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Cornell Course Catalog: ASTRO 2034: Black Holes: Race and the Cosmos
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From the Cornell University course catalog:

ASTRO 2034 Black Holes: Race and the Cosmos
Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2020-2021.

Conventional wisdom would have it that the “black” in black holes has nothing to do with race. Surely there can be no connection between the cosmos and the idea of racial blackness. Can there? Contemporary Black Studies theorists, artists, fiction writers implicitly and explicitly posit just such a connection. Theorists use astronomy concepts like “black holes” and “event horizons” to interpret the history of race in creative ways, while artists and musicians conjure blackness through cosmological themes and images. Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy, this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy concepts through readings in Black Studies. Texts may include works by theorists like Michelle Wright and Denise Ferreira da Silva, authors like Octavia Butler and Nalo Hopkinson, music by Sun Ra, Outkast and Janelle Monáe. Astronomy concepts will include the electromagnetic spectrum, stellar evolution, and general relativity.

When Offered Spring.

Distribution Category (LA-AS, ALC-AS, PHS-AS)

Enrollment InformationSyllabi: none
Regular Academic Session. Combined with: COML 2034
3 Credits
Stdnt Opt

20768LEC 001

M11:25am – 12:40pm
Online Meeting Feb 8 – May 14, 2021
Battaglia, N

Vaziri, P

From City Journal:

Down a Black Hole

Even the hard sciences are no longer immune to the ongoing racial hysteria.
Heather Mac Donald
June 21, 2021

“Black Holes: Race and the Cosmos” asks the question, “Is there a connection between the cosmos and the idea of racial blackness?” Anyone familiar with academia’s racial monomania knows the answer: of course there is! Though “conventional wisdom,” according to the catalog description of “Black Holes: Race and the Cosmos,” holds that the “‘black’ in black holes has nothing to do with race,” astronomy professor Nicholas Battaglia and comparative literature professor Parisa Vaziri know better.

Battaglia and Vaziri puncture the “conventional wisdom” by drawing on theorists such as Emory University English professor Michelle Wright. Wright’s book, The Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology, invokes “Newton’s laws of motion and gravity” and “theoretical particle physics” to “subvert racist assumptions about Blackness.” The Cornell course also studies music by Sun Ra and Outkast to “conjure blackness through cosmological themes.” …

What’s different about “Black Holes: Race and the Cosmos” is its co-listing in an actual science department. The course fulfills Cornell’s science distribution requirement, touching as it does on such concepts as the electromagnetic spectrum. It is not surprising that astronomy would be an early adopter of race theory, and that Cornell would lead the way. Many astronomy departments have been on the forefront of campus identity politics, eliminating the physics GRE as a requirement for graduate study, for example, on the ground that it has a disparate impact on female, black, and Hispanic students. Cornell’s astronomy department will not even allow prospective graduate students to submit the general GRE or the physics GRE. Cornell’s engineering department accepts female undergraduates at over two and a half times the rate of male students, to yield an engineering class that is majority female. This is hardly an accident. Twice as many male as female intending engineering students apply for admission; the average male math SAT score is significantly higher than the average female score, and males predominate at the upper reaches of the curve. …

 
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  1. Contemporary Black Studies theorists, artists, fiction writers implicitly and explicitly posit just such a connection. Theorists use astronomy concepts like “black holes” and “event horizons” to interpret the history of race in creative ways, while artists and musicians conjure blackness through cosmological themes and images

    Systemic darkness

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @James Speaks

    I dare you people to successfully satirize this. I dare you.


    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy
     
    Negroes? Pay attention please. That's astronomy, not astrology.

    Until she find out you a Scorpio, homes!

    Replies: @James Speaks, @James Speaks

  2. utu says:

    HOW A SIEGE IN 18TH-CENTURY BRITISH-OCCUPIED CALCUTTA GAVE US THE TERM ‘BLACK HOLE’
    https://www.firstpost.com/tech/science/how-a-siege-in-18th-century-british-occupied-calcutta-gave-us-the-term-black-hole-6507601.html

    MIT Professor and science writer, Marcia Bartusiak traces the origins of the term ‘black hole’ in her book Black Holes. Bartusiak writes that it was Hong-Yee Chiu, an American Astrophysicists of Chinese origins, who also coined the term “quasars”, organized the January 1964 AAAS talk at Cleveland. Chiu first stumbled upon the term in a seminar at Princeton, in the early 1960s, where physicist Robert Dicke was explaining the dense stars collapsing in their own gravitational field. Dicke described these objects as “like the Black Hole Of Calcutta”- a prison so bad that people went in but did not come out. In fact, it appears that Dicke used the phrase quite liberally, Bartusiak notes that Robert Dicke’s children remember their father saying “Ah, it must have been sucked into the black hole of Calcutta” whenever something got lost at their house.

    • Thanks: El Dato
    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @utu

    The term "black body radiation" goes back at least to 1900 (Planck's Law) or before (Wien 's Displacement Law and Stefan-Boltzmann Law). That the emitted spectrum did not match theory (the ultraviolet catastrophe) led Max Planck to hypothesize discrete packets and Albert Einstein to theorize the existence of photons. I'm sure they were all racists.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Roger, @nokangaroos

    , @Charon
    @utu

    The Black Hole of Calcutta was where subcons showed whitey wassup. You can see how they fit so neatly into Current Year America.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @utu

    The Black Hole of Calcutta was actually a dungeon in Fort William in which a large number of British captives were crammed overnight and most of them died after a native revolt.

    This was apparently due to a middle management snafu, and the intention of the higher ups was not was not to kill everybody. Sixth grade history.

    Black hole was standard military slang for the dungeon at the time.

    The term "the hole" is still a common part of prison slang in the United States. Spending a month in the hole mean spending a month in solitary confinement. Many people who spend time in the hole in US prisons are classified as blacks.

  3. • Thanks: JimDandy
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Mike Tre

    Black Science man is quoted above by Mike Tre saying:


    People don't think the universe to be like it is, but it do.
     
    cf. = DoBe - The Doobie-Brothers - What a Fool Believes.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Pat Kittle
    @Mike Tre

    That's a cheap shot.

    Though somewhat pompous, Neil deGrasse Tyson (AFAICT) is an intelligent likeable Black who concerns himself with matters far beyond BlacketyBlack.

  4. Black Holes In Space

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910

    It was always fun to see this sign's final letter burn out.


    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-sZqOSRSew_g/V9A7gTes8NI/AAAAAAAATtA/vFimZ9jmmgst_IaP16FzlM5guxrraKq6ACLcB/s1600/neon127.jpg

    Replies: @Bubba

    , @Bubba
    @MEH 0910

    Spinal Tap had a brief freeform jazz period (not cosmic though), but it didn't work out well...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkpycWPxQi4

  5. Sun Ra – Space is the Place

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Morton's toes

    Another Sun Rah who is a Great Bandit and also an artist:

    https://i.postimg.cc/gjZnKvgF/The-city-of-shifting-waters-p-13.png

    From The City of Shifting Waters (sadly abridged edition as few pages giving views of caravans of refugees blocked on highways have been dropped for some reason)

  6. @James Speaks

    Contemporary Black Studies theorists, artists, fiction writers implicitly and explicitly posit just such a connection. Theorists use astronomy concepts like “black holes” and “event horizons” to interpret the history of race in creative ways, while artists and musicians conjure blackness through cosmological themes and images
     
    Systemic darkness

    Replies: @Polistra

    I dare you people to successfully satirize this. I dare you.

    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy

    Negroes? Pay attention please. That’s astronomy, not astrology.

    Until she find out you a Scorpio, homes!

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Polistra


    I dare you people to successfully satirize this. I dare you.

    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy
     

     
    I accept your challenge. Oh wait, the rest of that sentence reads,

    "this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy concepts through readings in Black Studies."
     
    I respectfully decline your challenge.
    , @James Speaks
    @Polistra


    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy, this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy concepts through readings in Black Studies.
     
    The statement is self-satire. It unintentionally speaks truth to wisdom and avoids censorship by idiot.

    My first thought was that negroes consider astronomy to be something prestigious yet accessible, and by accessible I mean simple enough for the primitive negro brain to grasp this is that and these are those simple definitions. As I have stated before, the negro brain is static and is not capable of comprehending nuance. I think a good initial topic for negrostronomers would be the wave-particle duality of QM. (That was satire.)

    There seems to be a rush to transform all studies into negro studies. This tells me that the negro brain cannot really understand the other. Recall, in days of old, the other was a slave or food, or both. The negro brain interprets the world as a source of food, some low hanging fruit and some fast food on hoof. Consequently, the negro approach to white man's civilization, also known as civilization, is to relate to everything as a variant of some aspect of negro life.

    To the negro brain, truth does not have a separate reality. Everything is subjective.

    So what happens after negros have ruined our Western intellectual heritage by negrofying every subject? I think the next step will be compliance committees where negroes and SJW whites, also known as useful idiots, come into your home to help you validate your existence. From a negro perspective, of course.
  7. Carl Sagan said his great-grandfather made his living ferrying passengers across a local stream– on his back. We may be returning to that era, starting far above Sagan’s Cayuga, no less.

    • Agree: Bubba
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    While being a human ferry boat was unusual, the occupation of trager (carrier or porter) was a common occupation for poor urban Jews in E. Europe. In the era before trucks, goods were carted around the ghettos on human backs. There were also subspecialties like the wassertrager - the water carrier who would deliver buckets of water to your house.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/ulwAAOSwWdVgtifR/s-l1600.jpg

    People here seem to have the notion that the Jews of Europe were all bankers (when they were not Bolsheviks) or at least involved in prosperous middle man occupations but the truth was that millions lived in grinding poverty (which was why millions immigrated - rich people tend not to immigrate). And not American style "poverty" where you get so much free food that you are as fat as a sow, but actual not enough to eat and only patched up rags for clothes poverty. There may have been a time (before the 19th century) when most of the Jews of Poland were indeed involved in middle man occupations but the Jews had a high birth rate (by 1939 30% of the population of Warsaw was Jewish) and far outgrew that ecological niche and had to branch out into menial occupations. And with so much competition, even the middle man occupations themselves were not prosperous.

    Replies: @utu, @Dacian Julien Soros

    , @Cloudbuster
    @Reg Cæsar

    White people are doing that every day. Unfortunately, the passengers are all scorpions.

  8. I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.
     
    On average, it takes 3 years for American craziness to infect the rest of the anglosphere. So if you could nip it in the bud over there we would appreciate it. Thx.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @photondancer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I spent a few minutes searching the word 'race' on half a dozen big Australian university websites. No subjects quite this egregious were uncovered, but I was dismayed to find several flaunting the words 'critical theory' and 'intersection' so it's only a matter of time.

    Top search result at University of Melbourne is a subject on race in America, because that's so relevant to Australia. If the Aborigines had any gumption they'd be protesting.

    , @Ed
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Yes, it’s in all the Anglo countries. New Zealand ties itself into knots over Maori issues. They even have a reparations scheme. Canada will likely do something similar due to the hysteria over the discovery of 215 bodies of dead indigenous children at some school.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/02/28/810485160/episode-975-reparations-in-new-zealand


    Mavis Mullins runs a sheep-shearing company that handles over 1,000,000 sheep. She's also a charming, disarmingly honest straight-shooter. One day her cousin pulled her into a cafe with a request: Help us fight with the New Zealand government for reparations.

    Mavis is Māori, part of the indigenous population of New Zealand. And over the past 35 years, the government of New Zealand has been building a system to try and make amends to Māori for past betrayals. These reparations usually take the form of a check, land, and an apology. In today's show we follow Mavis Mullins through that process.
     

    Replies: @James Speaks

    , @Lev Myshkin
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It is, but not to the same extent. We don't have the critical mass of blacks in Canada for the maximum hilarity the US is enjoying

    , @Altai
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Not to the same extent, it always lags and emanates from the US, though Britain has recently started to innovate from the presence of South African Rhodes scholars who started agitating to 'decolonise' things.

    Transgenderism, though, seems to have failed to become so much an issue outside the US even accounting for the lag. My theory is the US is such an ethnic hodge-podge in it's major cities for so long that the people there no longer have a connection to reality or community and normal human society and actually really want to believe that 'transwomen are women'. Yes there are laws protecting transgenders now everywhere and yes there are clinics for children but nobody really cares, they don't really think 'trans women are women'. It hasn't really been turned into a wedge issue to assert dominance, a kind of visual in your face demand that society disintegrate.

    Maybe America is just so large that a critical mass of transgender people can agitate and become problems for HR departments of large companies in a way that doesn't happen elsewhere.

  9. @MEH 0910
    Black Holes In Space
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgAMBh4GkGI

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Bubba

    It was always fun to see this sign’s final letter burn out.

    • Replies: @Bubba
    @Reg Cæsar

    He was born a Blount, but it should have been Blunt.

    https://weedmaps.com/learn/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/181016_Learn_blunt_03-2-768x432.jpg

  10. Just like black holes, the negroidal undertow sucks in all positive nearby energy. And as usual these days, anything with the word “black” in it, is all of a sudden all about negros – and always in a racist way.

    • Agree: donut
    • Replies: @photondancer
    @usNthem

    It can only be a matter of time before we can't use the word 'black' for anything.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  11. I doubt that Calculus is a pre req.

    • LOL: glib
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Daniel H

    It could become a prereq again, once they reinterpret and rework it. Integration will be about Little Rock High School, the chain rule of differentiation will be a lecture about the chains of slavery, power series will be about white supremacy, conic sections will focus on KKK headwear, and so on.

  12. Well, it was only a matter of time before the shriekers of bedlam appropriated and enhanced another subject. However, will the Anti-Racist or Pro-Queer appropriators win?

    The “Black Holes have no Hair” theorem will be called “‘Where my Weave At’ Theorem”.

    On the other hand, “Black Holes” might be called “Pride Holes” and “Hawking Radiation” could be replaced by “Stonewall Radiation”. “Quasars” should be replaced by “Queersars” in any case.

    • LOL: Bubba
  13. OT, but Steve, have you heard about upscale Buckhead looking to secede from Atlanta? It would be a total disaster if it happens – Buckhead generates 40-50% of Atlanta’s revenue. It’s funny hearing the politicians talk about how “divisive” this move is and how everyone needs to stick together. This is just the start of the blowback to all of this BLM-craziness, I think. I think Yang is going to win in NYC because of it.

    • Replies: @res
    @jilla

    The Daily Mail's take on this.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9698789/Wealthy-Atlanta-suburb-Buckhead-files-divorce-city-amid-rising-crime.html

    Replies: @Paul Rise

    , @usNthem
    @jilla

    That’s interesting, but the problem for Buckhead (and many similar situations) is that it’s surrounded on all sides by blacks. Unless they can build a 20 foot wall topped with razor wire, manned machine gun posts and armored troop carriers to get to and from work, it’ll all be for naught.

    , @anon
    @jilla

    This would be a large blow to the DNC, since it would reduce Atlanta to a Southern Detroit.

    Atlanta is a lynchpin of Boomer feel-good narratives about Civil Rights, and will likely be a springboard for future, radical trojan horse Democrats who have reasonable appeal in flyover country. It's perception of being a middle-class Black Mecca is entirely kept afloat by wypipo money.

    The quicker it can be deep-sixed, the better.

    , @northeast
    @jilla

    Secession from Atlanta by Buckhead would only be the first step. They would then have to build a wall and increase the police force by 100% at least.

    Even then...roving gangs of black youth would still be an ever-present danger.

  14. 3 credits @ $2,000 per out-of-state credit.

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @Abolish_public_education


    3 credits @ $2,000 per out-of-state credit.
     
    Decadence has extended down into the ranks of college students. I presume all this will be paid for by daddy. NFW someone borrows money to pay for this.
  15. I wonder if this course was inspired by the movie Event Horizon starring Lawrence Fishburne.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Dave Pinsen

    Underrated haunted ship movie.

    "Where we go ... we need no eyes!"

    , @Anonymous
    @Dave Pinsen


    I wonder if this course was inspired by the movie Event Horizon
     
    Oh yeah, the first 40K movie. Classic.
  16. Texts may include works by theorists like Michelle Wright

    From Amazon’s Page on

    “Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage”

    Epistemology Paperback – February 15, 2015

    What does it mean to be Black? If Blackness is not biological in origin but socially and discursively constructed, does the meaning of Blackness change over time and space? In Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology, Michelle M. Wright argues that although we often explicitly define Blackness as a “what,” it in fact always operates as a “when” and a “where.”

    By putting lay discourses on spacetime from physics into conversation with works on identity from the African Diaspora, Physics of Blackness explores how Middle Passage epistemology subverts racist assumptions about Blackness, yet its linear structure inhibits the kind of inclusive epistemology of Blackness needed in the twenty-first century. Wright then engages with bodies frequently excluded from contemporary mainstream consideration: Black feminists, Black queers, recent Black African immigrants to the West, and Blacks whose histories may weave in and out of the Middle Passage epistemology but do not cohere to it.

    Physics of Blackness takes the reader on a journey both known and unfamiliar—from Isaac Newton’s laws of motion and gravity to the contemporary politics of diasporic Blackness in the academy, from James Baldwin’s postwar trope of the Eiffel Tower as the site for diasporic encounters to theoretical particle physics’ theory of multiverses and superpositioning, to the almost erased lives of Black African women during World War II. Accessible in its style, global in its perspective, and rigorous in its logic, Physics of Blackness will change the way you look at Blackness.

    Black Foucault: Rigorous in its Logic (but what Logic is that?).

    And what the hell is “diasporic Blackness in the academy”.

    10 ratings: 5 x 5 star, 5 x 4 star.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @El Dato

    Thanks. It's unbelievable but there it is. What they cannot wreck with literal brickbats they shall destroy with figurative ones: post-modern gobbledygook.

    , @Lurker
    @El Dato

    So half the ratings were from reactionary wreckers. Those racist malcontents must be rooted out.

    , @photondancer
    @El Dato

    "By putting lay discourses on spacetime from physics into conversation with works on identity "

    FFS, I have books from the mid 1990s on my shelf tearing to pieces this practice of charlatans of yoking science to garbage. Wright is too lazy to even come up with new garbage.

    Replies: @Professional Slav

  17. @Dave Pinsen
    I wonder if this course was inspired by the movie Event Horizon starring Lawrence Fishburne.

    https://youtu.be/OVlnER8SxfQ

    Replies: @El Dato, @Anonymous

    Underrated haunted ship movie.

    “Where we go … we need no eyes!”

    • Agree: Batman
  18. Cornell University!!!

    Those hard-working Americas who were always suspicious of higher education can go straight to open hostility for it now.

    The Ivy League seriously and honestly want a blood war between the races; they ladle out more proof every semester.

    What else explains the anti-European bias they have been nurturing among nonwhites, especially the nonwhites who were hypersensitive about race to begin with?

    H.G. Welles said civilization was in a race between education and disaster. Hell, education IS the disaster.

    • Agree: J.Ross
    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    @Franz


    The Ivy League seriously and honestly want a blood war between the races; they ladle out more proof every semester.
     
    It's "Let's You And He Fight" on a national scale. They seriously believe that they will either emerge unscathed, or come out on top after ordinary people have exhausted each other in a race war.

    Fifty years ago, only madmen like Charles Manson wanted to provoke a race war. Today, Mansonism is the ideology of choice for politicians, the mainstream media, and academia.
  19. There are multiple interpretations of black holes.

    • LOL: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @PaceLaw

    You beat me to it.

  20. I want to laugh, but I think we’re in big trouble.

    • Agree: Just another serf
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @JimB

    "I want to laugh, but ..."

    Afrofuturism makes sense if you smoke weed all day, every day.

  21. It’s not serious. My assumption is that practically everyone in the class will be black, and not the sort of black person who wants to actually study astronomy.

    It’s just a way to solve a science requirement for those blacks who need a college degree to get a job and feel more comfortable in classes of fellow blacks than otherwise. I’m sure you can still learn a lot of astronomy in cornell without taking this class.

    I noticed that Neil DeGrasses Tyson is missing. That’s unfortunate. He’s not perfect yadda yadda but he definitely knows enough and is engaging enough to teach a solid intro course at Cornell.

    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn’t Sagan teach at Cornell?

    Did you see the Bill Maher thing on college? I’ll see if I can find it…

    Here:

    And he’s right of course. The students taking Black Hole Cosmology with Maya Angelou don’t really need to “go to college” at all to get whatever government job they’re going for. But as long as we have “College Or Die!”, well, colleges will find a way around the harder courses so that they can keep the racket going.

    As an aside, Maher has some balls. He also dissed Bitcoin two weks before it crashed. I get annoyed by some of his crap but I assume he believes it because he’s not as cowardly as kimmel and co.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Anonymousygmjth

    I this a joke or - factual, actually: Maher says a third of college students spend less than five hours a week studying. Uh? - That true?

    , @EdwardM
    @Anonymousygmjth


    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn’t Sagan teach at Cornell?
     
    Sagan was on the faculty at Cornell but didn’t teach shit. It was a running joke that they loved to publicize his nominal role in their brochures but he never actually set foot on campus.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Unladen Swallow, @Giant Duck, @Prester John

  22. Of matters science and ever-insufficient Blackity Black Blackness…

    What’s wrong with the Ad below?
    As sharp, catchy, well-done and all-around aesthetically pleasing as this set of six Ads may be, isn’t something rather glaringly missing from them?

    Could such a blatant lack of Blackness possibly still have been OK as late as 2018?

    Though I suppose it figures that of all the places someone such as our host

    [MORE]
    could have chosen to moonlight at…

    View post on imgur.com



    Incidentally, why such a low-res photo at Taki Mag? I can’t be the first to have wondered.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Dissident


    What’s wrong with the Ad below?
     

    all-around aesthetically pleasing as this set of six Ads
     
    • Pedo: Dissident

    Replies: @Dissident

    , @Tex
    @Dissident


    What’s wrong with the Ad below?
     
    Inconsistent capitalization. Chicago Manual of Style, please!

    Replies: @Dissident

  23. @utu
    HOW A SIEGE IN 18TH-CENTURY BRITISH-OCCUPIED CALCUTTA GAVE US THE TERM 'BLACK HOLE'
    https://www.firstpost.com/tech/science/how-a-siege-in-18th-century-british-occupied-calcutta-gave-us-the-term-black-hole-6507601.html

    MIT Professor and science writer, Marcia Bartusiak traces the origins of the term ‘black hole’ in her book Black Holes. Bartusiak writes that it was Hong-Yee Chiu, an American Astrophysicists of Chinese origins, who also coined the term "quasars", organized the January 1964 AAAS talk at Cleveland. Chiu first stumbled upon the term in a seminar at Princeton, in the early 1960s, where physicist Robert Dicke was explaining the dense stars collapsing in their own gravitational field. Dicke described these objects as "like the Black Hole Of Calcutta"- a prison so bad that people went in but did not come out. In fact, it appears that Dicke used the phrase quite liberally, Bartusiak notes that Robert Dicke’s children remember their father saying "Ah, it must have been sucked into the black hole of Calcutta" whenever something got lost at their house.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Charon, @Jonathan Mason

    The term “black body radiation” goes back at least to 1900 (Planck’s Law) or before (Wien ‘s Displacement Law and Stefan-Boltzmann Law). That the emitted spectrum did not match theory (the ultraviolet catastrophe) led Max Planck to hypothesize discrete packets and Albert Einstein to theorize the existence of photons. I’m sure they were all racists.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @James Speaks

    OTOH, a Black Hole was not supposed to emit anything until Hawking posited his eponymous (blackbody) radiation, so the two terms have nothing in common.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    , @Roger
    @James Speaks

    That is an even better idea for a Black physics course. Maybe another college can teach a class on Black holes, black body radiation, and George Floyd.

    , @nokangaroos
    @James Speaks

    Planck´s law was the first mathematical formulation of black body (thermal)
    radiation - by itself it does not (yet) imply photons (that had to wait for Einstein and the
    photoelectric effect).
    But given how foundational it is and how often they use the term "black bodies"
    I´d have expected at least an honorable mention; the jokes write themselves :P

    Fun fact: Skin is almost ideally black over most of the spectrum -
    why the difference in the visible window?

    Replies: @James Speaks

  24. I’m going to guess that this a defensive move by Cornell’s astronomy department—to get ahead of the other science departments in this woke-inquisitorial age in academia. Being the first to do this gives them street cred and a badge of approval they can brandish, and hope that the mob will move on and focus their attention on other science departments.

    It’s no surprise, though, that astronomy is the first to do it. Of all the hard science departments (aside from, maybe, biology), they likely have the largest number of black students. Accordingly, they likely anticipated potential trouble before the others.

    • Replies: @Red Pill Angel
    @PiltdownMan

    The biology department at the state school where I work has very few, if any, black majors. The kindest theory is that white kids go to summer camp in the country, are more likely to live in the suburbs, and thus get to see and appreciate more of nature growing up. Do white kids have more pets? Anyway, black kids just aren’t very interested, although the school has hired several black professors, which isn’t easy. The black teachers are from overseas and are very good, but all their assistants and student aides are white.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  25. @Reg Cæsar
    @MEH 0910

    It was always fun to see this sign's final letter burn out.


    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-sZqOSRSew_g/V9A7gTes8NI/AAAAAAAATtA/vFimZ9jmmgst_IaP16FzlM5guxrraKq6ACLcB/s1600/neon127.jpg

    Replies: @Bubba

    He was born a Blount, but it should have been Blunt.

  26. Crash and burn.

    This is a lagging indicator — you can pull that stuff when you don’t have real challenges. From the end of the Soviet Union in 1991 to well, about five years ago.

    We’ve already seen global unrest with the food spikes in 2011 driving the Arab Spring revolts. Imagine that now, after global Covid lockdowns. And imagine it never ending.

    Food production relies heavily on oil and gas production and petrochemicals. Without cheap oil and gas and cheap petrochemicals there is no way marginal producers outside the US, Canada, and Ukraine can produce enough basic wheat, corn, and other crops to feed both people and livestock. We’ve already reached about 15 years of ESG hectoring and court orders and the rest to reduce oil and gas production so that’s baked into the cake. Saudis and Russia and Iran can increase marginal output, but not enough for demand.

    Meaning there will be hunger, for the first time since WWII, in the West. Widespread. Even worse in the Third World.

    Putting a premium on real technology and engineering prowess, and none on magical black people being real and such. If America’s rulers continue a belief in magic (quite literally) then they will be replaced by whatever hard men are daring and dangerous enough to seize it: Cartels, some Chinese military leader, a Russian expeditionary force, whoever. At Nellis Air Force Base participation in Drag Queen performances are mandatory for nearly all personnel. Yeah America is ripe for conquering.

  27. @MEH 0910
    Black Holes In Space
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgAMBh4GkGI

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Bubba

    Spinal Tap had a brief freeform jazz period (not cosmic though), but it didn’t work out well…

  28. Anon[266] June 19, 2021 at 2:27 am GMT

    I work at JPL, a NASA installation. Apparently the cafeteria had been open at breakfast this morning, but when I came for my 11 AM coffee break it was closed with a sign “Observing juneteenth”.

    One snafu: Like other black holes, Juneteenth cannot be observed directly.

    https://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/black-holes :

    Scientists can’t directly observe black holes with telescopes that detect x-rays, light, or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. We can, however, infer the presence of black holes and study them by detecting their effect on other matter nearby. Did you know that despite being only 13% of the matter in the universe, black holes are responsible for the destruction of 56% of astronomical bodies?

    • LOL: Bubba, Tex, El Dato
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Alan Sokal is at it again.

  29. Fox says:

    I am uncertain whether this is reality or satire. It seems today’s reality yet I can’t really believe that it’s true. It is just plainly too stupid, to brainless, has too much of the ‘absurd theater’ that was in vogue in the 1960s.
    May the engine that keeps this madhouse lit come to a screeching halt very soon. It will give plenty of useless and clueless academics & others who live a life in theory something to ponder upon.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Fox


    May the engine that keeps this madhouse lit come to a screeching halt very soon.
     
    Somehow one gets the feeling that it's just warming up.

    Replies: @Fox

    , @Old Prude
    @Fox

    This is no different than the Dallas city counsellor complaining that Devil's Food Cake is black, and Angels Food Cake is white, except this has the imprimatur of the university.

    I was going to quip "Black Matter Matters", but I realized its called Dark Matter. Darn astrophysicists missed a chance at more systemic racisms.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @guest, @Fox

  30. Astrophysics for Aspiring Rappers.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Yancey Ward


    Astrophysics for Aspiring Rappers.
     
    A new term in the lexicon: Aspiring Astronomers
    , @Anon7
    @Yancey Ward

    I'd feel less alarmed about this if I thought it was just the 2020 equivalent of "Physics for Poets".

  31. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Anon[266] June 19, 2021 at 2:27 am GMT
     

    I work at JPL, a NASA installation. Apparently the cafeteria had been open at breakfast this morning, but when I came for my 11 AM coffee break it was closed with a sign “Observing juneteenth”.
     
    One snafu: Like other black holes, Juneteenth cannot be observed directly.

    https://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/black-holes :


    Scientists can’t directly observe black holes with telescopes that detect x-rays, light, or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. We can, however, infer the presence of black holes and study them by detecting their effect on other matter nearby. Did you know that despite being only 13% of the matter in the universe, black holes are responsible for the destruction of 56% of astronomical bodies?
     

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Alan Sokal is at it again.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  32. Is Cornell trying to improve its athletic outcomes? This seems like a perfect “jock” science course.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    , @Barnard
    @Redneck farmer

    Cornell has been terrible in football for awhile now. Their last Ivy League conference championship was in 1990. The men's basketball team has been slightly better, they had three straight conference titles from 2008-2010 with the 2010 team making a run to the Sweet Sixteen before getting beat easily by a loaded Kentucky squad. If it is an effort to help student athletes, they need it. My guess is this a more a commitment to making sure all diverse Cornell students can achieve a good grade. Once you get into the Ivy League they don't want you dropping out because couldn't handle the course work.

  33. “this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy concepts through readings in Black Studies”

    This, of course, is just the beginning. Seems like this has happened before in Leftist history…

    Instructors and students of Peking University’s theoretical physics instruction study group, using Mao Tse-tung ideology as a weapon, have uncovered the bourgeois idealism and ontology in “quantum mechanics,” and thus have opened up the world struggle between two concepts. These efforts have changed the face of this course and improved the quality of teaching…

    …Previously, some had thought that Mao Tse-tung ideology did not have to be applied to the study and teaching of natural sciences. But now, from their own practical experience, they realize that without the direction of Mao Tse-tung ideology, the natural sciences would sink into a deep, muddy pit. Therefore, all are now earnestly studying Chairman Mao’s works and seeking to reform their own conception of the world, and their method of teaching. The reform in the teaching of quantum mechanics has inspired reforms in the teaching of other fields of science. MeanWhile, grasping Mao Tse-tung ideology as their weapon, all sections in the science department of Peking University have launched an effort to reform their individual fields of teaching.

    QUANTUM STUDY SIMPLIFIED IN PEl-CHING UNIVERSITY — ANOTHER VIOTORY FOR THE MAO TSE-TUNG IDEOLOGY
    Peking Daily, 24 May, 1960
    http://marxistphilosophy.org/MaoQuantum.pdf

    • Thanks: Dissident, PiltdownMan
  34. @PiltdownMan
    I'm going to guess that this a defensive move by Cornell's astronomy department—to get ahead of the other science departments in this woke-inquisitorial age in academia. Being the first to do this gives them street cred and a badge of approval they can brandish, and hope that the mob will move on and focus their attention on other science departments.

    It's no surprise, though, that astronomy is the first to do it. Of all the hard science departments (aside from, maybe, biology), they likely have the largest number of black students. Accordingly, they likely anticipated potential trouble before the others.

    Replies: @Red Pill Angel

    The biology department at the state school where I work has very few, if any, black majors. The kindest theory is that white kids go to summer camp in the country, are more likely to live in the suburbs, and thus get to see and appreciate more of nature growing up. Do white kids have more pets? Anyway, black kids just aren’t very interested, although the school has hired several black professors, which isn’t easy. The black teachers are from overseas and are very good, but all their assistants and student aides are white.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Red Pill Angel

    There's definitely a huge difference in empathy (and keeping an animal means reliably maintaining their habitat). Whites almost always have a pet, if they don't there's a reason, like an allergy or a landlord's prohibition, and they will be as close as possible (eg, letting it sleep in the same bed).

  35. @Redneck farmer
    Is Cornell trying to improve its athletic outcomes? This seems like a perfect "jock" science course.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Barnard

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as “Clapping for Credit.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as “Clapping for Credit.”
     
    Benoit Mandelbrot's uncle taught at Rice in the 1920s. Is that common knowledge there? He brought Benoit's family to America.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szolem_Mandelbrojt

    An artist now in his 90s must be from this family, considering his mathematical bent:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/254925561_Multiple-Time_Installation


    TIL a couple things about Southern California. One is an obscure film school, Dodge College at Chapman University. Is any Hollywood notable from there? One doesn't expect industry leaders to come out of the film schools at Montana State or Southern Illinois, but Dodge is in Orange County. Is that also flyover country?

    And there are about three dozen "Case Study" houses in and around LA:

    The Case Study houses that made Los Angeles a modernist mecca

    Are these well-known locally?

    In the Twin Cities, there are two neighborhoods, University Grove just outside St Paul in Philando's Falcon Heights, and the Luella Anderson Addition in South Minneapolis, full of modernest homes on streets named for University presidents. (Many of the houses were designed by Winston and Elizabeth Close, the former no doubt the namesake of the recently departed Winston Smith, whose parents must have been quite the architecture buffs.)

    Is this sort of experimental neighborhood common around major architecture schools?

    Replies: @candid_observer

    , @glib
    @Steve Sailer

    I once taught an astronomy class like (well, it was just "descriptive" and we left it at that) this one with a good part of the softball and football teams. One wide receiver, I discovered, could not read. Top that, Maestro...

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Old Prude

    , @Paperback Writer
    @Steve Sailer

    Then there was the good old "Rocks for Jocks," a dumbed down geology course.

    , @Papinian
    @Steve Sailer

    Obviously the professor did not use Hindemith's Elementary Training for Musicians which becomes impossible to do on page 6. Quotes in the instructions are to the effect of "If the students fails to develop perfect pitch after about 100 trials of this exercise, it must be questioned whether a mind that cannot learn to remember pitches has any business studying music."

    , @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.gtalumni.org/s/1481/alumni/17/magazine-pages.aspx?pgid=11127&gid=21&cid=24654

    This guy famously taught one of the toughest classes on offer and graded even tougher. His theory was that college Athletics required superior intelligence but it was rarely applied in the classroom.

    His classes were always packed with athletes. They performed well in class.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @tyrone
    @Steve Sailer

    UNC ran no-show classes out the black studies dept.......sleep in and get an A.......maybe that's why their basketball team was so great ......of course the coach didn't take the fall ,they are treated like gods.

    , @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Steve Sailer

    Were there any Chinese or Japanese students in that class? I will go out on a limb, and guess that was the moment when you understood Asians are not as creative as the races represented in that class room.

    , @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    Speaking of colleges and universities, here's a fact that should warm iSteve's generous heart.

    A revival of College Bowl airs tonight at 10 PM EDT for an hour on NBC.

    No, Rice U isn't a contestant but other schools are.

    So iSteve can re-live his college days again.

    I assume it will be more scholarly than the now Woke Jeopardy has become. Aside from questions about obscure non White, non Male figures (questions than often none of the fairly smart contestants even guess at), many now Woke Jeopardy questions are about current films, books or TV shows few people bother with. Or "winners" of various industry award shows in recent times. Industry meaning "Industry" as in entertainment or British book awards.

    Okay, everyone who knows who the 2011 Tony Award Best Musical winner was, please raise your hand (no Googling first either!). Bonus points if you can hum the popular tune from the show!

    College Bowl will feature harder questions about physics, math and ancient history. Oh, and feminist icons like Susquehanna Sue. Better get that Ritalin ready!

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @UNIT472

  36. @jilla
    OT, but Steve, have you heard about upscale Buckhead looking to secede from Atlanta? It would be a total disaster if it happens - Buckhead generates 40-50% of Atlanta's revenue. It's funny hearing the politicians talk about how "divisive" this move is and how everyone needs to stick together. This is just the start of the blowback to all of this BLM-craziness, I think. I think Yang is going to win in NYC because of it.

    Replies: @res, @usNthem, @anon, @northeast

    • Replies: @Paul Rise
    @res

    Missed headline opportunity

    "Buckhead breaking away from Atlanta?"

  37. @Polistra
    @James Speaks

    I dare you people to successfully satirize this. I dare you.


    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy
     
    Negroes? Pay attention please. That's astronomy, not astrology.

    Until she find out you a Scorpio, homes!

    Replies: @James Speaks, @James Speaks

    I dare you people to successfully satirize this. I dare you.

    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy

    I accept your challenge. Oh wait, the rest of that sentence reads,

    “this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy concepts through readings in Black Studies.”

    I respectfully decline your challenge.

    • Agree: bomag
  38. How long until the Gender Studies joins in the fun and turns “Black Holes!” into one of their “Porn and” courses?

  39. Anonymous[396] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @photondancer, @Ed, @Lev Myshkin, @Altai

    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.

    On average, it takes 3 years for American craziness to infect the rest of the anglosphere. So if you could nip it in the bud over there we would appreciate it. Thx.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Anonymous

    You're completely, utterly, absolutely wrong. The US is way LESS infected by this shit than UK.

    Everything that you consider bad about woke was instituted in Britain years ago.

    It's pathetic how little you people know about the world outside your rabbit hole.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  40. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as “Clapping for Credit.”

    Benoit Mandelbrot’s uncle taught at Rice in the 1920s. Is that common knowledge there? He brought Benoit’s family to America.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szolem_Mandelbrojt

    An artist now in his 90s must be from this family, considering his mathematical bent:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/254925561_Multiple-Time_Installation

    TIL a couple things about Southern California. One is an obscure film school, Dodge College at Chapman University. Is any Hollywood notable from there? One doesn’t expect industry leaders to come out of the film schools at Montana State or Southern Illinois, but Dodge is in Orange County. Is that also flyover country?

    And there are about three dozen “Case Study” houses in and around LA:

    The Case Study houses that made Los Angeles a modernist mecca

    Are these well-known locally?

    In the Twin Cities, there are two neighborhoods, University Grove just outside St Paul in Philando’s Falcon Heights, and the Luella Anderson Addition in South Minneapolis, full of modernest homes on streets named for University presidents. (Many of the houses were designed by Winston and Elizabeth Close, the former no doubt the namesake of the recently departed Winston Smith, whose parents must have been quite the architecture buffs.)

    Is this sort of experimental neighborhood common around major architecture schools?

    • Replies: @candid_observer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There are several in my neck of the woods, around Lexington MA, which were developed by the architecture school at Harvard.

    Five Fields is a well known example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Fields

    They all have a Back to the Future feel about them. Personally, I like their combined suggestion of optimistic progress and nostalgia. When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar

  41. Anonymous[396] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    I wonder if this course was inspired by the movie Event Horizon starring Lawrence Fishburne.

    https://youtu.be/OVlnER8SxfQ

    Replies: @El Dato, @Anonymous

    I wonder if this course was inspired by the movie Event Horizon

    Oh yeah, the first 40K movie. Classic.

  42. All this race thing would not b happening in a European aka White Ethnostate. We had such societies then threw them away. This time our new constitution will state our Ethnostate explicitly.

    • Replies: @Uncle Dan
    @1John

    What ethno is it, Italian, Czech, Polish, German, Spanish….?

  43. If the mind goes – hey: astray! -: – It wanders boundlessly around in the whole wide universe. In such a state of mind Black Holes appear to be right next door then.

    Soundgarden (like The Beatles, of course, whom Soundgarden follow here as aural pathfinders) have captured this mood astonishingly precise in Black Hole Sun (this hit song is echoing A Day in a Life with its Five thousand Holes in Blackfield Lancashire -and the lighthearted mood of Penny Lane) only to turn the screw of reason one more time and transform the Beatles’ strange but still everyday scenery into the almost totally surreal realms of Flip-city (My Analyst Told Me – top cover-version by Joni Mitchell).

    Botttom line in Black Hole Sun:

    Steal the warm wind tired friend / Times are gone for honest men

    • Thanks: Desiderius
  44. The course seems to be missing any substantial LGBT element though. That’s racist.

  45. Uh-oh.

  46. @Yancey Ward
    Astrophysics for Aspiring Rappers.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anon7

    Astrophysics for Aspiring Rappers.

    A new term in the lexicon: Aspiring Astronomers

  47. @Anonymousygmjth
    It's not serious. My assumption is that practically everyone in the class will be black, and not the sort of black person who wants to actually study astronomy.

    It's just a way to solve a science requirement for those blacks who need a college degree to get a job and feel more comfortable in classes of fellow blacks than otherwise. I'm sure you can still learn a lot of astronomy in cornell without taking this class.

    I noticed that Neil DeGrasses Tyson is missing. That's unfortunate. He's not perfect yadda yadda but he definitely knows enough and is engaging enough to teach a solid intro course at Cornell.

    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn't Sagan teach at Cornell?

    Did you see the Bill Maher thing on college? I'll see if I can find it...

    Here:

    And he's right of course. The students taking Black Hole Cosmology with Maya Angelou don't really need to "go to college" at all to get whatever government job they're going for. But as long as we have "College Or Die!", well, colleges will find a way around the harder courses so that they can keep the racket going.

    As an aside, Maher has some balls. He also dissed Bitcoin two weks before it crashed. I get annoyed by some of his crap but I assume he believes it because he's not as cowardly as kimmel and co.


    https://youtu.be/_x5SeXNabd8

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @EdwardM

    I this a joke or – factual, actually: Maher says a third of college students spend less than five hours a week studying. Uh? – That true?

  48. Astronomy used to be an ethereal kind of topic – isolated from the World and it’s petty concerns. A science, to be sure, but practiced by dedicated people – almost a priesthood – on mountain tops, gazing intently though the eyepiece of a telescope with, one imagined, Holst’s Neptune running through their minds.

    Now it’s just another crapfest that woke leftism has ruined.

    Astronomy
    1543 – 2021
    RIP

    • Replies: @Bubba
    @Mr. Anon

    Poor Johannes Kepler. Lived an incredibly tough life and yet made more contributions to astronomy in his short lifetime than an infinite google of woke, spoiled charlatans like Neil deGrasse Tyson.

    May his work will be salvaged after the coming Idiocracy.

    Replies: @nokangaroos

  49. @utu
    HOW A SIEGE IN 18TH-CENTURY BRITISH-OCCUPIED CALCUTTA GAVE US THE TERM 'BLACK HOLE'
    https://www.firstpost.com/tech/science/how-a-siege-in-18th-century-british-occupied-calcutta-gave-us-the-term-black-hole-6507601.html

    MIT Professor and science writer, Marcia Bartusiak traces the origins of the term ‘black hole’ in her book Black Holes. Bartusiak writes that it was Hong-Yee Chiu, an American Astrophysicists of Chinese origins, who also coined the term "quasars", organized the January 1964 AAAS talk at Cleveland. Chiu first stumbled upon the term in a seminar at Princeton, in the early 1960s, where physicist Robert Dicke was explaining the dense stars collapsing in their own gravitational field. Dicke described these objects as "like the Black Hole Of Calcutta"- a prison so bad that people went in but did not come out. In fact, it appears that Dicke used the phrase quite liberally, Bartusiak notes that Robert Dicke’s children remember their father saying "Ah, it must have been sucked into the black hole of Calcutta" whenever something got lost at their house.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Charon, @Jonathan Mason

    The Black Hole of Calcutta was where subcons showed whitey wassup. You can see how they fit so neatly into Current Year America.

  50. @El Dato

    Texts may include works by theorists like Michelle Wright
     
    From Amazon's Page on

    "Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage"
     
    Epistemology Paperback – February 15, 2015

    What does it mean to be Black? If Blackness is not biological in origin but socially and discursively constructed, does the meaning of Blackness change over time and space? In Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology, Michelle M. Wright argues that although we often explicitly define Blackness as a “what,” it in fact always operates as a “when” and a “where.”

    By putting lay discourses on spacetime from physics into conversation with works on identity from the African Diaspora, Physics of Blackness explores how Middle Passage epistemology subverts racist assumptions about Blackness, yet its linear structure inhibits the kind of inclusive epistemology of Blackness needed in the twenty-first century. Wright then engages with bodies frequently excluded from contemporary mainstream consideration: Black feminists, Black queers, recent Black African immigrants to the West, and Blacks whose histories may weave in and out of the Middle Passage epistemology but do not cohere to it.

    Physics of Blackness takes the reader on a journey both known and unfamiliar—from Isaac Newton’s laws of motion and gravity to the contemporary politics of diasporic Blackness in the academy, from James Baldwin’s postwar trope of the Eiffel Tower as the site for diasporic encounters to theoretical particle physics’ theory of multiverses and superpositioning, to the almost erased lives of Black African women during World War II. Accessible in its style, global in its perspective, and rigorous in its logic, Physics of Blackness will change the way you look at Blackness.
     

    Black Foucault: Rigorous in its Logic (but what Logic is that?).

    And what the hell is "diasporic Blackness in the academy".

    10 ratings: 5 x 5 star, 5 x 4 star.

    Replies: @Charon, @Lurker, @photondancer

    Thanks. It’s unbelievable but there it is. What they cannot wreck with literal brickbats they shall destroy with figurative ones: post-modern gobbledygook.

  51. @Fox
    I am uncertain whether this is reality or satire. It seems today's reality yet I can't really believe that it's true. It is just plainly too stupid, to brainless, has too much of the 'absurd theater' that was in vogue in the 1960s.
    May the engine that keeps this madhouse lit come to a screeching halt very soon. It will give plenty of useless and clueless academics & others who live a life in theory something to ponder upon.

    Replies: @Charon, @Old Prude

    May the engine that keeps this madhouse lit come to a screeching halt very soon.

    Somehow one gets the feeling that it’s just warming up.

    • Replies: @Fox
    @Charon

    A madhouse is still a madhouse, even if approved by parliamentary vote or imperial edict. The system is right now moving from the momentum it had acquired before the insanity years. This momentum will run out when the money's no good anymore, the general appearance of our surroundings will be more like a junk yard. The universities will of course become a laughing stock. With "astrophysicists" who were apparently hired for their skin color and being concerned with BLM instead of the stars rationality won't go very far. Mathematics, according to the newest theorems of the mad ruling fringe representing white supremacy and anti-black reservations will be toppled from the throne where she reigned as Queen of Sciences. In essence, 2 + 2 = not 4.
    I don't think that the part necessary for the running of nuclear power plants, keeping airplanes safe in the sky will be retained in the current model of progress while all other rationality will be replaced by perverted psychobabble.
    I see a very big wreck ahead of us, and it will affect everybody.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

  52. Interesting thread on gunfire reports in Minneapolis.

    These datasets might be the origin of the time series, though GIS skills would be needed to use them:

    https://opendata.minneapolismn.gov/datasets/cityoflakes::shots-fired/about

    https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=f9ae3bef2ccd4792b1835e2744de017f

  53. @usNthem
    Just like black holes, the negroidal undertow sucks in all positive nearby energy. And as usual these days, anything with the word “black” in it, is all of a sudden all about negros - and always in a racist way.

    Replies: @photondancer

    It can only be a matter of time before we can’t use the word ‘black’ for anything.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @photondancer

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ef/a9/93/efa993669c003704bb6784b7c481fd04.jpg

    Shaniqua is blaque?

  54. @Franz
    Cornell University!!!

    Those hard-working Americas who were always suspicious of higher education can go straight to open hostility for it now.

    The Ivy League seriously and honestly want a blood war between the races; they ladle out more proof every semester.

    What else explains the anti-European bias they have been nurturing among nonwhites, especially the nonwhites who were hypersensitive about race to begin with?

    H.G. Welles said civilization was in a race between education and disaster. Hell, education IS the disaster.

    Replies: @James N. Kennett

    The Ivy League seriously and honestly want a blood war between the races; they ladle out more proof every semester.

    It’s “Let’s You And He Fight” on a national scale. They seriously believe that they will either emerge unscathed, or come out on top after ordinary people have exhausted each other in a race war.

    Fifty years ago, only madmen like Charles Manson wanted to provoke a race war. Today, Mansonism is the ideology of choice for politicians, the mainstream media, and academia.

    • Agree: Franz
  55. @El Dato

    Texts may include works by theorists like Michelle Wright
     
    From Amazon's Page on

    "Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage"
     
    Epistemology Paperback – February 15, 2015

    What does it mean to be Black? If Blackness is not biological in origin but socially and discursively constructed, does the meaning of Blackness change over time and space? In Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology, Michelle M. Wright argues that although we often explicitly define Blackness as a “what,” it in fact always operates as a “when” and a “where.”

    By putting lay discourses on spacetime from physics into conversation with works on identity from the African Diaspora, Physics of Blackness explores how Middle Passage epistemology subverts racist assumptions about Blackness, yet its linear structure inhibits the kind of inclusive epistemology of Blackness needed in the twenty-first century. Wright then engages with bodies frequently excluded from contemporary mainstream consideration: Black feminists, Black queers, recent Black African immigrants to the West, and Blacks whose histories may weave in and out of the Middle Passage epistemology but do not cohere to it.

    Physics of Blackness takes the reader on a journey both known and unfamiliar—from Isaac Newton’s laws of motion and gravity to the contemporary politics of diasporic Blackness in the academy, from James Baldwin’s postwar trope of the Eiffel Tower as the site for diasporic encounters to theoretical particle physics’ theory of multiverses and superpositioning, to the almost erased lives of Black African women during World War II. Accessible in its style, global in its perspective, and rigorous in its logic, Physics of Blackness will change the way you look at Blackness.
     

    Black Foucault: Rigorous in its Logic (but what Logic is that?).

    And what the hell is "diasporic Blackness in the academy".

    10 ratings: 5 x 5 star, 5 x 4 star.

    Replies: @Charon, @Lurker, @photondancer

    So half the ratings were from reactionary wreckers. Those racist malcontents must be rooted out.

  56. “Many astronomy departments have been on the forefront of campus identity politics…”

    They probably thought they were majoring in astrology.

    In fact, couldn’t we just set the black “theorists” loose on that and other, less serious disciplines? Why not revive some old debunked sciences to make a sort of sandbox for blacks and their scholastic ilk to play around in more or less harmlessly. Let them reimagine phlebotomy. Imagine all the stupid energy that could be absorbed if we convinced their greedy asses that all alchemy needs is a little black theoretical magic.

  57. @El Dato

    Texts may include works by theorists like Michelle Wright
     
    From Amazon's Page on

    "Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage"
     
    Epistemology Paperback – February 15, 2015

    What does it mean to be Black? If Blackness is not biological in origin but socially and discursively constructed, does the meaning of Blackness change over time and space? In Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology, Michelle M. Wright argues that although we often explicitly define Blackness as a “what,” it in fact always operates as a “when” and a “where.”

    By putting lay discourses on spacetime from physics into conversation with works on identity from the African Diaspora, Physics of Blackness explores how Middle Passage epistemology subverts racist assumptions about Blackness, yet its linear structure inhibits the kind of inclusive epistemology of Blackness needed in the twenty-first century. Wright then engages with bodies frequently excluded from contemporary mainstream consideration: Black feminists, Black queers, recent Black African immigrants to the West, and Blacks whose histories may weave in and out of the Middle Passage epistemology but do not cohere to it.

    Physics of Blackness takes the reader on a journey both known and unfamiliar—from Isaac Newton’s laws of motion and gravity to the contemporary politics of diasporic Blackness in the academy, from James Baldwin’s postwar trope of the Eiffel Tower as the site for diasporic encounters to theoretical particle physics’ theory of multiverses and superpositioning, to the almost erased lives of Black African women during World War II. Accessible in its style, global in its perspective, and rigorous in its logic, Physics of Blackness will change the way you look at Blackness.
     

    Black Foucault: Rigorous in its Logic (but what Logic is that?).

    And what the hell is "diasporic Blackness in the academy".

    10 ratings: 5 x 5 star, 5 x 4 star.

    Replies: @Charon, @Lurker, @photondancer

    “By putting lay discourses on spacetime from physics into conversation with works on identity ”

    FFS, I have books from the mid 1990s on my shelf tearing to pieces this practice of charlatans of yoking science to garbage. Wright is too lazy to even come up with new garbage.

    • Replies: @Professional Slav
    @photondancer

    do you mind recommending some? thanks

    Replies: @photondancer

  58. Never mind “race”; isn’t there something anti-feminist in the term “hole”?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Tono Bungay

    Take it up with Courtney Love.

  59. Conventional wisdom would have it that the “black” in black holes has nothing to do with race. Surely there can be no connection between the cosmos and the idea of racial blackness. Can there? Contemporary Black Studies theorists, artists, fiction writers implicitly and explicitly posit just such a connection.

    Wright’s book, The Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology, invokes “Newton’s laws of motion and gravity” and “theoretical particle physics” to “subvert racist assumptions about Blackness.” The Cornell course also studies music by Sun Ra and Outkast to “conjure blackness through cosmological themes.” …

  60. @JohnnyWalker123
    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @photondancer, @Ed, @Lev Myshkin, @Altai

    I spent a few minutes searching the word ‘race’ on half a dozen big Australian university websites. No subjects quite this egregious were uncovered, but I was dismayed to find several flaunting the words ‘critical theory’ and ‘intersection’ so it’s only a matter of time.

    Top search result at University of Melbourne is a subject on race in America, because that’s so relevant to Australia. If the Aborigines had any gumption they’d be protesting.

  61. @photondancer
    @usNthem

    It can only be a matter of time before we can't use the word 'black' for anything.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Shaniqua is blaque?

  62. Being besieged by black students is not a new experience for Cornell U.

    Cornell, of course, made the national news in 1969 when armed black students took over the university students’ activity center, but there was an earlier siege that happened a year before, on April 3rd, 1968.

    From the NYT archives:

    • Thanks: Dissident
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @PiltdownMan

    The ultimate oxymoron: a based Jesuit who today would not be one of Pope Frankie's favorites!

    , @El Dato
    @PiltdownMan

    TFW you have the suspicion that Stanley Kubrick created a metaphor of upcoming black worship with "2001: A Space Odyssey" (on top of the metaphor that you have to overcome societal control systems and techno-feudalism by "drilling its brain out" before you can even attempt to reach enlightenment)

    , @Paperback Writer
    @PiltdownMan

    The Cornell blacks in those days demanded Afro-American studies classes; now they want to drag down the hard sciences - and we'll let them.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @PiltdownMan

    One of the students was Franklin Raines who later walked off with $50 million in bonuses after cooking the books at Fannie Mae to the tune of $13 billion. He had help from Jamie Gorelick, architect of the famous information wall between the CIA and the FBI.

  63. @PiltdownMan
    Being besieged by black students is not a new experience for Cornell U.

    Cornell, of course, made the national news in 1969 when armed black students took over the university students' activity center, but there was an earlier siege that happened a year before, on April 3rd, 1968.

    From the NYT archives:

    https://i.imgur.com/lLbyyTl.jpg

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @El Dato, @Paperback Writer, @Jim Don Bob

    The ultimate oxymoron: a based Jesuit who today would not be one of Pope Frankie’s favorites!

  64. @James Speaks
    @utu

    The term "black body radiation" goes back at least to 1900 (Planck's Law) or before (Wien 's Displacement Law and Stefan-Boltzmann Law). That the emitted spectrum did not match theory (the ultraviolet catastrophe) led Max Planck to hypothesize discrete packets and Albert Einstein to theorize the existence of photons. I'm sure they were all racists.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Roger, @nokangaroos

    OTOH, a Black Hole was not supposed to emit anything until Hawking posited his eponymous (blackbody) radiation, so the two terms have nothing in common.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @El Dato


    so the two terms have nothing in common.
     
    Both terms are unspeakably racist.
  65. @PiltdownMan
    Being besieged by black students is not a new experience for Cornell U.

    Cornell, of course, made the national news in 1969 when armed black students took over the university students' activity center, but there was an earlier siege that happened a year before, on April 3rd, 1968.

    From the NYT archives:

    https://i.imgur.com/lLbyyTl.jpg

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @El Dato, @Paperback Writer, @Jim Don Bob

    TFW you have the suspicion that Stanley Kubrick created a metaphor of upcoming black worship with “2001: A Space Odyssey” (on top of the metaphor that you have to overcome societal control systems and techno-feudalism by “drilling its brain out” before you can even attempt to reach enlightenment)

  66. @James Speaks
    @utu

    The term "black body radiation" goes back at least to 1900 (Planck's Law) or before (Wien 's Displacement Law and Stefan-Boltzmann Law). That the emitted spectrum did not match theory (the ultraviolet catastrophe) led Max Planck to hypothesize discrete packets and Albert Einstein to theorize the existence of photons. I'm sure they were all racists.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Roger, @nokangaroos

    That is an even better idea for a Black physics course. Maybe another college can teach a class on Black holes, black body radiation, and George Floyd.

  67. @Anonymousygmjth
    It's not serious. My assumption is that practically everyone in the class will be black, and not the sort of black person who wants to actually study astronomy.

    It's just a way to solve a science requirement for those blacks who need a college degree to get a job and feel more comfortable in classes of fellow blacks than otherwise. I'm sure you can still learn a lot of astronomy in cornell without taking this class.

    I noticed that Neil DeGrasses Tyson is missing. That's unfortunate. He's not perfect yadda yadda but he definitely knows enough and is engaging enough to teach a solid intro course at Cornell.

    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn't Sagan teach at Cornell?

    Did you see the Bill Maher thing on college? I'll see if I can find it...

    Here:

    And he's right of course. The students taking Black Hole Cosmology with Maya Angelou don't really need to "go to college" at all to get whatever government job they're going for. But as long as we have "College Or Die!", well, colleges will find a way around the harder courses so that they can keep the racket going.

    As an aside, Maher has some balls. He also dissed Bitcoin two weks before it crashed. I get annoyed by some of his crap but I assume he believes it because he's not as cowardly as kimmel and co.


    https://youtu.be/_x5SeXNabd8

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @EdwardM

    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn’t Sagan teach at Cornell?

    Sagan was on the faculty at Cornell but didn’t teach shit. It was a running joke that they loved to publicize his nominal role in their brochures but he never actually set foot on campus.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @EdwardM

    According to Sagan's son he spent his time staying at five star hotels while waiting to get paid a lot of money to make a speech and driving his Porsche all while espousing socialism.

    , @Unladen Swallow
    @EdwardM

    According to Sagan's son he spent his free time staying at five star hotels while waiting to get paid a lot of money to make a speech and driving his Porsche, all while espousing socialism.

    , @Giant Duck
    @EdwardM

    Sagan taught one class, either once a semester or once a year (I don't remember). The class was tiny and to get in you had to apply and he would then personally select who got to be his students.

    , @Prester John
    @EdwardM

    Most of the cream of the crop in the STEM fields don't set one foot into a classroom. They are there (CalTech, MIT, Harvard, Princeton etc) to do research. Nothing more or less. Their research assistants are their students.

    Replies: @EdwardM

  68. Ed says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @photondancer, @Ed, @Lev Myshkin, @Altai

    Yes, it’s in all the Anglo countries. New Zealand ties itself into knots over Maori issues. They even have a reparations scheme. Canada will likely do something similar due to the hysteria over the discovery of 215 bodies of dead indigenous children at some school.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/02/28/810485160/episode-975-reparations-in-new-zealand

    Mavis Mullins runs a sheep-shearing company that handles over 1,000,000 sheep. She’s also a charming, disarmingly honest straight-shooter. One day her cousin pulled her into a cafe with a request: Help us fight with the New Zealand government for reparations.

    Mavis is Māori, part of the indigenous population of New Zealand. And over the past 35 years, the government of New Zealand has been building a system to try and make amends to Māori for past betrayals. These reparations usually take the form of a check, land, and an apology. In today’s show we follow Mavis Mullins through that process.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Ed

    We need a better definition of "good man" if we are to survive. Forsake the image of a "good man" who lends a land to the downtrodden and embrace the spiritual qualities of truth, perserverance and scientific progress. Instead of trying to fix nature, apply the Prime Directive to negroes until they have evolved a bit more, or at least to where their marksmanship has improved.

  69. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    I once taught an astronomy class like (well, it was just “descriptive” and we left it at that) this one with a good part of the softball and football teams. One wide receiver, I discovered, could not read. Top that, Maestro…

    • Replies: @rebel yell
    @glib

    I was going to reply to Steve's comment with a question as to what kind of person would agree to teach a dumbed-down fake college course. Since you say you did this, I'll ask you. How did you feel about teaching a dumbed down course? Any ethical qualms or regrets? How did the head of the department feel about having this course on the curriculum?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Paleo Liberal

    , @Old Prude
    @glib

    Well the Supreme Court just ruled your illiterate wide receiver can be paid not to read.

    Why not just open gladiator schools for these athletes, so they don't pollute what is left of college being for the mind?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Shango

  70. Courses like this are an inevitable consequence of today’s Affirmative Action-on-Steroids approach to everything.

    As a result, companies will have to examine college transcripts to see whether J’Davious has a real STEM degree or some bullshit degree conferred to make the diversity numbers look good.

    After which the government will prohibit the examining of college transcripts, cause you know, das raciss.

  71. @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.
     
    On average, it takes 3 years for American craziness to infect the rest of the anglosphere. So if you could nip it in the bud over there we would appreciate it. Thx.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    You’re completely, utterly, absolutely wrong. The US is way LESS infected by this shit than UK.

    Everything that you consider bad about woke was instituted in Britain years ago.

    It’s pathetic how little you people know about the world outside your rabbit hole.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Paperback Writer

    You’re mistaking variance for mean. You got most of what you have second-hand through official American misreading of continental philosophy. Granted the Marxism didn’t help but this is orthogonal to that.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  72. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    Then there was the good old “Rocks for Jocks,” a dumbed down geology course.

  73. @PiltdownMan
    Being besieged by black students is not a new experience for Cornell U.

    Cornell, of course, made the national news in 1969 when armed black students took over the university students' activity center, but there was an earlier siege that happened a year before, on April 3rd, 1968.

    From the NYT archives:

    https://i.imgur.com/lLbyyTl.jpg

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @El Dato, @Paperback Writer, @Jim Don Bob

    The Cornell blacks in those days demanded Afro-American studies classes; now they want to drag down the hard sciences – and we’ll let them.

  74. Not surprised negroes would attempt to inflict themselves on the field of astronomy based on nothing more than the terms used for visible light or, in the case of black holes, its absence. Visible light was all the early astronomers had. Didn’t know that wavelengths extended way beyond the spectrum our eyes could detect so new, non color terms, had to be used for this part of the spectrum. Infra-red. ultra violet, X-rays, gamma rays.

    In turned out star color did bear some relation to an underlying property of a star. The bluer it was the larger and hotter it was, red hue denoted a cooler temperature for nearby stars or even its distance from us as the expansion of the universe causes a shift towards the red in visible light. That red shift became so pronounced visible light became infrared light and out of the range of optical telescopes like Hubble. Its bigger more powerful follow on, the Webb space telescope, is designed to operate in the infrared part of the spectrum just as Chandra space telescope was built to operate in the X-ray spectrum.

    Up until now astronomers and physicists had been free to assign names to their catalogue of stellar objects. White and Red dwarf stars. Red and Blue Giants, Quasars ( really an acronym for Quasi Stellar Active Radio Source) and, most mysteriously, Black Holes, Dark Matter and Dark Energy for the things astronomers could not actually observe but only infer existed from their influence on the things they could detect. Maybe that has to end now that the negro has decided to weigh in on the taxonomy of the universe with his totally self absorbed, earthbound observations.

    Obviously concerned that the stellar ranking system whereby color and luminosity reveal an underlying property of a star the negro becomes apprehensive that applying the same observational relationship to human coloration will also reveal underlying properties of humanity. That the presence of negroes, like black holes, do not have to be a physically observed but can be inferred by his effect on other nearby visible objects. Boarded up store fronts, spent bullet casings in the street, urban decay and graffiti on buildings.

    • LOL: Stan d Mute
  75. Karen Movie Teaser/Trailer

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/TMZ/status/1406118314603069443

    , @Altai
    @MEH 0910

    The more shocking part is that the Independent has the 'Progress flag' on it's avatar. The mayor of Munich got offended that he couldn't virtue signal against the Hungarian government during a Euro 2020 match. The responses from journalists are amazing. I really don't think 'neutral' means what they think it does, much like their confusion over 'conversation'.

    https://twitter.com/dw_sports/status/1407266712458780676

    https://twitter.com/BritLGBTAwards/status/1407273437710671873

    https://twitter.com/i/events/1407272989515681793

    Replies: @photondancer

    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    Steve Sailer Retweeted:
    https://twitter.com/DailyMail/status/1406532306462982145

    , @Mr. Anon
    @MEH 0910

    It looks like the WWW (The War on White Women) is escalating. It doesn't matter how much of a Nice White Lady you think you are - you're still just a "Karen" - a Klanswoman with a Gucci bag.

    White women.............are you paying attention?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  76. @Abolish_public_education
    3 credits @ $2,000 per out-of-state credit.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    3 credits @ $2,000 per out-of-state credit.

    Decadence has extended down into the ranks of college students. I presume all this will be paid for by daddy. NFW someone borrows money to pay for this.

  77. @JohnnyWalker123
    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @photondancer, @Ed, @Lev Myshkin, @Altai

    It is, but not to the same extent. We don’t have the critical mass of blacks in Canada for the maximum hilarity the US is enjoying

  78. The Cornell course also studies music by Sun Ra…

    Sonny Blount was a character, for sure. But he was grounded in a way that most liberal academics are not. He once said that the problem with black kids is that they have been brought up on the word ‘freedom’ when they should be brought up on the word ‘discipline’.

    Will Cornell teach Sun Ra’s condemnation of gangs, pimps, whores, and drug dealing? And Ra’s belief that blacks should separate themselves from whites in an attempt to be self-sufficient? Probably won’t go there, but just play some of his records (which the kids won’t like).

    • Replies: @Anon
    @xyzxy

    The Sun Ra Arkestra has continued on since Sunny's death, under the able leadership of now 97 year old Marshall Allen. Saw them two years ago and they absolutely smoked the SF Jazz Center.

  79. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/Independent/status/1407270350182830084

    Karen Movie Teaser/Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfEPWa1ay0U

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Altai, @MEH 0910, @Mr. Anon

  80. I know it’s off topic, but does anyone here not believe in black holes? It seems like fiction. Tesla didn’t believe it. Edison didn’t either. All that dark energy stuff is make believe. Every time they get it wrong, they have to come up with a new dark theory to explain the gaps. They even got to the point where they believe in multi parallel universes. It’s absurd. And smart people believe this junk. That says something about group think and celebrity worship. Newton never would have believed in black wholes or dark energy.

    • Replies: @UNIT472
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    As I tried to point out somethings do not have to be observed to know they exist. Let's say the skin of a negro absorbed every photon of light that struck it. He would be invisible to you unless you were a bat and used sonar to detect objects but you might notice the negroes presence by the lack of any commercial activity in the area save, perhaps, for a shabby liquor store or 'beauty parlor'. There would be an unusual amount of garbage in the street and the buildings would be decaying and covered with graffiti. You'd know this part of town was inhabited by photon absorbing people even if you could not see them.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    , @Jack D
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    The identification of a "black hole" as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958, so Tesla and Edison would not have known about them.

    The black hole follows as a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity and the interaction between light and gravity. While Einstein's relativity was not universally accepted (or even understood) at first by men such as Edison and Tesla who were born in the mid-19th century, today it is regarded by virtually all physicists as unquestionably correct and amply proved by numerous experiments. I have no doubt that if Newton had been brought up to speed, he would have eventually understood and agreed with relativity and with the existence of black holes.

    If seeing is believing, here is a photograph of a black hole:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/styles/article_main_image_-_1280w__no_aspect_/public/A-Consensus.jpg?itok=4xSDWrLl

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/black-hole

    Replies: @JimB, @The real Buddy Stevenson, @The real Buddy Stevenson

    , @Boomthorkell
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    Dark energy is real, in that it is a new term for Aether, but Black Holes are likely just a theoretical math error, at least in how they are imagined to function.

    Free energy and aether are vital to Maxwell's Equations, which were brutalized by lazy hacks who didn't understand energy and the wider universe.

    , @anon
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    ACKSHUALLY Michell (1784) and Laplace (1796) both independently postulated the existence of compact, massive non-luminous bodies.

    The modern understanding starts with Schwarzschild (1915), who would have been happy to speak with Edison or Tesla had they possessed the math to understand it, and had he not died of an icky disease in 1916.

    Newton, he'd have loved the idea.

    Mortimer

  81. Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy, this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy concepts through readings in Black Studies. Texts may include works by theorists like Michelle Wright and Denise Ferreira da Silva, authors like Octavia Butler and Nalo Hopkinson, music by Sun Ra, Outkast and Janelle Monáe.

    I know readers are laughing but this is what decolonizing the curriculum looks like.

    Compounding matters other coalition of the fringes members feel offended by certain facts like physics was invented and built by men as suggested by Alessandro Strumia.

  82. It is not surprising that astronomy would be an early adopter of race theory

    The less a hard science field is making progress (Or is perceived to be making progress or is seen to be exciting) the more it will attract reddit-people hobbyists as faculty rather than active thinking scientists.

    Same goes for geology and paleontology. Biology of all kinds except bioinformatics is now increasingly feminised and they will thus go the same way.

  83. @res
    @jilla

    The Daily Mail's take on this.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9698789/Wealthy-Atlanta-suburb-Buckhead-files-divorce-city-amid-rising-crime.html

    Replies: @Paul Rise

    Missed headline opportunity

    “Buckhead breaking away from Atlanta?”

  84. @JohnnyWalker123
    I wonder if Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Western Europe are experiencing the same craziness.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @photondancer, @Ed, @Lev Myshkin, @Altai

    Not to the same extent, it always lags and emanates from the US, though Britain has recently started to innovate from the presence of South African Rhodes scholars who started agitating to ‘decolonise’ things.

    Transgenderism, though, seems to have failed to become so much an issue outside the US even accounting for the lag. My theory is the US is such an ethnic hodge-podge in it’s major cities for so long that the people there no longer have a connection to reality or community and normal human society and actually really want to believe that ‘transwomen are women’. Yes there are laws protecting transgenders now everywhere and yes there are clinics for children but nobody really cares, they don’t really think ‘trans women are women’. It hasn’t really been turned into a wedge issue to assert dominance, a kind of visual in your face demand that society disintegrate.

    Maybe America is just so large that a critical mass of transgender people can agitate and become problems for HR departments of large companies in a way that doesn’t happen elsewhere.

  85. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/Independent/status/1407270350182830084

    Karen Movie Teaser/Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfEPWa1ay0U

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Altai, @MEH 0910, @Mr. Anon

    The more shocking part is that the Independent has the ‘Progress flag’ on it’s avatar. The mayor of Munich got offended that he couldn’t virtue signal against the Hungarian government during a Euro 2020 match. The responses from journalists are amazing. I really don’t think ‘neutral’ means what they think it does, much like their confusion over ‘conversation’.

    https://twitter.com/i/events/1407272989515681793

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @Altai

    They do not recognise the concept of neutral. As with all fanatics and cultists, they think if you are not wholeheartedly for them then you are against them.

  86. As the US self-destructs in science due to the woke obsession, China and India will gladly assume leadership in these fields.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    @Mike_from_SGV

    They may be glad to try to do it, but I don't think they can.

    https://i.imgur.com/0UDodeZ.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @photondancer
    @Mike_from_SGV

    China might, but from what I've read there's not a few anti-science people in India too. Ayurveda tends to feature in their arguments.

  87. There have been two or three controversies of politicians referring to misdeliveries and disappearances in particular postal services as “black holes”.

  88. @jilla
    OT, but Steve, have you heard about upscale Buckhead looking to secede from Atlanta? It would be a total disaster if it happens - Buckhead generates 40-50% of Atlanta's revenue. It's funny hearing the politicians talk about how "divisive" this move is and how everyone needs to stick together. This is just the start of the blowback to all of this BLM-craziness, I think. I think Yang is going to win in NYC because of it.

    Replies: @res, @usNthem, @anon, @northeast

    That’s interesting, but the problem for Buckhead (and many similar situations) is that it’s surrounded on all sides by blacks. Unless they can build a 20 foot wall topped with razor wire, manned machine gun posts and armored troop carriers to get to and from work, it’ll all be for naught.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
  89. What about a White Dwarf?

  90. @Redneck farmer
    Is Cornell trying to improve its athletic outcomes? This seems like a perfect "jock" science course.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Barnard

    Cornell has been terrible in football for awhile now. Their last Ivy League conference championship was in 1990. The men’s basketball team has been slightly better, they had three straight conference titles from 2008-2010 with the 2010 team making a run to the Sweet Sixteen before getting beat easily by a loaded Kentucky squad. If it is an effort to help student athletes, they need it. My guess is this a more a commitment to making sure all diverse Cornell students can achieve a good grade. Once you get into the Ivy League they don’t want you dropping out because couldn’t handle the course work.

  91. @Tono Bungay
    Never mind "race"; isn't there something anti-feminist in the term "hole"?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Take it up with Courtney Love.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  92. I have a very vague memory of a black comedian (Eddie Murphy? Richard Pryor?) on some TV show saying “I went to see the movie ‘The Black Hole.’ What a ripoff! Lola Falana wasn’t even IN it.”

  93. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/Independent/status/1407270350182830084

    Karen Movie Teaser/Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfEPWa1ay0U

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Altai, @MEH 0910, @Mr. Anon

    Steve Sailer Retweeted:

  94. “The course fulfills Cornell’s science distribution requirement, touching as it does on such concepts as the electromagnetic spectrum…Many astronomy departments have been on the forefront of campus identity politics, eliminating the physics GRE as a requirement for graduate study, for example, on the ground that it has a disparate impact on female, black, and Hispanic students.”

    Instead of the artsy approach, why’nt they just don’t teach um the physics and astronermy used by the original Black NASA. Them hidden figures never got their dues – Secret black NASA –

    • LOL: El Dato
  95. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as “Clapping for Credit.”
     
    Benoit Mandelbrot's uncle taught at Rice in the 1920s. Is that common knowledge there? He brought Benoit's family to America.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szolem_Mandelbrojt

    An artist now in his 90s must be from this family, considering his mathematical bent:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/254925561_Multiple-Time_Installation


    TIL a couple things about Southern California. One is an obscure film school, Dodge College at Chapman University. Is any Hollywood notable from there? One doesn't expect industry leaders to come out of the film schools at Montana State or Southern Illinois, but Dodge is in Orange County. Is that also flyover country?

    And there are about three dozen "Case Study" houses in and around LA:

    The Case Study houses that made Los Angeles a modernist mecca

    Are these well-known locally?

    In the Twin Cities, there are two neighborhoods, University Grove just outside St Paul in Philando's Falcon Heights, and the Luella Anderson Addition in South Minneapolis, full of modernest homes on streets named for University presidents. (Many of the houses were designed by Winston and Elizabeth Close, the former no doubt the namesake of the recently departed Winston Smith, whose parents must have been quite the architecture buffs.)

    Is this sort of experimental neighborhood common around major architecture schools?

    Replies: @candid_observer

    There are several in my neck of the woods, around Lexington MA, which were developed by the architecture school at Harvard.

    Five Fields is a well known example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Fields

    They all have a Back to the Future feel about them. Personally, I like their combined suggestion of optimistic progress and nostalgia. When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @candid_observer

    As our society has become socially less conservative (almost libertine), styles in domestic architecture have become MORE conservative - it is rare nowadays to see any new house built in a "modern" style. Most new home construction is vaguely "colonial" or "historical" with symmetrical pitched gable roofs, etc.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @guest

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @candid_observer


    When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.
     
    Icy might be closer to the truth. Especially in Robert Frost and Leroy Anderson's New England.

    Would you say Philip Johnson was more than a bit exhibitionist? His own nightmare on Elm Street:


    https://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2007/0707/360_amodern_0709.jpg

    Replies: @Muggles, @J.Ross

  96. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    Obviously the professor did not use Hindemith’s Elementary Training for Musicians which becomes impossible to do on page 6. Quotes in the instructions are to the effect of “If the students fails to develop perfect pitch after about 100 trials of this exercise, it must be questioned whether a mind that cannot learn to remember pitches has any business studying music.”

  97. @Reg Cæsar
    Carl Sagan said his great-grandfather made his living ferrying passengers across a local stream-- on his back. We may be returning to that era, starting far above Sagan's Cayuga, no less.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Cloudbuster

    While being a human ferry boat was unusual, the occupation of trager (carrier or porter) was a common occupation for poor urban Jews in E. Europe. In the era before trucks, goods were carted around the ghettos on human backs. There were also subspecialties like the wassertrager – the water carrier who would deliver buckets of water to your house.

    People here seem to have the notion that the Jews of Europe were all bankers (when they were not Bolsheviks) or at least involved in prosperous middle man occupations but the truth was that millions lived in grinding poverty (which was why millions immigrated – rich people tend not to immigrate). And not American style “poverty” where you get so much free food that you are as fat as a sow, but actual not enough to eat and only patched up rags for clothes poverty. There may have been a time (before the 19th century) when most of the Jews of Poland were indeed involved in middle man occupations but the Jews had a high birth rate (by 1939 30% of the population of Warsaw was Jewish) and far outgrew that ecological niche and had to branch out into menial occupations. And with so much competition, even the middle man occupations themselves were not prosperous.

    • Thanks: Abe, Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @utu
    @Jack D

    https://i.ibb.co/BLZZBbc/Treger.png

    , @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Jack D

    Who were delivering they water to, given that the 40% of the city were poor Jews? Just how many gallons did those spoiled Christians of Warsaw use?

    I noticed a concerted effort to claim poverty for the Jews lately. Isn't it enough that the have monopolized the genocide? (Having invented the word in the process.) Can't you leave a tiny memories about suffering, for the other nations to have and to share?

    Replies: @Bigdicknick, @Cortes, @Jack D

  98. @candid_observer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There are several in my neck of the woods, around Lexington MA, which were developed by the architecture school at Harvard.

    Five Fields is a well known example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Fields

    They all have a Back to the Future feel about them. Personally, I like their combined suggestion of optimistic progress and nostalgia. When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar

    As our society has become socially less conservative (almost libertine), styles in domestic architecture have become MORE conservative – it is rare nowadays to see any new house built in a “modern” style. Most new home construction is vaguely “colonial” or “historical” with symmetrical pitched gable roofs, etc.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    As our society has become socially less conservative (almost libertine), styles in domestic architecture have become MORE conservative – it is rare nowadays to see any new house built in a “modern” style. Most new home construction is vaguely “colonial” or “historical” with symmetrical pitched gable roofs, etc.
     
    Except the carriage house would be placed behind the main residence, on the alley, not attached and lording over it.


    https://megagaragehomes.com/

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/60/26/ad/6026ad4bf1eba61d7ae2887ad363dbcf.jpg

    https://www.oregonlive.com/resizer/w_5Fc2GCmpFKAqVDqyOt2l1u028=/1280x0/smart/advancelocal-adapter-image-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/expo.advance.net/img/a98336a97f/width2048/092_genmid19252794250.jpeg

    https://nashvillehome.guru/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/good1.jpg


    I shared a converted carriage house with three international students one year. It was smaller than any of these garages.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @guest
    @Jack D

    Well, yeah. Because modernism was built on lies and “modern” means more expensive for no reason except to fulfill irrational (anti-)aesthetic urges. “Conservative” means it won’t look like shit and/or fall apart a year after it’s erected.

    When Other People’s Money is involved, then it’s time to be modern.

  99. @Altai
    @MEH 0910

    The more shocking part is that the Independent has the 'Progress flag' on it's avatar. The mayor of Munich got offended that he couldn't virtue signal against the Hungarian government during a Euro 2020 match. The responses from journalists are amazing. I really don't think 'neutral' means what they think it does, much like their confusion over 'conversation'.

    https://twitter.com/dw_sports/status/1407266712458780676

    https://twitter.com/BritLGBTAwards/status/1407273437710671873

    https://twitter.com/i/events/1407272989515681793

    Replies: @photondancer

    They do not recognise the concept of neutral. As with all fanatics and cultists, they think if you are not wholeheartedly for them then you are against them.

  100. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    While being a human ferry boat was unusual, the occupation of trager (carrier or porter) was a common occupation for poor urban Jews in E. Europe. In the era before trucks, goods were carted around the ghettos on human backs. There were also subspecialties like the wassertrager - the water carrier who would deliver buckets of water to your house.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/ulwAAOSwWdVgtifR/s-l1600.jpg

    People here seem to have the notion that the Jews of Europe were all bankers (when they were not Bolsheviks) or at least involved in prosperous middle man occupations but the truth was that millions lived in grinding poverty (which was why millions immigrated - rich people tend not to immigrate). And not American style "poverty" where you get so much free food that you are as fat as a sow, but actual not enough to eat and only patched up rags for clothes poverty. There may have been a time (before the 19th century) when most of the Jews of Poland were indeed involved in middle man occupations but the Jews had a high birth rate (by 1939 30% of the population of Warsaw was Jewish) and far outgrew that ecological niche and had to branch out into menial occupations. And with so much competition, even the middle man occupations themselves were not prosperous.

    Replies: @utu, @Dacian Julien Soros

  101. @Dissident
    Of matters science and ever-insufficient Blackity Black Blackness...

    What's wrong with the Ad below?
    https://static.wixstatic.com/media/78b7db_80cf32c7ad514e75af8e5807397a536d~mv2_d_4961_3508_s_4_2.gif/v1/fill/w_980,h_692,al_c,q_85,usm_0.66_1.00_0.01/78b7db_80cf32c7ad514e75af8e5807397a536d~mv2_d_4961_3508_s_4_2.gif

    As sharp, catchy, well-done and all-around aesthetically pleasing as this set of six Ads may be, isn't something rather glaringly missing from them?

    Could such a blatant lack of Blackness possibly still have been OK as late as 2018?

    Though I suppose it figures that of all the places someone such as our host could have chosen to moonlight at...
    https://imgur.com/a/n2TvDk5

    https://www.takimag.com/wp-content/uploads/steve_sailer.jpg

    Incidentally, why such a low-res photo at Taki Mag? I can't be the first to have wondered.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Tex

    What’s wrong with the Ad below?

    all-around aesthetically pleasing as this set of six Ads

    • Pedo: Dissident

    • LOL: Polistra
    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    This again?

    Yet again, you respond to a benign posting of mine (and one that was not even directed at you, let alone amounted-to any kind of attack or provocation) by hurling a loaded epithet at me and linking to the libelous attack upon me that you posted back in March. That was the comment, for anyone who may have missed it, in which you referred-to what you characterized as my


    long-running oh-so-coy NAMBLA nonce musings and catamite portrait posts.
     
    Such a characterization, as I noted a month ago when you last linked to it, crosses the line from mere name-calling and anything else that could be dismissed as ultimately subjective, into accusations, at least strongly insinuated, of specific behaviors that entail grave crimes, both legal as well as moral.

    Hence, my advised use of the term libelous to describe your attack upon me-- one that, yet again, you have completely failed to substantiate or even attempt to substantiate. To-date, you have neither cited, as evidence of your incendiary, scurrilous characterizations, anything specific from my commenting history. Nor have you made even the faintest attempt at articulating any reasoned, substantive objection to or criticism of any of the images of boys, or sentiments, thoughts and views concerning boys that I have posted.

    One wonders why you apparently feel such a need, repeatedly, to lash-out at me in the abusive, anti-social, utterly pathetic fashion such as you have.

    I reiterate, once again, my confidence that no careful, fair review of the relevant parts of my commenting history, taken in their proper context, could reasonably be taken as supporting any of your assertions or insinuations. Quite the contrary, I would aver. It is my earnest, frank, candid writing in which I express some of my truest thoughts, concerns and sentiments, painstakingly considered in intricate, meticulous detail and nuance, that may be my greatest vindication. My work on this writing (and the thought processes behind it) are ongoing, arduous efforts-in-progress.

    To notice, acknowledge and celebrate the unique magic that is a boy? Who couldn't? To desecrate, defile or otherwise in any way corrupt such a precious creature? Who could?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  102. @glib
    @Steve Sailer

    I once taught an astronomy class like (well, it was just "descriptive" and we left it at that) this one with a good part of the softball and football teams. One wide receiver, I discovered, could not read. Top that, Maestro...

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Old Prude

    I was going to reply to Steve’s comment with a question as to what kind of person would agree to teach a dumbed-down fake college course. Since you say you did this, I’ll ask you. How did you feel about teaching a dumbed down course? Any ethical qualms or regrets? How did the head of the department feel about having this course on the curriculum?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @rebel yell

    It is definitely societally useful to give innumerates like me a "physics without math" course, where you explain the concepts without proving them, because the concepts are useful.

    , @Paleo Liberal
    @rebel yell

    There is a case to be made for taking a dumbed down college course. I did teach some back in the day.

    Let’s take astronomy. There are a handful of people who have the time, the ability, the interest and inclination to study the field in depth.

    There are others who have the time and ability and interest to take one or two hard core science classes about astronomy but won’t want to major in the subject.

    There are a number of people who don’t have the time or the ability for a real astronomy class, but would like to learn some of the basics.

    Someone taking such a class would learn more about the subject than someone who never took a class, or even someone who failed a more rigorous class.

    So there is a real use for dumbed down classes.

  103. @Mike_from_SGV
    As the US self-destructs in science due to the woke obsession, China and India will gladly assume leadership in these fields.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @photondancer

    They may be glad to try to do it, but I don’t think they can.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @PiltdownMan

    https://russellinvestments.com/us/blog/past-performance-no-guarantee-future-results

  104. @James Speaks
    @utu

    The term "black body radiation" goes back at least to 1900 (Planck's Law) or before (Wien 's Displacement Law and Stefan-Boltzmann Law). That the emitted spectrum did not match theory (the ultraviolet catastrophe) led Max Planck to hypothesize discrete packets and Albert Einstein to theorize the existence of photons. I'm sure they were all racists.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Roger, @nokangaroos

    Planck´s law was the first mathematical formulation of black body (thermal)
    radiation – by itself it does not (yet) imply photons (that had to wait for Einstein and the
    photoelectric effect).
    But given how foundational it is and how often they use the term “black bodies”
    I´d have expected at least an honorable mention; the jokes write themselves 😛

    Fun fact: Skin is almost ideally black over most of the spectrum –
    why the difference in the visible window?

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @nokangaroos

    You


    Planck´s law was the first mathematical formulation of black body (thermal)
    radiation – by itself it does not (yet) imply photons (that had to wait for Einstein and the
    photoelectric effect).
     
    Me

    That the emitted spectrum did not match theory (the ultraviolet catastrophe) led Max Planck to hypothesize discrete packets and Albert Einstein to theorize the existence of photons. I’m sure they were all racists.
     
    The theory before Planck led to infnite radiation at higher frequencies which conflicted with observation. (the ultraviolet ctastrophe) Thus, Planck postulated discrete packets of energy and made the formula fit the data.
  105. @The real Buddy Stevenson
    I know it’s off topic, but does anyone here not believe in black holes? It seems like fiction. Tesla didn’t believe it. Edison didn’t either. All that dark energy stuff is make believe. Every time they get it wrong, they have to come up with a new dark theory to explain the gaps. They even got to the point where they believe in multi parallel universes. It’s absurd. And smart people believe this junk. That says something about group think and celebrity worship. Newton never would have believed in black wholes or dark energy.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Jack D, @Boomthorkell, @anon

    As I tried to point out somethings do not have to be observed to know they exist. Let’s say the skin of a negro absorbed every photon of light that struck it. He would be invisible to you unless you were a bat and used sonar to detect objects but you might notice the negroes presence by the lack of any commercial activity in the area save, perhaps, for a shabby liquor store or ‘beauty parlor’. There would be an unusual amount of garbage in the street and the buildings would be decaying and covered with graffiti. You’d know this part of town was inhabited by photon absorbing people even if you could not see them.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    @UNIT472

    Actually, you can do a lab experiment proving exactly this point. Just drive (or hell, even stroll) thru Detriot before 10am.

  106. @The real Buddy Stevenson
    I know it’s off topic, but does anyone here not believe in black holes? It seems like fiction. Tesla didn’t believe it. Edison didn’t either. All that dark energy stuff is make believe. Every time they get it wrong, they have to come up with a new dark theory to explain the gaps. They even got to the point where they believe in multi parallel universes. It’s absurd. And smart people believe this junk. That says something about group think and celebrity worship. Newton never would have believed in black wholes or dark energy.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Jack D, @Boomthorkell, @anon

    The identification of a “black hole” as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958, so Tesla and Edison would not have known about them.

    The black hole follows as a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity and the interaction between light and gravity. While Einstein’s relativity was not universally accepted (or even understood) at first by men such as Edison and Tesla who were born in the mid-19th century, today it is regarded by virtually all physicists as unquestionably correct and amply proved by numerous experiments. I have no doubt that if Newton had been brought up to speed, he would have eventually understood and agreed with relativity and with the existence of black holes.

    If seeing is believing, here is a photograph of a black hole:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/black-hole

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Jack D

    Seeing is not believing. A single photo image is proof of nothing.

    , @The real Buddy Stevenson
    @Jack D

    They didn’t believe in time space fabric. You need black holes, dark energy and any number of made up particles to make it work. https://www.naturehacker.org/2019/04/the-black-hole-picture-is-fake.html

    , @The real Buddy Stevenson
    @Jack D

    We all know that science has been corrupted because of political correctness. And you can’t criticize Einstein’s theories because of his ethnic background. But there are alternative theories. https://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2021/06/19/wal-thornhill-webb-space-telescope-fundamental-change-thunderbolts/

    Replies: @Jack D

  107. @JimB
    I want to laugh, but I think we’re in big trouble.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “I want to laugh, but …”

    Afrofuturism makes sense if you smoke weed all day, every day.

  108. Yep. Dead on. 4 out of 5 of his takes are.

    If you’re worried about strong white identity keep giving this guy lay-ups and you’ll get it. I’d prefer American but if you’re determined to deconstruct that don’t be surprised if we end up with something worse for everyone.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Who put their height and IQ in their handle? This reeks of insecurity. Why not just go all out and include your penis length in your handle while you are at it? A claim of 187 IQ is by definition bogus since the most valid IQ tests (Wechsler and Binet) ceiling out at 155 - 160.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @tomv, @Dieter Kief, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  109. @PiltdownMan
    @Mike_from_SGV

    They may be glad to try to do it, but I don't think they can.

    https://i.imgur.com/0UDodeZ.jpg

    Replies: @Desiderius

  110. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    https://www.gtalumni.org/s/1481/alumni/17/magazine-pages.aspx?pgid=11127&gid=21&cid=24654

    This guy famously taught one of the toughest classes on offer and graded even tougher. His theory was that college Athletics required superior intelligence but it was rarely applied in the classroom.

    His classes were always packed with athletes. They performed well in class.

    • Agree: Red Pill Angel
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Desiderius


    college Athletics required superior intelligence
     
    Facts not in evidence.

    https://unlvrebels.com/images/2018/10/4/2018_19_UNLVmbb_Web.jpg?width=1600

    Does this look like a group that was selected for its intelligence?

    Replies: @Desiderius

  111. @Daniel H
    I doubt that Calculus is a pre req.

    Replies: @International Jew

    It could become a prereq again, once they reinterpret and rework it. Integration will be about Little Rock High School, the chain rule of differentiation will be a lecture about the chains of slavery, power series will be about white supremacy, conic sections will focus on KKK headwear, and so on.

  112. @The real Buddy Stevenson
    I know it’s off topic, but does anyone here not believe in black holes? It seems like fiction. Tesla didn’t believe it. Edison didn’t either. All that dark energy stuff is make believe. Every time they get it wrong, they have to come up with a new dark theory to explain the gaps. They even got to the point where they believe in multi parallel universes. It’s absurd. And smart people believe this junk. That says something about group think and celebrity worship. Newton never would have believed in black wholes or dark energy.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Jack D, @Boomthorkell, @anon

    Dark energy is real, in that it is a new term for Aether, but Black Holes are likely just a theoretical math error, at least in how they are imagined to function.

    Free energy and aether are vital to Maxwell’s Equations, which were brutalized by lazy hacks who didn’t understand energy and the wider universe.

  113. Surely a low point in the history of American academia that will be looked back upon with dismay by future generations.

    Extreme forms of decadence, albeit in different forms, have afflicted even Oxford and Cambridge in the past if I am not mistaken, and perhaps continental universities as well (as in Germany during the Hitler phase?) so there is hope for an eventual recovery.

    What is missing right now is any responsible leadership at the summit of American education. Where are the Hutchison’s and Conant’s of this generation?

    • Replies: @nokangaroos
    @Luke Lea

    The interesting part about Deutsche Physik ("say what you will as long as it´s jew-free",
    still the laughingstock of all the hard sciences)
    is it didn´t affect scientific rigour in other fields, unlike Lysenkoism;
    the French famously beheaded Lavoisier ("The Revolution has no use for scholars"),
    and of course there was the Culture Revolution.

    Science in the long run will always triumph over the fad ... but
    it took the Russians and Chinese slightly over two generations each -
    a lost war is quicker ;)

    Replies: @El Dato, @Morton's toes

    , @Jack D
    @Luke Lea


    Where are the Hutchison’s and Conant’s of this generation?
     
    Speaking of black holes, Wall Street and Silicon Valley suck in the top brains in America (meaning white and Asian males), where they are never heard from again. All other sectors get the leftovers which are female and increasingly NAM. This is a vicious circle because once a sector becomes black/female dominated it becomes increasingly hostile to white men so no man in his right mind is going to volunteer to herd that particular group of cats.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Desiderius
    @Luke Lea


    Where are the Hutchison’s and Conant’s of this generation?
     
    Sucking Les Wexner’s dick to get an extra zero on their salary.
    , @guest
    @Luke Lea

    Your optimism surprises me. I see no reason why academia should not continue to be a competition over who gets to be more intellectually petty. Forever. Or until the university ceases to exist.

    Of course, pockets of safety where certain disciplines be allowed to carry on with important work unmolested will probably be more numerous in future.

  114. @Yancey Ward
    Astrophysics for Aspiring Rappers.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anon7

    I’d feel less alarmed about this if I thought it was just the 2020 equivalent of “Physics for Poets”.

  115. Traditionally, liberal arts colleges offered science courses for non-majors but this is the first I’ve seen targeting affirmative action students.

  116. @Reg Cæsar
    Carl Sagan said his great-grandfather made his living ferrying passengers across a local stream-- on his back. We may be returning to that era, starting far above Sagan's Cayuga, no less.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Cloudbuster

    White people are doing that every day. Unfortunately, the passengers are all scorpions.

    • Thanks: photondancer
  117. Meanwhile corruption and incompetence are killing our manufacturing base and our National Defense. Corruption via bribery, kickbacks etc. has us producing effed up submarines.

    US Navy’s new $166B submarine fleet hobbled by faulty parts
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9709441/US-Navys-new-166B-submarine-fleet-hobbled-faulty-parts-wearing-DECADES-early.html
    21 hours ago — US Navy’s new $166B submarine fleet is hobbled by faulty parts wearing out DECADES earlier than expected. By Brian Stieglitz For Dailymail.

    U.S. Navy’s Deadliest New Sub Is Hobbled Over Spare Partshttps://www.bloomberg.com › news › articles › u-s-nav…
    1 day ago — The U.S. Navy has swapped more than 1600 parts among its new Virginia-class submarines since 2013 to ease maintenance bottlenecks as …

    Submarine Industrial Base Under Strain as … – USNI News
    https://news.usni.org/2021/04/20/submarine-industrial-base-under-strain-as-virginia-class-parts-wearing-out-early-implications-for-columbia-class › Budget Industry
    Apr 20, 2021 — 24, 2020. US Navy Photo. Some parts on Virginia-class attack boats are wearing out faster than the Navy anticipated 20 years ago, and buying …

  118. @Jack D
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    The identification of a "black hole" as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958, so Tesla and Edison would not have known about them.

    The black hole follows as a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity and the interaction between light and gravity. While Einstein's relativity was not universally accepted (or even understood) at first by men such as Edison and Tesla who were born in the mid-19th century, today it is regarded by virtually all physicists as unquestionably correct and amply proved by numerous experiments. I have no doubt that if Newton had been brought up to speed, he would have eventually understood and agreed with relativity and with the existence of black holes.

    If seeing is believing, here is a photograph of a black hole:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/styles/article_main_image_-_1280w__no_aspect_/public/A-Consensus.jpg?itok=4xSDWrLl

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/black-hole

    Replies: @JimB, @The real Buddy Stevenson, @The real Buddy Stevenson

    Seeing is not believing. A single photo image is proof of nothing.

  119. @Dissident
    Of matters science and ever-insufficient Blackity Black Blackness...

    What's wrong with the Ad below?
    https://static.wixstatic.com/media/78b7db_80cf32c7ad514e75af8e5807397a536d~mv2_d_4961_3508_s_4_2.gif/v1/fill/w_980,h_692,al_c,q_85,usm_0.66_1.00_0.01/78b7db_80cf32c7ad514e75af8e5807397a536d~mv2_d_4961_3508_s_4_2.gif

    As sharp, catchy, well-done and all-around aesthetically pleasing as this set of six Ads may be, isn't something rather glaringly missing from them?

    Could such a blatant lack of Blackness possibly still have been OK as late as 2018?

    Though I suppose it figures that of all the places someone such as our host could have chosen to moonlight at...
    https://imgur.com/a/n2TvDk5

    https://www.takimag.com/wp-content/uploads/steve_sailer.jpg

    Incidentally, why such a low-res photo at Taki Mag? I can't be the first to have wondered.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Tex

    What’s wrong with the Ad below?

    Inconsistent capitalization. Chicago Manual of Style, please!

    • LOL: Dissident
    • Replies: @Dissident
    @Tex


    Inconsistent capitalization.
     
    Might you, perhaps, have overlooked what would appear to be the most obvious and conspicuous difference between the two respective scientists in-question?

    Can we be certain that the inconsistency was not deliberate? Can we be certain that Scientist is not, for a female*, what Black is for those who were previously merely African-American, and not that long ago, merely black?

    (*pardon the binary term...)
  120. @PaceLaw
    There are multiple interpretations of black holes.
    https://youtu.be/ikZRkAKN-Qg

    Replies: @Not Raul

    You beat me to it.

  121. Too busy to read all the comments to make sure this hasn’t been brought up already….but….

    The purpose of this course is probably to offer a course that (a) meets a general education “science” requirement and (b) URM (underrepresented minority) students can reliably pass.

    I was a humanities major, but still had to take two science classes for my general education requirements. I originally signed up for physics because I enjoyed physics in high school. But before classes started, and older guy in my fraternity told me about the easy “athlete” science classes.

    There were two levels of these. Most were just easier versions of normal science classes that still met the general education requirements. For example, there may be a Chemistry 110 and a Chemistry 111. Usually, the school registrar would just fill up the easy one with athletes so normal students couldn’t get in.

    Then there were the crazy-easy version of these science classes for the really dumb athletes. (Actually, they were probably decently smart, but much less smart than normal students. My alma mater is much higher ranked than Cornell). From what I could tell, there were only a few of these and they were small. They were all already filled up with athletes well before registration started. I decided to have a go at one of these. The online system wouldn’t let me get on the waitlist, so I called the registrar and convinced them to let me on the waitlist.

    Three weeks into the semester I got a call from the registrar letting me know that I got off the waitlist and I could have a spot in the class if I wanted. And I had to let her know right then because it was the deadline to make changes to schedules. I did it.

    I went into the class the next week and the class was a mix of almost entirely black basketball and football players combined with some white students who were basically tutors for the basketball and football players. The class had by far the best social dynamics of any class I’ve ever taken. Lot’s of socializing and talking before and after class. And, unsurprisingly, it was jokingly easy. They still taught us like a normal class — but the tests were extremely easy. Obviously I got the easy A. And I made some friends, a few of whom I still hang out with. One of the guys in the class had a respectable NFL career.

    What I didn’t realize until the last few weeks of the semester was that the Professor and the TAs all assumed that I was a tutor for the athletes in the class. So I was really self conscious those last few weeks that they would “discover” that I was just a normal student. Apparently for these crazy-easy versions of these science classes, there would normally never be normal students — only athletes and tutors.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Seaxnēat

    At Yale around 1966, future NFL great Calvin Hill is leading his football teammates around on the first day of classes looking for easy onrd. He leads them into classroom and spots his DKE fraternity brother and says, "Hey, look, there's George Bush. This course must be a piece of cake."

  122. @Luke Lea
    Surely a low point in the history of American academia that will be looked back upon with dismay by future generations.

    Extreme forms of decadence, albeit in different forms, have afflicted even Oxford and Cambridge in the past if I am not mistaken, and perhaps continental universities as well (as in Germany during the Hitler phase?) so there is hope for an eventual recovery.

    What is missing right now is any responsible leadership at the summit of American education. Where are the Hutchison's and Conant's of this generation?

    Replies: @nokangaroos, @Jack D, @Desiderius, @guest

    The interesting part about Deutsche Physik (“say what you will as long as it´s jew-free”,
    still the laughingstock of all the hard sciences)
    is it didn´t affect scientific rigour in other fields, unlike Lysenkoism;
    the French famously beheaded Lavoisier (“The Revolution has no use for scholars”),
    and of course there was the Culture Revolution.

    Science in the long run will always triumph over the fad … but
    it took the Russians and Chinese slightly over two generations each –
    a lost war is quicker 😉

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @nokangaroos

    "Eventually you will have Bacon forced upon you."

    , @Morton's toes
    @nokangaroos

    I thought some of the historians were going with Lavoisier was a crooked finance type when he wasn't doing his Chemistry hobby and that's why the revolutionaries killed him.

    Replies: @nokangaroos

  123. I was going to reply to Steve’s comment with a question as to what kind of person would agree to teach a dumbed-down fake college course. Since you say you did this, I’ll ask you. How did you feel about teaching a dumbed down course? Any ethical qualms or regrets? How did the head of the department feel about having this course on the curriculum?

    Hi, sorry, but this site breaks down for me a bit too often and then I can not reply directly. The course(s) in question are directed at non scientists who need a science course to graduate. The enrolled students are then part of a metric called the student to faculty ratio. Your department is hardly the only one which offer such courses so if you don’t get those credit hours some other department will. So the head of department feels OK with the course, since the alternative is a strong reduction in the number of teaching assistants assigned to the Dept. Besides that, for such courses you do not choose the textbook, and the syllabus has to be related to the book.

    I think you misunderstand the extent of the problem. It is one thing if a criminal justice student takes such a dumbed down course. It is another matter if *required* courses for, say, engineering students also are dumbed down. Starting one such course, I gave student a trigonometry refresher in the form of a set of problems for 14-yrs old student in Russia (this was circa 2009). Only 5% of 20-yrs old american students could solve them. The problem hardly materializes at the college level.

    The illiterate wide receiver was circa 2001, not long after I was hired. I found out only because in a class of 300, I insisted that each student write a report and present it to me. Besides the obvious tour de force, others in the department were shaking their head that I would attempt that. it is all for naught. The student could not read his own report. Today it would be impossible to even attempt such a thing, some college level admin would overrule you.

    What do the least worst do in such a situation? They concentrate on research, on good graduate students (I think I am fairly distinguished in that regard), minimize interactions with management (Dean level or higher), are forever scheming ways to minimize paperwork, since the administrative system is, if possible, even more corrupt and unresponsive. I can honestly say that not being a good player has delayed my career, although I consider it a blessing, since I came to the US with a very false view of the country and civilization, which needed to be erased. You may have an incomplete view of the pressures of moving a family to another country, convincing the wife, then having kids, then finding out the things discussed here.

    Current faculty meetings clearly indicate a near paralysis in all things that are our core activities and tasks, so this state of affairs will not last much longer.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @glib

    Thanks for this comment. I hope you comment here more often.

    , @El Dato
    @glib

    Trapped in academia hell .... forever!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFv9ZRAqG1s

  124. @Luke Lea
    Surely a low point in the history of American academia that will be looked back upon with dismay by future generations.

    Extreme forms of decadence, albeit in different forms, have afflicted even Oxford and Cambridge in the past if I am not mistaken, and perhaps continental universities as well (as in Germany during the Hitler phase?) so there is hope for an eventual recovery.

    What is missing right now is any responsible leadership at the summit of American education. Where are the Hutchison's and Conant's of this generation?

    Replies: @nokangaroos, @Jack D, @Desiderius, @guest

    Where are the Hutchison’s and Conant’s of this generation?

    Speaking of black holes, Wall Street and Silicon Valley suck in the top brains in America (meaning white and Asian males), where they are never heard from again. All other sectors get the leftovers which are female and increasingly NAM. This is a vicious circle because once a sector becomes black/female dominated it becomes increasingly hostile to white men so no man in his right mind is going to volunteer to herd that particular group of cats.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jack D

    Speaking of black holes, Wall Street and Silicon Valley suck in the top brains in America (meaning white and Asian males), where they are never heard from again.

    Not as much as you apparently believe. The last few college grads I personally knew who went to SV were Hispanic females, or subcontinental females and males. Tribalism is a clear factor in tech now.

    In fact, you could ask James Damore about that.

    The only effect of Wall Street on my subset of the college world has to do with majors; people with superior math skills are still very tempted to go the quant route.

  125. @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.gtalumni.org/s/1481/alumni/17/magazine-pages.aspx?pgid=11127&gid=21&cid=24654

    This guy famously taught one of the toughest classes on offer and graded even tougher. His theory was that college Athletics required superior intelligence but it was rarely applied in the classroom.

    His classes were always packed with athletes. They performed well in class.

    Replies: @Jack D

    college Athletics required superior intelligence

    Facts not in evidence.

    Does this look like a group that was selected for its intelligence?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out. I’m a big Peter Lynch guy - I go with what I know - and yeah I’ve known a lot of sharp athletes and few dull. Especially black ones.

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke intended to trip up people like yourself who read social cues autistically. IIRC correctly there are other tests so it could even be legit as well but main intention is joke.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jack D

  126. @Paperback Writer
    @Anonymous

    You're completely, utterly, absolutely wrong. The US is way LESS infected by this shit than UK.

    Everything that you consider bad about woke was instituted in Britain years ago.

    It's pathetic how little you people know about the world outside your rabbit hole.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    You’re mistaking variance for mean. You got most of what you have second-hand through official American misreading of continental philosophy. Granted the Marxism didn’t help but this is orthogonal to that.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Desiderius

    I have no idea what you're talking about.

    This place is turning into a usenet newsgroup, so in the spirit of the old flame wars: LEARN TO READ.

    To repeat: The rest of the world is as bad as the US in terms of woke bullshit, if not worse. In fact they pioneered it.

    The country that I know best, the UK, preceded us by at least 10 years into the vortex. British theater pioneered "color blind" (actually, color-conscious explicitly anti-white racist) casting by 10 years.

  127. Fox says:
    @Charon
    @Fox


    May the engine that keeps this madhouse lit come to a screeching halt very soon.
     
    Somehow one gets the feeling that it's just warming up.

    Replies: @Fox

    A madhouse is still a madhouse, even if approved by parliamentary vote or imperial edict. The system is right now moving from the momentum it had acquired before the insanity years. This momentum will run out when the money’s no good anymore, the general appearance of our surroundings will be more like a junk yard. The universities will of course become a laughing stock. With “astrophysicists” who were apparently hired for their skin color and being concerned with BLM instead of the stars rationality won’t go very far. Mathematics, according to the newest theorems of the mad ruling fringe representing white supremacy and anti-black reservations will be toppled from the throne where she reigned as Queen of Sciences. In essence, 2 + 2 = not 4.
    I don’t think that the part necessary for the running of nuclear power plants, keeping airplanes safe in the sky will be retained in the current model of progress while all other rationality will be replaced by perverted psychobabble.
    I see a very big wreck ahead of us, and it will affect everybody.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Fox

    Lately I've been thinking about this more and more. I believe that our business and especially political leaders have concluded that there's many years yet before the collapse comes. I agree with that.

    The cultural, physical, and political infrastructure created by white males is so strong and sturdy that, like a Roman ruin, it can be subverted and undermined for quite a while before it finally collapses.

    Obviously the dollar will be devalued along the way, but before its collapse we'll have a one-party dictatorship in place. You might be amazed at one of those can accomplish.

    Rewriting history and crushing dissent are among their specialties. You may have noticed that this work is already underway.

    Replies: @Fox

  128. @Luke Lea
    Surely a low point in the history of American academia that will be looked back upon with dismay by future generations.

    Extreme forms of decadence, albeit in different forms, have afflicted even Oxford and Cambridge in the past if I am not mistaken, and perhaps continental universities as well (as in Germany during the Hitler phase?) so there is hope for an eventual recovery.

    What is missing right now is any responsible leadership at the summit of American education. Where are the Hutchison's and Conant's of this generation?

    Replies: @nokangaroos, @Jack D, @Desiderius, @guest

    Where are the Hutchison’s and Conant’s of this generation?

    Sucking Les Wexner’s dick to get an extra zero on their salary.

  129. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/ScottMGreer/status/1407338273480003591?s=20

    Yep. Dead on. 4 out of 5 of his takes are.

    If you’re worried about strong white identity keep giving this guy lay-ups and you’ll get it. I’d prefer American but if you’re determined to deconstruct that don’t be surprised if we end up with something worse for everyone.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Who put their height and IQ in their handle? This reeks of insecurity. Why not just go all out and include your penis length in your handle while you are at it? A claim of 187 IQ is by definition bogus since the most valid IQ tests (Wechsler and Binet) ceiling out at 155 – 160.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Jack D

    "Why does it say fresh fish? That implies that the fish isn't fresh!"

    , @tomv
    @Jack D


    Who put their height and IQ in their handle?
     
    A lot people on Twitter, apparently, as a kind of memetic joke, although it is to your credit that you're unaware of it.
    , @Dieter Kief
    @Jack D

    Oh, the quotient of IQ + forhead-diameter / Height is the actual penis length in inches. Internet-trivia!

    Everybody's got something to hide 'cept for me and my Monkey!

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D

    It’s there to troll sperg NPCs who don’t fully realize it’s a satire of ‘bluecheck’ credentialism in social media bios (e.g., Dr. Jill Biden). Lefties and ConInc Twitter twits who stumble on Greer’s account invariably get mad about his ‘bragging’ and immediately question the numbers, especially the IQ figure: “That couldn’t be true!” So either you’re knowingly trolling us right now (unlikely), or he got you too. Your huffy mentions of “penis length” and “insecurity” are extremely common responses from online autists who encounter Greer’s bio for the first time.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

  130. @EdwardM
    @Anonymousygmjth


    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn’t Sagan teach at Cornell?
     
    Sagan was on the faculty at Cornell but didn’t teach shit. It was a running joke that they loved to publicize his nominal role in their brochures but he never actually set foot on campus.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Unladen Swallow, @Giant Duck, @Prester John

    According to Sagan’s son he spent his time staying at five star hotels while waiting to get paid a lot of money to make a speech and driving his Porsche all while espousing socialism.

  131. @Jack D
    @Desiderius


    college Athletics required superior intelligence
     
    Facts not in evidence.

    https://unlvrebels.com/images/2018/10/4/2018_19_UNLVmbb_Web.jpg?width=1600

    Does this look like a group that was selected for its intelligence?

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out. I’m a big Peter Lynch guy – I go with what I know – and yeah I’ve known a lot of sharp athletes and few dull. Especially black ones.

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke intended to trip up people like yourself who read social cues autistically. IIRC correctly there are other tests so it could even be legit as well but main intention is joke.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Desiderius


    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out.
     
    Stelter is a gentile (Methodist) from rural Damascus, Maryland.
    , @Jack D
    @Desiderius


    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out.
     
    Todd is only 1/2 Jewish. Stetler is Methodist. He apparently married a Jewish woman but this did not increase his intelligence AFAIK. Jews also gave us Einstein and around 1 in 4 Nobelists and Terman so maybe Jews know something about about intelligence measurement (and about humor).

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke
     
    Is it the kind of joke that is not the least bit funny? Why would you make a relatively modest claim (Height 6'2") in the same breath as an outrageous one? Unless he is really a midget (both the mental and physical kind)? Height 7'2" IQ 187 is clearly a joke . Height 6'2" IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  132. @EdwardM
    @Anonymousygmjth


    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn’t Sagan teach at Cornell?
     
    Sagan was on the faculty at Cornell but didn’t teach shit. It was a running joke that they loved to publicize his nominal role in their brochures but he never actually set foot on campus.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Unladen Swallow, @Giant Duck, @Prester John

    According to Sagan’s son he spent his free time staying at five star hotels while waiting to get paid a lot of money to make a speech and driving his Porsche, all while espousing socialism.

  133. Doesn’t the term black-body radiation suggest that blacks are potentially hazardous?

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Henry's Cat

    Floyd’s constant (ɸ) ≡ 6.63×10−34

  134. @El Dato
    @James Speaks

    OTOH, a Black Hole was not supposed to emit anything until Hawking posited his eponymous (blackbody) radiation, so the two terms have nothing in common.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    so the two terms have nothing in common.

    Both terms are unspeakably racist.

  135. @Red Pill Angel
    @PiltdownMan

    The biology department at the state school where I work has very few, if any, black majors. The kindest theory is that white kids go to summer camp in the country, are more likely to live in the suburbs, and thus get to see and appreciate more of nature growing up. Do white kids have more pets? Anyway, black kids just aren’t very interested, although the school has hired several black professors, which isn’t easy. The black teachers are from overseas and are very good, but all their assistants and student aides are white.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    There’s definitely a huge difference in empathy (and keeping an animal means reliably maintaining their habitat). Whites almost always have a pet, if they don’t there’s a reason, like an allergy or a landlord’s prohibition, and they will be as close as possible (eg, letting it sleep in the same bed).

    • Agree: Red Pill Angel
  136. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/Independent/status/1407270350182830084

    Karen Movie Teaser/Trailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfEPWa1ay0U

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Altai, @MEH 0910, @Mr. Anon

    It looks like the WWW (The War on White Women) is escalating. It doesn’t matter how much of a Nice White Lady you think you are – you’re still just a “Karen” – a Klanswoman with a Gucci bag.

    White women………….are you paying attention?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mr. Anon


    It looks like the WWW (The War on White Women) is escalating. It doesn’t matter how much of a Nice White Lady you think you are – you’re still just a “Karen” – a Klanswoman with a Gucci bag.

    White women………….are you paying attention?
     
    Rosie and Alden are too busy criticizing us. Lagertha is the mother of sons, as is Mrs Sailer. They wouldn't focus on slights to women, but obstacles for their boys.
  137. @Ed
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Yes, it’s in all the Anglo countries. New Zealand ties itself into knots over Maori issues. They even have a reparations scheme. Canada will likely do something similar due to the hysteria over the discovery of 215 bodies of dead indigenous children at some school.

    https://www.npr.org/2020/02/28/810485160/episode-975-reparations-in-new-zealand


    Mavis Mullins runs a sheep-shearing company that handles over 1,000,000 sheep. She's also a charming, disarmingly honest straight-shooter. One day her cousin pulled her into a cafe with a request: Help us fight with the New Zealand government for reparations.

    Mavis is Māori, part of the indigenous population of New Zealand. And over the past 35 years, the government of New Zealand has been building a system to try and make amends to Māori for past betrayals. These reparations usually take the form of a check, land, and an apology. In today's show we follow Mavis Mullins through that process.
     

    Replies: @James Speaks

    We need a better definition of “good man” if we are to survive. Forsake the image of a “good man” who lends a land to the downtrodden and embrace the spiritual qualities of truth, perserverance and scientific progress. Instead of trying to fix nature, apply the Prime Directive to negroes until they have evolved a bit more, or at least to where their marksmanship has improved.

  138. @EdwardM
    @Anonymousygmjth


    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn’t Sagan teach at Cornell?
     
    Sagan was on the faculty at Cornell but didn’t teach shit. It was a running joke that they loved to publicize his nominal role in their brochures but he never actually set foot on campus.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Unladen Swallow, @Giant Duck, @Prester John

    Sagan taught one class, either once a semester or once a year (I don’t remember). The class was tiny and to get in you had to apply and he would then personally select who got to be his students.

  139. anon[353] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Luke Lea


    Where are the Hutchison’s and Conant’s of this generation?
     
    Speaking of black holes, Wall Street and Silicon Valley suck in the top brains in America (meaning white and Asian males), where they are never heard from again. All other sectors get the leftovers which are female and increasingly NAM. This is a vicious circle because once a sector becomes black/female dominated it becomes increasingly hostile to white men so no man in his right mind is going to volunteer to herd that particular group of cats.

    Replies: @anon

    Speaking of black holes, Wall Street and Silicon Valley suck in the top brains in America (meaning white and Asian males), where they are never heard from again.

    Not as much as you apparently believe. The last few college grads I personally knew who went to SV were Hispanic females, or subcontinental females and males. Tribalism is a clear factor in tech now.

    In fact, you could ask James Damore about that.

    The only effect of Wall Street on my subset of the college world has to do with majors; people with superior math skills are still very tempted to go the quant route.

  140. Anon[107] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Russell Warne at his blog has a nice post today. He finished reading F jiveacing Reality. The post is not a review, although he says the book “does not state anything about these differences that is new to experts.” The post is in response to the recent Twitter thread from the black Harvard statistics PhD candidate who seemed to want to belittle Murray. This guy is the, “2 + 2 =5” guy. Anyway, Warne, author of a Cambridge University Press statistics textbook and a psychometrician, debunks the Harvard guy’s claim that IQ tests force men’s and women’s IQ mean values to be equal (and by implication that they could — and might be — fiddling with tests to create the black-white gap.

    Warne then goes on to describe something I’d never heard of: the Golden Rule Procedure. This was developed by ETS as a result of a lawsuit over an employment test they developed that had whites scoring higher than blacks on average. The experts at ETS tried to create the unicorn of standardized tests, the elusive test that blacks and whites obtain the same average score on. They did this by eliminating questions that seemed too be the hardest for blacks. They managed to narrow the gap. But in the process the test lost its predictive value. Subsequently there has been quite a lot of research on the Golden Rule Procedure (whose name derives from the defendant in the lawsuit, not the New Testament).

    Warne has 13 references for this single blog post.

    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anon

    Professor Warne corrected his blog post today, retracting the claim that IQ test makers do not juice scores to attain sexual "equity." Emil Kirkekgaard and another fellow dug up a lot of evidence that sex IQ scores are in fact normed to a single mean as much as possible.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/06/hiding-sex-differences-not-a-myth/

    The part of the post about the Golden Rule Procedure, whereby some tests are modified to make black-white scores closer, while at the same time making the scores more random in predictive value, was unchanged.

    Replies: @anon

  141. @PiltdownMan
    Being besieged by black students is not a new experience for Cornell U.

    Cornell, of course, made the national news in 1969 when armed black students took over the university students' activity center, but there was an earlier siege that happened a year before, on April 3rd, 1968.

    From the NYT archives:

    https://i.imgur.com/lLbyyTl.jpg

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @El Dato, @Paperback Writer, @Jim Don Bob

    One of the students was Franklin Raines who later walked off with $50 million in bonuses after cooking the books at Fannie Mae to the tune of $13 billion. He had help from Jamie Gorelick, architect of the famous information wall between the CIA and the FBI.

  142. OT. Surprisingly good article about the new Victoria’s Secret rebranding. It mentions Wexner’s association w/Epstein. I can’t believe there isn’t some connection….

    https://web.archive.org/web/20210617043830/https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/16/business/victorias-secret-collective-megan-rapinoe.html

    One of the new breed of model will be transgender. Posing isn’t a competitive sport. I would love to ask Rapinoe whether she would welcome transgender inclusion in women’s soccer.

  143. @EdwardM
    @Anonymousygmjth


    Speaking of which (mind the gap) didn’t Sagan teach at Cornell?
     
    Sagan was on the faculty at Cornell but didn’t teach shit. It was a running joke that they loved to publicize his nominal role in their brochures but he never actually set foot on campus.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @Unladen Swallow, @Giant Duck, @Prester John

    Most of the cream of the crop in the STEM fields don’t set one foot into a classroom. They are there (CalTech, MIT, Harvard, Princeton etc) to do research. Nothing more or less. Their research assistants are their students.

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @Prester John

    Of course. He was there from 1968-1996, so I am sure that he produced some research output. Probably not much for the last half of that time, but that would hardly be unusual for a senior professor.

  144. Anonymous[404] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out. I’m a big Peter Lynch guy - I go with what I know - and yeah I’ve known a lot of sharp athletes and few dull. Especially black ones.

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke intended to trip up people like yourself who read social cues autistically. IIRC correctly there are other tests so it could even be legit as well but main intention is joke.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jack D

    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out.

    Stelter is a gentile (Methodist) from rural Damascus, Maryland.

  145. Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein has received a nice review today in Astrobites. Of course, we all know her and her work (Chanda Prescod-Weinstein’s Magnum Opus: “Making Black Women Scientists Under White Empiricism: the Racialization of Epistemology in Physics”)

    Read the review at Astrobites, a website created by astronomy grad students – Humanity and Identity are Inextricable from Astrophysics: a Review of The Disordered Cosmos by Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein.

    The review begins with this cautionary labeling:

    CONTENT WARNING: mentions of sexual assault, violence against and murder of Black and Indigenous people, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    It’s odd, but when I took Astronomy 101 in college, neither the main textbook (a survey volume) nor the supplementary volume (a really cool book on astrophysics that required more math than most undergrads knew) had any mention of those topics.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Anon7

    Do I radicalize epistemology when I say that black females simulating twerky mass sexual encounters while pressed against an ambulance which is busy trying to take someone away are cunts who need to be whipped?

  146. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Who put their height and IQ in their handle? This reeks of insecurity. Why not just go all out and include your penis length in your handle while you are at it? A claim of 187 IQ is by definition bogus since the most valid IQ tests (Wechsler and Binet) ceiling out at 155 - 160.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @tomv, @Dieter Kief, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    “Why does it say fresh fish? That implies that the fish isn’t fresh!”

  147. Shouldn’t that be “Black holes?”

  148. @rebel yell
    @glib

    I was going to reply to Steve's comment with a question as to what kind of person would agree to teach a dumbed-down fake college course. Since you say you did this, I'll ask you. How did you feel about teaching a dumbed down course? Any ethical qualms or regrets? How did the head of the department feel about having this course on the curriculum?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Paleo Liberal

    It is definitely societally useful to give innumerates like me a “physics without math” course, where you explain the concepts without proving them, because the concepts are useful.

    • Agree: photondancer
  149. @Polistra
    @James Speaks

    I dare you people to successfully satirize this. I dare you.


    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy
     
    Negroes? Pay attention please. That's astronomy, not astrology.

    Until she find out you a Scorpio, homes!

    Replies: @James Speaks, @James Speaks

    Co-taught by professors in Comparative Literature and Astronomy, this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of astronomy concepts through readings in Black Studies.

    The statement is self-satire. It unintentionally speaks truth to wisdom and avoids censorship by idiot.

    My first thought was that negroes consider astronomy to be something prestigious yet accessible, and by accessible I mean simple enough for the primitive negro brain to grasp this is that and these are those simple definitions. As I have stated before, the negro brain is static and is not capable of comprehending nuance. I think a good initial topic for negrostronomers would be the wave-particle duality of QM. (That was satire.)

    There seems to be a rush to transform all studies into negro studies. This tells me that the negro brain cannot really understand the other. Recall, in days of old, the other was a slave or food, or both. The negro brain interprets the world as a source of food, some low hanging fruit and some fast food on hoof. Consequently, the negro approach to white man’s civilization, also known as civilization, is to relate to everything as a variant of some aspect of negro life.

    To the negro brain, truth does not have a separate reality. Everything is subjective.

    So what happens after negros have ruined our Western intellectual heritage by negrofying every subject? I think the next step will be compliance committees where negroes and SJW whites, also known as useful idiots, come into your home to help you validate your existence. From a negro perspective, of course.

  150. @nokangaroos
    @James Speaks

    Planck´s law was the first mathematical formulation of black body (thermal)
    radiation - by itself it does not (yet) imply photons (that had to wait for Einstein and the
    photoelectric effect).
    But given how foundational it is and how often they use the term "black bodies"
    I´d have expected at least an honorable mention; the jokes write themselves :P

    Fun fact: Skin is almost ideally black over most of the spectrum -
    why the difference in the visible window?

    Replies: @James Speaks

    You

    Planck´s law was the first mathematical formulation of black body (thermal)
    radiation – by itself it does not (yet) imply photons (that had to wait for Einstein and the
    photoelectric effect).

    Me

    That the emitted spectrum did not match theory (the ultraviolet catastrophe) led Max Planck to hypothesize discrete packets and Albert Einstein to theorize the existence of photons. I’m sure they were all racists.

    The theory before Planck led to infnite radiation at higher frequencies which conflicted with observation. (the ultraviolet ctastrophe) Thus, Planck postulated discrete packets of energy and made the formula fit the data.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Thanks: Dieter Kief
  151. ‘Holes of Color’, shurely?

  152. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Who put their height and IQ in their handle? This reeks of insecurity. Why not just go all out and include your penis length in your handle while you are at it? A claim of 187 IQ is by definition bogus since the most valid IQ tests (Wechsler and Binet) ceiling out at 155 - 160.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @tomv, @Dieter Kief, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Who put their height and IQ in their handle?

    A lot people on Twitter, apparently, as a kind of memetic joke, although it is to your credit that you’re unaware of it.

  153. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Who put their height and IQ in their handle? This reeks of insecurity. Why not just go all out and include your penis length in your handle while you are at it? A claim of 187 IQ is by definition bogus since the most valid IQ tests (Wechsler and Binet) ceiling out at 155 - 160.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @tomv, @Dieter Kief, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Oh, the quotient of IQ + forhead-diameter / Height is the actual penis length in inches. Internet-trivia!

    Everybody’s got something to hide ‘cept for me and my Monkey!

    • LOL: Jack D
  154. @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out. I’m a big Peter Lynch guy - I go with what I know - and yeah I’ve known a lot of sharp athletes and few dull. Especially black ones.

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke intended to trip up people like yourself who read social cues autistically. IIRC correctly there are other tests so it could even be legit as well but main intention is joke.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jack D

    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out.

    Todd is only 1/2 Jewish. Stetler is Methodist. He apparently married a Jewish woman but this did not increase his intelligence AFAIK. Jews also gave us Einstein and around 1 in 4 Nobelists and Terman so maybe Jews know something about about intelligence measurement (and about humor).

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke

    Is it the kind of joke that is not the least bit funny? Why would you make a relatively modest claim (Height 6’2″) in the same breath as an outrageous one? Unless he is really a midget (both the mental and physical kind)? Height 7’2″ IQ 187 is clearly a joke . Height 6’2″ IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Height 6’2″ IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.
     
    Or uncanny valley.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    Why would you make a relatively modest claim (Height 6’2″) in the same breath as an outrageous one?
     

    Height 7’2″ IQ 187 is clearly a joke . Height 6’2″ IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.
     
    It’s a shanda that a goy has to explain humor to a Jew, but here ya go: The 6’2” data point primes Greer’s (newest) online detractors—often short and/or ugly—to be even more angry: The height claim is certainly a plausible, if unusual bragging point from a bluecheck account. (Greer’s detractors are already conditioned to revere official credentials from leftwing bluechecks they follow as solemn fact.) Then they read “187 IQ” and get mad at him for ‘lying’—on some unconscious level they realize their credentialist credulousness is being mocked (and are triggered by Greer’s smirking avi), thus they doth protest too much, in the replies, about Greer’s psychological ‘inadequacies’.

    The joke has legs, because on Twitter there are always new idiots who are unfamiliar with Greer and complain, in the same exact sperg NPC fashion, about the ‘credentials’ in his bio. Think of it as an extremely efficient Voigt-Kampff test using subtle humor to bait the midwit-and-lesser online leftist Borg for the amusement of Greer’s readers.
  155. @rebel yell
    @glib

    I was going to reply to Steve's comment with a question as to what kind of person would agree to teach a dumbed-down fake college course. Since you say you did this, I'll ask you. How did you feel about teaching a dumbed down course? Any ethical qualms or regrets? How did the head of the department feel about having this course on the curriculum?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Paleo Liberal

    There is a case to be made for taking a dumbed down college course. I did teach some back in the day.

    Let’s take astronomy. There are a handful of people who have the time, the ability, the interest and inclination to study the field in depth.

    There are others who have the time and ability and interest to take one or two hard core science classes about astronomy but won’t want to major in the subject.

    There are a number of people who don’t have the time or the ability for a real astronomy class, but would like to learn some of the basics.

    Someone taking such a class would learn more about the subject than someone who never took a class, or even someone who failed a more rigorous class.

    So there is a real use for dumbed down classes.

  156. @Fox
    I am uncertain whether this is reality or satire. It seems today's reality yet I can't really believe that it's true. It is just plainly too stupid, to brainless, has too much of the 'absurd theater' that was in vogue in the 1960s.
    May the engine that keeps this madhouse lit come to a screeching halt very soon. It will give plenty of useless and clueless academics & others who live a life in theory something to ponder upon.

    Replies: @Charon, @Old Prude

    This is no different than the Dallas city counsellor complaining that Devil’s Food Cake is black, and Angels Food Cake is white, except this has the imprimatur of the university.

    I was going to quip “Black Matter Matters”, but I realized its called Dark Matter. Darn astrophysicists missed a chance at more systemic racisms.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Old Prude


    This is no different than the Dallas city counsellor complaining that Devil’s Food Cake is black, and Angels Food Cake is white, except this has the imprimatur of the university.

     

    https://storcpdkenticomedia.blob.core.windows.net/media/recipemanagementsystem/media/recipe-media-files/recipes/retail/x17/rainbow-cake760x580.jpg?ext=.jpg

    the Dallas city counsellor...
     
    They're so disturbed they need a counselor on staff?
    , @guest
    @Old Prude

    “Why is a blackout such a big, bad thing? You can buy White-Out in a little-bitty bottle.”

    “Don’t be glib. Don’t you be glib with me.”

    Paraphrased conversation between a Black Muslim Terrorist and a Good Liberal Cellblock Administrator on a tv show in the 90s. Back when such utterances were merely nonsense intended to derail conversation.

    , @Fox
    @Old Prude

    Once one gives in to madness, there is no limit.
    There is no doubt that this idiocy movement is burning itself eventually out. This will be after a big catastrophe caused by it. Hopefully, it will harm the perpetrators and promoters, the profiteers and simple idiots who go along without any thought more, much more than those looking at this curious phenomenon of seeing people they had assumed to be rational, normal turn to mental mush.
    If the 'woke' want to commit the equivalent of suicide, it's their decision, but they are also intending to drag the whole world down into their doomed fate.

  157. @Jack D
    @candid_observer

    As our society has become socially less conservative (almost libertine), styles in domestic architecture have become MORE conservative - it is rare nowadays to see any new house built in a "modern" style. Most new home construction is vaguely "colonial" or "historical" with symmetrical pitched gable roofs, etc.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @guest

    As our society has become socially less conservative (almost libertine), styles in domestic architecture have become MORE conservative – it is rare nowadays to see any new house built in a “modern” style. Most new home construction is vaguely “colonial” or “historical” with symmetrical pitched gable roofs, etc.

    Except the carriage house would be placed behind the main residence, on the alley, not attached and lording over it.

    https://megagaragehomes.com/

    I shared a converted carriage house with three international students one year. It was smaller than any of these garages.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Horses smell so you would want your carriage house separate from your dwelling. Except maybe in very cold climates where having to make your way from the house to the outbuildings in winter was a major undertaking, perhaps even dangerous.

    Early automobile garages were also detached until it became clear that an attached garage did not present a huge risk. Still, car fires are not unknown even today.

    I've notice though that the McMansion minimum nowadays is the 3 car garage.

  158. @glib
    @Steve Sailer

    I once taught an astronomy class like (well, it was just "descriptive" and we left it at that) this one with a good part of the softball and football teams. One wide receiver, I discovered, could not read. Top that, Maestro...

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Old Prude

    Well the Supreme Court just ruled your illiterate wide receiver can be paid not to read.

    Why not just open gladiator schools for these athletes, so they don’t pollute what is left of college being for the mind?

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Old Prude

    Well, that's right out. Neither the NBA nor the NFL want to run minor league teams with their own money. That's what big time college programs are for, and the NCAA has been backing that to the hilt.

    Maybe when the colleges have to contend with paying "student" athletes to have their programs remain attractive to the leagues, and their cash cow runs dry, things might change. Or some work around will be devised, likely enough.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    , @Shango
    @Old Prude

    What was the name of the ruling? Was it when about black NFL players were scoring low and the word "race norming" became a thing.

  159. anon[231] • Disclaimer says:
    @jilla
    OT, but Steve, have you heard about upscale Buckhead looking to secede from Atlanta? It would be a total disaster if it happens - Buckhead generates 40-50% of Atlanta's revenue. It's funny hearing the politicians talk about how "divisive" this move is and how everyone needs to stick together. This is just the start of the blowback to all of this BLM-craziness, I think. I think Yang is going to win in NYC because of it.

    Replies: @res, @usNthem, @anon, @northeast

    This would be a large blow to the DNC, since it would reduce Atlanta to a Southern Detroit.

    Atlanta is a lynchpin of Boomer feel-good narratives about Civil Rights, and will likely be a springboard for future, radical trojan horse Democrats who have reasonable appeal in flyover country. It’s perception of being a middle-class Black Mecca is entirely kept afloat by wypipo money.

    The quicker it can be deep-sixed, the better.

  160. Cornell Course Catalog: ASTRO 2034: Black Holes: Race and the Cosmos

    Whatever happend to Pride Month? Prideteenth. They should be teaching ASTROGLIDE 2021.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  161. @Jack D
    @Desiderius


    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out.
     
    Todd is only 1/2 Jewish. Stetler is Methodist. He apparently married a Jewish woman but this did not increase his intelligence AFAIK. Jews also gave us Einstein and around 1 in 4 Nobelists and Terman so maybe Jews know something about about intelligence measurement (and about humor).

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke
     
    Is it the kind of joke that is not the least bit funny? Why would you make a relatively modest claim (Height 6'2") in the same breath as an outrageous one? Unless he is really a midget (both the mental and physical kind)? Height 7'2" IQ 187 is clearly a joke . Height 6'2" IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Height 6’2″ IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.

    Or uncanny valley.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Reg Cæsar

    No, it’s like Beattie’s schtick of over the top rank-pulling. It lampooning all the midwits who try to cover up their lack of insight/substance by alluding to professional jargon or credentials or implied IQ/test scores. Of course it’s frowned upon to be explicit about it, which is why they do it.

    You’ll be happy to learn that Beattie is Jewish, Jack, riding to the rescue of your tarnished collective honor, and not a moment too soon.

    Replies: @Jack D

  162. “Cornell’s engineering department accepts female undergraduates at over two and a half times the rate of male students, to yield an engineering class that is majority female. This is hardly an accident. Twice as many male as female intending engineering students apply for admission; the average male math SAT score is significantly higher than the average female score, and males predominate at the upper reaches of the curve”

    That seems like a notable and new development. Am I just oblivious? As an engineer with a son, troubling to learn. Apprenticeship making a comeback would be a good thing though.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Gabe Ruth

    That seems like a notable and new development. Am I just oblivious?

    This kind of "outreach" has been cooking along for years and years. The combination of girls-only summer science events, girls-only tutoring, girls-only scholarships, plus preferential recruiting is finally paying off in what feminists call a "level playing field", i.e. majority female.

    As an engineer with a son, troubling to learn.

    He just has to be twice as good as any comparable girl. Perhaps you have a long, lost "Hispanic" ancestor previously unknown?

    Apprenticeship making a comeback would be a good thing though.

    That would be sexist and racist.

  163. Stories like this being joy to the heart of an accelerationist curmudgeon such as myself.

  164. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    UNC ran no-show classes out the black studies dept…….sleep in and get an A…….maybe that’s why their basketball team was so great ……of course the coach didn’t take the fall ,they are treated like gods.

  165. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    Were there any Chinese or Japanese students in that class? I will go out on a limb, and guess that was the moment when you understood Asians are not as creative as the races represented in that class room.

  166. anon[463] • Disclaimer says:
    @Gabe Ruth
    "Cornell’s engineering department accepts female undergraduates at over two and a half times the rate of male students, to yield an engineering class that is majority female. This is hardly an accident. Twice as many male as female intending engineering students apply for admission; the average male math SAT score is significantly higher than the average female score, and males predominate at the upper reaches of the curve"

    That seems like a notable and new development. Am I just oblivious? As an engineer with a son, troubling to learn. Apprenticeship making a comeback would be a good thing though.

    Replies: @anon

    That seems like a notable and new development. Am I just oblivious?

    This kind of “outreach” has been cooking along for years and years. The combination of girls-only summer science events, girls-only tutoring, girls-only scholarships, plus preferential recruiting is finally paying off in what feminists call a “level playing field”, i.e. majority female.

    As an engineer with a son, troubling to learn.

    He just has to be twice as good as any comparable girl. Perhaps you have a long, lost “Hispanic” ancestor previously unknown?

    Apprenticeship making a comeback would be a good thing though.

    That would be sexist and racist.

  167. @1John
    All this race thing would not b happening in a European aka White Ethnostate. We had such societies then threw them away. This time our new constitution will state our Ethnostate explicitly.

    Replies: @Uncle Dan

    What ethno is it, Italian, Czech, Polish, German, Spanish….?

  168. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    While being a human ferry boat was unusual, the occupation of trager (carrier or porter) was a common occupation for poor urban Jews in E. Europe. In the era before trucks, goods were carted around the ghettos on human backs. There were also subspecialties like the wassertrager - the water carrier who would deliver buckets of water to your house.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/ulwAAOSwWdVgtifR/s-l1600.jpg

    People here seem to have the notion that the Jews of Europe were all bankers (when they were not Bolsheviks) or at least involved in prosperous middle man occupations but the truth was that millions lived in grinding poverty (which was why millions immigrated - rich people tend not to immigrate). And not American style "poverty" where you get so much free food that you are as fat as a sow, but actual not enough to eat and only patched up rags for clothes poverty. There may have been a time (before the 19th century) when most of the Jews of Poland were indeed involved in middle man occupations but the Jews had a high birth rate (by 1939 30% of the population of Warsaw was Jewish) and far outgrew that ecological niche and had to branch out into menial occupations. And with so much competition, even the middle man occupations themselves were not prosperous.

    Replies: @utu, @Dacian Julien Soros

    Who were delivering they water to, given that the 40% of the city were poor Jews? Just how many gallons did those spoiled Christians of Warsaw use?

    I noticed a concerted effort to claim poverty for the Jews lately. Isn’t it enough that the have monopolized the genocide? (Having invented the word in the process.) Can’t you leave a tiny memories about suffering, for the other nations to have and to share?

    • Replies: @Bigdicknick
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Jews engage in a lot of self deception. Throughout their history Jews were almost always wealthier and better educated than their neighbors.

    , @Cortes
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Several references to the extreme poverty of Jewish arrivals in London in the mid-19th century are made in Henry Mayhew’s classic survey “London Labour and the London Poor”. Brief review at

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/oct/16/rereading-henry-mayhew-london-poor

    The situations in Poland and elsewhere in mainland Europe were probably dire for most people without a reasonable landholding, including Jews.

    , @Jack D
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    Probably 90%+ of the population (both Jewish and Christian) of prewar Poland (and Romania) had an income that would put them below the 2021 American "poverty line" ($26,500 for a household of 4), but poverty was a relative thing. It was like Dante's hell, where there is not just one circle but a series of increasing deep layers of poverty. Down at the very deepest layer you had the homeless who begged in the street and slept in the study houses of synagogues. My father described a layer of poverty below his: people with not enough money to buy fuel to heat their hovels. In the winter their breath would condense on the walls, which would become glazed with ice as a result. Compared to them, my father's family of fishermen was somewhat better off, at least "rich" enough to heat their home above the freezing point, but not so well off in the years following WWI that his father could afford to spare his children's labor and send them to school. By the time his baby brother was of school age, they were "rich" enough that he was allowed to attend school (public education in prewar Poland lasted until the 4th grade).

    Water carriers lived in one of the deeper layers. They would have delivered the water to people who had no indoor plumbing (thus the need to have water delivered) but lived one or two circles up as tailors or shoemakers or people who sold vegetables in a market stall. This did not make them "rich". Having water delivered was not a luxury but an essential that all but the very poorest "enjoyed" just as all but the most extreme poor in America now have indoor plumbing.

  169. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    As our society has become socially less conservative (almost libertine), styles in domestic architecture have become MORE conservative – it is rare nowadays to see any new house built in a “modern” style. Most new home construction is vaguely “colonial” or “historical” with symmetrical pitched gable roofs, etc.
     
    Except the carriage house would be placed behind the main residence, on the alley, not attached and lording over it.


    https://megagaragehomes.com/

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/60/26/ad/6026ad4bf1eba61d7ae2887ad363dbcf.jpg

    https://www.oregonlive.com/resizer/w_5Fc2GCmpFKAqVDqyOt2l1u028=/1280x0/smart/advancelocal-adapter-image-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/expo.advance.net/img/a98336a97f/width2048/092_genmid19252794250.jpeg

    https://nashvillehome.guru/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/good1.jpg


    I shared a converted carriage house with three international students one year. It was smaller than any of these garages.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Horses smell so you would want your carriage house separate from your dwelling. Except maybe in very cold climates where having to make your way from the house to the outbuildings in winter was a major undertaking, perhaps even dangerous.

    Early automobile garages were also detached until it became clear that an attached garage did not present a huge risk. Still, car fires are not unknown even today.

    I’ve notice though that the McMansion minimum nowadays is the 3 car garage.

  170. Why do Rs in a state with this map have to rely on leaks to find out what the state mandates the schools must teach? Shouldn’t they be the ones writing the mandates?

    They are? Interesting. Why don’t the voters know this?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Desiderius


    Iowa is Trump country. Trump carried 94 out of 99 Iowa counties in 2020.
     
    93, going by the map, which might not be final. Including the Driftless, which had gone Democratic for decades, except in a couple of landslides. Trump carried Dubuque County (though probably not the city) in 2016, the first Republican to do so. Emptying the Robert Taylor Homes and Cabrini Green into their state (not enough room in Rockford for all of them) was a bridge too far-- literally.


    https://iowadot.gov/autotrails/images/julien.jpg


    Most of the Driftless is in Wisconsin, with bits in Minnesota and Illinois. They all shifted. It was a rare rural Democratic redoubt, but they threw it away.

    Look at the five six counties that rejected the Donald-- the state capital and the two largest universities, and an aging rivertown metro, explain four of them.

    This is Iowa State's county:


    "Prior to 1988, Story County was primarily Republican in presidential elections, only failing to back the Republican Party candidate three times between 1896 and 1984. Since 1988 Story County has voted reliably blue. To exemplify this, Donald Trump's 2016 election performance in the county was over 3 points worse than Mitt Romney in 2012 despite Trump outperforming Romney statewide by nearly 5 percent and winning Iowa's electoral votes."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Story_County,_Iowa

    Rep. Jim Jordan
    @Jim_Jordan

    Jun 21
    Average gas price:

    June 2020: $2.21
    June 2021: $3.07

    President Biden’s economy!
     
    From Two-Dollar Donald to Three-Buck Biden!
  171. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Who put their height and IQ in their handle? This reeks of insecurity. Why not just go all out and include your penis length in your handle while you are at it? A claim of 187 IQ is by definition bogus since the most valid IQ tests (Wechsler and Binet) ceiling out at 155 - 160.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @tomv, @Dieter Kief, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    It’s there to troll sperg NPCs who don’t fully realize it’s a satire of ‘bluecheck’ credentialism in social media bios (e.g., Dr. Jill Biden). Lefties and ConInc Twitter twits who stumble on Greer’s account invariably get mad about his ‘bragging’ and immediately question the numbers, especially the IQ figure: “That couldn’t be true!” So either you’re knowingly trolling us right now (unlikely), or he got you too. Your huffy mentions of “penis length” and “insecurity” are extremely common responses from online autists who encounter Greer’s bio for the first time.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Thanks: Polistra
    • LOL: El Dato
    • Replies: @anon
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    It’s there to troll sperg NPCs...

    https://i.imgflip.com/2xwbaj.jpg

    , @Jack D
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I can proudly say that I didn't get the "joke" because I know nothing about social media and care even less. Ditto for whoever this Greer is. Trolls are ugly creatures that live under a bridge AFAIK.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  172. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Height 6’2″ IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.
     
    Or uncanny valley.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    No, it’s like Beattie’s schtick of over the top rank-pulling. It lampooning all the midwits who try to cover up their lack of insight/substance by alluding to professional jargon or credentials or implied IQ/test scores. Of course it’s frowned upon to be explicit about it, which is why they do it.

    You’ll be happy to learn that Beattie is Jewish, Jack, riding to the rescue of your tarnished collective honor, and not a moment too soon.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    I'd be happy to learn who the hell Beattie is, given that I have no idea. Isn't Beattie a Scottish name?

  173. @Jack D
    @Desiderius


    Maybe the people who’ve given us Chuck Todd and Brian Stelter should sit this one out.
     
    Todd is only 1/2 Jewish. Stetler is Methodist. He apparently married a Jewish woman but this did not increase his intelligence AFAIK. Jews also gave us Einstein and around 1 in 4 Nobelists and Terman so maybe Jews know something about about intelligence measurement (and about humor).

    The IQ in the handle is (obviously) a joke
     
    Is it the kind of joke that is not the least bit funny? Why would you make a relatively modest claim (Height 6'2") in the same breath as an outrageous one? Unless he is really a midget (both the mental and physical kind)? Height 7'2" IQ 187 is clearly a joke . Height 6'2" IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Why would you make a relatively modest claim (Height 6’2″) in the same breath as an outrageous one?

    Height 7’2″ IQ 187 is clearly a joke . Height 6’2″ IQ 187 is some kind of strange, unfunny mixed message.

    It’s a shanda that a goy has to explain humor to a Jew, but here ya go: The 6’2” data point primes Greer’s (newest) online detractors—often short and/or ugly—to be even more angry: The height claim is certainly a plausible, if unusual bragging point from a bluecheck account. (Greer’s detractors are already conditioned to revere official credentials from leftwing bluechecks they follow as solemn fact.) Then they read “187 IQ” and get mad at him for ‘lying’—on some unconscious level they realize their credentialist credulousness is being mocked (and are triggered by Greer’s smirking avi), thus they doth protest too much, in the replies, about Greer’s psychological ‘inadequacies’.

    The joke has legs, because on Twitter there are always new idiots who are unfamiliar with Greer and complain, in the same exact sperg NPC fashion, about the ‘credentials’ in his bio. Think of it as an extremely efficient Voigt-Kampff test using subtle humor to bait the midwit-and-lesser online leftist Borg for the amusement of Greer’s readers.

  174. @glib
    I was going to reply to Steve’s comment with a question as to what kind of person would agree to teach a dumbed-down fake college course. Since you say you did this, I’ll ask you. How did you feel about teaching a dumbed down course? Any ethical qualms or regrets? How did the head of the department feel about having this course on the curriculum?

    Hi, sorry, but this site breaks down for me a bit too often and then I can not reply directly. The course(s) in question are directed at non scientists who need a science course to graduate. The enrolled students are then part of a metric called the student to faculty ratio. Your department is hardly the only one which offer such courses so if you don't get those credit hours some other department will. So the head of department feels OK with the course, since the alternative is a strong reduction in the number of teaching assistants assigned to the Dept. Besides that, for such courses you do not choose the textbook, and the syllabus has to be related to the book.

    I think you misunderstand the extent of the problem. It is one thing if a criminal justice student takes such a dumbed down course. It is another matter if *required* courses for, say, engineering students also are dumbed down. Starting one such course, I gave student a trigonometry refresher in the form of a set of problems for 14-yrs old student in Russia (this was circa 2009). Only 5% of 20-yrs old american students could solve them. The problem hardly materializes at the college level.

    The illiterate wide receiver was circa 2001, not long after I was hired. I found out only because in a class of 300, I insisted that each student write a report and present it to me. Besides the obvious tour de force, others in the department were shaking their head that I would attempt that. it is all for naught. The student could not read his own report. Today it would be impossible to even attempt such a thing, some college level admin would overrule you.

    What do the least worst do in such a situation? They concentrate on research, on good graduate students (I think I am fairly distinguished in that regard), minimize interactions with management (Dean level or higher), are forever scheming ways to minimize paperwork, since the administrative system is, if possible, even more corrupt and unresponsive. I can honestly say that not being a good player has delayed my career, although I consider it a blessing, since I came to the US with a very false view of the country and civilization, which needed to be erased. You may have an incomplete view of the pressures of moving a family to another country, convincing the wife, then having kids, then finding out the things discussed here.

    Current faculty meetings clearly indicate a near paralysis in all things that are our core activities and tasks, so this state of affairs will not last much longer.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @El Dato

    Thanks for this comment. I hope you comment here more often.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  175. @UNIT472
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    As I tried to point out somethings do not have to be observed to know they exist. Let's say the skin of a negro absorbed every photon of light that struck it. He would be invisible to you unless you were a bat and used sonar to detect objects but you might notice the negroes presence by the lack of any commercial activity in the area save, perhaps, for a shabby liquor store or 'beauty parlor'. There would be an unusual amount of garbage in the street and the buildings would be decaying and covered with graffiti. You'd know this part of town was inhabited by photon absorbing people even if you could not see them.

    Replies: @Stan d Mute

    Actually, you can do a lab experiment proving exactly this point. Just drive (or hell, even stroll) thru Detriot before 10am.

  176. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D

    It’s there to troll sperg NPCs who don’t fully realize it’s a satire of ‘bluecheck’ credentialism in social media bios (e.g., Dr. Jill Biden). Lefties and ConInc Twitter twits who stumble on Greer’s account invariably get mad about his ‘bragging’ and immediately question the numbers, especially the IQ figure: “That couldn’t be true!” So either you’re knowingly trolling us right now (unlikely), or he got you too. Your huffy mentions of “penis length” and “insecurity” are extremely common responses from online autists who encounter Greer’s bio for the first time.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

    It’s there to troll sperg NPCs…

  177. @Morton's toes
    Sun Ra - Space is the Place

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fgz-iQ5lSw4

    Replies: @El Dato

    Another Sun Rah who is a Great Bandit and also an artist:

    From The City of Shifting Waters (sadly abridged edition as few pages giving views of caravans of refugees blocked on highways have been dropped for some reason)

  178. OT – a new 19 yo has been charged in the recent Austin Texas exuberance shooting on 6th street, and charges dropped against the younger suspects.

    https://www.kxan.com/news/local/austin/6th-street-shooting-district-attorney-apd-interim-chief-give-updates-at-11-a-m/amp/

    If this is the killer, it seems unlikely he will get the death penalty, but he should do hard time assuming they do have a case.

  179. @Mike Tre
    https://res.cloudinary.com/teepublic/image/private/s--x66YIWUV--/t_Preview/b_rgb:191919,c_limit,f_jpg,h_630,q_90,w_630/v1446218346/production/designs/177827_4.jpg

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Pat Kittle

    Black Science man is quoted above by Mike Tre saying:

    People don’t think the universe to be like it is, but it do.

    cf. = DoBe – The Doobie-Brothers – What a Fool Believes.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Dieter Kief

    The origin of that quite is as shocking as its grammar, it comes from a professional baseball player relating how he pitched a no-hitter (ie, he single-handedly defeated one session of the hitters of the other team) while intoxicated by illegal drugs.
    ...
    no wait, that was Doc Ellis, the quote is from Oscar Gamble. Baseball players all look alike to me.

  180. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/bennyjohnson/status/1407397269759008769?s=20

    Why do Rs in a state with this map have to rely on leaks to find out what the state mandates the schools must teach? Shouldn’t they be the ones writing the mandates?

    They are? Interesting. Why don’t the voters know this?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Iowa is Trump country. Trump carried 94 out of 99 Iowa counties in 2020.

    93, going by the map, which might not be final. Including the Driftless, which had gone Democratic for decades, except in a couple of landslides. Trump carried Dubuque County (though probably not the city) in 2016, the first Republican to do so. Emptying the Robert Taylor Homes and Cabrini Green into their state (not enough room in Rockford for all of them) was a bridge too far– literally.

    Most of the Driftless is in Wisconsin, with bits in Minnesota and Illinois. They all shifted. It was a rare rural Democratic redoubt, but they threw it away.

    Look at the five six counties that rejected the Donald– the state capital and the two largest universities, and an aging rivertown metro, explain four of them.

    This is Iowa State’s county:

    “Prior to 1988, Story County was primarily Republican in presidential elections, only failing to back the Republican Party candidate three times between 1896 and 1984. Since 1988 Story County has voted reliably blue. To exemplify this, Donald Trump’s 2016 election performance in the county was over 3 points worse than Mitt Romney in 2012 despite Trump outperforming Romney statewide by nearly 5 percent and winning Iowa’s electoral votes.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Story_County,_Iowa

    Rep. Jim Jordan
    @Jim_Jordan

    Jun 21
    Average gas price:

    June 2020: $2.21
    June 2021: $3.07

    President Biden’s economy!

    From Two-Dollar Donald to Three-Buck Biden!

  181. @nokangaroos
    @Luke Lea

    The interesting part about Deutsche Physik ("say what you will as long as it´s jew-free",
    still the laughingstock of all the hard sciences)
    is it didn´t affect scientific rigour in other fields, unlike Lysenkoism;
    the French famously beheaded Lavoisier ("The Revolution has no use for scholars"),
    and of course there was the Culture Revolution.

    Science in the long run will always triumph over the fad ... but
    it took the Russians and Chinese slightly over two generations each -
    a lost war is quicker ;)

    Replies: @El Dato, @Morton's toes

    “Eventually you will have Bacon forced upon you.”

    • LOL: nokangaroos
  182. Just think – courses such as these count toward actual credentials, which are then used to “prove” qualifications for jobs. And certain people will always be promoted over others for entry into these colleges with degrees in “Deconstructing Mesoamerican Pottery”, which somehow qualify some people over others for jobs in the real world.

    If we could simply go back to civil service exams and the like, we could end this nonsense. But we can’t because the “wrong” people will always come out on top.

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @anon215

    Yep, that is indeed the issue. I'm finding it quite exasperating to see so many comments saying "Meh. This is just a dummy subject for dimwit blacks to pass and get their degree". Is it really so harmless to be filling up dimwit heads with anti-white propaganda and then pushing them out into the world where they'll get jobs of some influence, since they have that magic degree?

  183. @Old Prude
    @Fox

    This is no different than the Dallas city counsellor complaining that Devil's Food Cake is black, and Angels Food Cake is white, except this has the imprimatur of the university.

    I was going to quip "Black Matter Matters", but I realized its called Dark Matter. Darn astrophysicists missed a chance at more systemic racisms.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @guest, @Fox

    This is no different than the Dallas city counsellor complaining that Devil’s Food Cake is black, and Angels Food Cake is white, except this has the imprimatur of the university.

    the Dallas city counsellor…

    They’re so disturbed they need a counselor on staff?

  184. @Anon7
    Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein has received a nice review today in Astrobites. Of course, we all know her and her work (Chanda Prescod-Weinstein's Magnum Opus: "Making Black Women Scientists Under White Empiricism: the Racialization of Epistemology in Physics")

    Read the review at Astrobites, a website created by astronomy grad students - Humanity and Identity are Inextricable from Astrophysics: a Review of The Disordered Cosmos by Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein.

    The review begins with this cautionary labeling:

    CONTENT WARNING: mentions of sexual assault, violence against and murder of Black and Indigenous people, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    It's odd, but when I took Astronomy 101 in college, neither the main textbook (a survey volume) nor the supplementary volume (a really cool book on astrophysics that required more math than most undergrads knew) had any mention of those topics.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Do I radicalize epistemology when I say that black females simulating twerky mass sexual encounters while pressed against an ambulance which is busy trying to take someone away are cunts who need to be whipped?

  185. @Old Prude
    @glib

    Well the Supreme Court just ruled your illiterate wide receiver can be paid not to read.

    Why not just open gladiator schools for these athletes, so they don't pollute what is left of college being for the mind?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Shango

    Well, that’s right out. Neither the NBA nor the NFL want to run minor league teams with their own money. That’s what big time college programs are for, and the NCAA has been backing that to the hilt.

    Maybe when the colleges have to contend with paying “student” athletes to have their programs remain attractive to the leagues, and their cash cow runs dry, things might change. Or some work around will be devised, likely enough.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @JerseyJeffersonian


    Or some work around will be devised, likely enough.

     

    This is what I'm afraid of. It would be great if this new ruling broke the hold of Big Sports on American higher ed, but one thing university administrators are excellent at is finding ways to circumvent regulations and limits on their operations.

    I'm interested in informed takes on this ruling. I don't quite grasp its implications.
  186. @utu
    HOW A SIEGE IN 18TH-CENTURY BRITISH-OCCUPIED CALCUTTA GAVE US THE TERM 'BLACK HOLE'
    https://www.firstpost.com/tech/science/how-a-siege-in-18th-century-british-occupied-calcutta-gave-us-the-term-black-hole-6507601.html

    MIT Professor and science writer, Marcia Bartusiak traces the origins of the term ‘black hole’ in her book Black Holes. Bartusiak writes that it was Hong-Yee Chiu, an American Astrophysicists of Chinese origins, who also coined the term "quasars", organized the January 1964 AAAS talk at Cleveland. Chiu first stumbled upon the term in a seminar at Princeton, in the early 1960s, where physicist Robert Dicke was explaining the dense stars collapsing in their own gravitational field. Dicke described these objects as "like the Black Hole Of Calcutta"- a prison so bad that people went in but did not come out. In fact, it appears that Dicke used the phrase quite liberally, Bartusiak notes that Robert Dicke’s children remember their father saying "Ah, it must have been sucked into the black hole of Calcutta" whenever something got lost at their house.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Charon, @Jonathan Mason

    The Black Hole of Calcutta was actually a dungeon in Fort William in which a large number of British captives were crammed overnight and most of them died after a native revolt.

    This was apparently due to a middle management snafu, and the intention of the higher ups was not was not to kill everybody. Sixth grade history.

    Black hole was standard military slang for the dungeon at the time.

    The term “the hole” is still a common part of prison slang in the United States. Spending a month in the hole mean spending a month in solitary confinement. Many people who spend time in the hole in US prisons are classified as blacks.

    • Agree: UNIT472
  187. People used to joke that “the universe is racist,” mocking the Woke brigade’s compulsion to see racism in anything and everything. Apparently, SJWs really do believe systemic racism is woven into the very fabric of the universe.

  188. The circular firing squad strikes again.

    Michael B Jordan’s new rum brand accused of cultural appropriation:
    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/michael-b-jordans-new-rum-line-sparks-controversy-175757026.html

    The Duke of Sandwich was asked for comment, but he’s been shadow banned on Twitter.

  189. @nokangaroos
    @Luke Lea

    The interesting part about Deutsche Physik ("say what you will as long as it´s jew-free",
    still the laughingstock of all the hard sciences)
    is it didn´t affect scientific rigour in other fields, unlike Lysenkoism;
    the French famously beheaded Lavoisier ("The Revolution has no use for scholars"),
    and of course there was the Culture Revolution.

    Science in the long run will always triumph over the fad ... but
    it took the Russians and Chinese slightly over two generations each -
    a lost war is quicker ;)

    Replies: @El Dato, @Morton's toes

    I thought some of the historians were going with Lavoisier was a crooked finance type when he wasn’t doing his Chemistry hobby and that’s why the revolutionaries killed him.

    • Replies: @nokangaroos
    @Morton's toes

    He moonlighted as a tax collector because science didn´t pay, yes;
    but they really put down his defense as mentioned.

  190. @Jack D
    @candid_observer

    As our society has become socially less conservative (almost libertine), styles in domestic architecture have become MORE conservative - it is rare nowadays to see any new house built in a "modern" style. Most new home construction is vaguely "colonial" or "historical" with symmetrical pitched gable roofs, etc.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @guest

    Well, yeah. Because modernism was built on lies and “modern” means more expensive for no reason except to fulfill irrational (anti-)aesthetic urges. “Conservative” means it won’t look like shit and/or fall apart a year after it’s erected.

    When Other People’s Money is involved, then it’s time to be modern.

  191. @Old Prude
    @Fox

    This is no different than the Dallas city counsellor complaining that Devil's Food Cake is black, and Angels Food Cake is white, except this has the imprimatur of the university.

    I was going to quip "Black Matter Matters", but I realized its called Dark Matter. Darn astrophysicists missed a chance at more systemic racisms.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @guest, @Fox

    “Why is a blackout such a big, bad thing? You can buy White-Out in a little-bitty bottle.”

    “Don’t be glib. Don’t you be glib with me.”

    Paraphrased conversation between a Black Muslim Terrorist and a Good Liberal Cellblock Administrator on a tv show in the 90s. Back when such utterances were merely nonsense intended to derail conversation.

  192. @Luke Lea
    Surely a low point in the history of American academia that will be looked back upon with dismay by future generations.

    Extreme forms of decadence, albeit in different forms, have afflicted even Oxford and Cambridge in the past if I am not mistaken, and perhaps continental universities as well (as in Germany during the Hitler phase?) so there is hope for an eventual recovery.

    What is missing right now is any responsible leadership at the summit of American education. Where are the Hutchison's and Conant's of this generation?

    Replies: @nokangaroos, @Jack D, @Desiderius, @guest

    Your optimism surprises me. I see no reason why academia should not continue to be a competition over who gets to be more intellectually petty. Forever. Or until the university ceases to exist.

    Of course, pockets of safety where certain disciplines be allowed to carry on with important work unmolested will probably be more numerous in future.

  193. @candid_observer
    @Reg Cæsar

    There are several in my neck of the woods, around Lexington MA, which were developed by the architecture school at Harvard.

    Five Fields is a well known example:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Fields

    They all have a Back to the Future feel about them. Personally, I like their combined suggestion of optimistic progress and nostalgia. When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Reg Cæsar

    When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.

    Icy might be closer to the truth. Especially in Robert Frost and Leroy Anderson‘s New England.

    Would you say Philip Johnson was more than a bit exhibitionist? His own nightmare on Elm Street:

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Reg Cæsar

    What was that saying about "people who live in glass houses?"

    Yet there is a wall with big rocks in it right in front of the house (in the photo).

    Philip Johnson was just asking for it!

    Replies: @Ralph L

    , @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    This one is actually really neat, I saw it on 4chan's design forum and it took me a minute to figure it out. The glass is dumb and reminds of Bogdanov's Red Star, but say this is a demonstration model. The walls could be anything. The house, whatever you make it out of, is mostly empty container (holding furniture and paintings).
    The point is that brick column, which contains everything involving heat and water. Central easy plumbing system. It could be divided into quarters, containing an oven, a commode and sink, a fireplace, and a shower, leading up to a chimney and down to drainage. Since electricity wasn't mentioned, we could go one step further, say there is none, the goal was primitivism: there is a constant hearth, automatically a central wood fireplace, which becomes a stove or oven with the right accessories, and which heats the water functions it sits next to.
    So with limited resources you could build a perfectly good shelter, it could even be a tent if you're careful, and with this brick fire/water column it would be a near fully modern house.

    Replies: @photondancer

  194. @Steve Sailer
    @Redneck farmer

    I took a music class at Rice U. along with about a quarter of the football team. Due to its easy grading, it was known among the jocks as "Clapping for Credit."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @glib, @Paperback Writer, @Papinian, @Desiderius, @tyrone, @Dacian Julien Soros, @Muggles

    Speaking of colleges and universities, here’s a fact that should warm iSteve’s generous heart.

    A revival of College Bowl airs tonight at 10 PM EDT for an hour on NBC.

    No, Rice U isn’t a contestant but other schools are.

    So iSteve can re-live his college days again.

    I assume it will be more scholarly than the now Woke Jeopardy has become. Aside from questions about obscure non White, non Male figures (questions than often none of the fairly smart contestants even guess at), many now Woke Jeopardy questions are about current films, books or TV shows few people bother with. Or “winners” of various industry award shows in recent times. Industry meaning “Industry” as in entertainment or British book awards.

    Okay, everyone who knows who the 2011 Tony Award Best Musical winner was, please raise your hand (no Googling first either!). Bonus points if you can hum the popular tune from the show!

    College Bowl will feature harder questions about physics, math and ancient history. Oh, and feminist icons like Susquehanna Sue. Better get that Ritalin ready!

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Muggles

    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek's demise?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Ralph L, @Muggles

    , @UNIT472
    @Muggles

    Sheesh, I remember GE College Bowl but it may have been before Sailer's TV time. Intellectual capital seems to have been more EQUATIBLY distributed back then though because I remember schools like Marquette and Duquesne competing with what my father might have called 'liberal arts know it alls.

    I liked to watch it because the only 'huddle' the 'teams' held was when they didn't know the answer but wanted to offer an educated guess. A technique I used myself in my academic career.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  195. @Mr. Anon
    @MEH 0910

    It looks like the WWW (The War on White Women) is escalating. It doesn't matter how much of a Nice White Lady you think you are - you're still just a "Karen" - a Klanswoman with a Gucci bag.

    White women.............are you paying attention?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It looks like the WWW (The War on White Women) is escalating. It doesn’t matter how much of a Nice White Lady you think you are – you’re still just a “Karen” – a Klanswoman with a Gucci bag.

    White women………….are you paying attention?

    Rosie and Alden are too busy criticizing us. Lagertha is the mother of sons, as is Mrs Sailer. They wouldn’t focus on slights to women, but obstacles for their boys.

  196. @Desiderius
    @Paperback Writer

    You’re mistaking variance for mean. You got most of what you have second-hand through official American misreading of continental philosophy. Granted the Marxism didn’t help but this is orthogonal to that.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    I have no idea what you’re talking about.

    This place is turning into a usenet newsgroup, so in the spirit of the old flame wars: LEARN TO READ.

    To repeat: The rest of the world is as bad as the US in terms of woke bullshit, if not worse. In fact they pioneered it.

    The country that I know best, the UK, preceded us by at least 10 years into the vortex. British theater pioneered “color blind” (actually, color-conscious explicitly anti-white racist) casting by 10 years.

  197. @Reg Cæsar
    @candid_observer


    When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.
     
    Icy might be closer to the truth. Especially in Robert Frost and Leroy Anderson's New England.

    Would you say Philip Johnson was more than a bit exhibitionist? His own nightmare on Elm Street:


    https://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2007/0707/360_amodern_0709.jpg

    Replies: @Muggles, @J.Ross

    What was that saying about “people who live in glass houses?”

    Yet there is a wall with big rocks in it right in front of the house (in the photo).

    Philip Johnson was just asking for it!

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Muggles

    What was that saying about “people who live in glass houses?”

    Harry Markle says they shouldn't stow thrones.

  198. @Old Prude
    @glib

    Well the Supreme Court just ruled your illiterate wide receiver can be paid not to read.

    Why not just open gladiator schools for these athletes, so they don't pollute what is left of college being for the mind?

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian, @Shango

    What was the name of the ruling? Was it when about black NFL players were scoring low and the word “race norming” became a thing.

  199. @glib
    I was going to reply to Steve’s comment with a question as to what kind of person would agree to teach a dumbed-down fake college course. Since you say you did this, I’ll ask you. How did you feel about teaching a dumbed down course? Any ethical qualms or regrets? How did the head of the department feel about having this course on the curriculum?

    Hi, sorry, but this site breaks down for me a bit too often and then I can not reply directly. The course(s) in question are directed at non scientists who need a science course to graduate. The enrolled students are then part of a metric called the student to faculty ratio. Your department is hardly the only one which offer such courses so if you don't get those credit hours some other department will. So the head of department feels OK with the course, since the alternative is a strong reduction in the number of teaching assistants assigned to the Dept. Besides that, for such courses you do not choose the textbook, and the syllabus has to be related to the book.

    I think you misunderstand the extent of the problem. It is one thing if a criminal justice student takes such a dumbed down course. It is another matter if *required* courses for, say, engineering students also are dumbed down. Starting one such course, I gave student a trigonometry refresher in the form of a set of problems for 14-yrs old student in Russia (this was circa 2009). Only 5% of 20-yrs old american students could solve them. The problem hardly materializes at the college level.

    The illiterate wide receiver was circa 2001, not long after I was hired. I found out only because in a class of 300, I insisted that each student write a report and present it to me. Besides the obvious tour de force, others in the department were shaking their head that I would attempt that. it is all for naught. The student could not read his own report. Today it would be impossible to even attempt such a thing, some college level admin would overrule you.

    What do the least worst do in such a situation? They concentrate on research, on good graduate students (I think I am fairly distinguished in that regard), minimize interactions with management (Dean level or higher), are forever scheming ways to minimize paperwork, since the administrative system is, if possible, even more corrupt and unresponsive. I can honestly say that not being a good player has delayed my career, although I consider it a blessing, since I came to the US with a very false view of the country and civilization, which needed to be erased. You may have an incomplete view of the pressures of moving a family to another country, convincing the wife, then having kids, then finding out the things discussed here.

    Current faculty meetings clearly indicate a near paralysis in all things that are our core activities and tasks, so this state of affairs will not last much longer.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @El Dato

    Trapped in academia hell …. forever!

  200. @Reg Cæsar
    @candid_observer


    When I was a kid, these sort of homes seemed supercool, and now they still seem pretty cool.
     
    Icy might be closer to the truth. Especially in Robert Frost and Leroy Anderson's New England.

    Would you say Philip Johnson was more than a bit exhibitionist? His own nightmare on Elm Street:


    https://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2007/0707/360_amodern_0709.jpg

    Replies: @Muggles, @J.Ross

    This one is actually really neat, I saw it on 4chan’s design forum and it took me a minute to figure it out. The glass is dumb and reminds of Bogdanov’s Red Star, but say this is a demonstration model. The walls could be anything. The house, whatever you make it out of, is mostly empty container (holding furniture and paintings).
    The point is that brick column, which contains everything involving heat and water. Central easy plumbing system. It could be divided into quarters, containing an oven, a commode and sink, a fireplace, and a shower, leading up to a chimney and down to drainage. Since electricity wasn’t mentioned, we could go one step further, say there is none, the goal was primitivism: there is a constant hearth, automatically a central wood fireplace, which becomes a stove or oven with the right accessories, and which heats the water functions it sits next to.
    So with limited resources you could build a perfectly good shelter, it could even be a tent if you’re careful, and with this brick fire/water column it would be a near fully modern house.

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @J.Ross

    I've stayed in a house like that. The 'walls' were heavy plastic rather than glass so they could be rolled up on balmy nights. It was in the bush so no privacy concerns. I found it very pleasant.

  201. @Dieter Kief
    @Mike Tre

    Black Science man is quoted above by Mike Tre saying:


    People don't think the universe to be like it is, but it do.
     
    cf. = DoBe - The Doobie-Brothers - What a Fool Believes.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    The origin of that quite is as shocking as its grammar, it comes from a professional baseball player relating how he pitched a no-hitter (ie, he single-handedly defeated one session of the hitters of the other team) while intoxicated by illegal drugs.

    no wait, that was Doc Ellis, the quote is from Oscar Gamble. Baseball players all look alike to me.

    • LOL: Dieter Kief
  202. anon[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @The real Buddy Stevenson
    I know it’s off topic, but does anyone here not believe in black holes? It seems like fiction. Tesla didn’t believe it. Edison didn’t either. All that dark energy stuff is make believe. Every time they get it wrong, they have to come up with a new dark theory to explain the gaps. They even got to the point where they believe in multi parallel universes. It’s absurd. And smart people believe this junk. That says something about group think and celebrity worship. Newton never would have believed in black wholes or dark energy.

    Replies: @UNIT472, @Jack D, @Boomthorkell, @anon

    ACKSHUALLY Michell (1784) and Laplace (1796) both independently postulated the existence of compact, massive non-luminous bodies.

    The modern understanding starts with Schwarzschild (1915), who would have been happy to speak with Edison or Tesla had they possessed the math to understand it, and had he not died of an icky disease in 1916.

    Newton, he’d have loved the idea.

    Mortimer

  203. @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    Speaking of colleges and universities, here's a fact that should warm iSteve's generous heart.

    A revival of College Bowl airs tonight at 10 PM EDT for an hour on NBC.

    No, Rice U isn't a contestant but other schools are.

    So iSteve can re-live his college days again.

    I assume it will be more scholarly than the now Woke Jeopardy has become. Aside from questions about obscure non White, non Male figures (questions than often none of the fairly smart contestants even guess at), many now Woke Jeopardy questions are about current films, books or TV shows few people bother with. Or "winners" of various industry award shows in recent times. Industry meaning "Industry" as in entertainment or British book awards.

    Okay, everyone who knows who the 2011 Tony Award Best Musical winner was, please raise your hand (no Googling first either!). Bonus points if you can hum the popular tune from the show!

    College Bowl will feature harder questions about physics, math and ancient history. Oh, and feminist icons like Susquehanna Sue. Better get that Ritalin ready!

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @UNIT472

    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek’s demise?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Unladen Swallow

    Jennings was/is insufferable. When the conservatives abandoned the Liberal Arts everything went to shit.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Ralph L
    @Unladen Swallow

    They've been trying to get more female and/or black champions for years; you can tell by the categories. Lately, they've had all-female-contestant shows.

    The voice of the current guest host is worse than Hillary's, yet she's a name on morning TV.

    What surprises me is how many easy (usually history) clues they miss.

    , @Muggles
    @Unladen Swallow


    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek’s demise?
     
    Although my wife and I regularly watch the show (Tivoed) it is hard to pin an exact time for Wokeness.

    I would guess around late 2018 or in early 2019. Our local station is running some Trebek 2019 shows as well as into 2020, so it was definitely "on" then.

    Sometimes when I see the late Alex reading off Woke correct answers no one even tried to guess, I see a sadness in his eyes. After his demise it seems to have stayed roughly the same with respect to Wokeness. However the highest money winners are nearly always White males. Very few daily winners get past the third appearance unless they are extremely good.

    While most of the POC contestants are pretty bright, a few are just terrible. One poor recent subcon contestant stopped ringing in after the first round and crapped out w/ less than zero by the final question. Many of them on the other hand, are pretty bright.

    But far more pop culture questions about rappers and obscure POC actors/writers, etc than in the past. So reading People Magazine is more useful than any advanced degree. Watch a few shows and judge for yourself. Especially if you are a longtime fan.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Unladen Swallow

  204. Pretty sure someone in the BAPsphere or Reaboi/Cerno has posted some. Definitely strength training -> RW politics. T-level thing.

  205. @Unladen Swallow
    @Muggles

    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek's demise?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Ralph L, @Muggles

    Jennings was/is insufferable. When the conservatives abandoned the Liberal Arts everything went to shit.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @anon
    @Desiderius

    When the conservatives abandoned the Liberal Arts everything went to shit.

    Reversing the arrow of causation in a combox does not make it true in the real world.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/John_Dewey_in_1902.jpg

    https://cdn.studenti.stbm.it/images/2019/07/10/antonio-gramsci-orig.jpeg

    Replies: @Desiderius

  206. @xyzxy

    The Cornell course also studies music by Sun Ra...

     

    Sonny Blount was a character, for sure. But he was grounded in a way that most liberal academics are not. He once said that the problem with black kids is that they have been brought up on the word 'freedom' when they should be brought up on the word 'discipline'.

    Will Cornell teach Sun Ra's condemnation of gangs, pimps, whores, and drug dealing? And Ra's belief that blacks should separate themselves from whites in an attempt to be self-sufficient? Probably won't go there, but just play some of his records (which the kids won't like).

    Replies: @Anon

    The Sun Ra Arkestra has continued on since Sunny’s death, under the able leadership of now 97 year old Marshall Allen. Saw them two years ago and they absolutely smoked the SF Jazz Center.

  207. Fact.

  208. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Jack D

    Who were delivering they water to, given that the 40% of the city were poor Jews? Just how many gallons did those spoiled Christians of Warsaw use?

    I noticed a concerted effort to claim poverty for the Jews lately. Isn't it enough that the have monopolized the genocide? (Having invented the word in the process.) Can't you leave a tiny memories about suffering, for the other nations to have and to share?

    Replies: @Bigdicknick, @Cortes, @Jack D

    Jews engage in a lot of self deception. Throughout their history Jews were almost always wealthier and better educated than their neighbors.

  209. @Desiderius
    @Unladen Swallow

    Jennings was/is insufferable. When the conservatives abandoned the Liberal Arts everything went to shit.

    Replies: @anon

    When the conservatives abandoned the Liberal Arts everything went to shit.

    Reversing the arrow of causation in a combox does not make it true in the real world.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @anon

    Quitters never win and winners never quit.

    Replies: @anon

  210. @Henry's Cat
    Doesn't the term black-body radiation suggest that blacks are potentially hazardous?

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    Floyd’s constant (ɸ) ≡ 6.63×10−34

  211. @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    Speaking of colleges and universities, here's a fact that should warm iSteve's generous heart.

    A revival of College Bowl airs tonight at 10 PM EDT for an hour on NBC.

    No, Rice U isn't a contestant but other schools are.

    So iSteve can re-live his college days again.

    I assume it will be more scholarly than the now Woke Jeopardy has become. Aside from questions about obscure non White, non Male figures (questions than often none of the fairly smart contestants even guess at), many now Woke Jeopardy questions are about current films, books or TV shows few people bother with. Or "winners" of various industry award shows in recent times. Industry meaning "Industry" as in entertainment or British book awards.

    Okay, everyone who knows who the 2011 Tony Award Best Musical winner was, please raise your hand (no Googling first either!). Bonus points if you can hum the popular tune from the show!

    College Bowl will feature harder questions about physics, math and ancient history. Oh, and feminist icons like Susquehanna Sue. Better get that Ritalin ready!

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow, @UNIT472

    Sheesh, I remember GE College Bowl but it may have been before Sailer’s TV time. Intellectual capital seems to have been more EQUATIBLY distributed back then though because I remember schools like Marquette and Duquesne competing with what my father might have called ‘liberal arts know it alls.

    I liked to watch it because the only ‘huddle’ the ‘teams’ held was when they didn’t know the answer but wanted to offer an educated guess. A technique I used myself in my academic career.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @UNIT472

    BYU is a now rare example of a college that still isn't all that stratified by test scores. Lots of smart Mormons go to it, as do lots of non-smart Mormons. VMI and the Citadel are kind of similar.

    Replies: @Muggles

  212. @jilla
    OT, but Steve, have you heard about upscale Buckhead looking to secede from Atlanta? It would be a total disaster if it happens - Buckhead generates 40-50% of Atlanta's revenue. It's funny hearing the politicians talk about how "divisive" this move is and how everyone needs to stick together. This is just the start of the blowback to all of this BLM-craziness, I think. I think Yang is going to win in NYC because of it.

    Replies: @res, @usNthem, @anon, @northeast

    Secession from Atlanta by Buckhead would only be the first step. They would then have to build a wall and increase the police force by 100% at least.

    Even then…roving gangs of black youth would still be an ever-present danger.

    • Agree: Bubba
  213. @Muggles
    @Reg Cæsar

    What was that saying about "people who live in glass houses?"

    Yet there is a wall with big rocks in it right in front of the house (in the photo).

    Philip Johnson was just asking for it!

    Replies: @Ralph L

    What was that saying about “people who live in glass houses?”

    Harry Markle says they shouldn’t stow thrones.

  214. @Mike_from_SGV
    As the US self-destructs in science due to the woke obsession, China and India will gladly assume leadership in these fields.

    Replies: @PiltdownMan, @photondancer

    China might, but from what I’ve read there’s not a few anti-science people in India too. Ayurveda tends to feature in their arguments.

  215. @Unladen Swallow
    @Muggles

    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek's demise?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Ralph L, @Muggles

    They’ve been trying to get more female and/or black champions for years; you can tell by the categories. Lately, they’ve had all-female-contestant shows.

    The voice of the current guest host is worse than Hillary’s, yet she’s a name on morning TV.

    What surprises me is how many easy (usually history) clues they miss.

  216. @Mr. Anon
    Astronomy used to be an ethereal kind of topic - isolated from the World and it's petty concerns. A science, to be sure, but practiced by dedicated people - almost a priesthood - on mountain tops, gazing intently though the eyepiece of a telescope with, one imagined, Holst's Neptune running through their minds.

    Now it's just another crapfest that woke leftism has ruined.

    Astronomy
    1543 - 2021
    RIP

    Replies: @Bubba

    Poor Johannes Kepler. Lived an incredibly tough life and yet made more contributions to astronomy in his short lifetime than an infinite google of woke, spoiled charlatans like Neil deGrasse Tyson.

    May his work will be salvaged after the coming Idiocracy.

    • Replies: @nokangaroos
    @Bubba

    Actually Kepler only meta-studied Tycho de Brahe´s tables (who really sacrificed himself on the altar of science) and was pragmatic:
    Astrology "from her whore´s wages" should "support the noble sister" ;)

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  217. It is a shame that one cannot short schools. Someone, I forget who, said a problem with startup funding was that you cannot bet against them. So, all the people who thought ‘Uber for pets’ was a bad idea had no way of turning that into money when the biz failed. Leave aside that Uber for pets is not a terrible idea.

    I would love there to be some way to play academic moneyball for money. CUNY going open admissions, Cali getting rid of SAT scores. Any school trying to improve the basketball and football teams’ win-lose ratio. You and I know that increasing black enrollment means dumber students and a worse life on campus. The Associate Dean of Diversity know it, too. He also knows that to be promoted to Senior Partner of Undergraduate Diversity, then he needs moar Diversity.

    I realize that the GoodWhites are somewhat true believers. The school and real students suffer from their decisions. But no Prez wants some disgruntled diversity intern tweeting, “Cornell President Jebediah P Cornhole says ‘Cornell can’t take moar diversity without hurting the real students!! smh please retweet #CornellbBlacker” so he takes more blacks. They fail real classes. He gives them Black Hole Keep it Real in da Universe 101 and 10, so they can pass something without real students taking it.

    You know sexual harassment suits with multimillion dollar victories and settlements in the eighties(?) and nineties scared companies so badly that they hired HR folk and tasked them with trying to help with sexual harassment? In my head, these women who wanted to strike a blow against piggishness, got the talk:
    “The corporation pays your salary so that we are covered when employees sue the company for HR-related issues. Specifically, when they are alleging that their boss, or someone higher up in their chain of command for misbehavior. These lawsuits are Vampires. You provide the holy water. When the holy water fails, and the vampires come after us, we do not pay more for holy water. We get rid of the priests”

    Someone at Unies needs to sit down the Diversity Director and tell her, “you’re mission has changed. Your job is not to increase diversity at this school. Your new mission is to protect the school from lawsuits from diversities. If diversities are so unhappy here that they sue, then you did not do your job.”

    Seriously, having unies 5% nonwhites when the country was 90% white was a manageable burden. But it was still a burden. Trying to make the universities 49% nonwhite in a 40% white means the unies do not function well at any of their tasks: sorting the top X% by IQ-ish merit; giving the sons and daughters of rich men impeccable credentials so that the elite can pretend to be meritocratic as it perpetuates itself; pull off the brightest and most ambitious minorities so they are on the side of the establishment, not riling up the ghetto; trying to teach anyone in the first two categories stuff. Most importantly teach the people who own the country that they have to keep at least part of the country happy to keep the par-tay going.

    I realize that the elite are able to breed themselves taller, smarter, and blonder by having smart, attractive women for their sons to marry at the college. However high the average IQ of a class is, there will be a left hand side.

    • LOL: nokangaroos
  218. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Jack D

    Who were delivering they water to, given that the 40% of the city were poor Jews? Just how many gallons did those spoiled Christians of Warsaw use?

    I noticed a concerted effort to claim poverty for the Jews lately. Isn't it enough that the have monopolized the genocide? (Having invented the word in the process.) Can't you leave a tiny memories about suffering, for the other nations to have and to share?

    Replies: @Bigdicknick, @Cortes, @Jack D

    Several references to the extreme poverty of Jewish arrivals in London in the mid-19th century are made in Henry Mayhew’s classic survey “London Labour and the London Poor”. Brief review at

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/oct/16/rereading-henry-mayhew-london-poor

    The situations in Poland and elsewhere in mainland Europe were probably dire for most people without a reasonable landholding, including Jews.

    • Agree: photondancer
  219. @Jack D
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    The identification of a "black hole" as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958, so Tesla and Edison would not have known about them.

    The black hole follows as a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity and the interaction between light and gravity. While Einstein's relativity was not universally accepted (or even understood) at first by men such as Edison and Tesla who were born in the mid-19th century, today it is regarded by virtually all physicists as unquestionably correct and amply proved by numerous experiments. I have no doubt that if Newton had been brought up to speed, he would have eventually understood and agreed with relativity and with the existence of black holes.

    If seeing is believing, here is a photograph of a black hole:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/styles/article_main_image_-_1280w__no_aspect_/public/A-Consensus.jpg?itok=4xSDWrLl

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/black-hole

    Replies: @JimB, @The real Buddy Stevenson, @The real Buddy Stevenson

    They didn’t believe in time space fabric. You need black holes, dark energy and any number of made up particles to make it work. https://www.naturehacker.org/2019/04/the-black-hole-picture-is-fake.html

  220. @Jack D
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    The identification of a "black hole" as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958, so Tesla and Edison would not have known about them.

    The black hole follows as a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity and the interaction between light and gravity. While Einstein's relativity was not universally accepted (or even understood) at first by men such as Edison and Tesla who were born in the mid-19th century, today it is regarded by virtually all physicists as unquestionably correct and amply proved by numerous experiments. I have no doubt that if Newton had been brought up to speed, he would have eventually understood and agreed with relativity and with the existence of black holes.

    If seeing is believing, here is a photograph of a black hole:

    https://www.sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/styles/article_main_image_-_1280w__no_aspect_/public/A-Consensus.jpg?itok=4xSDWrLl

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/black-hole

    Replies: @JimB, @The real Buddy Stevenson, @The real Buddy Stevenson

    We all know that science has been corrupted because of political correctness. And you can’t criticize Einstein’s theories because of his ethnic background. But there are alternative theories. https://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2021/06/19/wal-thornhill-webb-space-telescope-fundamental-change-thunderbolts/

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    The "Electric Universe Theory" is not bad science, it's not science at all in the sense of having any sort of foundation of experimental or mathematical support.

    There is no such thing as "Jewish physics". There is only true physics and not true physics. Science is not like sports or politics or literature where your political views and ethnic sympathies have relevance as to whom and what you like. Once you introduce those into your thinking, you're automatically not doing science anymore.

    Replies: @The real Buddy Stevenson

  221. @UNIT472
    @Muggles

    Sheesh, I remember GE College Bowl but it may have been before Sailer's TV time. Intellectual capital seems to have been more EQUATIBLY distributed back then though because I remember schools like Marquette and Duquesne competing with what my father might have called 'liberal arts know it alls.

    I liked to watch it because the only 'huddle' the 'teams' held was when they didn't know the answer but wanted to offer an educated guess. A technique I used myself in my academic career.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    BYU is a now rare example of a college that still isn’t all that stratified by test scores. Lots of smart Mormons go to it, as do lots of non-smart Mormons. VMI and the Citadel are kind of similar.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    BYU probably skims the cream off of the Mormon student pool, overwhelming white.

    Other than Pacific Islanders not many POC Mormons.

    They also probably skim the POC student pool and award scholarships, as they have been pretty sensitive about been seen as "too white." Sad really. But the Angel Moroni is a tough sell in POC land.

    Since they start with a higher IQ general pool and resulting student body, it is helpful for producing decent graduates who have to work harder.

    The thing about smaller selective schools (like iSteve's Rice U, and mine) is that students who were "smart" in high school are usually at best, average in highly selective places. So you work harder to get good grades and stay afloat. Also you learn than some higher IQ types are pretty screwed up and often in many ways, not as smart as they think they are.

    You learn this in smaller elite places. Humility. Not learned at "the Ivy's" where being admitted lets you sit back and bask in your selected greatness. Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bomag

  222. @photondancer
    @El Dato

    "By putting lay discourses on spacetime from physics into conversation with works on identity "

    FFS, I have books from the mid 1990s on my shelf tearing to pieces this practice of charlatans of yoking science to garbage. Wright is too lazy to even come up with new garbage.

    Replies: @Professional Slav

    do you mind recommending some? thanks

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @Professional Slav

    Intellectual Impostures, also published as Fashionable Nonsense, by Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont

    The Sokal Hoax by Lingua Franca

    Higher Superstition by Paul Gross and Norman Levitt

    These are the ones I was thinking of but there were others. Absolutely nothing twerps such as Wright are saying is original. It's all cribbed from 20 years ago. There are 2 differences:

    1) the anti-americanism of the earlier fad is now a generic anti-white and anti-democracy position
    2) it's being driven by the young/students as much as by the older/academics

    Replies: @El Dato, @James N. Kennett

  223. @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Old Prude

    Well, that's right out. Neither the NBA nor the NFL want to run minor league teams with their own money. That's what big time college programs are for, and the NCAA has been backing that to the hilt.

    Maybe when the colleges have to contend with paying "student" athletes to have their programs remain attractive to the leagues, and their cash cow runs dry, things might change. Or some work around will be devised, likely enough.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Or some work around will be devised, likely enough.

    This is what I’m afraid of. It would be great if this new ruling broke the hold of Big Sports on American higher ed, but one thing university administrators are excellent at is finding ways to circumvent regulations and limits on their operations.

    I’m interested in informed takes on this ruling. I don’t quite grasp its implications.

  224. @Seaxnēat
    Too busy to read all the comments to make sure this hasn't been brought up already....but....

    The purpose of this course is probably to offer a course that (a) meets a general education "science" requirement and (b) URM (underrepresented minority) students can reliably pass.

    I was a humanities major, but still had to take two science classes for my general education requirements. I originally signed up for physics because I enjoyed physics in high school. But before classes started, and older guy in my fraternity told me about the easy "athlete" science classes.

    There were two levels of these. Most were just easier versions of normal science classes that still met the general education requirements. For example, there may be a Chemistry 110 and a Chemistry 111. Usually, the school registrar would just fill up the easy one with athletes so normal students couldn't get in.

    Then there were the crazy-easy version of these science classes for the really dumb athletes. (Actually, they were probably decently smart, but much less smart than normal students. My alma mater is much higher ranked than Cornell). From what I could tell, there were only a few of these and they were small. They were all already filled up with athletes well before registration started. I decided to have a go at one of these. The online system wouldn't let me get on the waitlist, so I called the registrar and convinced them to let me on the waitlist.

    Three weeks into the semester I got a call from the registrar letting me know that I got off the waitlist and I could have a spot in the class if I wanted. And I had to let her know right then because it was the deadline to make changes to schedules. I did it.

    I went into the class the next week and the class was a mix of almost entirely black basketball and football players combined with some white students who were basically tutors for the basketball and football players. The class had by far the best social dynamics of any class I've ever taken. Lot's of socializing and talking before and after class. And, unsurprisingly, it was jokingly easy. They still taught us like a normal class -- but the tests were extremely easy. Obviously I got the easy A. And I made some friends, a few of whom I still hang out with. One of the guys in the class had a respectable NFL career.

    What I didn't realize until the last few weeks of the semester was that the Professor and the TAs all assumed that I was a tutor for the athletes in the class. So I was really self conscious those last few weeks that they would "discover" that I was just a normal student. Apparently for these crazy-easy versions of these science classes, there would normally never be normal students -- only athletes and tutors.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    At Yale around 1966, future NFL great Calvin Hill is leading his football teammates around on the first day of classes looking for easy onrd. He leads them into classroom and spots his DKE fraternity brother and says, “Hey, look, there’s George Bush. This course must be a piece of cake.”

  225. @Unladen Swallow
    @Muggles

    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek's demise?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Ralph L, @Muggles

    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek’s demise?

    Although my wife and I regularly watch the show (Tivoed) it is hard to pin an exact time for Wokeness.

    I would guess around late 2018 or in early 2019. Our local station is running some Trebek 2019 shows as well as into 2020, so it was definitely “on” then.

    Sometimes when I see the late Alex reading off Woke correct answers no one even tried to guess, I see a sadness in his eyes. After his demise it seems to have stayed roughly the same with respect to Wokeness. However the highest money winners are nearly always White males. Very few daily winners get past the third appearance unless they are extremely good.

    While most of the POC contestants are pretty bright, a few are just terrible. One poor recent subcon contestant stopped ringing in after the first round and crapped out w/ less than zero by the final question. Many of them on the other hand, are pretty bright.

    But far more pop culture questions about rappers and obscure POC actors/writers, etc than in the past. So reading People Magazine is more useful than any advanced degree. Watch a few shows and judge for yourself. Especially if you are a longtime fan.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Muggles

    Wokelism is downmarket. So is TV.

    , @Unladen Swallow
    @Muggles

    Maybe the last time I watched was four to five years ago, and it seemed largely the same as it was when I was in high school. I was a fan back then, but then I few years ago I heard about that professional gambling guy who was winning all the time and winning a lot of money per show, so I figured it hadn't changed too much. Regarding the POC contestants are they Indians like the person you described? or are NAM's ( Non-Asian minorities ) i.e. blacks and Hispanics? Just curious.

  226. @Steve Sailer
    @UNIT472

    BYU is a now rare example of a college that still isn't all that stratified by test scores. Lots of smart Mormons go to it, as do lots of non-smart Mormons. VMI and the Citadel are kind of similar.

    Replies: @Muggles

    BYU probably skims the cream off of the Mormon student pool, overwhelming white.

    Other than Pacific Islanders not many POC Mormons.

    They also probably skim the POC student pool and award scholarships, as they have been pretty sensitive about been seen as “too white.” Sad really. But the Angel Moroni is a tough sell in POC land.

    Since they start with a higher IQ general pool and resulting student body, it is helpful for producing decent graduates who have to work harder.

    The thing about smaller selective schools (like iSteve’s Rice U, and mine) is that students who were “smart” in high school are usually at best, average in highly selective places. So you work harder to get good grades and stay afloat. Also you learn than some higher IQ types are pretty screwed up and often in many ways, not as smart as they think they are.

    You learn this in smaller elite places. Humility. Not learned at “the Ivy’s” where being admitted lets you sit back and bask in your selected greatness. Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Muggles


    Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?
     
    The Chief of the Scandinavian Desk of Military Intelligence in 1945 wrote stuff like this (for Harvard Night at the Boston Pops) in his spare time:


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fQPLrVC8PTQ


    Not bad for a spook and a Harvard man. By the time he matriculated, he'd already had thirteen years of schooling on Washington Avenue. Nothing puts a degree into perspective like being a townie.
    , @bomag
    @Muggles


    Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?
     
    I suppose, by definition, we don't hear about them.
  227. Fox says:
    @Old Prude
    @Fox

    This is no different than the Dallas city counsellor complaining that Devil's Food Cake is black, and Angels Food Cake is white, except this has the imprimatur of the university.

    I was going to quip "Black Matter Matters", but I realized its called Dark Matter. Darn astrophysicists missed a chance at more systemic racisms.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @guest, @Fox

    Once one gives in to madness, there is no limit.
    There is no doubt that this idiocy movement is burning itself eventually out. This will be after a big catastrophe caused by it. Hopefully, it will harm the perpetrators and promoters, the profiteers and simple idiots who go along without any thought more, much more than those looking at this curious phenomenon of seeing people they had assumed to be rational, normal turn to mental mush.
    If the ‘woke’ want to commit the equivalent of suicide, it’s their decision, but they are also intending to drag the whole world down into their doomed fate.

  228. @anon
    @Desiderius

    When the conservatives abandoned the Liberal Arts everything went to shit.

    Reversing the arrow of causation in a combox does not make it true in the real world.


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/John_Dewey_in_1902.jpg

    https://cdn.studenti.stbm.it/images/2019/07/10/antonio-gramsci-orig.jpeg

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Quitters never win and winners never quit.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Desiderius

    When pride comes, then comes disgrace; but wisdom is with those who have humility. (Proverbs 11:2)

    Replies: @Desiderius

  229. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @Jack D

    Who were delivering they water to, given that the 40% of the city were poor Jews? Just how many gallons did those spoiled Christians of Warsaw use?

    I noticed a concerted effort to claim poverty for the Jews lately. Isn't it enough that the have monopolized the genocide? (Having invented the word in the process.) Can't you leave a tiny memories about suffering, for the other nations to have and to share?

    Replies: @Bigdicknick, @Cortes, @Jack D

    Probably 90%+ of the population (both Jewish and Christian) of prewar Poland (and Romania) had an income that would put them below the 2021 American “poverty line” ($26,500 for a household of 4), but poverty was a relative thing. It was like Dante’s hell, where there is not just one circle but a series of increasing deep layers of poverty. Down at the very deepest layer you had the homeless who begged in the street and slept in the study houses of synagogues. My father described a layer of poverty below his: people with not enough money to buy fuel to heat their hovels. In the winter their breath would condense on the walls, which would become glazed with ice as a result. Compared to them, my father’s family of fishermen was somewhat better off, at least “rich” enough to heat their home above the freezing point, but not so well off in the years following WWI that his father could afford to spare his children’s labor and send them to school. By the time his baby brother was of school age, they were “rich” enough that he was allowed to attend school (public education in prewar Poland lasted until the 4th grade).

    Water carriers lived in one of the deeper layers. They would have delivered the water to people who had no indoor plumbing (thus the need to have water delivered) but lived one or two circles up as tailors or shoemakers or people who sold vegetables in a market stall. This did not make them “rich”. Having water delivered was not a luxury but an essential that all but the very poorest “enjoyed” just as all but the most extreme poor in America now have indoor plumbing.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  230. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D

    It’s there to troll sperg NPCs who don’t fully realize it’s a satire of ‘bluecheck’ credentialism in social media bios (e.g., Dr. Jill Biden). Lefties and ConInc Twitter twits who stumble on Greer’s account invariably get mad about his ‘bragging’ and immediately question the numbers, especially the IQ figure: “That couldn’t be true!” So either you’re knowingly trolling us right now (unlikely), or he got you too. Your huffy mentions of “penis length” and “insecurity” are extremely common responses from online autists who encounter Greer’s bio for the first time.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

    I can proudly say that I didn’t get the “joke” because I know nothing about social media and care even less. Ditto for whoever this Greer is. Trolls are ugly creatures that live under a bridge AFAIK.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    I can proudly say that I didn’t get the “joke” because I know nothing about social media and care even less.
     
    Well, theoretically you should know about social media, particularly Twitter—it’s a major driver and real-time chronicle of the zeitgeist that we all (you included) at iSteve spend hours jabbering about. Being proud of your own ignorance is nothing to be proud of.

    Trolls are ugly creatures that live under a bridge AFAIK.
     
    “Troll” in this context is a verb meaning to bait and provoke: You took the bait and got trolled. Even if you had never heard of Twitter, if you had better-functioning ‘theory of mind’ you should have realized Greer was joking—and that even if you didn’t fully get the joke, known it was possibly aimed, positively and/or negatively, at some subgroup(s).

    “If you can’t spot the sucker, it’s you.”


    troll |trōl| verb [ no obj. ]

    1. fish by trailing a baited line along behind a boat:
    We trolled for mackerel.

    2. submit a deliberately provocative posting to an online message board with the aim of inciting an angry response
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Desiderius

  231. @Desiderius
    @anon

    Quitters never win and winners never quit.

    Replies: @anon

    When pride comes, then comes disgrace; but wisdom is with those who have humility. (Proverbs 11:2)

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @anon

    OK we’ve been humiliated by Dewey’s demented disciples for half a century. Now what?

  232. @Desiderius
    @Reg Cæsar

    No, it’s like Beattie’s schtick of over the top rank-pulling. It lampooning all the midwits who try to cover up their lack of insight/substance by alluding to professional jargon or credentials or implied IQ/test scores. Of course it’s frowned upon to be explicit about it, which is why they do it.

    You’ll be happy to learn that Beattie is Jewish, Jack, riding to the rescue of your tarnished collective honor, and not a moment too soon.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I’d be happy to learn who the hell Beattie is, given that I have no idea. Isn’t Beattie a Scottish name?

  233. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Dissident


    What’s wrong with the Ad below?
     

    all-around aesthetically pleasing as this set of six Ads
     
    • Pedo: Dissident

    Replies: @Dissident

    This again?

    Yet again, you respond to a benign posting of mine (and one that was not even directed at you, let alone amounted-to any kind of attack or provocation) by hurling a loaded epithet at me and linking to the libelous attack upon me that you posted back in March. That was the comment, for anyone who may have missed it, in which you referred-to what you characterized as my

    long-running oh-so-coy NAMBLA nonce musings and catamite portrait posts.

    Such a characterization, as I noted a month ago when you last linked to it, crosses the line from mere name-calling and anything else that could be dismissed as ultimately subjective, into accusations, at least strongly insinuated, of specific behaviors that entail grave crimes, both legal as well as moral.

    Hence, my advised use of the term libelous to describe your attack upon me– one that, yet again, you have completely failed to substantiate or even attempt to substantiate.

    [MORE]
    To-date, you have neither cited, as evidence of your incendiary, scurrilous characterizations, anything specific from my commenting history. Nor have you made even the faintest attempt at articulating any reasoned, substantive objection to or criticism of any of the images of boys, or sentiments, thoughts and views concerning boys that I have posted.

    One wonders why you apparently feel such a need, repeatedly, to lash-out at me in the abusive, anti-social, utterly pathetic fashion such as you have.

    I reiterate, once again, my confidence that no careful, fair review of the relevant parts of my commenting history, taken in their proper context, could reasonably be taken as supporting any of your assertions or insinuations. Quite the contrary, I would aver. It is my earnest, frank, candid writing in which I express some of my truest thoughts, concerns and sentiments, painstakingly considered in intricate, meticulous detail and nuance, that may be my greatest vindication. My work on this writing (and the thought processes behind it) are ongoing, arduous efforts-in-progress.

    To notice, acknowledge and celebrate the unique magic that is a boy? Who couldn’t? To desecrate, defile or otherwise in any way corrupt such a precious creature? Who could?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Dissident


    This again?
     
    Exactly my reaction to your post.

    Yet again, you respond to a benign posting of mine
     
    It’s not benign, and you know it. When I first called you out, that should have been enough for you to stop seeding this site with your pedophile musings.

    to lash-out at me in the abusive, anti-social
     
    You are being anti-social with your NAMBLA nonce posts. Read the room—this isn’t a place for that crap.

    It is my earnest, frank, candid writing in which I express some of my truest thoughts, concerns and sentiments, painstakingly considered in intricate, meticulous detail and nuance, that may be my greatest vindication.
     
    Your writing is banal, purple prose—overly wordy and self-indulgent tripe:

    Objectively, who else offers the particular perspective, viewpoint, style, and aesthetic that I, with said posts, bring? The meticulously considered, painstakingly qualified, comprehensive set of sensibilities, principles and ideals? Does anyone?
     
    Normally I would ignore such onanistic blabber (either you’re trolling or just an extreme narcissist), but your pedo content doesn’t belong here. And I will get more relentless in calling you out if you persist. Maybe you’re also a masochist and want to be publicly berated—I will oblige.

    My work on this writing (and the thought processes behind it) are ongoing, arduous efforts-in-progress.
     
    It’s a sissyphean waste of time. Your flowery writing style is (unintentional?) self-parody.

    To notice, acknowledge and celebrate the unique magic that is a boy?
     
    You can do that somewhere else—no one here cares.
  234. @Morton's toes
    @nokangaroos

    I thought some of the historians were going with Lavoisier was a crooked finance type when he wasn't doing his Chemistry hobby and that's why the revolutionaries killed him.

    Replies: @nokangaroos

    He moonlighted as a tax collector because science didn´t pay, yes;
    but they really put down his defense as mentioned.

  235. @Bubba
    @Mr. Anon

    Poor Johannes Kepler. Lived an incredibly tough life and yet made more contributions to astronomy in his short lifetime than an infinite google of woke, spoiled charlatans like Neil deGrasse Tyson.

    May his work will be salvaged after the coming Idiocracy.

    Replies: @nokangaroos

    Actually Kepler only meta-studied Tycho de Brahe´s tables (who really sacrificed himself on the altar of science) and was pragmatic:
    Astrology “from her whore´s wages” should “support the noble sister” 😉

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @nokangaroos

    Kepler proposed his three laws of planetary motion. As such, he was the first to truly make theoretical astronomy quantitative. That was pretty important.

    Kepler >> Brahe

  236. Anon[676] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    OT

    Russell Warne at his blog has a nice post today. He finished reading F jiveacing Reality. The post is not a review, although he says the book "does not state anything about these differences that is new to experts." The post is in response to the recent Twitter thread from the black Harvard statistics PhD candidate who seemed to want to belittle Murray. This guy is the, "2 + 2 =5" guy. Anyway, Warne, author of a Cambridge University Press statistics textbook and a psychometrician, debunks the Harvard guy's claim that IQ tests force men's and women's IQ mean values to be equal (and by implication that they could -- and might be -- fiddling with tests to create the black-white gap.

    Warne then goes on to describe something I'd never heard of: the Golden Rule Procedure. This was developed by ETS as a result of a lawsuit over an employment test they developed that had whites scoring higher than blacks on average. The experts at ETS tried to create the unicorn of standardized tests, the elusive test that blacks and whites obtain the same average score on. They did this by eliminating questions that seemed too be the hardest for blacks. They managed to narrow the gap. But in the process the test lost its predictive value. Subsequently there has been quite a lot of research on the Golden Rule Procedure (whose name derives from the defendant in the lawsuit, not the New Testament).

    Warne has 13 references for this single blog post.

    Replies: @Anon

    Professor Warne corrected his blog post today, retracting the claim that IQ test makers do not juice scores to attain sexual “equity.” Emil Kirkekgaard and another fellow dug up a lot of evidence that sex IQ scores are in fact normed to a single mean as much as possible.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/06/hiding-sex-differences-not-a-myth/

    The part of the post about the Golden Rule Procedure, whereby some tests are modified to make black-white scores closer, while at the same time making the scores more random in predictive value, was unchanged.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anon

    Thanks

  237. @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    BYU probably skims the cream off of the Mormon student pool, overwhelming white.

    Other than Pacific Islanders not many POC Mormons.

    They also probably skim the POC student pool and award scholarships, as they have been pretty sensitive about been seen as "too white." Sad really. But the Angel Moroni is a tough sell in POC land.

    Since they start with a higher IQ general pool and resulting student body, it is helpful for producing decent graduates who have to work harder.

    The thing about smaller selective schools (like iSteve's Rice U, and mine) is that students who were "smart" in high school are usually at best, average in highly selective places. So you work harder to get good grades and stay afloat. Also you learn than some higher IQ types are pretty screwed up and often in many ways, not as smart as they think they are.

    You learn this in smaller elite places. Humility. Not learned at "the Ivy's" where being admitted lets you sit back and bask in your selected greatness. Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bomag

    Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?

    The Chief of the Scandinavian Desk of Military Intelligence in 1945 wrote stuff like this (for Harvard Night at the Boston Pops) in his spare time:

    Not bad for a spook and a Harvard man. By the time he matriculated, he’d already had thirteen years of schooling on Washington Avenue. Nothing puts a degree into perspective like being a townie.

  238. @Tex
    @Dissident


    What’s wrong with the Ad below?
     
    Inconsistent capitalization. Chicago Manual of Style, please!

    Replies: @Dissident

    Inconsistent capitalization.

    Might you, perhaps, have overlooked what would appear to be the most obvious and conspicuous difference between the two respective scientists in-question?

    Can we be certain that the inconsistency was not deliberate? Can we be certain that Scientist is not, for a female*, what Black is for those who were previously merely African-American, and not that long ago, merely black?

    (*pardon the binary term…)

  239. @anon215
    Just think - courses such as these count toward actual credentials, which are then used to "prove" qualifications for jobs. And certain people will always be promoted over others for entry into these colleges with degrees in "Deconstructing Mesoamerican Pottery", which somehow qualify some people over others for jobs in the real world.

    If we could simply go back to civil service exams and the like, we could end this nonsense. But we can't because the "wrong" people will always come out on top.

    Replies: @photondancer

    Yep, that is indeed the issue. I’m finding it quite exasperating to see so many comments saying “Meh. This is just a dummy subject for dimwit blacks to pass and get their degree”. Is it really so harmless to be filling up dimwit heads with anti-white propaganda and then pushing them out into the world where they’ll get jobs of some influence, since they have that magic degree?

  240. @Anon
    @Anon

    Professor Warne corrected his blog post today, retracting the claim that IQ test makers do not juice scores to attain sexual "equity." Emil Kirkekgaard and another fellow dug up a lot of evidence that sex IQ scores are in fact normed to a single mean as much as possible.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/06/hiding-sex-differences-not-a-myth/

    The part of the post about the Golden Rule Procedure, whereby some tests are modified to make black-white scores closer, while at the same time making the scores more random in predictive value, was unchanged.

    Replies: @anon

    Thanks

  241. @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    This one is actually really neat, I saw it on 4chan's design forum and it took me a minute to figure it out. The glass is dumb and reminds of Bogdanov's Red Star, but say this is a demonstration model. The walls could be anything. The house, whatever you make it out of, is mostly empty container (holding furniture and paintings).
    The point is that brick column, which contains everything involving heat and water. Central easy plumbing system. It could be divided into quarters, containing an oven, a commode and sink, a fireplace, and a shower, leading up to a chimney and down to drainage. Since electricity wasn't mentioned, we could go one step further, say there is none, the goal was primitivism: there is a constant hearth, automatically a central wood fireplace, which becomes a stove or oven with the right accessories, and which heats the water functions it sits next to.
    So with limited resources you could build a perfectly good shelter, it could even be a tent if you're careful, and with this brick fire/water column it would be a near fully modern house.

    Replies: @photondancer

    I’ve stayed in a house like that. The ‘walls’ were heavy plastic rather than glass so they could be rolled up on balmy nights. It was in the bush so no privacy concerns. I found it very pleasant.

  242. @Jack D
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I can proudly say that I didn't get the "joke" because I know nothing about social media and care even less. Ditto for whoever this Greer is. Trolls are ugly creatures that live under a bridge AFAIK.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I can proudly say that I didn’t get the “joke” because I know nothing about social media and care even less.

    Well, theoretically you should know about social media, particularly Twitter—it’s a major driver and real-time chronicle of the zeitgeist that we all (you included) at iSteve spend hours jabbering about. Being proud of your own ignorance is nothing to be proud of.

    Trolls are ugly creatures that live under a bridge AFAIK.

    “Troll” in this context is a verb meaning to bait and provoke: You took the bait and got trolled. Even if you had never heard of Twitter, if you had better-functioning ‘theory of mind’ you should have realized Greer was joking—and that even if you didn’t fully get the joke, known it was possibly aimed, positively and/or negatively, at some subgroup(s).

    “If you can’t spot the sucker, it’s you.”

    troll |trōl| verb [ no obj. ]

    1. fish by trailing a baited line along behind a boat:
    We trolled for mackerel.

    2. submit a deliberately provocative posting to an online message board with the aim of inciting an angry response

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Jack,

    The main people trolling you are your elected representatives and the agencies they undersee. Friendly men troll each other to toughen ourselves up and prevent bad actors from so easily jerking us around.

    This is called hazing.

    , @Desiderius
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    BAP has been riding Rufo mercilessly for several days to toughen him up for this:

    https://twitter.com/NickFondacaro/status/1407879502152224769?s=20

    then gives him the retweet fist bump after he comes through like a champ then follows up with relentless body blows:

    https://twitter.com/realchrisrufo/status/1407881432366665739?s=20

    https://twitter.com/realchrisrufo/status/1408086645933436930?s=20

    When I rip into conservatives here it's in hopes you'll get off of your asses and do half the work Rufo's already done for your country and your people.

    Specifics are THE killer app.

  243. @Professional Slav
    @photondancer

    do you mind recommending some? thanks

    Replies: @photondancer

    Intellectual Impostures, also published as Fashionable Nonsense, by Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont

    The Sokal Hoax by Lingua Franca

    Higher Superstition by Paul Gross and Norman Levitt

    These are the ones I was thinking of but there were others. Absolutely nothing twerps such as Wright are saying is original. It’s all cribbed from 20 years ago. There are 2 differences:

    1) the anti-americanism of the earlier fad is now a generic anti-white and anti-democracy position
    2) it’s being driven by the young/students as much as by the older/academics

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @photondancer

    "Retardation increases as 1/time-left-to-end-of-empire"

    Replies: @photondancer

    , @James N. Kennett
    @photondancer

    Richard Dawkins' review of Intellectual Impostures is worth a read.

    https://physics.nyu.edu/sokal/dawkins.html

    Replies: @photondancer

  244. @nokangaroos
    @Bubba

    Actually Kepler only meta-studied Tycho de Brahe´s tables (who really sacrificed himself on the altar of science) and was pragmatic:
    Astrology "from her whore´s wages" should "support the noble sister" ;)

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Kepler proposed his three laws of planetary motion. As such, he was the first to truly make theoretical astronomy quantitative. That was pretty important.

    Kepler >> Brahe

    • Agree: PiltdownMan, Bubba
  245. @Dissident
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    This again?

    Yet again, you respond to a benign posting of mine (and one that was not even directed at you, let alone amounted-to any kind of attack or provocation) by hurling a loaded epithet at me and linking to the libelous attack upon me that you posted back in March. That was the comment, for anyone who may have missed it, in which you referred-to what you characterized as my


    long-running oh-so-coy NAMBLA nonce musings and catamite portrait posts.
     
    Such a characterization, as I noted a month ago when you last linked to it, crosses the line from mere name-calling and anything else that could be dismissed as ultimately subjective, into accusations, at least strongly insinuated, of specific behaviors that entail grave crimes, both legal as well as moral.

    Hence, my advised use of the term libelous to describe your attack upon me-- one that, yet again, you have completely failed to substantiate or even attempt to substantiate. To-date, you have neither cited, as evidence of your incendiary, scurrilous characterizations, anything specific from my commenting history. Nor have you made even the faintest attempt at articulating any reasoned, substantive objection to or criticism of any of the images of boys, or sentiments, thoughts and views concerning boys that I have posted.

    One wonders why you apparently feel such a need, repeatedly, to lash-out at me in the abusive, anti-social, utterly pathetic fashion such as you have.

    I reiterate, once again, my confidence that no careful, fair review of the relevant parts of my commenting history, taken in their proper context, could reasonably be taken as supporting any of your assertions or insinuations. Quite the contrary, I would aver. It is my earnest, frank, candid writing in which I express some of my truest thoughts, concerns and sentiments, painstakingly considered in intricate, meticulous detail and nuance, that may be my greatest vindication. My work on this writing (and the thought processes behind it) are ongoing, arduous efforts-in-progress.

    To notice, acknowledge and celebrate the unique magic that is a boy? Who couldn't? To desecrate, defile or otherwise in any way corrupt such a precious creature? Who could?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    This again?

    Exactly my reaction to your post.

    Yet again, you respond to a benign posting of mine

    It’s not benign, and you know it. When I first called you out, that should have been enough for you to stop seeding this site with your pedophile musings.

    to lash-out at me in the abusive, anti-social

    You are being anti-social with your NAMBLA nonce posts. Read the room—this isn’t a place for that crap.

    It is my earnest, frank, candid writing in which I express some of my truest thoughts, concerns and sentiments, painstakingly considered in intricate, meticulous detail and nuance, that may be my greatest vindication.

    Your writing is banal, purple prose—overly wordy and self-indulgent tripe:

    Objectively, who else offers the particular perspective, viewpoint, style, and aesthetic that I, with said posts, bring? The meticulously considered, painstakingly qualified, comprehensive set of sensibilities, principles and ideals? Does anyone?

    Normally I would ignore such onanistic blabber (either you’re trolling or just an extreme narcissist), but your pedo content doesn’t belong here. And I will get more relentless in calling you out if you persist. Maybe you’re also a masochist and want to be publicly berated—I will oblige.

    My work on this writing (and the thought processes behind it) are ongoing, arduous efforts-in-progress.

    It’s a sissyphean waste of time. Your flowery writing style is (unintentional?) self-parody.

    To notice, acknowledge and celebrate the unique magic that is a boy?

    You can do that somewhere else—no one here cares.

  246. @The real Buddy Stevenson
    @Jack D

    We all know that science has been corrupted because of political correctness. And you can’t criticize Einstein’s theories because of his ethnic background. But there are alternative theories. https://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2021/06/19/wal-thornhill-webb-space-telescope-fundamental-change-thunderbolts/

    Replies: @Jack D

    The “Electric Universe Theory” is not bad science, it’s not science at all in the sense of having any sort of foundation of experimental or mathematical support.

    There is no such thing as “Jewish physics”. There is only true physics and not true physics. Science is not like sports or politics or literature where your political views and ethnic sympathies have relevance as to whom and what you like. Once you introduce those into your thinking, you’re automatically not doing science anymore.

    • Thanks: photondancer
    • Replies: @The real Buddy Stevenson
    @Jack D

    It has mathematical support. I am amazed by how many smart people believe in time space fabric. It always seemed wonky to me. I don’t have anything against Einstein’s heritage. I think he’s been made into a god because he was a survivor. And to criticize his ideas makes people seem anti Semitic. So people don’t question his ideas. Questioning his ideas is akin to being an h-denier. Fabric was used with marbles as a visual aid to illustrate gravity to school kids in the 1800s. Einstein probably got his ideas from those types of demonstrations. Plasma physics is more interesting, simple and easy to understand. It doesn’t need all these weird side theories to bolster it. Why does everything else in the universe make sense except for the universe? I think the universe is probably understandable and based on real things—like everything else is. It’s not as magical as people want to believe, or as fantastic.

    The only reason I bring it up here is because I know the guys who read this site are contrarians and truth seekers. There are REAL mysteries of how the universe actually works and great minds are wasting their time with wild goose hunts. Hundreds of billions of dollars have been wasted trying to prove time space fabric theory. There are no pictures of black holes because holes do not exist. That image was not real.

  247. @Muggles
    @Unladen Swallow


    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek’s demise?
     
    Although my wife and I regularly watch the show (Tivoed) it is hard to pin an exact time for Wokeness.

    I would guess around late 2018 or in early 2019. Our local station is running some Trebek 2019 shows as well as into 2020, so it was definitely "on" then.

    Sometimes when I see the late Alex reading off Woke correct answers no one even tried to guess, I see a sadness in his eyes. After his demise it seems to have stayed roughly the same with respect to Wokeness. However the highest money winners are nearly always White males. Very few daily winners get past the third appearance unless they are extremely good.

    While most of the POC contestants are pretty bright, a few are just terrible. One poor recent subcon contestant stopped ringing in after the first round and crapped out w/ less than zero by the final question. Many of them on the other hand, are pretty bright.

    But far more pop culture questions about rappers and obscure POC actors/writers, etc than in the past. So reading People Magazine is more useful than any advanced degree. Watch a few shows and judge for yourself. Especially if you are a longtime fan.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Unladen Swallow

    Wokelism is downmarket. So is TV.

  248. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    I can proudly say that I didn’t get the “joke” because I know nothing about social media and care even less.
     
    Well, theoretically you should know about social media, particularly Twitter—it’s a major driver and real-time chronicle of the zeitgeist that we all (you included) at iSteve spend hours jabbering about. Being proud of your own ignorance is nothing to be proud of.

    Trolls are ugly creatures that live under a bridge AFAIK.
     
    “Troll” in this context is a verb meaning to bait and provoke: You took the bait and got trolled. Even if you had never heard of Twitter, if you had better-functioning ‘theory of mind’ you should have realized Greer was joking—and that even if you didn’t fully get the joke, known it was possibly aimed, positively and/or negatively, at some subgroup(s).

    “If you can’t spot the sucker, it’s you.”


    troll |trōl| verb [ no obj. ]

    1. fish by trailing a baited line along behind a boat:
    We trolled for mackerel.

    2. submit a deliberately provocative posting to an online message board with the aim of inciting an angry response
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Desiderius

    Jack,

    The main people trolling you are your elected representatives and the agencies they undersee. Friendly men troll each other to toughen ourselves up and prevent bad actors from so easily jerking us around.

    This is called hazing.

  249. @Muggles
    @Unladen Swallow


    When did Jeopardy go woke? Was it after Alex Trebek’s demise?
     
    Although my wife and I regularly watch the show (Tivoed) it is hard to pin an exact time for Wokeness.

    I would guess around late 2018 or in early 2019. Our local station is running some Trebek 2019 shows as well as into 2020, so it was definitely "on" then.

    Sometimes when I see the late Alex reading off Woke correct answers no one even tried to guess, I see a sadness in his eyes. After his demise it seems to have stayed roughly the same with respect to Wokeness. However the highest money winners are nearly always White males. Very few daily winners get past the third appearance unless they are extremely good.

    While most of the POC contestants are pretty bright, a few are just terrible. One poor recent subcon contestant stopped ringing in after the first round and crapped out w/ less than zero by the final question. Many of them on the other hand, are pretty bright.

    But far more pop culture questions about rappers and obscure POC actors/writers, etc than in the past. So reading People Magazine is more useful than any advanced degree. Watch a few shows and judge for yourself. Especially if you are a longtime fan.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Unladen Swallow

    Maybe the last time I watched was four to five years ago, and it seemed largely the same as it was when I was in high school. I was a fan back then, but then I few years ago I heard about that professional gambling guy who was winning all the time and winning a lot of money per show, so I figured it hadn’t changed too much. Regarding the POC contestants are they Indians like the person you described? or are NAM’s ( Non-Asian minorities ) i.e. blacks and Hispanics? Just curious.

  250. @anon
    @Desiderius

    When pride comes, then comes disgrace; but wisdom is with those who have humility. (Proverbs 11:2)

    Replies: @Desiderius

    OK we’ve been humiliated by Dewey’s demented disciples for half a century. Now what?

  251. @Mike Tre
    https://res.cloudinary.com/teepublic/image/private/s--x66YIWUV--/t_Preview/b_rgb:191919,c_limit,f_jpg,h_630,q_90,w_630/v1446218346/production/designs/177827_4.jpg

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Pat Kittle

    That’s a cheap shot.

    Though somewhat pompous, Neil deGrasse Tyson (AFAICT) is an intelligent likeable Black who concerns himself with matters far beyond BlacketyBlack.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Disagree: Bubba
  252. @Fox
    @Charon

    A madhouse is still a madhouse, even if approved by parliamentary vote or imperial edict. The system is right now moving from the momentum it had acquired before the insanity years. This momentum will run out when the money's no good anymore, the general appearance of our surroundings will be more like a junk yard. The universities will of course become a laughing stock. With "astrophysicists" who were apparently hired for their skin color and being concerned with BLM instead of the stars rationality won't go very far. Mathematics, according to the newest theorems of the mad ruling fringe representing white supremacy and anti-black reservations will be toppled from the throne where she reigned as Queen of Sciences. In essence, 2 + 2 = not 4.
    I don't think that the part necessary for the running of nuclear power plants, keeping airplanes safe in the sky will be retained in the current model of progress while all other rationality will be replaced by perverted psychobabble.
    I see a very big wreck ahead of us, and it will affect everybody.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    Lately I’ve been thinking about this more and more. I believe that our business and especially political leaders have concluded that there’s many years yet before the collapse comes. I agree with that.

    The cultural, physical, and political infrastructure created by white males is so strong and sturdy that, like a Roman ruin, it can be subverted and undermined for quite a while before it finally collapses.

    Obviously the dollar will be devalued along the way, but before its collapse we’ll have a one-party dictatorship in place. You might be amazed at one of those can accomplish.

    Rewriting history and crushing dissent are among their specialties. You may have noticed that this work is already underway.

    • Replies: @Fox
    @Hangnail Hans

    Thank you for your reply.
    One can't tell how long the madness will go on before the inevitable consequence of collapse will ensue. It's like getting into drugs and self-abuse, at first there is the high of the new and different, then comes the phase of becoming somewhat accustomed to the effects, the body still functions, a youthful brain will be able to compensate for parts becoming defunct, but the drug use goes on, the decline continues until the day when it's becoming harder to breathe and aches and deficiencies appear. And then, as the abuse goes on, the blood pressure rises, the breathing difficulties turn out to be caused by perhaps a lung tumor or emphysema, knees and eyes hurt, strength is starting to fail.
    How long this decline will drag on is uncertain, although I think that it won't be too long, since, unlike with an abused body, where the still sound parts can't ditch the diseased parts, in a nation, composed of communities that can exist without the whole, the sound communities will be able to separate themselves from the failing rest.

  253. @photondancer
    @Professional Slav

    Intellectual Impostures, also published as Fashionable Nonsense, by Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont

    The Sokal Hoax by Lingua Franca

    Higher Superstition by Paul Gross and Norman Levitt

    These are the ones I was thinking of but there were others. Absolutely nothing twerps such as Wright are saying is original. It's all cribbed from 20 years ago. There are 2 differences:

    1) the anti-americanism of the earlier fad is now a generic anti-white and anti-democracy position
    2) it's being driven by the young/students as much as by the older/academics

    Replies: @El Dato, @James N. Kennett

    “Retardation increases as 1/time-left-to-end-of-empire”

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @El Dato

    LOL. Is that yours? I like it.

  254. @El Dato
    @photondancer

    "Retardation increases as 1/time-left-to-end-of-empire"

    Replies: @photondancer

    LOL. Is that yours? I like it.

  255. Fox says:
    @Hangnail Hans
    @Fox

    Lately I've been thinking about this more and more. I believe that our business and especially political leaders have concluded that there's many years yet before the collapse comes. I agree with that.

    The cultural, physical, and political infrastructure created by white males is so strong and sturdy that, like a Roman ruin, it can be subverted and undermined for quite a while before it finally collapses.

    Obviously the dollar will be devalued along the way, but before its collapse we'll have a one-party dictatorship in place. You might be amazed at one of those can accomplish.

    Rewriting history and crushing dissent are among their specialties. You may have noticed that this work is already underway.

    Replies: @Fox

    Thank you for your reply.
    One can’t tell how long the madness will go on before the inevitable consequence of collapse will ensue. It’s like getting into drugs and self-abuse, at first there is the high of the new and different, then comes the phase of becoming somewhat accustomed to the effects, the body still functions, a youthful brain will be able to compensate for parts becoming defunct, but the drug use goes on, the decline continues until the day when it’s becoming harder to breathe and aches and deficiencies appear. And then, as the abuse goes on, the blood pressure rises, the breathing difficulties turn out to be caused by perhaps a lung tumor or emphysema, knees and eyes hurt, strength is starting to fail.
    How long this decline will drag on is uncertain, although I think that it won’t be too long, since, unlike with an abused body, where the still sound parts can’t ditch the diseased parts, in a nation, composed of communities that can exist without the whole, the sound communities will be able to separate themselves from the failing rest.

  256. @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer

    BYU probably skims the cream off of the Mormon student pool, overwhelming white.

    Other than Pacific Islanders not many POC Mormons.

    They also probably skim the POC student pool and award scholarships, as they have been pretty sensitive about been seen as "too white." Sad really. But the Angel Moroni is a tough sell in POC land.

    Since they start with a higher IQ general pool and resulting student body, it is helpful for producing decent graduates who have to work harder.

    The thing about smaller selective schools (like iSteve's Rice U, and mine) is that students who were "smart" in high school are usually at best, average in highly selective places. So you work harder to get good grades and stay afloat. Also you learn than some higher IQ types are pretty screwed up and often in many ways, not as smart as they think they are.

    You learn this in smaller elite places. Humility. Not learned at "the Ivy's" where being admitted lets you sit back and bask in your selected greatness. Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bomag

    Are there any humble Ivy League alumni?

    I suppose, by definition, we don’t hear about them.

    • LOL: Dissident
  257. @Prester John
    @EdwardM

    Most of the cream of the crop in the STEM fields don't set one foot into a classroom. They are there (CalTech, MIT, Harvard, Princeton etc) to do research. Nothing more or less. Their research assistants are their students.

    Replies: @EdwardM

    Of course. He was there from 1968-1996, so I am sure that he produced some research output. Probably not much for the last half of that time, but that would hardly be unusual for a senior professor.

  258. @Jack D
    @The real Buddy Stevenson

    The "Electric Universe Theory" is not bad science, it's not science at all in the sense of having any sort of foundation of experimental or mathematical support.

    There is no such thing as "Jewish physics". There is only true physics and not true physics. Science is not like sports or politics or literature where your political views and ethnic sympathies have relevance as to whom and what you like. Once you introduce those into your thinking, you're automatically not doing science anymore.

    Replies: @The real Buddy Stevenson

    It has mathematical support. I am amazed by how many smart people believe in time space fabric. It always seemed wonky to me. I don’t have anything against Einstein’s heritage. I think he’s been made into a god because he was a survivor. And to criticize his ideas makes people seem anti Semitic. So people don’t question his ideas. Questioning his ideas is akin to being an h-denier. Fabric was used with marbles as a visual aid to illustrate gravity to school kids in the 1800s. Einstein probably got his ideas from those types of demonstrations. Plasma physics is more interesting, simple and easy to understand. It doesn’t need all these weird side theories to bolster it. Why does everything else in the universe make sense except for the universe? I think the universe is probably understandable and based on real things—like everything else is. It’s not as magical as people want to believe, or as fantastic.

    The only reason I bring it up here is because I know the guys who read this site are contrarians and truth seekers. There are REAL mysteries of how the universe actually works and great minds are wasting their time with wild goose hunts. Hundreds of billions of dollars have been wasted trying to prove time space fabric theory. There are no pictures of black holes because holes do not exist. That image was not real.

  259. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    I can proudly say that I didn’t get the “joke” because I know nothing about social media and care even less.
     
    Well, theoretically you should know about social media, particularly Twitter—it’s a major driver and real-time chronicle of the zeitgeist that we all (you included) at iSteve spend hours jabbering about. Being proud of your own ignorance is nothing to be proud of.

    Trolls are ugly creatures that live under a bridge AFAIK.
     
    “Troll” in this context is a verb meaning to bait and provoke: You took the bait and got trolled. Even if you had never heard of Twitter, if you had better-functioning ‘theory of mind’ you should have realized Greer was joking—and that even if you didn’t fully get the joke, known it was possibly aimed, positively and/or negatively, at some subgroup(s).

    “If you can’t spot the sucker, it’s you.”


    troll |trōl| verb [ no obj. ]

    1. fish by trailing a baited line along behind a boat:
    We trolled for mackerel.

    2. submit a deliberately provocative posting to an online message board with the aim of inciting an angry response
     

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Desiderius

    BAP has been riding Rufo mercilessly for several days to toughen him up for this:

    then gives him the retweet fist bump after he comes through like a champ then follows up with relentless body blows:

    When I rip into conservatives here it’s in hopes you’ll get off of your asses and do half the work Rufo’s already done for your country and your people.

    Specifics are THE killer app.

  260. @photondancer
    @Professional Slav

    Intellectual Impostures, also published as Fashionable Nonsense, by Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont

    The Sokal Hoax by Lingua Franca

    Higher Superstition by Paul Gross and Norman Levitt

    These are the ones I was thinking of but there were others. Absolutely nothing twerps such as Wright are saying is original. It's all cribbed from 20 years ago. There are 2 differences:

    1) the anti-americanism of the earlier fad is now a generic anti-white and anti-democracy position
    2) it's being driven by the young/students as much as by the older/academics

    Replies: @El Dato, @James N. Kennett

    Richard Dawkins’ review of Intellectual Impostures is worth a read.

    https://physics.nyu.edu/sokal/dawkins.html

    • Replies: @photondancer
    @James N. Kennett

    Thanks, it's written with his usual lucidity. Two good points he raised:

    1. the fury over the Sokal Hoax showed that this isn't a game for these people (a point that should have raised more alarms than it did, and we are now reaping the crop of their sowing)

    2. these people are (still) in charge of appointments, research direction and budget allocation for university departments

    Brought back memories of when I was doing my philosophy degree. Deleuze and Guatari were definitely the 'in' philosophers. They're probably considered old hat now and all the kids are following someone equally vapid and incomprehensible.

  261. @James N. Kennett
    @photondancer

    Richard Dawkins' review of Intellectual Impostures is worth a read.

    https://physics.nyu.edu/sokal/dawkins.html

    Replies: @photondancer

    Thanks, it’s written with his usual lucidity. Two good points he raised:

    1. the fury over the Sokal Hoax showed that this isn’t a game for these people (a point that should have raised more alarms than it did, and we are now reaping the crop of their sowing)

    2. these people are (still) in charge of appointments, research direction and budget allocation for university departments

    Brought back memories of when I was doing my philosophy degree. Deleuze and Guatari were definitely the ‘in’ philosophers. They’re probably considered old hat now and all the kids are following someone equally vapid and incomprehensible.

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