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Blogger Education Realist responds to Reuters’ fine investigative report on the systemic cheating on the SAT going on in Asia:

But like all reported stories I’ve seen on Asian cheating of the SAT, there’s no connection to the larger interests involved.

As your story mentions, many public and private universities are recruiting foreign students who are mostly from China and South Korea, even though the students are cheating on applications and tests, lying about their grades and resumes. Keep in mind that universities get tax breaks and other federal funding and public universities were chartered to serve the educational needs of their states.

Meanwhile, the SAT is moving outside its old beat as a college admissions test into a high school graduation test. Several states have committed to use the SAT as a high school exit examination. Several states have switched from the ACT, which focuses on American students, to the SAT, which manifestly does not.

This isn’t just an issue for worried parents of college applicants. The College Board encourages and benefits from international criminal racketeering organizations that engage in immigration and mail fraud while enabling colleges to pretend they are accepting qualified applicants when in fact the colleges know full well their applicants lied. It collects money from multiple state contracts for a test product they can’t be bothered to spend money protecting from those organized criminal enterprises. State and private universities knowingly consume a fraudulent information product in order to fatten their coffers, all the while benefiting from tax-exempt status at both the federal and state interest.

Should the College Board be allowed to sell state contracts given its knowing participation in organized crime? Should our tax dollars be spent on universities if they are no longer acting in the public interest? Reasonable people can undoubtedly disagree on these questions. But surely they should at least be raised.

ER raises some other good points:

You know how reporters say [so and so] refused repeated requests to comment? You apparently only asked David Coleman to comment once.

David Coleman is a celebrity in the world of education reform. He is celebrated, rightly or wrongly, for Common Core standards. He took over the helm at the College Board in 2012–that fact alone should be mentioned, should it not? Presumably he was present, along with other “senior College Board staff” at the meeting with the Power Point slides in June 2013.

Coleman is not an idiot and he might actually make some progress against cheating if his feet were held to the media fire over it.

Also, ER points out that nobody ever seems to know much about the ACT, even though it is now bigger in the U.S. than the SAT. Is the ACT as vulnerable? Is the reason we seldom hear about the ACT because it has few problems? Or does the lack of attention directed at the ACT by the media allow its problems to fester in silence? I really don’t have a clue …

I’m reminded that something we are lacking in the U.S. is the profession of “standardized test critic.” We don’t need many, but we could use about two independent experts on testing who can each write well for the general public, while being up to date on psychometrics and the like.

We have a large number of high stakes standardized tests, some of which presumably are better than others. But there’s nobody in this giant country who has a well-known reputation as an objective, public-spirited expert on the pros and cons of the various tests. There’s one old liberal from the 1970s who has a little think tank that still puts out quotes for reporters denouncing standardized tests in general; but our society needs somebody more sophisticated who could shine a light on best and worst practices in testing.

Perhaps the biggest reason we don’t have an Ebert & Siskel of standardized testing is The Gap, which could always turn into a career-killer. It’s like if Roger Ebert could have gotten Watsoned at any moment for admitting that movie stars tend to be skinnier than movie reviewers. If so, Ebert probably would have found something else to do for a living.

 
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  1. Thanks for the link and the kind words!

    Well, I try hard to be a test critic. I love tests. The fact that they don’t work any more is very depressing. But I agree we need someone in the media. Bob Schaeffer has done really good work on the SAT international fraud, and we agree on a lot of problems.

    But Bob says “There are problems with testing, this is why we can’t test.” I say “There are problems with testing, we need to fix them.”

    The ACT does not have a big international market. Therefore, Asians don’t use it–they prefer the SAT 3:1, and I think (but am not sure, that’s my next piece) that’s Asians living in America. As a result, there’s no interest in cheating on it. Thus the ACT can presumably reuse a test now and again without it causing trouble.

    I’ve been watching a number of long-time ACT test states move to the SAT, and I’m very concerned. Why would they switch?

    • Replies: @anonitron2
    @education realist

    There are certainly moneyed interests I'm not clued into, but the SAT still dominates the ACT in terms of public consciousness. Prestige is likely a draw for tiger children in addition to the apparent ease of cheating.

    Off topic: Steve, how am I supposed to remember all these fake email addresses?

  2. yeah it could but there is no will to do it. same as all the other problems.

    OT- Paul “50 million more muslim immigrants” Ryan is officially getting primaried. The (already wealthy) challenger is pretty clearly following Trump’s lead, and even admits as much.

    Hopefully many more wealthy white guys get in on this trend.

    Wisconsin businessman Paul Nehlen announced Tuesday that he is the tea party-allied candidate who is challenging House Speaker Paul D. Ryan in the Republican primary, saying he’s “had it” with the speaker betraying conservatives.

    Sources first confirmed to The Washington Times earlier this week that a wealthy businessman was mounting a primary challenge to Mr. Ryan in Wisconsin’s 1st Congressional District, but Mr. Nehlen did not reveal his identity until now.

    “Paul Ryan’s embrace of big government spending, his continued support of illegal immigration and imported workers, and his championing of the job-killing trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership betrays me, this district, and this nation,” he said.

    “He’s failed to put America’s security and American jobs first. I’ve had it. We’ve all had it,” said Mr. Nehlen, a successful executive, entrepreneur and inventor who previously donated to Mr. Ryan’s campaigns.

    “Ted Cruz and Donald Trump have become frontrunners in this presidential election cycle because they have dared to communicate an anti-establishment message. They won’t be alone,” he said. “I will bring the fight straight to one of the most powerful establishment players in Washington, taking him on right here in Wisconsin’s 1st District. Paul Ryan is a career politician. It’s time that career came to an end.”

  3. I think you’ve identified your calling, Steve. Although, standardized test journalist may not pay much more than your current gig.

  4. Nice job putting Ebert first. He was superior.

  5. via wiki

    >RICO also permits a private individual “damaged in his business or property” by a “racketeer” to file a civil suit. The plaintiff must prove the existence of an “enterprise”. The defendant(s) are not the enterprise; in other words, the defendant(s) and the enterprise are not one and the same.[3] There must be one of four specified relationships between the defendant(s) and the enterprise: either the defendant(s) invested the proceeds of the pattern of racketeering activity into the enterprise (18 U.S.C. § 1962(a)); or the defendant(s) acquired or maintained an interest in, or control of, the enterprise through the pattern of racketeering activity (subsection (b)); or the defendant(s) conducted or participated in the affairs of the enterprise “through” the pattern of racketeering activity (subsection (c)); or the defendant(s) conspired to do one of the above (subsection (d)).[4] In essence, the enterprise is either the ‘prize,’ ‘instrument,’ ‘victim,’ or ‘perpetrator’ of the racketeers.[5] A civil RICO action can be filed in state or federal court.[6]<

    seems ripe for an enterprising attorney

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
    @newrouter

    A civil plaintiff would need to quantify damages. That would be tough, both finding the plaintiff and proving the damages.

  6. Ed says:

    If higher educational institutions developed their own entrance exams alot of these problems would be avoided. The SAT is gameable because its only one test. If each institution had its own exam, there might be a problem with cheating on the Harvard entrance exam but it should’t be an issue with schools that are less well known.

    • Replies: @The Practical Conservative
    @Ed

    That used to be how things worked, but that was "biased".

    , @newrouter
    @Ed

    > there might be a problem with cheating on the Harvard entrance exam<

    why are the "Ivy League" the standard?

  7. @education realist
    Thanks for the link and the kind words!

    Well, I try hard to be a test critic. I love tests. The fact that they don't work any more is very depressing. But I agree we need someone in the media. Bob Schaeffer has done really good work on the SAT international fraud, and we agree on a lot of problems.

    But Bob says "There are problems with testing, this is why we can't test." I say "There are problems with testing, we need to fix them."

    The ACT does not have a big international market. Therefore, Asians don't use it--they prefer the SAT 3:1, and I think (but am not sure, that's my next piece) that's Asians living in America. As a result, there's no interest in cheating on it. Thus the ACT can presumably reuse a test now and again without it causing trouble.

    I've been watching a number of long-time ACT test states move to the SAT, and I'm very concerned. Why would they switch?

    Replies: @anonitron2

    There are certainly moneyed interests I’m not clued into, but the SAT still dominates the ACT in terms of public consciousness. Prestige is likely a draw for tiger children in addition to the apparent ease of cheating.

    Off topic: Steve, how am I supposed to remember all these fake email addresses?

  8. This Rico ??

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Anonymous

    No , more like this Rico

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwj45Nj33ejLAhVCuIMKHR5MD18QuAIIKTAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DFEiOjH0v0oM&usg=AFQjCNGiKzRtx1Sgg6qwTJzT6yxoWl3-FQ&sig2=hnfpeqOxq4xglxuKptUFQw

  9. OT:

    A while back we had a discussion about things we couldn’t believe, yet had evidence that were real:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/what-things-that-exist-do-you-have-a-hard-time-believing-in/

    One of the things was famed Nazi commando Otto Skorzeny. It appears likely that he committed an assassination for the Mossad:

    http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/1.711115

    • Replies: @Cracker
    @Lugash

    This gun is for hire...Why waste a good resource, ja?

    , @Olorin
    @Lugash

    When a person's really good at something, they don't care who signs the paycheck. Nu?

  10. they don’t develop their own entrance exams for two reasons. First, the undue burden on the student. Second, and more importantly, it would transfer the blame for the achievement gap from the SAT to the colleges.

  11. @Ed
    If higher educational institutions developed their own entrance exams alot of these problems would be avoided. The SAT is gameable because its only one test. If each institution had its own exam, there might be a problem with cheating on the Harvard entrance exam but it should't be an issue with schools that are less well known.

    Replies: @The Practical Conservative, @newrouter

    That used to be how things worked, but that was “biased”.

  12. RICO can be used for anything.

  13. West Seneca is a hotbed of the opt-out movement in rebellion against New York State tests to assess student academic progress and teacher effectiveness:
    http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/education/two-thousand-kids-in-west-seneca-schools-opt-out-20150414
    That article is from last year, but testing is a big business, and a playground for Big Data. A similar article in today’s (March 29, 2016) Buffalo News states
    ==QUOTE==
    A new contractor, Questar Assessment, was hired to create tests starting next year. While the old vendor, Pearson, created this year’s test, educators met last fall and selected the questions. By the 2018 test, teachers will be writing questions. … “I’m encouraged by the changes that the state has implemented,” said James E. Przepasniak, superintendent at Lake Shore Central Schools, where last year 61 percent of students refused to take the state assessments. … West Seneca, where last year 71 percent of students refused to take the tests.
    ==UNQUOTE==

    Having Siskel & Ebert-type academic test reviewers is an intriguing idea, but would these reviewers be paid (and by whom?), or would they do it for free as public-spirited individuals? And would testing companies try to thwart the reviewers by copyrighting their tests?

  14. @Ed
    If higher educational institutions developed their own entrance exams alot of these problems would be avoided. The SAT is gameable because its only one test. If each institution had its own exam, there might be a problem with cheating on the Harvard entrance exam but it should't be an issue with schools that are less well known.

    Replies: @The Practical Conservative, @newrouter

    > there might be a problem with cheating on the Harvard entrance exam<

    why are the "Ivy League" the standard?

  15. @Lugash
    OT:

    A while back we had a discussion about things we couldn't believe, yet had evidence that were real:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/what-things-that-exist-do-you-have-a-hard-time-believing-in/

    One of the things was famed Nazi commando Otto Skorzeny. It appears likely that he committed an assassination for the Mossad:

    http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/1.711115

    Replies: @Cracker, @Olorin

    This gun is for hire…Why waste a good resource, ja?

  16. Gotta recycle those greenbacks somehow. The Chinese have T-Bills stacked to the rafters. They gotta spend it on something, and since munitions are out, they are buying-up housing, diplomas, and whole companies when they can get away with it, which isn’t all that often.

    I think I’m starting to appreciate the Petro-dollar model more and more. Saudi’s send us oil, we send them M-1’s and F-15’s. And Citigroup stock.

    To be sure, they are both BS propagated by useful idiots like Krugman, but the latter, at least, didn’t have our kids and grandkids living in penury.

    • Replies: @Bill jones
    @Portlander

    Africa. the Chinese are spending their Federal Reseve notes buying Africa.

  17. Before we start high-fiving so-called “Education Realist,” I have a few points to note.

    1. China is a developing country with a high degree of corruption. It does not stretch one’s imagination to imagine that there is much academic cheating that goes hand-in-hand with the adult version, i.e. corruption, in that country. And as a rapidly developing economic juggernaut with export orientation, the demand for American educational credentials is massive… which leads every Chinese Tom, Dick, and Harry to want such a credential, warranted/deserved or not.

    2. “Education Realist” tends to conflate the likely widespread Chinese cheating with not just all Chinese in China, but most East Asians, even the ones in the United States. More on that below.

    3. As a percentage of foreign students in the U.S. the Chinese portion has been rising dramatically; the Indian segment is also rising, but not at the same rate. This likely compounds the issue.

    4. Meanwhile, the percentage of Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese foreign students in the U.S. has been declining in the past 15 years. More and more, Koreans, for example, now prefer to study in China or Europe, rather than in the U.S. as Korea’s trade ties with China deepen significantly.

    5. Discovering incidents of cheating is useful for finding that there is a problem. The next question is just how widespread that problem is, and how the scale of that problem compares from one area to another (if for example, 50% of Chinese in China cheat, but 60% of our students admit to cheating, we can’t exactly get indignant easily).

    6. One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

    7. In my previous exchanges with Education Realist, she claimed that she had seen research documenting the said mismatch among Asian-Americans, whom she accused of engaging in widespread cheating. When I examined the links she provided, they actually contradicted her claims, at which point she called me a bunch of names and disappeared from this blog for a while.

    8. I am actually in agreement with Education Realist on the possibility, indeed likelihood, there is much academic cheating and fraud in China, but that does not automatically make her claims about other Asians or Asian-Americans valid. Asian-American mismatch does not exist (per the links she provided). As for other foreign Asians (not from China), I think it would be very useful to be able to see some data on mismatch (alas, such granular data may not exist, at least not ones that break down by origin country).

    • Replies: @27 year old
    @Twinkie

    Yellow knighting

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @peterike
    @Twinkie


    One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

     

    Why do you assume cheating stops at the test? It doesn't.

    In professional settings the information will be largely anecdotal, unless you manage to break into a company's HR files and read their employee reviews. That said, there are mountains of anecdotal evidence of the poor quality of Indian software programmers. Though large corporations are every bit as PC-addled as universities, and they would frown GREATLY on Asians getting poor job evaluations. In the workplace, Asians, blacks, Hispanics, women and gays all get a huge advantage. Only the usual cis white male has to routinely earn his keep.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @NOTA

    , @Anon
    @Twinkie

    I once took a class on geology(one of those requirements) in college, and a T.A. was from China.

    There was certainly a mismatch between word and pronunciation.

    He pronounced 'sheet' as 'shit', and we couldn't stop laughing.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Twinkie

    I am pretty sure Education Realist is a man.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  18. @Twinkie
    Before we start high-fiving so-called "Education Realist," I have a few points to note.

    1. China is a developing country with a high degree of corruption. It does not stretch one's imagination to imagine that there is much academic cheating that goes hand-in-hand with the adult version, i.e. corruption, in that country. And as a rapidly developing economic juggernaut with export orientation, the demand for American educational credentials is massive... which leads every Chinese Tom, Dick, and Harry to want such a credential, warranted/deserved or not.

    2. "Education Realist" tends to conflate the likely widespread Chinese cheating with not just all Chinese in China, but most East Asians, even the ones in the United States. More on that below.

    3. As a percentage of foreign students in the U.S. the Chinese portion has been rising dramatically; the Indian segment is also rising, but not at the same rate. This likely compounds the issue.

    4. Meanwhile, the percentage of Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese foreign students in the U.S. has been declining in the past 15 years. More and more, Koreans, for example, now prefer to study in China or Europe, rather than in the U.S. as Korea's trade ties with China deepen significantly.

    5. Discovering incidents of cheating is useful for finding that there is a problem. The next question is just how widespread that problem is, and how the scale of that problem compares from one area to another (if for example, 50% of Chinese in China cheat, but 60% of our students admit to cheating, we can't exactly get indignant easily).

    6. One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

    7. In my previous exchanges with Education Realist, she claimed that she had seen research documenting the said mismatch among Asian-Americans, whom she accused of engaging in widespread cheating. When I examined the links she provided, they actually contradicted her claims, at which point she called me a bunch of names and disappeared from this blog for a while.

    8. I am actually in agreement with Education Realist on the possibility, indeed likelihood, there is much academic cheating and fraud in China, but that does not automatically make her claims about other Asians or Asian-Americans valid. Asian-American mismatch does not exist (per the links she provided). As for other foreign Asians (not from China), I think it would be very useful to be able to see some data on mismatch (alas, such granular data may not exist, at least not ones that break down by origin country).

    Replies: @27 year old, @peterike, @Anon, @ScarletNumber

    Yellow knighting

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @27 year old

    I am of the generation and religion that still consider "knight" a compliment.

  19. @Twinkie
    Before we start high-fiving so-called "Education Realist," I have a few points to note.

    1. China is a developing country with a high degree of corruption. It does not stretch one's imagination to imagine that there is much academic cheating that goes hand-in-hand with the adult version, i.e. corruption, in that country. And as a rapidly developing economic juggernaut with export orientation, the demand for American educational credentials is massive... which leads every Chinese Tom, Dick, and Harry to want such a credential, warranted/deserved or not.

    2. "Education Realist" tends to conflate the likely widespread Chinese cheating with not just all Chinese in China, but most East Asians, even the ones in the United States. More on that below.

    3. As a percentage of foreign students in the U.S. the Chinese portion has been rising dramatically; the Indian segment is also rising, but not at the same rate. This likely compounds the issue.

    4. Meanwhile, the percentage of Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese foreign students in the U.S. has been declining in the past 15 years. More and more, Koreans, for example, now prefer to study in China or Europe, rather than in the U.S. as Korea's trade ties with China deepen significantly.

    5. Discovering incidents of cheating is useful for finding that there is a problem. The next question is just how widespread that problem is, and how the scale of that problem compares from one area to another (if for example, 50% of Chinese in China cheat, but 60% of our students admit to cheating, we can't exactly get indignant easily).

    6. One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

    7. In my previous exchanges with Education Realist, she claimed that she had seen research documenting the said mismatch among Asian-Americans, whom she accused of engaging in widespread cheating. When I examined the links she provided, they actually contradicted her claims, at which point she called me a bunch of names and disappeared from this blog for a while.

    8. I am actually in agreement with Education Realist on the possibility, indeed likelihood, there is much academic cheating and fraud in China, but that does not automatically make her claims about other Asians or Asian-Americans valid. Asian-American mismatch does not exist (per the links she provided). As for other foreign Asians (not from China), I think it would be very useful to be able to see some data on mismatch (alas, such granular data may not exist, at least not ones that break down by origin country).

    Replies: @27 year old, @peterike, @Anon, @ScarletNumber

    One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

    Why do you assume cheating stops at the test? It doesn’t.

    In professional settings the information will be largely anecdotal, unless you manage to break into a company’s HR files and read their employee reviews. That said, there are mountains of anecdotal evidence of the poor quality of Indian software programmers. Though large corporations are every bit as PC-addled as universities, and they would frown GREATLY on Asians getting poor job evaluations. In the workplace, Asians, blacks, Hispanics, women and gays all get a huge advantage. Only the usual cis white male has to routinely earn his keep.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @peterike


    Why do you assume cheating stops at the test? It doesn’t.
     
    I don't.

    It would take an incredible and persistent genius to be able to cheat all through one's different levels of schooling, training, and life without being spotted as a cheat. That's not something a mass of people can do. Sooner of later, mismatch shows up statistically if there is a gap between credential and ability. A few individuals may be able to sustain the fraud longer than others, but the law of the large number applies when we talk about a whole ethnic group.

    For example, blacks are admitted into medical schools with some amount of affirmative action (not as wide scale as college admissions). Guess what? They fail the Board certification tests for their specialties at VERY HIGH rates. Asian-American doctors do not. And on most Boards there is an oral component that is effectively immune to cheating. The examiners give you a scenario and the test-taker has to explain the course of action/treatment.

    Similarly at higher levels of STEM, say a physics Ph.D. program, cheating one's way through without actually understanding the material is near impossible.


    That said, there are mountains of anecdotal evidence of the poor quality of Indian software programmers.
     
    Are you talking about American-born Indians or foreigners from India?

    Though large corporations are every bit as PC-addled as universities, and they would frown GREATLY on Asians getting poor job evaluations. In the workplace, Asians, blacks, Hispanics, women and gays all get a huge advantage.
     
    Blacks, Hispanics, and women, yes, but Asian males don't do all that well. If you looked at the tech firms in Silicon Valley, Asian males account for a HUGE percentage of the technical staff, but lag behind white males in management/leadership positions. They seem to suffer from the stereotype that they are poor leaders, if anything. And the same story for partnerships at law firms.

    As for universities, I know, for a fact, there is a prejudice against Asians. I am not talking about student admissions here, but of employment as staff/professors. During my day, it was not uncommon to hear largely Jewish administrators brazenly discuss their anti-Asian feelings. I know, because I taught in college as an untenured academic after finishing graduate school. My sense was that Jews in academia (more administrative types than professors) frequently viewed Asians as competitors and were not kindly disposed toward them. Obviously that tendency was much more pronounced in humanities and social sciences than in STEM fields (where brilliant Asian scientists can't just be dismissed out of hand).

    Replies: @Nico

    , @NOTA
    @peterike

    One-time cheating on a standardized test in another country is very different from consistent cheating through four years of classes on campus. If the Asian students are cheating in class more than others, guven the number of Asian students here, that should have become the stereotype. Instead, the stereotype of Asian students is of grinding away, studying hard enough to get through even classes where they don't get all the material all that well.

    Replies: @Triumph104

  20. @Lugash
    OT:

    A while back we had a discussion about things we couldn't believe, yet had evidence that were real:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/what-things-that-exist-do-you-have-a-hard-time-believing-in/

    One of the things was famed Nazi commando Otto Skorzeny. It appears likely that he committed an assassination for the Mossad:

    http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/1.711115

    Replies: @Cracker, @Olorin

    When a person’s really good at something, they don’t care who signs the paycheck. Nu?

  21. @27 year old
    @Twinkie

    Yellow knighting

    Replies: @Twinkie

    I am of the generation and religion that still consider “knight” a compliment.

  22. @peterike
    @Twinkie


    One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

     

    Why do you assume cheating stops at the test? It doesn't.

    In professional settings the information will be largely anecdotal, unless you manage to break into a company's HR files and read their employee reviews. That said, there are mountains of anecdotal evidence of the poor quality of Indian software programmers. Though large corporations are every bit as PC-addled as universities, and they would frown GREATLY on Asians getting poor job evaluations. In the workplace, Asians, blacks, Hispanics, women and gays all get a huge advantage. Only the usual cis white male has to routinely earn his keep.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @NOTA

    Why do you assume cheating stops at the test? It doesn’t.

    I don’t.

    It would take an incredible and persistent genius to be able to cheat all through one’s different levels of schooling, training, and life without being spotted as a cheat. That’s not something a mass of people can do. Sooner of later, mismatch shows up statistically if there is a gap between credential and ability. A few individuals may be able to sustain the fraud longer than others, but the law of the large number applies when we talk about a whole ethnic group.

    For example, blacks are admitted into medical schools with some amount of affirmative action (not as wide scale as college admissions). Guess what? They fail the Board certification tests for their specialties at VERY HIGH rates. Asian-American doctors do not. And on most Boards there is an oral component that is effectively immune to cheating. The examiners give you a scenario and the test-taker has to explain the course of action/treatment.

    Similarly at higher levels of STEM, say a physics Ph.D. program, cheating one’s way through without actually understanding the material is near impossible.

    That said, there are mountains of anecdotal evidence of the poor quality of Indian software programmers.

    Are you talking about American-born Indians or foreigners from India?

    Though large corporations are every bit as PC-addled as universities, and they would frown GREATLY on Asians getting poor job evaluations. In the workplace, Asians, blacks, Hispanics, women and gays all get a huge advantage.

    Blacks, Hispanics, and women, yes, but Asian males don’t do all that well. If you looked at the tech firms in Silicon Valley, Asian males account for a HUGE percentage of the technical staff, but lag behind white males in management/leadership positions. They seem to suffer from the stereotype that they are poor leaders, if anything. And the same story for partnerships at law firms.

    As for universities, I know, for a fact, there is a prejudice against Asians. I am not talking about student admissions here, but of employment as staff/professors. During my day, it was not uncommon to hear largely Jewish administrators brazenly discuss their anti-Asian feelings. I know, because I taught in college as an untenured academic after finishing graduate school. My sense was that Jews in academia (more administrative types than professors) frequently viewed Asians as competitors and were not kindly disposed toward them. Obviously that tendency was much more pronounced in humanities and social sciences than in STEM fields (where brilliant Asian scientists can’t just be dismissed out of hand).

    • Replies: @Nico
    @Twinkie


    It would take an incredible and persistent genius to be able to cheat all through one’s different levels of schooling, training, and life without being spotted as a cheat. That’s not something a mass of people can do. Sooner of later, mismatch shows up statistically if there is a gap between credential and ability. A few individuals may be able to sustain the fraud longer than others, but the law of the large number applies when we talk about a whole ethnic group.
     
    The other point is someone capable of putting up a front to that extent and for that long is probably fairly gifted to begin with. Which gets back to another point: if corruption and cheating are endemic in China, a lot of it has to do with their very different approach to ethics. One classic example is intellectual property law and piracy in the East vs the West. It wouldn't seem illogical that what we call "cheating" in the mindset of many from that region be widely considered "using all of one's resources." Part of our problem with China (which goes beyond tests) is our failure to understand such attitudes and take the appropriate posture.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  23. The problem with RICO is the judicial firewall of liberal courts for the liberal agenda, nobody has the funds to plow through to the Supreme Court which is most often busy with “gay stuff”.

    Notice for instance the forced imposition of crony-socialist green energy projects (nearly all fraudulent) in complete violation of every tenet of the Sherman Anti Trust act and the associated 50 state acts in order to promote a global Socialist political agenda, not 1 state prosecution or even “query” as to how green energy costs are spread or contracts issued has been initiated, quite the opposite State Attorney Generals have agreed to collude and NOT notice the Sherman Anti Trust Act in regards to electricity generation contracts or illegal immigration. http://news.mpbn.net/post/maine-ag-joins-colleagues-climate-change-fraud-investigation#stream/0 these people should be investigating green energy fraud and price fixing instead they’ve formed a coalition to prosecute those that speak out against their fraud.

    (As if opening up our electrical grid to Abengoa cartel piracy won’t have an effect on the national economy, ask Spain, it did )

    Exhibit A: a $2,200,000,000.00 “Death Ray toll” added onto everybody in CA’s electrical bill. http://www.marketwatch.com/story/could-californias-massive-ivanpah-solar-power-plant-be-forced-to-go-dark-2016-03-16 and that death ray toll isn’t the only immigration toll in CA added onto everybody in CA’s water and electric bill.

    “Give ’em more time, massive taxpayer losses on green energy loans is bad for Hillary, hide ’em till after the election, screw CA, screw America”

    Or how the dysfunctional “plant” can’t be unplugged until after the CA election because the taxpayer and ratepayer losses would kill the Clinton Climate Foundation Candidate before her coronation.

    Hillary’s $500,000,000.00 California electrical toll demand payment .http://dailysignal.com/2016/03/29/taxpayers-are-footing-bill-for-solar-project-that-doesnt-work/

    Ted Cruz’s wife’s bank Goldman Sachs was involved in most of these Green loans, probably Houston office.

    Even the Abengoa bankruptcy was mysteriously pushed back without any creditor ratings downgrades (ratings agency collusion) http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/article/idUKL5N11Z42T20150929?irpc=932

    They were supposed to “cut a deal” or go bust and liquidate on 3/28/16 that didn’t happen (after a 90 day timeout), higher forces intervened. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-28/abengoa-wins-reprieve-in-debt-talks-to-avert-insolvency-process

    The US government was the primary creditor.

  24. Bottom line you can’t vote out or litigate away a criminal government (they won’t let you)

  25. “Perhaps the biggest reason we don’t have an Ebert & Siskel of standardized testing is The Gap, which could always turn into a career-killer.”

    Poor example. Our testing system is pure Ebert & Siskel. Dumbed down.

  26. @Twinkie
    Before we start high-fiving so-called "Education Realist," I have a few points to note.

    1. China is a developing country with a high degree of corruption. It does not stretch one's imagination to imagine that there is much academic cheating that goes hand-in-hand with the adult version, i.e. corruption, in that country. And as a rapidly developing economic juggernaut with export orientation, the demand for American educational credentials is massive... which leads every Chinese Tom, Dick, and Harry to want such a credential, warranted/deserved or not.

    2. "Education Realist" tends to conflate the likely widespread Chinese cheating with not just all Chinese in China, but most East Asians, even the ones in the United States. More on that below.

    3. As a percentage of foreign students in the U.S. the Chinese portion has been rising dramatically; the Indian segment is also rising, but not at the same rate. This likely compounds the issue.

    4. Meanwhile, the percentage of Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese foreign students in the U.S. has been declining in the past 15 years. More and more, Koreans, for example, now prefer to study in China or Europe, rather than in the U.S. as Korea's trade ties with China deepen significantly.

    5. Discovering incidents of cheating is useful for finding that there is a problem. The next question is just how widespread that problem is, and how the scale of that problem compares from one area to another (if for example, 50% of Chinese in China cheat, but 60% of our students admit to cheating, we can't exactly get indignant easily).

    6. One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

    7. In my previous exchanges with Education Realist, she claimed that she had seen research documenting the said mismatch among Asian-Americans, whom she accused of engaging in widespread cheating. When I examined the links she provided, they actually contradicted her claims, at which point she called me a bunch of names and disappeared from this blog for a while.

    8. I am actually in agreement with Education Realist on the possibility, indeed likelihood, there is much academic cheating and fraud in China, but that does not automatically make her claims about other Asians or Asian-Americans valid. Asian-American mismatch does not exist (per the links she provided). As for other foreign Asians (not from China), I think it would be very useful to be able to see some data on mismatch (alas, such granular data may not exist, at least not ones that break down by origin country).

    Replies: @27 year old, @peterike, @Anon, @ScarletNumber

    I once took a class on geology(one of those requirements) in college, and a T.A. was from China.

    There was certainly a mismatch between word and pronunciation.

    He pronounced ‘sheet’ as ‘shit’, and we couldn’t stop laughing.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Anon


    He pronounced ‘sheet’ as ‘shit’, and we couldn’t stop laughing.
     
    I had a math teacher in high school who was from Eastern Europe. She always pronounced "vectors" as "wek-TTORs" with a very soft T (sounded like Walter Koenig's character on Star Trek). Even though she had been in the U.S. for a number of years by that time, she apparently just refused to pronounce it the American way.

    Not as funny as "shit," but my classmates and I - juveniles all of us - found it amusing and began to pronounce "vectors" her way all the time. She raised her eyebrows the first time, but then just rolled with it coolly... until the final grade time.

    Didn't stop her from being a decent math teacher though.
  27. Meanwhile, in Detroit…

    NYT, 03/29/16 – 13 Detroit School Principals Charged in Vendor Kickback Scheme

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/30/us/13-detroit-school-principals-charged-in-vendor-kickback-scheme.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=0

    In Detroit’s crumbling schools, where the threat of insolvency means that basic repairs, supplies and even teachers are in short supply, 13 principals conspired with a vendor to defraud the system, siphoning away millions of dollars, federal agents and prosecutors charged on Tuesday.

    The principals, including five who have retired and one who became a district administrator, ordered supplies like paper, workbooks and chairs from the vendor, and Detroit Public Schools paid the bills. The vendor then delivered only some of the supplies to the schools, and paid $908,518 in kickbacks to the principals, according to documents filed in Federal District Court in Detroit.

    At a news conference, Barbara L. McQuade, the United States attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, said the orders had totaled about $5 million, “and of that, we believe that $2.7 million was fraudulent.”

    “The real victims in a case like this are, of course, the students and the families who attend Detroit Public Schools,” and honest school employees struggling under tough conditions, she said. [What about the tax payers?]

    …“Here we go again,” Ivy Bailey, the interim president of the Detroit Federation of Teachers, said of the criminal charges announced Tuesday….

    Most of the incidents date from 2009 to 2015, but prosecutors said one fraudulent deal occurred in 2002.

    The other main beneficiary, they said, was Clara Flowers, who was accused of receiving $324,785 in illicit payments over six years, starting when she was a principal and continuing into her tenure as an assistant superintendent of the system…

    According to the charges, the principals used an array of methods to disguise the kickbacks, including receiving prepaid gift cards or having payments made to sham companies they had created…

    • Replies: @Bill jones
    @E. Rekshun

    Perhaps Clint Eastward could make a movie: "Play dusky for me "

    , @Triumph104
    @E. Rekshun

    That would explain why Detroit students aren't receiving textbooks and building repairs aren't being made.

    https://youtu.be/ROCxtuyFjp0

    Replies: @Nico

  28. @peterike
    @Twinkie


    One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

     

    Why do you assume cheating stops at the test? It doesn't.

    In professional settings the information will be largely anecdotal, unless you manage to break into a company's HR files and read their employee reviews. That said, there are mountains of anecdotal evidence of the poor quality of Indian software programmers. Though large corporations are every bit as PC-addled as universities, and they would frown GREATLY on Asians getting poor job evaluations. In the workplace, Asians, blacks, Hispanics, women and gays all get a huge advantage. Only the usual cis white male has to routinely earn his keep.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @NOTA

    One-time cheating on a standardized test in another country is very different from consistent cheating through four years of classes on campus. If the Asian students are cheating in class more than others, guven the number of Asian students here, that should have become the stereotype. Instead, the stereotype of Asian students is of grinding away, studying hard enough to get through even classes where they don’t get all the material all that well.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @NOTA

    It is the stereotype and it is true, for Chinese at least. In 2014, 8000 Chinese were expelled from US universities for cheating and bad grades.

    http://qz.com/415098/8000-chinese-students-were-expelled-from-us-universities-last-year-mostly-for-cheating-and-bad-grades/

  29. ” If the Asian students are cheating in class more than others, guven the number of Asian students here, that should have become the stereotype”

    It is the stereotype for Chinese international students. Along with utter obsession about the grade.

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
    @education realist

    utter obsession about the grade and a willingness to spend what it takes to get a high one...

  30. @Twinkie
    @peterike


    Why do you assume cheating stops at the test? It doesn’t.
     
    I don't.

    It would take an incredible and persistent genius to be able to cheat all through one's different levels of schooling, training, and life without being spotted as a cheat. That's not something a mass of people can do. Sooner of later, mismatch shows up statistically if there is a gap between credential and ability. A few individuals may be able to sustain the fraud longer than others, but the law of the large number applies when we talk about a whole ethnic group.

    For example, blacks are admitted into medical schools with some amount of affirmative action (not as wide scale as college admissions). Guess what? They fail the Board certification tests for their specialties at VERY HIGH rates. Asian-American doctors do not. And on most Boards there is an oral component that is effectively immune to cheating. The examiners give you a scenario and the test-taker has to explain the course of action/treatment.

    Similarly at higher levels of STEM, say a physics Ph.D. program, cheating one's way through without actually understanding the material is near impossible.


    That said, there are mountains of anecdotal evidence of the poor quality of Indian software programmers.
     
    Are you talking about American-born Indians or foreigners from India?

    Though large corporations are every bit as PC-addled as universities, and they would frown GREATLY on Asians getting poor job evaluations. In the workplace, Asians, blacks, Hispanics, women and gays all get a huge advantage.
     
    Blacks, Hispanics, and women, yes, but Asian males don't do all that well. If you looked at the tech firms in Silicon Valley, Asian males account for a HUGE percentage of the technical staff, but lag behind white males in management/leadership positions. They seem to suffer from the stereotype that they are poor leaders, if anything. And the same story for partnerships at law firms.

    As for universities, I know, for a fact, there is a prejudice against Asians. I am not talking about student admissions here, but of employment as staff/professors. During my day, it was not uncommon to hear largely Jewish administrators brazenly discuss their anti-Asian feelings. I know, because I taught in college as an untenured academic after finishing graduate school. My sense was that Jews in academia (more administrative types than professors) frequently viewed Asians as competitors and were not kindly disposed toward them. Obviously that tendency was much more pronounced in humanities and social sciences than in STEM fields (where brilliant Asian scientists can't just be dismissed out of hand).

    Replies: @Nico

    It would take an incredible and persistent genius to be able to cheat all through one’s different levels of schooling, training, and life without being spotted as a cheat. That’s not something a mass of people can do. Sooner of later, mismatch shows up statistically if there is a gap between credential and ability. A few individuals may be able to sustain the fraud longer than others, but the law of the large number applies when we talk about a whole ethnic group.

    The other point is someone capable of putting up a front to that extent and for that long is probably fairly gifted to begin with. Which gets back to another point: if corruption and cheating are endemic in China, a lot of it has to do with their very different approach to ethics. One classic example is intellectual property law and piracy in the East vs the West. It wouldn’t seem illogical that what we call “cheating” in the mindset of many from that region be widely considered “using all of one’s resources.” Part of our problem with China (which goes beyond tests) is our failure to understand such attitudes and take the appropriate posture.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Nico


    Which gets back to another point: if corruption and cheating are endemic in China, a lot of it has to do with their very different approach to ethics.
     
    I am not convinced that the Chinese are naturally unethical. After all, they gave the world the likes of Confucian ethics. Two very large contributing factors to corruption in China today, in my view, are likely the breakneck speed economic development, which encourages taking shortcuts, and China's communist history, as communism tended to breed a certain kind of rule-breaking and resistance to authority, not to forget black market activities and bribery of officials for favors for specific examples.

    Their (sort of) ethnic kin in Singapore manages to be extremely uncorrupt (Singapore probably has one of the least corrupt governments in the world, along with Scandinavian and Anglophone-Oceanian governments). Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan all ranked lower in the Corruption Perception Index in the past and managed to climb the rankings as their economies and civil society matured.

    None of that, of course, changes the fact that China is today very corrupt, and we must deal with that reality.
  31. @Twinkie
    Before we start high-fiving so-called "Education Realist," I have a few points to note.

    1. China is a developing country with a high degree of corruption. It does not stretch one's imagination to imagine that there is much academic cheating that goes hand-in-hand with the adult version, i.e. corruption, in that country. And as a rapidly developing economic juggernaut with export orientation, the demand for American educational credentials is massive... which leads every Chinese Tom, Dick, and Harry to want such a credential, warranted/deserved or not.

    2. "Education Realist" tends to conflate the likely widespread Chinese cheating with not just all Chinese in China, but most East Asians, even the ones in the United States. More on that below.

    3. As a percentage of foreign students in the U.S. the Chinese portion has been rising dramatically; the Indian segment is also rising, but not at the same rate. This likely compounds the issue.

    4. Meanwhile, the percentage of Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese foreign students in the U.S. has been declining in the past 15 years. More and more, Koreans, for example, now prefer to study in China or Europe, rather than in the U.S. as Korea's trade ties with China deepen significantly.

    5. Discovering incidents of cheating is useful for finding that there is a problem. The next question is just how widespread that problem is, and how the scale of that problem compares from one area to another (if for example, 50% of Chinese in China cheat, but 60% of our students admit to cheating, we can't exactly get indignant easily).

    6. One useful method of estimating the scale of the cheating problem is mismatch, that is, the subsequent performance (in class, the next level of education, and in professional settings) level compared to the testing level.

    7. In my previous exchanges with Education Realist, she claimed that she had seen research documenting the said mismatch among Asian-Americans, whom she accused of engaging in widespread cheating. When I examined the links she provided, they actually contradicted her claims, at which point she called me a bunch of names and disappeared from this blog for a while.

    8. I am actually in agreement with Education Realist on the possibility, indeed likelihood, there is much academic cheating and fraud in China, but that does not automatically make her claims about other Asians or Asian-Americans valid. Asian-American mismatch does not exist (per the links she provided). As for other foreign Asians (not from China), I think it would be very useful to be able to see some data on mismatch (alas, such granular data may not exist, at least not ones that break down by origin country).

    Replies: @27 year old, @peterike, @Anon, @ScarletNumber

    I am pretty sure Education Realist is a man.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @ScarletNumber


    I am pretty sure Education Realist is a man.
     
    I thought so a while back (and my default pronoun is "he"), but someone corrected me otherwise. The way she went "ape" with the name-calling "worthless liar" and all that, very emotionally, after I rebutted her points with data from her own links struck me as hysterically feminine.

    Replies: @Triumph104

  32. The College Board encourages and benefits from international criminal racketeering organizations that engage in immigration and mail fraud while enabling colleges to pretend they are accepting qualified applicants when in fact the colleges know full well their applicants lied. It collects money from multiple state contracts for a test product they can’t be bothered to spend money protecting from those organized criminal enterprises.

    Some twenty or thirty people were arrested on Long Island in a SAT cheating racket scandal back in 2011, so it’s not entirely true that nothing is being done. I would however agree that this raises the question of whether it is ethical for the SAT scores to be accepted from outside the United States, or at least from countries where monitoring test integrity is notoriously difficult.

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
    @Nico

    No industry should profit by selling a product to non-citizens that includes a visa with the purchase. What they are doing is selling the desirability of the United States as a place to live while simultaneously detracting from it.

  33. @Anon
    @Twinkie

    I once took a class on geology(one of those requirements) in college, and a T.A. was from China.

    There was certainly a mismatch between word and pronunciation.

    He pronounced 'sheet' as 'shit', and we couldn't stop laughing.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    He pronounced ‘sheet’ as ‘shit’, and we couldn’t stop laughing.

    I had a math teacher in high school who was from Eastern Europe. She always pronounced “vectors” as “wek-TTORs” with a very soft T (sounded like Walter Koenig’s character on Star Trek). Even though she had been in the U.S. for a number of years by that time, she apparently just refused to pronounce it the American way.

    Not as funny as “shit,” but my classmates and I – juveniles all of us – found it amusing and began to pronounce “vectors” her way all the time. She raised her eyebrows the first time, but then just rolled with it coolly… until the final grade time.

    Didn’t stop her from being a decent math teacher though.

  34. @ScarletNumber
    @Twinkie

    I am pretty sure Education Realist is a man.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    I am pretty sure Education Realist is a man.

    I thought so a while back (and my default pronoun is “he”), but someone corrected me otherwise. The way she went “ape” with the name-calling “worthless liar” and all that, very emotionally, after I rebutted her points with data from her own links struck me as hysterically feminine.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @Twinkie

    She just called me a "prick" and told me to "piss-off" for nearly the same reason. I agree with your assessment. I am a female and recognize my own kind.

    https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/the-sat-is-corrupt-reuters-version/#comments

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  35. @Portlander
    Gotta recycle those greenbacks somehow. The Chinese have T-Bills stacked to the rafters. They gotta spend it on something, and since munitions are out, they are buying-up housing, diplomas, and whole companies when they can get away with it, which isn't all that often.

    I think I'm starting to appreciate the Petro-dollar model more and more. Saudi's send us oil, we send them M-1's and F-15's. And Citigroup stock.

    To be sure, they are both BS propagated by useful idiots like Krugman, but the latter, at least, didn't have our kids and grandkids living in penury.

    Replies: @Bill jones

    Africa. the Chinese are spending their Federal Reseve notes buying Africa.

  36. @E. Rekshun
    Meanwhile, in Detroit...


    NYT, 03/29/16 - 13 Detroit School Principals Charged in Vendor Kickback Scheme

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/30/us/13-detroit-school-principals-charged-in-vendor-kickback-scheme.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=0

    In Detroit’s crumbling schools, where the threat of insolvency means that basic repairs, supplies and even teachers are in short supply, 13 principals conspired with a vendor to defraud the system, siphoning away millions of dollars, federal agents and prosecutors charged on Tuesday.

    The principals, including five who have retired and one who became a district administrator, ordered supplies like paper, workbooks and chairs from the vendor, and Detroit Public Schools paid the bills. The vendor then delivered only some of the supplies to the schools, and paid $908,518 in kickbacks to the principals, according to documents filed in Federal District Court in Detroit.

    At a news conference, Barbara L. McQuade, the United States attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, said the orders had totaled about $5 million, “and of that, we believe that $2.7 million was fraudulent.”

    “The real victims in a case like this are, of course, the students and the families who attend Detroit Public Schools,” and honest school employees struggling under tough conditions, she said. [What about the tax payers?]

    ...“Here we go again,” Ivy Bailey, the interim president of the Detroit Federation of Teachers, said of the criminal charges announced Tuesday....

    Most of the incidents date from 2009 to 2015, but prosecutors said one fraudulent deal occurred in 2002.

    The other main beneficiary, they said, was Clara Flowers, who was accused of receiving $324,785 in illicit payments over six years, starting when she was a principal and continuing into her tenure as an assistant superintendent of the system...

    According to the charges, the principals used an array of methods to disguise the kickbacks, including receiving prepaid gift cards or having payments made to sham companies they had created...
     

    Replies: @Bill jones, @Triumph104

    Perhaps Clint Eastward could make a movie: “Play dusky for me ”

  37. @Nico
    @Twinkie


    It would take an incredible and persistent genius to be able to cheat all through one’s different levels of schooling, training, and life without being spotted as a cheat. That’s not something a mass of people can do. Sooner of later, mismatch shows up statistically if there is a gap between credential and ability. A few individuals may be able to sustain the fraud longer than others, but the law of the large number applies when we talk about a whole ethnic group.
     
    The other point is someone capable of putting up a front to that extent and for that long is probably fairly gifted to begin with. Which gets back to another point: if corruption and cheating are endemic in China, a lot of it has to do with their very different approach to ethics. One classic example is intellectual property law and piracy in the East vs the West. It wouldn't seem illogical that what we call "cheating" in the mindset of many from that region be widely considered "using all of one's resources." Part of our problem with China (which goes beyond tests) is our failure to understand such attitudes and take the appropriate posture.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Which gets back to another point: if corruption and cheating are endemic in China, a lot of it has to do with their very different approach to ethics.

    I am not convinced that the Chinese are naturally unethical. After all, they gave the world the likes of Confucian ethics. Two very large contributing factors to corruption in China today, in my view, are likely the breakneck speed economic development, which encourages taking shortcuts, and China’s communist history, as communism tended to breed a certain kind of rule-breaking and resistance to authority, not to forget black market activities and bribery of officials for favors for specific examples.

    Their (sort of) ethnic kin in Singapore manages to be extremely uncorrupt (Singapore probably has one of the least corrupt governments in the world, along with Scandinavian and Anglophone-Oceanian governments). Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan all ranked lower in the Corruption Perception Index in the past and managed to climb the rankings as their economies and civil society matured.

    None of that, of course, changes the fact that China is today very corrupt, and we must deal with that reality.

  38. @newrouter
    via wiki

    >RICO also permits a private individual "damaged in his business or property" by a "racketeer" to file a civil suit. The plaintiff must prove the existence of an "enterprise". The defendant(s) are not the enterprise; in other words, the defendant(s) and the enterprise are not one and the same.[3] There must be one of four specified relationships between the defendant(s) and the enterprise: either the defendant(s) invested the proceeds of the pattern of racketeering activity into the enterprise (18 U.S.C. § 1962(a)); or the defendant(s) acquired or maintained an interest in, or control of, the enterprise through the pattern of racketeering activity (subsection (b)); or the defendant(s) conducted or participated in the affairs of the enterprise "through" the pattern of racketeering activity (subsection (c)); or the defendant(s) conspired to do one of the above (subsection (d)).[4] In essence, the enterprise is either the 'prize,' 'instrument,' 'victim,' or 'perpetrator' of the racketeers.[5] A civil RICO action can be filed in state or federal court.[6]<


    seems ripe for an enterprising attorney

    Replies: @Craig Nelsen

    A civil plaintiff would need to quantify damages. That would be tough, both finding the plaintiff and proving the damages.

  39. @education realist
    " If the Asian students are cheating in class more than others, guven the number of Asian students here, that should have become the stereotype"

    It is the stereotype for Chinese international students. Along with utter obsession about the grade.

    Replies: @Craig Nelsen

    utter obsession about the grade and a willingness to spend what it takes to get a high one…

  40. @Nico

    The College Board encourages and benefits from international criminal racketeering organizations that engage in immigration and mail fraud while enabling colleges to pretend they are accepting qualified applicants when in fact the colleges know full well their applicants lied. It collects money from multiple state contracts for a test product they can’t be bothered to spend money protecting from those organized criminal enterprises.
     
    Some twenty or thirty people were arrested on Long Island in a SAT cheating racket scandal back in 2011, so it's not entirely true that nothing is being done. I would however agree that this raises the question of whether it is ethical for the SAT scores to be accepted from outside the United States, or at least from countries where monitoring test integrity is notoriously difficult.

    Replies: @Craig Nelsen

    No industry should profit by selling a product to non-citizens that includes a visa with the purchase. What they are doing is selling the desirability of the United States as a place to live while simultaneously detracting from it.

  41. @E. Rekshun
    Meanwhile, in Detroit...


    NYT, 03/29/16 - 13 Detroit School Principals Charged in Vendor Kickback Scheme

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/30/us/13-detroit-school-principals-charged-in-vendor-kickback-scheme.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=0

    In Detroit’s crumbling schools, where the threat of insolvency means that basic repairs, supplies and even teachers are in short supply, 13 principals conspired with a vendor to defraud the system, siphoning away millions of dollars, federal agents and prosecutors charged on Tuesday.

    The principals, including five who have retired and one who became a district administrator, ordered supplies like paper, workbooks and chairs from the vendor, and Detroit Public Schools paid the bills. The vendor then delivered only some of the supplies to the schools, and paid $908,518 in kickbacks to the principals, according to documents filed in Federal District Court in Detroit.

    At a news conference, Barbara L. McQuade, the United States attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, said the orders had totaled about $5 million, “and of that, we believe that $2.7 million was fraudulent.”

    “The real victims in a case like this are, of course, the students and the families who attend Detroit Public Schools,” and honest school employees struggling under tough conditions, she said. [What about the tax payers?]

    ...“Here we go again,” Ivy Bailey, the interim president of the Detroit Federation of Teachers, said of the criminal charges announced Tuesday....

    Most of the incidents date from 2009 to 2015, but prosecutors said one fraudulent deal occurred in 2002.

    The other main beneficiary, they said, was Clara Flowers, who was accused of receiving $324,785 in illicit payments over six years, starting when she was a principal and continuing into her tenure as an assistant superintendent of the system...

    According to the charges, the principals used an array of methods to disguise the kickbacks, including receiving prepaid gift cards or having payments made to sham companies they had created...
     

    Replies: @Bill jones, @Triumph104

    That would explain why Detroit students aren’t receiving textbooks and building repairs aren’t being made.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @Triumph104

    On the other hand, if there were money for textbooks and decent teachers in Detroit, would it even be a worthwhile investment?

    Replies: @NOTA

  42. @NOTA
    @peterike

    One-time cheating on a standardized test in another country is very different from consistent cheating through four years of classes on campus. If the Asian students are cheating in class more than others, guven the number of Asian students here, that should have become the stereotype. Instead, the stereotype of Asian students is of grinding away, studying hard enough to get through even classes where they don't get all the material all that well.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    It is the stereotype and it is true, for Chinese at least. In 2014, 8000 Chinese were expelled from US universities for cheating and bad grades.

    http://qz.com/415098/8000-chinese-students-were-expelled-from-us-universities-last-year-mostly-for-cheating-and-bad-grades/

  43. @Twinkie
    @ScarletNumber


    I am pretty sure Education Realist is a man.
     
    I thought so a while back (and my default pronoun is "he"), but someone corrected me otherwise. The way she went "ape" with the name-calling "worthless liar" and all that, very emotionally, after I rebutted her points with data from her own links struck me as hysterically feminine.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    She just called me a “prick” and told me to “piss-off” for nearly the same reason. I agree with your assessment. I am a female and recognize my own kind.

    https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/the-sat-is-corrupt-reuters-version/#comments

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Triumph104


    She just called me a “prick” and told me to “piss-off” for nearly the same reason. I agree with your assessment. I am a female and recognize my own kind.
     
    Male commenters, here and elsewhere, call you all kinds of things when you disagree with them. But female commenters have this very annoying quirk of taking you down even when you agree. There's just something schoolmarmy about that.
  44. Could RICO be Used to Clean Up SAT Cheating?

    Oh, come on. RICO is only meant to be used for serious threats to the public, such as nuns holding rosaries and thought-provoking banners outside clinics.

  45. @Triumph104
    @Twinkie

    She just called me a "prick" and told me to "piss-off" for nearly the same reason. I agree with your assessment. I am a female and recognize my own kind.

    https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/the-sat-is-corrupt-reuters-version/#comments

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    She just called me a “prick” and told me to “piss-off” for nearly the same reason. I agree with your assessment. I am a female and recognize my own kind.

    Male commenters, here and elsewhere, call you all kinds of things when you disagree with them. But female commenters have this very annoying quirk of taking you down even when you agree. There’s just something schoolmarmy about that.

  46. I don’t discuss my gender; you are welcome to consider me any gender you like. Even transgender. Anyone who corrected you has no idea what my gender is. Wearing Anonymity

    As for the prick–and I neither knew nor cared about your gender–I always get annoyed at people who explain things that don’t need explaining. But you’ll do well with Twinkle-toes.

  47. @Triumph104
    @E. Rekshun

    That would explain why Detroit students aren't receiving textbooks and building repairs aren't being made.

    https://youtu.be/ROCxtuyFjp0

    Replies: @Nico

    On the other hand, if there were money for textbooks and decent teachers in Detroit, would it even be a worthwhile investment?

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Nico

    Yes. Teaching those kids to read is a 100% pure win, and literacy is within the reach of people on the left end of the bell curve.

  48. @Nico
    @Triumph104

    On the other hand, if there were money for textbooks and decent teachers in Detroit, would it even be a worthwhile investment?

    Replies: @NOTA

    Yes. Teaching those kids to read is a 100% pure win, and literacy is within the reach of people on the left end of the bell curve.

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