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From Bloomberg News:

Crops Rot While Trump-Led Immigration Backlash Idles Farm Work
Alan Bjerga
June 6, 2016 — 4:00 PM

Fresh produce harvests limited while migrant debate languishes
Secure-border solution may send fruits, vegetables to Mexico

The death of meaningful U.S. immigration reform, done in by Washington partisanship and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s incendiary comments on foreigners, is leaving crops withering in the field and the farm lobby with nowhere to turn as a labor shortage intensifies.

Carlos Castaneda watched one-quarter of his Napa cabbages rot in three California fields this spring as 37 immigrant laborers scheduled to arrive March 13 under a farmworker visa program were delayed by bureaucratic paperwork.

I first wrote about why Crop Rot Fever is an evergreen media assignment back in 2006.

Here are the worst unemployment rates in the U.S. at present, which seem to be largely farming areas in California that have imported generations of stoop labor:

Screenshot 2016-06-07 23.11.03

In contrast, the lowest unemployment rate at the moment is in Ames, Iowa (2.0%), where a different agriculture productivity model prevailed.

 
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  1. Of course Trump’s to blame. He’s got the best foreign workers (replacing Americans) in Mar-a-Lago and anywhere else he needs them. Who wouldn’t rather wait tables than pick cabbages.

    Hopefully his new teleprompters will clear everything up.

    • Replies: @Difference maker
    You've evaded it and danced around it, but time to go on the ignore list
    , @Jim Christian
    For that matter who wouldn't rather shovel sand into the traps or mow the grass of the greens and fairways...Just sayin'.
  2. You’ve also got the fish rotting in barrels for lack of Sailers to shoot them. There are some jobs our esteemed corps of journalists just won’t do.

  3. Carlos Castaneda? Mr Alan Bjerga seems to be taking a page from the late author of Hispano-spiritual fiction, Carlos Castaneda. Is there really a cabbage farmer named Carlos Castaneda? Does it matter? What is truth anyway? It’s the narrative that matters, apparently.

    • Replies: @5371
    It's a tell. His next piece will feature quotes from a grape grower called Rigoberta Menchú.
    , @Mark Eugenikos
    Carlos Castaneda is supposed to be peyote farmer, not cabbage farmer. I'd expect his two main farm hands to be Don Juan and Don Genaro.
  4. Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

    And let my neighbor’s grass grow, no longer cut by truckloads of Mexicans, until he decides to get off his butt and do his own yard work or hire an American teenager.

    Gee, what’s next, no more cheap, plastic, Chinese crap to buy at Walmart?

    Oh the humanity!

    BTW we all know “rotting crops” are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant, and this country has more food than it knows what to do with (thank God).

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    Americans haven't forgotten how to work. They just like to be paid more than this asshole is willing (or able) to shell out.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome


    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

     

    The problem is that Mexico sends us their laziest workers and keeps the hard-working ones at home. In Mexico, workers earn less than one-fourth what American workers earn. The hard-working ones stay put and work at those low wages (may our Ford bless their hard-working souls). The ones that immigrate are the lazy ones seeking our higher wages and easier working conditions.
    , @Threecranes
    "BTW we all know “rotting crops” are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant"

    This, people, is the Truth.

    Back when I was a small scale farmer I would, while walking the dog, see mountains of harvested potatoes left to rot.
    , @Frau Katze
    Maybe a new higher minimum wage would help. Americans might pick crops for $15/hour. If the law was enforced everywhere and included farm workers, it might alter things.

    True, the price of food would increase, but food is quite cheap now, from a historical point of view.

    Just a thought.
  5. @Buzz Mohawk
    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

    And let my neighbor's grass grow, no longer cut by truckloads of Mexicans, until he decides to get off his butt and do his own yard work or hire an American teenager.

    Gee, what's next, no more cheap, plastic, Chinese crap to buy at Walmart?

    Oh the humanity!

    BTW we all know "rotting crops" are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant, and this country has more food than it knows what to do with (thank God).

    Americans haven’t forgotten how to work. They just like to be paid more than this asshole is willing (or able) to shell out.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Americans haven’t forgotten how to work. They just like to be paid more than this asshole is willing (or able) to shell out.

     

    Good point.

    Importation of cheap labor and exportation of jobs have combined to force American workers to compete with the desperate, impoverished, unfree billions of the world. This is the real destruction of our nation and our people that the current election is about.
    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    Let's not forget that original coalition of the fringes that included Southern congressmen who got ag work exempted from labor laws in the first place. I can picture a surrealist Mexican mural with a segregationist Senator like Theodore Bilbo or Jim Eastland sitting around a table with Jorge Ramos, Mark Zuckerberg, and Thomas Friedman laughing while a dismayed Cesar Chavez and Barbara Jordan stand off to the side looking at the horror of it all.
    , @wrd9
    It's always been disgusting that the left professes to advocate for illegal immigrants who work in agriculture (or other backbreaking jobs) yet they allow them to work under slave conditions in order to use them as examples for why the US needs illegals. Had they advocated for totally humane working conditions and wages then Americans would do those jobs and the need for illegals would disappear. But, true to their despicable and hypocritical nature, the left continues to support inequality and encourage racial animus so that they can continue their gravy train.

    The book, "Tomatoland", describes the modern day slavery in some areas of agriculture in Florida.

    "But over the past 15 years, Florida law enforcement officers have freed more than 1,000 men and women who were held against their will and forced to work in the fields. "

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/barry-estabrooks-tomatoland-an-indictment-of-modern-agriculture/2011/04/11/AGei5rOH_story.html

    Meatpacking used to pay well with decent working conditions in the 1980s, now they have low paid illegals working under dangerous conditions.
  6. How many click-bait writers read iSteve just for ideas for evergreen hack articles?

  7. Wasn’t ‘Carlos Casteneda’ a character in a really terrible novel written in the 1970s?

    • Replies: @Trelane
    Or was that the author? Carlos Casteneda wrote, sort of, several books that had no redeeming value and had their corners cut off in the bargain bin.
    , @Hubbub
    Ha! Read too quickly. I had at first thought you wrote 'Carlos's Castanets', referring to the man's man-fruit.
    , @The Plutonium Kid
    Carlos Castaneda was an author. Like Alex Haley's "Roots," his books (such as "The Teaching of Don Juan" and others) are fiction passed off as non-fiction. Though he has a PhD in anthropology, his writings are not taken seriously by scientists.
  8. @Stephen R. Diamond
    Americans haven't forgotten how to work. They just like to be paid more than this asshole is willing (or able) to shell out.

    Americans haven’t forgotten how to work. They just like to be paid more than this asshole is willing (or able) to shell out.

    Good point.

    Importation of cheap labor and exportation of jobs have combined to force American workers to compete with the desperate, impoverished, unfree billions of the world. This is the real destruction of our nation and our people that the current election is about.

  9. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    There seems to be government-sponsored neo-Luditism going around.

    “Farms Fund Robots to Replace Migrant Fruit Pickers”, Wired, Eliza Strickland, 21-Jun-2007:

    “…But it wasn’t just technological challenges that held back previous attempts at building a mechanical harvester –- politics got involved, too.

    …Chavez was outraged that the federal government was funding research and development on agricultural machines, but not spending any money to aid the farm workers who would be displaced.”

    “Alternatives to Immigrant Labor?”, Yoav Sarig, James F. Thompson, Galen K. Brown, Center for Immigration Studies, December 2000:

    “…Harvest labor productivity must be greatly increased so that production costs can decrease and worker income can increase. This is a key factor that the U.S. Government has been neglecting since 1979, when the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture of that time, Bob Bergland, stated, “I will not put federal money into any project that reduces the need for farm labor.” This policy supported an anti-mechanization movement that had brought a lawsuit against the University of California for using public funds to conduct mechanization research. The Court eventually dismissed all charges, except the need for a public interest representative on the project review committee. However, the Bergland policy has gradually ended the availability of public funding for research and development projects focused on reducing the cost and increasing the labor productivity for harvesting horticultural crops. Today, the USDA has only one poorly funded harvest mechanization project.”

    If they can make a self-driving car, do you think they can make a robot that can pick the crops in a field? Do you maybe suspect it’s even a bit easier, when all is said and done, because you are going to be operating the bot in conditions that are in many ways more controlled?

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "If they can make a self-driving car, do you think they can make a robot that can pick the crops in a field? Do you maybe suspect it’s even a bit easier, when all is said and done, because you are going to be operating the bot in conditions that are in many ways more controlled?"

    Artificial intelligence is the future of The United States, not Mexicans.

    That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol.

    MEXICANS, WE DON'T NEED NO STINKIN MEXICANS.
    , @Threecranes
    The issue of mechanization/stoop labor is a recurring theme in America.

    There is one school of historical thought that reasons that mechanization would have ultimately displaced negro field hands in the South and that the Civil War was unnecessary. Southern planters would have realized that maintaining human beings cost more than replacing them with machines and would have gradually adopted up to date technological innovations which would have jump started the virtuous feedback cycle of increasing demand, money for research and development, innovation and increased productivity, lowers prices, greater demand and so on.

    According to this argument then, the tragedy of the loss of life in the Civil War can be laid directly at the feet of Northern Abolitionists who, impatient of gradual reform, forced a violent resolution to a problem about which they knew little. Too, they can be blamed for the consequent degradation of life for both poor whites and blacks in the post Reconstruction South. Had the transition been allowed to proceed organically, then the fabric of social life in the South would not have been rent.

    This may or may not be true. Certainly, many planters would have been reluctant to adopt new ways.

    One thing is sure; free labor cannot compete with slave labor. Most immigrants to America during the first half of the 19th century settled in the (tariff protected) North because there were no good paying jobs for free whites in the South. This principle holds as well today as it did then. Thus, ironically, the supposedly liberal, open-border apologists such as Paul Krugman serve the interests of today's slave-holding class.

  10. Speaking of Rotten Crops; Yo Steve-O, why is it so hard for you to find the Great White Defendant? I find one every 3 days!

    It’s terrible the way the LIB-ur-UHLS railroaded this fine gentleman afflete into a 6 month sentence for rape!

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/%E2%80%98a-steep-price-to-pay-for-20-minutes-of-action-dad-defends-stanford-sex-offender/ar-BBtUZpE?ocid=ansmsnnews11

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    Damn, Troof, be cool!

    You keep spreading the white-girl idea that dry-humping and finger-fscking are "rape", and half the African "refugees" in Europe and most of the bruthas in America over age 12 are gonna be doing jail time.

    Whose side are you on?
    , @Tex
    Steve found him yesterday. Do try to keep up.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/finally-a-great-white-defendant-is-found/
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    If it were not for "LIB-ur-UHLS" Brock Turner would have swung from a yard arm by now. However, I do salute your channelling of your inner Joseph Goebbels in choosing your two monikers. You and Joey - soulmates forever.
  11. Interesting how Caesar Chavez didn’t seem to think that you needed an endless supply of illegal immigrants to pick the crops: http://spectator.org/59956_cesar-chavez-anti-immigration-his-union-core/

  12. @Trelane
    Wasn't 'Carlos Casteneda' a character in a really terrible novel written in the 1970s?

    Or was that the author? Carlos Casteneda wrote, sort of, several books that had no redeeming value and had their corners cut off in the bargain bin.

    • Replies: @rod1963
    Yep. The guy was a total BS artist. Near the end he had about a half-dozen female assistants with such names as "blue scout". After he croaked several apparently killed themselves.

    Also a group he created called Clear Green is still operation and peddling workshops.

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.
  13. Wow. We have 55 million Mexicans, who are 17% of the population, and the crops are still rotting for lack of farm laborers and we still need to import more.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    First Mexicans get in as fruitpickers "doing the jobs Americans won't do [for lousy, un-American wages]".

    Sadly, our Magic Dirt doesn't work. Once they set foot on our soil, they don't automagically get a PhD in biochemistry and start working at Johns Hopkins. Nor do their children. Nor do their children's children, or their children's children's children.

    Since Magic Dirt never fails to work (in the SJW mythos), their failure to instantly cast off their work gloves and don a lab coat can only be due to white oppression. We must then expend massive amounts of money to take care of them and "close the gap".

    SJWs honor Mexicans because they are noble, hardworking, and work cheap. Once they walk on the Magic Dirt and actually start working cheap, however, they automagically become poor and oppressed and the taxpayer must take care of them.

    Weird stuff. If you don't want poverty, stop importing poverty.
  14. @Georg E
    Carlos Castaneda? Mr Alan Bjerga seems to be taking a page from the late author of Hispano-spiritual fiction, Carlos Castaneda. Is there really a cabbage farmer named Carlos Castaneda? Does it matter? What is truth anyway? It's the narrative that matters, apparently.

    It’s a tell. His next piece will feature quotes from a grape grower called Rigoberta Menchú.

    • Replies: @anowow
    Or about Donald Quixote, owner of La Mancha farms, to get his crops in thanks to President Trump.
  15. @anonymous
    There seems to be government-sponsored neo-Luditism going around.


    "Farms Fund Robots to Replace Migrant Fruit Pickers", Wired, Eliza Strickland, 21-Jun-2007:


    "...But it wasn't just technological challenges that held back previous attempts at building a mechanical harvester –- politics got involved, too.

    ...Chavez was outraged that the federal government was funding research and development on agricultural machines, but not spending any money to aid the farm workers who would be displaced."

     

    "Alternatives to Immigrant Labor?", Yoav Sarig, James F. Thompson, Galen K. Brown, Center for Immigration Studies, December 2000:


    "...Harvest labor productivity must be greatly increased so that production costs can decrease and worker income can increase. This is a key factor that the U.S. Government has been neglecting since 1979, when the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture of that time, Bob Bergland, stated, “I will not put federal money into any project that reduces the need for farm labor.” This policy supported an anti-mechanization movement that had brought a lawsuit against the University of California for using public funds to conduct mechanization research. The Court eventually dismissed all charges, except the need for a public interest representative on the project review committee. However, the Bergland policy has gradually ended the availability of public funding for research and development projects focused on reducing the cost and increasing the labor productivity for harvesting horticultural crops. Today, the USDA has only one poorly funded harvest mechanization project."

     

    If they can make a self-driving car, do you think they can make a robot that can pick the crops in a field? Do you maybe suspect it's even a bit easier, when all is said and done, because you are going to be operating the bot in conditions that are in many ways more controlled?

    “If they can make a self-driving car, do you think they can make a robot that can pick the crops in a field? Do you maybe suspect it’s even a bit easier, when all is said and done, because you are going to be operating the bot in conditions that are in many ways more controlled?”

    Artificial intelligence is the future of The United States, not Mexicans.

    That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol.

    MEXICANS, WE DON’T NEED NO STINKIN MEXICANS.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Artificial intelligence is the future of The United States, not Mexicans.

    That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol.
     
    I bet George Lucas could make a killer remake of Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, set in some exoplanetary wilderness.
    , @uslabor
    "That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol"

    That's why it is science FICTION.
  16. Carlos Castaneda watched one-quarter of his Napa cabbages rot …

    But after he came down from the peyote he discovered they were still okay. It was just a typical psychedelic hallucination, nowhere near as fantastical as the idea that private citizen Donald Trump is already controlling immigration policy.

  17. @Georg E
    Carlos Castaneda? Mr Alan Bjerga seems to be taking a page from the late author of Hispano-spiritual fiction, Carlos Castaneda. Is there really a cabbage farmer named Carlos Castaneda? Does it matter? What is truth anyway? It's the narrative that matters, apparently.

    Carlos Castaneda is supposed to be peyote farmer, not cabbage farmer. I’d expect his two main farm hands to be Don Juan and Don Genaro.

  18. Crop Rot Fever

    That’s supposed to be set to the melody of Cat Scratch Fever, right? I wonder if anyone could get Ted Nugent to do a cover of his own song.

    • Replies: @Jacques Sheete
    Cheezuss!

    Sounds like a horrific case of Crotch Rot Fever to me!
  19. The BLS publishes unemployment rates by metro area 8 of the top 10 are agricultural areas in California another is Yuma AZ just over the the state line

    http://www.bls.gov/web/metro/laummtrk.htm

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks. I'll use that.
  20. @t
    The BLS publishes unemployment rates by metro area 8 of the top 10 are agricultural areas in California another is Yuma AZ just over the the state line

    http://www.bls.gov/web/metro/laummtrk.htm

    Thanks. I’ll use that.

  21. Ocean City, NJ uses J-1 Visas to bring in young Europeans instead of hiring locals over the summer.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    Likewise Wisconsin Dells, Cape Cod, and doubtless dozens of other touristy, amusement park areas.
    , @Paul Mendez
    The problem is that the tourist season starts before local schools let out, and goes on after school is back in session. Plus, American kids like to spend at least part of their summer vacation going on vacation with their families.

    Of course the Ocean City businesses could bring in high school dropouts from places like Baltimore and Camden instead of importing Eastern Europeans, right? They could live in group houses, work hard all day then stroll the boardwalk in the evening. I mean, that would be an option, wouldn't it?
  22. the Time magazine cover with Carlos Castaneda is from Mar. 5, 1973

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
  23. @Buzz Mohawk
    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

    And let my neighbor's grass grow, no longer cut by truckloads of Mexicans, until he decides to get off his butt and do his own yard work or hire an American teenager.

    Gee, what's next, no more cheap, plastic, Chinese crap to buy at Walmart?

    Oh the humanity!

    BTW we all know "rotting crops" are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant, and this country has more food than it knows what to do with (thank God).

    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

    The problem is that Mexico sends us their laziest workers and keeps the hard-working ones at home. In Mexico, workers earn less than one-fourth what American workers earn. The hard-working ones stay put and work at those low wages (may our Ford bless their hard-working souls). The ones that immigrate are the lazy ones seeking our higher wages and easier working conditions.

    • Replies: @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.
    , @Jack D
    That doesn't sound quite right. Whatever you say about illegal aliens, it takes a certain amount of cojones to leave your village, pay the smugglers, risk dying in the desert, etc.

    We used to have a large agricultural labor force in America for hundreds of years, even after the abolition of slavery - they were called Negroes. Then we put most of them on welfare. Not only did this pay better than farm labor, but they got out of the habit of doing menial labor. The women, especially, grew enormously obese due to generous food stamp benefits so they couldn't do manual labor anymore even if they wanted to, which they don't. If we hadn't spoiled our Negroes they would still be out there working, if their other choice was starving. So first, thru generous welfare benefits, we created one problem (lack of agricultural workers) and then created another problem (millions of aliens who will never make good Americans) to fix the first problem. This is like giving yourself malaria to cure your syphilis. Most Mexicans are fine hard working people (at least the first generation before they learn how to be low class Americans with all the bad habits that implies) but they should be fine people in Mexico, not here.
  24. @Trelane
    Or was that the author? Carlos Casteneda wrote, sort of, several books that had no redeeming value and had their corners cut off in the bargain bin.

    Yep. The guy was a total BS artist. Near the end he had about a half-dozen female assistants with such names as “blue scout”. After he croaked several apparently killed themselves.

    Also a group he created called Clear Green is still operation and peddling workshops.

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.
     

    Indeed, he was, at a time hippies were seen in number in this land—New Agers came later—and many of the rest of us were curious about what they had to say.

    Carlos Castaneda, who was in his mid-40s by the time Woodstock happened was a Ph.D. anthropologist from UCLA who wrote a number of books prosletyzing Shamanism and the "insights" provided by the peyote mushroom. His popular books detailed, in a phantastic narrative, his supposed experiences with shaman guides in the desert.

    I recall reading them c. 1972, and their contents were as transient in my mind then as the experiences they described. There was nothing there that Aldous Huxley hadn't reported a decade earlier in his slender volume, 'The Doors of Perception'. The books did sell in the many millions, though, which should be an indicator to younger readers of the peculiar zeitgeist of those times.

    You can sample them on Google books and elsewhere-they are mildly amusing to read and very lightweight. Maybe that was intentional, thinking about it. Reading it now, I wonder if Castaneda was pulling our leg.

    But back then, a lot of people took that stuff seriously, or at least pretended to.

    http://tinyurl.com/zztvys6

    http://www.prismagems.com/castaneda/donjuan3.html

  25. What Happened to the Wages of Mexican Immigrants? Trends and Interpretations

    Abstract

    Over the past several decades the wages earned by Mexican immigrants stagnated relative to those earned by native Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. In this article we draw on data from the decennial census and American Community Survey to understand why and how this stagnation occurred.

  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Economics is supposedly all about utility and efficiency.

    We keep hearing that California, or at least southern California has a critical water shortage, caused, ironically, by immigration driven population growth.
    Now, agriculture has privileged access to water resources – water resources which otherwise would go to domestic consumers. Doubtless, ‘auctioning off’ those water rights to household customers would produce greater revenue than the revenue which is produced by agriculture. Doubtless also that if a goodly portion of that agricultural land is developed for immigration driven housing, the revenue and value added accruing to that land is much greater than that which it could ever produce by agriculture.

    So, all those rabid free market types clamoring for unlimited immigration have got it exactly ass backwards. The economics of uncontrolled immigration kill any notion of rational agriculture in California.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Doubtless also that if a goodly portion of that agricultural land is developed for immigration driven housing, the revenue and value added accruing to that land is much greater than that which it could ever produce by agriculture.
     
    Have you ever been to California's Central Valley? It's not the nice California you see on TV, which is a helluva long drive away.
  27. @empty
    the Time magazine cover with Carlos Castaneda is from Mar. 5, 1973
    ...

    Thanks.

  28. @Anonymous
    Economics is supposedly all about utility and efficiency.

    We keep hearing that California, or at least southern California has a critical water shortage, caused, ironically, by immigration driven population growth.
    Now, agriculture has privileged access to water resources - water resources which otherwise would go to domestic consumers. Doubtless, 'auctioning off' those water rights to household customers would produce greater revenue than the revenue which is produced by agriculture. Doubtless also that if a goodly portion of that agricultural land is developed for immigration driven housing, the revenue and value added accruing to that land is much greater than that which it could ever produce by agriculture.

    So, all those rabid free market types clamoring for unlimited immigration have got it exactly ass backwards. The economics of uncontrolled immigration kill any notion of rational agriculture in California.

    Doubtless also that if a goodly portion of that agricultural land is developed for immigration driven housing, the revenue and value added accruing to that land is much greater than that which it could ever produce by agriculture.

    Have you ever been to California’s Central Valley? It’s not the nice California you see on TV, which is a helluva long drive away.

  29. @rod1963
    Yep. The guy was a total BS artist. Near the end he had about a half-dozen female assistants with such names as "blue scout". After he croaked several apparently killed themselves.

    Also a group he created called Clear Green is still operation and peddling workshops.

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.

    Indeed, he was, at a time hippies were seen in number in this land—New Agers came later—and many of the rest of us were curious about what they had to say.

    Carlos Castaneda, who was in his mid-40s by the time Woodstock happened was a Ph.D. anthropologist from UCLA who wrote a number of books prosletyzing Shamanism and the “insights” provided by the peyote mushroom. His popular books detailed, in a phantastic narrative, his supposed experiences with shaman guides in the desert.

    I recall reading them c. 1972, and their contents were as transient in my mind then as the experiences they described. There was nothing there that Aldous Huxley hadn’t reported a decade earlier in his slender volume, ‘The Doors of Perception’. The books did sell in the many millions, though, which should be an indicator to younger readers of the peculiar zeitgeist of those times.

    You can sample them on Google books and elsewhere-they are mildly amusing to read and very lightweight. Maybe that was intentional, thinking about it. Reading it now, I wonder if Castaneda was pulling our leg.

    But back then, a lot of people took that stuff seriously, or at least pretended to.

    http://tinyurl.com/zztvys6

    http://www.prismagems.com/castaneda/donjuan3.html

    • Replies: @G Pinfold
    The books sold in the millions?
    So the farmer may be CC Jr or CC III?
    , @kihowi
    How can anybody read druggie books? I can't imagine anything more boring. It's like people telling you their dreams. I'd rather go through Dan Brown's entire oeuvre in one sitting.
    , @SFG
    He apparently got three women to go off and live with him as acolytes, which shows that B.S. changes with the era but Game is timeless.
  30. In contrast, the lowest unemployment rate at the moment is in Ames, Iowa (2.0%), where a different agriculture productivity model prevailed.

    What agriculture productivity model? The economy of Ames is entirely derived from Iowa State University.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Ames is also within reasonable commuting distance to Des Moines, which is booming. Nevertheless, ISU is far and away the most important economic factor in Ames; I don't know about the Story County agricultural economy.
    , @TheJester
    Same for the economy in Manhattan, Kansas, based on Kansas State University. The university is booming ... the the local economy is booming. Indeed, Manhattan is a visible oasis in the midst of an otherwise barren state economy. Things are so good that locals relate that the 2008 financial collapse did not impact them.
    , @Big Bill
    ISU does agricultural equipment research, development and testing. Networking between vehicles, plant-level data gathering, new harvesting and planting equipment, efficient chemical application, row guidance, autonomous vehicles, etc.

    It does not do much work for specialty crops like vegetables, nuts and fruit. Mainly equipment for corn, soybeans and small grains.
    , @iSteveFan
    I think he was referring to the fact that farming in California is more along the lines of truck farming which requires more manual labor than the highly mechanized nature of farming row crops in the midwest.
  31. @PiltdownMan

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.
     

    Indeed, he was, at a time hippies were seen in number in this land—New Agers came later—and many of the rest of us were curious about what they had to say.

    Carlos Castaneda, who was in his mid-40s by the time Woodstock happened was a Ph.D. anthropologist from UCLA who wrote a number of books prosletyzing Shamanism and the "insights" provided by the peyote mushroom. His popular books detailed, in a phantastic narrative, his supposed experiences with shaman guides in the desert.

    I recall reading them c. 1972, and their contents were as transient in my mind then as the experiences they described. There was nothing there that Aldous Huxley hadn't reported a decade earlier in his slender volume, 'The Doors of Perception'. The books did sell in the many millions, though, which should be an indicator to younger readers of the peculiar zeitgeist of those times.

    You can sample them on Google books and elsewhere-they are mildly amusing to read and very lightweight. Maybe that was intentional, thinking about it. Reading it now, I wonder if Castaneda was pulling our leg.

    But back then, a lot of people took that stuff seriously, or at least pretended to.

    http://tinyurl.com/zztvys6

    http://www.prismagems.com/castaneda/donjuan3.html

    The books sold in the millions?
    So the farmer may be CC Jr or CC III?

  32. Trump causing dismal job growth…

    USA Today, 06/05/16 – Dismal jobs report blamed on weather, Trump, etc.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2016/06/04/dismal-jobs-report-blamed-weather-trump-and-more/85364144/

  33. @Twinkie

    In contrast, the lowest unemployment rate at the moment is in Ames, Iowa (2.0%), where a different agriculture productivity model prevailed.
     
    What agriculture productivity model? The economy of Ames is entirely derived from Iowa State University.

    Ames is also within reasonable commuting distance to Des Moines, which is booming. Nevertheless, ISU is far and away the most important economic factor in Ames; I don’t know about the Story County agricultural economy.

  34. What’s so special about farms? It isn’t about food security, which comes from grain whose production is highly mechanized.

    Why can’t textile mills import 3rd world labour so they can compete with Bangladesh? This actually happened in Lancashire and West Yorkshire in the 60s. The mills are gone but we’re saddled with the Pakistani population.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Shhhhhh, don't give them any ideas!

    That was American Apparel's corporate strategy, right?

    Los Angeles became a huge light manufacturing center in the 1980s by importing an illegal alien workforce to sew clothes together and the like. But is light manufacturing (i.e., low investment manufacturing) much good, except for the owners? I'm not sure, actually, because the disposability of the industry might be a strike in its favor in the long run. The current gentrification of the downtown L.A. has to do with the ease of pushing out low value added apparel businesses that really should go to the Third World.

    In contrast, Rust Belt towns with heavy industry remain Rust Belt towns with heavy industry for a very long time because the huge capital investment. Henry Ford's River Rouge factory, for example, is still in operation, although it appears that the original building was finally closed in 2004.

    , @Lurker
    Indeed, the UK's textile mills have largely disappeared yet we still have the vital Asian workforce who were going to save it. There are a few mills remaining however, I'd be fascinated to know whether any of them actually rely on Asian labour now.
  35. @jimmyriddle
    What's so special about farms? It isn't about food security, which comes from grain whose production is highly mechanized.

    Why can't textile mills import 3rd world labour so they can compete with Bangladesh? This actually happened in Lancashire and West Yorkshire in the 60s. The mills are gone but we're saddled with the Pakistani population.

    Shhhhhh, don’t give them any ideas!

    That was American Apparel’s corporate strategy, right?

    Los Angeles became a huge light manufacturing center in the 1980s by importing an illegal alien workforce to sew clothes together and the like. But is light manufacturing (i.e., low investment manufacturing) much good, except for the owners? I’m not sure, actually, because the disposability of the industry might be a strike in its favor in the long run. The current gentrification of the downtown L.A. has to do with the ease of pushing out low value added apparel businesses that really should go to the Third World.

    In contrast, Rust Belt towns with heavy industry remain Rust Belt towns with heavy industry for a very long time because the huge capital investment. Henry Ford’s River Rouge factory, for example, is still in operation, although it appears that the original building was finally closed in 2004.

    • Replies: @Steve from Detroit
    Steve,

    The Rouge Complex is a sight to behold, and the sheer breadth of it would awe most people. True vertical integration before anyone knew what an MBA was. I went there on a field trip in fourth grade and I can still vividly remember it.

    It survived WWII and the many recessions since. It's greatest feat, however, may be the fact that it survived the potentially ruinous environmental nonsense of Henry Ford's grandson, Bill Ford, Jr. The best thing that can be said for Bill is that he fired himself as CEO and hired Alan Mullaly.
  36. @anony-mouse
    Of course Trump's to blame. He's got the best foreign workers (replacing Americans) in Mar-a-Lago and anywhere else he needs them. Who wouldn't rather wait tables than pick cabbages.

    Hopefully his new teleprompters will clear everything up.

    You’ve evaded it and danced around it, but time to go on the ignore list

  37. @Hippopotamusdrome


    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

     

    The problem is that Mexico sends us their laziest workers and keeps the hard-working ones at home. In Mexico, workers earn less than one-fourth what American workers earn. The hard-working ones stay put and work at those low wages (may our Ford bless their hard-working souls). The ones that immigrate are the lazy ones seeking our higher wages and easier working conditions.

    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor … the especially disagreeable kind. I’ve hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn’t find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I’ve tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    • Replies: @william munney
    Of course, this is typical of many first generation immigrant groups. One of many examples: I grew up in a blue collar town that had an influx of Hungarians after the 56 uprising. My grandfather hired them and admired their work ethic. He was fond of telling me that he would send them into a hole or ditch to do plumbing work in the morning and have to kick them at dark to tell them the day was over. Stopping for a break, let alone lunch, was unheard of (come to think of it, maybe my grandfather was a dick, God bless him). They completely Americanized and their children were no different than the other working class folks around them (and they intermarried and everyone lost their distinct identity in a generation). It seems the same can't be said for Mexican immigrants....
    , @Anonymous
    More like 'micro slavery' than 'micro society'.

    Tell me, how well did that work out the last time it was tried?
    , @Jim Don Bob
    That is true of the first generation. The second generation shows all the hallmarks of the black underclass - drugs, early pregnancies, crime, etc.
    , @carol
    All those jobs are still done by local gringo kids in Missoula, Montana. For now.
    , @Big Bill

    They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour.
     
    "From a sense of justice" I would send you to prison for giving aid and comfort to illegal aliens in violation of Federal law. "From a sense of justice" I would also have you pay the continuing, eternal welfare costs for all of their 85 IQ offspring instead of dumping them on the American taxpayer.
    , @E. Rekshun
    Because I couldn’t find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I’ve tried.

    Me too. I recently had some big landscaping and exterior painting projects at my house. Three neighbors offered up their 13 y/o sons as paid help. All three had crappy attitudes and were tired and ready to go home w/i one hour. Nonetheless, I still paid them something like $15 per hour. Sometime after, I was desperate for some helpers and called on the parents on these three teens - each of them sheepishly replied that they're sons didn't want to work.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    But it's relative to the workers on the old country. They're getting paid multiples of what they're paid back home. The ones that migrate are just seeking the job where they will get paid the most. The ones that stayed behind work outdoors just as long a day, but at a fraction of the wages.
    , @Salger
    If Mexicans are so productive, then how is Mexico Mexico?
  38. @Twinkie

    In contrast, the lowest unemployment rate at the moment is in Ames, Iowa (2.0%), where a different agriculture productivity model prevailed.
     
    What agriculture productivity model? The economy of Ames is entirely derived from Iowa State University.

    Same for the economy in Manhattan, Kansas, based on Kansas State University. The university is booming … the the local economy is booming. Indeed, Manhattan is a visible oasis in the midst of an otherwise barren state economy. Things are so good that locals relate that the 2008 financial collapse did not impact them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In general, the middle of the US (which doesn't have much lumber or wood-working industry) has had a good 21st Century. In contrast, heavily forested North Carolina, which had a fine 1990s, was hammered by the housing bubble popped. I only realized that from looking at Chetty's county-by-county data.
    , @Bleuteaux
    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.
  39. I remember my father telling me about the odd jobs he took on the continent during the late 70s early 80s. He had two jobs that were essentially the same position in canning factories in Belgium and the Netherlands.

    The Belgium factory paid lower wages and had far fewer native workers as a result, it was also woefully backward technologically and hugely inefficient.

    The Dutch factory was like something from the future, your wages were higher, but there were fewer workers and far fewer immigrants. All kinds of high-tech machines and productivity was far greater. The vast pool of cheap, unskilled immigrant labour allowed Belgium manufacturers get away with not investing in the future, until they couldn’t catch up.

    Needless to say the Dutch manufacturing industry survived and innovated far better than the Belgium one.

    As the recent events from Brussels remind us, it might have been less high profile than the infamous guest worker programmes in the rest of Europe, but Belgium really went full-tilt for immigrant labour in the post-war years. I think we can all agree it worked really well.

    Afterall today all the best innovative and successful people want to go to live in Brussels…
    Meanwhile places like Denmark that managed to fend off immigration so successfully compared to the rest of Western Europe (Copenhagen is deeply unsettling in how surprisingly Danish the city is.) are just falling apart and Hipsters have no interest in them…

    The deep tragedy is given how beautiful Brussels is, it should be a jewel in the crown of Europe. I suppose the exact same was once said about Detroit or Chicago in the US.

  40. Don’t get it. There are cheap-ish machines, either standalone or bolt-on, for harvesting:
    Cabbages
    Sprouts
    Leeks
    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Onions
    Parsnips
    Beets
    Seeding, transplanting and cutting leaf salads
    Strawberries
    Beans
    Corn
    etc. etc.
    So why employ unhygienic, cantankerous primates? Who frankly aren’t physiologically and skeletally suited to this kind of drudgery. And can’t just be parked up in a shed all winter. Who pays for their downtime? Almost as bad as having horses, they have to be fed and given something to do.

    • Replies: @anon
    Yes, it's fascinating, isn't it? They sell flying machines that can be guided by satellites in space as toys, but apparently the only way to get fruit is to have someone pick it by hand.

    You'd think that, with our food sources so vulnerable to complete decimation every year, someone would work on that, but I guess not.
    , @Lurker
    There is also designing some of the work out of the equation. This guy grows dwarf fruit trees that don't grow above normal working height, so no ladders/machines needed. The trees are grown in mulch, so ripe apples fall to the ground undamaged, so no actual picking involved. Just picking up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8NUGG5IZpQ

    http://www.backtoedenfilm.com/news/tour-paul-gautschis-home-garden
    , @Jack D
    Grape picking for wine in California has been mechanized for quite some time now (right around the time the grape pickers were unionized - what a coincidence!) Lately they have been growing olives for olive oil in California (California olive oil is excellent - much better than the "Italian" olive oil which half the time isn't from Italy or maybe not even olive oil at all) and picking them using the same type of machines. The olive trees are planted and trimmed like hedges so that the grape picking machines can work on them.
  41. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    Of course, this is typical of many first generation immigrant groups. One of many examples: I grew up in a blue collar town that had an influx of Hungarians after the 56 uprising. My grandfather hired them and admired their work ethic. He was fond of telling me that he would send them into a hole or ditch to do plumbing work in the morning and have to kick them at dark to tell them the day was over. Stopping for a break, let alone lunch, was unheard of (come to think of it, maybe my grandfather was a dick, God bless him). They completely Americanized and their children were no different than the other working class folks around them (and they intermarried and everyone lost their distinct identity in a generation). It seems the same can’t be said for Mexican immigrants….

  42. @TheJester
    Same for the economy in Manhattan, Kansas, based on Kansas State University. The university is booming ... the the local economy is booming. Indeed, Manhattan is a visible oasis in the midst of an otherwise barren state economy. Things are so good that locals relate that the 2008 financial collapse did not impact them.

    In general, the middle of the US (which doesn’t have much lumber or wood-working industry) has had a good 21st Century. In contrast, heavily forested North Carolina, which had a fine 1990s, was hammered by the housing bubble popped. I only realized that from looking at Chetty’s county-by-county data.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's one of the differences between states that went for Trump (typically, have had a bad time since 2008) vs. Cruz (done reasonably well for themselves over the last 8 years).

    Warning: these things are cyclical and don't necessarily predict the future. (On the other hand, sometimes they do.)

  43. @Steve Sailer
    In general, the middle of the US (which doesn't have much lumber or wood-working industry) has had a good 21st Century. In contrast, heavily forested North Carolina, which had a fine 1990s, was hammered by the housing bubble popped. I only realized that from looking at Chetty's county-by-county data.

    It’s one of the differences between states that went for Trump (typically, have had a bad time since 2008) vs. Cruz (done reasonably well for themselves over the last 8 years).

    Warning: these things are cyclical and don’t necessarily predict the future. (On the other hand, sometimes they do.)

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Then the question remains will those traditionally GOP leaning Mt./Plains states that Cruz carried vote for Trump or for Hillary? After all, Hillary has been part of the Obama administration which helped produce the post-2008 Recession with all that magnificent booming prosperity for that part of the country. If the last five to six yrs are to be believed, large parts of the US have experienced unheard of prosperity. Hillary would do well to remind the voters that she too was part of Obama's administration and thus by inference, part of the prosperity for the Mt./Plains states as a whole. Of course she has decided to emphasize gun control.

    Does anyone know how gun control plays in TX; OK; KS; NE; and the rest of the Mt./Plains states? Are these big gun control states?

  44. There’s coal rotting in the mines, for lack of Welshmen to pick it.
    Trees rotting in the forest, too.

    • Replies: @Richard S
    Cute, but the coal and trees will still be there come winter..
  45. @PiltdownMan

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.
     

    Indeed, he was, at a time hippies were seen in number in this land—New Agers came later—and many of the rest of us were curious about what they had to say.

    Carlos Castaneda, who was in his mid-40s by the time Woodstock happened was a Ph.D. anthropologist from UCLA who wrote a number of books prosletyzing Shamanism and the "insights" provided by the peyote mushroom. His popular books detailed, in a phantastic narrative, his supposed experiences with shaman guides in the desert.

    I recall reading them c. 1972, and their contents were as transient in my mind then as the experiences they described. There was nothing there that Aldous Huxley hadn't reported a decade earlier in his slender volume, 'The Doors of Perception'. The books did sell in the many millions, though, which should be an indicator to younger readers of the peculiar zeitgeist of those times.

    You can sample them on Google books and elsewhere-they are mildly amusing to read and very lightweight. Maybe that was intentional, thinking about it. Reading it now, I wonder if Castaneda was pulling our leg.

    But back then, a lot of people took that stuff seriously, or at least pretended to.

    http://tinyurl.com/zztvys6

    http://www.prismagems.com/castaneda/donjuan3.html

    How can anybody read druggie books? I can’t imagine anything more boring. It’s like people telling you their dreams. I’d rather go through Dan Brown’s entire oeuvre in one sitting.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    How can anybody read druggie books? I can’t imagine anything more boring. It’s like people telling you their dreams.
     
    Yeah, and how can people sit still for movies? That crap never happened!
  46. @5371
    It's a tell. His next piece will feature quotes from a grape grower called Rigoberta Menchú.

    Or about Donald Quixote, owner of La Mancha farms, to get his crops in thanks to President Trump.

    • Replies: @SFG
    Too obvious--people would smell a rat.
  47. @PiltdownMan

    At his peak he was big with the hippies and new agers.
     

    Indeed, he was, at a time hippies were seen in number in this land—New Agers came later—and many of the rest of us were curious about what they had to say.

    Carlos Castaneda, who was in his mid-40s by the time Woodstock happened was a Ph.D. anthropologist from UCLA who wrote a number of books prosletyzing Shamanism and the "insights" provided by the peyote mushroom. His popular books detailed, in a phantastic narrative, his supposed experiences with shaman guides in the desert.

    I recall reading them c. 1972, and their contents were as transient in my mind then as the experiences they described. There was nothing there that Aldous Huxley hadn't reported a decade earlier in his slender volume, 'The Doors of Perception'. The books did sell in the many millions, though, which should be an indicator to younger readers of the peculiar zeitgeist of those times.

    You can sample them on Google books and elsewhere-they are mildly amusing to read and very lightweight. Maybe that was intentional, thinking about it. Reading it now, I wonder if Castaneda was pulling our leg.

    But back then, a lot of people took that stuff seriously, or at least pretended to.

    http://tinyurl.com/zztvys6

    http://www.prismagems.com/castaneda/donjuan3.html

    He apparently got three women to go off and live with him as acolytes, which shows that B.S. changes with the era but Game is timeless.

  48. @anowow
    Or about Donald Quixote, owner of La Mancha farms, to get his crops in thanks to President Trump.

    Too obvious–people would smell a rat.

  49. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    More like ‘micro slavery’ than ‘micro society’.

    Tell me, how well did that work out the last time it was tried?

  50. @TheJester
    Same for the economy in Manhattan, Kansas, based on Kansas State University. The university is booming ... the the local economy is booming. Indeed, Manhattan is a visible oasis in the midst of an otherwise barren state economy. Things are so good that locals relate that the 2008 financial collapse did not impact them.

    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    • Replies: @Gross Terry
    Madison is becoming a Chinese colony.

    That is another story of the last 8 years that respectable people are avoiding- how heavily Sinicized the modern university has become in the last decade.


    http://www.wsj.com/articles/heavy-recruitment-of-chinese-students-sows-discord-on-u-s-campuses-1458224413
    , @E. Rekshun
    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    Same with all the Florida public universities. The University of FL is in Gainesville, but has extended its reach with programs and facilities hundreds of miles away. I thik I've read of some state universities (perhaps NY and CA) setting up facilities in the Caribbean and Europe.
    , @Olorin
    Curious to hear your reflections on this.

    Has the CAMPUS exploded? Annexed surrounding land?

    Or just drawn billions for infill development of existing land on the isthmus and beyond it?

    University Ave. with all its towers looks nothing like it did even in the '90s, but looking at the Google map of the campus I'm not seeing any obviously new territory.

    Big Ten and Land Grant universities are basically encampments where private sector entities take advantage of public funding to create SJW paradises...that actually are the best examples of segregation and "wealth inequality" in the nation.

    They may not have billionaires, but the multiplier between the football coach's salary and the farm wives working part time in the administrative units is far larger than in cities of similar sizes where the wealth distributes around a middle class mean.

    As segregated enclaves run by big money, extracting cash from parental debt-streams (often quite distant ones), they become highly desirable places to live for whites, Asians, and Nigerians who want white-culture/Germanic places to live. (IME, the Arab princes usually go back to Saudi Arabia....) All one needs to do is obey the masters on what can and cannot be said, and bow down every time a DWL demands it.

    , @Brutusale
    One of the upsides of Massachusetts is the harem eunuch status of the UMass. It's a tough sell when you're the flagship institution and you're ranked 15th in the state.

    There are few votes to expand what's essentially looked at as mediocrity.
  51. Is this supposed to appeal to our instincts and cultural prohibitions against wasting food?

    Here in Europe nobody would buy this “rotting” argument, since producers have made a habit of dumping some of their crops in a pile in town squares as a protest when there is overproduction and prices are low.

    Instead of crops rotting, the stories usually have a human interest angle on the industrious migrants and intermittent laborers, with the farmer noting that it’s impossible to get local youths or that they have unrealistic expectations. No discussion on the economic and fiscal impacts, we are only to know that these people are better than us and we need them.

    • Replies: @snorlax

    Is this supposed to appeal to our instincts and cultural prohibitions against wasting food?
     
    Exactly; an argument that works especially well in America because it's one of the favorite rationalizations of our army of fatasses.
  52. @Buzz Mohawk
    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

    And let my neighbor's grass grow, no longer cut by truckloads of Mexicans, until he decides to get off his butt and do his own yard work or hire an American teenager.

    Gee, what's next, no more cheap, plastic, Chinese crap to buy at Walmart?

    Oh the humanity!

    BTW we all know "rotting crops" are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant, and this country has more food than it knows what to do with (thank God).

    “BTW we all know “rotting crops” are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant”

    This, people, is the Truth.

    Back when I was a small scale farmer I would, while walking the dog, see mountains of harvested potatoes left to rot.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    Our Catholic Church organizes crews of nice white church people to glean the fields of nearby farms and bring the unharvested crops back to give to the poor people. It's a win-win. The poor people get free food they don't have to work for, and the nice white church people get to be outside getting some exercise while feeling virtuous.
  53. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    That is true of the first generation. The second generation shows all the hallmarks of the black underclass – drugs, early pregnancies, crime, etc.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jim Bob, My Mom, now 98, tells about how she and her siblings rode the bus to pick beans in North Collins, NY for 8 cents a bushel. That was during the Great Depression. We, as a family, picked tomatoes, peppers, peaches, and pears for home canning. My children picked strawberries at the U-Pick-Farm just to eat and for a day's activity. I don't think my grandchildren have even visited a farm. Farm labor is hard and each succeeding generation moves further from manual labor. My five children, all college grads, three with Masters degrees, three licensed professionals, all have done better than me. They expect their children to do better than them...that's the real American way.
  54. @anonymous
    There seems to be government-sponsored neo-Luditism going around.


    "Farms Fund Robots to Replace Migrant Fruit Pickers", Wired, Eliza Strickland, 21-Jun-2007:


    "...But it wasn't just technological challenges that held back previous attempts at building a mechanical harvester –- politics got involved, too.

    ...Chavez was outraged that the federal government was funding research and development on agricultural machines, but not spending any money to aid the farm workers who would be displaced."

     

    "Alternatives to Immigrant Labor?", Yoav Sarig, James F. Thompson, Galen K. Brown, Center for Immigration Studies, December 2000:


    "...Harvest labor productivity must be greatly increased so that production costs can decrease and worker income can increase. This is a key factor that the U.S. Government has been neglecting since 1979, when the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture of that time, Bob Bergland, stated, “I will not put federal money into any project that reduces the need for farm labor.” This policy supported an anti-mechanization movement that had brought a lawsuit against the University of California for using public funds to conduct mechanization research. The Court eventually dismissed all charges, except the need for a public interest representative on the project review committee. However, the Bergland policy has gradually ended the availability of public funding for research and development projects focused on reducing the cost and increasing the labor productivity for harvesting horticultural crops. Today, the USDA has only one poorly funded harvest mechanization project."

     

    If they can make a self-driving car, do you think they can make a robot that can pick the crops in a field? Do you maybe suspect it's even a bit easier, when all is said and done, because you are going to be operating the bot in conditions that are in many ways more controlled?

    The issue of mechanization/stoop labor is a recurring theme in America.

    There is one school of historical thought that reasons that mechanization would have ultimately displaced negro field hands in the South and that the Civil War was unnecessary. Southern planters would have realized that maintaining human beings cost more than replacing them with machines and would have gradually adopted up to date technological innovations which would have jump started the virtuous feedback cycle of increasing demand, money for research and development, innovation and increased productivity, lowers prices, greater demand and so on.

    According to this argument then, the tragedy of the loss of life in the Civil War can be laid directly at the feet of Northern Abolitionists who, impatient of gradual reform, forced a violent resolution to a problem about which they knew little. Too, they can be blamed for the consequent degradation of life for both poor whites and blacks in the post Reconstruction South. Had the transition been allowed to proceed organically, then the fabric of social life in the South would not have been rent.

    This may or may not be true. Certainly, many planters would have been reluctant to adopt new ways.

    One thing is sure; free labor cannot compete with slave labor. Most immigrants to America during the first half of the 19th century settled in the (tariff protected) North because there were no good paying jobs for free whites in the South. This principle holds as well today as it did then. Thus, ironically, the supposedly liberal, open-border apologists such as Paul Krugman serve the interests of today’s slave-holding class.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    Plantation slavery largely died out in the Roman empire after the 4th century, and the former agriculture slaves morphed into (free) tenant farmers, albeit, without much leverage. Landowners made more, and steady, money charging rents to tenant farmers than through slave worked plantations. There was still urban slavery, but most urban slaves would not change their position with that of a free agriculturalist if given the chance.
  55. @Dave Pinsen
    Ocean City, NJ uses J-1 Visas to bring in young Europeans instead of hiring locals over the summer.

    Likewise Wisconsin Dells, Cape Cod, and doubtless dozens of other touristy, amusement park areas.

  56. I thought it said “cops rotting in the field”. What a disappointment.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    You may be thinking of this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Onion_Field

    Fortyish years ago and so far away from the current times.
  57. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Expletive Deleted
    Don't get it. There are cheap-ish machines, either standalone or bolt-on, for harvesting:
    Cabbages
    Sprouts
    Leeks
    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Onions
    Parsnips
    Beets
    Seeding, transplanting and cutting leaf salads
    Strawberries
    Beans
    Corn
    etc. etc.
    So why employ unhygienic, cantankerous primates? Who frankly aren't physiologically and skeletally suited to this kind of drudgery. And can't just be parked up in a shed all winter. Who pays for their downtime? Almost as bad as having horses, they have to be fed and given something to do.

    Yes, it’s fascinating, isn’t it? They sell flying machines that can be guided by satellites in space as toys, but apparently the only way to get fruit is to have someone pick it by hand.

    You’d think that, with our food sources so vulnerable to complete decimation every year, someone would work on that, but I guess not.

  58. And he’s not even President yet, and he’s causing crops to rot in the field. Though since he’s also re-building Auschwtiz brick by brick by hand personally in the basement of Trump Tower, I guess a few rotten grapes seems benign by comparison.

    Lost the URL, but as it turns out, these particular claims about CRITF are untrue.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "And he’s not even President yet, and he’s causing crops to rot in the field."

    Why doesn't the Left blame the current president we have right now in The White House fot the rotting crops? The Left is basically unintentionally saying that Barack Hussein Obama is a powerless empty suit. Donald Trump is not the current POTUS, so it is not his job to fix this mess.
  59. @Truth
    Speaking of Rotten Crops; Yo Steve-O, why is it so hard for you to find the Great White Defendant? I find one every 3 days!

    It's terrible the way the LIB-ur-UHLS railroaded this fine gentleman afflete into a 6 month sentence for rape!

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/%E2%80%98a-steep-price-to-pay-for-20-minutes-of-action-dad-defends-stanford-sex-offender/ar-BBtUZpE?ocid=ansmsnnews11

    Damn, Troof, be cool!

    You keep spreading the white-girl idea that dry-humping and finger-fscking are “rape”, and half the African “refugees” in Europe and most of the bruthas in America over age 12 are gonna be doing jail time.

    Whose side are you on?

  60. @Truth
    Speaking of Rotten Crops; Yo Steve-O, why is it so hard for you to find the Great White Defendant? I find one every 3 days!

    It's terrible the way the LIB-ur-UHLS railroaded this fine gentleman afflete into a 6 month sentence for rape!

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/%E2%80%98a-steep-price-to-pay-for-20-minutes-of-action-dad-defends-stanford-sex-offender/ar-BBtUZpE?ocid=ansmsnnews11

    Steve found him yesterday. Do try to keep up.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/finally-a-great-white-defendant-is-found/

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Be nice to Troofie! It takes him 2 hours to watch 60 Minutes.
  61. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    All those jobs are still done by local gringo kids in Missoula, Montana. For now.

  62. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour.

    “From a sense of justice” I would send you to prison for giving aid and comfort to illegal aliens in violation of Federal law. “From a sense of justice” I would also have you pay the continuing, eternal welfare costs for all of their 85 IQ offspring instead of dumping them on the American taxpayer.

  63. @Bleuteaux
    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    Madison is becoming a Chinese colony.

    That is another story of the last 8 years that respectable people are avoiding- how heavily Sinicized the modern university has become in the last decade.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/heavy-recruitment-of-chinese-students-sows-discord-on-u-s-campuses-1458224413

  64. @Hippopotamusdrome
    Wow. We have 55 million Mexicans, who are 17% of the population, and the crops are still rotting for lack of farm laborers and we still need to import more.

    First Mexicans get in as fruitpickers “doing the jobs Americans won’t do [for lousy, un-American wages]”.

    Sadly, our Magic Dirt doesn’t work. Once they set foot on our soil, they don’t automagically get a PhD in biochemistry and start working at Johns Hopkins. Nor do their children. Nor do their children’s children, or their children’s children’s children.

    Since Magic Dirt never fails to work (in the SJW mythos), their failure to instantly cast off their work gloves and don a lab coat can only be due to white oppression. We must then expend massive amounts of money to take care of them and “close the gap”.

    SJWs honor Mexicans because they are noble, hardworking, and work cheap. Once they walk on the Magic Dirt and actually start working cheap, however, they automagically become poor and oppressed and the taxpayer must take care of them.

    Weird stuff. If you don’t want poverty, stop importing poverty.

  65. Steve a few yrs back the Pew Center said only 3 percent of illegals.worked in agriculture – where are the other 97 percent?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Yes, we need to import a million Mexicans in order to have 30,000 who will pick lettuce.
  66. @Steve Sailer
    Shhhhhh, don't give them any ideas!

    That was American Apparel's corporate strategy, right?

    Los Angeles became a huge light manufacturing center in the 1980s by importing an illegal alien workforce to sew clothes together and the like. But is light manufacturing (i.e., low investment manufacturing) much good, except for the owners? I'm not sure, actually, because the disposability of the industry might be a strike in its favor in the long run. The current gentrification of the downtown L.A. has to do with the ease of pushing out low value added apparel businesses that really should go to the Third World.

    In contrast, Rust Belt towns with heavy industry remain Rust Belt towns with heavy industry for a very long time because the huge capital investment. Henry Ford's River Rouge factory, for example, is still in operation, although it appears that the original building was finally closed in 2004.

    Steve,

    The Rouge Complex is a sight to behold, and the sheer breadth of it would awe most people. True vertical integration before anyone knew what an MBA was. I went there on a field trip in fourth grade and I can still vividly remember it.

    It survived WWII and the many recessions since. It’s greatest feat, however, may be the fact that it survived the potentially ruinous environmental nonsense of Henry Ford’s grandson, Bill Ford, Jr. The best thing that can be said for Bill is that he fired himself as CEO and hired Alan Mullaly.

  67. @Twinkie

    In contrast, the lowest unemployment rate at the moment is in Ames, Iowa (2.0%), where a different agriculture productivity model prevailed.
     
    What agriculture productivity model? The economy of Ames is entirely derived from Iowa State University.

    ISU does agricultural equipment research, development and testing. Networking between vehicles, plant-level data gathering, new harvesting and planting equipment, efficient chemical application, row guidance, autonomous vehicles, etc.

    It does not do much work for specialty crops like vegetables, nuts and fruit. Mainly equipment for corn, soybeans and small grains.

  68. @Twinkie

    In contrast, the lowest unemployment rate at the moment is in Ames, Iowa (2.0%), where a different agriculture productivity model prevailed.
     
    What agriculture productivity model? The economy of Ames is entirely derived from Iowa State University.

    I think he was referring to the fact that farming in California is more along the lines of truck farming which requires more manual labor than the highly mechanized nature of farming row crops in the midwest.

  69. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    Because I couldn’t find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I’ve tried.

    Me too. I recently had some big landscaping and exterior painting projects at my house. Three neighbors offered up their 13 y/o sons as paid help. All three had crappy attitudes and were tired and ready to go home w/i one hour. Nonetheless, I still paid them something like $15 per hour. Sometime after, I was desperate for some helpers and called on the parents on these three teens – each of them sheepishly replied that they’re sons didn’t want to work.

    • Replies: @anowow
    So, all those kids working at McDonalds or Burger King are making $30 an hour or working under duress?
    , @unpc downunder
    Have you tried foreign backpackers? We use them in Australia and New Zealand for such jobs and they do a reasonably good job and there's less welfare hazard. Not only that but they spent most of their money locally, rather than send it to their relative overseas. The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash, but no doubt you get that sort of thing with illegal Mexicans anyway.
  70. @Bleuteaux
    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    Same with all the Florida public universities. The University of FL is in Gainesville, but has extended its reach with programs and facilities hundreds of miles away. I thik I’ve read of some state universities (perhaps NY and CA) setting up facilities in the Caribbean and Europe.

    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    I'm really surprised I haven't seen more stories or research along these lines.

    The contrast between rust belt cities and college towns is simply incredible. To stick with Wisconsin for a moment, there are industrial towns almost emptied of manufacturing where the downtown is a ghost town, and another couple dozen miles away a public university will cause its downtown to relatively thrive. Compare small towns of Fond du Lac to Oshkosh, for example.

    The difference is multiplied where you have the state capital in the same city as the major university. In the case of Wisconsin, *the* major university.

    There must be an easy 200 bars within one mile of either the Capitol Building or campus property. Thriving.
  71. In April, the unemployment rate (U3) in Napa was 4.4% (California was 6.3%).

    BTW, ever wonder why most of the tea we drink is imported from places like India, China, Thailand or Ceylon? I never understood the reason until a few years ago when I visited the Charleston Tea Plantation.
    The climate in the South Carolina Low Country is much like the parts of Asia where much tea is grown – hot and humid, with lots of rain. Small amounts of tea were cultivated there in the late 19th century, but eventually it died out. The problem was that tea leaves were picked by hand, cheap in Asia, not so cheap in the USA. Tea growing was revived in the 1980’s by the invention of an automated tea leaf picker. I watched this gem in operation and then tasted the tea, which was excellent.

    Maybe the California farmers could try the same thing.

  72. @Expletive Deleted
    Don't get it. There are cheap-ish machines, either standalone or bolt-on, for harvesting:
    Cabbages
    Sprouts
    Leeks
    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Onions
    Parsnips
    Beets
    Seeding, transplanting and cutting leaf salads
    Strawberries
    Beans
    Corn
    etc. etc.
    So why employ unhygienic, cantankerous primates? Who frankly aren't physiologically and skeletally suited to this kind of drudgery. And can't just be parked up in a shed all winter. Who pays for their downtime? Almost as bad as having horses, they have to be fed and given something to do.

    There is also designing some of the work out of the equation. This guy grows dwarf fruit trees that don’t grow above normal working height, so no ladders/machines needed. The trees are grown in mulch, so ripe apples fall to the ground undamaged, so no actual picking involved. Just picking up.

    http://www.backtoedenfilm.com/news/tour-paul-gautschis-home-garden

  73. Farms are 1% of GDP
    http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/chart-gallery/detail.aspx?chartId=40037

    It’s time for the US to accept that it’s a post-agrarian nation. We have no business competing with the third world in a contest over who has the cheapest farm hands.

  74. @jimmyriddle
    What's so special about farms? It isn't about food security, which comes from grain whose production is highly mechanized.

    Why can't textile mills import 3rd world labour so they can compete with Bangladesh? This actually happened in Lancashire and West Yorkshire in the 60s. The mills are gone but we're saddled with the Pakistani population.

    Indeed, the UK’s textile mills have largely disappeared yet we still have the vital Asian workforce who were going to save it. There are a few mills remaining however, I’d be fascinated to know whether any of them actually rely on Asian labour now.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Britain's remaining textile industry seems to be concentrated in the Scots borders producing exclusive brand woolens/knitwear.
    As far as I know its staffed by local Scots, always has been staffed by local Scots and is humming along well with a contented workforce.
    , @anon
    "still have the Asian work force"

    Just like Germany still has the Turks brought in right after ww2.

    There is nothing more permanent then temporary labor.
  75. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Of course, the rational ‘free market’ solution is import the fruits and veg from Mexico – utililizing Mexico’s comparative advantage, ie Mexicans, and let ‘market solutions’ look after the former farm land – this could mean anything from golf courses to residential development to ‘niche crops’.

    Funny how this sort of argument only applies to heavy industry, and never to stoop labor, where, arguably, the savings due to rationalization are much greater – think of the massive taxpayer funded externalities of ‘cheap’ Mexican labor.
    Adam Smith – eat your heart out.

  76. @Lurker
    Indeed, the UK's textile mills have largely disappeared yet we still have the vital Asian workforce who were going to save it. There are a few mills remaining however, I'd be fascinated to know whether any of them actually rely on Asian labour now.

    Britain’s remaining textile industry seems to be concentrated in the Scots borders producing exclusive brand woolens/knitwear.
    As far as I know its staffed by local Scots, always has been staffed by local Scots and is humming along well with a contented workforce.

  77. Sorry to hear Mike Judge has been dragooned into making Anti-Trump ads, but the point stands-

  78. Well if you’re a Mexican stoop laborer happily ensconced in some U.S. town, once you realize that you can get food stamps, housing assistance, free medical care, free school for your pudgy brats and countless other goodies, why bother going to work? Hell, you can do a few day jobs here and there for beer money.

    Now if — heaven forbid — we cut them off from ALL benefits of any kind, including kicking their brats out of the schools, you might have a sudden abundance of willing labor. Or a rapid return to what would now be an easier life in Mexico.

    It’s amazing how easy it is to solve problems when you’re not consumed with white guilt.

  79. anon • Disclaimer says:

    Another “crops rotting in the field” horror story from the Marxist media. You would think tens of millions of Americans were dying of starvation in a massive continent wide famine.

    In reality the farmers and higher ups in the agri-business are very tight fisted and just want cheap labour rather then pay a fair wage.

    Then again there is that clown McCain who says Americans won’t pick lettuce for fifty dollars an hour….

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    And my local strawberry grower charges me more per pound to pick my own strawberries than they cost at the local supermarket.
  80. @Esso
    Is this supposed to appeal to our instincts and cultural prohibitions against wasting food?

    Here in Europe nobody would buy this "rotting" argument, since producers have made a habit of dumping some of their crops in a pile in town squares as a protest when there is overproduction and prices are low.

    Instead of crops rotting, the stories usually have a human interest angle on the industrious migrants and intermittent laborers, with the farmer noting that it's impossible to get local youths or that they have unrealistic expectations. No discussion on the economic and fiscal impacts, we are only to know that these people are better than us and we need them.

    Is this supposed to appeal to our instincts and cultural prohibitions against wasting food?

    Exactly; an argument that works especially well in America because it’s one of the favorite rationalizations of our army of fatasses.

  81. Yep, because the average unemployed American is too dumb or too proud to pick produce ….

    I used to pick fruit as a kid … apparently we don’t do that any more.

    https://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/LNS11300012

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Picking fruit and other agricultural exchange activities are recommended to help ground people. The simple pleasures of eating something that you picked, and even better that you grew, should be experienced by humanity.

    Many special snowflakes and their extended families would benefit from some time spent away from electronic devices and in the fresh air where they are in touch with the tangible world.

    Of course, that would be spun by the media into a mandate for re-education camps.
  82. Won’t somebody think of the cabbages!

  83. @Hippopotamusdrome


    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

     

    The problem is that Mexico sends us their laziest workers and keeps the hard-working ones at home. In Mexico, workers earn less than one-fourth what American workers earn. The hard-working ones stay put and work at those low wages (may our Ford bless their hard-working souls). The ones that immigrate are the lazy ones seeking our higher wages and easier working conditions.

    That doesn’t sound quite right. Whatever you say about illegal aliens, it takes a certain amount of cojones to leave your village, pay the smugglers, risk dying in the desert, etc.

    We used to have a large agricultural labor force in America for hundreds of years, even after the abolition of slavery – they were called Negroes. Then we put most of them on welfare. Not only did this pay better than farm labor, but they got out of the habit of doing menial labor. The women, especially, grew enormously obese due to generous food stamp benefits so they couldn’t do manual labor anymore even if they wanted to, which they don’t. If we hadn’t spoiled our Negroes they would still be out there working, if their other choice was starving. So first, thru generous welfare benefits, we created one problem (lack of agricultural workers) and then created another problem (millions of aliens who will never make good Americans) to fix the first problem. This is like giving yourself malaria to cure your syphilis. Most Mexicans are fine hard working people (at least the first generation before they learn how to be low class Americans with all the bad habits that implies) but they should be fine people in Mexico, not here.

  84. @Expletive Deleted
    Don't get it. There are cheap-ish machines, either standalone or bolt-on, for harvesting:
    Cabbages
    Sprouts
    Leeks
    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Onions
    Parsnips
    Beets
    Seeding, transplanting and cutting leaf salads
    Strawberries
    Beans
    Corn
    etc. etc.
    So why employ unhygienic, cantankerous primates? Who frankly aren't physiologically and skeletally suited to this kind of drudgery. And can't just be parked up in a shed all winter. Who pays for their downtime? Almost as bad as having horses, they have to be fed and given something to do.

    Grape picking for wine in California has been mechanized for quite some time now (right around the time the grape pickers were unionized – what a coincidence!) Lately they have been growing olives for olive oil in California (California olive oil is excellent – much better than the “Italian” olive oil which half the time isn’t from Italy or maybe not even olive oil at all) and picking them using the same type of machines. The olive trees are planted and trimmed like hedges so that the grape picking machines can work on them.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    So then, why can't CA do the same thing and mechanize the harvesting of their other crops, namely, with lettuce, berries, etc? You can remove the middle men (stoop laborers) by not paying any humans any wages, period, and simply let the machines do the work.
  85. @Stephen R. Diamond
    Americans haven't forgotten how to work. They just like to be paid more than this asshole is willing (or able) to shell out.

    Let’s not forget that original coalition of the fringes that included Southern congressmen who got ag work exempted from labor laws in the first place. I can picture a surrealist Mexican mural with a segregationist Senator like Theodore Bilbo or Jim Eastland sitting around a table with Jorge Ramos, Mark Zuckerberg, and Thomas Friedman laughing while a dismayed Cesar Chavez and Barbara Jordan stand off to the side looking at the horror of it all.

  86. @E. Rekshun
    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    Same with all the Florida public universities. The University of FL is in Gainesville, but has extended its reach with programs and facilities hundreds of miles away. I thik I've read of some state universities (perhaps NY and CA) setting up facilities in the Caribbean and Europe.

    I’m really surprised I haven’t seen more stories or research along these lines.

    The contrast between rust belt cities and college towns is simply incredible. To stick with Wisconsin for a moment, there are industrial towns almost emptied of manufacturing where the downtown is a ghost town, and another couple dozen miles away a public university will cause its downtown to relatively thrive. Compare small towns of Fond du Lac to Oshkosh, for example.

    The difference is multiplied where you have the state capital in the same city as the major university. In the case of Wisconsin, *the* major university.

    There must be an easy 200 bars within one mile of either the Capitol Building or campus property. Thriving.

    • Agree: E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    It's called a "Bubble." A gigantic, Trillion-with-a-T Student Loan Bubble. Data on who holds the loans is completely opaque. Supposedly, a lot of it is parked on the Fed's balance sheet.

    This is pure Hayek-Austrian model: the "real" economy starves for capital and the "bubble" economy explodes. The longer this goes on, the greater the correction. The next one is going to be real ugly.
  87. @Expletive deleted
    There's coal rotting in the mines, for lack of Welshmen to pick it.
    Trees rotting in the forest, too.

    Cute, but the coal and trees will still be there come winter..

  88. Just remember, ladles and gendermen, the same Big Ag that runs our farms and regularly admits it lacks the managerial acumen to properly plan production levels and labor needs…

    …is also the Big Pharma and Big Insurance that wants to monetarize every phase, stage, and phenomenon of your embodied existence, and speculate on it.

    We can look fwd to headlines about old people rotting in the elder ghettos, because of the lack of braceros to water them.

  89. @E. Rekshun
    Because I couldn’t find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I’ve tried.

    Me too. I recently had some big landscaping and exterior painting projects at my house. Three neighbors offered up their 13 y/o sons as paid help. All three had crappy attitudes and were tired and ready to go home w/i one hour. Nonetheless, I still paid them something like $15 per hour. Sometime after, I was desperate for some helpers and called on the parents on these three teens - each of them sheepishly replied that they're sons didn't want to work.

    So, all those kids working at McDonalds or Burger King are making $30 an hour or working under duress?

  90. @Bleuteaux
    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    Curious to hear your reflections on this.

    Has the CAMPUS exploded? Annexed surrounding land?

    Or just drawn billions for infill development of existing land on the isthmus and beyond it?

    University Ave. with all its towers looks nothing like it did even in the ’90s, but looking at the Google map of the campus I’m not seeing any obviously new territory.

    Big Ten and Land Grant universities are basically encampments where private sector entities take advantage of public funding to create SJW paradises…that actually are the best examples of segregation and “wealth inequality” in the nation.

    They may not have billionaires, but the multiplier between the football coach’s salary and the farm wives working part time in the administrative units is far larger than in cities of similar sizes where the wealth distributes around a middle class mean.

    As segregated enclaves run by big money, extracting cash from parental debt-streams (often quite distant ones), they become highly desirable places to live for whites, Asians, and Nigerians who want white-culture/Germanic places to live. (IME, the Arab princes usually go back to Saudi Arabia….) All one needs to do is obey the masters on what can and cannot be said, and bow down every time a DWL demands it.

    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    Good question, probably the latter. I've only finished college (elsewhere in state) in the last 10 years. But I know that they are completing one new university building per year. Certainly all the businesses in the area are taking advantage of students and armies of administrators with pockets full of taxpayer subsidized student loan cash. New 10+ story apartment complexes on State Street. New condos all over the Capitol Square. It is simply paradise compared to the rest of the state.

    Really, anything in Dane County is benefiting. I drive through the area regularly (suburbs). You have your choice of several organic fair trade coffee shops in every suburb, along with wineries in most of them.

    Another world compared to the Sheboygans and Oak Creeks.

  91. @Trelane
    Wasn't 'Carlos Casteneda' a character in a really terrible novel written in the 1970s?

    Ha! Read too quickly. I had at first thought you wrote ‘Carlos’s Castanets’, referring to the man’s man-fruit.

  92. @Threecranes
    The issue of mechanization/stoop labor is a recurring theme in America.

    There is one school of historical thought that reasons that mechanization would have ultimately displaced negro field hands in the South and that the Civil War was unnecessary. Southern planters would have realized that maintaining human beings cost more than replacing them with machines and would have gradually adopted up to date technological innovations which would have jump started the virtuous feedback cycle of increasing demand, money for research and development, innovation and increased productivity, lowers prices, greater demand and so on.

    According to this argument then, the tragedy of the loss of life in the Civil War can be laid directly at the feet of Northern Abolitionists who, impatient of gradual reform, forced a violent resolution to a problem about which they knew little. Too, they can be blamed for the consequent degradation of life for both poor whites and blacks in the post Reconstruction South. Had the transition been allowed to proceed organically, then the fabric of social life in the South would not have been rent.

    This may or may not be true. Certainly, many planters would have been reluctant to adopt new ways.

    One thing is sure; free labor cannot compete with slave labor. Most immigrants to America during the first half of the 19th century settled in the (tariff protected) North because there were no good paying jobs for free whites in the South. This principle holds as well today as it did then. Thus, ironically, the supposedly liberal, open-border apologists such as Paul Krugman serve the interests of today's slave-holding class.

    Plantation slavery largely died out in the Roman empire after the 4th century, and the former agriculture slaves morphed into (free) tenant farmers, albeit, without much leverage. Landowners made more, and steady, money charging rents to tenant farmers than through slave worked plantations. There was still urban slavery, but most urban slaves would not change their position with that of a free agriculturalist if given the chance.

  93. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    But it’s relative to the workers on the old country. They’re getting paid multiples of what they’re paid back home. The ones that migrate are just seeking the job where they will get paid the most. The ones that stayed behind work outdoors just as long a day, but at a fraction of the wages.

  94. @Lurker
    Indeed, the UK's textile mills have largely disappeared yet we still have the vital Asian workforce who were going to save it. There are a few mills remaining however, I'd be fascinated to know whether any of them actually rely on Asian labour now.

    “still have the Asian work force”

    Just like Germany still has the Turks brought in right after ww2.

    There is nothing more permanent then temporary labor.

  95. @countenance
    And he's not even President yet, and he's causing crops to rot in the field. Though since he's also re-building Auschwtiz brick by brick by hand personally in the basement of Trump Tower, I guess a few rotten grapes seems benign by comparison.

    Lost the URL, but as it turns out, these particular claims about CRITF are untrue.

    “And he’s not even President yet, and he’s causing crops to rot in the field.”

    Why doesn’t the Left blame the current president we have right now in The White House fot the rotting crops? The Left is basically unintentionally saying that Barack Hussein Obama is a powerless empty suit. Donald Trump is not the current POTUS, so it is not his job to fix this mess.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Silly rabbit, Obama's problems are all George Bush's fault. Likewise, Trump will be held responsible for everything bad through the 2030s.
  96. @Jack D
    Grape picking for wine in California has been mechanized for quite some time now (right around the time the grape pickers were unionized - what a coincidence!) Lately they have been growing olives for olive oil in California (California olive oil is excellent - much better than the "Italian" olive oil which half the time isn't from Italy or maybe not even olive oil at all) and picking them using the same type of machines. The olive trees are planted and trimmed like hedges so that the grape picking machines can work on them.

    So then, why can’t CA do the same thing and mechanize the harvesting of their other crops, namely, with lettuce, berries, etc? You can remove the middle men (stoop laborers) by not paying any humans any wages, period, and simply let the machines do the work.

    • Replies: @International Jew

    You can remove the middle men (stoop laborers) by not paying any humans any wages, period, and simply let the machines do the work.
     
    It's not only a question of technological feasibility, but also of economics.

    Machines aren't free. They're not software, reproducible endlessly at zero marginal cost. For every kind of machine, there's a line: if the hourly wage is above that line, the machine is worth using, if the wage is lower, farmers will hire humans.

  97. @WorkingClass
    I thought it said "cops rotting in the field". What a disappointment.

    You may be thinking of this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Onion_Field

    Fortyish years ago and so far away from the current times.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    An excellent movie. Saw it when it first came out and then watched it again recently. Still holds up. James Woods' finest role.
  98. @Steve Sailer
    It's one of the differences between states that went for Trump (typically, have had a bad time since 2008) vs. Cruz (done reasonably well for themselves over the last 8 years).

    Warning: these things are cyclical and don't necessarily predict the future. (On the other hand, sometimes they do.)

    Then the question remains will those traditionally GOP leaning Mt./Plains states that Cruz carried vote for Trump or for Hillary? After all, Hillary has been part of the Obama administration which helped produce the post-2008 Recession with all that magnificent booming prosperity for that part of the country. If the last five to six yrs are to be believed, large parts of the US have experienced unheard of prosperity. Hillary would do well to remind the voters that she too was part of Obama’s administration and thus by inference, part of the prosperity for the Mt./Plains states as a whole. Of course she has decided to emphasize gun control.

    Does anyone know how gun control plays in TX; OK; KS; NE; and the rest of the Mt./Plains states? Are these big gun control states?

  99. Ivy says:
    @The Alarmist
    Yep, because the average unemployed American is too dumb or too proud to pick produce ....

    I used to pick fruit as a kid ... apparently we don't do that any more.

    https://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/LNS11300012

    Picking fruit and other agricultural exchange activities are recommended to help ground people. The simple pleasures of eating something that you picked, and even better that you grew, should be experienced by humanity.

    Many special snowflakes and their extended families would benefit from some time spent away from electronic devices and in the fresh air where they are in touch with the tangible world.

    Of course, that would be spun by the media into a mandate for re-education camps.

  100. @anon
    Another "crops rotting in the field" horror story from the Marxist media. You would think tens of millions of Americans were dying of starvation in a massive continent wide famine.

    In reality the farmers and higher ups in the agri-business are very tight fisted and just want cheap labour rather then pay a fair wage.

    Then again there is that clown McCain who says Americans won't pick lettuce for fifty dollars an hour....

    And my local strawberry grower charges me more per pound to pick my own strawberries than they cost at the local supermarket.

  101. @Ivy
    You may be thinking of this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Onion_Field

    Fortyish years ago and so far away from the current times.

    An excellent movie. Saw it when it first came out and then watched it again recently. Still holds up. James Woods’ finest role.

  102. @Dave Pinsen
    Ocean City, NJ uses J-1 Visas to bring in young Europeans instead of hiring locals over the summer.

    The problem is that the tourist season starts before local schools let out, and goes on after school is back in session. Plus, American kids like to spend at least part of their summer vacation going on vacation with their families.

    Of course the Ocean City businesses could bring in high school dropouts from places like Baltimore and Camden instead of importing Eastern Europeans, right? They could live in group houses, work hard all day then stroll the boardwalk in the evening. I mean, that would be an option, wouldn’t it?

  103. @Threecranes
    "BTW we all know “rotting crops” are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant"

    This, people, is the Truth.

    Back when I was a small scale farmer I would, while walking the dog, see mountains of harvested potatoes left to rot.

    Our Catholic Church organizes crews of nice white church people to glean the fields of nearby farms and bring the unharvested crops back to give to the poor people. It’s a win-win. The poor people get free food they don’t have to work for, and the nice white church people get to be outside getting some exercise while feeling virtuous.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Paul, It would be exponentially better if your fellow parishioners would organize work days at the farm and take the needy with them to glean the fields....."Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for a life time."
  104. @Jefferson
    "And he’s not even President yet, and he’s causing crops to rot in the field."

    Why doesn't the Left blame the current president we have right now in The White House fot the rotting crops? The Left is basically unintentionally saying that Barack Hussein Obama is a powerless empty suit. Donald Trump is not the current POTUS, so it is not his job to fix this mess.

    Silly rabbit, Obama’s problems are all George Bush’s fault. Likewise, Trump will be held responsible for everything bad through the 2030s.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Silly rabbit, Obama’s problems are all George Bush’s fault. Likewise, Trump will be held responsible for everything bad through the 2030s."

    Ronald Reagan is still blamed by the Left for the high incarceration rate of Dindu Nuffins, even though he has not been president in over 27 years.

    All of the Black males arrested under Barack Hussein Obama's watch is not his fault, nothing ever is according to the Left.

    10 years from now the Left will still blame Ronald Reagan for the school to prison pipeline for Obama's sons.
  105. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    So then, why can't CA do the same thing and mechanize the harvesting of their other crops, namely, with lettuce, berries, etc? You can remove the middle men (stoop laborers) by not paying any humans any wages, period, and simply let the machines do the work.

    You can remove the middle men (stoop laborers) by not paying any humans any wages, period, and simply let the machines do the work.

    It’s not only a question of technological feasibility, but also of economics.

    Machines aren’t free. They’re not software, reproducible endlessly at zero marginal cost. For every kind of machine, there’s a line: if the hourly wage is above that line, the machine is worth using, if the wage is lower, farmers will hire humans.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    Maybe they can like make an illegal machine to compete with the illegals.
  106. Cabbage is $0.47 a pound in my local grocery store. Clearly there is no shortage as a result of all these rotting cabbages.

  107. @Jim Don Bob
    That is true of the first generation. The second generation shows all the hallmarks of the black underclass - drugs, early pregnancies, crime, etc.

    Jim Bob, My Mom, now 98, tells about how she and her siblings rode the bus to pick beans in North Collins, NY for 8 cents a bushel. That was during the Great Depression. We, as a family, picked tomatoes, peppers, peaches, and pears for home canning. My children picked strawberries at the U-Pick-Farm just to eat and for a day’s activity. I don’t think my grandchildren have even visited a farm. Farm labor is hard and each succeeding generation moves further from manual labor. My five children, all college grads, three with Masters degrees, three licensed professionals, all have done better than me. They expect their children to do better than them…that’s the real American way.

  108. @Truth
    Speaking of Rotten Crops; Yo Steve-O, why is it so hard for you to find the Great White Defendant? I find one every 3 days!

    It's terrible the way the LIB-ur-UHLS railroaded this fine gentleman afflete into a 6 month sentence for rape!

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/%E2%80%98a-steep-price-to-pay-for-20-minutes-of-action-dad-defends-stanford-sex-offender/ar-BBtUZpE?ocid=ansmsnnews11

    If it were not for “LIB-ur-UHLS” Brock Turner would have swung from a yard arm by now. However, I do salute your channelling of your inner Joseph Goebbels in choosing your two monikers. You and Joey – soulmates forever.

  109. @Paul Mendez
    Our Catholic Church organizes crews of nice white church people to glean the fields of nearby farms and bring the unharvested crops back to give to the poor people. It's a win-win. The poor people get free food they don't have to work for, and the nice white church people get to be outside getting some exercise while feeling virtuous.

    Paul, It would be exponentially better if your fellow parishioners would organize work days at the farm and take the needy with them to glean the fields…..”Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for a life time.”

    • Replies: @Pericles
    But the needy already know how to eat for a lifetime.
  110. @Anonymous
    Steve a few yrs back the Pew Center said only 3 percent of illegals.worked in agriculture - where are the other 97 percent?

    Yes, we need to import a million Mexicans in order to have 30,000 who will pick lettuce.

  111. @Olorin
    Curious to hear your reflections on this.

    Has the CAMPUS exploded? Annexed surrounding land?

    Or just drawn billions for infill development of existing land on the isthmus and beyond it?

    University Ave. with all its towers looks nothing like it did even in the '90s, but looking at the Google map of the campus I'm not seeing any obviously new territory.

    Big Ten and Land Grant universities are basically encampments where private sector entities take advantage of public funding to create SJW paradises...that actually are the best examples of segregation and "wealth inequality" in the nation.

    They may not have billionaires, but the multiplier between the football coach's salary and the farm wives working part time in the administrative units is far larger than in cities of similar sizes where the wealth distributes around a middle class mean.

    As segregated enclaves run by big money, extracting cash from parental debt-streams (often quite distant ones), they become highly desirable places to live for whites, Asians, and Nigerians who want white-culture/Germanic places to live. (IME, the Arab princes usually go back to Saudi Arabia....) All one needs to do is obey the masters on what can and cannot be said, and bow down every time a DWL demands it.

    Good question, probably the latter. I’ve only finished college (elsewhere in state) in the last 10 years. But I know that they are completing one new university building per year. Certainly all the businesses in the area are taking advantage of students and armies of administrators with pockets full of taxpayer subsidized student loan cash. New 10+ story apartment complexes on State Street. New condos all over the Capitol Square. It is simply paradise compared to the rest of the state.

    Really, anything in Dane County is benefiting. I drive through the area regularly (suburbs). You have your choice of several organic fair trade coffee shops in every suburb, along with wineries in most of them.

    Another world compared to the Sheboygans and Oak Creeks.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    New 10+ story apartment complexes on State Street. New condos all over the Capitol Square. It is simply paradise compared to the rest of the state.
     
    I always thought it ironic that so much of the lakefront property in public-spirited, neosocialist Madison was in private hands. Compare that to the metro areas it's nestled between-- capitalist Chicago and corporate Minneapolis-St Paul.

    The former ensured that the limited lakefront acreage would forever be public property. The same is true in the Twin Cities, not with lakefront (with 17,000 of them, there's plenty for everyone), but with scarce Mississippi River frontage, nearly all of which is parkland.
  112. wrd9 says:
    @Stephen R. Diamond
    Americans haven't forgotten how to work. They just like to be paid more than this asshole is willing (or able) to shell out.

    It’s always been disgusting that the left professes to advocate for illegal immigrants who work in agriculture (or other backbreaking jobs) yet they allow them to work under slave conditions in order to use them as examples for why the US needs illegals. Had they advocated for totally humane working conditions and wages then Americans would do those jobs and the need for illegals would disappear. But, true to their despicable and hypocritical nature, the left continues to support inequality and encourage racial animus so that they can continue their gravy train.

    The book, “Tomatoland”, describes the modern day slavery in some areas of agriculture in Florida.

    “But over the past 15 years, Florida law enforcement officers have freed more than 1,000 men and women who were held against their will and forced to work in the fields. ”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/barry-estabrooks-tomatoland-an-indictment-of-modern-agriculture/2011/04/11/AGei5rOH_story.html

    Meatpacking used to pay well with decent working conditions in the 1980s, now they have low paid illegals working under dangerous conditions.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @woodNfish

    It’s always been disgusting that the left professes to advocate for illegal immigrants who work in agriculture (or other backbreaking jobs) yet they allow them to work under slave conditions in order to use them as examples for why the US needs illegals.
     
    Leftists, are by nature, hypocrites. Believe what they say at your own peril.
  113. @Bleuteaux
    Good question, probably the latter. I've only finished college (elsewhere in state) in the last 10 years. But I know that they are completing one new university building per year. Certainly all the businesses in the area are taking advantage of students and armies of administrators with pockets full of taxpayer subsidized student loan cash. New 10+ story apartment complexes on State Street. New condos all over the Capitol Square. It is simply paradise compared to the rest of the state.

    Really, anything in Dane County is benefiting. I drive through the area regularly (suburbs). You have your choice of several organic fair trade coffee shops in every suburb, along with wineries in most of them.

    Another world compared to the Sheboygans and Oak Creeks.

    New 10+ story apartment complexes on State Street. New condos all over the Capitol Square. It is simply paradise compared to the rest of the state.

    I always thought it ironic that so much of the lakefront property in public-spirited, neosocialist Madison was in private hands. Compare that to the metro areas it’s nestled between– capitalist Chicago and corporate Minneapolis-St Paul.

    The former ensured that the limited lakefront acreage would forever be public property. The same is true in the Twin Cities, not with lakefront (with 17,000 of them, there’s plenty for everyone), but with scarce Mississippi River frontage, nearly all of which is parkland.

  114. @Jefferson
    "If they can make a self-driving car, do you think they can make a robot that can pick the crops in a field? Do you maybe suspect it’s even a bit easier, when all is said and done, because you are going to be operating the bot in conditions that are in many ways more controlled?"

    Artificial intelligence is the future of The United States, not Mexicans.

    That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol.

    MEXICANS, WE DON'T NEED NO STINKIN MEXICANS.

    Artificial intelligence is the future of The United States, not Mexicans.

    That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol.

    I bet George Lucas could make a killer remake of Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, set in some exoplanetary wilderness.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    Bring Me the Operating System of Alfredo Garcia V1.0
  115. @Buzz Mohawk
    Good. Let the crops rot until Americans learn how to work again.

    And let my neighbor's grass grow, no longer cut by truckloads of Mexicans, until he decides to get off his butt and do his own yard work or hire an American teenager.

    Gee, what's next, no more cheap, plastic, Chinese crap to buy at Walmart?

    Oh the humanity!

    BTW we all know "rotting crops" are a normal part of farming and seldom the tragedy the press make them out to be. Farmers routinely over plant, and this country has more food than it knows what to do with (thank God).

    Maybe a new higher minimum wage would help. Americans might pick crops for $15/hour. If the law was enforced everywhere and included farm workers, it might alter things.

    True, the price of food would increase, but food is quite cheap now, from a historical point of view.

    Just a thought.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    The solution is getting rid of food stamps, which both artificially increase the demand for food and lower the amount of farm labor available.

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2016/05/17/us/BYSTANDERSNWK1/BYSTANDERSNWK1-jumbo.jpg

    Jumbo indeed.

    You can't have people starve, so they should dole out a pre-planned healthy and inexpensive diet with the correct # of calories -greens, grits, etc.

    Minimum wages are stupid because by setting a floor on the price of labor, anyone whose productivity is less than that can't make any money at all and has to be supported by the taxpayers. While Ms. Jumbo is in the process of losing weight, she might only be able to add say $10/hr worth of value to a farm employer so he would rather let the cabbages rot in the field than pay her $15.

  116. it’s too bad you don’t tag your posts. i remember reading close to 5 posts of yours like this over the years but they are not very easy to find.

  117. @E. Rekshun
    Because I couldn’t find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I’ve tried.

    Me too. I recently had some big landscaping and exterior painting projects at my house. Three neighbors offered up their 13 y/o sons as paid help. All three had crappy attitudes and were tired and ready to go home w/i one hour. Nonetheless, I still paid them something like $15 per hour. Sometime after, I was desperate for some helpers and called on the parents on these three teens - each of them sheepishly replied that they're sons didn't want to work.

    Have you tried foreign backpackers? We use them in Australia and New Zealand for such jobs and they do a reasonably good job and there’s less welfare hazard. Not only that but they spent most of their money locally, rather than send it to their relative overseas. The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash, but no doubt you get that sort of thing with illegal Mexicans anyway.

    • Replies: @Lurker

    The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash
     
    And not even that if they're Brits.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash, but no doubt you get that sort of thing with illegal Mexicans anyway.
     
    They don't drive on the wrong side of the road. They drive on the wrong side of the border.
  118. @TheJester
    I disagree. Hippopotamusdrome, have you ever hired Mexican labor? They are the hardest working people I have ever known. Manual labor ... the especially disagreeable kind. I've hired them on a number of occasions in California, Oklahoma, and Virginia when bringing in a new house and desperate for help moving and/or landscaping. One in particular was a extraordinary case. He dug trenches where I found it hard to break the ground, and I would have to direct him to take breaks. They work so hard that from a sense of justice I generally pay them $20/hour. Why Mexican labor? Because I couldn't find an American teenager who would take out the trash for less than $20/hour. I've tried.

    In short, since the turn of the century, the landscaping, ditch digging, road work, construction, roofing, commercial moving, and fast food work in Northern Virginia have been primarily done by Hispanic labor. It would be hard to imagine how this micro-society could manage without them.

    BTW: The above has nothing to do with arguments for or against Hispanic immigration. These are comments about how hard they work.

    If Mexicans are so productive, then how is Mexico Mexico?

    • Replies: @uslabor
    "If Mexicans are so productive, then how is Mexico Mexico?"

    Because of its neighbor to the north.

    Why are we slamming Mexicans? Everybody commenting on this blog, except the millionaires, has more in common with Mexican workers than they do with billionaire Americans; like Donald Trump for example. The very wealthy are setting workers against workers other to divide,conquer, and rule us. The government starts wars to benefit the very few and they use our children as cannon fodder.
  119. @International Jew
    Silly rabbit, Obama's problems are all George Bush's fault. Likewise, Trump will be held responsible for everything bad through the 2030s.

    “Silly rabbit, Obama’s problems are all George Bush’s fault. Likewise, Trump will be held responsible for everything bad through the 2030s.”

    Ronald Reagan is still blamed by the Left for the high incarceration rate of Dindu Nuffins, even though he has not been president in over 27 years.

    All of the Black males arrested under Barack Hussein Obama’s watch is not his fault, nothing ever is according to the Left.

    10 years from now the Left will still blame Ronald Reagan for the school to prison pipeline for Obama’s sons.

  120. @Reg Cæsar

    Artificial intelligence is the future of The United States, not Mexicans.

    That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol.
     
    I bet George Lucas could make a killer remake of Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, set in some exoplanetary wilderness.

    Bring Me the Operating System of Alfredo Garcia V1.0

  121. @unpc downunder
    Have you tried foreign backpackers? We use them in Australia and New Zealand for such jobs and they do a reasonably good job and there's less welfare hazard. Not only that but they spent most of their money locally, rather than send it to their relative overseas. The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash, but no doubt you get that sort of thing with illegal Mexicans anyway.

    The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash

    And not even that if they’re Brits.

  122. @International Jew

    You can remove the middle men (stoop laborers) by not paying any humans any wages, period, and simply let the machines do the work.
     
    It's not only a question of technological feasibility, but also of economics.

    Machines aren't free. They're not software, reproducible endlessly at zero marginal cost. For every kind of machine, there's a line: if the hourly wage is above that line, the machine is worth using, if the wage is lower, farmers will hire humans.

    Maybe they can like make an illegal machine to compete with the illegals.

    • Agree: International Jew
  123. @Buffalo Joe
    Paul, It would be exponentially better if your fellow parishioners would organize work days at the farm and take the needy with them to glean the fields....."Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for a life time."

    But the needy already know how to eat for a lifetime.

  124. @Tex
    Steve found him yesterday. Do try to keep up.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/finally-a-great-white-defendant-is-found/

    Be nice to Troofie! It takes him 2 hours to watch 60 Minutes.

  125. @Frau Katze
    Maybe a new higher minimum wage would help. Americans might pick crops for $15/hour. If the law was enforced everywhere and included farm workers, it might alter things.

    True, the price of food would increase, but food is quite cheap now, from a historical point of view.

    Just a thought.

    The solution is getting rid of food stamps, which both artificially increase the demand for food and lower the amount of farm labor available.

    Jumbo indeed.

    You can’t have people starve, so they should dole out a pre-planned healthy and inexpensive diet with the correct # of calories -greens, grits, etc.

    Minimum wages are stupid because by setting a floor on the price of labor, anyone whose productivity is less than that can’t make any money at all and has to be supported by the taxpayers. While Ms. Jumbo is in the process of losing weight, she might only be able to add say $10/hr worth of value to a farm employer so he would rather let the cabbages rot in the field than pay her $15.

  126. @Bleuteaux
    Same with Madison, Wisconsin. Simply exploded the last 15+ years. The campus itself goes on and on and on in every direction.

    One of the upsides of Massachusetts is the harem eunuch status of the UMass. It’s a tough sell when you’re the flagship institution and you’re ranked 15th in the state.

    There are few votes to expand what’s essentially looked at as mediocrity.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    Well, just to come to the defense of UMass, it does actually profit considerably from being in Massachusetts, as do many of the other universities.

    If you're a researcher in just about any field, Massachusetts is considered a very desirable place to be, surrounded as you are by others in the field who are active at the highest level. Maybe this is particularly true in biotechnology and the life sciences, where the dominance of Harvard sciences, Harvard Medical School, MIT sciences, the Broad Institute, etc., is likely to foster a new Silicon Valley when genetic techniques finally mature. UMass Medical School is likely to be part of that, and has already hired some very prominent people in this area.

    No doubt this industry will be huge -- much larger indeed, I'd guess, than the current technology industry in Silicon Valley. If we are willing to pay 600 bucks for an iPhone, what won't we pay to keep ourselves alive and healthy?
    , @Grandpa Jack
    Yeah, but its relative. I mean, 15th in Mass when you've got MIT, Harvard, Boston College, etc.... What is 15th in Arkansas? Subway University?
  127. @Mark Eugenikos

    Crop Rot Fever
     
    That's supposed to be set to the melody of Cat Scratch Fever, right? I wonder if anyone could get Ted Nugent to do a cover of his own song.

    Cheezuss!

    Sounds like a horrific case of Crotch Rot Fever to me!

  128. Your days of finger wagging, little Miss Mary Rotten Crop, are over!

    (with apologies to R. Lee Ermey).

  129. @Bleuteaux
    I'm really surprised I haven't seen more stories or research along these lines.

    The contrast between rust belt cities and college towns is simply incredible. To stick with Wisconsin for a moment, there are industrial towns almost emptied of manufacturing where the downtown is a ghost town, and another couple dozen miles away a public university will cause its downtown to relatively thrive. Compare small towns of Fond du Lac to Oshkosh, for example.

    The difference is multiplied where you have the state capital in the same city as the major university. In the case of Wisconsin, *the* major university.

    There must be an easy 200 bars within one mile of either the Capitol Building or campus property. Thriving.

    It’s called a “Bubble.” A gigantic, Trillion-with-a-T Student Loan Bubble. Data on who holds the loans is completely opaque. Supposedly, a lot of it is parked on the Fed’s balance sheet.

    This is pure Hayek-Austrian model: the “real” economy starves for capital and the “bubble” economy explodes. The longer this goes on, the greater the correction. The next one is going to be real ugly.

    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    True, but like all government bubbles, I don't think it's going to stop anytime soon. What is going to cut off the spigot besides total social collapse?
  130. @Brutusale
    One of the upsides of Massachusetts is the harem eunuch status of the UMass. It's a tough sell when you're the flagship institution and you're ranked 15th in the state.

    There are few votes to expand what's essentially looked at as mediocrity.

    Well, just to come to the defense of UMass, it does actually profit considerably from being in Massachusetts, as do many of the other universities.

    If you’re a researcher in just about any field, Massachusetts is considered a very desirable place to be, surrounded as you are by others in the field who are active at the highest level. Maybe this is particularly true in biotechnology and the life sciences, where the dominance of Harvard sciences, Harvard Medical School, MIT sciences, the Broad Institute, etc., is likely to foster a new Silicon Valley when genetic techniques finally mature. UMass Medical School is likely to be part of that, and has already hired some very prominent people in this area.

    No doubt this industry will be huge — much larger indeed, I’d guess, than the current technology industry in Silicon Valley. If we are willing to pay 600 bucks for an iPhone, what won’t we pay to keep ourselves alive and healthy?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I suppose it depends on which campus you are talking about. For example, Joker Tsarnaev attended UMass -Dartmouth. If the students of UMass-Dartmouth were to achieve mediocrity, it would be a big step up from where they are now.

    The other thing is that you have to distinguish between the faculty of these institutions and their students. The PhD glut being what it is (American private industry has stopped hiring science PhDs because all R&D work is now done in Asia ), the faculty is often considerably more qualified than their students - the professors at U Mass did not ATTEND U Mass.
    , @Brutusale
    You're misunderstanding what I wrote.

    UMass, and for the out-of-staters we're talking about UMass-Amherst, the flagship, isn't a bad school, even though it's not even the best school in its own little hamlet. It's a decent school, and its safety-school status is simply a reflection of where it is.

    What I'm saying is that anything schools are doing is already being done here by more august institutions untrammeled by the vagaries of politics. They don't have to hire life-long political hacks like the Corrupt Midget, Billy Bulger, former UMass President, or brain-dead former congressman Marty Meehan, the current chancellor, to get their research dollars. The excellence of the institutions itself brings in the research dollars. They also don't have to try to walk the line between the quality of the school and keeping the institution affordable/attainable to the children of Massachusetts taxpayers.

    You could drop a blanket and it would cover Harvard, Tufts and Boston University medical schools and their teaching hospitals. There's a lot of interaction and movement between them. It's a long haul up the Mass Pike to Amherst. Absent spending the money to facilitate the hiring of a superstar researcher bringing a lot of outside clout to the table, UMass Medical School will always be the outsider looking in.

  131. @kihowi
    How can anybody read druggie books? I can't imagine anything more boring. It's like people telling you their dreams. I'd rather go through Dan Brown's entire oeuvre in one sitting.

    How can anybody read druggie books? I can’t imagine anything more boring. It’s like people telling you their dreams.

    Yeah, and how can people sit still for movies? That crap never happened!

  132. @The Anti-Gnostic
    It's called a "Bubble." A gigantic, Trillion-with-a-T Student Loan Bubble. Data on who holds the loans is completely opaque. Supposedly, a lot of it is parked on the Fed's balance sheet.

    This is pure Hayek-Austrian model: the "real" economy starves for capital and the "bubble" economy explodes. The longer this goes on, the greater the correction. The next one is going to be real ugly.

    True, but like all government bubbles, I don’t think it’s going to stop anytime soon. What is going to cut off the spigot besides total social collapse?

  133. @wrd9
    It's always been disgusting that the left professes to advocate for illegal immigrants who work in agriculture (or other backbreaking jobs) yet they allow them to work under slave conditions in order to use them as examples for why the US needs illegals. Had they advocated for totally humane working conditions and wages then Americans would do those jobs and the need for illegals would disappear. But, true to their despicable and hypocritical nature, the left continues to support inequality and encourage racial animus so that they can continue their gravy train.

    The book, "Tomatoland", describes the modern day slavery in some areas of agriculture in Florida.

    "But over the past 15 years, Florida law enforcement officers have freed more than 1,000 men and women who were held against their will and forced to work in the fields. "

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/barry-estabrooks-tomatoland-an-indictment-of-modern-agriculture/2011/04/11/AGei5rOH_story.html

    Meatpacking used to pay well with decent working conditions in the 1980s, now they have low paid illegals working under dangerous conditions.

    It’s always been disgusting that the left professes to advocate for illegal immigrants who work in agriculture (or other backbreaking jobs) yet they allow them to work under slave conditions in order to use them as examples for why the US needs illegals.

    Leftists, are by nature, hypocrites. Believe what they say at your own peril.

  134. I think the Dept of Education took over much of the loan origination that used to be done by banks. There is no doubt that
    1) much of this money will never be repaid
    2) we are on the hook for it

  135. @candid_observer
    Well, just to come to the defense of UMass, it does actually profit considerably from being in Massachusetts, as do many of the other universities.

    If you're a researcher in just about any field, Massachusetts is considered a very desirable place to be, surrounded as you are by others in the field who are active at the highest level. Maybe this is particularly true in biotechnology and the life sciences, where the dominance of Harvard sciences, Harvard Medical School, MIT sciences, the Broad Institute, etc., is likely to foster a new Silicon Valley when genetic techniques finally mature. UMass Medical School is likely to be part of that, and has already hired some very prominent people in this area.

    No doubt this industry will be huge -- much larger indeed, I'd guess, than the current technology industry in Silicon Valley. If we are willing to pay 600 bucks for an iPhone, what won't we pay to keep ourselves alive and healthy?

    I suppose it depends on which campus you are talking about. For example, Joker Tsarnaev attended UMass -Dartmouth. If the students of UMass-Dartmouth were to achieve mediocrity, it would be a big step up from where they are now.

    The other thing is that you have to distinguish between the faculty of these institutions and their students. The PhD glut being what it is (American private industry has stopped hiring science PhDs because all R&D work is now done in Asia ), the faculty is often considerably more qualified than their students – the professors at U Mass did not ATTEND U Mass.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    UMass-Amherst and UMass-Lowell, formerly Lowell Tech and a decent technology school, a worthy institutions. The remaining schools are, like Dzhokhar U, strictly crap and a drain on the public treasury. In a wiser age they wouldn't exist.
  136. The downside of mechanized harvesting is that as the machines have evolved, so too has the produce. Shit gotta get tougher for the rough picking that machines do. And high loss from mechanical damage, up to 40 percent of a crop when discussing soft fruits or vegetables. The good thing for modern growers is that Americans expect tomatoes to be greenish and small, and strawberries to have white tips, and sweet corn to have dented kernels and crush marks. Like I said, fuck the taste, it’s all about surviving the harvest with today’s produce. Taste is the last consideration of current production models.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Shit gotta get tougher
     
    I'm sorry to discover you are eating excrement. Maybe you should shift some of your discretionary income to purchasing actual food.
  137. QUIET SAILER! I ENJOY ME SOME LIBERAL NONSENSE! LEAVE ME BE TO DRINK MY COLA AND EAT MY BIG MAC WHILE WATCHING THE KARDASHIANS AS ROME BURNS.

  138. @Brutusale
    One of the upsides of Massachusetts is the harem eunuch status of the UMass. It's a tough sell when you're the flagship institution and you're ranked 15th in the state.

    There are few votes to expand what's essentially looked at as mediocrity.

    Yeah, but its relative. I mean, 15th in Mass when you’ve got MIT, Harvard, Boston College, etc…. What is 15th in Arkansas? Subway University?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Trump University is last in every state.
  139. @dr kill
    The downside of mechanized harvesting is that as the machines have evolved, so too has the produce. Shit gotta get tougher for the rough picking that machines do. And high loss from mechanical damage, up to 40 percent of a crop when discussing soft fruits or vegetables. The good thing for modern growers is that Americans expect tomatoes to be greenish and small, and strawberries to have white tips, and sweet corn to have dented kernels and crush marks. Like I said, fuck the taste, it's all about surviving the harvest with today's produce. Taste is the last consideration of current production models.

    Shit gotta get tougher

    I’m sorry to discover you are eating excrement. Maybe you should shift some of your discretionary income to purchasing actual food.

    • Replies: @dr kill
    Is that you, Monsanto? Very prickly today, No?
  140. @anony-mouse
    Of course Trump's to blame. He's got the best foreign workers (replacing Americans) in Mar-a-Lago and anywhere else he needs them. Who wouldn't rather wait tables than pick cabbages.

    Hopefully his new teleprompters will clear everything up.

    For that matter who wouldn’t rather shovel sand into the traps or mow the grass of the greens and fairways…Just sayin’.

  141. @Grandpa Jack
    Yeah, but its relative. I mean, 15th in Mass when you've got MIT, Harvard, Boston College, etc.... What is 15th in Arkansas? Subway University?

    Trump University is last in every state.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    DeVry Institute magically transformed into DeVry University. That was another sign of the apocalypse.
    , @res
    I think it has some competition from Laureate Education: http://www.breitbart.com/2016-presidential-race/2016/06/02/hillary-university-bill-clinton-bagged-16-46-million-from-for-profit-college-as-state-dept-funneled-55-million-back/
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/laureate-a-for-profit-education-firm-finds-international-success-with-a-clintons-help/2014/01/16/13f8adde-7ca6-11e3-9556-4a4bf7bcbd84_story.html
  142. @Jack D
    Trump University is last in every state.

    DeVry Institute magically transformed into DeVry University. That was another sign of the apocalypse.

  143. @unpc downunder
    Have you tried foreign backpackers? We use them in Australia and New Zealand for such jobs and they do a reasonably good job and there's less welfare hazard. Not only that but they spent most of their money locally, rather than send it to their relative overseas. The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash, but no doubt you get that sort of thing with illegal Mexicans anyway.

    The occassional one drives on the wrong side of the road and has a crash, but no doubt you get that sort of thing with illegal Mexicans anyway.

    They don’t drive on the wrong side of the road. They drive on the wrong side of the border.

  144. @candid_observer
    Well, just to come to the defense of UMass, it does actually profit considerably from being in Massachusetts, as do many of the other universities.

    If you're a researcher in just about any field, Massachusetts is considered a very desirable place to be, surrounded as you are by others in the field who are active at the highest level. Maybe this is particularly true in biotechnology and the life sciences, where the dominance of Harvard sciences, Harvard Medical School, MIT sciences, the Broad Institute, etc., is likely to foster a new Silicon Valley when genetic techniques finally mature. UMass Medical School is likely to be part of that, and has already hired some very prominent people in this area.

    No doubt this industry will be huge -- much larger indeed, I'd guess, than the current technology industry in Silicon Valley. If we are willing to pay 600 bucks for an iPhone, what won't we pay to keep ourselves alive and healthy?

    You’re misunderstanding what I wrote.

    UMass, and for the out-of-staters we’re talking about UMass-Amherst, the flagship, isn’t a bad school, even though it’s not even the best school in its own little hamlet. It’s a decent school, and its safety-school status is simply a reflection of where it is.

    What I’m saying is that anything schools are doing is already being done here by more august institutions untrammeled by the vagaries of politics. They don’t have to hire life-long political hacks like the Corrupt Midget, Billy Bulger, former UMass President, or brain-dead former congressman Marty Meehan, the current chancellor, to get their research dollars. The excellence of the institutions itself brings in the research dollars. They also don’t have to try to walk the line between the quality of the school and keeping the institution affordable/attainable to the children of Massachusetts taxpayers.

    You could drop a blanket and it would cover Harvard, Tufts and Boston University medical schools and their teaching hospitals. There’s a lot of interaction and movement between them. It’s a long haul up the Mass Pike to Amherst. Absent spending the money to facilitate the hiring of a superstar researcher bringing a lot of outside clout to the table, UMass Medical School will always be the outsider looking in.

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    I certainly agree that, if you're talking excellence at the undergraduate and graduate level, it's UMass Amherst and possibly UMass Lowell that spring to mind -- though there are occasionally some decent researchers (if very few students) at UMass Boston who are good. As corrupt as is the politics of any state run institution in Mass, the better university campuses manage at the lower levels to get good people, because the hiring practices at universities are almost always left in the hands of the faculty.

    And UMass Medical School is in Worcester, within pretty easy commuting distance of the very desirable western suburbs of Boston -- which were shown, in a recent NY Times article, to be at the very top of public school districts in student achievement across the entire US. In some respects, Worcester is a better location than are Boston or Cambridge, because the traffic is far less and goes in the direction opposite from the Boston rush hour traffic. UMass Medical School has at least one Nobel Prize winner, as well as a Lasker award winner on its faculty. It's well located to take advantage of the Boston/Cambridge milieu.

  145. @Jack D
    I suppose it depends on which campus you are talking about. For example, Joker Tsarnaev attended UMass -Dartmouth. If the students of UMass-Dartmouth were to achieve mediocrity, it would be a big step up from where they are now.

    The other thing is that you have to distinguish between the faculty of these institutions and their students. The PhD glut being what it is (American private industry has stopped hiring science PhDs because all R&D work is now done in Asia ), the faculty is often considerably more qualified than their students - the professors at U Mass did not ATTEND U Mass.

    UMass-Amherst and UMass-Lowell, formerly Lowell Tech and a decent technology school, a worthy institutions. The remaining schools are, like Dzhokhar U, strictly crap and a drain on the public treasury. In a wiser age they wouldn’t exist.

  146. @Brutusale
    You're misunderstanding what I wrote.

    UMass, and for the out-of-staters we're talking about UMass-Amherst, the flagship, isn't a bad school, even though it's not even the best school in its own little hamlet. It's a decent school, and its safety-school status is simply a reflection of where it is.

    What I'm saying is that anything schools are doing is already being done here by more august institutions untrammeled by the vagaries of politics. They don't have to hire life-long political hacks like the Corrupt Midget, Billy Bulger, former UMass President, or brain-dead former congressman Marty Meehan, the current chancellor, to get their research dollars. The excellence of the institutions itself brings in the research dollars. They also don't have to try to walk the line between the quality of the school and keeping the institution affordable/attainable to the children of Massachusetts taxpayers.

    You could drop a blanket and it would cover Harvard, Tufts and Boston University medical schools and their teaching hospitals. There's a lot of interaction and movement between them. It's a long haul up the Mass Pike to Amherst. Absent spending the money to facilitate the hiring of a superstar researcher bringing a lot of outside clout to the table, UMass Medical School will always be the outsider looking in.

    I certainly agree that, if you’re talking excellence at the undergraduate and graduate level, it’s UMass Amherst and possibly UMass Lowell that spring to mind — though there are occasionally some decent researchers (if very few students) at UMass Boston who are good. As corrupt as is the politics of any state run institution in Mass, the better university campuses manage at the lower levels to get good people, because the hiring practices at universities are almost always left in the hands of the faculty.

    And UMass Medical School is in Worcester, within pretty easy commuting distance of the very desirable western suburbs of Boston — which were shown, in a recent NY Times article, to be at the very top of public school districts in student achievement across the entire US. In some respects, Worcester is a better location than are Boston or Cambridge, because the traffic is far less and goes in the direction opposite from the Boston rush hour traffic. UMass Medical School has at least one Nobel Prize winner, as well as a Lasker award winner on its faculty. It’s well located to take advantage of the Boston/Cambridge milieu.

  147. @Trelane
    Wasn't 'Carlos Casteneda' a character in a really terrible novel written in the 1970s?

    Carlos Castaneda was an author. Like Alex Haley’s “Roots,” his books (such as “The Teaching of Don Juan” and others) are fiction passed off as non-fiction. Though he has a PhD in anthropology, his writings are not taken seriously by scientists.

  148. @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Shit gotta get tougher
     
    I'm sorry to discover you are eating excrement. Maybe you should shift some of your discretionary income to purchasing actual food.

    Is that you, Monsanto? Very prickly today, No?

  149. @Jefferson
    "If they can make a self-driving car, do you think they can make a robot that can pick the crops in a field? Do you maybe suspect it’s even a bit easier, when all is said and done, because you are going to be operating the bot in conditions that are in many ways more controlled?"

    Artificial intelligence is the future of The United States, not Mexicans.

    That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol.

    MEXICANS, WE DON'T NEED NO STINKIN MEXICANS.

    “That is why most Hollywood sci-fi films that are set in the future lack Mexicans, lol”

    That’s why it is science FICTION.

  150. @Salger
    If Mexicans are so productive, then how is Mexico Mexico?

    “If Mexicans are so productive, then how is Mexico Mexico?”

    Because of its neighbor to the north.

    Why are we slamming Mexicans? Everybody commenting on this blog, except the millionaires, has more in common with Mexican workers than they do with billionaire Americans; like Donald Trump for example. The very wealthy are setting workers against workers other to divide,conquer, and rule us. The government starts wars to benefit the very few and they use our children as cannon fodder.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    uslabor, Most Mexican manufacturing jobs come from US companies that have located or relocated there, same with our neighbors to the north. There are really only a handful of billionaires worldwide, one of whom is running for the office of president, but I would venture a guess that most politicians are way better off than the voters who elect them to office. Mr. and Mrs. Clinton are a stratosphere above me in personal wealth, so maybe you should just use the word "politician" as a derogatory term.
  151. @uslabor
    "If Mexicans are so productive, then how is Mexico Mexico?"

    Because of its neighbor to the north.

    Why are we slamming Mexicans? Everybody commenting on this blog, except the millionaires, has more in common with Mexican workers than they do with billionaire Americans; like Donald Trump for example. The very wealthy are setting workers against workers other to divide,conquer, and rule us. The government starts wars to benefit the very few and they use our children as cannon fodder.

    uslabor, Most Mexican manufacturing jobs come from US companies that have located or relocated there, same with our neighbors to the north. There are really only a handful of billionaires worldwide, one of whom is running for the office of president, but I would venture a guess that most politicians are way better off than the voters who elect them to office. Mr. and Mrs. Clinton are a stratosphere above me in personal wealth, so maybe you should just use the word “politician” as a derogatory term.

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