAP

    Embarrassing for Judges and Prosecutors when we find out why someone with repeated drunkng driving or reckless driving offenses still has a drivers license when they are involved in a major accident.

    Just because someone is driving a car does not mean they have a valid drivers license.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  39. @Jack D
    Apparently very white actress Anne Heche also suffers from exuberance (possibly the kind of exuberance you get by drinking vodka for breakfast).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6eGw9OloCJ4

    She was doing 90 before she drove her car into someone's house - she drove thru the front and ended up near the back and survived the crash (those 1950s LA tract houses were kind of flimsy so you can drive thru the walls without hurting much - it's just a few 2x4s and some drywall) but was pinned in the wreckage. Meanwhile, she had set the house on fire and the flames were really getting going with her stuck in the car. A whole bunch of firemen showed up but it still took like 1/2 hr to put out the flames enough to get her out of the car. By some miracle she was still alive after all this (barely) and didn't kill anyone else. The house was a total loss.

    Heche was once the "girlfriend" of Ellen DeGeneres despite not being gay. Some women are attracted to money and power, never mind the arrangement of the organs. Back then she was cute with the little butch pixie haircut she wore for her girlfriend but boy has she hit the Wall (first figuratively and now literally).

    Replies: @C. Van Carter

    Anne Heche says she was ”insane” for 31 years:

    Heche’s problems began with childhood sexual abuse at the hands of her father. A church choir director who lived a secret gay life, he infected her with herpes and died of AIDS when she was 12. To cope, she developed a second personality, a heavenly alien named Celestia. ”I believed I was from another planet. I think I was insane,” she says. Celestia was a presence throughout Heche’s adult life — during her two-year relationship with friendly father-figure Steve Martin (who was 24 years her senior) and her three years with Ellen DeGeneres.

    A day after their break-up, Heche’s inner voice told her to board a spaceship and take a hit of Ecstasy; she was found wandering in a daze in Fresno, Calif. She says, ”Fresno was the culmination of a journey and a world that I thought I needed to escape to in order to find love.”

    https://ew.com/article/2001/09/07/anne-heche-says-she-was-insane-31-years/

    • Thanks: The Wild Geese Howard
    • Replies: @Prester John
    @C. Van Carter

    Sad...sad. Really sad.

  40. @Jack D
    I once had a guy end up with his car in my driveway with the car on its side and facing the street. When I first came out (after hearing a boom) I couldn't understand what had happened. The engine was still running and the motor oil was dripping out of the dipstick hole onto the hot manifold so it was starting to smoke pretty good but was not on fire. I yelled to the guy to turn off the motor but he was dazed (and as it turned out drunk) and didn't listen at first. The cops soon showed up and got him out of the car (the door now facing the sky) and after determining he was unhurt, put him in cuffs. This made a big impression on my son who was then like 5 or 6 and saw all of this live - being arrested for drunk driving was not just something you see on TV.

    Afterward, I figured out that the guy was going up the street at high speed and crossed the centerline (luckily no one was coming in the other direction) and then hit the curb which "tripped" the car onto its side and the car then skidded some distance on its side, burning off speed without actually hitting anything other than the curb and landed in my driveway as neatly as if this was a planned Hollywood stunt. The guy literally did not have a scratch on him. God watches out for fools and drunkards.

    Replies: @OFWHAP, @Johann Ricke

    The guy literally did not have a scratch on him. God watches out for fools and drunkards.

    Drunks are less likely to tense up due to the poor reaction time/reflexes from the alcohol. Tensing up before a major collision causes more injuries than being limp. Or so I have been told.

  41. @Steve Sailer
    @AKAHorace

    My impression from watching the local news in Chicago in the 1990s was that the people most likely to do something useful in an emergency were white yuppies: e.g., if you were laying on the pavement bleeding, you were most likely to survive if a a 30 year old Purdue grad was driving by.

    There aren't that many Rice grads in Chicago, but I rescued a lady who was hit by car in 1993 and a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    In the first instance, I sat in my car thinking, "Wow, if I weren't so much further away than so many other people, I'd run out there and help that woman to the sidewalk before she is run over by a second car." But after two seconds of nobody doing anything, I ran over and got her out of the street.

    A half dozen years later when I saw a woman fall 53 feet from the Madison Street Bridge into the cold Chicago River in front of several thousand Rush Hour commuters at 6:10 PM in early May, I immediately started running 500 yards to the life preserver on the far side of the bridge because I knew nobody else had ever noticed it. I yelled at the gawkers to call 911. I'm a slow runner, but when I got to the life preserver, nobody else had thought the same thing. Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live, and grabbed on until the cops arrived in a speedboat ten minutes later.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Anon, @EdwardM, @Luddite in Chief, @james wilson

    I rescued … a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    Wait, wut? Do tell us more please. If it was in January or February ’99 I will be especially impressed.

  42. @anonymous
    They say the woman driver is also being charged with the death of the unborn baby (8 1/2 mos.) in the dead mother, who was on her way to see her doctor. Legally isn't it still a 'cluster of cells with a heartbeat' in the State? And let's say the pregnant woman was on her way to the doctor, but it was an abortion doctor?

    Replies: @EdwardM

    Sam Waterston’s character gave a law-school-type hypothetical in an episode of Law & Order: if someone jumps off of a 50-story building, and you standing at the window on the third floor and shoot him dead while he is falling past you, you are guilty of murder.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @EdwardM

    Sam Waterston’s character gave a law-school-type hypothetical in an episode of Law & Order: if someone jumps off of a 50-story building, and you standing at the window on the third floor and shoot him dead while he is falling past you, you are guilty of murder.

    That is lifted from the Talmud tractate Bava Kamma 26b "If one threw a child from a roof and another came along and impaled him on his sword and the child died etc." But Anonymous's point here is subtler ; If we accept that 'A woman's right to her own body' defines the embryonic child as a non-person if the woman chooses abortion, yet as a person for purposes of charging a third party with homicide, then we are saying that the personhood of the embryonic child is dependent on the will/whim of the mother. Hence his/her question; if the mother is on way to aborting child hasn't she already declared child non-person? Can 3rd party still be prosecuted for homicide? Can always change mind etc. but points to an absurdity in legal definition.

  43. @Mike Tre
    @AKAHorace

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief, @Chris Mallory

    We came around a corner one time, and I saw a body flying in the air. He was on the way down. A car had just hit him, because the 84 y/o man had tried to cross the street between parked cars and almost certainly looked left first – but this was a one-way street the other way.

    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He’d never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later. (The guy died a couple of hours later in the hospital though anyway.)

    Doing what iSteve did is admirable, and I don’t know exactly how one could get in trouble with lawyers, but who knows? One time in Baldwin Hills, California, I saw an ~ 10 y/o girl out of control going downhill on a bike (her feet got off the pedals) hit a pole and break her arm. I went into the neighborhood to get someone to call an ambulance – this was before cell phones – and it took a couple of houses before anyone would talk to me. They thought this honky was up to no good or was a salesman or something.

    I finally got back around onto that big road and just ended up telling the ambulance guys what happened.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He’d never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later.
     
    Why not?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @ben tillman
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He’d never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later. (The guy died a couple of hours later in the hospital though anyway.)
     
    I've heard that fentanyl poses a danger to anyone giving mouthy-to-mouth resuscitation as well.
  44. @Henry Canaday
    Heather Mac Donald has spotted another way BLM has found to kill blacks: more black preferences in admission to medical schools. No one has asked ordinary blacks, the people who actually go to doctors to be treated, whether they prefer: a) black doctors; or b) the most competent doctors available.

    It's almost as if BLM's aim and the Democrats' aim are to get rid of all that embarrassing black trash.

    Replies: @additionalMike

    Heh. Last year one of our office assistants was on the phone with a black lady who wanted to file a complaint of racial discrimination against her employer…when she was told that she could be represented by a government agency attorney, she responded “Hell no! I want an angry Jew!”

    Ed, a fellow in our office of the Hebraic persuasion, has since been known as the Angry Jew, a nickname which amuses him.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @additionalMike


    she responded “Hell no! I want an angry Jew!
     
    What makes Jews such good lawyers?

    Replies: @James Speaks

  45. @International Jew
    I wonder what the driver of that light blue Prius is thinking?

    Replies: @Director95, @Almost Missouri

    Who knows? If it were me, I would get on my knees and give thanks to my Guardian Angel. She loves me after all these years and my many sins.

  46. @International Jew
    I wonder what the driver of that light blue Prius is thinking?

    Replies: @Director95, @Almost Missouri

    “Right turn on red is legal in California—no wait, not if there is a three-car inferno on the corner … or is it? Man, I wish they covered this in driving school. Where my cannabis?”

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    That's a good answer but if that were me I'd be thinking thoughts of fate and the frailty of existence.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  47. “View Park-Windsor Hills is a fairly upscale neighborhood that’s 70% black.”

    how does that work?

    also what’s the over under on the prison sentence for the driver? 10 years?

    10 years for an african woman killing 6 people pretty much on purpose. 400 years less than James Fields. sounds about right in America today.

  48. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @epebble

    So they're trying to portray her as a victim of circumstance as well.

    "It's not really her fault, she was fighting with her boyfriend, got a little drunk, and drove at 100mph thru a city intersection and killed 6 people, including children, injuring 8 others.....but haven't we all felt the pain of heartbreak and been in her shoes?"

  49. @Almost Missouri
    @International Jew

    "Right turn on red is legal in California—no wait, not if there is a three-car inferno on the corner ... or is it? Man, I wish they covered this in driving school. Where my cannabis?"

    Replies: @International Jew

    That’s a good answer but if that were me I’d be thinking thoughts of fate and the frailty of existence.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @International Jew

    Are you an Angeleno?

    Replies: @International Jew

  50. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    She seems to share an alma mater with our Vice President. Maybe with that and the California connection someone can persuade Kamala to issue a statement?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Almost Missouri

    There's a silver lining. This should scotch any chances of her becoming Vice President - even if she spends 10 years under Willie Brown.

  51. @Altai
    Are you sure this was a death of exuberance? They haven't released a cause of the crash yet but I find it almost incomprehensible for anyone to have run that fast into an obvious wall of traffic like that unless they encountered a mechanical fault with the car or were attempting the world's most violent and painful suicide. (Which given it was a middle aged woman seems unlikely)

    You'd need to be on some serious drugs. Which is, I suppose a roundabout death of exuberance.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, I’m wondering the same thing. My first guess was: “Domestic dispute on the cell phone, leading to instant low-impulse-control rage-suicide/murder.”

  52. @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    That's a good answer but if that were me I'd be thinking thoughts of fate and the frailty of existence.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Are you an Angeleno?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    No, I'm from northern Cal.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  53. @Steve Sailer
    @AKAHorace

    My impression from watching the local news in Chicago in the 1990s was that the people most likely to do something useful in an emergency were white yuppies: e.g., if you were laying on the pavement bleeding, you were most likely to survive if a a 30 year old Purdue grad was driving by.

    There aren't that many Rice grads in Chicago, but I rescued a lady who was hit by car in 1993 and a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    In the first instance, I sat in my car thinking, "Wow, if I weren't so much further away than so many other people, I'd run out there and help that woman to the sidewalk before she is run over by a second car." But after two seconds of nobody doing anything, I ran over and got her out of the street.

    A half dozen years later when I saw a woman fall 53 feet from the Madison Street Bridge into the cold Chicago River in front of several thousand Rush Hour commuters at 6:10 PM in early May, I immediately started running 500 yards to the life preserver on the far side of the bridge because I knew nobody else had ever noticed it. I yelled at the gawkers to call 911. I'm a slow runner, but when I got to the life preserver, nobody else had thought the same thing. Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live, and grabbed on until the cops arrived in a speedboat ten minutes later.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Anon, @EdwardM, @Luddite in Chief, @james wilson

    Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live

    I have often wondered how many bridge suicides regret what they have just done in mid-air.

    One of the most horrifying things I have ever read was an account of a Golden Gate Bridge suicide survivor (Ken Baldwin) who said:

    “I wanted to disappear,” he said. “So the Golden Gate was the spot. I’d heard that the water just sweeps you under.” On the bridge, Baldwin counted to ten and stayed frozen. He counted to ten again, then vaulted over. “I still see my hands coming off the railing,” he said. As he crossed the chord* in flight, Baldwin recalls, “I instantly realized that everything in my life that I’d thought was unfixable was totally fixable—except for having just jumped.

    I cannot imagine what that must have felt like. Imagine being given such an insight at the exact moment when it would not do you any good.

    No doubt the woman you saved is anxious not to draw attention to herself (and I cannot say I blame her), but it would be interesting to know what she is up to today. Most people do not get a second chance and I can only hope she chose to make the most of hers.

    *The chord is a steel beam that forms the outermost portion of the bridge. Most jumpers stand on the chord for some time before they jump.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Luddite in Chief

    "I have often wondered how many bridge suicides regret what they have just done in mid-air."

    Somewhere among my books is a police autobiography from way back - 30s/40s/50s. As a young constable in London the author worked with the Thames River Police aka Thames Division of the Met, one of whose jobs was retrieving drowned people, mostly suicides, from the river. After investigating many of these cases for the inquest, he noticed that those suicides crossed in love had torn and bloody nails, as they'd tried to cling onto the bridge piers and live, whereas bankrupts and the terminally ill just let themselves drown.

    So don't try and drown yourself because she's gone off with someone else.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    , @Sick n' Tired
    @Luddite in Chief

    Jumping 53' into water won't kill you unless you can't swim or have cement blocks tied to your feet. As teenagers we used to jump of a bride that was 85' above the river (you had to wear shoes or you'd bruise the bottoms of your feet). That bridge also had a rope swing under it, which would actually swing you up higher to about 90'+. Another friend of mine jumped off the top of a dam that was 110' from where he jumped from to the surface of the water. He did that for a school project his senior year. Shout out to Than if you're reading this.

  54. @Mike Tre
    @AKAHorace

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief, @Chris Mallory

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    Does this mean the lawyers have found a way around the “Good Samaritan” laws designed to prevent exactly this sort of thing?

    (I would hate to think someone could be sued after trying their best to help a fellow human, but, unfortunately, I can believe it.)

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Luddite in Chief



    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.
     
    Does this mean the lawyers have found a way around the “Good Samaritan” laws designed to prevent exactly this sort of thing?

    (I would hate to think someone could be sued after trying their best to help a fellow human, but, unfortunately, I can believe it.)

     

    The theory if I recall correctly is that once you offer aid you have a duty to exercise reasonable care in rendering the aid. The law doesn't impose a duty of bystanders to act, but once they act they have duties which attach. I doubt that the successful cases where plaintiff prevailed were situations in which the defendant saved the plaintiff's life where the plaintiff would otherwise have surely died, but rather cases where the intervention caused a substantial additional injury.

    I think the "Good Samaritan" laws just codified in statute bright lines for when the rescuer is immune from suit.
  55. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anon

    That's one reason to do drugs and booze. Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There's even an old saying about it: "drown your sorrows."

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Anonymous, @Detroit Refugee

    That’s one reason to do drugs and booze. Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There’s even an old saying about it: “drown your sorrows.”

    For the most part, they aren’t exactly Dostoyevskeyian existentialists or something. They don’t drugs and booze because they’re tortured souls. They do it for the same reason they watch lots of TV.

    The real reason we have this problem is the decline of paternalism from elites that set standards and punishments for indulging in booze and drugs. It’s now considered acceptable, legal, and there’s no longer public shaming and strict enforcement of drug use.

    Working/lower class people will spend most of their time watching TV and eating, drinking, and abusing drugs to excess if they can get away with it. Here are workers with good UAW union jobs:

  56. @AKAHorace
    @Steve Sailer

    Good for you.

    I live in an area with a lot of white, upper middle class, woke liberals. For all their faults, they are pretty good in situations like this.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I live in a woke White (“WW”) Seattle neighborhood. My big issue is litter. WW might be second only to the the Japanese in picking up other people’s litter. When I lived in a Chinese neighborhood in California (extremely safe, btw), I would go around with a trash grabber and a plastic bag. In my current neighborhood there just isn’t any trash to pick up. Of course, WW have their many, many downsides. In Seattle – and many other cities – WW pathological altruism has allowed homeless encampments to go unchecked. But yes, if I’m bleeding out on the sidewalk I trust my doctor/tech bro/engineer PhD neighbors (literally these are our neighbors) to be Good Samaritans. On a side note, I recall that the US is unique in the West in not having any Good Samaritan laws.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anonymous Jew

    I know for a fact that GA has a Good Samaritan law, codified at OCGA 51-1-29.

    Most states seem to have them.

    https://recreation-law.com/2014/05/28/good-samaritan-laws-by-state/

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

  57. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Clyde, @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @My Comment

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    It is a low trust society. Western Christianity is pretty unique in creating high trust-at-scale societies. (The Japanese are about the only top flight competitor.)

    This is one of the great advantages that America (and the West) has over China. Unfortunately, our “elites” have this ravening desire to turn us into a dumpy multi-cultural, ergo low-trust, marketplace empire.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    This is one of the great advantages that America (and the West) has over China. Unfortunately, our “elites” have this ravening desire to turn us into a dumpy multi-cultural, ergo low-trust, marketplace empire.
     
    What is meant by the term "high trust society" is usually that people in the society trust one another.

    What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society.

    Replies: @David In TN, @The Wild Geese Howard

  58. @Redneck farmer
    @Rob McX

    Running to the ER?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    It’s scary to think she was a ICU neuro ward nurse. At least her “nursing” days are now over.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Rob McX

    Per the LA Times, a sister of one of the victims says, "We forgive her." Since the perp is black this will likely be the Community reaction.

    Her "nursing" days may not be over.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

  59. @Mike Tre
    @AKAHorace

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief, @Chris Mallory

    All 50 states have versions of “Good Samaritan” laws limiting the liability of a person giving aid in an emergency.

  60. @Almost Missouri
    @Rob McX

    She seems to share an alma mater with our Vice President. Maybe with that and the California connection someone can persuade Kamala to issue a statement?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    There’s a silver lining. This should scotch any chances of her becoming Vice President – even if she spends 10 years under Willie Brown.

  61. This crash that killed six was at the corner of La Brea and Slauson…

    Man, what were they thinking? Is that move what you folks in SoCal call the Slauson Cutoff?

    Johnny Carson did a recurring sketch in which he gave driving directions. It always included this step: “When you get to the Slauson Cutoff, stop, get out of your car and cut off your Slauson.”

    • Thanks: EddieSpaghetti
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://youtu.be/twqa9AppfeE

  62. Notice who is not on that graph?
    Illegal aliens as they are on the ultra best behaviour as they do not want to be deported. Or so their apologists say.

  63. There’s been a flurry of Hollywood types offering thoughts and prayers for Anne Heche. They don’t seem so concerned about the people whose house she destroyed by driving into it at lunatic speed.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Joe S.Walker

    The Property Brothers are already building them a new home.

    Chinese won't help people because they are afraid they will be made responsible for the injured person.

  64. @AKAHorace
    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is. Only two people seem to do anything.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Daniel Dravot, @Mike Tre, @Unit472, @Mark G.

    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is.

    When I was younger, I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people. One time I was walking along a downtown street on a hot summer day. I saw an old black man slumped over in a wheelchair with unconcerned looking people walking by him. I stopped and asked if he was ok. He said he was looking for a charity giving out free school backpacks and wanted some for his grandkids. He got lost and then became dehydrated. I got the address from him. I walked down the street, found where it was, and bought a bottle of water out of a vending machine in the building. Then I went back. I told him how to get there and gave him the water and offered to help him get where he wanted to go. He said he could make it and thanked me, and I left. It just surprised me so much that I was the only person who stopped and offered to help him.

    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @Mark G.

    This really happened up here" young "rapper" viciously pummeled an ancient black veteran at the pumps for his car keys. As he crawled on his stomach to the stations doors, a dozen other blacks simply walked around him or stepped over him.

    All caught on video and aired on 2,4,and 7Action News Detroit.

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Mark G.

    I had a Swedish girlfriend in the aughts who was appalled by the indifference of New Yorkers to the, er, "unhoused." She said if a man was lying in his own piss on the streets in Sweden people would stop to see if he was okay, then make sure he was taken somewhere to be looked after.

    She was new. Six months later she was like, 'Why is that asshole sleeping in our vestibule?"

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Henry Bowman

    , @Anon
    @Mark G.

    I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people.

    Not only that, but they also seem to get delight from seeing other suffer.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  65. @Jack D
    I once had a guy end up with his car in my driveway with the car on its side and facing the street. When I first came out (after hearing a boom) I couldn't understand what had happened. The engine was still running and the motor oil was dripping out of the dipstick hole onto the hot manifold so it was starting to smoke pretty good but was not on fire. I yelled to the guy to turn off the motor but he was dazed (and as it turned out drunk) and didn't listen at first. The cops soon showed up and got him out of the car (the door now facing the sky) and after determining he was unhurt, put him in cuffs. This made a big impression on my son who was then like 5 or 6 and saw all of this live - being arrested for drunk driving was not just something you see on TV.

    Afterward, I figured out that the guy was going up the street at high speed and crossed the centerline (luckily no one was coming in the other direction) and then hit the curb which "tripped" the car onto its side and the car then skidded some distance on its side, burning off speed without actually hitting anything other than the curb and landed in my driveway as neatly as if this was a planned Hollywood stunt. The guy literally did not have a scratch on him. God watches out for fools and drunkards.

    Replies: @OFWHAP, @Johann Ricke

    Afterward, I figured out that the guy was going up the street at high speed

    I keep hearing a version of “in vino veritas”. Drunks who are innately incautious become more incautious, whereas those who are innately cautious become even more cautious. Other say in lowers inhibitions for the incautious and cautious alike. Gotta wonder which version is true in reality.

    • Replies: @Unintended Consequence
    @Johann Ricke

    I thought "in vino veritas" meant you blurted out your true thoughts when drunk. I've seen this happen.

  66. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    I’d be surprised if she was not totally engaged in social media at that moment.

  67. @Almost Missouri
    @International Jew

    Are you an Angeleno?

    Replies: @International Jew

    No, I’m from northern Cal.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @International Jew

    Maybe they do things a little differently down there?

  68. @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.
     
    It is a low trust society. Western Christianity is pretty unique in creating high trust-at-scale societies. (The Japanese are about the only top flight competitor.)

    This is one of the great advantages that America (and the West) has over China. Unfortunately, our "elites" have this ravening desire to turn us into a dumpy multi-cultural, ergo low-trust, marketplace empire.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    This is one of the great advantages that America (and the West) has over China. Unfortunately, our “elites” have this ravening desire to turn us into a dumpy multi-cultural, ergo low-trust, marketplace empire.

    What is meant by the term “high trust society” is usually that people in the society trust one another.

    What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Mr. Anon

    "What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society."

    Or, to put it another way, a fear of those who control society, resulting in obedience to them.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Mr. Anon


    What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society.
     
    I had some very similar thoughts the other day.

    My take was that the controllers want a zero trust society among the plebes and an infinite trust society among themselves with virtually no possibility of interactions or transitions between the two groups.

    So, the plebe would face a life in a system that endlessly requires him to prove his identity and pay a tax for the privilege of doing so to gain access to the most basic functions of life.

    The controllers would face none of those challenges and do as they pleased. I suppose that's not that different from their current status.
  69. @C. Van Carter
    @Jack D

    Anne Heche says she was ''insane'' for 31 years:


    Heche’s problems began with childhood sexual abuse at the hands of her father. A church choir director who lived a secret gay life, he infected her with herpes and died of AIDS when she was 12. To cope, she developed a second personality, a heavenly alien named Celestia. ”I believed I was from another planet. I think I was insane,” she says. Celestia was a presence throughout Heche’s adult life — during her two-year relationship with friendly father-figure Steve Martin (who was 24 years her senior) and her three years with Ellen DeGeneres.

    A day after their break-up, Heche’s inner voice told her to board a spaceship and take a hit of Ecstasy; she was found wandering in a daze in Fresno, Calif. She says, ”Fresno was the culmination of a journey and a world that I thought I needed to escape to in order to find love.”
     
    https://ew.com/article/2001/09/07/anne-heche-says-she-was-insane-31-years/

    Replies: @Prester John

    Sad…sad. Really sad.

  70. @Steve Sailer
    @AKAHorace

    My impression from watching the local news in Chicago in the 1990s was that the people most likely to do something useful in an emergency were white yuppies: e.g., if you were laying on the pavement bleeding, you were most likely to survive if a a 30 year old Purdue grad was driving by.

    There aren't that many Rice grads in Chicago, but I rescued a lady who was hit by car in 1993 and a lady who jumped in the Chicago River in 1999.

    In the first instance, I sat in my car thinking, "Wow, if I weren't so much further away than so many other people, I'd run out there and help that woman to the sidewalk before she is run over by a second car." But after two seconds of nobody doing anything, I ran over and got her out of the street.

    A half dozen years later when I saw a woman fall 53 feet from the Madison Street Bridge into the cold Chicago River in front of several thousand Rush Hour commuters at 6:10 PM in early May, I immediately started running 500 yards to the life preserver on the far side of the bridge because I knew nobody else had ever noticed it. I yelled at the gawkers to call 911. I'm a slow runner, but when I got to the life preserver, nobody else had thought the same thing. Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live, and grabbed on until the cops arrived in a speedboat ten minutes later.

    Replies: @AKAHorace, @Anon, @EdwardM, @Luddite in Chief, @james wilson

    “All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped.” https://ennyman.medium.com/a-lesson-from-29-golden-gate-suicide-attempts-a42f4ef3f970

    Suicides think things will be less messy if the jump into water. The trouble with that is you will not die when you hit the water. You will be first be distorted into unnatural and incredibly painful positions, and then you will drown.

    • Replies: @Sick n' Tired
    @james wilson

    A lot of them survived because they chose to jump on a windy, choppy day which breaks up the water surface tension and softens the impact. The ones who jump on calm days usually don't make it because it's like jumping onto a concrete sidewalk.

    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @james wilson


    “All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped.”
     
    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions. They are also, apparently, flakey.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @Luddite in Chief

  71. @Buzz Mohawk

    This crash that killed six was at the corner of La Brea and Slauson...
     
    Man, what were they thinking? Is that move what you folks in SoCal call the Slauson Cutoff?

    Johnny Carson did a recurring sketch in which he gave driving directions. It always included this step: "When you get to the Slauson Cutoff, stop, get out of your car and cut off your Slauson."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    • Thanks: EddieSpaghetti
  72. @Daniel Dravot
    @AKAHorace

    It's basically like the person drowning in The Time Machine movie when everyone is just standing watching.
    You see similar scenes in China where people seemingly just watch people drowning or dying They make no effort to help.
    I'll avoid drawing any further, obvious conclusions.

    Replies: @james wilson

    I’d be surprised if she was not totally engaged in social media at that moment.

  73. Many possible reasons, but one that I seem to notice is that a lot of black motorists are not just enthusiastic users of their phones while driving, I have on more than one occasion been in traffic where a black driver was actually Facetiming while in city traffic. Normally white soccer moms are also people you need to be alert around because they always seem to be on their phones, but I haven’t seen any actually using video.

    The other thing I have seen a couple of times in my city is where a group of blacks in multiple cars are following each other around while filming with their phones, presumably for Instagram or some amateur rap video. Earlier this summer I witnessed this with two women literally sitting out of open passenger front and rear windows while holding up their phones behind the lead car (tricked out Charger) as it hit a relatively high speed left turn with them barely hanging on.

  74. @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    No, I'm from northern Cal.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Maybe they do things a little differently down there?

  75. @Altai
    Are you sure this was a death of exuberance? They haven't released a cause of the crash yet but I find it almost incomprehensible for anyone to have run that fast into an obvious wall of traffic like that unless they encountered a mechanical fault with the car or were attempting the world's most violent and painful suicide. (Which given it was a middle aged woman seems unlikely)

    You'd need to be on some serious drugs. Which is, I suppose a roundabout death of exuberance.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Achmed E. Newman

    You’d need to be on some serious drugs. Which is, I suppose a roundabout death of exuberance.

    I have had anything but exuberance when it comes to round-abouts recently. It’s bad enough driving on the left, but then you’ve got to circle CW (which fits with that) and there’s one of those fockers every 1/4 mile. “Take the 2nd exist”, i.e. go in a straight line, if there weren’t this stupid chunk of grass in the way!

    It was one of the few times I truly depended on my wife and the GPS for navigation, as it was all I could do to concentrate on the driving. Serious drugs could have only helped.

  76. @Luddite in Chief
    @Steve Sailer


    Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live
     
    I have often wondered how many bridge suicides regret what they have just done in mid-air.

    One of the most horrifying things I have ever read was an account of a Golden Gate Bridge suicide survivor (Ken Baldwin) who said:

    “I wanted to disappear,” he said. “So the Golden Gate was the spot. I’d heard that the water just sweeps you under.” On the bridge, Baldwin counted to ten and stayed frozen. He counted to ten again, then vaulted over. “I still see my hands coming off the railing,” he said. As he crossed the chord* in flight, Baldwin recalls, “I instantly realized that everything in my life that I’d thought was unfixable was totally fixable—except for having just jumped.

    I cannot imagine what that must have felt like. Imagine being given such an insight at the exact moment when it would not do you any good.

    No doubt the woman you saved is anxious not to draw attention to herself (and I cannot say I blame her), but it would be interesting to know what she is up to today. Most people do not get a second chance and I can only hope she chose to make the most of hers.




    *The chord is a steel beam that forms the outermost portion of the bridge. Most jumpers stand on the chord for some time before they jump.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Sick n' Tired

    “I have often wondered how many bridge suicides regret what they have just done in mid-air.”

    Somewhere among my books is a police autobiography from way back – 30s/40s/50s. As a young constable in London the author worked with the Thames River Police aka Thames Division of the Met, one of whose jobs was retrieving drowned people, mostly suicides, from the river. After investigating many of these cases for the inquest, he noticed that those suicides crossed in love had torn and bloody nails, as they’d tried to cling onto the bridge piers and live, whereas bankrupts and the terminally ill just let themselves drown.

    So don’t try and drown yourself because she’s gone off with someone else.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Somewhere among my books is a police autobiography from way back – 30s/40s/50s. As a young constable in London the author worked with the Thames River Police aka Thames Division of the Met, one of whose jobs was retrieving drowned people, mostly suicides, from the river.
     
    If you happen to recall the title of the book, could you please post it?

    I ask because I am always interested in autobiographies and find the older ones easier reading (likely because literacy seems to have largely gone out with the 1960s).

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  77. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    Typical for this type incident, the perp killed six people while receiving minor injuries.

  78. @Danindc
    @Mike Tre

    What a ridiculous, cowardly thing to say. That was an anecdotal story 25 years ago. You should help people in distress. Hope that clears things up.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    What’s ridiculous is that it is true:

    https://abcnews.go.com/TheLaw/story?id=6498405&page=1

    I’m just pointing it out. Calm down. You have no idea what my inclinations are in an emergency situation, so save your hollow life lectures for your fellow desk humping spergs that overpopulate this comment section.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Mike Tre

    Everybody knows that one story. That’s why I called it anecdotal, nitwit.

  79. @Rob McX
    @Redneck farmer

    It's scary to think she was a ICU neuro ward nurse. At least her "nursing" days are now over.

    Replies: @David In TN

    Per the LA Times, a sister of one of the victims says, “We forgive her.” Since the perp is black this will likely be the Community reaction.

    Her “nursing” days may not be over.

    • Replies: @Detroit Refugee
    @David In TN

    Oh, so the Black Community has spoken? Ah, got it.

  80. @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    This is one of the great advantages that America (and the West) has over China. Unfortunately, our “elites” have this ravening desire to turn us into a dumpy multi-cultural, ergo low-trust, marketplace empire.
     
    What is meant by the term "high trust society" is usually that people in the society trust one another.

    What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society.

    Replies: @David In TN, @The Wild Geese Howard

    “What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society.”

    Or, to put it another way, a fear of those who control society, resulting in obedience to them.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @David In TN


    Or, to put it another way, a fear of those who control society, resulting in obedience to them.
     
    Yeah, that works too. Although it is curious how many people will love Big Brother with no prompting at all.
  81. @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    Afterward, I figured out that the guy was going up the street at high speed
     
    I keep hearing a version of "in vino veritas". Drunks who are innately incautious become more incautious, whereas those who are innately cautious become even more cautious. Other say in lowers inhibitions for the incautious and cautious alike. Gotta wonder which version is true in reality.

    Replies: @Unintended Consequence

    I thought “in vino veritas” meant you blurted out your true thoughts when drunk. I’ve seen this happen.

  82. @epebble
    @Rob McX

    she may have been impaired following a fight with her boyfriend.

    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/a-child-was-in-the-street-bystanders-rush-to-help-victims-of-fiery-crash-in-windsor-hills-area/

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired

    So they’re trying to portray her as a victim of circumstance as well.

    “It’s not really her fault, she was fighting with her boyfriend, got a little drunk, and drove at 100mph thru a city intersection and killed 6 people, including children, injuring 8 others…..but haven’t we all felt the pain of heartbreak and been in her shoes?”

  83. @Luddite in Chief
    @Steve Sailer


    Fortunately, another yuppie understood what I was doing and gave me his umbrella to smash the glass over the life ring. I dropped it to the woman, who had apparently decided when she hit the water that she really did want to live
     
    I have often wondered how many bridge suicides regret what they have just done in mid-air.

    One of the most horrifying things I have ever read was an account of a Golden Gate Bridge suicide survivor (Ken Baldwin) who said:

    “I wanted to disappear,” he said. “So the Golden Gate was the spot. I’d heard that the water just sweeps you under.” On the bridge, Baldwin counted to ten and stayed frozen. He counted to ten again, then vaulted over. “I still see my hands coming off the railing,” he said. As he crossed the chord* in flight, Baldwin recalls, “I instantly realized that everything in my life that I’d thought was unfixable was totally fixable—except for having just jumped.

    I cannot imagine what that must have felt like. Imagine being given such an insight at the exact moment when it would not do you any good.

    No doubt the woman you saved is anxious not to draw attention to herself (and I cannot say I blame her), but it would be interesting to know what she is up to today. Most people do not get a second chance and I can only hope she chose to make the most of hers.




    *The chord is a steel beam that forms the outermost portion of the bridge. Most jumpers stand on the chord for some time before they jump.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Sick n' Tired

    Jumping 53′ into water won’t kill you unless you can’t swim or have cement blocks tied to your feet. As teenagers we used to jump of a bride that was 85′ above the river (you had to wear shoes or you’d bruise the bottoms of your feet). That bridge also had a rope swing under it, which would actually swing you up higher to about 90’+. Another friend of mine jumped off the top of a dam that was 110′ from where he jumped from to the surface of the water. He did that for a school project his senior year. Shout out to Than if you’re reading this.

  84. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anon

    That's one reason to do drugs and booze. Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There's even an old saying about it: "drown your sorrows."

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Anonymous, @Detroit Refugee

    Suicide Solution by Ozzy Ozbourne and Randy Rhoads.

  85. @David In TN
    @Rob McX

    Per the LA Times, a sister of one of the victims says, "We forgive her." Since the perp is black this will likely be the Community reaction.

    Her "nursing" days may not be over.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee

    Oh, so the Black Community has spoken? Ah, got it.

  86. @Mark G.
    @AKAHorace


    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is.
     
    When I was younger, I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people. One time I was walking along a downtown street on a hot summer day. I saw an old black man slumped over in a wheelchair with unconcerned looking people walking by him. I stopped and asked if he was ok. He said he was looking for a charity giving out free school backpacks and wanted some for his grandkids. He got lost and then became dehydrated. I got the address from him. I walked down the street, found where it was, and bought a bottle of water out of a vending machine in the building. Then I went back. I told him how to get there and gave him the water and offered to help him get where he wanted to go. He said he could make it and thanked me, and I left. It just surprised me so much that I was the only person who stopped and offered to help him.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon

    This really happened up here” young “rapper” viciously pummeled an ancient black veteran at the pumps for his car keys. As he crawled on his stomach to the stations doors, a dozen other blacks simply walked around him or stepped over him.

    All caught on video and aired on 2,4,and 7Action News Detroit.

  87. @james wilson
    @Steve Sailer

    "All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped." https://ennyman.medium.com/a-lesson-from-29-golden-gate-suicide-attempts-a42f4ef3f970

    Suicides think things will be less messy if the jump into water. The trouble with that is you will not die when you hit the water. You will be first be distorted into unnatural and incredibly painful positions, and then you will drown.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @Intelligent Dasein

    A lot of them survived because they chose to jump on a windy, choppy day which breaks up the water surface tension and softens the impact. The ones who jump on calm days usually don’t make it because it’s like jumping onto a concrete sidewalk.

  88. @Mark G.
    @AKAHorace


    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is.
     
    When I was younger, I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people. One time I was walking along a downtown street on a hot summer day. I saw an old black man slumped over in a wheelchair with unconcerned looking people walking by him. I stopped and asked if he was ok. He said he was looking for a charity giving out free school backpacks and wanted some for his grandkids. He got lost and then became dehydrated. I got the address from him. I walked down the street, found where it was, and bought a bottle of water out of a vending machine in the building. Then I went back. I told him how to get there and gave him the water and offered to help him get where he wanted to go. He said he could make it and thanked me, and I left. It just surprised me so much that I was the only person who stopped and offered to help him.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon

    I had a Swedish girlfriend in the aughts who was appalled by the indifference of New Yorkers to the, er, “unhoused.” She said if a man was lying in his own piss on the streets in Sweden people would stop to see if he was okay, then make sure he was taken somewhere to be looked after.

    She was new. Six months later she was like, ‘Why is that asshole sleeping in our vestibule?”

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Do the Swedes put their homeless drunks and schizos up permanently in institutions after the first laying-in-your-own-piss episode? I doubt it but I've never been to Sweden.

    I remember calling 911 on a guy lying on the sidewalk, unresponsive after I tapped his foot and yelled at him to tell me his name. His chest was rising and falling and his extremities were pink and lips a normal red so I didn't do CPR.

    An ambulance pulled into the parking lot, going notably slow with no sirens or flashers. The EMT stepped out and lightly slapped the guy. He blinked and sat up--just a drunk sleeping it off. The EMT told me it was their fourth call on him.

    , @Henry Bowman
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Yeah, they’ll do that.

    Was she good looking?

  89. Wow! A neuro travel nurse? In my experience, Negroes are rare in the actual service-providing side of the medical business. You see them at check-in desks, etc., but not as nurses. They can’t get through nursing school, is the problem, I’d imagine. I’m glad she wasn’t my nurse! And with any luck, she won’t be anyone else’s nurse for awhile either. Hopefully her entire life.

  90. @AKAHorace
    @Steve Sailer

    Good for you.

    I live in an area with a lot of white, upper middle class, woke liberals. For all their faults, they are pretty good in situations like this.

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Twice I have had to rescue people from car wrecks. The first time was pretty straightforward: the accident was not severe, and the driver was conscious and not seriously injured.

    The second time was a bloody mess — literally. Broken glass, unconscious passengers, the works. I was first on the scene so I felt obliged to act, but a little scared and reluctant. As I approached the wreck, I heard a voice from behind me: “Step out of the way, I’m an off-duty EMT, I’ll handle this. Just stand back and do what I tell you.” I never felt more relieved in my life.

    A third one ended weirdly: I was driving on the highway at 4 AM, viz the only car on the road, when I came across an upside-down vehicle on fire. I grabbed the fire extinguisher out of my trunk (ALWAYS keep in your trunk a fire extinguisher, a crowbar, a first aid kit and an auto tool kit — Boy Scout law!) and ran toward the vehicle. Suddenly I heard a voice from the side of the road: “It’s OK, don’t bother, we all got out okay!” There was an entire family sitting safely by the roadside. How they got out OK., I never figured out.

    PS — it’s wise to carry a sharp but legal pocket knife, because you often have to cut the seatbelt off the passenger in order to get them out safely.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    (ALWAYS keep in your trunk a fire extinguisher, a crowbar, a first aid kit and an auto tool kit — Boy Scout law!)
     
    Could a fire extinguisher not explode from the impact of an accident and send off shrapnel like a grenade?

    What should one have in the first aid kit?

    Replies: @Jack D

  91. @AceDeuce
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Another reason to do drugs and booze is to dull psychic pain.

    There’s even an old saying about it: “drown your sorrows.”
     

    Welp, to paraphrase O.W. Holmes Jr. Your "psychic pain" ends where my nose begins. Kill yourself, not others.

    Sad stories are like arseholes--everyone has one.

    Also, FYI,sorrows can swim. Quite well. They'll be there treading water when you come to from your binge.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Well, I definitely agree with that. If it’s been a rough day why can’t you just pick up a bottle of wine on the way home from work.

    Some drunks seem really motivated to get behind the wheel of a car once they get tanked. No idea why.

  92. @Anonymous Jew
    @AKAHorace

    I live in a woke White (“WW”) Seattle neighborhood. My big issue is litter. WW might be second only to the the Japanese in picking up other people’s litter. When I lived in a Chinese neighborhood in California (extremely safe, btw), I would go around with a trash grabber and a plastic bag. In my current neighborhood there just isn’t any trash to pick up. Of course, WW have their many, many downsides. In Seattle - and many other cities - WW pathological altruism has allowed homeless encampments to go unchecked. But yes, if I’m bleeding out on the sidewalk I trust my doctor/tech bro/engineer PhD neighbors (literally these are our neighbors) to be Good Samaritans. On a side note, I recall that the US is unique in the West in not having any Good Samaritan laws.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    I know for a fact that GA has a Good Samaritan law, codified at OCGA 51-1-29.

    Most states seem to have them.

    https://recreation-law.com/2014/05/28/good-samaritan-laws-by-state/

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Thanks, but those are laws protecting Good Samaritans from liability. I meant laws compelling citizens to aid others in certain situations.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  93. @David In TN
    @Mr. Anon

    "What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society."

    Or, to put it another way, a fear of those who control society, resulting in obedience to them.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Or, to put it another way, a fear of those who control society, resulting in obedience to them.

    Yeah, that works too. Although it is curious how many people will love Big Brother with no prompting at all.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
  94. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Mark G.

    I had a Swedish girlfriend in the aughts who was appalled by the indifference of New Yorkers to the, er, "unhoused." She said if a man was lying in his own piss on the streets in Sweden people would stop to see if he was okay, then make sure he was taken somewhere to be looked after.

    She was new. Six months later she was like, 'Why is that asshole sleeping in our vestibule?"

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Henry Bowman

    Do the Swedes put their homeless drunks and schizos up permanently in institutions after the first laying-in-your-own-piss episode? I doubt it but I’ve never been to Sweden.

    I remember calling 911 on a guy lying on the sidewalk, unresponsive after I tapped his foot and yelled at him to tell me his name. His chest was rising and falling and his extremities were pink and lips a normal red so I didn’t do CPR.

    An ambulance pulled into the parking lot, going notably slow with no sirens or flashers. The EMT stepped out and lightly slapped the guy. He blinked and sat up–just a drunk sleeping it off. The EMT told me it was their fourth call on him.

  95. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike Tre

    We came around a corner one time, and I saw a body flying in the air. He was on the way down. A car had just hit him, because the 84 y/o man had tried to cross the street between parked cars and almost certainly looked left first - but this was a one-way street the other way.

    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He'd never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later. (The guy died a couple of hours later in the hospital though anyway.)

    Doing what iSteve did is admirable, and I don't know exactly how one could get in trouble with lawyers, but who knows? One time in Baldwin Hills, California, I saw an ~ 10 y/o girl out of control going downhill on a bike (her feet got off the pedals) hit a pole and break her arm. I went into the neighborhood to get someone to call an ambulance - this was before cell phones - and it took a couple of houses before anyone would talk to me. They thought this honky was up to no good or was a salesman or something.

    I finally got back around onto that big road and just ended up telling the ambulance guys what happened.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman

    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He’d never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later.

    Why not?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anonymous

    Liability. A lawyer (maybe Jack D.) could tell you, but I think a doctor may not be covered under the Good Samaritan laws.

  96. @additionalMike
    @Henry Canaday

    Heh. Last year one of our office assistants was on the phone with a black lady who wanted to file a complaint of racial discrimination against her employer...when she was told that she could be represented by a government agency attorney, she responded "Hell no! I want an angry Jew!"

    Ed, a fellow in our office of the Hebraic persuasion, has since been known as the Angry Jew, a nickname which amuses him.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    she responded “Hell no! I want an angry Jew!

    What makes Jews such good lawyers?

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Anonymous

    It's the culture, and it helps explain why Jews hate Syrians so much. Turns out that Jews do not like to argue with Syrians because they're likely to lose, or so I have been told.

    In other news, I heard the driver was late for an Emmet Till memorial service.

  97. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Mark G.

    I had a Swedish girlfriend in the aughts who was appalled by the indifference of New Yorkers to the, er, "unhoused." She said if a man was lying in his own piss on the streets in Sweden people would stop to see if he was okay, then make sure he was taken somewhere to be looked after.

    She was new. Six months later she was like, 'Why is that asshole sleeping in our vestibule?"

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Henry Bowman

    Yeah, they’ll do that.

    Was she good looking?

  98. @james wilson
    @Steve Sailer

    "All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped." https://ennyman.medium.com/a-lesson-from-29-golden-gate-suicide-attempts-a42f4ef3f970

    Suicides think things will be less messy if the jump into water. The trouble with that is you will not die when you hit the water. You will be first be distorted into unnatural and incredibly painful positions, and then you will drown.

    Replies: @Sick n' Tired, @Intelligent Dasein

    “All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped.”

    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions. They are also, apparently, flakey.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @Intelligent Dasein


    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions.
     
    Unfortunately, if your worldview narrows drastically enough, death may appear to be the only solution to your current set of problems. I have been told that severe pain (particularly severe psychic pain) has a way of narrowing one's worldview and making it seem like one is in a sort of tunnel.

    After a time, all you want is to get out of the tunnel. You do not particularly care how.

    The unfortunate thing about suicide is that most people who attempt it are not seeking death. Rather, they are seeking relief from pain. However, it is difficult for someone to foresee the consequences of his own actions when thinking past the next few seconds is more than he can bear.
    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Intelligent Dasein


    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions.
     
    I have been told that severe pain (particularly severe psychic pain) has a way of narrowing one's worldview. If the pain is severe enough, it begins to feel as though you are seeing life through a sort of tunnel.

    After a time, all you want is to get out of the tunnel. You do not particularly care how.

    The unfortunate thing about suicide is that most people who attempt it are not seeking death. Rather, they are seeking a way out of their pain. It is difficult to understand the consequences of your actions when thinking beyond even the next few seconds is more than you can bear.



    (Apologies if the above turns out to be a double post. I am not sure whether my initial post went through or not.)

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  99. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Clyde, @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @My Comment

    Youtubers — Serpentza and friend. —- https://www.youtube.com/c/serpentza/videos — He should be marketing his hair grow back formula. Prolly some obscure Chinese herbal brew.

  100. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anonymous Jew

    I know for a fact that GA has a Good Samaritan law, codified at OCGA 51-1-29.

    Most states seem to have them.

    https://recreation-law.com/2014/05/28/good-samaritan-laws-by-state/

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    Thanks, but those are laws protecting Good Samaritans from liability. I meant laws compelling citizens to aid others in certain situations.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Anonymous Jew

    That’s what those laws do—citizens are compelled to act but are shielded from liability.

  101. @Luddite in Chief
    @Mike Tre


    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.
     
    Does this mean the lawyers have found a way around the "Good Samaritan" laws designed to prevent exactly this sort of thing?

    (I would hate to think someone could be sued after trying their best to help a fellow human, but, unfortunately, I can believe it.)

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    You can be successfully sued these days by the person you are trying to help.

    Does this mean the lawyers have found a way around the “Good Samaritan” laws designed to prevent exactly this sort of thing?

    (I would hate to think someone could be sued after trying their best to help a fellow human, but, unfortunately, I can believe it.)

    The theory if I recall correctly is that once you offer aid you have a duty to exercise reasonable care in rendering the aid. The law doesn’t impose a duty of bystanders to act, but once they act they have duties which attach. I doubt that the successful cases where plaintiff prevailed were situations in which the defendant saved the plaintiff’s life where the plaintiff would otherwise have surely died, but rather cases where the intervention caused a substantial additional injury.

    I think the “Good Samaritan” laws just codified in statute bright lines for when the rescuer is immune from suit.

  102. She had booze in the car and it just broken up with her boyfriend so this one doesn’t seem to fit your exuberance pattern in the joyful sense of the word … despair is closer.

  103. @EdwardM
    @anonymous

    Sam Waterston's character gave a law-school-type hypothetical in an episode of Law & Order: if someone jumps off of a 50-story building, and you standing at the window on the third floor and shoot him dead while he is falling past you, you are guilty of murder.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Sam Waterston’s character gave a law-school-type hypothetical in an episode of Law & Order: if someone jumps off of a 50-story building, and you standing at the window on the third floor and shoot him dead while he is falling past you, you are guilty of murder.

    That is lifted from the Talmud tractate Bava Kamma 26b “If one threw a child from a roof and another came along and impaled him on his sword and the child died etc.” But Anonymous’s point here is subtler ; If we accept that ‘A woman’s right to her own body’ defines the embryonic child as a non-person if the woman chooses abortion, yet as a person for purposes of charging a third party with homicide, then we are saying that the personhood of the embryonic child is dependent on the will/whim of the mother. Hence his/her question; if the mother is on way to aborting child hasn’t she already declared child non-person? Can 3rd party still be prosecuted for homicide? Can always change mind etc. but points to an absurdity in legal definition.

  104. Anon[253] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @AKAHorace

    Twice I have had to rescue people from car wrecks. The first time was pretty straightforward: the accident was not severe, and the driver was conscious and not seriously injured.

    The second time was a bloody mess -- literally. Broken glass, unconscious passengers, the works. I was first on the scene so I felt obliged to act, but a little scared and reluctant. As I approached the wreck, I heard a voice from behind me: "Step out of the way, I'm an off-duty EMT, I'll handle this. Just stand back and do what I tell you." I never felt more relieved in my life.

    A third one ended weirdly: I was driving on the highway at 4 AM, viz the only car on the road, when I came across an upside-down vehicle on fire. I grabbed the fire extinguisher out of my trunk (ALWAYS keep in your trunk a fire extinguisher, a crowbar, a first aid kit and an auto tool kit --- Boy Scout law!) and ran toward the vehicle. Suddenly I heard a voice from the side of the road: "It's OK, don't bother, we all got out okay!" There was an entire family sitting safely by the roadside. How they got out OK., I never figured out.

    PS -- it's wise to carry a sharp but legal pocket knife, because you often have to cut the seatbelt off the passenger in order to get them out safely.

    Replies: @Anon

    (ALWAYS keep in your trunk a fire extinguisher, a crowbar, a first aid kit and an auto tool kit — Boy Scout law!)

    Could a fire extinguisher not explode from the impact of an accident and send off shrapnel like a grenade?

    What should one have in the first aid kit?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anon


    Could a fire extinguisher not explode from the impact of an accident and send off shrapnel like a grenade?
     
    No. The valve or gauge will break off and discharge the contents long before the pressure vessel explodes.

    They make standard first aid kits for automobiles. In some countries they are legally required. A lot of luxury cars seem to come with them. You are not an EMT - the $20 kind is good enough for you. Mostly it's just a bunch of bandages.

    Replies: @Anon

  105. @Intelligent Dasein
    Steve is still trying to meme his stupid "Deaths of Exuberance" idea into existence as if it were a real thing, the same way he is trying to meme his Basil Fawlty understanding of the Ukrainian war into an astute anti-Russian observation. In neither case is there any substance behind the slogan.

    If you really were skilled at noticing anything, you would notice that society is cracking. People of all shapes and skin tones are behaving worse and worse, not just on the road but in person, at the shopping centers, on the phone, at the doctor's office, at work, and everywhere else.

    Why is this? Because the bills are coming due, that's why.

    Here in America, we do not bother even thinking about fundamental problems let alone solving them, and our society was never set up to be sustainable. We have a cumulative legacy of decades of tolerating every sort of misbehavior and not enforcing any kind of standard, and papering over the symptoms of our insanity with a wall of unearned money derived from exorbitant dollar privilege. Now that the privilege is breaking down, all that remains is the rot at the core.

    This should be fairly obvious to everyone, but to a man with a hammer everything looks like a nail, and to an amateur statistician with a 30-year-old, half-baked HBD theory forged at the height of American prosperity, everything looks like a triple bank shot Moneyball monkeyball problem.

    Replies: @New Dealer

    Could you please express your incoherent resentment somewhere else, like maybe r/politics on reddit? Thanks!

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  106. @Anon
    Nobody is dying from deaths of despair. Both blacks and whites are dying from deaths of overindulgence. Drugs and booze are things people do when they want to party.

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @The Anti-Gnostic, @JohnnyWalker123

    Whites don’t party that much these days.

    If you meet a White who’s heavily into drugs & alcohol (it’s important to remember that it’s only a small subset of Whites who abuse substances), he’s probably trying to medicate away the pain and cope with life. It’s likely that he uses these substances in the privacy of his home, by himself or maybe with a spouse. He’s not using these substances with large numbers of friends, at a fun party or nightclub.

    Interestingly, that wasn’t always true.

    From the mid 1940s up through the early 90s, Whites partied a lot. More generally speaking, they enjoyed socializing, meeting people, and having fun with large groups of people. Especially during the 60-80s, the party/social scene was epic. Often to a point of destroying people. Back then, people recklessly abused alcohol, marijuana, LSD, cocaine, etc.

    While some of the substance back then was related to coping with depression, much of it was due to wanting to be “the life of the party.” Back then, people want to party like the kids of “Ridgemont High.”

    Things changed sometime during the early/mid 90s. By the early 2000s, the party/social scene had declined significantly. Over the last 15 years, whatever remained basically collapsed. These days it’s rare for Whites to attempt to be “the life of the party.”

    There are still Whites who like to party, but they are outliers. Some may occasionally get together in small groups, but they’re not having huge parties every weekend. Not even close. The social/party scene is now small & quiet.

    The decline of social extraversion among American Whites is a very interesting phenomenon that needs to be studied more closely.

    When Whites abused drugs & alcohol in past decades, it was often due to exuberant partying. Not always, but often. Nowadays, the substance abuse is almost always due to depression or anxiety. Especially in hard-hit communities in the Rustbelt, Appalachia, and Ozarks. Those areas have been devastated by deindustrialization, obesity, illegal immigration, and the popularization of trashy pop culture. Affluent Whites have it much easier than working-class Whites, but even they often drink to cope with the anxieties of modern life (especially job & financial stress).

    Some people here assume that population groups stay the same over time. In reality, populations are dynamic. They change. Whites have changed a lot over the decades, as have their motivations for substance abuse.

    • Agree: E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I always say that "Happy White People" are what everyone else want to destroy and make extinct. That includes the government and the media.

    , @Danindc
    @JohnnyWalker123

    This is anecdotal but I had a big housewarming party last weekend

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  107. @Anonymous
    @additionalMike


    she responded “Hell no! I want an angry Jew!
     
    What makes Jews such good lawyers?

    Replies: @James Speaks

    It’s the culture, and it helps explain why Jews hate Syrians so much. Turns out that Jews do not like to argue with Syrians because they’re likely to lose, or so I have been told.

    In other news, I heard the driver was late for an Emmet Till memorial service.

  108. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Anon

    Whites don't party that much these days.

    If you meet a White who's heavily into drugs & alcohol (it's important to remember that it's only a small subset of Whites who abuse substances), he's probably trying to medicate away the pain and cope with life. It's likely that he uses these substances in the privacy of his home, by himself or maybe with a spouse. He's not using these substances with large numbers of friends, at a fun party or nightclub.

    Interestingly, that wasn't always true.

    From the mid 1940s up through the early 90s, Whites partied a lot. More generally speaking, they enjoyed socializing, meeting people, and having fun with large groups of people. Especially during the 60-80s, the party/social scene was epic. Often to a point of destroying people. Back then, people recklessly abused alcohol, marijuana, LSD, cocaine, etc.

    While some of the substance back then was related to coping with depression, much of it was due to wanting to be "the life of the party." Back then, people want to party like the kids of "Ridgemont High."

    Things changed sometime during the early/mid 90s. By the early 2000s, the party/social scene had declined significantly. Over the last 15 years, whatever remained basically collapsed. These days it's rare for Whites to attempt to be "the life of the party."

    There are still Whites who like to party, but they are outliers. Some may occasionally get together in small groups, but they're not having huge parties every weekend. Not even close. The social/party scene is now small & quiet.

    The decline of social extraversion among American Whites is a very interesting phenomenon that needs to be studied more closely.

    When Whites abused drugs & alcohol in past decades, it was often due to exuberant partying. Not always, but often. Nowadays, the substance abuse is almost always due to depression or anxiety. Especially in hard-hit communities in the Rustbelt, Appalachia, and Ozarks. Those areas have been devastated by deindustrialization, obesity, illegal immigration, and the popularization of trashy pop culture. Affluent Whites have it much easier than working-class Whites, but even they often drink to cope with the anxieties of modern life (especially job & financial stress).

    Some people here assume that population groups stay the same over time. In reality, populations are dynamic. They change. Whites have changed a lot over the decades, as have their motivations for substance abuse.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Danindc

    I always say that “Happy White People” are what everyone else want to destroy and make extinct. That includes the government and the media.

  109. @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He’d never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later.
     
    Why not?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Liability. A lawyer (maybe Jack D.) could tell you, but I think a doctor may not be covered under the Good Samaritan laws.

  110. Anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/magnum-p-i-actor-roger-e-mosley-dead-83

    You think he was a victim of the Winsor Hills crash?

  111. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Luddite in Chief

    "I have often wondered how many bridge suicides regret what they have just done in mid-air."

    Somewhere among my books is a police autobiography from way back - 30s/40s/50s. As a young constable in London the author worked with the Thames River Police aka Thames Division of the Met, one of whose jobs was retrieving drowned people, mostly suicides, from the river. After investigating many of these cases for the inquest, he noticed that those suicides crossed in love had torn and bloody nails, as they'd tried to cling onto the bridge piers and live, whereas bankrupts and the terminally ill just let themselves drown.

    So don't try and drown yourself because she's gone off with someone else.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    Somewhere among my books is a police autobiography from way back – 30s/40s/50s. As a young constable in London the author worked with the Thames River Police aka Thames Division of the Met, one of whose jobs was retrieving drowned people, mostly suicides, from the river.

    If you happen to recall the title of the book, could you please post it?

    I ask because I am always interested in autobiographies and find the older ones easier reading (likely because literacy seems to have largely gone out with the 1960s).

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Luddite in Chief

    If you happen to recall the title of the book, could you please post it?

    I think it may be "Time and Tide: The Life of a Thames Waterman". I don't remember the story that YAA is citing but it was a long time ago. Very interesting read iirc.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

  112. @Intelligent Dasein
    @james wilson


    “All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped.”
     
    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions. They are also, apparently, flakey.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @Luddite in Chief

    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions.

    Unfortunately, if your worldview narrows drastically enough, death may appear to be the only solution to your current set of problems. I have been told that severe pain (particularly severe psychic pain) has a way of narrowing one’s worldview and making it seem like one is in a sort of tunnel.

    After a time, all you want is to get out of the tunnel. You do not particularly care how.

    The unfortunate thing about suicide is that most people who attempt it are not seeking death. Rather, they are seeking relief from pain. However, it is difficult for someone to foresee the consequences of his own actions when thinking past the next few seconds is more than he can bear.

  113. @Intelligent Dasein
    @james wilson


    “All 29 people who survived their suicide attempts off San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge have said they regretted their decision as soon as they jumped.”
     
    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions. They are also, apparently, flakey.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief, @Luddite in Chief

    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions.

    I have been told that severe pain (particularly severe psychic pain) has a way of narrowing one’s worldview. If the pain is severe enough, it begins to feel as though you are seeing life through a sort of tunnel.

    After a time, all you want is to get out of the tunnel. You do not particularly care how.

    The unfortunate thing about suicide is that most people who attempt it are not seeking death. Rather, they are seeking a way out of their pain. It is difficult to understand the consequences of your actions when thinking beyond even the next few seconds is more than you can bear.

    (Apologies if the above turns out to be a double post. I am not sure whether my initial post went through or not.)

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Luddite in Chief

    Addressed more to ID than to yourself....

    Speaking from a rather painful personal familial perspective, I can assure you that many people who commit suicide are quite mad, or else are in the process of going mad: they don't even understand their present actions, let alone the future consequences.

    You're better than banging on about this, dude. It's like the culturally pervasive adolescent giggling about prison rape --- an outrageous human rights violation and a form of torture --- which has the function of normalizing an absolute horror in the common culture, as something to make jokes about. Nobody should do it, and nobody should make casual, catty remarks about a thing as grievous as suicide.

    Now, onwards and upwards, gents.

  114. @Luddite in Chief
    @Intelligent Dasein


    People who would attempt suicide are probably not that good at foreseeing the consequences of their own actions.
     
    I have been told that severe pain (particularly severe psychic pain) has a way of narrowing one's worldview. If the pain is severe enough, it begins to feel as though you are seeing life through a sort of tunnel.

    After a time, all you want is to get out of the tunnel. You do not particularly care how.

    The unfortunate thing about suicide is that most people who attempt it are not seeking death. Rather, they are seeking a way out of their pain. It is difficult to understand the consequences of your actions when thinking beyond even the next few seconds is more than you can bear.



    (Apologies if the above turns out to be a double post. I am not sure whether my initial post went through or not.)

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Addressed more to ID than to yourself….

    Speaking from a rather painful personal familial perspective, I can assure you that many people who commit suicide are quite mad, or else are in the process of going mad: they don’t even understand their present actions, let alone the future consequences.

    You’re better than banging on about this, dude. It’s like the culturally pervasive adolescent giggling about prison rape — an outrageous human rights violation and a form of torture — which has the function of normalizing an absolute horror in the common culture, as something to make jokes about. Nobody should do it, and nobody should make casual, catty remarks about a thing as grievous as suicide.

    Now, onwards and upwards, gents.

    • Agree: kaganovitch, AKAHorace
  115. @Mike Tre
    @Danindc

    What's ridiculous is that it is true:

    https://abcnews.go.com/TheLaw/story?id=6498405&page=1

    I'm just pointing it out. Calm down. You have no idea what my inclinations are in an emergency situation, so save your hollow life lectures for your fellow desk humping spergs that overpopulate this comment section.

    Replies: @Danindc

    Everybody knows that one story. That’s why I called it anecdotal, nitwit.

  116. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Anon

    Whites don't party that much these days.

    If you meet a White who's heavily into drugs & alcohol (it's important to remember that it's only a small subset of Whites who abuse substances), he's probably trying to medicate away the pain and cope with life. It's likely that he uses these substances in the privacy of his home, by himself or maybe with a spouse. He's not using these substances with large numbers of friends, at a fun party or nightclub.

    Interestingly, that wasn't always true.

    From the mid 1940s up through the early 90s, Whites partied a lot. More generally speaking, they enjoyed socializing, meeting people, and having fun with large groups of people. Especially during the 60-80s, the party/social scene was epic. Often to a point of destroying people. Back then, people recklessly abused alcohol, marijuana, LSD, cocaine, etc.

    While some of the substance back then was related to coping with depression, much of it was due to wanting to be "the life of the party." Back then, people want to party like the kids of "Ridgemont High."

    Things changed sometime during the early/mid 90s. By the early 2000s, the party/social scene had declined significantly. Over the last 15 years, whatever remained basically collapsed. These days it's rare for Whites to attempt to be "the life of the party."

    There are still Whites who like to party, but they are outliers. Some may occasionally get together in small groups, but they're not having huge parties every weekend. Not even close. The social/party scene is now small & quiet.

    The decline of social extraversion among American Whites is a very interesting phenomenon that needs to be studied more closely.

    When Whites abused drugs & alcohol in past decades, it was often due to exuberant partying. Not always, but often. Nowadays, the substance abuse is almost always due to depression or anxiety. Especially in hard-hit communities in the Rustbelt, Appalachia, and Ozarks. Those areas have been devastated by deindustrialization, obesity, illegal immigration, and the popularization of trashy pop culture. Affluent Whites have it much easier than working-class Whites, but even they often drink to cope with the anxieties of modern life (especially job & financial stress).

    Some people here assume that population groups stay the same over time. In reality, populations are dynamic. They change. Whites have changed a lot over the decades, as have their motivations for substance abuse.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Danindc

    This is anecdotal but I had a big housewarming party last weekend

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Danindc

    Congratulations on the new house!

  117. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Clyde, @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @My Comment

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    It’s all part of a peculiar Oriental philosophy that says, “If I’m not looking at you, you don’t exist.” I think it comes from living in close quarters with millions of your neighbors. Makes for some hilarious accident videos.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    My vague impression is that South Koreans have become less hideously unconcerned about accident victims at their feet in recent years. But I could be wrong.

    Replies: @Anon

  118. @Achmed E. Newman
    I can't help but think that electronics were a contributing factor in this one. She may have been drunk off her ass, but 30 years ago, she'd still have been looking out the window, eventually scared shitless at that speed. (An article mentioned "not seeing the red light". Yeah, well at 100 mph, 2-3 times the speed of everyone else, red or green, you're gonna hit something or somebody soon enough.)

    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking? (I've been in a car in which someone panicked and mashed the wrong pedal.)

    Replies: @JR Ewing, @Paul Jolliffe, @Jim Christian

    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking?

    Accurate take, Acchie. Fingertip controls and bluetooth touch screens in new cars are a ferocious distraction. My 2004 Subaru has a basic radio and a cruise control stalk. simple, works great. My 2018 Taurus has a half dozen pairs of function buttons built into the steering wheel on one layer, if you switch to the other layer, a half dozen more. Not intuitive at all. My daughter’s new Acura is worse. Try to make use of it, you HAVE to take your eyes off the road. I have my cruise and radio volume in layer one and ignore all the rest. I don’t answer the phone or texts even with the bluetooth, which itself screws up answering, so I severed THAT link. These are distractions, these rear-enders occur all over the place in the Boston region on the Interstates and a couple of times a week, collisions with police cars on the side of the road. They’re distracted and like you said, electronics.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Christian

    Right, Jim. It's 2 things that I think are the most dangerous, i.e., hardest to use while still driving a car safely:

    1) Anything with multiple layers of menus. Unless you really get into this while parked somewhere and have a great memory, you have to keep screwing with the switches while looking at a screen - either the big one in the center or a small one where your speedometer, tach and oil-P and water-T gauges used to simply be. You have to be careful not to reset anything, too. It's not meant for doing while driving.

    2) Touch screens of ANY sort. Other buttons can be looked at with a 1/2 s glance, then held and played with when one's eyes are back looking out the windshield. Since they have no feel to them, touch "buttons" must be stared at first to find the spot, then to make sure you have "pressed" it. This is so much worse on airplanes in turbulence, it's plain stupid!

    Back to this idiotic lady. If she were really drunk, any kind of voice commands would not work. She'd be staring at screens for an inordinate amount of time due to slow judgement that makes things take longer AND takes away her sense of time with eyes off the road.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Luddite in Chief
    @Jim Christian


    My 2018 Taurus has a half dozen pairs of function buttons built into the steering wheel on one layer, if you switch to the other layer, a half dozen more. Not intuitive at all. My daughter’s new Acura is worse. Try to make use of it, you HAVE to take your eyes off the road.
     
    I cannot recall where I heard this (perhaps someone else heard it, too, and can chime in?), but sometime earlier this year, I was half-listening to an audio stream and the topic of passenger car ergonomics came up.

    The gist of the story seemed to be that there was a growing concern modern car cockpits are rapidly becoming too "busy" and complex to allow drivers to effectively pay attention to what is going on both inside the car (e.g. with the instrumentation) as well as what is happening outside the car (e.g. hapless pedestrians being mowed down by the driver distractedly trying to tune the radio).

    The only reason I remember this at all is because one of the people they mentioned was the chap who was in charge of the ergonomics for the F-18 fighter aircraft. It seems the same concerns military aircraft firms have about balancing information load (e.g. telling pilots their airspeed in an effective, yet non-distracting way) also come into play in passenger cars.

    Apparently, this fellow was concerned that people operating passenger cars were becoming even more overwhelmed than fighter pilots. His suggestion was that automakers should start looking a good deal closer at both what they are doing when they design interior layouts and instrument clusters as well as why they are doing it.

    I am not much of a "car guy," but some of the instrumentation set-ups I have seen in newer cars have caused me to wonder if they had been designed entirely by software engineers who had never actually driven the cars in which their gear was installed.
  119. @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    @Anon


    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.
     
    It's all part of a peculiar Oriental philosophy that says, "If I'm not looking at you, you don't exist." I think it comes from living in close quarters with millions of your neighbors. Makes for some hilarious accident videos.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    My vague impression is that South Koreans have become less hideously unconcerned about accident victims at their feet in recent years. But I could be wrong.

    • Agree: Cool Daddy Jimbo
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    My vague impression is that South Koreans have become less hideously unconcerned about accident victims at their feet in recent years. But I could be wrong.
     
    Do European-derived peoples have a special capacity for empathy that is not seen in other groups? Consider, as another point of comparison, the whoops, laughter, and giddiness one hears from African-Americans on videos showing violent fights or beatings or other gruesome incidents.
  120. @Joe S.Walker
    There's been a flurry of Hollywood types offering thoughts and prayers for Anne Heche. They don't seem so concerned about the people whose house she destroyed by driving into it at lunatic speed.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    The Property Brothers are already building them a new home.

    Chinese won’t help people because they are afraid they will be made responsible for the injured person.

  121. @Anonymous Jew
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Thanks, but those are laws protecting Good Samaritans from liability. I meant laws compelling citizens to aid others in certain situations.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    That’s what those laws do—citizens are compelled to act but are shielded from liability.

  122. @Jim Christian
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking?
     
    Accurate take, Acchie. Fingertip controls and bluetooth touch screens in new cars are a ferocious distraction. My 2004 Subaru has a basic radio and a cruise control stalk. simple, works great. My 2018 Taurus has a half dozen pairs of function buttons built into the steering wheel on one layer, if you switch to the other layer, a half dozen more. Not intuitive at all. My daughter's new Acura is worse. Try to make use of it, you HAVE to take your eyes off the road. I have my cruise and radio volume in layer one and ignore all the rest. I don't answer the phone or texts even with the bluetooth, which itself screws up answering, so I severed THAT link. These are distractions, these rear-enders occur all over the place in the Boston region on the Interstates and a couple of times a week, collisions with police cars on the side of the road. They're distracted and like you said, electronics.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

    Right, Jim. It’s 2 things that I think are the most dangerous, i.e., hardest to use while still driving a car safely:

    1) Anything with multiple layers of menus. Unless you really get into this while parked somewhere and have a great memory, you have to keep screwing with the switches while looking at a screen – either the big one in the center or a small one where your speedometer, tach and oil-P and water-T gauges used to simply be. You have to be careful not to reset anything, too. It’s not meant for doing while driving.

    2) Touch screens of ANY sort. Other buttons can be looked at with a 1/2 s glance, then held and played with when one’s eyes are back looking out the windshield. Since they have no feel to them, touch “buttons” must be stared at first to find the spot, then to make sure you have “pressed” it. This is so much worse on airplanes in turbulence, it’s plain stupid!

    Back to this idiotic lady. If she were really drunk, any kind of voice commands would not work. She’d be staring at screens for an inordinate amount of time due to slow judgement that makes things take longer AND takes away her sense of time with eyes off the road.

    • Thanks: Jim Christian
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I hate touch screens and people who text and drive as much as the next guy, but your hypothesis is really a stretch in this case. If you are texting your natural inclination is to slow down (many times I have passed people going slow and they are texting) . Going 100mph down a city street with a 35 mph speed limit requires enormous concentration just to get as far as she did before she hit the intersection, especially if you are drunk.

    While I suppose it's not IMPOSSIBLE that she added texting or menu button pressing to her hat trick of recklessness, it's really not necessary for that accident to have happened. Even if she was completely focused on the road (as focused as you can be when drunk) the same thing would have happened once she entered the intersection at 100 mph.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  123. @Mark G.
    @AKAHorace


    Weirdest thing is how little bystander reaction there is.
     
    When I was younger, I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people. One time I was walking along a downtown street on a hot summer day. I saw an old black man slumped over in a wheelchair with unconcerned looking people walking by him. I stopped and asked if he was ok. He said he was looking for a charity giving out free school backpacks and wanted some for his grandkids. He got lost and then became dehydrated. I got the address from him. I walked down the street, found where it was, and bought a bottle of water out of a vending machine in the building. Then I went back. I told him how to get there and gave him the water and offered to help him get where he wanted to go. He said he could make it and thanked me, and I left. It just surprised me so much that I was the only person who stopped and offered to help him.

    Replies: @Detroit Refugee, @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Anon

    I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people.

    Not only that, but they also seem to get delight from seeing other suffer.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Anon


    I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people.

    Not only that, but they also seem to get delight from seeing other suffer.
     
    A very apt quote from G. K. Chesterton:

    "The definition of the true savage is that he laughs when he hurts you; and howls when you hurt him."
  124. Anon[354] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    My vague impression is that South Koreans have become less hideously unconcerned about accident victims at their feet in recent years. But I could be wrong.

    Replies: @Anon

    My vague impression is that South Koreans have become less hideously unconcerned about accident victims at their feet in recent years. But I could be wrong.

    Do European-derived peoples have a special capacity for empathy that is not seen in other groups? Consider, as another point of comparison, the whoops, laughter, and giddiness one hears from African-Americans on videos showing violent fights or beatings or other gruesome incidents.

  125. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jim Christian

    Right, Jim. It's 2 things that I think are the most dangerous, i.e., hardest to use while still driving a car safely:

    1) Anything with multiple layers of menus. Unless you really get into this while parked somewhere and have a great memory, you have to keep screwing with the switches while looking at a screen - either the big one in the center or a small one where your speedometer, tach and oil-P and water-T gauges used to simply be. You have to be careful not to reset anything, too. It's not meant for doing while driving.

    2) Touch screens of ANY sort. Other buttons can be looked at with a 1/2 s glance, then held and played with when one's eyes are back looking out the windshield. Since they have no feel to them, touch "buttons" must be stared at first to find the spot, then to make sure you have "pressed" it. This is so much worse on airplanes in turbulence, it's plain stupid!

    Back to this idiotic lady. If she were really drunk, any kind of voice commands would not work. She'd be staring at screens for an inordinate amount of time due to slow judgement that makes things take longer AND takes away her sense of time with eyes off the road.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I hate touch screens and people who text and drive as much as the next guy, but your hypothesis is really a stretch in this case. If you are texting your natural inclination is to slow down (many times I have passed people going slow and they are texting) . Going 100mph down a city street with a 35 mph speed limit requires enormous concentration just to get as far as she did before she hit the intersection, especially if you are drunk.

    While I suppose it’s not IMPOSSIBLE that she added texting or menu button pressing to her hat trick of recklessness, it’s really not necessary for that accident to have happened. Even if she was completely focused on the road (as focused as you can be when drunk) the same thing would have happened once she entered the intersection at 100 mph.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No, see, I don't think she'd have kept going at 100 mph if she had been looking out the window, even if pretty drunk.

  126. Obviously, no one traffic accident can be confidently attributed to a massive social trend.

    This was not an accident.

  127. @Rob McX
    Here's the perp.

    http://kili.railpage.com.au/cara-https-eurweb.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Nicole-L-Linton.jpg

    That's such an insane speed, it must have been a suicide attempt, or she was just very mad about something. The automotive equivalent of shooting into a crowd at a funeral.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Joe Sweet, @epebble, @Almost Missouri, @james wilson, @David In TN, @ben tillman

    Exactly. It’s murder.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    She has been arrested and accused of "vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence".

    Murder generally requires some level of intent. I guess you could make out a case for "depraved heart" murder (such as shooting into a crowd) but while it's not implausible that she was trying to commit suicide by hitting these other cars, unless she confesses it's going to be hard to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. There's no bright line where gross negligence become depraved heart. She was after all driving down the street and not charging into a crowd of pedestrians for example. What if she had been going 60 in a 40 zone? Is that depraved heart or just very negligent? 70?

    In CA, vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor at the discretion of the prosecutor. A felony conviction is punishable by probation with a county jail sentence of up to one year, or state prison for two, four, or six years, and a fine of up to $10,000. In other words she is looking at 6 years max, or maybe less if she has a clean record.

    I suppose it's possible that they will upgrade the charges as the evidence is revealed but that's how it stands now.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @James B. Shearer, @Anonymous, @David In TN

  128. @Anon
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    (ALWAYS keep in your trunk a fire extinguisher, a crowbar, a first aid kit and an auto tool kit — Boy Scout law!)
     
    Could a fire extinguisher not explode from the impact of an accident and send off shrapnel like a grenade?

    What should one have in the first aid kit?

    Replies: @Jack D

    Could a fire extinguisher not explode from the impact of an accident and send off shrapnel like a grenade?

    No. The valve or gauge will break off and discharge the contents long before the pressure vessel explodes.

    They make standard first aid kits for automobiles. In some countries they are legally required. A lot of luxury cars seem to come with them. You are not an EMT – the \$20 kind is good enough for you. Mostly it’s just a bunch of bandages.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Jack D

    Thank you.

    Couldn’t the valve and gauge go shooting off under the high pressure?

  129. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Mike Tre

    We came around a corner one time, and I saw a body flying in the air. He was on the way down. A car had just hit him, because the 84 y/o man had tried to cross the street between parked cars and almost certainly looked left first - but this was a one-way street the other way.

    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He'd never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later. (The guy died a couple of hours later in the hospital though anyway.)

    Doing what iSteve did is admirable, and I don't know exactly how one could get in trouble with lawyers, but who knows? One time in Baldwin Hills, California, I saw an ~ 10 y/o girl out of control going downhill on a bike (her feet got off the pedals) hit a pole and break her arm. I went into the neighborhood to get someone to call an ambulance - this was before cell phones - and it took a couple of houses before anyone would talk to me. They thought this honky was up to no good or was a salesman or something.

    I finally got back around onto that big road and just ended up telling the ambulance guys what happened.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ben tillman

    I mention this because my friend who was in Med School gave him CPR and all that. He’d never do something like that again, he told me a couple of years later. (The guy died a couple of hours later in the hospital though anyway.)

    I’ve heard that fentanyl poses a danger to anyone giving mouthy-to-mouth resuscitation as well.

  130. @ben tillman
    @Rob McX

    Exactly. It's murder.

    Replies: @Jack D

    She has been arrested and accused of “vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence”.

    Murder generally requires some level of intent. I guess you could make out a case for “depraved heart” murder (such as shooting into a crowd) but while it’s not implausible that she was trying to commit suicide by hitting these other cars, unless she confesses it’s going to be hard to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. There’s no bright line where gross negligence become depraved heart. She was after all driving down the street and not charging into a crowd of pedestrians for example. What if she had been going 60 in a 40 zone? Is that depraved heart or just very negligent? 70?

    In CA, vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor at the discretion of the prosecutor. A felony conviction is punishable by probation with a county jail sentence of up to one year, or state prison for two, four, or six years, and a fine of up to \$10,000. In other words she is looking at 6 years max, or maybe less if she has a clean record.

    I suppose it’s possible that they will upgrade the charges as the evidence is revealed but that’s how it stands now.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Jack D

    The laws are pretty strange there.

    There was a case in California a few years ago of twin brothers (white) who became addicted to painkillers after injuries sustained in a road accident. It happened on their way to a sports event they were taking part in, and neither of them was the driver. After that, they started buying drugs illegally on the street.

    One night the cops came upon one such drug deal and the brothers tried to evade them. In the ensuing chase, they hit another car, killing a Hispanic man and his daughter. They both got life without parole for felony murder.

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Jack D

    "... maybe less if she has a clean record."

    According to the LAT:

    "California Highway Patrol investigators identified 13 prior crashes involving Linton. Those incidents are the foundation for the district attorney’s case that she knew the dangers of reckless driving."

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    Murder generally requires some level of intent.
     
    Derek Chauvin didn’t intend to kill George Floyd.

    Replies: @anon

    , @David In TN
    @Jack D

    Perhaps surprisingly, they've charged her with six murder counts.

  131. @Danindc
    @JohnnyWalker123

    This is anecdotal but I had a big housewarming party last weekend

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Congratulations on the new house!

    • Thanks: Danindc
  132. @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    She has been arrested and accused of "vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence".

    Murder generally requires some level of intent. I guess you could make out a case for "depraved heart" murder (such as shooting into a crowd) but while it's not implausible that she was trying to commit suicide by hitting these other cars, unless she confesses it's going to be hard to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. There's no bright line where gross negligence become depraved heart. She was after all driving down the street and not charging into a crowd of pedestrians for example. What if she had been going 60 in a 40 zone? Is that depraved heart or just very negligent? 70?

    In CA, vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor at the discretion of the prosecutor. A felony conviction is punishable by probation with a county jail sentence of up to one year, or state prison for two, four, or six years, and a fine of up to $10,000. In other words she is looking at 6 years max, or maybe less if she has a clean record.

    I suppose it's possible that they will upgrade the charges as the evidence is revealed but that's how it stands now.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @James B. Shearer, @Anonymous, @David In TN

    The laws are pretty strange there.

    There was a case in California a few years ago of twin brothers (white) who became addicted to painkillers after injuries sustained in a road accident. It happened on their way to a sports event they were taking part in, and neither of them was the driver. After that, they started buying drugs illegally on the street.

    One night the cops came upon one such drug deal and the brothers tried to evade them. In the ensuing chase, they hit another car, killing a Hispanic man and his daughter. They both got life without parole for felony murder.

  133. @Luddite in Chief
    @YetAnotherAnon


    Somewhere among my books is a police autobiography from way back – 30s/40s/50s. As a young constable in London the author worked with the Thames River Police aka Thames Division of the Met, one of whose jobs was retrieving drowned people, mostly suicides, from the river.
     
    If you happen to recall the title of the book, could you please post it?

    I ask because I am always interested in autobiographies and find the older ones easier reading (likely because literacy seems to have largely gone out with the 1960s).

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    If you happen to recall the title of the book, could you please post it?

    I think it may be “Time and Tide: The Life of a Thames Waterman”. I don’t remember the story that YAA is citing but it was a long time ago. Very interesting read iirc.

    • Replies: @Luddite in Chief
    @kaganovitch


    I think it may be “Time and Tide: The Life of a Thames Waterman”. I don’t remember the story that YAA is citing but it was a long time ago. Very interesting read iirc.

     

    Thank you for taking the time to post the title. Regardless of whether it is the same book previously mentioned, the author (Jack Gaster) seems to have lived a very interesting life.

    I have a copy on order from a local bookshop and look forward to reading about it.
  134. @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    This is one of the great advantages that America (and the West) has over China. Unfortunately, our “elites” have this ravening desire to turn us into a dumpy multi-cultural, ergo low-trust, marketplace empire.
     
    What is meant by the term "high trust society" is usually that people in the society trust one another.

    What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society.

    Replies: @David In TN, @The Wild Geese Howard

    What the elites want is a society in which the citizens have little to no trust in each other, but high trust in those who control society.

    I had some very similar thoughts the other day.

    My take was that the controllers want a zero trust society among the plebes and an infinite trust society among themselves with virtually no possibility of interactions or transitions between the two groups.

    So, the plebe would face a life in a system that endlessly requires him to prove his identity and pay a tax for the privilege of doing so to gain access to the most basic functions of life.

    The controllers would face none of those challenges and do as they pleased. I suppose that’s not that different from their current status.

  135. This is the same load of garbage Steve keeps trying to push. No, it’s not the lack of terrorism and piracy on the roads. You can even see before George Floyd, black deaths were rising. The lockdowns and vaccines are what’s causing this, and nothing else. There’s literally zero evidence that armed gangsters harassing drivers does anything to make people drive safer. In fact, my experience shows the opposite. The gangsters drive recklessly and provoke fear and erratic driving.

    Steve have you had your 5th booster yet?

    • Replies: @anon
    @Libre


    The lockdowns and vaccines are what’s causing this, and nothing else.
     
    Blacks have one of the lowest rates of vaccination and of lockdown observance of any group.
  136. @Jim Christian
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Could she have been looking down for 10 seconds straight texting? Could she have been screwing with the radio controls on the steering wheel of the fancy car and operating the cruise control instead, then panicking?
     
    Accurate take, Acchie. Fingertip controls and bluetooth touch screens in new cars are a ferocious distraction. My 2004 Subaru has a basic radio and a cruise control stalk. simple, works great. My 2018 Taurus has a half dozen pairs of function buttons built into the steering wheel on one layer, if you switch to the other layer, a half dozen more. Not intuitive at all. My daughter's new Acura is worse. Try to make use of it, you HAVE to take your eyes off the road. I have my cruise and radio volume in layer one and ignore all the rest. I don't answer the phone or texts even with the bluetooth, which itself screws up answering, so I severed THAT link. These are distractions, these rear-enders occur all over the place in the Boston region on the Interstates and a couple of times a week, collisions with police cars on the side of the road. They're distracted and like you said, electronics.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Luddite in Chief

    My 2018 Taurus has a half dozen pairs of function buttons built into the steering wheel on one layer, if you switch to the other layer, a half dozen more. Not intuitive at all. My daughter’s new Acura is worse. Try to make use of it, you HAVE to take your eyes off the road.

    I cannot recall where I heard this (perhaps someone else heard it, too, and can chime in?), but sometime earlier this year, I was half-listening to an audio stream and the topic of passenger car ergonomics came up.

    The gist of the story seemed to be that there was a growing concern modern car cockpits are rapidly becoming too “busy” and complex to allow drivers to effectively pay attention to what is going on both inside the car (e.g. with the instrumentation) as well as what is happening outside the car (e.g. hapless pedestrians being mowed down by the driver distractedly trying to tune the radio).

    The only reason I remember this at all is because one of the people they mentioned was the chap who was in charge of the ergonomics for the F-18 fighter aircraft. It seems the same concerns military aircraft firms have about balancing information load (e.g. telling pilots their airspeed in an effective, yet non-distracting way) also come into play in passenger cars.

    Apparently, this fellow was concerned that people operating passenger cars were becoming even more overwhelmed than fighter pilots. His suggestion was that automakers should start looking a good deal closer at both what they are doing when they design interior layouts and instrument clusters as well as why they are doing it.

    I am not much of a “car guy,” but some of the instrumentation set-ups I have seen in newer cars have caused me to wonder if they had been designed entirely by software engineers who had never actually driven the cars in which their gear was installed.

    • Thanks: Jim Christian
  137. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I hate touch screens and people who text and drive as much as the next guy, but your hypothesis is really a stretch in this case. If you are texting your natural inclination is to slow down (many times I have passed people going slow and they are texting) . Going 100mph down a city street with a 35 mph speed limit requires enormous concentration just to get as far as she did before she hit the intersection, especially if you are drunk.

    While I suppose it's not IMPOSSIBLE that she added texting or menu button pressing to her hat trick of recklessness, it's really not necessary for that accident to have happened. Even if she was completely focused on the road (as focused as you can be when drunk) the same thing would have happened once she entered the intersection at 100 mph.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    No, see, I don’t think she’d have kept going at 100 mph if she had been looking out the window, even if pretty drunk.

  138. @kaganovitch
    @Luddite in Chief

    If you happen to recall the title of the book, could you please post it?

    I think it may be "Time and Tide: The Life of a Thames Waterman". I don't remember the story that YAA is citing but it was a long time ago. Very interesting read iirc.

    Replies: @Luddite in Chief

    I think it may be “Time and Tide: The Life of a Thames Waterman”. I don’t remember the story that YAA is citing but it was a long time ago. Very interesting read iirc.

    Thank you for taking the time to post the title. Regardless of whether it is the same book previously mentioned, the author (Jack Gaster) seems to have lived a very interesting life.

    I have a copy on order from a local bookshop and look forward to reading about it.

  139. @Anon
    @Mark G.

    I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people.

    Not only that, but they also seem to get delight from seeing other suffer.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    I lived in an area with lots of poor blacks and noticed how little empathy they often had for other people.

    Not only that, but they also seem to get delight from seeing other suffer.

    A very apt quote from G. K. Chesterton:

    “The definition of the true savage is that he laughs when he hurts you; and howls when you hurt him.”

  140. @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    She has been arrested and accused of "vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence".

    Murder generally requires some level of intent. I guess you could make out a case for "depraved heart" murder (such as shooting into a crowd) but while it's not implausible that she was trying to commit suicide by hitting these other cars, unless she confesses it's going to be hard to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. There's no bright line where gross negligence become depraved heart. She was after all driving down the street and not charging into a crowd of pedestrians for example. What if she had been going 60 in a 40 zone? Is that depraved heart or just very negligent? 70?

    In CA, vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor at the discretion of the prosecutor. A felony conviction is punishable by probation with a county jail sentence of up to one year, or state prison for two, four, or six years, and a fine of up to $10,000. In other words she is looking at 6 years max, or maybe less if she has a clean record.

    I suppose it's possible that they will upgrade the charges as the evidence is revealed but that's how it stands now.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @James B. Shearer, @Anonymous, @David In TN

    “… maybe less if she has a clean record.”

    According to the LAT:

    “California Highway Patrol investigators identified 13 prior crashes involving Linton. Those incidents are the foundation for the district attorney’s case that she knew the dangers of reckless driving.”

  141. While on the topic of livability in cities, Economist published the 10 best and worst cities to live in.

    10 best places to live

    1. Vienna, Austria
    2. Copenhagen, Denmark
    3. Zurich, Switzerland
    4. Calgary, Canada
    5. Vancouver, Canada
    6. Geneva, Switzerland
    7. Frankfurt, Germany
    8. Toronto, Canada
    9. Amsterdam, Netherlands
    10. Osaka, Japan and Melbourne, Australia (tie)

    The 10 worst places to live

    1. Tehran, Iran
    2. Douala, Cameroon
    3. Harare, Zimbabwe
    4. Dhaka, Bangladesh
    5. Port Moresby, PNG
    6. Karachi, Pakistan
    7. Algiers, Algeria
    8. Tripoli, Libya
    9. Lagos, Nigeria
    10. Damascus, Syria

    • Replies: @smetana
    @epebble

    Given a Zurich salary that afforded you a small efficiency apartment, you have to consider whether Damascus or Lagos wouldn't be a hoot and a half with the same francs changed to local money. If you measured satisfaction in girly action, e.g.

  142. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Those two youtubers who ride motorcycles through China (and lived there for years) claim Chinese NEVER come to one’s aid.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Clyde, @Cool Daddy Jimbo, @My Comment

    A lot of the Chinese reluctantance to help strangers is attributed to a famous case where a man helped a woman who fell getting off of a bus. She claimed he caused the problem (even though he was a good sammaritan) and sued him for damages. She won a fortune. The judge ruled that if he didn’t cause it, he would not have helped her.

  143. @Jack D
    @Anon


    Could a fire extinguisher not explode from the impact of an accident and send off shrapnel like a grenade?
     
    No. The valve or gauge will break off and discharge the contents long before the pressure vessel explodes.

    They make standard first aid kits for automobiles. In some countries they are legally required. A lot of luxury cars seem to come with them. You are not an EMT - the $20 kind is good enough for you. Mostly it's just a bunch of bandages.

    Replies: @Anon

    Thank you.

    Couldn’t the valve and gauge go shooting off under the high pressure?

  144. Anonymous[176] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    She has been arrested and accused of "vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence".

    Murder generally requires some level of intent. I guess you could make out a case for "depraved heart" murder (such as shooting into a crowd) but while it's not implausible that she was trying to commit suicide by hitting these other cars, unless she confesses it's going to be hard to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. There's no bright line where gross negligence become depraved heart. She was after all driving down the street and not charging into a crowd of pedestrians for example. What if she had been going 60 in a 40 zone? Is that depraved heart or just very negligent? 70?

    In CA, vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor at the discretion of the prosecutor. A felony conviction is punishable by probation with a county jail sentence of up to one year, or state prison for two, four, or six years, and a fine of up to $10,000. In other words she is looking at 6 years max, or maybe less if she has a clean record.

    I suppose it's possible that they will upgrade the charges as the evidence is revealed but that's how it stands now.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @James B. Shearer, @Anonymous, @David In TN

    Murder generally requires some level of intent.

    Derek Chauvin didn’t intend to kill George Floyd.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    He didn't kill "George Floyd." The mannikins they put on the gurney looked different and , was shorter. This has been covered in many venues. And no, it's not conspiracy theory, it was observation.

  145. @Libre
    This is the same load of garbage Steve keeps trying to push. No, it's not the lack of terrorism and piracy on the roads. You can even see before George Floyd, black deaths were rising. The lockdowns and vaccines are what's causing this, and nothing else. There's literally zero evidence that armed gangsters harassing drivers does anything to make people drive safer. In fact, my experience shows the opposite. The gangsters drive recklessly and provoke fear and erratic driving.

    Steve have you had your 5th booster yet?

    Replies: @anon

    The lockdowns and vaccines are what’s causing this, and nothing else.

    Blacks have one of the lowest rates of vaccination and of lockdown observance of any group.

  146. @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    That was fucking nuts. Stuck throttle?

    Replies: @Cortes

    Thanks.

    That’s what came to my mind. Many years ago I had a near-thing when the hook on the throttle control spring on the ancient Citroen 2CV snapped off as I tried to brake for a signposted roadworks contraflow. As the lane switch approached scarily fast, I spotted a lay-by (rest/parking area) and managed to swerve in and bring the car to a halt with the engine going crazy. That 2CV had a top speed of 72mph. In a more powerful vehicle I doubt if I could have controlled the car. The whole episode lasted perhaps 20-25 seconds.

  147. LA Times, 08/08/22 – Mercedes driver charged with murder in crash that killed 5 in Windsor Hills

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2022-08-08/mercedes-driver-charged-with-murder-in-windsor-hills-crash

    o get a second-degree murder conviction, prosecutors must prove she acted with implied malice and knew the act of driving at a high speed on city streets was dangerous to human life…

    investigators found she has a history of dangerous crashes and knew the threat posed by her driving behavior, prosecutors said…

    California Highway Patrol investigators identified 13 prior crashes involving Linton. Those incidents are the foundation for the district attorney’s case that she knew the dangers of reckless driving…

    The five counts of vehicular manslaughter against her are for the deaths of the four adults and the baby, who was about two weeks shy of 1 year old. Ryan’s unborn child cannot be included in those charges…

    Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Natalie Stone denied her bail, which previously had been set at \$9 million, at the request of the district attorney’s office, which said she is a flight risk. Linton’s permanent address is in Texas, and she’s currently renting a room in Los Angeles as a traveling nurse. She was set to travel to Hawaii for work…

    Attorney Halim Dhanidina asked the court to continue Linton’s arraignment to October because he is reviewing her out-of-state history of “documented profound mental health issues.”…

    She looks crazy in the courtroom picture.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @E. Rekshun

    She was shedding tears, which were, I expect, for herself, not the victims.

    I would like to know her excuse for running a red light at 100 mph.

  148. @epebble
    While on the topic of livability in cities, Economist published the 10 best and worst cities to live in.

    10 best places to live

    1. Vienna, Austria
    2. Copenhagen, Denmark
    3. Zurich, Switzerland
    4. Calgary, Canada
    5. Vancouver, Canada
    6. Geneva, Switzerland
    7. Frankfurt, Germany
    8. Toronto, Canada
    9. Amsterdam, Netherlands
    10. Osaka, Japan and Melbourne, Australia (tie)

    The 10 worst places to live

    1. Tehran, Iran
    2. Douala, Cameroon
    3. Harare, Zimbabwe
    4. Dhaka, Bangladesh
    5. Port Moresby, PNG
    6. Karachi, Pakistan
    7. Algiers, Algeria
    8. Tripoli, Libya
    9. Lagos, Nigeria
    10. Damascus, Syria

    Replies: @smetana

    Given a Zurich salary that afforded you a small efficiency apartment, you have to consider whether Damascus or Lagos wouldn’t be a hoot and a half with the same francs changed to local money. If you measured satisfaction in girly action, e.g.

  149. @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    She has been arrested and accused of "vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence".

    Murder generally requires some level of intent. I guess you could make out a case for "depraved heart" murder (such as shooting into a crowd) but while it's not implausible that she was trying to commit suicide by hitting these other cars, unless she confesses it's going to be hard to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. There's no bright line where gross negligence become depraved heart. She was after all driving down the street and not charging into a crowd of pedestrians for example. What if she had been going 60 in a 40 zone? Is that depraved heart or just very negligent? 70?

    In CA, vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence can be charged as either a felony or a misdemeanor at the discretion of the prosecutor. A felony conviction is punishable by probation with a county jail sentence of up to one year, or state prison for two, four, or six years, and a fine of up to $10,000. In other words she is looking at 6 years max, or maybe less if she has a clean record.

    I suppose it's possible that they will upgrade the charges as the evidence is revealed but that's how it stands now.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @James B. Shearer, @Anonymous, @David In TN

    Perhaps surprisingly, they’ve charged her with six murder counts.

  150. @E. Rekshun
    LA Times, 08/08/22 - Mercedes driver charged with murder in crash that killed 5 in Windsor Hills

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2022-08-08/mercedes-driver-charged-with-murder-in-windsor-hills-crash

    ...


    o get a second-degree murder conviction, prosecutors must prove she acted with implied malice and knew the act of driving at a high speed on city streets was dangerous to human life...

    investigators found she has a history of dangerous crashes and knew the threat posed by her driving behavior, prosecutors said...

    California Highway Patrol investigators identified 13 prior crashes involving Linton. Those incidents are the foundation for the district attorney’s case that she knew the dangers of reckless driving...

    The five counts of vehicular manslaughter against her are for the deaths of the four adults and the baby, who was about two weeks shy of 1 year old. Ryan’s unborn child cannot be included in those charges...

    Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Natalie Stone denied her bail, which previously had been set at $9 million, at the request of the district attorney’s office, which said she is a flight risk. Linton’s permanent address is in Texas, and she’s currently renting a room in Los Angeles as a traveling nurse. She was set to travel to Hawaii for work...

    Attorney Halim Dhanidina asked the court to continue Linton’s arraignment to October because he is reviewing her out-of-state history of “documented profound mental health issues.”...
     

    She looks crazy in the courtroom picture.

    Replies: @David In TN

    She was shedding tears, which were, I expect, for herself, not the victims.

    I would like to know her excuse for running a red light at 100 mph.

  151. @Joe Sweet
    @Rob McX

    Suicide attempt is plausible. Perhaps she lost her mind, wracked with guilt for her complicity in Operation Covid, the greatest crime against humanity ever perpetrated.

    Or...

    Maybe she was going to blow the whistle on Big Pharma criminality and she got Micheal Hastings-ed in that totally hackable Mercedes.

    Replies: @anon

    Hey, Paul Walker was “accidentally” killed in such a way. I doubt she was going to put herself on the line for the covid hoax though. Just a hunch.

  152. @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    Murder generally requires some level of intent.
     
    Derek Chauvin didn’t intend to kill George Floyd.

    Replies: @anon

    He didn’t kill “George Floyd.” The mannikins they put on the gurney looked different and , was shorter. This has been covered in many venues. And no, it’s not conspiracy theory, it was observation.

    • Agree: Jim Christian

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