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Covid Fatalities Tend to be Past Their Primes: the Best Example of This Yet
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As I’ve been pointing out since the late spring, the vast death toll from COVID hasn’t deprived our future of a comparable amount of human capital because most of the victims have been past their primes. For example, from the New York Times obituary section, here is perhaps the most legendary American victim of COVID-19 yet. But his prime was around 1963:

Phil Spector, Famed Music Producer and Convicted Murderer, Dies at 81

Known for creating the ‘Wall of Sound,’ he scored hits with the Crystals, the Ronettes and the Righteous Brothers and was one of the most influential figures in popular music.

By William Grimes
Jan. 17, 2021

Phil Spector, one of the most influential and successful record producers in rock ’n’ roll, who generated a string of hits in the early 1960s defined by the lavish instrumental treatment known as the wall of sound, but who was sentenced to prison for the murder of a woman at his home, died on Saturday. He was 81.

The cause was complications of Covid-19, his daughter, Nicole Audrey Spector, said. He was taken to San Joaquin General Hospital in French Camp, Calif., on Dec. 31 and intubated in January, she said.

Mr. Spector had been serving a prison sentence since 2009 for the murder of Lana Clarkson, a nightclub hostess whom he had taken to his home after a night of drinking in 2003. The Los Angeles police found her slumped in a chair in the foyer, dead from a single bullet wound to the head. …

After learning the ropes as a record producer, Mr. Spector, the central figure in Tom Wolfe’s 1965 essay “The First Tycoon of Teen,” became a one-man hit factory. Between 1960 and 1965 he placed 24 records in the Top 40, many of them classics.

His 13 Top 10 singles included some of the quintessential “girl group” songs of the era: “He’s a Rebel,” “Uptown,” “Then He Kissed Me” and “Da Doo Ron Ron”by the Crystals, and “Be My Baby” and “Walking in the Rain” by the Ronettes.

For the Righteous Brothers he produced “Unchained Melody” and “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling,” a No. 1 hit that became the 20th century’s most-played song on radio and television, according to BMI.

Mr. Spector single-handedly created the image of the record producer as auteur, a creative force equal to or even greater than his artists, with an instantly identifiable aural brand.

Even the general public (e.g., me) had heard he was a dangerous loon by about 1980 when the Ramones mentioned how scary it was to record their End of the Century album with him.

 
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  1. The original “wall of sound”:

    (contains added loon).

  2. The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Buffalo Joe


    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties
     
    .

    Ok, understandable. But what callous society has no sympathy for its death row inmates??


    U.S. Executes Virginia Drug Trafficker Despite Covid-19 Infection

    Robert Hart
    Forbes Staff
    Jan 15, 2021

    The U.S. government executed Corey Johnson, convicted of murder, Thursday after the Supreme Court vacated pleas made by his lawyers urging that he be allowed to recover from Covid-19 first...

    In 1992, Johnson, a drug trafficker, was involved in a series of eleven murders in Virginia’s capital city.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthart/2021/01/15/us-executes-virginia-drug-trafficker-despite-covid-19-infection/?sh=4a3306607a14

     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Old Prude

    , @scrivener3
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bite your tongue. Do you think Joe and Nancy think of themselves as old timers? I hate to tell you but an 84 year old on the inside feels much like a 17 year old, except for the aches and pains and the BPH and the liver spots.

    I can still remember my 84 year old mother, in the nursing home with dementia and other ailments. After a bad spell when a nurse gave her a diazepam and she settled down and felt better she looked at me with relief and said, "I thought I was gong to die. I thought 'So soon'." At 84 thinking she was facing death she thought 'so soon'.

    There is so much truth in those two words it could be in an opera.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Thoughts, @Buffalo Joe

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Buffalo Joe

    I understand what you mean but can you provide an exact number of years that people are allowed to live before sympathy is withdrawn.

    "Oh hi Wilbur, I just called your sister Mary and I told her that I'm canceling my 80th birthday celebrations tomorrow, because it marks the point at which I am officially useless."

    In fact I am sending back the birthday cards, and please don't call me to congratulate me.

    Yes, of course most of the people who are dying of covid-19 are senile and have dementia and are in nursing homes, and of course their deaths are expected, by their families, and maybe even welcomed where inheritance is involved, but the more we can reduce deaths from covid-19, the less deaths will occur where the person is still valued and useful to the family.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @AceDeuce
    @Buffalo Joe

    Wow, you sound severely damaged.

    I hope you live to be 100. Have fun with that.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  3. FCC: Do NOT use your license for battle.

    Federal Communications Commission DA 21-73

    DA 21-73
    Released: January 17, 2021

    FCC ENFORCEMENT ADVISORY

    WARNING: AMATEUR AND PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES LICENSEES AND OPERATORS MAY NOT USE RADIO EQUIPMENT TO COMMIT OR FACILITATE CRIMINAL ACTS
    The Enforcement Bureau (Bureau) of the Federal Communications Commission issues this Enforcement Advisory to remind licensees in the Amateur Radio Service, as well as licensees and operators in the Personal Radio Services, that the Commission prohibits the use of radios in those services to commit or facilitate criminal acts.

    The Bureau has become aware of discussions on social media platforms suggesting that certain radio services regulated by the Commission may be an alternative to social media platforms for groups to communicate and coordinate future activities. The Bureau recognizes that these services can be used for a wide range of permitted purposes, including speech that is protected under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Amateur and Personal Radio Services, however, may not be used to commit or facilitate crimes.

    Specifically, the Bureau reminds amateur licensees that they are prohibited from transmitting “communications intended to facilitate a criminal act” or “messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning.” 47 CFR § 97.113(a)(4).
    Likewise, individuals operating radios in the Personal Radio Services, a category that includes Citizens Band radios, Family Radio Service walkie-talkies, and General Mobile Radio Service, are prohibited from using those radios “in connection with any activity which is against Federal, State or local law.” 47 CFR § 95.333(a).
    Individuals using radios in the Amateur or Personal Radio Services in this manner may be subject to severe penalties, including significant fines, seizure of the offending equipment, and, in some cases, criminal prosecution. 47 U.S.C. §§ 401, 501, 503, 510.

    Media inquiries should be directed to 202-418-0500 or [email protected].
    To file a complaint with the FCC, visit https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov or call 1-888-CALL-FCC. To report a crime, contact your local law enforcement office or the FBI.
    To request materials in accessible formats for people with disabilities (Braille, large print, electronic files, audio format), send an e-mail to [email protected] or call the Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau at (202) 418-0530 (voice), (202) 418-0432 (TTY).

    Issued by: Chief, Enforcement Bureau

    2

    https://www.fcc.gov/document/amateur-personal-radio-users-reminded-not-use-radios-crimes

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Joe Stalin

    The noose is tightening!

    Replies: @Another Canadian

    , @epebble
    @Joe Stalin

    Many years back when we were in San Diego, I got a CB radio for my son to play with. When I turned it on in front of him, we heard a drug deal going on! That was the last of CB radio for us. It is amazing how many drug dealers were being caught and jailed for deals done on CB radios (this was before cell phones ).

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Autochthon

  4. Spector’s fall from grace presaged Weinstein’s. Spector was at least on his last legs creatively (if he had any hits left in him at all), so the powers in Hollywood didn’t protect him from prosecution like they would have in 1970 or 1980.

    Weinstein’s, meanwhile, came while he was still very viable as a producer. Even today, I feel like something is missing if there’s no Weinstein-produced picture getting massive critical acclaim to go with a good box office return and being fun to watch. But I still hope the asshole rots in prison.

  5. I’d put him in second place to Dawn Wells, whose prime was from September 26, 1964, to April 17, 1967.

    Your mileage may vary, but I hope it’s not because you prefer Ginger.

    • Replies: @anon
    @ferd

    Wow. It's odd how short of an original run many of the shows had which were to become pop culture staples for us syndication watching Gen Xer's .

    Replies: @ferd

  6. Perhaps he did not die solely of Covid. It looks like we have eradicated cancer because cancer deaths are way, way down. But Covid deaths are way, way, up. What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an “opportunistic” covid infection?

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
    @scrivener3

    Follow the money.

    Of course as Fred Reed avers, doctors would never put Covid on the death cert when it was really cancer. They could lose their licenses!

    Replies: @Icy Blast

    , @donut
    @scrivener3

    Causes of death as listed aren't always reliable IMO . A former girl friends father was a fireman he died of lung cancer which according to the union contract was considered a job related hazard . He died at home and the union rep told his wife who was a total idiot to call him first when he died not the doctor who was after all paid by the insurance company . She of course called the doctor first and then the rep . When the rep arrived the doctor was about to write cause of death as pneumonia which would have meant no death benefits for a job related death . The rep and the doc got into quiet an argument before the rep prevailed . And despite her stupidity she got the benefits she was due . So money , politics and incompetence influence the official cause of death in some cases .

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Peterike
    @scrivener3

    “ What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an “opportunistic” covid infection?”

    In many places a positive Covid test (yes with a 90% false positive rate) within 60 days of death is sufficient to have cause of death listed as Covid.

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Jim Don Bob

    , @theMann
    @scrivener3

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/01/gary-d-barnett/no-virus-pandemic-exists-the-covid-fraud-is-nothing-more-than-a-cover-for-many-other-evils/

    Fairly definitive.

    As I have been telling other Boomers for months now, the medical community will lie to you for money, torture you for money, and kill you for money, and a truly unholy alliance of Corporations and the Government are offering them the money. Hilarious to even hear the term "Medical Ethics" when the entire profession has revealed themselves as a collection of money-grubbing liars, capable of any crime. Good to know though.

  7. Young and middle-aged adults who must get out in the world to make a living should get the priority over old folks like me (I’m 73).

    • Replies: @scrivener3
    @Single malt

    I know what priority means. Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt. Then young people could have their opportunity at life and old farts would move off the stage when they have no assets left to pay their bills.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @AceDeuce

    , @MOG
    @Single malt

    Do yourself a big favor and skip the "vaccination". leave it for a youngster who is more likely to survive the side effects.

  8. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties.

    Replies: @Anon, @scrivener3, @Jonathan Mason, @AceDeuce

    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties

    .

    Ok, understandable. But what callous society has no sympathy for its death row inmates??

    U.S. Executes Virginia Drug Trafficker Despite Covid-19 Infection

    Robert Hart
    Forbes Staff
    Jan 15, 2021

    The U.S. government executed Corey Johnson, convicted of murder, Thursday after the Supreme Court vacated pleas made by his lawyers urging that he be allowed to recover from Covid-19 first…

    In 1992, Johnson, a drug trafficker, was involved in a series of eleven murders in Virginia’s capital city.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthart/2021/01/15/us-executes-virginia-drug-trafficker-despite-covid-19-infection/?sh=4a3306607a14

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    Another COVID-19 death for the stats! Ker-ching!

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    , @Old Prude
    @Anon

    28 years to off this scum. Wish he caught the cooties a quarter century earlier.

  9. @Buffalo Joe
    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties.

    Replies: @Anon, @scrivener3, @Jonathan Mason, @AceDeuce

    Bite your tongue. Do you think Joe and Nancy think of themselves as old timers? I hate to tell you but an 84 year old on the inside feels much like a 17 year old, except for the aches and pains and the BPH and the liver spots.

    I can still remember my 84 year old mother, in the nursing home with dementia and other ailments. After a bad spell when a nurse gave her a diazepam and she settled down and felt better she looked at me with relief and said, “I thought I was gong to die. I thought ‘So soon’.” At 84 thinking she was facing death she thought ‘so soon’.

    There is so much truth in those two words it could be in an opera.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @scrivener3


    “I thought I was gong to die. I thought ‘So soon’.” At 84 thinking she was facing death she thought ‘so soon’.
     
    The anguish of death. The fear at the approach of the 6: 00 A.M. bus that disappears into the darkness.
    , @Thoughts
    @scrivener3

    Or you could realize that we've spent far more time dead then alive

    Death is the old faithful friend, it's life that's the scary unknown!

    I didn't seem to mind being dead during the Renaissance, I'm sure I won't mind being dead during 2200

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @scrivener3

    scriv, I don't want to be thought of as callous, but my 103 year old Mother prays for an Angel to come and get her. AND she is at the top of the list for a Covid shot. Stay safe.

  10. @Joe Stalin
    FCC: Do NOT use your license for battle.

    Federal Communications Commission DA 21-73



    DA 21-73
    Released: January 17, 2021

    FCC ENFORCEMENT ADVISORY


    WARNING: AMATEUR AND PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES LICENSEES AND OPERATORS MAY NOT USE RADIO EQUIPMENT TO COMMIT OR FACILITATE CRIMINAL ACTS
    The Enforcement Bureau (Bureau) of the Federal Communications Commission issues this Enforcement Advisory to remind licensees in the Amateur Radio Service, as well as licensees and operators in the Personal Radio Services, that the Commission prohibits the use of radios in those services to commit or facilitate criminal acts.

    The Bureau has become aware of discussions on social media platforms suggesting that certain radio services regulated by the Commission may be an alternative to social media platforms for groups to communicate and coordinate future activities. The Bureau recognizes that these services can be used for a wide range of permitted purposes, including speech that is protected under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Amateur and Personal Radio Services, however, may not be used to commit or facilitate crimes.

    Specifically, the Bureau reminds amateur licensees that they are prohibited from transmitting “communications intended to facilitate a criminal act” or “messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning.” 47 CFR § 97.113(a)(4).
    Likewise, individuals operating radios in the Personal Radio Services, a category that includes Citizens Band radios, Family Radio Service walkie-talkies, and General Mobile Radio Service, are prohibited from using those radios “in connection with any activity which is against Federal, State or local law.” 47 CFR § 95.333(a).
    Individuals using radios in the Amateur or Personal Radio Services in this manner may be subject to severe penalties, including significant fines, seizure of the offending equipment, and, in some cases, criminal prosecution. 47 U.S.C. §§ 401, 501, 503, 510.


    Media inquiries should be directed to 202-418-0500 or [email protected]
    To file a complaint with the FCC, visit https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov or call 1-888-CALL-FCC. To report a crime, contact your local law enforcement office or the FBI.
    To request materials in accessible formats for people with disabilities (Braille, large print, electronic files, audio format), send an e-mail to [email protected] or call the Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau at (202) 418-0530 (voice), (202) 418-0432 (TTY).

    Issued by: Chief, Enforcement Bureau

    2

    https://www.fcc.gov/document/amateur-personal-radio-users-reminded-not-use-radios-crimes
     

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @epebble

    The noose is tightening!

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    @Dan Hayes

    And the hangmen are nervous.

  11. @scrivener3
    Perhaps he did not die solely of Covid. It looks like we have eradicated cancer because cancer deaths are way, way down. But Covid deaths are way, way, up. What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an "opportunistic" covid infection?

    Replies: @Bragadocious, @donut, @Peterike, @theMann

    Follow the money.

    Of course as Fred Reed avers, doctors would never put Covid on the death cert when it was really cancer. They could lose their licenses!

    • Replies: @Icy Blast
    @Bragadocious

    Fred can be a real idiot sometimes. I think the wound he sustained in Vietnam might be the cause. And I'm not mocking him. I'm serious. I've been reading his stuff off and on since about 1981 and it seems he has intermittent "bouts of insanity," as the old cliche goes.

  12. People don’t usually think of Phil Spector when they hear this, but he produced it with George Harrison, and once you know that he did, it’s obvious. Nice song, odd modern video that his kids arranged for, years after his death—and far from Harrison’s interest in Hindu dualist metaphysical thought and Hare-Krishna worship.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @PiltdownMan

    1. Most of George Harrison's songs (Beatles and early post) weren't just about hinduism. Taxman, If I needed someone, and of course Something, weren't about Hinduism. He did actually, you know, have a life outside that sort of thing.

    2. George Harrison had one of the worst singing voices in Rock and Roll history. The absolute worst. Spector's Wall of Sound actually helped him in several ways. For one thing, it made it appear that Harrison could actually sing on key (which he couldn't. John made that very, very clear in his final interview). Paul had the best singing voice of the Fab Four, and George had the worst.

    The point: The Wall of Sound certainly helped George who couldn't sing worth a lick and only got worse with age.

    Spector's Wall of Sound did directly lead to overprocessed, overcomputerized autotuned pitch corrected vocals that we all know and love today (Madonna, Britney, Boy Bands etc).

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @slumber_j
    @PiltdownMan

    Yeah: I was gonna bring that song up, but now I don't have to. I've always thought it has the walliest Wall of Sound ever. By the end it's turned up well past 11.

    , @Anon
    @PiltdownMan

    Video is cute. But like how it was used in Goodfellas as Henry is manically driving around shortly before getting busted.

  13. Has covid had an outsized effect on gays and transexuals? People on hormonal therapies or hiv-positives?

    You guys know?

  14. @Single malt
    Young and middle-aged adults who must get out in the world to make a living should get the priority over old folks like me (I’m 73).

    Replies: @scrivener3, @MOG

    I know what priority means. Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt. Then young people could have their opportunity at life and old farts would move off the stage when they have no assets left to pay their bills.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @scrivener3


    Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt.

     

    I guess you are writing this tongue in cheek, but it does raise certain important questions about how society is organized.

    Not every nation finances tertiary education by imposing massive loans on people with professional degrees. For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.

    Cuba currently hosts 3432 medical students from 23 nations studying in Havana.

    Cuba has also provided state subsidized education to foreign nationals under specific programs, including U.S. students who are trained as doctors at the Latin American School of Medicine. The program provides for full scholarships, including accommodation, and its graduates are meant to return to the US to offer low-cost healthcare.

    Ecuador provides comprehensive health care to everyone for a monthly insurance premium of about $70 with no copays or deductibles. Public universities in Ecuador have been tuition free since 2008. Medical school is tuition free, but young doctors then do have to pay for postgraduate training, but at least can work and practice medicine while doing so.

    The US certainly could finance its tertiary education system and health care differently if it wanted, and these are precisely the kind of issues that ought to be properly debated and discussed in general elections, so that voters have real choices.

    The US probably has more elderly people than any nation, thanks to Medicare, and some states like Florida and Arizona have a much higher number of elderly people than other states. These factors are, or should be, political issues that determine what kinds of local laws states put in place.

    The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that the government can do what it has always said that it cannot do, namely just print money and hand it out.

    Now we need to think about how this revolutionary new discovery in economics can be used for the general good!

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Buffalo Joe, @Mark G.

    , @AceDeuce
    @scrivener3

    LOL. Your Adderall and Prozac-tainted blood would be streaming into the farking gutters before you got your first loan payment, Weaselballs.

  15. “Intubated?” So California is going the way of New York and deliberately killing Covid patients, apparently. It’s been nearly half a year since we learned that supplemental oxygen is good, and ventilators are very very bad.

    Seems like only yesterday that America was considered to have the greatest health care system in the world. My, how far we’ve fallen.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Michael S

    While they are putting people on ventilators LESS than at the start of the epidemic, there are still some situations for which ventilation is the recommended treatment. That being said, I don't think that the finest doctors in CA practice in prison hospitals. Lots of foreign medical grads.

    , @Homeschooling Mom in NY
    @Michael S

    It’s been longer than that. They knew since SARS ie the other covid, that intubation killed people.

  16. @scrivener3
    Perhaps he did not die solely of Covid. It looks like we have eradicated cancer because cancer deaths are way, way down. But Covid deaths are way, way, up. What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an "opportunistic" covid infection?

    Replies: @Bragadocious, @donut, @Peterike, @theMann

    Causes of death as listed aren’t always reliable IMO . A former girl friends father was a fireman he died of lung cancer which according to the union contract was considered a job related hazard . He died at home and the union rep told his wife who was a total idiot to call him first when he died not the doctor who was after all paid by the insurance company . She of course called the doctor first and then the rep . When the rep arrived the doctor was about to write cause of death as pneumonia which would have meant no death benefits for a job related death . The rep and the doc got into quiet an argument before the rep prevailed . And despite her stupidity she got the benefits she was due . So money , politics and incompetence influence the official cause of death in some cases .

    • Replies: @Anon
    @donut


    Causes of death as listed aren’t always reliable IMO . A former girl friends father was a fireman he died of lung cancer which according to the union contract was considered a job related hazard . He died at home and the union rep told his wife who was a total idiot to call him first when he died not the doctor who was after all paid by the insurance company . She of course called the doctor first and then the rep . When the rep arrived the doctor was about to write cause of death as pneumonia which would have meant no death benefits for a job related death .
     
    This is a cancer death in the stats even if the proximate cause is pneumonia. I can't see how a union rep would have changed this. The only possibility is if the lung cancer patient also had the flu and then immediately got pneumonia, in which case there is a flu/pneumonia category in the CDC/WHO causes of death taxonomy that theoretically might apply. Time-line-wise, the union rep would have to have known about the flu to realize there could be a problem. But I don't think a doctor would omit lung cancer from the death certificate even in this case.

    Replies: @donut

  17. @scrivener3
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bite your tongue. Do you think Joe and Nancy think of themselves as old timers? I hate to tell you but an 84 year old on the inside feels much like a 17 year old, except for the aches and pains and the BPH and the liver spots.

    I can still remember my 84 year old mother, in the nursing home with dementia and other ailments. After a bad spell when a nurse gave her a diazepam and she settled down and felt better she looked at me with relief and said, "I thought I was gong to die. I thought 'So soon'." At 84 thinking she was facing death she thought 'so soon'.

    There is so much truth in those two words it could be in an opera.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Thoughts, @Buffalo Joe

    “I thought I was gong to die. I thought ‘So soon’.” At 84 thinking she was facing death she thought ‘so soon’.

    The anguish of death. The fear at the approach of the 6: 00 A.M. bus that disappears into the darkness.

  18. “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling”

    Lana sure did.

  19. There is an epidemic of atrial fibrillation. Bet you didn’t know that. Incidence rate up more than 30% since 1999. That’s a lot. Couldn’t be electro-magnetic radiation, though. That’s impossible.

    • Replies: @donut
    @obwandiyag

    Elderly people esp females are prone to develop A-fib , often a urinary tract infection puts females into A-fib . Just a guess but the incidence rate may may be up because it gets diagnosed more often in time to intervene . They don't due autopsies on elderly people found dead at home unless there are obvious signs of violence .

    https://nypost.com/2020/12/24/the-autopsy-a-fading-practice-revealed-secrets-of-covid-19/

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    , @El Dato
    @obwandiyag


    Couldn’t be electro-magnetic radiation, though
     
    I hope you won't shit your pants when I tell you that every cubic millimeter is a sea of "electro-magnetic radiation" and has been so for about 15 billion years.
  20. There’s almost no chance we’d have a Biden Presidency if it weren’t for the Covid Lockdown Hysteria.

    It tanked the economy and then allowed states to put in fishy voting procedures to deal with the “crisis”. While I doubt voter fraud was that decisive (the demographics being changed are the biggest deal), I’m sure it could have affected things on the margins.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @RichardTaylor


    There’s almost no chance we’d have a Biden Presidency if it weren’t for the Covid Lockdown Hysteria.

    It tanked the economy and then allowed states to put in fishy voting procedures to deal with the “crisis”. While I doubt voter fraud was that decisive (the demographics being changed are the biggest deal), I’m sure it could have affected things on the margins.
     
    I don't think *any* cheating was necessary for Biden to win. All of the wailing and gnashing of teeth in the GOP is probably a little overdone. Between the pandemic and its effects, it’s surprising that the blue wave predicted by the pundits never materialized. Just take a look at two historical precedents – the years (1) 1932, just after the onset of The Great Depression* and (1) 1920, after the Spanish flu both killed large numbers, and seriously dented economies around the world. In both of these elections, the incumbent party was crushed, and the opposition achieved victory margins well in excess of 200 electoral votes. In addition, the opposition won over 2/3 of House seats, and might well have won 2/3 of Senate seats if they were all up for election the same year.

    These historical comparisons are presumably why pollsters came up with popular vote margins for Biden that were 10% higher than what they turned out to be. They massaged their models to come up with the margins they expected, based on these precedents.

    Bottom line is that even in defeat, Trump beat the odds in a huge way. And that is why Pelosi wants to prevent Trump from running again. After Biden/Harris stumble their way through their first term, voters might start to really miss Trump. Pelosi’s presumably not trying to prevent Trump from running for office again because she thinks he would lose in 2024.

    * This comparison isn’t far-fetched because this pandemic’s economic effects simply swamped anything other than the Great Depression.
  21. @PiltdownMan
    People don't usually think of Phil Spector when they hear this, but he produced it with George Harrison, and once you know that he did, it's obvious. Nice song, odd modern video that his kids arranged for, years after his death—and far from Harrison's interest in Hindu dualist metaphysical thought and Hare-Krishna worship.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiH9edd25Bc

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @slumber_j, @Anon

    1. Most of George Harrison’s songs (Beatles and early post) weren’t just about hinduism. Taxman, If I needed someone, and of course Something, weren’t about Hinduism. He did actually, you know, have a life outside that sort of thing.

    2. George Harrison had one of the worst singing voices in Rock and Roll history. The absolute worst. Spector’s Wall of Sound actually helped him in several ways. For one thing, it made it appear that Harrison could actually sing on key (which he couldn’t. John made that very, very clear in his final interview). Paul had the best singing voice of the Fab Four, and George had the worst.

    The point: The Wall of Sound certainly helped George who couldn’t sing worth a lick and only got worse with age.

    Spector’s Wall of Sound did directly lead to overprocessed, overcomputerized autotuned pitch corrected vocals that we all know and love today (Madonna, Britney, Boy Bands etc).

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ringo couldn't sing on key to save his life. He always sang flat, though unfortunately not a full note flat. Unfortunately because when they tried transposing material for his benefit, he'd still sing flat. It was a chore. He should have stuck to drumming.

    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles--"It Don't Come Easy"--and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.

    Replies: @theMann, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @John Up North, @MEH 0910

  22. • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @PublicSphere

    1. Trump should've given him the Presidential Medal of Freedom before leaving office.

    2. A young Trump most definitely would've admired Phil Spector. Absolutely. Phil was YUGE! And, a young Trump most likely had a lot of Spector's albums in private collection.

  23. My (limited) experience with COVID is this: I have known several people to get it whom I surely thought would die, but survived. The handful of people I have known who died from it (none of them well) were all elderly or had a comorbidity, but only one struck me as already having one foot in the grave. My experience is all anecdotal, of course, but we may find that it took more years off the end of its victims lives than we thought.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @Wilkey

    The average lifespan in OECD countries is around 79 to 82 and the age of the average COVID-19 victim appears to be similar. Estimating how many life years are lost is difficult due to 1) the increasing probability, as one nears 80, that one will in fact live some years longer, and 2) the tendency of notorious COVID-19 comorbidities to subtract life years. Crunching some quick-and-dirty numbers I figured that in Britain, the average COVID-19 victim lost about seven years of life.

    The kicker is in figuring how far we are willing to go to save someone's life: you can't kill off an entire country to spare one person. On the other hand monetizing someone seems repulsive, and yet that is what actuaries are required to do when pricing or allocating medical resources. In the U.S. a life saved is often estimated at $10 million per head; in the U.K., the N.H.S. uses a per-QALY (quality-adjusted life year) estimate of about £30 thousand in terms of pricing acceptable prognoses. Some people say one is too low or one is too high; some say that monetizing human life time is immoral period. Regardless, this method of pricing large-scale measures is "normal" in today's world, and if as Moderna's C.E.O. claims COVID-19 is here to stay (not an impossible scenario in my view) there will before too long be a need to "normalize" (read: calm down) anti-COVID-19 measures along these lines if we are to preserve enough economic fundamentals to support a modern health care system with such niceties as, for example, I.C.U.s and respirators in the first place.

    There is perhaps another way, which would be to count the number of QALY lost by imposing COVID-19-related restrictions. Estimating the impact on people's lives is complicated because even in a "firebreak" lockdown there are differences: a stay-at-home mother of 3 on 10 acres in the countryside will likely have her life impacted rather less than a young single banker in London (but if her husband loses his job she could be in for a far more consequential impact). Let's say such a lockdown reduces the QALY of the affected population by about half the time it is in force. So a two-month firebreak lockdown will result in a loss of one month for each of Britain's about 66 million people, a loss of 5.5 million QALYs. But supposing everyone in Britain caught COVID-19 to herd immunity, and the absolute death rate is indeed 0.8%. This would mean 520,000 COVID-19 deaths, and at 7 QALYs lost per victim, about 3,696,000 QALYs lost to COVID-19.

    There are a lot of caveats to these numbers, but you get the idea. A lockdown to prevent hospital overflow wasn't unreasonable when we didn't understand the virus very well. It is less reasonable now that we know a bit more. If there are other ways to prevent hospital overflow they need to be explored, because otherwise by almost any metric the present cure is worse than the disease. And even if banking everything on the vaccine pays off this time (it might, but I am still wary), the conditions of the modern world are such that we can likely expect something similar in about 20 years' time. Best start preparing now.

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  24. As I’ve been pointing out since the late spring

    About that.

  25. Good riddance. I was exceptionally upset at the time of the murder since I remembered Lana Clarkson being incredibly hot in the 1985 cult film “Barbarian Queen”.

  26. “…murder of Lana Clarkson, a nightclub hostess…”

    Lana Clarkson was a somewhat known/recognizable “B” movie actress.

    A317BF9D-69B6-4851-9ECB-84F70F6AB74B

    On a side note I had a few screws threaded in and spent several days laid up in that same hospital, San Joaquin General (water skiing in the delta near Discovery Bay, not penitentiary brawl).

    Phil would have been up for parole in 2025.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @danand

    Lana had a bit part in Scarface, and a larger part in Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

  27. @ferd
    I'd put him in second place to Dawn Wells, whose prime was from September 26, 1964, to April 17, 1967.

    Your mileage may vary, but I hope it's not because you prefer Ginger.

    Replies: @anon

    Wow. It’s odd how short of an original run many of the shows had which were to become pop culture staples for us syndication watching Gen Xer’s .

    • Replies: @ferd
    @anon

    This may be one of the stronger Gen X characteristics, for a cohort without many strong characteristics.

    And you're right, I'm one too- born during that brief Gilligan run.

  28. The pending arrival of the Honduran Caravan should pose an interesting test of COVID kabuki theater, I mean, uh, COVID protocols.

    Do these new arrivals get tested and quarantined? Uh-oh, brown kids in cages! Do they get the vaccine before your Uncle Fred? Surely Joe would not just wave them through to spread God knows what new “deadly variant” they may be toting up from Tegucigalpa way. Will COVID finally claim a true A-List celeb who tragically hires the wrong gardener or stonemason?

    • Replies: @theMann
    @Known Fact

    Checking them for STDs would be revelational, but......unlikely.

    Checking them for TB, Hepatitis, Malaria, and a host of parasitic diseases common to Central America would be a good idea too.


    At least all those diseases have reliable tests, unlike "the Covid".

  29. Most of George Harrison’s songs (Beatles and early post) weren’t just about hinduism. Taxman, If I needed someone, and of course Something, weren’t about Hinduism.

    Indeed they weren’t. But this one might have been, and perhaps was.

  30. @Anon
    @Buffalo Joe


    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties
     
    .

    Ok, understandable. But what callous society has no sympathy for its death row inmates??


    U.S. Executes Virginia Drug Trafficker Despite Covid-19 Infection

    Robert Hart
    Forbes Staff
    Jan 15, 2021

    The U.S. government executed Corey Johnson, convicted of murder, Thursday after the Supreme Court vacated pleas made by his lawyers urging that he be allowed to recover from Covid-19 first...

    In 1992, Johnson, a drug trafficker, was involved in a series of eleven murders in Virginia’s capital city.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthart/2021/01/15/us-executes-virginia-drug-trafficker-despite-covid-19-infection/?sh=4a3306607a14

     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Old Prude

    Another COVID-19 death for the stats! Ker-ching!

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Lol... Ker-ching!

  31. @Michael S
    "Intubated?" So California is going the way of New York and deliberately killing Covid patients, apparently. It's been nearly half a year since we learned that supplemental oxygen is good, and ventilators are very very bad.

    Seems like only yesterday that America was considered to have the greatest health care system in the world. My, how far we've fallen.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Homeschooling Mom in NY

    While they are putting people on ventilators LESS than at the start of the epidemic, there are still some situations for which ventilation is the recommended treatment. That being said, I don’t think that the finest doctors in CA practice in prison hospitals. Lots of foreign medical grads.

  32. @scrivener3
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bite your tongue. Do you think Joe and Nancy think of themselves as old timers? I hate to tell you but an 84 year old on the inside feels much like a 17 year old, except for the aches and pains and the BPH and the liver spots.

    I can still remember my 84 year old mother, in the nursing home with dementia and other ailments. After a bad spell when a nurse gave her a diazepam and she settled down and felt better she looked at me with relief and said, "I thought I was gong to die. I thought 'So soon'." At 84 thinking she was facing death she thought 'so soon'.

    There is so much truth in those two words it could be in an opera.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Thoughts, @Buffalo Joe

    Or you could realize that we’ve spent far more time dead then alive

    Death is the old faithful friend, it’s life that’s the scary unknown!

    I didn’t seem to mind being dead during the Renaissance, I’m sure I won’t mind being dead during 2200

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Thoughts

    Exactly my & Twain's thoughts.

    But- most people don't think that way. Proust summed it up:

    I should have been incapable of resuscitating Albertine because I was incapable of resuscitating myself, of resuscitating the self of those days. Life, in accordance with its habit which is, by unceasing, infinitesimal labours, to change the face of the world, had not said to me on the morrow of Albertine’s death: “Become another person,” but, by changes too imperceptible for me to be conscious even that I was changing, had altered almost everything in me, with the result that my mind was already accustomed to its new master—my new self—when it became aware that it had changed; it was to this new master that it was attached. My feeling for Albertine, my jealousy, stemmed, as we have seen, from the irradiation, by the association of ideas, of certain pleasant or painful impressions, the memory of Mlle Vinteuil at Montjouvain, the precious good-night kisses that Albertine used to give me on the neck. But in proportion as these impressions had grown fainter, the vast field of impressions which they coloured with a hue that was agonising or soothing reverted to neutral tones. As soon as oblivion had taken hold of certain dominant points of suffering and pleasure, the resistance offered by my love was overcome, I no longer loved Albertine. I tried to recall her image to my mind. I had been right in my presentiment when, a couple of days after Albertine’s flight, I was appalled by the discovery that I had been able to live for forty-eight hours without her. It had been the same as when I wrote to Gilberte long ago saying to myself: “If this goes on for a year or two, I shall no longer love her.” And if, when Swann asked me to come and see Gilberte again, this had seemed to me as embarrassing as greeting a dead woman, in Albertine’s case death—or what I had supposed to be death—had achieved the same result as a prolonged breach in Gilberte’s. Death merely acts in the same way as absence. The monster at whose apparition my love had trembled, oblivion, had indeed, as I had feared, ended by devouring that love. Not only did the news that she was alive fail to revive my love, not only did it enable me to realise how far I had already proceeded along the road towards indifference, it at once and so abruptly accelerated that process that I wondered retrospectively whether the opposite report, that of Albertine’s death, had not, conversely, by completing the effect of her departure, rekindled my love and delayed its decline. Yes, now that the knowledge that she was alive and the possibility of our reunion made her suddenly cease to be so precious to me, I wondered whether Françoise’s insinuations, our rupture itself, and even her death (imaginary, but believed to be real) had not prolonged my love, to such an extent do the efforts of third persons, and even those of fate, to separate us from a woman succeed only in attaching us to her. Now it was the contrary process that had occurred. Anyhow, I tried to recall her image and perhaps because I had only to raise a finger for her to be mine once more, the memory that came to me was that of a somewhat stout and mannish-looking girl from whose faded features protruded already, like a sprouting seed, the profile of Mme Bontemps. What she might or might not have done with Andrée or with other girls no longer interested me. I no longer suffered from the malady which I had so long thought to be incurable, and really I might have foreseen this. Certainly, regret for a lost mistress and surviving jealousy are physical maladies fully as much as tuberculosis or leukaemia.

    And yet among physical maladies it is possible to distinguish those which are caused by a purely physical agency, and those which act upon the body only through the medium of the intelligence. Above all, if the part of the mind which serves as carrier is the memory—that is to say if the cause is obliterated or remote—however agonising the pain, however profound the disturbance to the organism may appear to be, it is very seldom (the mind having a capacity for renewal or rather an incapacity for conservation which the tissues lack) that the prognosis is not favourable. At the end of a given period after which someone who has been attacked by cancer will be dead, it is very seldom that the grief of an inconsolable widower or father is not healed. Mine was healed. Was it for this girl whom I saw in my mind’s eye so bloated and who had certainly aged, as the girls whom she had loved had aged—was it for her that I must renounce the dazzling girl who was my memory of yesterday, my hope for tomorrow, to whom I could no longer give a sou, any more than to any other, if I married Albertine, that I must renounce this “new Albertine” whom I loved “not as Hades had beheld her … but faithful, but proud, and even rather shy”? It was she who was now what Albertine had been in the past: my love for Albertine had been but a transitory form of my devotion to youth. We think that we are in love with a girl, whereas we love in her, alas! only that dawn the glow of which is momentarily reflected on her face.

    The night went by. In the morning I gave the telegram back to the hotel porter explaining that it had been brought to me by mistake and that it was not for me. He told me that now it had been opened he might get into trouble, that it would be better if I kept it; I put it back in my pocket, but made up my mind to behave as though I had never received it. I had finally ceased to love Albertine. So that this love, after departing so greatly from what I had anticipated on the basis of my love for Gilberte, after obliging me to make so long and painful a detour, had ended too, after having proved an exception to it, by succumbing, like my love for Gilberte, to the general law of oblivion.

    But then I thought to myself: I used to value Albertine more than myself; I no longer value her now because for a certain time past I have ceased to see her. My desire not to be parted from myself by death, to rise again after my death—that desire was not like the desire never to be parted from Albertine; it still persisted. Was this due to the fact that I valued myself more highly than her, that when I loved her I loved myself more? No, it was because, having ceased to see her, I had ceased to love her, whereas I had not ceased to love myself because my everyday links with myself had not been severed like those with Albertine. But if my links with my body, with myself, were severed also …? Obviously, it would be the same. Our love of life is only an old liaison of which we do not know how to rid ourselves. Its strength lies in its permanence. But death which severs it will cure us of the desire for immortality.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Thoughts


    Or you could realize that we’ve spent far more time dead then alive
     
    On Feb 7th, John Lennon will have been dead longer than he was alive. On May 20th, Kurt Cobain.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  33. Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played song in the 20th century. My gut feeling had been that it was Maggie May

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Marty

    I once interview Weil and Mann who wrote "You've Lost that Lovin' Feeling" with Spector.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @danand
    @Marty

    “Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played...”

    The 1986 “Tom Cruise” movie Top Gun revived the songs popularity. Hall & Oats 1980 rendition radio played semi frequently until the film’s release.

    https://youtu.be/xlp6ls6e3Fc

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jim Don Bob

  34. @obwandiyag
    There is an epidemic of atrial fibrillation. Bet you didn't know that. Incidence rate up more than 30% since 1999. That's a lot. Couldn't be electro-magnetic radiation, though. That's impossible.

    Replies: @donut, @El Dato

    Elderly people esp females are prone to develop A-fib , often a urinary tract infection puts females into A-fib . Just a guess but the incidence rate may may be up because it gets diagnosed more often in time to intervene . They don’t due autopsies on elderly people found dead at home unless there are obvious signs of violence .

    https://nypost.com/2020/12/24/the-autopsy-a-fading-practice-revealed-secrets-of-covid-19/

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @donut

    I knew some bozo like you would trot out the old "it only is up amongst older people" canard.

    Learn what "adjusted for age" means. A-fib is up 30%--adjusted for age. And so your contentions are moot.

    Replies: @donut

  35. @scrivener3
    Perhaps he did not die solely of Covid. It looks like we have eradicated cancer because cancer deaths are way, way down. But Covid deaths are way, way, up. What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an "opportunistic" covid infection?

    Replies: @Bragadocious, @donut, @Peterike, @theMann

    “ What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an “opportunistic” covid infection?”

    In many places a positive Covid test (yes with a 90% false positive rate) within 60 days of death is sufficient to have cause of death listed as Covid.

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Peterike


    In many places a positive Covid test (yes with a 90% false positive rate) within 60 days of death is sufficient to have cause of death listed as Covid.

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.
     
    Never fear. It will start decreasing dramatically about a month after "The Big Guy" - Tail-Grabber Joe - is inaugurated.

    Replies: @epebble

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Peterike


    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.
     
    And where, pray tell, are all the flu cases we normally see in the winter, hm?
  36. Anon[125] • Disclaimer says:
    @donut
    @scrivener3

    Causes of death as listed aren't always reliable IMO . A former girl friends father was a fireman he died of lung cancer which according to the union contract was considered a job related hazard . He died at home and the union rep told his wife who was a total idiot to call him first when he died not the doctor who was after all paid by the insurance company . She of course called the doctor first and then the rep . When the rep arrived the doctor was about to write cause of death as pneumonia which would have meant no death benefits for a job related death . The rep and the doc got into quiet an argument before the rep prevailed . And despite her stupidity she got the benefits she was due . So money , politics and incompetence influence the official cause of death in some cases .

    Replies: @Anon

    Causes of death as listed aren’t always reliable IMO . A former girl friends father was a fireman he died of lung cancer which according to the union contract was considered a job related hazard . He died at home and the union rep told his wife who was a total idiot to call him first when he died not the doctor who was after all paid by the insurance company . She of course called the doctor first and then the rep . When the rep arrived the doctor was about to write cause of death as pneumonia which would have meant no death benefits for a job related death .

    This is a cancer death in the stats even if the proximate cause is pneumonia. I can’t see how a union rep would have changed this. The only possibility is if the lung cancer patient also had the flu and then immediately got pneumonia, in which case there is a flu/pneumonia category in the CDC/WHO causes of death taxonomy that theoretically might apply. Time-line-wise, the union rep would have to have known about the flu to realize there could be a problem. But I don’t think a doctor would omit lung cancer from the death certificate even in this case.

    • Replies: @donut
    @Anon

    As I understood at the time the union had had trouble in the past with city over the issue . Why do you think the rep would be so insistent on being at the home before the doctor arrived ? In any case the union was determined that the death certificate listed lung cancer as the cause of death .

  37. @Known Fact
    The pending arrival of the Honduran Caravan should pose an interesting test of COVID kabuki theater, I mean, uh, COVID protocols.

    Do these new arrivals get tested and quarantined? Uh-oh, brown kids in cages! Do they get the vaccine before your Uncle Fred? Surely Joe would not just wave them through to spread God knows what new "deadly variant" they may be toting up from Tegucigalpa way. Will COVID finally claim a true A-List celeb who tragically hires the wrong gardener or stonemason?

    Replies: @theMann

    Checking them for STDs would be revelational, but……unlikely.

    Checking them for TB, Hepatitis, Malaria, and a host of parasitic diseases common to Central America would be a good idea too.

    At least all those diseases have reliable tests, unlike “the Covid”.

  38. FWIW a personal COVID-19 story from today:

    Today my wife talked with a friend who just had COVID-19 with her husband. Both are fine.

    The friend is overweight, in her mid to late 60s and has been receiving treatments for some kind of cancer, which is in remission I guess. I don’t know about her husband.

    The woman pretty much fits the profile of someone you would think is at high risk, right?

    It began for both of them as thinking they had colds. Five or six days later they developed fevers and dry coughs, so they got tested. Sure enough, COVID-19. Doctors “gave her antibodies,” but her husband, also in his 60s, somehow “didn’t qualify.” I presume he got shit. I don’t know, but he’s alive too.

    The fevers went on for a few days, sometimes subsiding and then coming back. They monitored their oxygen levels with pulse oximeters on their fingers. At one point his level dropped to 88 and they called their doctor. He told them to have him sit up and breath deeply. His oxygen level immediately went back up into the normal 90s range. No problem. That’s all it took.

    An overweight woman in her mid to late sixties with cancer just went through COVID-19 with her husband, and that is all the drama there was. Just about like having a bad flu. No big deal.

    FWIW, as I say. This is just about the only Corona-chan personal story I know. Big Fucking Deal.

    • Agree: prosa123
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Buzz Mohawk

    In the grim dark future, everyone is a Holocough survivor.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Ganderson
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Even now after almost “a year to flatten the curve”, to read the papers or watch the news you’d think we were in the first 100 pages of “The Stand”. Sheesh.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    My 2 friend Kung Flu case anecdotes:

    62 y/o male, stayed inside most of the time for a week. Admitted* feeling weak for 2 days. Presented* light diarrhea for a day (TMI, in my opinion), and had a fever of up to 100F for a couple of days.

    ~ 45 y/o male, stayed inside the whole 10 days, except probably to take out the trash. Overly paranoid at the outset. I offered to leave pasta on his porch for him (he's Italian). Denied* appetite for pasta. Had slight nausea for 4 hours one day, which was his only symptom over the 10 days. Paranoia was greatly reduced by the end of his illness.

    Hey, the reason we're giving anecdotes is because people don't TRUST the data.


    .

    * My attempt at doctor talk here.

    Replies: @El Dato, @ferd

  39. @scrivener3
    Perhaps he did not die solely of Covid. It looks like we have eradicated cancer because cancer deaths are way, way down. But Covid deaths are way, way, up. What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an "opportunistic" covid infection?

    Replies: @Bragadocious, @donut, @Peterike, @theMann

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/01/gary-d-barnett/no-virus-pandemic-exists-the-covid-fraud-is-nothing-more-than-a-cover-for-many-other-evils/

    Fairly definitive.

    As I have been telling other Boomers for months now, the medical community will lie to you for money, torture you for money, and kill you for money, and a truly unholy alliance of Corporations and the Government are offering them the money. Hilarious to even hear the term “Medical Ethics” when the entire profession has revealed themselves as a collection of money-grubbing liars, capable of any crime. Good to know though.

  40. @Michael S
    "Intubated?" So California is going the way of New York and deliberately killing Covid patients, apparently. It's been nearly half a year since we learned that supplemental oxygen is good, and ventilators are very very bad.

    Seems like only yesterday that America was considered to have the greatest health care system in the world. My, how far we've fallen.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Homeschooling Mom in NY

    It’s been longer than that. They knew since SARS ie the other covid, that intubation killed people.

  41. My commentariat has been WAY ahead of me in figuring out that COVID-19 was the weaponization of the common cold/flu for political purposes, but I am slowly (faster than Ron!) catching on..
    —-S Sailor

    Agreed!

  42. @Buzz Mohawk
    FWIW a personal COVID-19 story from today:

    Today my wife talked with a friend who just had COVID-19 with her husband. Both are fine.

    The friend is overweight, in her mid to late 60s and has been receiving treatments for some kind of cancer, which is in remission I guess. I don't know about her husband.

    The woman pretty much fits the profile of someone you would think is at high risk, right?

    It began for both of them as thinking they had colds. Five or six days later they developed fevers and dry coughs, so they got tested. Sure enough, COVID-19. Doctors "gave her antibodies," but her husband, also in his 60s, somehow "didn't qualify." I presume he got shit. I don't know, but he's alive too.

    The fevers went on for a few days, sometimes subsiding and then coming back. They monitored their oxygen levels with pulse oximeters on their fingers. At one point his level dropped to 88 and they called their doctor. He told them to have him sit up and breath deeply. His oxygen level immediately went back up into the normal 90s range. No problem. That's all it took.

    An overweight woman in her mid to late sixties with cancer just went through COVID-19 with her husband, and that is all the drama there was. Just about like having a bad flu. No big deal.

    FWIW, as I say. This is just about the only Corona-chan personal story I know. Big Fucking Deal.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @Ganderson, @Achmed E. Newman

    In the grim dark future, everyone is a Holocough survivor.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @BenKenobi

    COVID-19 is going to kill six million people, and it will be a crime to question the number.

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @BenKenobi


    In the grim dark future, everyone is a Holocough survivor.
     
    That's more transgressive than "Flu Manchu". Brings up visions of Puke-au and Ausch-choo.
  43. @Anon
    @donut


    Causes of death as listed aren’t always reliable IMO . A former girl friends father was a fireman he died of lung cancer which according to the union contract was considered a job related hazard . He died at home and the union rep told his wife who was a total idiot to call him first when he died not the doctor who was after all paid by the insurance company . She of course called the doctor first and then the rep . When the rep arrived the doctor was about to write cause of death as pneumonia which would have meant no death benefits for a job related death .
     
    This is a cancer death in the stats even if the proximate cause is pneumonia. I can't see how a union rep would have changed this. The only possibility is if the lung cancer patient also had the flu and then immediately got pneumonia, in which case there is a flu/pneumonia category in the CDC/WHO causes of death taxonomy that theoretically might apply. Time-line-wise, the union rep would have to have known about the flu to realize there could be a problem. But I don't think a doctor would omit lung cancer from the death certificate even in this case.

    Replies: @donut

    As I understood at the time the union had had trouble in the past with city over the issue . Why do you think the rep would be so insistent on being at the home before the doctor arrived ? In any case the union was determined that the death certificate listed lung cancer as the cause of death .

  44. @RichardTaylor
    There's almost no chance we'd have a Biden Presidency if it weren't for the Covid Lockdown Hysteria.

    It tanked the economy and then allowed states to put in fishy voting procedures to deal with the "crisis". While I doubt voter fraud was that decisive (the demographics being changed are the biggest deal), I'm sure it could have affected things on the margins.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    There’s almost no chance we’d have a Biden Presidency if it weren’t for the Covid Lockdown Hysteria.

    It tanked the economy and then allowed states to put in fishy voting procedures to deal with the “crisis”. While I doubt voter fraud was that decisive (the demographics being changed are the biggest deal), I’m sure it could have affected things on the margins.

    I don’t think *any* cheating was necessary for Biden to win. All of the wailing and gnashing of teeth in the GOP is probably a little overdone. Between the pandemic and its effects, it’s surprising that the blue wave predicted by the pundits never materialized. Just take a look at two historical precedents – the years (1) 1932, just after the onset of The Great Depression* and (1) 1920, after the Spanish flu both killed large numbers, and seriously dented economies around the world. In both of these elections, the incumbent party was crushed, and the opposition achieved victory margins well in excess of 200 electoral votes. In addition, the opposition won over 2/3 of House seats, and might well have won 2/3 of Senate seats if they were all up for election the same year.

    These historical comparisons are presumably why pollsters came up with popular vote margins for Biden that were 10% higher than what they turned out to be. They massaged their models to come up with the margins they expected, based on these precedents.

    Bottom line is that even in defeat, Trump beat the odds in a huge way. And that is why Pelosi wants to prevent Trump from running again. After Biden/Harris stumble their way through their first term, voters might start to really miss Trump. Pelosi’s presumably not trying to prevent Trump from running for office again because she thinks he would lose in 2024.

    * This comparison isn’t far-fetched because this pandemic’s economic effects simply swamped anything other than the Great Depression.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  45. @Peterike
    @scrivener3

    “ What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an “opportunistic” covid infection?”

    In many places a positive Covid test (yes with a 90% false positive rate) within 60 days of death is sufficient to have cause of death listed as Covid.

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Jim Don Bob

    In many places a positive Covid test (yes with a 90% false positive rate) within 60 days of death is sufficient to have cause of death listed as Covid.

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.

    Never fear. It will start decreasing dramatically about a month after “The Big Guy” – Tail-Grabber Joe – is inaugurated.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    Biden's CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky is predicting 500,000 by mid February.

    Per IHME, it will slowdown by spring due to combination of warming and vaccinations.

    By March 1: 520-522, by April 1: 546-556, by May 1: 553-557

    https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america?view=total-deaths&tab=trend

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Mr. Anon

  46. So why should we care about the death of a convicted murderer?”
    Good riddance to bad rubbish, I say.

  47. Even the general public (e.g., me) had heard he was a dangerous loon by about 1980 when the Ramones mentioned how scary it was to record their End of the Century album with him.

    Miss Bennett needed better romantic advice, perhaps from Jane Austen.

  48. @PublicSphere
    He comes off as nutty in Tom Wolfe's 1965 profile, "The First Tycoon of Teen."

    https://books.google.com/books?id=QwyU4YsvLsEC&newbks=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PA57&dq=%E2%80%9CThe+First+Tycoon+of+Teen,%E2%80%9D&hl=en#v=onepage&q=%E2%80%9CThe%20First%20Tycoon%20of%20Teen%2C%E2%80%9D&f=false

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    1. Trump should’ve given him the Presidential Medal of Freedom before leaving office.

    2. A young Trump most definitely would’ve admired Phil Spector. Absolutely. Phil was YUGE! And, a young Trump most likely had a lot of Spector’s albums in private collection.

  49. Talk about “intersectionality”– how does Covid interact with progeria? Those kids are “past their primes” at ten.

    While everyone was fretting about vaccines, this happy news slipped under the radar:

    The FDA has approved the first drug to treat the rapid-aging disease progeria

    Children with progeria hold out messages of hope in lockdown

    He’s nine.

  50. @Marty
    Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played song in the 20th century. My gut feeling had been that it was Maggie May

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @danand

    I once interview Weil and Mann who wrote “You’ve Lost that Lovin’ Feeling” with Spector.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I once interview[ed] Weil and Mann who wrote “You’ve Lost that Lovin’ Feeling” with Spector.
     
    Was that last century? Someone misspelled revue in that.

    Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played song in the 20th century. My gut feeling had been that it was Maggie May --Marty
     
    Played on the radio? Recent reports say "Don't Stop Believin'" is the most downloaded song of the 20th century. Not bad for an extended whine about a lost kid from Windsor, Ontario. (They should put up a statue. Bruce County, you there?)

    "White Christmas" was long considered the champion of the century. But on media that could break, not merely snarl or buffer.
  51. @Single malt
    Young and middle-aged adults who must get out in the world to make a living should get the priority over old folks like me (I’m 73).

    Replies: @scrivener3, @MOG

    Do yourself a big favor and skip the “vaccination”. leave it for a youngster who is more likely to survive the side effects.

  52. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @PiltdownMan

    1. Most of George Harrison's songs (Beatles and early post) weren't just about hinduism. Taxman, If I needed someone, and of course Something, weren't about Hinduism. He did actually, you know, have a life outside that sort of thing.

    2. George Harrison had one of the worst singing voices in Rock and Roll history. The absolute worst. Spector's Wall of Sound actually helped him in several ways. For one thing, it made it appear that Harrison could actually sing on key (which he couldn't. John made that very, very clear in his final interview). Paul had the best singing voice of the Fab Four, and George had the worst.

    The point: The Wall of Sound certainly helped George who couldn't sing worth a lick and only got worse with age.

    Spector's Wall of Sound did directly lead to overprocessed, overcomputerized autotuned pitch corrected vocals that we all know and love today (Madonna, Britney, Boy Bands etc).

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Ringo couldn’t sing on key to save his life. He always sang flat, though unfortunately not a full note flat. Unfortunately because when they tried transposing material for his benefit, he’d still sing flat. It was a chore. He should have stuck to drumming.

    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles–“It Don’t Come Easy”–and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.

    • Replies: @theMann
    @HammerJack

    Astonishing to me that the Beatles ever got where they did. Listening to any of their live performances, the parts you can hear over the shrieking prepubescent girls, reveals that they could barely play together, let alone sing on key.
    But hey, they wrote their own songs so they were totally awesome, man! Rocky Raccoon, Lucy in the Sky, Zither monotones, totally awesome!

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @HammerJack

    But unlike George, Ringo had charisma on stage. He could also "sell" a song on stage pretty well. Yellow Submarine, for example, was a massive hit. The Beatles recognized Ringo's charismatic personality and always made sure to write him a song for each of their albums to sing. Clearly, they thought well enough of his voice to give him one of their songs to sing.

    Aside from his guitar playing, George had nothing going on singing wise. Nothing there. Spector's Wall of Sound made it appear that he could actually sing on key, which of course he couldn't. It's almost like it was Lennon-McCartney, a song by Ringo, and...oh yeah, gotta give something to George as well.

    Amazing the band was as successful as they were considering they were driving around with two flat tires all the time (Ringo and George's singing, or lack thereof).

    , @John Up North
    @HammerJack

    Paul Mccartney was the sole talent and brains behind The Beatles. The other guys in the band were just lucky to have met up with Paul. McCartney's parents were professional musicians who would travel around Britain performing at various events. McCartney is a multiinstramentalist, although he can't read music. McCartney's father was a Protestant and his mother was a Catholic.

    , @MEH 0910
    @HammerJack


    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles–“It Don’t Come Easy”–and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.
     
    What about "Photograph"?

    Photograph
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nevdSt_2PIM

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photograph_(Ringo_Starr_song)

    The officially released version was recorded in Los Angeles with producer Richard Perry. It incorporates aspects of Phil Spector's Wall of Sound through the presence of multiple drums and acoustic guitars, as well as an orchestra and a choir. Aside from Starr and Harrison, the musicians on the recording include Nicky Hopkins, Bobby Keys, Jim Keltner, and Spector's musical arranger, Jack Nitzsche.
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photograph_(Ringo_Starr_song)#Recording

    Jack Nitzsche, Phil Spector's musical arranger for much of the 1960s,[49][50] provided the song's string and choral arrangements, which were overdubbed at Burbank Studios on 29 June.[10] Aside from Nitzsche's contributions, the recording incorporates aspects of Spector's Wall of Sound production[51] through the use of multiple rhythm guitars and drums, and prominent percussion such as castanets.[52]
     

    Replies: @HammerJack

  53. @Marty
    Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played song in the 20th century. My gut feeling had been that it was Maggie May

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @danand

    “Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played…”

    The 1986 “Tom Cruise” movie Top Gun revived the songs popularity. Hall & Oats 1980 rendition radio played semi frequently until the film’s release.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @danand

    Hall & Oats 1980 rendition radio

    Is that what they play at those black site interrogation prisons?

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @danand

    Man oh man, was Kelly McGillis gorgeous or what. Too bad she turned out to be a rug muncher.

  54. Delicious Tacos had a great post about him.

    • Thanks: Mark G.
  55. ‘Nightclub Hostess’ is no way to remember the star of films such as Barbarian Queen and Deathstalker!
    What a sad end it was (for Lana).

    As for Phil ‘the American Joe Meek’ Spector, well, you can’t deny that Christmas album in particular…

  56. @HammerJack
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ringo couldn't sing on key to save his life. He always sang flat, though unfortunately not a full note flat. Unfortunately because when they tried transposing material for his benefit, he'd still sing flat. It was a chore. He should have stuck to drumming.

    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles--"It Don't Come Easy"--and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.

    Replies: @theMann, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @John Up North, @MEH 0910

    Astonishing to me that the Beatles ever got where they did. Listening to any of their live performances, the parts you can hear over the shrieking prepubescent girls, reveals that they could barely play together, let alone sing on key.
    But hey, they wrote their own songs so they were totally awesome, man! Rocky Raccoon, Lucy in the Sky, Zither monotones, totally awesome!

  57. @Anon
    @Buffalo Joe


    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties
     
    .

    Ok, understandable. But what callous society has no sympathy for its death row inmates??


    U.S. Executes Virginia Drug Trafficker Despite Covid-19 Infection

    Robert Hart
    Forbes Staff
    Jan 15, 2021

    The U.S. government executed Corey Johnson, convicted of murder, Thursday after the Supreme Court vacated pleas made by his lawyers urging that he be allowed to recover from Covid-19 first...

    In 1992, Johnson, a drug trafficker, was involved in a series of eleven murders in Virginia’s capital city.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthart/2021/01/15/us-executes-virginia-drug-trafficker-despite-covid-19-infection/?sh=4a3306607a14

     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Old Prude

    28 years to off this scum. Wish he caught the cooties a quarter century earlier.

  58. @obwandiyag
    There is an epidemic of atrial fibrillation. Bet you didn't know that. Incidence rate up more than 30% since 1999. That's a lot. Couldn't be electro-magnetic radiation, though. That's impossible.

    Replies: @donut, @El Dato

    Couldn’t be electro-magnetic radiation, though

    I hope you won’t shit your pants when I tell you that every cubic millimeter is a sea of “electro-magnetic radiation” and has been so for about 15 billion years.

  59. Spector should have done time for what he did to the music from the Let it Be / Get Back sessions.

  60. @BenKenobi
    @Buzz Mohawk

    In the grim dark future, everyone is a Holocough survivor.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Reg Cæsar

    COVID-19 is going to kill six million people, and it will be a crime to question the number.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • LOL: AR in Illinois
    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Looks like that will take 60 weeks.

    It's a big world out there!

    Global Covid-19 deaths to top 100,000 a week ‘very soon,’ WHO warns

  61. @Buffalo Joe
    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties.

    Replies: @Anon, @scrivener3, @Jonathan Mason, @AceDeuce

    I understand what you mean but can you provide an exact number of years that people are allowed to live before sympathy is withdrawn.

    “Oh hi Wilbur, I just called your sister Mary and I told her that I’m canceling my 80th birthday celebrations tomorrow, because it marks the point at which I am officially useless.”

    In fact I am sending back the birthday cards, and please don’t call me to congratulate me.

    Yes, of course most of the people who are dying of covid-19 are senile and have dementia and are in nursing homes, and of course their deaths are expected, by their families, and maybe even welcomed where inheritance is involved, but the more we can reduce deaths from covid-19, the less deaths will occur where the person is still valued and useful to the family.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan, Mr Mason you are one of my fav commentors but check out these two Buffalo News Covid headlines...(Paraphrasing) "Family mourns Covid deaths of both parents in 15 days" She was 94 and in "memory care" and he was 98. "She would have lived to be 105, but Covid claims life of 95 year old woman." Truly these are gag worthy. My Mom, at 103, prays for an Angel to come and get her. She is tired. Sure we will mourn, but 103 is very,very old. And, NYS has her at the top of the list for a Covid vaccine shot. Stay safe my friend.

  62. @Dan Hayes
    @Joe Stalin

    The noose is tightening!

    Replies: @Another Canadian

    And the hangmen are nervous.

  63. @scrivener3
    @Single malt

    I know what priority means. Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt. Then young people could have their opportunity at life and old farts would move off the stage when they have no assets left to pay their bills.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @AceDeuce

    Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt.

    I guess you are writing this tongue in cheek, but it does raise certain important questions about how society is organized.

    Not every nation finances tertiary education by imposing massive loans on people with professional degrees. For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.

    Cuba currently hosts 3432 medical students from 23 nations studying in Havana.

    Cuba has also provided state subsidized education to foreign nationals under specific programs, including U.S. students who are trained as doctors at the Latin American School of Medicine. The program provides for full scholarships, including accommodation, and its graduates are meant to return to the US to offer low-cost healthcare.

    Ecuador provides comprehensive health care to everyone for a monthly insurance premium of about $70 with no copays or deductibles. Public universities in Ecuador have been tuition free since 2008. Medical school is tuition free, but young doctors then do have to pay for postgraduate training, but at least can work and practice medicine while doing so.

    The US certainly could finance its tertiary education system and health care differently if it wanted, and these are precisely the kind of issues that ought to be properly debated and discussed in general elections, so that voters have real choices.

    The US probably has more elderly people than any nation, thanks to Medicare, and some states like Florida and Arizona have a much higher number of elderly people than other states. These factors are, or should be, political issues that determine what kinds of local laws states put in place.

    The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that the government can do what it has always said that it cannot do, namely just print money and hand it out.

    Now we need to think about how this revolutionary new discovery in economics can be used for the general good!

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Jonathan Mason

    We printed more money during the first year of the Obama Presidency , when the fed purchased 4 Trillion dollars worth of bonds...so this revolutionary economic discovery has been known since the Obama administration. We can print Trillions of dollars with few consequences , most of them seen as positive such as propping up real estate values, driving up the stock market and Bitcoin

    So called quantitative easing, the printing of billions of dollars each month to purchase bonds , remained in effect until Trump was elected , but did resumed in 2020. The fed’s balance sheet is now $6 trillion and climbing....will hit $8 trillion by the end of 2021.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan, maybe it is time that we started to think of medicine as a "trade' and not some lofty near miraculous calling. Last week I had a PA exam my cantelope sized right knee. She reviewed the x-rays with me and said a knee replacement was the only option BUT in the meantime a Cortisone shot would help. Help, hell I feel like I am 20 again and I can get another shot, if needed in 4 months. Did not need to see an ortho.

    , @Mark G.
    @Jonathan Mason


    For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.
     
    Cuba had a problem with doctors defecting when they went overseas so the Cuban government required that their wives and children stay behind to act as hostages. If a doctor defected, he would never see his wife and children again. If you have to resort to this sort of thing to get your medical system to work, you really don't have a very good medical system.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  64. @Thoughts
    @scrivener3

    Or you could realize that we've spent far more time dead then alive

    Death is the old faithful friend, it's life that's the scary unknown!

    I didn't seem to mind being dead during the Renaissance, I'm sure I won't mind being dead during 2200

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Reg Cæsar

    Exactly my & Twain’s thoughts.

    But- most people don’t think that way. Proust summed it up:

    I should have been incapable of resuscitating Albertine because I was incapable of resuscitating myself, of resuscitating the self of those days. Life, in accordance with its habit which is, by unceasing, infinitesimal labours, to change the face of the world, had not said to me on the morrow of Albertine’s death: “Become another person,” but, by changes too imperceptible for me to be conscious even that I was changing, had altered almost everything in me, with the result that my mind was already accustomed to its new master—my new self—when it became aware that it had changed; it was to this new master that it was attached. My feeling for Albertine, my jealousy, stemmed, as we have seen, from the irradiation, by the association of ideas, of certain pleasant or painful impressions, the memory of Mlle Vinteuil at Montjouvain, the precious good-night kisses that Albertine used to give me on the neck. But in proportion as these impressions had grown fainter, the vast field of impressions which they coloured with a hue that was agonising or soothing reverted to neutral tones. As soon as oblivion had taken hold of certain dominant points of suffering and pleasure, the resistance offered by my love was overcome, I no longer loved Albertine. I tried to recall her image to my mind. I had been right in my presentiment when, a couple of days after Albertine’s flight, I was appalled by the discovery that I had been able to live for forty-eight hours without her. It had been the same as when I wrote to Gilberte long ago saying to myself: “If this goes on for a year or two, I shall no longer love her.” And if, when Swann asked me to come and see Gilberte again, this had seemed to me as embarrassing as greeting a dead woman, in Albertine’s case death—or what I had supposed to be death—had achieved the same result as a prolonged breach in Gilberte’s. Death merely acts in the same way as absence. The monster at whose apparition my love had trembled, oblivion, had indeed, as I had feared, ended by devouring that love. Not only did the news that she was alive fail to revive my love, not only did it enable me to realise how far I had already proceeded along the road towards indifference, it at once and so abruptly accelerated that process that I wondered retrospectively whether the opposite report, that of Albertine’s death, had not, conversely, by completing the effect of her departure, rekindled my love and delayed its decline. Yes, now that the knowledge that she was alive and the possibility of our reunion made her suddenly cease to be so precious to me, I wondered whether Françoise’s insinuations, our rupture itself, and even her death (imaginary, but believed to be real) had not prolonged my love, to such an extent do the efforts of third persons, and even those of fate, to separate us from a woman succeed only in attaching us to her. Now it was the contrary process that had occurred. Anyhow, I tried to recall her image and perhaps because I had only to raise a finger for her to be mine once more, the memory that came to me was that of a somewhat stout and mannish-looking girl from whose faded features protruded already, like a sprouting seed, the profile of Mme Bontemps. What she might or might not have done with Andrée or with other girls no longer interested me. I no longer suffered from the malady which I had so long thought to be incurable, and really I might have foreseen this. Certainly, regret for a lost mistress and surviving jealousy are physical maladies fully as much as tuberculosis or leukaemia.

    And yet among physical maladies it is possible to distinguish those which are caused by a purely physical agency, and those which act upon the body only through the medium of the intelligence. Above all, if the part of the mind which serves as carrier is the memory—that is to say if the cause is obliterated or remote—however agonising the pain, however profound the disturbance to the organism may appear to be, it is very seldom (the mind having a capacity for renewal or rather an incapacity for conservation which the tissues lack) that the prognosis is not favourable. At the end of a given period after which someone who has been attacked by cancer will be dead, it is very seldom that the grief of an inconsolable widower or father is not healed. Mine was healed. Was it for this girl whom I saw in my mind’s eye so bloated and who had certainly aged, as the girls whom she had loved had aged—was it for her that I must renounce the dazzling girl who was my memory of yesterday, my hope for tomorrow, to whom I could no longer give a sou, any more than to any other, if I married Albertine, that I must renounce this “new Albertine” whom I loved “not as Hades had beheld her … but faithful, but proud, and even rather shy”? It was she who was now what Albertine had been in the past: my love for Albertine had been but a transitory form of my devotion to youth. We think that we are in love with a girl, whereas we love in her, alas! only that dawn the glow of which is momentarily reflected on her face.

    The night went by. In the morning I gave the telegram back to the hotel porter explaining that it had been brought to me by mistake and that it was not for me. He told me that now it had been opened he might get into trouble, that it would be better if I kept it; I put it back in my pocket, but made up my mind to behave as though I had never received it. I had finally ceased to love Albertine. So that this love, after departing so greatly from what I had anticipated on the basis of my love for Gilberte, after obliging me to make so long and painful a detour, had ended too, after having proved an exception to it, by succumbing, like my love for Gilberte, to the general law of oblivion.

    But then I thought to myself: I used to value Albertine more than myself; I no longer value her now because for a certain time past I have ceased to see her. My desire not to be parted from myself by death, to rise again after my death—that desire was not like the desire never to be parted from Albertine; it still persisted. Was this due to the fact that I valued myself more highly than her, that when I loved her I loved myself more? No, it was because, having ceased to see her, I had ceased to love her, whereas I had not ceased to love myself because my everyday links with myself had not been severed like those with Albertine. But if my links with my body, with myself, were severed also …? Obviously, it would be the same. Our love of life is only an old liaison of which we do not know how to rid ourselves. Its strength lies in its permanence. But death which severs it will cure us of the desire for immortality.

  65. @Buzz Mohawk
    FWIW a personal COVID-19 story from today:

    Today my wife talked with a friend who just had COVID-19 with her husband. Both are fine.

    The friend is overweight, in her mid to late 60s and has been receiving treatments for some kind of cancer, which is in remission I guess. I don't know about her husband.

    The woman pretty much fits the profile of someone you would think is at high risk, right?

    It began for both of them as thinking they had colds. Five or six days later they developed fevers and dry coughs, so they got tested. Sure enough, COVID-19. Doctors "gave her antibodies," but her husband, also in his 60s, somehow "didn't qualify." I presume he got shit. I don't know, but he's alive too.

    The fevers went on for a few days, sometimes subsiding and then coming back. They monitored their oxygen levels with pulse oximeters on their fingers. At one point his level dropped to 88 and they called their doctor. He told them to have him sit up and breath deeply. His oxygen level immediately went back up into the normal 90s range. No problem. That's all it took.

    An overweight woman in her mid to late sixties with cancer just went through COVID-19 with her husband, and that is all the drama there was. Just about like having a bad flu. No big deal.

    FWIW, as I say. This is just about the only Corona-chan personal story I know. Big Fucking Deal.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @Ganderson, @Achmed E. Newman

    Even now after almost “a year to flatten the curve”, to read the papers or watch the news you’d think we were in the first 100 pages of “The Stand”. Sheesh.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Ganderson

    Agreed, and The Stand is more fun, at least for me, because a lot of it takes place in Boulder, where I used to live. Stephen King conceived it when he was living there. Compared to that, SARS-CoV-2 is a fart in the back of the classroom.

    Replies: @anon

  66. @scrivener3
    @Single malt

    I know what priority means. Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt. Then young people could have their opportunity at life and old farts would move off the stage when they have no assets left to pay their bills.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @AceDeuce

    LOL. Your Adderall and Prozac-tainted blood would be streaming into the farking gutters before you got your first loan payment, Weaselballs.

  67. @danand
    “...murder of Lana Clarkson, a nightclub hostess...”

    Lana Clarkson was a somewhat known/recognizable “B” movie actress.

    https://flic.kr/p/2kte1Fg

    On a side note I had a few screws threaded in and spent several days laid up in that same hospital, San Joaquin General (water skiing in the delta near Discovery Bay, not penitentiary brawl).

    Phil would have been up for parole in 2025.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    Lana had a bit part in Scarface, and a larger part in Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

  68. @Buffalo Joe
    The Buffalo News was putting a face on the local deaths attributed to Covid, but tough to muster sympathy for old timers passing in their late eighties and nineties.

    Replies: @Anon, @scrivener3, @Jonathan Mason, @AceDeuce

    Wow, you sound severely damaged.

    I hope you live to be 100. Have fun with that.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @AceDeuce

    Ace, my mother is 103 and has been a virtual prisoner at the assisted living facility where she resides.She is also at the top of the list when they procure vaccine. She prays for an Angel to come and take her to Eternal Rest. I am not callous , but when you feature the "tragic' Covid deaths of people who are 94 through 98, some in "memory care, you are pandering. Now, stay safe.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  69. I have heard several times that the average age of death from Covid is higher than the average age of death.

  70. “As I’ve been pointing out since the late spring, the vast death toll from COVID hasn’t deprived our future of a comparable amount of human capital because most of the victims have been past their primes. ”

    What you haven’t even touched on at all, is the criminal decision to lock down an entire country even though all that was necessary was for clear minded authorities to advise elderly and infirm people to self quarantine.

    Instead they decided to subject two whole generations of “human capital” to humiliating and subjugating psychological and social manipulation, intensive propaganda, and outright lies. (And never mind the economy; the fabric that is being weakened is well upstream from the economy.)

    You Steve, have said not a damn word about it (that I can recall, anyway,) nor the immeasurable long term effects of this “new normal.”

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Mike Tre

    'Instead they decided to subject two whole generations of “human capital” to humiliating and subjugating psychological and social manipulation, intensive propaganda, and outright lies.'

    90% of humans have genuflected to the Covidiotic religion deathstyle, they genuinely prefer facediapers and lockdowns and pretending that standing three feet from others endangers lives. Even if Democratic sociopaths lift diapering orders, 90% of humans will diaper up and assburger-distance for the rest of their lives.

    All children are now taught and must practice at pain of punishment the Most Holy tenets of Covidiocy. Behaviors that 11 months ago would merit therapy to help a child overcome illness anxiety disorder per the DSM-5 are now mandated in all schools.

    Contra Sailer averring "This too shall pass," in fact it will not. The CoronaHoax is permanent because imbeciles - ie 90% of humanity - genuinely prefer the New Abnormal.

  71. @Jonathan Mason
    @scrivener3


    Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt.

     

    I guess you are writing this tongue in cheek, but it does raise certain important questions about how society is organized.

    Not every nation finances tertiary education by imposing massive loans on people with professional degrees. For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.

    Cuba currently hosts 3432 medical students from 23 nations studying in Havana.

    Cuba has also provided state subsidized education to foreign nationals under specific programs, including U.S. students who are trained as doctors at the Latin American School of Medicine. The program provides for full scholarships, including accommodation, and its graduates are meant to return to the US to offer low-cost healthcare.

    Ecuador provides comprehensive health care to everyone for a monthly insurance premium of about $70 with no copays or deductibles. Public universities in Ecuador have been tuition free since 2008. Medical school is tuition free, but young doctors then do have to pay for postgraduate training, but at least can work and practice medicine while doing so.

    The US certainly could finance its tertiary education system and health care differently if it wanted, and these are precisely the kind of issues that ought to be properly debated and discussed in general elections, so that voters have real choices.

    The US probably has more elderly people than any nation, thanks to Medicare, and some states like Florida and Arizona have a much higher number of elderly people than other states. These factors are, or should be, political issues that determine what kinds of local laws states put in place.

    The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that the government can do what it has always said that it cannot do, namely just print money and hand it out.

    Now we need to think about how this revolutionary new discovery in economics can be used for the general good!

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Buffalo Joe, @Mark G.

    We printed more money during the first year of the Obama Presidency , when the fed purchased 4 Trillion dollars worth of bonds…so this revolutionary economic discovery has been known since the Obama administration. We can print Trillions of dollars with few consequences , most of them seen as positive such as propping up real estate values, driving up the stock market and Bitcoin

    So called quantitative easing, the printing of billions of dollars each month to purchase bonds , remained in effect until Trump was elected , but did resumed in 2020. The fed’s balance sheet is now $6 trillion and climbing….will hit $8 trillion by the end of 2021.

  72. @danand
    @Marty

    “Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played...”

    The 1986 “Tom Cruise” movie Top Gun revived the songs popularity. Hall & Oats 1980 rendition radio played semi frequently until the film’s release.

    https://youtu.be/xlp6ls6e3Fc

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jim Don Bob

    Hall & Oats 1980 rendition radio

    Is that what they play at those black site interrogation prisons?

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  73. @Buzz Mohawk
    FWIW a personal COVID-19 story from today:

    Today my wife talked with a friend who just had COVID-19 with her husband. Both are fine.

    The friend is overweight, in her mid to late 60s and has been receiving treatments for some kind of cancer, which is in remission I guess. I don't know about her husband.

    The woman pretty much fits the profile of someone you would think is at high risk, right?

    It began for both of them as thinking they had colds. Five or six days later they developed fevers and dry coughs, so they got tested. Sure enough, COVID-19. Doctors "gave her antibodies," but her husband, also in his 60s, somehow "didn't qualify." I presume he got shit. I don't know, but he's alive too.

    The fevers went on for a few days, sometimes subsiding and then coming back. They monitored their oxygen levels with pulse oximeters on their fingers. At one point his level dropped to 88 and they called their doctor. He told them to have him sit up and breath deeply. His oxygen level immediately went back up into the normal 90s range. No problem. That's all it took.

    An overweight woman in her mid to late sixties with cancer just went through COVID-19 with her husband, and that is all the drama there was. Just about like having a bad flu. No big deal.

    FWIW, as I say. This is just about the only Corona-chan personal story I know. Big Fucking Deal.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @Ganderson, @Achmed E. Newman

    My 2 friend Kung Flu case anecdotes:

    62 y/o male, stayed inside most of the time for a week. Admitted* feeling weak for 2 days. Presented* light diarrhea for a day (TMI, in my opinion), and had a fever of up to 100F for a couple of days.

    ~ 45 y/o male, stayed inside the whole 10 days, except probably to take out the trash. Overly paranoid at the outset. I offered to leave pasta on his porch for him (he’s Italian). Denied* appetite for pasta. Had slight nausea for 4 hours one day, which was his only symptom over the 10 days. Paranoia was greatly reduced by the end of his illness.

    Hey, the reason we’re giving anecdotes is because people don’t TRUST the data.

    .

    * My attempt at doctor talk here.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Anecdote: I know a lady in her 30s who got it twice. First time only slightly noticeable (but a antibody test said, yes it's there). 14 days later she got knocked out for a week. Maybe the virus was adapting?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    , @ferd
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Are you guys in heavy lockdown states? If you live in the upper midwest you'll have many friends who've been through it. In my state we're not up to the dizzying case percentages of the Dakotas but almost 10% positive for the state has taken some diligence and has earned us Herd Immunity Light. I'd say I can list 80-100 acquaintances who had it and recovered, with two deaths.

    http://91-divoc.com/pages/covid-visualization/?chart=states-normalized&highlight=Nebraska&show=us-states&y=both&scale=linear&data=cases&data-source=jhu&xaxis=right-8wk#states-normalized

    I got it in late August with three family members. For me the brain fog and depression was pretty nasty for six weeks. I periodically feel tired and queasy but am hopeful tomorrow will be perfect.

    An elderly social group in town spawned eight cases and three deaths. That story didn't make it to the news.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Jim Don Bob

  74. @PiltdownMan
    People don't usually think of Phil Spector when they hear this, but he produced it with George Harrison, and once you know that he did, it's obvious. Nice song, odd modern video that his kids arranged for, years after his death—and far from Harrison's interest in Hindu dualist metaphysical thought and Hare-Krishna worship.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiH9edd25Bc

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @slumber_j, @Anon

    Yeah: I was gonna bring that song up, but now I don’t have to. I’ve always thought it has the walliest Wall of Sound ever. By the end it’s turned up well past 11.

  75. @Peterike
    @scrivener3

    “ What are the rules for keying cause of death for a cancer (or other chronic disease) patient who is weakened by his illness and gets an “opportunistic” covid infection?”

    In many places a positive Covid test (yes with a 90% false positive rate) within 60 days of death is sufficient to have cause of death listed as Covid.

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Jim Don Bob

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.

    And where, pray tell, are all the flu cases we normally see in the winter, hm?

  76. @danand
    @Marty

    “Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played...”

    The 1986 “Tom Cruise” movie Top Gun revived the songs popularity. Hall & Oats 1980 rendition radio played semi frequently until the film’s release.

    https://youtu.be/xlp6ls6e3Fc

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Jim Don Bob

    Man oh man, was Kelly McGillis gorgeous or what. Too bad she turned out to be a rug muncher.

  77. @Joe Stalin
    FCC: Do NOT use your license for battle.

    Federal Communications Commission DA 21-73



    DA 21-73
    Released: January 17, 2021

    FCC ENFORCEMENT ADVISORY


    WARNING: AMATEUR AND PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES LICENSEES AND OPERATORS MAY NOT USE RADIO EQUIPMENT TO COMMIT OR FACILITATE CRIMINAL ACTS
    The Enforcement Bureau (Bureau) of the Federal Communications Commission issues this Enforcement Advisory to remind licensees in the Amateur Radio Service, as well as licensees and operators in the Personal Radio Services, that the Commission prohibits the use of radios in those services to commit or facilitate criminal acts.

    The Bureau has become aware of discussions on social media platforms suggesting that certain radio services regulated by the Commission may be an alternative to social media platforms for groups to communicate and coordinate future activities. The Bureau recognizes that these services can be used for a wide range of permitted purposes, including speech that is protected under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Amateur and Personal Radio Services, however, may not be used to commit or facilitate crimes.

    Specifically, the Bureau reminds amateur licensees that they are prohibited from transmitting “communications intended to facilitate a criminal act” or “messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning.” 47 CFR § 97.113(a)(4).
    Likewise, individuals operating radios in the Personal Radio Services, a category that includes Citizens Band radios, Family Radio Service walkie-talkies, and General Mobile Radio Service, are prohibited from using those radios “in connection with any activity which is against Federal, State or local law.” 47 CFR § 95.333(a).
    Individuals using radios in the Amateur or Personal Radio Services in this manner may be subject to severe penalties, including significant fines, seizure of the offending equipment, and, in some cases, criminal prosecution. 47 U.S.C. §§ 401, 501, 503, 510.


    Media inquiries should be directed to 202-418-0500 or [email protected]
    To file a complaint with the FCC, visit https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov or call 1-888-CALL-FCC. To report a crime, contact your local law enforcement office or the FBI.
    To request materials in accessible formats for people with disabilities (Braille, large print, electronic files, audio format), send an e-mail to [email protected] or call the Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau at (202) 418-0530 (voice), (202) 418-0432 (TTY).

    Issued by: Chief, Enforcement Bureau

    2

    https://www.fcc.gov/document/amateur-personal-radio-users-reminded-not-use-radios-crimes
     

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @epebble

    Many years back when we were in San Diego, I got a CB radio for my son to play with. When I turned it on in front of him, we heard a drug deal going on! That was the last of CB radio for us. It is amazing how many drug dealers were being caught and jailed for deals done on CB radios (this was before cell phones ).

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @epebble

    Maybe around that same time, my father's girlfriend in LA let me play with the CB radio in her car as she was driving me somewhere along the 405.

    I started having a conversation with somebody who began asking me weird questions I couldn't answer. The questions were coded as euphemisms and references to "equipment" and such.

    Dad's girlfriend explained to me that they thought I was a trucker and were trying to set me up with a prostitute. I was seventeen and hadn't quite grasped what I was being dragged into on the Citizens Band.

    That was the 70s too.

    , @Autochthon
    @epebble

    I recently watched a video of owls on YouTube with my toddler. (I just wanted him to see an owl, as we'd been reading about them.) He was a bit surprised (as was I; I won't again repeat the mistake of watching anything with him I've not already seen myself in its entirety, but at the time I'd thought "Okay, a video from National Geographic; nothing to worry about....") when the owl attacked and ate a mouse, saying "He eats the mouse?!" I told him "Yes; owls eat mice." He was brilliantly resilient to the whole concept, not much affected at all; and although initially scared I had introduced him to nature red in tooth and claw before he was psychologically prepared for it, given his relatively mild reaction, I actually think it may be good for him to know how the real word works on this front, since he already understands we eat cows and chickens, after all. Maybe there is value in your child having learned about dirtbags so as to avoid their ways later.... 🤷🏻‍♂️

  78. @Mr. Anon
    @Peterike


    In many places a positive Covid test (yes with a 90% false positive rate) within 60 days of death is sufficient to have cause of death listed as Covid.

    The (deliberate) misreporting is massive.
     
    Never fear. It will start decreasing dramatically about a month after "The Big Guy" - Tail-Grabber Joe - is inaugurated.

    Replies: @epebble

    Biden’s CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky is predicting 500,000 by mid February.

    Per IHME, it will slowdown by spring due to combination of warming and vaccinations.

    By March 1: 520-522, by April 1: 546-556, by May 1: 553-557

    https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america?view=total-deaths&tab=trend

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @epebble

    "Biden’s CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky is predicting 500,000 by mid February."

    Hi, bedwetter imbecile. Until the huge financial incentives to mark deaths 'Covid' are repealed, I predict the bodycount will rise unto infinity. The moment the incentives are eliminated, the bodycount will stabilize.

    It is a hoax, a medical coding fraud, and a mass hysteria. The CoronaHoax is a medically unremarkable seasonal flu and is only interesting as a sociological and psychological phenomenon at this point.

    Replies: @epebble

    , @Mr. Anon
    @epebble

    I'm sure by the time it's all over (except that it will never be over), the modelers will get the numbers right, right down to the ones place.

    And the number of COVID death certificates will come out to the right answer too.

  79. @HammerJack
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ringo couldn't sing on key to save his life. He always sang flat, though unfortunately not a full note flat. Unfortunately because when they tried transposing material for his benefit, he'd still sing flat. It was a chore. He should have stuck to drumming.

    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles--"It Don't Come Easy"--and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.

    Replies: @theMann, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @John Up North, @MEH 0910

    But unlike George, Ringo had charisma on stage. He could also “sell” a song on stage pretty well. Yellow Submarine, for example, was a massive hit. The Beatles recognized Ringo’s charismatic personality and always made sure to write him a song for each of their albums to sing. Clearly, they thought well enough of his voice to give him one of their songs to sing.

    Aside from his guitar playing, George had nothing going on singing wise. Nothing there. Spector’s Wall of Sound made it appear that he could actually sing on key, which of course he couldn’t. It’s almost like it was Lennon-McCartney, a song by Ringo, and…oh yeah, gotta give something to George as well.

    Amazing the band was as successful as they were considering they were driving around with two flat tires all the time (Ringo and George’s singing, or lack thereof).

  80. “Keeping the vaccination team busy” is now a goal in itself in Wales and takes priority over actually vaccinating people. Apparently everything needs to work like the Grand Soviet of the DMV.

    UK health experts ‘extremely concerned’ about Covid vaccine rollout in Wales as first minister defends holding back supplies

    Speaking earlier on Monday morning, First Minister Mark Drakeford told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that he had decided to spread existing vaccine supplies out until the next delivery.

    “We won’t get another delivery of that until the end of January, probably the beginning of February,” he said.

    “We have to use that over that six week stretch. It would be logistically very damaging to try and use all of that in the first week, and then to have all our vaccinators standing around with nothing to do for another month.”

    Former Welsh Secretary Stephen Crabb said Drakeford’s comments were “astonishing.”

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  81. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    My 2 friend Kung Flu case anecdotes:

    62 y/o male, stayed inside most of the time for a week. Admitted* feeling weak for 2 days. Presented* light diarrhea for a day (TMI, in my opinion), and had a fever of up to 100F for a couple of days.

    ~ 45 y/o male, stayed inside the whole 10 days, except probably to take out the trash. Overly paranoid at the outset. I offered to leave pasta on his porch for him (he's Italian). Denied* appetite for pasta. Had slight nausea for 4 hours one day, which was his only symptom over the 10 days. Paranoia was greatly reduced by the end of his illness.

    Hey, the reason we're giving anecdotes is because people don't TRUST the data.


    .

    * My attempt at doctor talk here.

    Replies: @El Dato, @ferd

    Anecdote: I know a lady in her 30s who got it twice. First time only slightly noticeable (but a antibody test said, yes it’s there). 14 days later she got knocked out for a week. Maybe the virus was adapting?

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @El Dato


    Anecdote: I know a lady in her 30s who got it twice. First time only slightly noticeable (but a antibody test said, yes it’s there). 14 days later she got knocked out for a week. Maybe the virus was adapting?
     
    14 days after the antibody test? My guesses would be a bad test result, antibody tests aren't as precise as the gold standard of RT-PCR, saw a claim they have a 96% ceiling due to how wild our immune systems are, or her immune system either isn't 100%, or wasn't 100% in reacting to the virus. Was her perceived second infection confirmed by RT-PCR?

    "The virus adapting" inside one person's body who didn't quickly throw it off, allowing an ecological battle inside it, is how we think the new British variant came about.
  82. @anon
    @ferd

    Wow. It's odd how short of an original run many of the shows had which were to become pop culture staples for us syndication watching Gen Xer's .

    Replies: @ferd

    This may be one of the stronger Gen X characteristics, for a cohort without many strong characteristics.

    And you’re right, I’m one too- born during that brief Gilligan run.

  83. Steve you haven’t said anything about this. You’ve been scared out of your mind and praying for a vaccine for almost the past year.

  84. @HammerJack
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ringo couldn't sing on key to save his life. He always sang flat, though unfortunately not a full note flat. Unfortunately because when they tried transposing material for his benefit, he'd still sing flat. It was a chore. He should have stuck to drumming.

    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles--"It Don't Come Easy"--and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.

    Replies: @theMann, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @John Up North, @MEH 0910

    Paul Mccartney was the sole talent and brains behind The Beatles. The other guys in the band were just lucky to have met up with Paul. McCartney’s parents were professional musicians who would travel around Britain performing at various events. McCartney is a multiinstramentalist, although he can’t read music. McCartney’s father was a Protestant and his mother was a Catholic.

    • Agree: Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  85. @Jonathan Mason
    @Buffalo Joe

    I understand what you mean but can you provide an exact number of years that people are allowed to live before sympathy is withdrawn.

    "Oh hi Wilbur, I just called your sister Mary and I told her that I'm canceling my 80th birthday celebrations tomorrow, because it marks the point at which I am officially useless."

    In fact I am sending back the birthday cards, and please don't call me to congratulate me.

    Yes, of course most of the people who are dying of covid-19 are senile and have dementia and are in nursing homes, and of course their deaths are expected, by their families, and maybe even welcomed where inheritance is involved, but the more we can reduce deaths from covid-19, the less deaths will occur where the person is still valued and useful to the family.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Jonathan, Mr Mason you are one of my fav commentors but check out these two Buffalo News Covid headlines…(Paraphrasing) “Family mourns Covid deaths of both parents in 15 days” She was 94 and in “memory care” and he was 98. “She would have lived to be 105, but Covid claims life of 95 year old woman.” Truly these are gag worthy. My Mom, at 103, prays for an Angel to come and get her. She is tired. Sure we will mourn, but 103 is very,very old. And, NYS has her at the top of the list for a Covid vaccine shot. Stay safe my friend.

  86. @scrivener3
    @Buffalo Joe

    Bite your tongue. Do you think Joe and Nancy think of themselves as old timers? I hate to tell you but an 84 year old on the inside feels much like a 17 year old, except for the aches and pains and the BPH and the liver spots.

    I can still remember my 84 year old mother, in the nursing home with dementia and other ailments. After a bad spell when a nurse gave her a diazepam and she settled down and felt better she looked at me with relief and said, "I thought I was gong to die. I thought 'So soon'." At 84 thinking she was facing death she thought 'so soon'.

    There is so much truth in those two words it could be in an opera.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Thoughts, @Buffalo Joe

    scriv, I don’t want to be thought of as callous, but my 103 year old Mother prays for an Angel to come and get her. AND she is at the top of the list for a Covid shot. Stay safe.

  87. @PiltdownMan
    People don't usually think of Phil Spector when they hear this, but he produced it with George Harrison, and once you know that he did, it's obvious. Nice song, odd modern video that his kids arranged for, years after his death—and far from Harrison's interest in Hindu dualist metaphysical thought and Hare-Krishna worship.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiH9edd25Bc

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @slumber_j, @Anon

    Video is cute. But like how it was used in Goodfellas as Henry is manically driving around shortly before getting busted.

  88. @Jonathan Mason
    @scrivener3


    Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt.

     

    I guess you are writing this tongue in cheek, but it does raise certain important questions about how society is organized.

    Not every nation finances tertiary education by imposing massive loans on people with professional degrees. For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.

    Cuba currently hosts 3432 medical students from 23 nations studying in Havana.

    Cuba has also provided state subsidized education to foreign nationals under specific programs, including U.S. students who are trained as doctors at the Latin American School of Medicine. The program provides for full scholarships, including accommodation, and its graduates are meant to return to the US to offer low-cost healthcare.

    Ecuador provides comprehensive health care to everyone for a monthly insurance premium of about $70 with no copays or deductibles. Public universities in Ecuador have been tuition free since 2008. Medical school is tuition free, but young doctors then do have to pay for postgraduate training, but at least can work and practice medicine while doing so.

    The US certainly could finance its tertiary education system and health care differently if it wanted, and these are precisely the kind of issues that ought to be properly debated and discussed in general elections, so that voters have real choices.

    The US probably has more elderly people than any nation, thanks to Medicare, and some states like Florida and Arizona have a much higher number of elderly people than other states. These factors are, or should be, political issues that determine what kinds of local laws states put in place.

    The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that the government can do what it has always said that it cannot do, namely just print money and hand it out.

    Now we need to think about how this revolutionary new discovery in economics can be used for the general good!

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Buffalo Joe, @Mark G.

    Jonathan, maybe it is time that we started to think of medicine as a “trade’ and not some lofty near miraculous calling. Last week I had a PA exam my cantelope sized right knee. She reviewed the x-rays with me and said a knee replacement was the only option BUT in the meantime a Cortisone shot would help. Help, hell I feel like I am 20 again and I can get another shot, if needed in 4 months. Did not need to see an ortho.

  89. @Wilkey
    My (limited) experience with COVID is this: I have known several people to get it whom I surely thought would die, but survived. The handful of people I have known who died from it (none of them well) were all elderly or had a comorbidity, but only one struck me as already having one foot in the grave. My experience is all anecdotal, of course, but we may find that it took more years off the end of its victims lives than we thought.

    Replies: @Nico

    The average lifespan in OECD countries is around 79 to 82 and the age of the average COVID-19 victim appears to be similar. Estimating how many life years are lost is difficult due to 1) the increasing probability, as one nears 80, that one will in fact live some years longer, and 2) the tendency of notorious COVID-19 comorbidities to subtract life years. Crunching some quick-and-dirty numbers I figured that in Britain, the average COVID-19 victim lost about seven years of life.

    The kicker is in figuring how far we are willing to go to save someone’s life: you can’t kill off an entire country to spare one person. On the other hand monetizing someone seems repulsive, and yet that is what actuaries are required to do when pricing or allocating medical resources. In the U.S. a life saved is often estimated at $10 million per head; in the U.K., the N.H.S. uses a per-QALY (quality-adjusted life year) estimate of about £30 thousand in terms of pricing acceptable prognoses. Some people say one is too low or one is too high; some say that monetizing human life time is immoral period. Regardless, this method of pricing large-scale measures is “normal” in today’s world, and if as Moderna’s C.E.O. claims COVID-19 is here to stay (not an impossible scenario in my view) there will before too long be a need to “normalize” (read: calm down) anti-COVID-19 measures along these lines if we are to preserve enough economic fundamentals to support a modern health care system with such niceties as, for example, I.C.U.s and respirators in the first place.

    There is perhaps another way, which would be to count the number of QALY lost by imposing COVID-19-related restrictions. Estimating the impact on people’s lives is complicated because even in a “firebreak” lockdown there are differences: a stay-at-home mother of 3 on 10 acres in the countryside will likely have her life impacted rather less than a young single banker in London (but if her husband loses his job she could be in for a far more consequential impact). Let’s say such a lockdown reduces the QALY of the affected population by about half the time it is in force. So a two-month firebreak lockdown will result in a loss of one month for each of Britain’s about 66 million people, a loss of 5.5 million QALYs. But supposing everyone in Britain caught COVID-19 to herd immunity, and the absolute death rate is indeed 0.8%. This would mean 520,000 COVID-19 deaths, and at 7 QALYs lost per victim, about 3,696,000 QALYs lost to COVID-19.

    There are a lot of caveats to these numbers, but you get the idea. A lockdown to prevent hospital overflow wasn’t unreasonable when we didn’t understand the virus very well. It is less reasonable now that we know a bit more. If there are other ways to prevent hospital overflow they need to be explored, because otherwise by almost any metric the present cure is worse than the disease. And even if banking everything on the vaccine pays off this time (it might, but I am still wary), the conditions of the modern world are such that we can likely expect something similar in about 20 years’ time. Best start preparing now.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Nico

    "The average lifespan in OECD countries is around 79 to 82 and the age of the average COVID-19 victim appears to be similar [seven paragraphs of loggorhea menstruating WELL past the close]"

    When you have a functioning prefrontal cortex, this fact alone makes clear covid is a hoax, as I recognized and declared last February.

    Eleven months into this hoax and I still don't own a Facediaper™.

    Replies: @Nico, @NOTA

  90. @HammerJack
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Ringo couldn't sing on key to save his life. He always sang flat, though unfortunately not a full note flat. Unfortunately because when they tried transposing material for his benefit, he'd still sing flat. It was a chore. He should have stuck to drumming.

    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles--"It Don't Come Easy"--and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.

    Replies: @theMann, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @John Up North, @MEH 0910

    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles–“It Don’t Come Easy”–and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.

    What about “Photograph”?

    Photograph

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photograph_(Ringo_Starr_song)

    The officially released version was recorded in Los Angeles with producer Richard Perry. It incorporates aspects of Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound through the presence of multiple drums and acoustic guitars, as well as an orchestra and a choir. Aside from Starr and Harrison, the musicians on the recording include Nicky Hopkins, Bobby Keys, Jim Keltner, and Spector’s musical arranger, Jack Nitzsche.

    [MORE]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photograph_(Ringo_Starr_song)#Recording

    Jack Nitzsche, Phil Spector’s musical arranger for much of the 1960s,[49][50] provided the song’s string and choral arrangements, which were overdubbed at Burbank Studios on 29 June.[10] Aside from Nitzsche’s contributions, the recording incorporates aspects of Spector’s Wall of Sound production[51] through the use of multiple rhythm guitars and drums, and prominent percussion such as castanets.[52]

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @MEH 0910

    Heh, I did think of that song as soon as I posted. It's a good song. So I immediately edited my remark to say "one great" song rather than just "one good" song.

  91. anon[344] • Disclaimer says:

    Given the way corona virus is being handled, one would think we don’t realize that people die quite regularly, especially when they’re in bad condition. Now, we’re practically demanding that nobody should die from catching a microbe – that we should stay home and hold our breath until everyone is guaranteed to survive. Since when have we ever believed that? Is that how we built civilization? The civilization that we’re now destroying?

    There’s little reason for insulin-sensitive people – with healthy immune status and without metabolic disease – to stay home, wear a mask or ‘social distance’ themselves. Since they won’t be getting seriously ill, their staying home wouldn’t help ‘flatten the curve’ of sick people overburdening the healthcare system (as usual, to the expense of all of us). On the contrary, active healthy people can contribute something to the economy.

    The main benefit of herd immunity is that it will allow the country to function again. And that would be good for everyone, healthy and sickly alike. The metabolically/immunologically compromised will be vulnerable to catching the corona virus from anyone who’s contracted it and is temporarily contagious, no matter whether the carrier’s general health is good or poor. And that’s the same fix that people with poor immune function are in, always and everywhere. The answer for protecting these most vulnerable people from COVID – which is only one of the many dangers to their health that they face – can be one of two things; the best one being that they start eating right. And/or, we can build as much equipment and medical facilities, where they’re most needed, as they may require. Either of these solutions is much more viable, less disruptive and less expensive than what we’re doing now. And with either solution, healthier people would no longer be punished for possessing normal human vitality.

    While governments, health agencies and scientists take steps to upgrade the availability of care facilities, equipment and treatments, individuals should follow this
    CORONA VIRUS PROTOCOL
    Part A (Everyone)
    Begin a therapeutic diet to quickly upgrade and regulate the immune system. This consists of, wholly or mostly:
    Home cooked meat, oily fish, eggs (especially yolks), animal fat, bone broth, collagen or gelatin, and liver, and the elimination of corn, soy, canola, safflower, sunflower, grapeseed and rice bran oils as well as flours, sugar and prepared foods.

    Part B (those most at risk for COVID complications- individuals with high BMI or chronic health issues, or taking prescription medications, etc.)
    While following the part A protocol, take reasonable precautions to limit your exposure to possible infection from others, such as limiting time or wearing a mask when in close contact with other people.

  92. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    Another COVID-19 death for the stats! Ker-ching!

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    Lol… Ker-ching!

  93. @epebble
    @Joe Stalin

    Many years back when we were in San Diego, I got a CB radio for my son to play with. When I turned it on in front of him, we heard a drug deal going on! That was the last of CB radio for us. It is amazing how many drug dealers were being caught and jailed for deals done on CB radios (this was before cell phones ).

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Autochthon

    Maybe around that same time, my father’s girlfriend in LA let me play with the CB radio in her car as she was driving me somewhere along the 405.

    I started having a conversation with somebody who began asking me weird questions I couldn’t answer. The questions were coded as euphemisms and references to “equipment” and such.

    Dad’s girlfriend explained to me that they thought I was a trucker and were trying to set me up with a prostitute. I was seventeen and hadn’t quite grasped what I was being dragged into on the Citizens Band.

    That was the 70s too.

  94. ‘Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he won’t receive the coronavirus vaccine until Black, Hispanic and poor New Yorkers in his age group are able to receive it.’

    He wants it tested on blacks, etc., first.

  95. @Buzz Mohawk
    @BenKenobi

    COVID-19 is going to kill six million people, and it will be a crime to question the number.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Looks like that will take 60 weeks.

    It’s a big world out there!

    Global Covid-19 deaths to top 100,000 a week ‘very soon,’ WHO warns

  96. @Ganderson
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Even now after almost “a year to flatten the curve”, to read the papers or watch the news you’d think we were in the first 100 pages of “The Stand”. Sheesh.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Agreed, and The Stand is more fun, at least for me, because a lot of it takes place in Boulder, where I used to live. Stephen King conceived it when he was living there. Compared to that, SARS-CoV-2 is a fart in the back of the classroom.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How old were you when you read The Stand?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  97. @Mike Tre
    "As I’ve been pointing out since the late spring, the vast death toll from COVID hasn’t deprived our future of a comparable amount of human capital because most of the victims have been past their primes. "

    What you haven't even touched on at all, is the criminal decision to lock down an entire country even though all that was necessary was for clear minded authorities to advise elderly and infirm people to self quarantine.

    Instead they decided to subject two whole generations of "human capital" to humiliating and subjugating psychological and social manipulation, intensive propaganda, and outright lies. (And never mind the economy; the fabric that is being weakened is well upstream from the economy.)

    You Steve, have said not a damn word about it (that I can recall, anyway,) nor the immeasurable long term effects of this "new normal."

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    ‘Instead they decided to subject two whole generations of “human capital” to humiliating and subjugating psychological and social manipulation, intensive propaganda, and outright lies.’

    90% of humans have genuflected to the Covidiotic religion deathstyle, they genuinely prefer facediapers and lockdowns and pretending that standing three feet from others endangers lives. Even if Democratic sociopaths lift diapering orders, 90% of humans will diaper up and assburger-distance for the rest of their lives.

    All children are now taught and must practice at pain of punishment the Most Holy tenets of Covidiocy. Behaviors that 11 months ago would merit therapy to help a child overcome illness anxiety disorder per the DSM-5 are now mandated in all schools.

    Contra Sailer averring “This too shall pass,” in fact it will not. The CoronaHoax is permanent because imbeciles – ie 90% of humanity – genuinely prefer the New Abnormal.

  98. @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    Biden's CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky is predicting 500,000 by mid February.

    Per IHME, it will slowdown by spring due to combination of warming and vaccinations.

    By March 1: 520-522, by April 1: 546-556, by May 1: 553-557

    https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america?view=total-deaths&tab=trend

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Mr. Anon

    “Biden’s CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky is predicting 500,000 by mid February.”

    Hi, bedwetter imbecile. Until the huge financial incentives to mark deaths ‘Covid’ are repealed, I predict the bodycount will rise unto infinity. The moment the incentives are eliminated, the bodycount will stabilize.

    It is a hoax, a medical coding fraud, and a mass hysteria. The CoronaHoax is a medically unremarkable seasonal flu and is only interesting as a sociological and psychological phenomenon at this point.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is not a hoax. California's Air Quality agency is temporarily lifting air quality concerns because there is no place to store bodies. Never in the history there has been a case of running out of funeral homes, refrigerated trucks and crematorium capacity simultaneously. This is in addition to running out of bottled oxygen and hospital beds.

    Backlog of bodies caused by COVID-19 forces California air quality agency to suspend cremation limits
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-19-backlog-bodies-cremation-limits-suspended-california-air-quality-agency/

    Los Angeles is running out of oxygen
    https://www.deseret.com/u-s-world/2021/1/6/22216826/coronavirus-spike-california-oxygen

    California hospitals at 'brink of catastrophe' as many run out of ICU beds
    https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/california-hospitals-at-brink-of-catastrophe-as-many-run-out-of-icu-beds-1.5249919

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Intelligent Dasein

  99. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @epebble

    "Biden’s CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky is predicting 500,000 by mid February."

    Hi, bedwetter imbecile. Until the huge financial incentives to mark deaths 'Covid' are repealed, I predict the bodycount will rise unto infinity. The moment the incentives are eliminated, the bodycount will stabilize.

    It is a hoax, a medical coding fraud, and a mass hysteria. The CoronaHoax is a medically unremarkable seasonal flu and is only interesting as a sociological and psychological phenomenon at this point.

    Replies: @epebble

    It is not a hoax. California’s Air Quality agency is temporarily lifting air quality concerns because there is no place to store bodies. Never in the history there has been a case of running out of funeral homes, refrigerated trucks and crematorium capacity simultaneously. This is in addition to running out of bottled oxygen and hospital beds.

    Backlog of bodies caused by COVID-19 forces California air quality agency to suspend cremation limits
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-19-backlog-bodies-cremation-limits-suspended-california-air-quality-agency/

    Los Angeles is running out of oxygen
    https://www.deseret.com/u-s-world/2021/1/6/22216826/coronavirus-spike-california-oxygen

    California hospitals at ‘brink of catastrophe’ as many run out of ICU beds
    https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/california-hospitals-at-brink-of-catastrophe-as-many-run-out-of-icu-beds-1.5249919

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @epebble


    Los Angeles is running out of oxygen
    https://www.deseret.com/u-s-world/2021/1/6/22216826/coronavirus-spike-california-oxygen
     
    Neither that article nor the one its based on offers any tangible evidence that California hospitals are running out of oxygen. It's just "people were told" and "some hospitals" - no specifics, which is par for these kind of scare-mongering articles.

    California hospitals at ‘brink of catastrophe’ as many run out of ICU beds
    https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/california-hospitals-at-brink-of-catastrophe-as-many-run-out-of-icu-beds-1.5249919
     
    I expect these are overdone too. Anyway, as in New York City, there might be a reason for this:

    https://centerforhealthjournalism.org/resources/lessons/california-rural-communities-are-hit-hard-hospital-closures

    Just as, over the last twenty years, NYC lost about 20% of its hospital beds.
    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @epebble

    The real significance to this news is that America's medical infrastructure is unable to handle a rather mild respiratory infection.

    That doesn't bode well.

    Replies: @anon

  100. @AceDeuce
    @Buffalo Joe

    Wow, you sound severely damaged.

    I hope you live to be 100. Have fun with that.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Ace, my mother is 103 and has been a virtual prisoner at the assisted living facility where she resides.She is also at the top of the list when they procure vaccine. She prays for an Angel to come and take her to Eternal Rest. I am not callous , but when you feature the “tragic’ Covid deaths of people who are 94 through 98, some in “memory care, you are pandering. Now, stay safe.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Buffalo Joe

    I'm sorry about your mother. My best wishes to her. Sorry I was harsh to you. You're right about the pandering being wrong, but the MSM should never be taken seriously.

  101. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    My 2 friend Kung Flu case anecdotes:

    62 y/o male, stayed inside most of the time for a week. Admitted* feeling weak for 2 days. Presented* light diarrhea for a day (TMI, in my opinion), and had a fever of up to 100F for a couple of days.

    ~ 45 y/o male, stayed inside the whole 10 days, except probably to take out the trash. Overly paranoid at the outset. I offered to leave pasta on his porch for him (he's Italian). Denied* appetite for pasta. Had slight nausea for 4 hours one day, which was his only symptom over the 10 days. Paranoia was greatly reduced by the end of his illness.

    Hey, the reason we're giving anecdotes is because people don't TRUST the data.


    .

    * My attempt at doctor talk here.

    Replies: @El Dato, @ferd

    Are you guys in heavy lockdown states? If you live in the upper midwest you’ll have many friends who’ve been through it. In my state we’re not up to the dizzying case percentages of the Dakotas but almost 10% positive for the state has taken some diligence and has earned us Herd Immunity Light. I’d say I can list 80-100 acquaintances who had it and recovered, with two deaths.

    http://91-divoc.com/pages/covid-visualization/?chart=states-normalized&highlight=Nebraska&show=us-states&y=both&scale=linear&data=cases&data-source=jhu&xaxis=right-8wk#states-normalized

    I got it in late August with three family members. For me the brain fog and depression was pretty nasty for six weeks. I periodically feel tired and queasy but am hopeful tomorrow will be perfect.

    An elderly social group in town spawned eight cases and three deaths. That story didn’t make it to the news.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @ferd

    My State is pretty mellow about the LOCKDOWNS, Ferd.

    Since I wrote last, I ran into a co-worker who has had the Kung Flu. This guy is 57 y/o. He had to spend 5 days in the hospital, so it wasn't so benign for him. He was not at all worried about people not wearing the face diapers though.

    I'm glad you are mostly over it.

    Replies: @ferd

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @ferd

    I tested positive around Halloween just before I was to visit an old girl friend in the NE. ;-(

    No symptoms.

  102. @Thoughts
    @scrivener3

    Or you could realize that we've spent far more time dead then alive

    Death is the old faithful friend, it's life that's the scary unknown!

    I didn't seem to mind being dead during the Renaissance, I'm sure I won't mind being dead during 2200

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Reg Cæsar

    Or you could realize that we’ve spent far more time dead then alive

    On Feb 7th, John Lennon will have been dead longer than he was alive. On May 20th, Kurt Cobain.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    Re: Lennon, I think you mean October 9, not Feb. 7.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  103. @Steve Sailer
    @Marty

    I once interview Weil and Mann who wrote "You've Lost that Lovin' Feeling" with Spector.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I once interview[ed] Weil and Mann who wrote “You’ve Lost that Lovin’ Feeling” with Spector.

    Was that last century? Someone misspelled revue in that.

    Had no idea You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was the most played song in the 20th century. My gut feeling had been that it was Maggie May –Marty

    Played on the radio? Recent reports say “Don’t Stop Believin’” is the most downloaded song of the 20th century. Not bad for an extended whine about a lost kid from Windsor, Ontario. (They should put up a statue. Bruce County, you there?)

    “White Christmas” was long considered the champion of the century. But on media that could break, not merely snarl or buffer.

  104. @Bragadocious
    @scrivener3

    Follow the money.

    Of course as Fred Reed avers, doctors would never put Covid on the death cert when it was really cancer. They could lose their licenses!

    Replies: @Icy Blast

    Fred can be a real idiot sometimes. I think the wound he sustained in Vietnam might be the cause. And I’m not mocking him. I’m serious. I’ve been reading his stuff off and on since about 1981 and it seems he has intermittent “bouts of insanity,” as the old cliche goes.

  105. @BenKenobi
    @Buzz Mohawk

    In the grim dark future, everyone is a Holocough survivor.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Reg Cæsar

    In the grim dark future, everyone is a Holocough survivor.

    That’s more transgressive than “Flu Manchu”. Brings up visions of Puke-au and Ausch-choo.

  106. @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    Biden's CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky is predicting 500,000 by mid February.

    Per IHME, it will slowdown by spring due to combination of warming and vaccinations.

    By March 1: 520-522, by April 1: 546-556, by May 1: 553-557

    https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america?view=total-deaths&tab=trend

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Mr. Anon

    I’m sure by the time it’s all over (except that it will never be over), the modelers will get the numbers right, right down to the ones place.

    And the number of COVID death certificates will come out to the right answer too.

  107. @epebble
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is not a hoax. California's Air Quality agency is temporarily lifting air quality concerns because there is no place to store bodies. Never in the history there has been a case of running out of funeral homes, refrigerated trucks and crematorium capacity simultaneously. This is in addition to running out of bottled oxygen and hospital beds.

    Backlog of bodies caused by COVID-19 forces California air quality agency to suspend cremation limits
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-19-backlog-bodies-cremation-limits-suspended-california-air-quality-agency/

    Los Angeles is running out of oxygen
    https://www.deseret.com/u-s-world/2021/1/6/22216826/coronavirus-spike-california-oxygen

    California hospitals at 'brink of catastrophe' as many run out of ICU beds
    https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/california-hospitals-at-brink-of-catastrophe-as-many-run-out-of-icu-beds-1.5249919

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Intelligent Dasein

    Los Angeles is running out of oxygen
    https://www.deseret.com/u-s-world/2021/1/6/22216826/coronavirus-spike-california-oxygen

    Neither that article nor the one its based on offers any tangible evidence that California hospitals are running out of oxygen. It’s just “people were told” and “some hospitals” – no specifics, which is par for these kind of scare-mongering articles.

    California hospitals at ‘brink of catastrophe’ as many run out of ICU beds
    https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/california-hospitals-at-brink-of-catastrophe-as-many-run-out-of-icu-beds-1.5249919

    I expect these are overdone too. Anyway, as in New York City, there might be a reason for this:

    https://centerforhealthjournalism.org/resources/lessons/california-rural-communities-are-hit-hard-hospital-closures

    Just as, over the last twenty years, NYC lost about 20% of its hospital beds.

  108. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Ganderson

    Agreed, and The Stand is more fun, at least for me, because a lot of it takes place in Boulder, where I used to live. Stephen King conceived it when he was living there. Compared to that, SARS-CoV-2 is a fart in the back of the classroom.

    Replies: @anon

    How old were you when you read The Stand?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @anon

    I read The Stand when I was in my late twenties or so. I found it enjoyable to read all the references to locations I knew so well.


    Before he was famous, King was turned down for a job at the local newspaper, where my best friend was a reporter for a while. I thought it was funny that my friend could get a job there but Stephen King couldn't.

    Another one from King is The Shining, which takes its inspiration from the nearby Stanley Hotel, where I had some pretty good fun.

    Why do you ask?

    Replies: @ganderson

  109. @Jonathan Mason
    @scrivener3


    Perhaps social security should end at 72 and the payments go to younger people with crushing student loan debt.

     

    I guess you are writing this tongue in cheek, but it does raise certain important questions about how society is organized.

    Not every nation finances tertiary education by imposing massive loans on people with professional degrees. For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.

    Cuba currently hosts 3432 medical students from 23 nations studying in Havana.

    Cuba has also provided state subsidized education to foreign nationals under specific programs, including U.S. students who are trained as doctors at the Latin American School of Medicine. The program provides for full scholarships, including accommodation, and its graduates are meant to return to the US to offer low-cost healthcare.

    Ecuador provides comprehensive health care to everyone for a monthly insurance premium of about $70 with no copays or deductibles. Public universities in Ecuador have been tuition free since 2008. Medical school is tuition free, but young doctors then do have to pay for postgraduate training, but at least can work and practice medicine while doing so.

    The US certainly could finance its tertiary education system and health care differently if it wanted, and these are precisely the kind of issues that ought to be properly debated and discussed in general elections, so that voters have real choices.

    The US probably has more elderly people than any nation, thanks to Medicare, and some states like Florida and Arizona have a much higher number of elderly people than other states. These factors are, or should be, political issues that determine what kinds of local laws states put in place.

    The Covid-19 pandemic has shown that the government can do what it has always said that it cannot do, namely just print money and hand it out.

    Now we need to think about how this revolutionary new discovery in economics can be used for the general good!

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Buffalo Joe, @Mark G.

    For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.

    Cuba had a problem with doctors defecting when they went overseas so the Cuban government required that their wives and children stay behind to act as hostages. If a doctor defected, he would never see his wife and children again. If you have to resort to this sort of thing to get your medical system to work, you really don’t have a very good medical system.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Mark G.

    Britain has the same problem with its NHS. British (Labour) governments have been complaining about it since the 1940s. Medical students receive a free education at the expense of the state, then skip overseas instead of working for the NHS. This is also the reason so many foreigners and minorities work in the NHS. For them, the poor pay and conditions are a step up, not a step down.

  110. @Nico
    @Wilkey

    The average lifespan in OECD countries is around 79 to 82 and the age of the average COVID-19 victim appears to be similar. Estimating how many life years are lost is difficult due to 1) the increasing probability, as one nears 80, that one will in fact live some years longer, and 2) the tendency of notorious COVID-19 comorbidities to subtract life years. Crunching some quick-and-dirty numbers I figured that in Britain, the average COVID-19 victim lost about seven years of life.

    The kicker is in figuring how far we are willing to go to save someone's life: you can't kill off an entire country to spare one person. On the other hand monetizing someone seems repulsive, and yet that is what actuaries are required to do when pricing or allocating medical resources. In the U.S. a life saved is often estimated at $10 million per head; in the U.K., the N.H.S. uses a per-QALY (quality-adjusted life year) estimate of about £30 thousand in terms of pricing acceptable prognoses. Some people say one is too low or one is too high; some say that monetizing human life time is immoral period. Regardless, this method of pricing large-scale measures is "normal" in today's world, and if as Moderna's C.E.O. claims COVID-19 is here to stay (not an impossible scenario in my view) there will before too long be a need to "normalize" (read: calm down) anti-COVID-19 measures along these lines if we are to preserve enough economic fundamentals to support a modern health care system with such niceties as, for example, I.C.U.s and respirators in the first place.

    There is perhaps another way, which would be to count the number of QALY lost by imposing COVID-19-related restrictions. Estimating the impact on people's lives is complicated because even in a "firebreak" lockdown there are differences: a stay-at-home mother of 3 on 10 acres in the countryside will likely have her life impacted rather less than a young single banker in London (but if her husband loses his job she could be in for a far more consequential impact). Let's say such a lockdown reduces the QALY of the affected population by about half the time it is in force. So a two-month firebreak lockdown will result in a loss of one month for each of Britain's about 66 million people, a loss of 5.5 million QALYs. But supposing everyone in Britain caught COVID-19 to herd immunity, and the absolute death rate is indeed 0.8%. This would mean 520,000 COVID-19 deaths, and at 7 QALYs lost per victim, about 3,696,000 QALYs lost to COVID-19.

    There are a lot of caveats to these numbers, but you get the idea. A lockdown to prevent hospital overflow wasn't unreasonable when we didn't understand the virus very well. It is less reasonable now that we know a bit more. If there are other ways to prevent hospital overflow they need to be explored, because otherwise by almost any metric the present cure is worse than the disease. And even if banking everything on the vaccine pays off this time (it might, but I am still wary), the conditions of the modern world are such that we can likely expect something similar in about 20 years' time. Best start preparing now.

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “The average lifespan in OECD countries is around 79 to 82 and the age of the average COVID-19 victim appears to be similar [seven paragraphs of loggorhea menstruating WELL past the close]”

    When you have a functioning prefrontal cortex, this fact alone makes clear covid is a hoax, as I recognized and declared last February.

    Eleven months into this hoax and I still don’t own a Facediaper™.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    As you said you didn’t read the rest of what I wrote and you obviously have never had a look at actuarial science or statistics.

    Average lifespan counts ALL specimens in a given zone including those who die below the average. When you make it to 80 years of age you’ve already passed enough obstacles that your chances of making it to 90 (all other factors equal) are substantially higher than they are for the average human in said zone.

    I think there is a convincing case to be made that COVID-19’s death toll is not worth the level of fuss being made. You going by instinct is fine enough on the streets, but why you bother hanging out on a rather autistic forum if you don’t like elaborating further on the underlying mechanics is rather amusing to speculate on.

    , @NOTA
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Isn't it weird how every country on Earth is being taken in by the hoax in the same way, including juicing their covid death statistics in exactly the same way? Why, it's almost as though they are all having the same actual disease sweep through their populations, causing the same sorts of problems everywhere.

  111. @donut
    @obwandiyag

    Elderly people esp females are prone to develop A-fib , often a urinary tract infection puts females into A-fib . Just a guess but the incidence rate may may be up because it gets diagnosed more often in time to intervene . They don't due autopsies on elderly people found dead at home unless there are obvious signs of violence .

    https://nypost.com/2020/12/24/the-autopsy-a-fading-practice-revealed-secrets-of-covid-19/

    Replies: @obwandiyag

    I knew some bozo like you would trot out the old “it only is up amongst older people” canard.

    Learn what “adjusted for age” means. A-fib is up 30%–adjusted for age. And so your contentions are moot.

    • Replies: @donut
    @obwandiyag

    I know what “adjusted for age” means you just didn't mention it in your post .

  112. @Buffalo Joe
    @AceDeuce

    Ace, my mother is 103 and has been a virtual prisoner at the assisted living facility where she resides.She is also at the top of the list when they procure vaccine. She prays for an Angel to come and take her to Eternal Rest. I am not callous , but when you feature the "tragic' Covid deaths of people who are 94 through 98, some in "memory care, you are pandering. Now, stay safe.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    I’m sorry about your mother. My best wishes to her. Sorry I was harsh to you. You’re right about the pandering being wrong, but the MSM should never be taken seriously.

  113. @Reg Cæsar
    @Thoughts


    Or you could realize that we’ve spent far more time dead then alive
     
    On Feb 7th, John Lennon will have been dead longer than he was alive. On May 20th, Kurt Cobain.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Re: Lennon, I think you mean October 9, not Feb. 7.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    Re: Lennon, I think you mean October 9, not Feb. 7.
     
    No, Lennon lived 60 days after his final birthday. Feb. 6 is 60 days after his final day.

    You know when Biden reached Reagan's presidential age record? Election Day. Here are some handy calculators.
  114. @epebble
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    It is not a hoax. California's Air Quality agency is temporarily lifting air quality concerns because there is no place to store bodies. Never in the history there has been a case of running out of funeral homes, refrigerated trucks and crematorium capacity simultaneously. This is in addition to running out of bottled oxygen and hospital beds.

    Backlog of bodies caused by COVID-19 forces California air quality agency to suspend cremation limits
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-19-backlog-bodies-cremation-limits-suspended-california-air-quality-agency/

    Los Angeles is running out of oxygen
    https://www.deseret.com/u-s-world/2021/1/6/22216826/coronavirus-spike-california-oxygen

    California hospitals at 'brink of catastrophe' as many run out of ICU beds
    https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/california-hospitals-at-brink-of-catastrophe-as-many-run-out-of-icu-beds-1.5249919

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Intelligent Dasein

    The real significance to this news is that America’s medical infrastructure is unable to handle a rather mild respiratory infection.

    That doesn’t bode well.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Intelligent Dasein

    The real significance to this news is that America’s medical infrastructure is unable to handle a rather mild respiratory infection.

    SARS-2 is a vascular disease that is spread via the respiratory route. You should check your facts before commenting.

  115. @Intelligent Dasein
    @epebble

    The real significance to this news is that America's medical infrastructure is unable to handle a rather mild respiratory infection.

    That doesn't bode well.

    Replies: @anon

    The real significance to this news is that America’s medical infrastructure is unable to handle a rather mild respiratory infection.

    SARS-2 is a vascular disease that is spread via the respiratory route. You should check your facts before commenting.

  116. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    Re: Lennon, I think you mean October 9, not Feb. 7.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Re: Lennon, I think you mean October 9, not Feb. 7.

    No, Lennon lived 60 days after his final birthday. Feb. 6 is 60 days after his final day.

    You know when Biden reached Reagan’s presidential age record? Election Day. Here are some handy calculators.

  117. @obwandiyag
    @donut

    I knew some bozo like you would trot out the old "it only is up amongst older people" canard.

    Learn what "adjusted for age" means. A-fib is up 30%--adjusted for age. And so your contentions are moot.

    Replies: @donut

    I know what “adjusted for age” means you just didn’t mention it in your post .

  118. @MEH 0910
    @HammerJack


    Ringo had only one great song after the Beatles–“It Don’t Come Easy”–and that was essentially a Beatles song anyway.
     
    What about "Photograph"?

    Photograph
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nevdSt_2PIM

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photograph_(Ringo_Starr_song)

    The officially released version was recorded in Los Angeles with producer Richard Perry. It incorporates aspects of Phil Spector's Wall of Sound through the presence of multiple drums and acoustic guitars, as well as an orchestra and a choir. Aside from Starr and Harrison, the musicians on the recording include Nicky Hopkins, Bobby Keys, Jim Keltner, and Spector's musical arranger, Jack Nitzsche.
     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photograph_(Ringo_Starr_song)#Recording

    Jack Nitzsche, Phil Spector's musical arranger for much of the 1960s,[49][50] provided the song's string and choral arrangements, which were overdubbed at Burbank Studios on 29 June.[10] Aside from Nitzsche's contributions, the recording incorporates aspects of Spector's Wall of Sound production[51] through the use of multiple rhythm guitars and drums, and prominent percussion such as castanets.[52]
     

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Heh, I did think of that song as soon as I posted. It’s a good song. So I immediately edited my remark to say “one great” song rather than just “one good” song.

  119. @ferd
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Are you guys in heavy lockdown states? If you live in the upper midwest you'll have many friends who've been through it. In my state we're not up to the dizzying case percentages of the Dakotas but almost 10% positive for the state has taken some diligence and has earned us Herd Immunity Light. I'd say I can list 80-100 acquaintances who had it and recovered, with two deaths.

    http://91-divoc.com/pages/covid-visualization/?chart=states-normalized&highlight=Nebraska&show=us-states&y=both&scale=linear&data=cases&data-source=jhu&xaxis=right-8wk#states-normalized

    I got it in late August with three family members. For me the brain fog and depression was pretty nasty for six weeks. I periodically feel tired and queasy but am hopeful tomorrow will be perfect.

    An elderly social group in town spawned eight cases and three deaths. That story didn't make it to the news.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Jim Don Bob

    My State is pretty mellow about the LOCKDOWNS, Ferd.

    Since I wrote last, I ran into a co-worker who has had the Kung Flu. This guy is 57 y/o. He had to spend 5 days in the hospital, so it wasn’t so benign for him. He was not at all worried about people not wearing the face diapers though.

    I’m glad you are mostly over it.

    • Replies: @ferd
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ha, indeed. I haven't seen a tendency for those who get the virus around here to call for more caution either- probably the contrary. My more progressive friends have tended to isolate more carefully and have been less likely to get it.

    The more interesting point is the huge disparity between places that have gone very hot, illustrated anecdotally by the difference in number of second-had experience between you and me. It was quite an experience in N/S Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Wisconsin in October, November, December. We were hotter than any country on Earth and it was a story that was not covered on the national level.

  120. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Nico

    "The average lifespan in OECD countries is around 79 to 82 and the age of the average COVID-19 victim appears to be similar [seven paragraphs of loggorhea menstruating WELL past the close]"

    When you have a functioning prefrontal cortex, this fact alone makes clear covid is a hoax, as I recognized and declared last February.

    Eleven months into this hoax and I still don't own a Facediaper™.

    Replies: @Nico, @NOTA

    As you said you didn’t read the rest of what I wrote and you obviously have never had a look at actuarial science or statistics.

    Average lifespan counts ALL specimens in a given zone including those who die below the average. When you make it to 80 years of age you’ve already passed enough obstacles that your chances of making it to 90 (all other factors equal) are substantially higher than they are for the average human in said zone.

    I think there is a convincing case to be made that COVID-19’s death toll is not worth the level of fuss being made. You going by instinct is fine enough on the streets, but why you bother hanging out on a rather autistic forum if you don’t like elaborating further on the underlying mechanics is rather amusing to speculate on.

    • Agree: Dissident
  121. @anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How old were you when you read The Stand?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I read The Stand when I was in my late twenties or so. I found it enjoyable to read all the references to locations I knew so well.

    Before he was famous, King was turned down for a job at the local newspaper, where my best friend was a reporter for a while. I thought it was funny that my friend could get a job there but Stephen King couldn’t.

    Another one from King is The Shining, which takes its inspiration from the nearby Stanley Hotel, where I had some pretty good fun.

    Why do you ask?

    • Replies: @ganderson
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz- we must be about the same age- that's when I read "the Stand". The ending sucked, but it was pretty gripping, mostly.

    I had lunch at the Stanley a couple summers ago- although I had always been told the Shining was inspired by Mohonk Mountain Lodge in upstate NY.

    I noticed today on the radio Slow Joe's new press secretary prattling on about "virus out of control...etc".

    I thought Trump didn't do enough to combat the lockdowners- maybe in our debased culture there wasn't much he could have done, but I think we're now headed for psychotic levels of stupidity. (apologies, Achmed) Look for the Demential Patient to put pressure on people like Noem and DeSantis to start locking down.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  122. @Achmed E. Newman
    @ferd

    My State is pretty mellow about the LOCKDOWNS, Ferd.

    Since I wrote last, I ran into a co-worker who has had the Kung Flu. This guy is 57 y/o. He had to spend 5 days in the hospital, so it wasn't so benign for him. He was not at all worried about people not wearing the face diapers though.

    I'm glad you are mostly over it.

    Replies: @ferd

    Ha, indeed. I haven’t seen a tendency for those who get the virus around here to call for more caution either- probably the contrary. My more progressive friends have tended to isolate more carefully and have been less likely to get it.

    The more interesting point is the huge disparity between places that have gone very hot, illustrated anecdotally by the difference in number of second-had experience between you and me. It was quite an experience in N/S Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Wisconsin in October, November, December. We were hotter than any country on Earth and it was a story that was not covered on the national level.

  123. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Nico

    "The average lifespan in OECD countries is around 79 to 82 and the age of the average COVID-19 victim appears to be similar [seven paragraphs of loggorhea menstruating WELL past the close]"

    When you have a functioning prefrontal cortex, this fact alone makes clear covid is a hoax, as I recognized and declared last February.

    Eleven months into this hoax and I still don't own a Facediaper™.

    Replies: @Nico, @NOTA

    Isn’t it weird how every country on Earth is being taken in by the hoax in the same way, including juicing their covid death statistics in exactly the same way? Why, it’s almost as though they are all having the same actual disease sweep through their populations, causing the same sorts of problems everywhere.

  124. @El Dato
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Anecdote: I know a lady in her 30s who got it twice. First time only slightly noticeable (but a antibody test said, yes it's there). 14 days later she got knocked out for a week. Maybe the virus was adapting?

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Anecdote: I know a lady in her 30s who got it twice. First time only slightly noticeable (but a antibody test said, yes it’s there). 14 days later she got knocked out for a week. Maybe the virus was adapting?

    14 days after the antibody test? My guesses would be a bad test result, antibody tests aren’t as precise as the gold standard of RT-PCR, saw a claim they have a 96% ceiling due to how wild our immune systems are, or her immune system either isn’t 100%, or wasn’t 100% in reacting to the virus. Was her perceived second infection confirmed by RT-PCR?

    “The virus adapting” inside one person’s body who didn’t quickly throw it off, allowing an ecological battle inside it, is how we think the new British variant came about.

  125. @Buzz Mohawk
    @anon

    I read The Stand when I was in my late twenties or so. I found it enjoyable to read all the references to locations I knew so well.


    Before he was famous, King was turned down for a job at the local newspaper, where my best friend was a reporter for a while. I thought it was funny that my friend could get a job there but Stephen King couldn't.

    Another one from King is The Shining, which takes its inspiration from the nearby Stanley Hotel, where I had some pretty good fun.

    Why do you ask?

    Replies: @ganderson

    Buzz- we must be about the same age- that’s when I read “the Stand”. The ending sucked, but it was pretty gripping, mostly.

    I had lunch at the Stanley a couple summers ago- although I had always been told the Shining was inspired by Mohonk Mountain Lodge in upstate NY.

    I noticed today on the radio Slow Joe’s new press secretary prattling on about “virus out of control…etc”.

    I thought Trump didn’t do enough to combat the lockdowners- maybe in our debased culture there wasn’t much he could have done, but I think we’re now headed for psychotic levels of stupidity. (apologies, Achmed) Look for the Demential Patient to put pressure on people like Noem and DeSantis to start locking down.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @ganderson


    I had lunch at the Stanley a couple summers ago- although I had always been told the Shining was inspired by Mohonk Mountain Lodge in upstate NY.
     
    You're probably right, but the owners of the Stanley hyped the Shining connection when I was there. My girlfriend was an actress in their summer theater, and they gave her a room for the season. We made the most of it.

    ... I think we’re now headed for psychotic levels of stupidity.
     
    Oh yes.
  126. @ferd
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Are you guys in heavy lockdown states? If you live in the upper midwest you'll have many friends who've been through it. In my state we're not up to the dizzying case percentages of the Dakotas but almost 10% positive for the state has taken some diligence and has earned us Herd Immunity Light. I'd say I can list 80-100 acquaintances who had it and recovered, with two deaths.

    http://91-divoc.com/pages/covid-visualization/?chart=states-normalized&highlight=Nebraska&show=us-states&y=both&scale=linear&data=cases&data-source=jhu&xaxis=right-8wk#states-normalized

    I got it in late August with three family members. For me the brain fog and depression was pretty nasty for six weeks. I periodically feel tired and queasy but am hopeful tomorrow will be perfect.

    An elderly social group in town spawned eight cases and three deaths. That story didn't make it to the news.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Jim Don Bob

    I tested positive around Halloween just before I was to visit an old girl friend in the NE. ;-(

    No symptoms.

  127. @ganderson
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz- we must be about the same age- that's when I read "the Stand". The ending sucked, but it was pretty gripping, mostly.

    I had lunch at the Stanley a couple summers ago- although I had always been told the Shining was inspired by Mohonk Mountain Lodge in upstate NY.

    I noticed today on the radio Slow Joe's new press secretary prattling on about "virus out of control...etc".

    I thought Trump didn't do enough to combat the lockdowners- maybe in our debased culture there wasn't much he could have done, but I think we're now headed for psychotic levels of stupidity. (apologies, Achmed) Look for the Demential Patient to put pressure on people like Noem and DeSantis to start locking down.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    I had lunch at the Stanley a couple summers ago- although I had always been told the Shining was inspired by Mohonk Mountain Lodge in upstate NY.

    You’re probably right, but the owners of the Stanley hyped the Shining connection when I was there. My girlfriend was an actress in their summer theater, and they gave her a room for the season. We made the most of it.

    … I think we’re now headed for psychotic levels of stupidity.

    Oh yes.

  128. Anonymous[414] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mark G.
    @Jonathan Mason


    For example, in Cuba the education of doctors is paid for by the state, and everyone has access to free healthcare at a place near where they live. Cuba also sends thousands of doctors overseas to help in even poorer nations.
     
    Cuba had a problem with doctors defecting when they went overseas so the Cuban government required that their wives and children stay behind to act as hostages. If a doctor defected, he would never see his wife and children again. If you have to resort to this sort of thing to get your medical system to work, you really don't have a very good medical system.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Britain has the same problem with its NHS. British (Labour) governments have been complaining about it since the 1940s. Medical students receive a free education at the expense of the state, then skip overseas instead of working for the NHS. This is also the reason so many foreigners and minorities work in the NHS. For them, the poor pay and conditions are a step up, not a step down.

  129. @epebble
    @Joe Stalin

    Many years back when we were in San Diego, I got a CB radio for my son to play with. When I turned it on in front of him, we heard a drug deal going on! That was the last of CB radio for us. It is amazing how many drug dealers were being caught and jailed for deals done on CB radios (this was before cell phones ).

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Autochthon

    I recently watched a video of owls on YouTube with my toddler. (I just wanted him to see an owl, as we’d been reading about them.) He was a bit surprised (as was I; I won’t again repeat the mistake of watching anything with him I’ve not already seen myself in its entirety, but at the time I’d thought “Okay, a video from National Geographic; nothing to worry about….”) when the owl attacked and ate a mouse, saying “He eats the mouse?!” I told him “Yes; owls eat mice.” He was brilliantly resilient to the whole concept, not much affected at all; and although initially scared I had introduced him to nature red in tooth and claw before he was psychologically prepared for it, given his relatively mild reaction, I actually think it may be good for him to know how the real word works on this front, since he already understands we eat cows and chickens, after all. Maybe there is value in your child having learned about dirtbags so as to avoid their ways later…. 🤷🏻‍♂️

  130. Just as he had come in to his own last year as a fund raiser for NHS charities, Captain Sir Tom Moore was cut down in his prime at 100 years old by COVID-19.


    [MORE]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Tom

    Captain Sir Thomas Moore (30 April 1920 – 2 February 2021),[1] popularly known as “Captain Tom“, was a British Army officer and centenarian, known for his achievements raising money for charity in the run-up to his 100th birthday during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Moore served in India, the Burma campaign during the Second World War, and later became an instructor in armoured warfare. After the war, he worked as managing director of a concrete company and was an avid motorcycle racer.

    On 6 April 2020, at the age of 99, he began to walk round his garden in aid of NHS Charities Together, with the goal of raising £1,000 by his hundredth birthday. In the 24-day course of his fundraising he made many media appearances and became a popular household name in the United Kingdom, earning a number of accolades and attracting over 1.5 million individual donations. In recognition of his efforts, he received the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Helen Rollason Award at the 2020 ceremony. He performed in a cover version of the song “You’ll Never Walk Alone” sung by Michael Ball, with proceeds going to the same charity. The single topped the UK music charts, making him the oldest person to achieve a UK number one.

    On the morning of his hundredth birthday the total raised by his walk passed £30 million, and by the time the campaign closed at the end of that day had increased to over £32.79 million (worth almost £39 million with expected tax rebates). His birthday was marked in a number of ways, including flypasts by the Royal Air Force and the British Army. He received over 150,000 cards, and was appointed as honorary colonel of the Army Foundation College. On 17 July 2020, he was personally invested as a Knight Bachelor by the Queen at Windsor Castle.

    Moore died on 2 February, two days after being hospitalised with COVID-19.

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