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From CNN :

Atlanta Police officer who killed Rayshard Brooks charged with felony murder
By Eric Levenson and Christina Maxouris, CNN

Updated 5:40 PM ET, Wed June 17, 2020

(CNN) The Atlanta Police officer who shot and killed Rayshard Brooks at a Wendy’s parking lot last week was charged with felony murder

“Felony murder” is a charge that exists when you commit a felony other than murder that winds up killing somebody. E.g., you burn down your business to collect the fire insurance and a fireman dies fighting your blaze. From CriminalDefenseLawyer.com ,

Felony murder is a legal rule that expands the definition of murder. It applies when someone commits a certain kind of felony and someone else dies in the course of it. It doesn’t matter whether the death was intentional or accidental—the defendant is liable for it. The rule is usually limited to felonies that are inherently or foreseeably dangerous to human life, such as arson, rape, robbery, and burglary.

So … What’s the felony? Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

iSteve commenter ben tillman says:

It’s obviously NOT felony murder. The felony that turns the homicide into a murder can’t be the force that results in the killing. It’s just plain murder, or at least that’s the prosecutor’s theory.

iSteve commenter gongtao asks:

Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer.

Back to CNN:

, and the other officer on scene was charged with aggravated assault, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced Wednesday.

… After shooting Brooks, Rolfe said “I got him” and kicked him, and Brosnan then stood on Brooks’ shoulder, Howard said. The officers did not provide medical aid to Brooks for more than two minutes after he was shot, Howard said.

Their demeanor after the shooting “did not reflect any fear or danger of Mr. Brooks, but reflected other kinds of emotions,” Howard said.

Are their emotions after being attacked the felony? “Inappropriate Emotions in the First Degree”?

Brosnan has agreed to be a state’s witness, Howard said.

“I don’t remember a circumstance where we had an officer, particularly in a case this important, to step forward and say that they would cooperate with the state,” he said.

Three of the counts against Rolfe are for aggravated assault related to a bullet he fired that hit an occupied vehicle nearby in the Wendy’s lot. Brosnan’s three charges include two counts of violations of oath of office.

Rolfe was fired and Brosnan was placed on administrative duty in the wake of the shooting.

Arrest warrants have been issued for the two and they were asked to surrender by Thursday. With the felony murder charge, Rolfe could face the death penalty if convicted.

Meanwhile, here’s my new Taki’s Magazine column, “ The End of Gentrification ,” on what happened to murder rates the last two times white elites decided that cops were the Bad Guys and inner city black knuckleheads were the Good Guys.

 
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  1. I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    • Agree: Kronos, MBlanc46, AnotherDad
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Art Deco

    Why won't there be a massive march in his defense?

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

    , @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I bet we’re also gonna learn how much fireproofing has been incorporated into Atlanta’s infrastructure since Sherman.

    https://www.history.com/.image/t_share/MTU3ODc3NjU2NzUzMzUwMzY3/sherman-and-the-burning-of-atlanta.jpg

    Might be a good time to short Atlanta real estate.

    Replies: @moshe

    , @vhrm
    @Art Deco


    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.
     
    IANAL, but some of the recent cases against the cops are so ridiculous that i hope they go down on summary judgment. It would make me feel a bit better about rationality in the courts.

    Also i don't understand how these guys keep getting fired so fast. Don't police unions exist anymore? aren't there due process clauses in the contracts?

    Replies: @Lot, @Hibernian

    , @ben tillman
    @Art Deco


    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.
     
    I know the chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court from before he was a judge. I know nothing about what he has done with the Georgia Supreme Court. .

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @AnotherDad
    @Art Deco


    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.
     
    What we are really going to get is a test of the jury system. Specifically, whether it can work in this day and age. Whether a jury can function in the age of Antifa mau-mauing and official acquiesence?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  2. Will nobody riot for Rolfe?

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Cloudbuster

    No riots--a peaceful march. A MASSIVE peaceful march.

    Replies: @Very Nice Boy

    , @Cato
    @Cloudbuster


    Will nobody riot for Rolfe?
     
    No, but when he is acquited, expect an LA-1992 style riot.
  3. Wow. My God. What do we do?

    • Replies: @Red Pill Angel
    @JimDandy

    Exactly. I want to do something. This insanity must end now.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @Anonymous
    @JimDandy


    Wow. My God. What do we do?
     
    It’s a terrible situation. But first and foremost, we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible. They made this happen.

    Trust me, they did not have “good intentions“.

    Make them eat the pain.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Mike_from_SGV, @TomSchmidt

    , @Anonymous
    @JimDandy

    Nothing. There are ways to help a defendant in a criminal trial, but it's safe to say if anyone is considering them they wouldn't say anything about it on the internet. Maybe there will be a bitcoin link created?

    The people who should be doing something are our Republican politicians, but they prefer warmongering and tax cutting. I'll be writing in "drop table" in November.

    I remember an article Steve wrote justifying his refusals to comment on the latest Trump controversy. At that time, the Trump controversies were mostly Trump insulting the looks of some starlet, stuff an intelligent person should ignore. But now with stuff like the Bolton accusations, why isn't he saying anything? There's really no way to defend Trump. Either he did what Bolton accuses him of doing, or he hired a neocon traitor he was loudly warned against hiring.

    Replies: @Coemgen, @vhrm

  4. “Felony murder” is a no good doctrine in the first place, much like “the truth is no defense”. As a juror I wouldn’t convict anyone of it under any circumstances.

    The refusal to use it in cases like the FBI shooting Vicki Weaver further proves it is a whorish and malignant idea.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond


    “Felony murder” is a no good doctrine in the first place, much like “the truth is no defense”. As a juror I wouldn’t convict anyone of it under any circumstances.
     
    Never say never. It is a good doctrine to use against extremely malevolent felons like big-time drug dealers, for example. But yes, it should be used very sparingly. In all likelihood, there will be at least one out of twelve as sensible as you on the jury.

    Nowadays, White conservatives feel under attack by eli, whether they are consciously aware of it or not. Along with prepper and homesteading instincts, one of the predictable consequences of this is an antipathy for anything that involves any sort of discretion on the part of said elites. Of course, that's not really the solution, because it misidentified the problem.

    Replies: @vhrm

    , @Jack D
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond

    "The truth is no defense" is not, generally speaking, a part of American law while the felony murder rule is ancient (going back to at least the 12 century or "time immemorial" (i.e. before the law was written down).

    Felony murder relates to the concept that to be guilty of murder, you need both a dead person and you need "malice". Malice with no dead person might be attempted murder (or no crime at all if the malice was entirely in your head and you never left your arm chair) but it's not murder. A dead person without malice might be manslaughter but its not murder either. Dead person PLUS malice - murder.

    Malice is, roughly speaking, the evil state of mind which one has when one about to commit a serious crime. Say that you intend to shoot the lock off of a safe and the bullet ricochets off the lock and kills the bank officer instead. You have a dead person and you have "malice" and the malice of shooting the lock off is transferred to the killing so now you have all of the ingredients for murder, even though you did not intend to kill the bank officer. Your evil or malicious intent in shooting the lock off is transferred to the murder.

    Is this right or wrong? Generally speaking I think it is fair. If you start out intending to commit an evil, felonious deed and someone dies as a result, you should be responsible for his death - it was no "accident". Once you embark on the path of felony, whatever follows is on you. Don't want to be guilty of felony murder - don't commit any felonies.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Jane Plain, @Steve Sailer

  5. To be fair, the officer didn’t just kill the guy. He dissed him, too. The death penalty kinda makes sense if you think about it.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Daniel Williams

    I can understand the gunshot wound to the back -- it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.

    How are officers trained? My understanding is that they are put in "simulators" where they are shown videos of at first glance persons not an immediate threat who then turn to shoot the officer in the simulator, and then the officer is told he would have been shot in the absence of "responding to the threat."

    This should be offered as a court room defense, not just a "reasonable person" test but how police are trained to react, and react quickly to such situations. That Mr. Brooks was shot in the back is something that can be examined as to what posture was assumed at what moment in running away, turning to point a gun-like object at the officer and then turning to keep running. Are the police trained to say, "He pointed what appeared to be a gun and shoot it at me, but he turned again to run away, and that is a safe-harbor provision where suspect (of committing assault on the officers arresting him for drunk driving) can count on not being shot by the police?

    As to the disrespect charge, this is the first I ever heard of this -- has anyone seeing any of the videos seen such a thing. Is there any video imagery supporting this, given body cameras and bystanders and everything being recorded, or is this the recollection of eye witnesses and we know how that all "goes down."

    Replies: @jon, @Charon, @Adam Smith

    , @lysias
    @Daniel Williams

    Dissing somebody deserves the death penalty?

  6. @Art Deco
    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Kronos, @vhrm, @ben tillman, @AnotherDad

    Why won’t there be a massive march in his defense?

    • Replies: @Joseph Doaks
    @JimDandy

    Because white Americans are demoralized by 50 years of having the deck stacked against them.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Truth

  7. If you are a police officer forced to shoot a Black in self-defense, and that’s what the video shows, you get charged with murder. Police should start looking for other employment.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Thucydides

    Police should start looking to spend more time at the donut shop. And they will, my friend, they will.

    Every police officer indicted for "overzealous" policing means 10 more blacks (and maybe a couple of whites) murdered because the cops are not as interested in arresting felons.

    And it take a LOT of arrests under our system to get someone off the street permanently. Basim Henry, the getaway driver in the carjacking murder of young lawyer Justin Friedland, killed for his Range Rover, had, at the age of 36, been arrested seven times as a juvenile, fourteen times as an adult, convicted of unlawful possession of an assault firearm, and convicted of bank robbery and STILL he was free to walk the streets until he committed his final crime (not counting those he may commit in prison during his life plus 10 year sentence). Not only had he been given a 2nd chance, he had been given a 3rd and a 4th and a 21st (this is not counting all the times he committed crimes for which he was not caught - probably 10x as many). These are the black lives that are said to "matter". They do matter because for decades such predators have made our big cities unlivable and they will again given the chance. But to even mention the Basim Henry's of the world or attribute any agency to them is "racist" in today's environment.

    Replies: @black sea, @Anonymousse

    , @Jordi
    @Thucydides

    Police will focus on ticketing motorists, bullying middle class divorcees for « emotional abuse » and paperwork.

    No need for them to resign... or confront dindus.

  8. usNthem says:

    This is black run america at its finest. Any White cop working in a black run city, which by definition will be majority (or at the least large minority) black has no chance in the current environment. There’s absolutely no upside and unlimited downside to any confrontation with a jogger. White cops need to walk away from these places ASAP. As for Brosnan, he’s just trying to save his own ass from cannibal’s pot.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @usNthem

    Brosnan's attorney says he just truthfully told what happened, he didn't assault Brooks after he went down as a result of the shooting, and he didn't turn state's evidence against his partner. Of course what he should have done was take the fifth.

  9. anon[155] • Disclaimer says:

    Arrest warrants have been issued for the two and they were asked to surrender by Thursday. With the felony murder charge, Rolfe could face the death penalty if convicted.

    The next time there’s a drunk passed out in a fast food driveup line in Atlanta it may take quite a while for the po-lice to show up. Quite a while indeed. Especially for officers getting close to retirement.

    Can’t wait for social workers to take this task over. I’m sure a 22 year old girl with a degree in sociology from Spellman is much better suited to deal with such things. Much better suited. Need to wear bodycams, though, because we can’t rely on WorldStarHipHop for entertaining reports.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @anon

    OneFiveFive, in nearby Lockport, NY, in 2017 a young social worker was playing cards with three young men at the halfway where she worked . One of the men/teens had stolen $160 from a lock box at the residence. To cover his crime, he threw a blanket over the girl's head and then beat her to death with a table leg. Why? Because he was not in prison where he belonged and she could send him to jail. In Buffalo, Sister Karen Klimczak ran a halfway house for recently released felons. Sister discovered one burglarizing her room. He beat and strangled her to death. Little women against a felon with murderous intent stand no chance. Some people are not worthy to share our air.

    Replies: @Alden

  10. Death penalty? That’s just to feed the beasts. Ain’t happenin’.

    Even the Stacey Abrams crowd isn’t that stupid.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Prester John

    Perhaps, but life in prison for a white male cop who killed a black person will be much worse than death.

    , @Tono Bungay
    @Prester John

    It sometimes seems as if the prosecutors overcharge on purpose. Is it to appease the crowd or is it to make it easier for the defense at trial? The three other officers in the Floyd affair are each charged with crimes that could mean 40 years in prison. Does that make any sense at all? Some of them were in their first weeks of work. It's utterly implausible to expect a rookie to interfere with an experienced officer.

    Replies: @anon

  11. @Art Deco
    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Kronos, @vhrm, @ben tillman, @AnotherDad

    I bet we’re also gonna learn how much fireproofing has been incorporated into Atlanta’s infrastructure since Sherman.

    Might be a good time to short Atlanta real estate.

    • Replies: @moshe
    @Kronos

    It would be interesting to see a composite Zillow chart of real estate values by city to see whether any got more or less expensive over the past few weeks.

    I assume such a chart must exist somewhere.But where?

    Replies: @David

  12. vhrm says:
    @Art Deco
    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Kronos, @vhrm, @ben tillman, @AnotherDad

    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    IANAL, but some of the recent cases against the cops are so ridiculous that i hope they go down on summary judgment. It would make me feel a bit better about rationality in the courts.

    Also i don’t understand how these guys keep getting fired so fast. Don’t police unions exist anymore? aren’t there due process clauses in the contracts?

    • Replies: @Lot
    @vhrm

    “i hope they go down on summary judgment.”

    I think that term is only used in civil cases. In criminal cases it would be a motion for a directed verdict, or if it comes after a guilty jury verdict, a motion to set aside or motion for acquittal notwithstanding the verdict.

    I think your hope will be disappointed, at least in MSP and Atlanta, as such a judge would face a very good chance of being killed or burned out of his home.

    Replies: @vhrm

    , @Hibernian
    @vhrm

    We live in a new world.

    Replies: @Stan

  13. The higher the charges, the more likely it is the officer will be acquitted.

    Might as well charge him with orchestrating the holocaust while they’re at it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Spud Boy

    Wait until tomorrow.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Mr. Anon

    , @bomag
    @Spud Boy

    I'd guess these initial charges are to placate the mob; later proceedings will be for lighter consequences.

    Not a good look for the courts to be playing to the mob.

    , @RAZ
    @Spud Boy

    True that higher charges more likely to lead to acquittal.

    George Zimmerman was overcharged with 2nd degree murder because Sharpton et al demanded it. They probably would've gotten a conviction on a lesser charge. Speaking of which, he's managed to stay out of trouble for awhile. I figured it was just a matter of time till he effed up enough to get himself convicted for something if he stayed in the US and thought he'd be better going to his mom's native Peru. But after some drama I haven't heard about him for awhile.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @jon, @Art Deco

  14. Altai [AKA "Altai_2"] says:

    The English Premiere League returned today to play in empty stadiums. All the players and referees took a knee. The best part of the footage is the piped in crowd noise, there’s a metaphor there for something.

    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with ‘Black Lives Matter’. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level. But a man was killed in America.

    • Replies: @Change that Matters
    @Altai

    A lazy search determined $150* Premier League kits are manufactured in Bangladesh, where treasured BAMEs earn about $100/month* and are dying from Covid-19 due to ineffective social distancing measures and poor medical facilities.*

    This shows the Premier League hasn't learned an important lesson. There will always be another minority victim and an endless list of social justice complaints and demands.

    They are about to learn the path to wokedom is actually a treadmill.

    *Lazy researcher data.

    , @Agathoklis
    @Altai

    When Greek Cypriot APOEL fans make political statements about Turkish occupation and Greek patriotism they get sanctioned by UEFA.

    Replies: @Altai

    , @Pericles
    @Altai



    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with ‘Black Lives Matter’. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level.

     

    Good point.

    I had a look at the FIFA and UEFA websites, but they weren't very forthcoming with how the public could report such flagrant violations.

    Replies: @Altai

    , @Gordo
    @Altai

    Mercenaries, not one had the balls to say no.

    , @Dannyboy
    @Altai

    ANY white man who still watches/ supports professional or college sports is just a pussy cuck who should Fed Ex his nuts in a jar to the DNC and be done with it.

  15. A DWI case gone terribly wrong.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @trelane


    A DWI case gone terribly wrong.
     
    What do you mean?
  16. The current rumor on /pol/ is that most (if not all) of the Atlanta police department is walking off the job tonight, Robocop style.

    This evening, Atlanta may very well be the first fully depoliced major city in the U.S.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @allahu akbar

    Putin’s hackers will disrupt the police department communications systems.

    , @Charon
    @allahu akbar

    We won't learn until something like that is actually done. So far it's just talk.

    , @Lot
    @allahu akbar

    Confirmed by Erik Erikson, Atlanta talk radio host who says he talked with two different Atlanta PD cops, one high ranking.

    Inshallah PBUH habibi!

    Also, the KKK is loose and hanging noose in Oakland!

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/17/nooses-oakland-hate-crime-hanging-california

    The Guardian doesn’t even contemplate a tiny chance it is a hate hoax, rather it is “the latest in a spate of racist, anti-black related crimes.”

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    , @Anon
    @allahu akbar

    If this happens in Atlanta, it's going to be more ghetto blacks against middle-class blacks, than ghetto blacks against whites. Middle-class blacks live closer to the ghetto than whites do, and they own small businesses in the ghetto. They don't want to be burned out by their ghetto brethren, but that's what's going to happen.

    It will be the ultimate crabs-in-a-bucket act by ghetto blacks. "You think you're better than me? You think you want to escape the hood? I'll burn you out. Nobody escapes the jealousy of the hood."

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    , @Alden
    @allahu akbar

    I saw that too. That there are 6 zones and that all the Atlanta officers in 3 of the zones had walked out by 8pm east coast time.

    I hope it’s true. Atlanta has a lot of woods, bushes and open space. Maybe the arsonists will set a California style forest fire.

    I’m trying to watch Tucker Carlson. But there’s an AD every 3 minutes. That’s why I never watch TV

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @allahu akbar

    allahu, cooler heads will prevail. I am sure that this would be a violation of their contract which could nullify the compact and result in summary dismisals. And then you get the GBI, State Troopers and maybe the National Guard and no real policing. A real shit storm. And to your point, the Atlanta Police Chief basically walked off the job when she resigned.

  17. Lot says:

    On topic:

    I noticed on a census map that the suburban counties around Atlanta have the fastest growing black populations in America by several measures.

    For example:

    “ Gwinnett County is often cited as one of the counties in the US that has demographically changed the most rapidly. As recently as 1990, over 90% of Gwinnett County’s population was white. By 2007, the county was considered majority-minority.”

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Lot

    I noticed on a census map that the suburban counties around Atlanta have the fastest growing black populations in America by several measures.

    Serves them/us right. We/they have been voting for the cucks for 40 years now, demanding nothing in return.

    It's up to you people. 2020 is a watershed year. just say not to cucks. Destroy the cuck/Republican faction. The cucks are the problem. They are the greater enemy.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  18. @Cloudbuster
    Will nobody riot for Rolfe?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Cato

    No riots–a peaceful march. A MASSIVE peaceful march.

    • Replies: @Very Nice Boy
    @JimDandy

    Do I need to point out the naivety of this idea?

    Do you think any such march won't be met with thousands of bused in "anti-racists" who will, according to CNN, be there to confront the abhorrent racists who came to march?

    Do you imagine that the, quite likely, very ugly violence inflicted on the marchers by the "anti-racists" will be reported on at all fairly by any media organization?

    Replies: @JimDandy

  19. I predict a lot of current cops retiring or just quitting.

    I predict a lot of new cops like Mohammed Noor.

    • Replies: @OscarWildeLoveChild
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    Yep, those jobs will be filled, but with another demographic. Which, if the cities stay black, it may be for the best.

    , @ChrisZ
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    That's always been the idea. They're more pliant to arbitrary authority, with less allegiance to the country and people they're supposed to protect. We underestimate how much the religious and patriotic loyalties of ethnic White cops have restrained them from being mere shock troops of elites, as police are in other countries. Our soulless leaders are taking us in the latter direction.

  20. @Spud Boy
    The higher the charges, the more likely it is the officer will be acquitted.

    Might as well charge him with orchestrating the holocaust while they're at it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @bomag, @RAZ

    Wait until tomorrow.

    • LOL: Polynikes
    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Steve Sailer

    Any wise insights from Tom Wolfe’s “A Man in Full?”

    https://www.amazon.com/Man-Full-Tom-Wolfe/dp/0553381334

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Wait until tomorrow.
     
    We are told that these actions by the police are the result of institutional racism. Given that, shouldn't the entire Police Department and City government of Atlanta, and the Fulton County DAs office, be indicted for conspiracy to commit murder?

    Replies: @Hibernian

  21. We are learning that those scenes in “Birth of a Nation”, which depicted the operation of occupied state “governments” during Reconstruction were, contrary to the official ruling class narrative, quite accurate.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    There were New England Yankees and Southern scalawags who'd been Whigs before the war in the mix then. Not sure who the equivalents are now, but I'm afraid there aren't any anymore, or they're very week.

    , @captflee
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    The carnival of corruption that attended the Grand Army of the Republic at its every stop and in its aftermath must have been truly something to behold. Despite a century and a half of assiduous efforts by those most diligent of camp followers, the "historians" (only card carrying Marxists or Strauss & Jaffa acolytes need apply), to put an utterly unwarranted gloss on that dubious and sleazy Marxoid enterprise, the stench is still easily discernible.

    From time to time I grow weary and fail to remember that one cannot really expect from that august organisation, the Grand Old Party, much in the way of help, founded as it was as a regional party, in the main dedicated to the conquest and looting (whether by ballot or by bayonet) of other sections of the Union, sending forth their blue uniformed minions to settle accounts with anyone not along for the grift. They've got their priorities, ya see.

    , @Alden
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I’ve been listening to confederate civil war songs today. My favorite is I’m a good ol rebel. Love it I hate this yankee Nation I won’t be re constructed are my motto.

    Replies: @Veracitor

  22. Lot says:
    @vhrm
    @Art Deco


    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.
     
    IANAL, but some of the recent cases against the cops are so ridiculous that i hope they go down on summary judgment. It would make me feel a bit better about rationality in the courts.

    Also i don't understand how these guys keep getting fired so fast. Don't police unions exist anymore? aren't there due process clauses in the contracts?

    Replies: @Lot, @Hibernian

    “i hope they go down on summary judgment.”

    I think that term is only used in civil cases. In criminal cases it would be a motion for a directed verdict, or if it comes after a guilty jury verdict, a motion to set aside or motion for acquittal notwithstanding the verdict.

    I think your hope will be disappointed, at least in MSP and Atlanta, as such a judge would face a very good chance of being killed or burned out of his home.

    • Thanks: vhrm
    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Lot

    "directed verdict" is what i was thinking of (though i don't remember knowing the term).

    Specifically the kind where the the judge makes it at the end of the prosecution's case because no sensible jury could ever convict based on the evidence presented.

    (and yeah, i know they're exceedingly rare;)

    Replies: @Polynikes

  23. If I were a cop, I would immediately do two things.
    1. Start looking for a new job. And in the meantime,
    2. Stop doing my job. Don’t go looking for suspects. Any trouble arresting someone? Subject escaped. End of story.
    Once criminals realize this (and it won’t take long) crime rates will soar.

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities. In previous eras, despite crime and filth, business required centralized offices to get business done. That preserved enough of a tax base to keep cities from collapsing. But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime…

    • Agree: SafeNow, Goatweed
    • Replies: @trelane
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Cities are population sinks, maintaining their population only through immigration and not natural increase. Cities thus become slums.

    For human civilization to survive this problem must be solved: how to keep our cities from becoming slums.

    Replies: @Wyatt

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Excellent analysis, NJTC.

    , @Intelligent Dasein
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime…
     
    This is absolute nonsense. How the hell do you think society will maintain the infrastructure necessary to allow people to work remotely if they can't even defend a building sitting on a piece of real property?

    "Remote work" is a hothouse flower that will not survive any serious difficulty. The end result of this period of unrest will be that any meaningful activity that must be carried on is going to become much more centralized and defended, not less.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @usNthem

    , @Anonymous
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities.
     
    Yep. Big cities have been on politically supplied life support since the 1960s, by which time they'd lost their economic base to containerization, cheaper transport (Interstate in the US), better communications. Cities have been economically obsolete for about 60 years.

    And this year they visibly break up.

    Election of POTUS Trump was a sign that city political support was below critical level. This year, cities and city dominated states can't make budget. The CHAS / Riot business was a distraction for city populations, "You might not have a home and money or even food, but we're staging a revolution to change all that".
    Claims of revolution succeeded in raising support for urban funding in the 1960s, but apparently not this time. Antifa has been rejected as "revolutionary leadership". The effective end of policing in Atlanta means that few or none of the trucking companies will be bringing in supplies. Their drivers and their insurance companies won't risk going to non-policed ares. Already inadequate tax revenues will be down considerably; same with real-estate values, and POTUS Trump won't make up the shortfall. Patronage jobs vanish; subsidies to political workers vanish; basic infrastructure/services degrade even more, start to fail. And on and on and _on_, as is typical of cascade failures when feedback in a complex system fails.

    Again, remember that this is a major change, and it's probably worldwide. In the midst of an inadvertent bioweapon release, which appears to have been the proximate cause of the major change for cities.
    Don't get hit by splatter. Willie and Joe cartoon, WW II, comment on the attempted revolution in Germany: "Get down so they don't hit you with a wild shot."
    , @Skyler_the_Weird
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Thanks to Corona Chan Big Business has found its Remote Employees function quite well and are now looking offshore to replace them with new employees willing to work remotely for half the Salary and no benefits.

    , @obwandiyag
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    They already don't do their job, mook. What do you think this is, Adam Twelve?

    You watch too much TV if you think cops do anything more than eat donuts, give innocent people outrageous tickets, and then shoot people rather than having to deal with them.

    Replies: @Prof. Woland

  24. Criminals are going to start resisting arrest. This will be one of the outcomes of the Black Lives Matter movement.

    • Agree: Cloudbuster
  25. @Steve Sailer
    @Spud Boy

    Wait until tomorrow.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Mr. Anon

    Any wise insights from Tom Wolfe’s “A Man in Full?”

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Kronos

    Not for this kind of case. Good book, though.

    Replies: @Kronos

  26. @JimDandy
    Wow. My God. What do we do?

    Replies: @Red Pill Angel, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Exactly. I want to do something. This insanity must end now.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Red Pill Angel

    I assume there's a chance Trump will address this to work up his rally crowds. But why aren't there ever marches for sanity?

    Replies: @Barnard, @The Anti-Gnostic

  27. @allahu akbar
    The current rumor on /pol/ is that most (if not all) of the Atlanta police department is walking off the job tonight, Robocop style.

    This evening, Atlanta may very well be the first fully depoliced major city in the U.S.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Charon, @Lot, @Anon, @Alden, @Buffalo Joe

    Putin’s hackers will disrupt the police department communications systems.

  28. Can you say “Right Wing Paramilitary?”

    Cops are going to be flowing into those so fast it won’t even be funny.

    This is going to get interesting much sooner than anybody realizes.

    • LOL: Anonymous (n)
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    , @Clifford Brown
    @theMann

    The United States is not yet Ulster or South America. Cops generally do their jobs because they pay well. Most police officers are not particularly ideological and virtually none have strong ethnic or clannish identities that inspire right wing paramilitary reaction. American cops may have authoritarian personalities according to the Frankfort School, but they are not political radicals nor do they have they have the tribal identity that is needed to rebel against the State.

    At this point, Americans, especially cops, are still far too comfortable.

    Cops could quit en masse and join private security forces for the rich in elite cities under the auspices of Blackwater or Academi as it calls itself this week. This Brazilification of urban law enforcement is far more likely than the rise of an Ulster Volunteer Force in Manhattan.

    , @Kratoklastes
    @theMann

    Right-wing paramilitaries would do well to screen for pigs wanting to join, and to blackball the fuck out of them - because cops are cowards first and foremost. They have the same psychotype as snitches.

    If any group I encounter contains a cop who claims he's a fellow-traveller, I try to get him booted - and then try to identify his undercover mate (e.g., Mark Kennedy).

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

  29. If this cop was harsh, well it was to encourage the others.

    (A large percentage of criminals are now going to start resisting arrest).

  30. The best lack all conviction, while the worst
    Are full of passionate intensity.

    Again.

    And again.

    And again.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
  31. Dr. X says:

    what happened to murder rates the last two times white elites decided that cops were the Bad Guys and inner city black knuckleheads were the Good Guys.

    Cops can be bad guys. Probably a minority of them, but still too many, and thugs and goons. That being said, for some reason people don’t get outraged and start riots over the really egregious examples, like the Daniel Shaver shooting.

    The black in Ferguson who attacked the cop, the black in Atlanta who stole the taser, and even Rodney King are not exactly textbook cases of police brutality. The George Floyd case was, but the cops got charged.

    And it’s incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @Daniel Williams
    @Dr. X


    And it’s incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:
     
    Because whites are generally sensible enough to know that in a nation of hundreds of millions of people, shit happens.

    A handful of sensational cases (and accompanying videos) are not evidence of a trend, they’re just statistical blips in a nation where millions of police encounters take place a day. They don’t reflect the norms of police or policing, and most adult white people know this.

    But just like Africans in Africa believe that every illness is the result of ill intent, so then every black death—including the recent spate of suicides we’re being asked to demand “justice” for—can only be explained by racism on the part of hostile whites. If a cop kills a black, he was motivated by racism. There really can be no other explanation.

    , @Anon
    @Dr. X

    That sheriff’s deputy had a history of being abusive and in 2018 finally went to jail for 4 months for a felony.


    https://dailygazette.com/article/2018/06/15/former-deputy-gets-jail-time-on-weapons-charge

    https://dailygazette.com/sites/default/files/styles/article_image/public/312glans1_0.jpg
    Former Saratoga County Sheriff's Sgt. Shawn Glans (wearing a U.S. Marines polo)

     

    I think we need to re-examine the common practice of law enforcement agencies preferring to hire former military. While we all want tough policing against the criminals, the militarization of law enforcement has had a larger negative impact on the law-abiding citizenry.
    , @ATBOTL
    @Dr. X

    Because most white people will side with police against an innocent white civilian every time. That is part of the cuck psychology of the American white man. If a pig shot a white baby sleeping in a stroller for no reason and then set the baby on fire before throwing the baby over Niagara falls, most white Americans would blame the white baby and say the pig was justified. Until that changes, there is no chance of any kind of white resistance. We have to push back against the pro-police, "blue lives matter" nonsense.

    Worship of the police is a uniquely white American value and one of the many reasons modern white American culture doesn't deserve to survive. We can't do anything without changing our culture first. That is the battle.

    Replies: @Aeronerauk, @bruce county, @William Badwhite

    , @David In TN
    @Dr. X

    "And it's incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:"

    What do you expect with the MSM, politicians, and especially Conservatism Inc. peddling the BLM lies?"

  32. @Altai
    The English Premiere League returned today to play in empty stadiums. All the players and referees took a knee. The best part of the footage is the piped in crowd noise, there's a metaphor there for something.

    https://twitter.com/SkySportsPL/status/1273301775844626443

    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with 'Black Lives Matter'. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level. But a man was killed in America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Eau27NHWsAMHVV8.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EavmK-pX0AIwRVN.jpg

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @Agathoklis, @Pericles, @Gordo, @Dannyboy

    A lazy search determined $150* Premier League kits are manufactured in Bangladesh, where treasured BAMEs earn about $100/month* and are dying from Covid-19 due to ineffective social distancing measures and poor medical facilities.*

    This shows the Premier League hasn’t learned an important lesson. There will always be another minority victim and an endless list of social justice complaints and demands.

    They are about to learn the path to wokedom is actually a treadmill.

    *Lazy researcher data.

  33. White cops will have to call for Blackup every they confront poc perps.

    Like a squad of black cops can be at the ready to handle their fellow blacks.

    • Replies: @Anonymous (n)
    @Koffeefutures

    I don't think we're very far away from a point where "the culture" celebrates all violence committed by blacks against whites as great, laudable instances of social justice and karmic payback while any white who dares resist being violated by a Black King or Queen (TM) is publicly and legally destroyed as an offender worse than a pedophile or rapist.

    Whether the reaction to the Floyd non event was engineered by TPTB or was in fact a spontaneous product of the current demographic and societal zeitgeist doesn't even matter. What it has shown is that we are now in a world where objective reality is no longer even a tenuous lifeline for whites. Some black guy can keel over and die of a heart attack in his own bedroom tomorrow and a savvy provocateur with media backing can create a wave of nationwide outrage over it to stir anti-white hatred at this stage. Anyone who would dare point out that there wasn't a white within a mile of the black when he died would be immediately silenced and then utterly destroyed. The hysteria is such that whites can now be forced to kneel before blacks like slaves before masters and resistance to kneeling is punished by public disgrace and career death in the best case, or immediate physical assault in the worst case. If a white resists the physical assault, he is arrested and charged while those who assaulted him are brought on as witnesses to the crime of lese majeste.

    Today, you must literally kneel in front of a photo of a dead black thug and offer assurances of obeisance in order to avoid destruction if the Eye of Sauron deigns to focus its gaze upon you and demands it. A few more years and cycles of this insanity, and it is very easy to envision that whites will be entirely barred from serving in law enforcement capacities and objecting to this will be as suicidal as publicly questioning the death of saint floyd is today. When the police patrolling your neighborhood looks like the crips and your local Soros funded DA has been fully unleashed the real fun begins.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Koffeefutures

    Inner city units should all be k9 units. Resisting would go down considerably.

    Replies: @bruce county

  34. @Kronos
    @Art Deco

    I bet we’re also gonna learn how much fireproofing has been incorporated into Atlanta’s infrastructure since Sherman.

    https://www.history.com/.image/t_share/MTU3ODc3NjU2NzUzMzUwMzY3/sherman-and-the-burning-of-atlanta.jpg

    Might be a good time to short Atlanta real estate.

    Replies: @moshe

    It would be interesting to see a composite Zillow chart of real estate values by city to see whether any got more or less expensive over the past few weeks.

    I assume such a chart must exist somewhere.But where?

    • Replies: @David
    @moshe

    You got me wondering. Here's a Zillow site where you can download what your asking for. I suggest the Raw median list price report for metro regions. It's through May. June should start to tell us something.

    https://www.zillow.com/research/data/

  35. Future life of jurors who vote to acquit

  36. It looks like any hope for a pardon here would have to go to the state board. Any attorneys know enough Georgia law to know if Governor Kemp could have any role here?

  37. Rosie says:
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond
    "Felony murder" is a no good doctrine in the first place, much like "the truth is no defense". As a juror I wouldn't convict anyone of it under any circumstances.

    The refusal to use it in cases like the FBI shooting Vicki Weaver further proves it is a whorish and malignant idea.

    Replies: @Rosie, @Jack D

    “Felony murder” is a no good doctrine in the first place, much like “the truth is no defense”. As a juror I wouldn’t convict anyone of it under any circumstances.

    Never say never. It is a good doctrine to use against extremely malevolent felons like big-time drug dealers, for example. But yes, it should be used very sparingly. In all likelihood, there will be at least one out of twelve as sensible as you on the jury.

    Nowadays, White conservatives feel under attack by eli, whether they are consciously aware of it or not. Along with prepper and homesteading instincts, one of the predictable consequences of this is an antipathy for anything that involves any sort of discretion on the part of said elites. Of course, that’s not really the solution, because it misidentified the problem.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Rosie

    Felony murder rule is total crap, imo. Most of the time i hear about it it's being used against some dumb kid sitting in the back of a car when the driver's friend shoots someone in a convenience store robbery.
    (or something similar).

    even as generally a law and order guy i can't stand American prosecutors and their charging ways (at least what makes the news)

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @James B. Shearer

  38. Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    • Replies: @anon
    @George

    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    Allegedly he blew 0.108 which is over the limit of 0.08.

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    We've been over this. There's precedent and USSC decisions that extended "DUI" to parked vehicles on the side of a public road, and "public road" includes shopping mall parking lots & so forth. Much of this dates back to the 1980's when Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) was very influential in state legislatures as well as in the Congress and the Reagan administration. It's all old news and settled law that nobody is going to challenge in any court.

    Suggest you view the bodycam vid. The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Polynikes, @Jim Don Bob, @Truth

    , @kaganovitch
    @George

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    Yup, sleeping it off is the first step in turning your life around.

    , @Peripatetic Commenter
    @George


    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.
     
    It doesn't matter. To get there he must have driven while intoxicated and he did blow 0.102 or something like that, so he was likely even further over the limit when he drove the vehicle to the Wendy's drive through so he could go jogging.
    , @Alden
    @George

    I think a person drunk alone in a parked car can be arrested on the grounds that if left in the car he might start driving again under the influence.

  39. @Prester John
    Death penalty? That's just to feed the beasts. Ain't happenin'.

    Even the Stacey Abrams crowd isn't that stupid.

    Replies: @Charon, @Tono Bungay

    Perhaps, but life in prison for a white male cop who killed a black person will be much worse than death.

  40. @Daniel Williams
    To be fair, the officer didn’t just kill the guy. He dissed him, too. The death penalty kinda makes sense if you think about it.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @lysias

    I can understand the gunshot wound to the back — it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.

    How are officers trained? My understanding is that they are put in “simulators” where they are shown videos of at first glance persons not an immediate threat who then turn to shoot the officer in the simulator, and then the officer is told he would have been shot in the absence of “responding to the threat.”

    This should be offered as a court room defense, not just a “reasonable person” test but how police are trained to react, and react quickly to such situations. That Mr. Brooks was shot in the back is something that can be examined as to what posture was assumed at what moment in running away, turning to point a gun-like object at the officer and then turning to keep running. Are the police trained to say, “He pointed what appeared to be a gun and shoot it at me, but he turned again to run away, and that is a safe-harbor provision where suspect (of committing assault on the officers arresting him for drunk driving) can count on not being shot by the police?

    As to the disrespect charge, this is the first I ever heard of this — has anyone seeing any of the videos seen such a thing. Is there any video imagery supporting this, given body cameras and bystanders and everything being recorded, or is this the recollection of eye witnesses and we know how that all “goes down.”

    • Replies: @jon
    @Inquiring Mind


    it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him

     

    Don't rely on what has been said, just watch the video yourself. This is a short news clip from a local Atlanta station that has the Wendy's security cam footage:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCvca3Qo664
    You can clearly see that while running away, he turns toward the officer, fires the taser, and then gets shot almost immediately after.
    , @Charon
    @Inquiring Mind

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn't look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    That said, isn't it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court's jurisdiction.

    Replies: @bruce county, @jon, @James B. Shearer, @Charlotte, @Mr. Anon

    , @Adam Smith
    @Inquiring Mind


    it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.
     
    Here is the full video. The action starts about 28 minutes in...

    https://youtu.be/a-FVrZio2-8

    Brooks was indeed running away.

    Rolfe was not in any danger as tasers are non-lethal especially once discharged.

    Let Brooks run. No need to shoot him in the back while he is fleeing for his life.

    Not sure anyone can be charged with disrespect but it seems to me that 25 minutes of playing simon says is harassment. Brooks blew a .108 on the breathalyzer.

    Replies: @vinteuil

  41. @allahu akbar
    The current rumor on /pol/ is that most (if not all) of the Atlanta police department is walking off the job tonight, Robocop style.

    This evening, Atlanta may very well be the first fully depoliced major city in the U.S.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Charon, @Lot, @Anon, @Alden, @Buffalo Joe

    We won’t learn until something like that is actually done. So far it’s just talk.

  42. @Kronos
    @Steve Sailer

    Any wise insights from Tom Wolfe’s “A Man in Full?”

    https://www.amazon.com/Man-Full-Tom-Wolfe/dp/0553381334

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    Not for this kind of case. Good book, though.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Redneck farmer

    True, the legal background is different. White cop shoots armed black dude compared to black athlete allegedly rapes daughter of wealthy white Atlanta figure. But the racial dimensions and potential for explosive violence is still there. Blacks will likely do more than shake their collective booties at a fancy drivers club.

    https://youtu.be/-vKdpQRS3RI

    (Honestly, I only got halfway so no spoilers. There was a new Warhammer 40,000 book that got me sidetracked but I’ll finish “A Man in Full” sometime in the future. Don’t give me any crap for switching from gold to trash.)

    Strangely enough, Trump very much resembles a New York version of Charles Croker. Or, Captain Charlie resembles a Atlanta version of Trump (minus the football and generation background.) Both demonstrate great showmanship and are confident at navigating either high society or working class gatherings.

    (Just don’t call your potential Jewish customers “Heeb” by accident or even show clients how horses are bred.)

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

  43. vhrm says:
    @Lot
    @vhrm

    “i hope they go down on summary judgment.”

    I think that term is only used in civil cases. In criminal cases it would be a motion for a directed verdict, or if it comes after a guilty jury verdict, a motion to set aside or motion for acquittal notwithstanding the verdict.

    I think your hope will be disappointed, at least in MSP and Atlanta, as such a judge would face a very good chance of being killed or burned out of his home.

    Replies: @vhrm

    “directed verdict” is what i was thinking of (though i don’t remember knowing the term).

    Specifically the kind where the the judge makes it at the end of the prosecution’s case because no sensible jury could ever convict based on the evidence presented.

    (and yeah, i know they’re exceedingly rare;)

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @vhrm

    They are rare, but this case would be a good example of when they can be used. Unless there is more than the video and photo evidence circulating the internet, this is an insane case. Defense attorneys would kill (poor pun alert) for this case.


    I’m not shocked by much. The worst predictions of places like this blog have slowly been coming true. But this is stunning. This case would be tough for an internal review of administrative discipline for excessive force. Murder??? Atlanta has lost its f’n mind!

  44. Precious says:

    So … What’s the felony? Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    The prosecutor is a moron. Oh, no wait, now that I see his picture, I see he isn’t a moron, he is just taking the opportunity to settle some scores.

    Three of the counts against Rolfe are for aggravated assault related to a bullet he fired that hit an occupied vehicle nearby in the Wendy’s lot.

    I was wondering where the third bullet ended up.

    Brosnan’s three charges include two counts of violations of oath of office.

    That’s…even more stupid than the felony murder charge.

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Precious

    Well, he is actually a moron as well...

    , @ben tillman
    @Precious



    Brosnan’s three charges include two counts of violations of oath of office.
     
    That’s…even more stupid than the felony murder charge.
     
    Where do you get the idea that there is a felony murder charge? Surely that's just an idiot reporter misusing/misunderstanding legal terms.

    Replies: @Jack D

  45. @theMann
    Can you say "Right Wing Paramilitary?"

    Cops are going to be flowing into those so fast it won't even be funny.

    This is going to get interesting much sooner than anybody realizes.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Clifford Brown, @Kratoklastes

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    • Agree: Daniel H
    • LOL: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Steve Sailer

    Given the fiscal situation of many cities and states, those generous benefits are probably tenuous at best - maybe not just yet, but soon. Furthermore, if you’re fired or worse, those benes are most likely toast anyway.

    , @theMann
    @Steve Sailer

    Do pensions get paid when the local and State tax bases collapse? Do your medical and dental "benefits" mean anything when the people providing those services are systematically going out of business?

    The police have been systematically set up to take the fall for the actions of stupendously corrupt and dishonest Politicians and they know it. They aren't somewhat unhappy, they are enraged.

    And btw, you can be an active duty policeman and still join a semi-secret organization. Especially if you start with the IRA as a model.

    Replies: @sayless

    , @Alden
    @Steve Sailer

    Right wing para military squads consist of FBI informants ATF informants DOJ Civil Rights division informants ADL AJC $PLC antifa informants and provocateurs and other White hating liberals and government workers funded by the Ford Foundation

    , @Steve Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    Depends on how successful they are.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?
     
    They do if they have Henry Winkler on board:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFYlpTEdyDM&t=50m05s

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @captflee
    @Steve Sailer

    My only experience with death squad personnel was in the lobby of my apartment building in Rio, on Avenida Atlantica down by Arpoador, where Copacabana ends and Ipanema begins. Whiling away some time before strolling up to Mariu's for some dinner, I was inflicting my muito mal Portugues on the two doormen, when I noted a rather dapper older gent, sporting some very nice Harris tweed and a particularly flamboyant ascot, mounting the stairs on the Rua Vinicius de Moraes side, inbound. The effect on the doormen was instantaneous and profound. Out came the shotguns,and our heretofore casual doormen snapped into a quite serviceable position of attention and commenced a decent rendition of the manual of arms as he glided silently past, apparently quite above noticing any of us.

    My attempts to gather any information at all as to who or what was this fellow drew no reply from my erstwhile buddies, and it was not until a day or two later that I was able to discuss with one of my neighbors what I had seen; according to him he was a very powerful man, highly placed within the organs of the previous military government, now carrying on much as before, just not for the government of the day. Even my neighbor, himself a man of means and even more a man of influence, would speak of that dapper gent in hushed and fearful tones, imploring me to never mention our conversation. I had marveled at the tranquility of the immediate area of my building in comparison to the free for all ongoing all around us, only a block or so away, on the beach across the Avenue, not to mention over on Nossa Senhora, site of frequent Wild West style robberies of buses, the take from which generally amounted to a few dollars worth of currency and a couple of five dollar plastic watches. Even the morons from the favelas behind us apparently got the word and stayed well clear.

    So, at least at the top of the hierarchy, Steve, life was pretty good, or as good as it can get when cruzado inflation was running 100% per month against the greenback.

    , @JackOH
    @Steve Sailer

    Yep. A decent-enough steady job, wife and children, the goodwill and respect--whether nominal or genuine--of neighbors, friends, and colleagues, recognized position within one's occupation or other civic group, etc., make rhetorical dissent, let alone "resistance", difficult, quixotic, and just plain crazy.

    The disgruntled big-city cop earning $80 grand a year with OT will be okay with a small-town gig in a low-cost area earning half that. Dodgy ex-cops have paid options working as muscle, legal security or legal investigative work, or over-the-line "persuasion" on behalf of bullshit civic leaders.

    Ideologically motivated paramilitary ops--probably not.

  46. I wonder if DUI will be considered harmless if whites do it? It obviously is OK to DUIWB.

  47. @NJ Transit Commuter
    If I were a cop, I would immediately do two things.
    1. Start looking for a new job. And in the meantime,
    2. Stop doing my job. Don’t go looking for suspects. Any trouble arresting someone? Subject escaped. End of story.
    Once criminals realize this (and it won’t take long) crime rates will soar.

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities. In previous eras, despite crime and filth, business required centralized offices to get business done. That preserved enough of a tax base to keep cities from collapsing. But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime...

    Replies: @trelane, @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Anonymous, @Skyler_the_Weird, @obwandiyag

    Cities are population sinks, maintaining their population only through immigration and not natural increase. Cities thus become slums.

    For human civilization to survive this problem must be solved: how to keep our cities from becoming slums.

    • Replies: @Wyatt
    @trelane

    Easy. Tear down every skyscraper and limit every building to 3 stories. You can't build up. You can't build down. The population is capped by population density and square footage.

    Replies: @trelane

  48. @Red Pill Angel
    @JimDandy

    Exactly. I want to do something. This insanity must end now.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    I assume there’s a chance Trump will address this to work up his rally crowds. But why aren’t there ever marches for sanity?

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @JimDandy

    Wasn't Trump making comments about how it looked like a bad shooting? He hasn't shown much of a spine backing law and order since this all started. The entire Atlanta PD should refuse to show up and if he hasn't already, Rolfe should refuse to turn himself in.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @JimDandy

    Because at 61% white and falling, and half the whites hating the other half of the whites and wishing they were dead, there aren't enough adult, angry white people to march for sanity. They'd face a larger crowd of screaming, angrier Team Browns and Team Goodwhites. It's not your country any more, Badwhite.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  49. Lot says:
    @allahu akbar
    The current rumor on /pol/ is that most (if not all) of the Atlanta police department is walking off the job tonight, Robocop style.

    This evening, Atlanta may very well be the first fully depoliced major city in the U.S.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Charon, @Lot, @Anon, @Alden, @Buffalo Joe

    Confirmed by Erik Erikson, Atlanta talk radio host who says he talked with two different Atlanta PD cops, one high ranking.

    Inshallah PBUH habibi!

    Also, the KKK is loose and hanging noose in Oakland!

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/17/nooses-oakland-hate-crime-hanging-california

    The Guardian doesn’t even contemplate a tiny chance it is a hate hoax, rather it is “the latest in a spate of racist, anti-black related crimes.”

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Lot

    More El Noose-ra-cabra sightings!

  50. Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @gongtao

    "Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer."

    The law isn't usually applied in that way for obvious reasons. However suppose the cop's shots had missed Brooks and killed an innocent third party while Brooks survived. Then Brooks might be guilty be guilty of felony murder. I am pretty sure he would be if the cop's shots were deemed lawful and he might be even if the cop's shots were deemed unlawful.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Truth

  51. @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    Given the fiscal situation of many cities and states, those generous benefits are probably tenuous at best – maybe not just yet, but soon. Furthermore, if you’re fired or worse, those benes are most likely toast anyway.

    • Agree: VinnyVette
  52. vhrm says:
    @Rosie
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond


    “Felony murder” is a no good doctrine in the first place, much like “the truth is no defense”. As a juror I wouldn’t convict anyone of it under any circumstances.
     
    Never say never. It is a good doctrine to use against extremely malevolent felons like big-time drug dealers, for example. But yes, it should be used very sparingly. In all likelihood, there will be at least one out of twelve as sensible as you on the jury.

    Nowadays, White conservatives feel under attack by eli, whether they are consciously aware of it or not. Along with prepper and homesteading instincts, one of the predictable consequences of this is an antipathy for anything that involves any sort of discretion on the part of said elites. Of course, that's not really the solution, because it misidentified the problem.

    Replies: @vhrm

    Felony murder rule is total crap, imo. Most of the time i hear about it it’s being used against some dumb kid sitting in the back of a car when the driver’s friend shoots someone in a convenience store robbery.
    (or something similar).

    even as generally a law and order guy i can’t stand American prosecutors and their charging ways (at least what makes the news)

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @vhrm

    Its used usually to put pressure on buddies/co-conspirators to turn and rat on the chief guys. "Ok, you won't testify against him? Fine, you're on the hook for murder as well."

    It's also used, as in this case, to jack up charges for headline-seeking prosecutors and to quiet outraged communities.

    , @James B. Shearer
    @vhrm

    "Felony murder rule is total crap, imo. Most of the time i hear about it it’s being used against some dumb kid sitting in the back of a car when the driver’s friend shoots someone in a convenience store robbery.
    (or something similar)."

    That's because you only hear about the cases where the application of the rule seems harsh. Just like you don't hear much about uneventful arrests.

    "even as generally a law and order guy i can’t stand American prosecutors and their charging ways (at least what makes the news)"

    The felony murder rule originated in English common law hundreds of years ago.

  53. theMann says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    Do pensions get paid when the local and State tax bases collapse? Do your medical and dental “benefits” mean anything when the people providing those services are systematically going out of business?

    The police have been systematically set up to take the fall for the actions of stupendously corrupt and dishonest Politicians and they know it. They aren’t somewhat unhappy, they are enraged.

    And btw, you can be an active duty policeman and still join a semi-secret organization. Especially if you start with the IRA as a model.

    • Replies: @sayless
    @theMann

    "--they are enraged"

    They sure are. In NYC DeBlasio has just accused the cops of being racist for holding some Blue Lives Matter event. He seems to really hate law enforcement people, I wonder why.

    How did we come to deserve this creature? I know New Yorkers are bad, but we aren't that bad.

  54. @NJ Transit Commuter
    If I were a cop, I would immediately do two things.
    1. Start looking for a new job. And in the meantime,
    2. Stop doing my job. Don’t go looking for suspects. Any trouble arresting someone? Subject escaped. End of story.
    Once criminals realize this (and it won’t take long) crime rates will soar.

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities. In previous eras, despite crime and filth, business required centralized offices to get business done. That preserved enough of a tax base to keep cities from collapsing. But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime...

    Replies: @trelane, @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Anonymous, @Skyler_the_Weird, @obwandiyag

    Excellent analysis, NJTC.

    • Agree: sayless
  55. I own property in a nearby gentrifying neighborhood not too far from that Wendys they burned down.

    I hope I can sell it before the crash begins.. It’s done really well so far.

  56. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    White men….

    Why join the military and fight Wars for Israel?

    Why join the police and fight battles for gentrification?

    Why especially when those behind both hate you and scapegoat you for everything?

    Let the smarmy ‘liberal’ urban elites defend themselves. Besides, they got nothing to worry about from angelic blacks.

    All this policing was based on the ‘racist’ fantasy that blacks commit lots of crime.

    • Agree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    Why join the military and fight Wars for Israel?

    There are no Wars for Israel outside your imagination.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  57. @vhrm
    @Rosie

    Felony murder rule is total crap, imo. Most of the time i hear about it it's being used against some dumb kid sitting in the back of a car when the driver's friend shoots someone in a convenience store robbery.
    (or something similar).

    even as generally a law and order guy i can't stand American prosecutors and their charging ways (at least what makes the news)

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @James B. Shearer

    Its used usually to put pressure on buddies/co-conspirators to turn and rat on the chief guys. “Ok, you won’t testify against him? Fine, you’re on the hook for murder as well.”

    It’s also used, as in this case, to jack up charges for headline-seeking prosecutors and to quiet outraged communities.

  58. anon[247] • Disclaimer says:
    @George
    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    Replies: @anon, @kaganovitch, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Alden

    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    Allegedly he blew 0.108 which is over the limit of 0.08.

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    We’ve been over this. There’s precedent and USSC decisions that extended “DUI” to parked vehicles on the side of a public road, and “public road” includes shopping mall parking lots & so forth. Much of this dates back to the 1980’s when Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) was very influential in state legislatures as well as in the Congress and the Reagan administration. It’s all old news and settled law that nobody is going to challenge in any court.

    Suggest you view the bodycam vid. The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Tiger Woods' DUI conviction was when he was found pulled over on the side of the highway.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Polynikes
    @anon

    Correct. Many a men (even white ones!) have been charged with owi when found sleeping one off in the back seat. It’s bullshit, but it’s been SOP for twenty years. This Brooks case is just routine at this point. Well minus the everything that happened when he started attacking the cops.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @anon

    I know a guy who pulled over to sleep it off who got popped for DUI because his keys were in the ignition. Ok with me.

    Replies: @bruce county

    , @Truth
    @anon


    The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.
     
    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn't give them to police, they'd give them a second firearm.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @VinnyVette, @The Anti-Gnostic, @jsm

  59. huh. must be that white privilege i keep hearing about.

  60. @Precious
    So … What’s the felony? Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    The prosecutor is a moron. Oh, no wait, now that I see his picture, I see he isn't a moron, he is just taking the opportunity to settle some scores.

    Three of the counts against Rolfe are for aggravated assault related to a bullet he fired that hit an occupied vehicle nearby in the Wendy’s lot.

    I was wondering where the third bullet ended up.

    Brosnan’s three charges include two counts of violations of oath of office.

    That's...even more stupid than the felony murder charge.

    Replies: @usNthem, @ben tillman

    Well, he is actually a moron as well…

  61. They think they can win Georgia in November if they stir this thing up enough. What’s so disgusting is that DA’s of color are busy emptying prisons and letting everyone else run around scot-free

  62. A.Lawyer says:

    This is becoming something of an IQ test for white cops, and they are not performing well. Here’s a little free legal advice. If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @A.Lawyer

    Some cops are, you know, trying to do their jobs and protect the community.

    Not in their immediate term best interest but honorable and necessary for our society to continue.

    , @kaganovitch
    @A.Lawyer

    If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    You do know it's not 1972 anymore? All police cars are GPSed to the gills. Dispatch can see where you are relative to address just as if you were driving an Uber.

    Replies: @Anon, @Charon

    , @black sea
    @A.Lawyer

    I used to know an Atlanta cop. He said that there were officers who would get out of their car and confront a criminal situation and, if necessary, chase people down (or try to), and then there were other officers who would find all sorts of reasons to stay in the car for as much time as possible and wouldn't consider chasing someone down because -- in addition to being difficult -- it increases the risk level for the officer considerably.

    He also said that the latter were widely resented by the former. But I can see why after a certain number of years on the job, you would realize the career dangers and the legal dangers -- in addition to the physical dangers -- of taking on bad people doing bad things and conclude that you weren't really being paid to put yourself in such situations.

    Downtown Atlanta is never going to be urban destination of choice, but without some serious policing, it's going to revert to its natural state, which is as an exclusionary zone for people with money and options.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Anonymousse
    @A.Lawyer

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/06/11/us/chicago-officers-in-congressmans-office/index.html

    Some cops were spotted trying the “hide out to avoid an officially organized impossible situation” strategy in Chicago.

    They are now targets of media rage for not being out there being out there getting beaten up/and or prosecuted for resisting getting beaten up. The politicians feel that this was the officers just desserts and it was shameful of them to try to avoid receiving them.

    The cops also had the temerity to impugn the integrity of BOBBY RUSH! They went so far as to imply that the honorable Revered Dr Bobby Rush Jr. asked for VIP police protection from mobs of his own righteously angry peacefully protesting people.

    So yeah... there is no way to win. A white cop who isn’t in the process of quitting is either insane or (less likely) an actual saint.

  63. Anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @allahu akbar
    The current rumor on /pol/ is that most (if not all) of the Atlanta police department is walking off the job tonight, Robocop style.

    This evening, Atlanta may very well be the first fully depoliced major city in the U.S.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Charon, @Lot, @Anon, @Alden, @Buffalo Joe

    If this happens in Atlanta, it’s going to be more ghetto blacks against middle-class blacks, than ghetto blacks against whites. Middle-class blacks live closer to the ghetto than whites do, and they own small businesses in the ghetto. They don’t want to be burned out by their ghetto brethren, but that’s what’s going to happen.

    It will be the ultimate crabs-in-a-bucket act by ghetto blacks. “You think you’re better than me? You think you want to escape the hood? I’ll burn you out. Nobody escapes the jealousy of the hood.”

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Anon

    Its this shit that actually has me sad and yet saying, "serves them right."

    Those middle-class blacks voted hard-left for years, took every affirmative action goodies and pushed for more, voted for gun control, and blamed whitey in public for all their problems.Never once did they police their problems or accept blame and shame for their own people's massive criminality.

    They couldn't police their own, and then blamed us for all their brethren's bad behavior.

    Fuck them.

    We could have been allies and friends. Instead you made us your enemy. Now your enemy won't come help you when the real wolves are coming for you.

  64. @trelane
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Cities are population sinks, maintaining their population only through immigration and not natural increase. Cities thus become slums.

    For human civilization to survive this problem must be solved: how to keep our cities from becoming slums.

    Replies: @Wyatt

    Easy. Tear down every skyscraper and limit every building to 3 stories. You can’t build up. You can’t build down. The population is capped by population density and square footage.

    • Replies: @trelane
    @Wyatt

    Not easy. Wrong. Bad answer. Much more complicated than that.

    Replies: @Charon

  65. Anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy
    Wow. My God. What do we do?

    Replies: @Red Pill Angel, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Wow. My God. What do we do?

    It’s a terrible situation. But first and foremost, we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible. They made this happen.

    Trust me, they did not have “good intentions“.

    Make them eat the pain.

    • Agree: theMann, Kylie
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    Ha ha, how long have you worked for the F.B.I., sir?

    How about a peaceful march? Why can't sane people pull something like that off?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Pericles

    , @Mike_from_SGV
    @Anonymous

    An insightful comment. White libs are the true villains. The street thugs are just dim bulbs who grab what they can; not the brains of the operation.Cut off the snakes head, not the tail.

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Anonymous

    "we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible."

    Insist that they change the name of Yale University. Elihu Yale both owned slaves and was a slave trader. Rub it in their faces.

    Make Hillary, Bill, and W defend the name. Better yet, make them advocate to change the name.

    Replies: @Pericles

  66. @anon
    @George

    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    Allegedly he blew 0.108 which is over the limit of 0.08.

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    We've been over this. There's precedent and USSC decisions that extended "DUI" to parked vehicles on the side of a public road, and "public road" includes shopping mall parking lots & so forth. Much of this dates back to the 1980's when Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) was very influential in state legislatures as well as in the Congress and the Reagan administration. It's all old news and settled law that nobody is going to challenge in any court.

    Suggest you view the bodycam vid. The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Polynikes, @Jim Don Bob, @Truth

    Tiger Woods’ DUI conviction was when he was found pulled over on the side of the highway.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Woods has never been a straight driver.

    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @kaganovitch, @jon, @vhrm

  67. @George
    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    Replies: @anon, @kaganovitch, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Alden

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    Yup, sleeping it off is the first step in turning your life around.

  68. Jesse says:

    It’s more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.

    I do, however, agree with the general consensus that murder charges are the wrong route. Take the Daniel Shaver situation. It was a sadistic sergeant and the trigger happy twerp beside him, which raises questions about the department’s hiring and promotion standards. Charging the twerp with murder and implying he was the one playing twisted Simon says allowed a clear structural rot to look like a horrible but isolated hiring error.

    TPTB are learning that the BLM types have no sense of nuance or proportion, or ability to wait even medium term for results. So they throw them a bone – in the form of anyone unfortunate enough to get caught on camera – and leave the structural issues alone. What this case warranted was a quiet sit down with the chief of police, and to quietly get the ball rolling on forcing these two incompetents out.

    • Disagree: vhrm
    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    @Jesse


    It’s more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.
     
    You can watch the full 45 minute video of the arrest. They can't use their clubs. They cannot use chokeholds. Maybe they could have subdued the suspect if they could have put a knee on his neck. Perhaps take his keys and tell him to call a taxi?

    What did the cops do wrong?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhdpG2XzRXQ

    Replies: @syonredux, @JimDandy, @James B. Shearer, @Joseph Doaks

    , @Precious
    @Jesse

    But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.

    ^What a load of baloney. The cops were exceedingly patient and polite. It got to that moment in the first place because they didn't sucker punch or pistol whip the guy without warning. Black people are not children. If they expect to be coddled like children then they can give up their right to alcohol and the right to vote.

    , @Anonymousse
    @Jesse

    Would love to have YOU, the jogger whisperer, out there showing em’ how it’s done.

  69. @JimDandy
    @Red Pill Angel

    I assume there's a chance Trump will address this to work up his rally crowds. But why aren't there ever marches for sanity?

    Replies: @Barnard, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Wasn’t Trump making comments about how it looked like a bad shooting? He hasn’t shown much of a spine backing law and order since this all started. The entire Atlanta PD should refuse to show up and if he hasn’t already, Rolfe should refuse to turn himself in.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Barnard

    Did he say that?

    Replies: @Jane Plain

  70. Apparently select Zones of the Atlanta PD have walked off the job and they are trying to secure aid from adjacent LE agencies.

    Download a public service app on your cellphone and check out Atlanta.

    Gonna remake the Burning of Atlanta scene from GWTW, if the residents decide it.

  71. You’ve got to give it to Leftists, they really don’t let any crisis go to waste.

    I’ve driven my family to Atlanta plenty of times. I don’t see that happening again.

  72. @Barnard
    @JimDandy

    Wasn't Trump making comments about how it looked like a bad shooting? He hasn't shown much of a spine backing law and order since this all started. The entire Atlanta PD should refuse to show up and if he hasn't already, Rolfe should refuse to turn himself in.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Did he say that?

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @JimDandy

    I can't believe you chumps.

    Do you think that Trump gives a shit about this cop? He just signed an EO banning police misconduct, or some such bullshit.

    It was drafted by his advisor, some black guy with an apostrophe in the middle of his first name. Ja'Von something.

    Trump isn't going to say anything or do anything.

    He. Does. Not. Care.

    My suggestion: a very focused strike, to take down an important target.

    The NFL.

    But it will never happen.

  73. @vhrm
    @Lot

    "directed verdict" is what i was thinking of (though i don't remember knowing the term).

    Specifically the kind where the the judge makes it at the end of the prosecution's case because no sensible jury could ever convict based on the evidence presented.

    (and yeah, i know they're exceedingly rare;)

    Replies: @Polynikes

    They are rare, but this case would be a good example of when they can be used. Unless there is more than the video and photo evidence circulating the internet, this is an insane case. Defense attorneys would kill (poor pun alert) for this case.

    I’m not shocked by much. The worst predictions of places like this blog have slowly been coming true. But this is stunning. This case would be tough for an internal review of administrative discipline for excessive force. Murder??? Atlanta has lost its f’n mind!

    • Agree: vhrm
  74. Rolfe?

    As in John Rolfe, the Virginian who started the great American tradition of miscegenation in 1612?

    Or as in the other John Rolfe, grandfather to Barack Obama’s sixth-great-grandfather Jonathan Dunham? (Jonathan Dunham II, whose other, namesake grandfather was one of the nuttiest loose screws in the colonies.)

    By the way, Trayvon’s mother is running for office, and says we need cops.

    https://fox6now.com/2020/06/13/trayvon-martins-mother-calls-for-more-cops-says-she-disagrees-with-calls-to-defund-police-report/

    • Troll: RichardTaylor
  75. @Dr. X

    what happened to murder rates the last two times white elites decided that cops were the Bad Guys and inner city black knuckleheads were the Good Guys.
     
    Cops can be bad guys. Probably a minority of them, but still too many, and thugs and goons. That being said, for some reason people don't get outraged and start riots over the really egregious examples, like the Daniel Shaver shooting.

    The black in Ferguson who attacked the cop, the black in Atlanta who stole the taser, and even Rodney King are not exactly textbook cases of police brutality. The George Floyd case was, but the cops got charged.

    And it's incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XExqABO4kc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvoQRdSFiDw

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @Anon, @ATBOTL, @David In TN

    And it’s incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:

    Because whites are generally sensible enough to know that in a nation of hundreds of millions of people, shit happens.

    A handful of sensational cases (and accompanying videos) are not evidence of a trend, they’re just statistical blips in a nation where millions of police encounters take place a day. They don’t reflect the norms of police or policing, and most adult white people know this.

    But just like Africans in Africa believe that every illness is the result of ill intent, so then every black death—including the recent spate of suicides we’re being asked to demand “justice” for—can only be explained by racism on the part of hostile whites. If a cop kills a black, he was motivated by racism. There really can be no other explanation.

    • Agree: Aeronerauk, Charon
  76. @A.Lawyer
    This is becoming something of an IQ test for white cops, and they are not performing well. Here's a little free legal advice. If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    Replies: @vhrm, @kaganovitch, @black sea, @Anonymousse

    Some cops are, you know, trying to do their jobs and protect the community.

    Not in their immediate term best interest but honorable and necessary for our society to continue.

  77. @Koffeefutures
    White cops will have to call for Blackup every they confront poc perps.

    Like a squad of black cops can be at the ready to handle their fellow blacks.

    Replies: @Anonymous (n), @Ron Mexico

    I don’t think we’re very far away from a point where “the culture” celebrates all violence committed by blacks against whites as great, laudable instances of social justice and karmic payback while any white who dares resist being violated by a Black King or Queen (TM) is publicly and legally destroyed as an offender worse than a pedophile or rapist.

    Whether the reaction to the Floyd non event was engineered by TPTB or was in fact a spontaneous product of the current demographic and societal zeitgeist doesn’t even matter. What it has shown is that we are now in a world where objective reality is no longer even a tenuous lifeline for whites. Some black guy can keel over and die of a heart attack in his own bedroom tomorrow and a savvy provocateur with media backing can create a wave of nationwide outrage over it to stir anti-white hatred at this stage. Anyone who would dare point out that there wasn’t a white within a mile of the black when he died would be immediately silenced and then utterly destroyed. The hysteria is such that whites can now be forced to kneel before blacks like slaves before masters and resistance to kneeling is punished by public disgrace and career death in the best case, or immediate physical assault in the worst case. If a white resists the physical assault, he is arrested and charged while those who assaulted him are brought on as witnesses to the crime of lese majeste.

    Today, you must literally kneel in front of a photo of a dead black thug and offer assurances of obeisance in order to avoid destruction if the Eye of Sauron deigns to focus its gaze upon you and demands it. A few more years and cycles of this insanity, and it is very easy to envision that whites will be entirely barred from serving in law enforcement capacities and objecting to this will be as suicidal as publicly questioning the death of saint floyd is today. When the police patrolling your neighborhood looks like the crips and your local Soros funded DA has been fully unleashed the real fun begins.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Anonymous (n)

    LOL, relax. You’re like watered-down Whiskey.

    Are you going to kneel? Have you been kneeling?

    Give us the details, oh trembling one.

  78. @George
    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    Replies: @anon, @kaganovitch, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Alden

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    It doesn’t matter. To get there he must have driven while intoxicated and he did blow 0.102 or something like that, so he was likely even further over the limit when he drove the vehicle to the Wendy’s drive through so he could go jogging.

  79. @Wyatt
    @trelane

    Easy. Tear down every skyscraper and limit every building to 3 stories. You can't build up. You can't build down. The population is capped by population density and square footage.

    Replies: @trelane

    Not easy. Wrong. Bad answer. Much more complicated than that.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @trelane

    Not much more. He's describing Copenhagen, more or less. There's just one other relevant factor, but I don't want to lose my job by saying it out loud.

  80. Anon[247] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X

    what happened to murder rates the last two times white elites decided that cops were the Bad Guys and inner city black knuckleheads were the Good Guys.
     
    Cops can be bad guys. Probably a minority of them, but still too many, and thugs and goons. That being said, for some reason people don't get outraged and start riots over the really egregious examples, like the Daniel Shaver shooting.

    The black in Ferguson who attacked the cop, the black in Atlanta who stole the taser, and even Rodney King are not exactly textbook cases of police brutality. The George Floyd case was, but the cops got charged.

    And it's incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XExqABO4kc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvoQRdSFiDw

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @Anon, @ATBOTL, @David In TN

    That sheriff’s deputy had a history of being abusive and in 2018 finally went to jail for 4 months for a felony.

    https://dailygazette.com/article/2018/06/15/former-deputy-gets-jail-time-on-weapons-charge


    Former Saratoga County Sheriff’s Sgt. Shawn Glans (wearing a U.S. Marines polo)

    I think we need to re-examine the common practice of law enforcement agencies preferring to hire former military. While we all want tough policing against the criminals, the militarization of law enforcement has had a larger negative impact on the law-abiding citizenry.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
  81. 6dust6 says:

    I cannot verify this information, but heard from a MA
    State Trooper that Brooks was recently released from prison
    doing time for beating his wife and kids. The corona virus
    got him out of jail. This encounter with Atlanta police, he
    knew, would send him back to the can. That is the reason
    he freaked out and resisted arrest. Candace Owens also reported
    this information.

    • Replies: @Charlotte
    @6dust6

    The Daily Mail is reporting that https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8429013/Fired-officer-shot-Rayshard-Brooks-dead-begged-father-four-stay-alive-gave-CPR.html

  82. @Anonymous
    @JimDandy


    Wow. My God. What do we do?
     
    It’s a terrible situation. But first and foremost, we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible. They made this happen.

    Trust me, they did not have “good intentions“.

    Make them eat the pain.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Mike_from_SGV, @TomSchmidt

    Ha ha, how long have you worked for the F.B.I., sir?

    How about a peaceful march? Why can’t sane people pull something like that off?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JimDandy

    Oh no, don’t misunderstand me. I don’t mean do anything against the law. I mean don’t lift a finger to help white liberals and where possible, push policies that make them bear the cost of their actions.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @Pericles
    @JimDandy


    How about a peaceful march? Why can’t sane people pull something like that off?

     

    Judging from recent years:

    1. Antifa show up and beat the tar out of you.
    2. If you defend yourself, you get arrested, charged, and convicted while the antifa walk.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  83. @anon
    @George

    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    Allegedly he blew 0.108 which is over the limit of 0.08.

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    We've been over this. There's precedent and USSC decisions that extended "DUI" to parked vehicles on the side of a public road, and "public road" includes shopping mall parking lots & so forth. Much of this dates back to the 1980's when Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) was very influential in state legislatures as well as in the Congress and the Reagan administration. It's all old news and settled law that nobody is going to challenge in any court.

    Suggest you view the bodycam vid. The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Polynikes, @Jim Don Bob, @Truth

    Correct. Many a men (even white ones!) have been charged with owi when found sleeping one off in the back seat. It’s bullshit, but it’s been SOP for twenty years. This Brooks case is just routine at this point. Well minus the everything that happened when he started attacking the cops.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Polynikes


    Many a men (even white ones!) have been charged with owi when found sleeping one off in the back seat. It’s bullshit, but it’s been SOP for twenty years.
     
    And that could be one of the problems, that there are too many bullshit laws. Also note that some people consider jaywalking laws to discriminate against black citizens, because they give the police the power to arrest or harass people for something that is not even an offense in many countries.

    Replies: @Polynikes

  84. Atlanta’s gonna burn tonight like it hasn’t done since The Civil War.

    Man, what time for Gone With the Wind to be banned. So terrifyingly and yet poetically fitting.

  85. @usNthem
    This is black run america at its finest. Any White cop working in a black run city, which by definition will be majority (or at the least large minority) black has no chance in the current environment. There’s absolutely no upside and unlimited downside to any confrontation with a jogger. White cops need to walk away from these places ASAP. As for Brosnan, he’s just trying to save his own ass from cannibal’s pot.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Brosnan’s attorney says he just truthfully told what happened, he didn’t assault Brooks after he went down as a result of the shooting, and he didn’t turn state’s evidence against his partner. Of course what he should have done was take the fifth.

  86. Alden says:
    @allahu akbar
    The current rumor on /pol/ is that most (if not all) of the Atlanta police department is walking off the job tonight, Robocop style.

    This evening, Atlanta may very well be the first fully depoliced major city in the U.S.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Charon, @Lot, @Anon, @Alden, @Buffalo Joe

    I saw that too. That there are 6 zones and that all the Atlanta officers in 3 of the zones had walked out by 8pm east coast time.

    I hope it’s true. Atlanta has a lot of woods, bushes and open space. Maybe the arsonists will set a California style forest fire.

    I’m trying to watch Tucker Carlson. But there’s an AD every 3 minutes. That’s why I never watch TV

  87. @vhrm
    @Art Deco


    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.
     
    IANAL, but some of the recent cases against the cops are so ridiculous that i hope they go down on summary judgment. It would make me feel a bit better about rationality in the courts.

    Also i don't understand how these guys keep getting fired so fast. Don't police unions exist anymore? aren't there due process clauses in the contracts?

    Replies: @Lot, @Hibernian

    We live in a new world.

    • Replies: @Stan
    @Hibernian

    The African world.

  88. @Anon
    @allahu akbar

    If this happens in Atlanta, it's going to be more ghetto blacks against middle-class blacks, than ghetto blacks against whites. Middle-class blacks live closer to the ghetto than whites do, and they own small businesses in the ghetto. They don't want to be burned out by their ghetto brethren, but that's what's going to happen.

    It will be the ultimate crabs-in-a-bucket act by ghetto blacks. "You think you're better than me? You think you want to escape the hood? I'll burn you out. Nobody escapes the jealousy of the hood."

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    Its this shit that actually has me sad and yet saying, “serves them right.”

    Those middle-class blacks voted hard-left for years, took every affirmative action goodies and pushed for more, voted for gun control, and blamed whitey in public for all their problems.Never once did they police their problems or accept blame and shame for their own people’s massive criminality.

    They couldn’t police their own, and then blamed us for all their brethren’s bad behavior.

    Fuck them.

    We could have been allies and friends. Instead you made us your enemy. Now your enemy won’t come help you when the real wolves are coming for you.

  89. syonredux says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:00 am GMT • 200 Words   

    Looks as though Mr Brooks was not exactly a model citizen….

    EXCLUSIVE: Rayshard Brooks was on probation for four crimes – including cruelty to children – and faced going back to prison if charged with a DUI, when he was found asleep and intoxicated at Wendy’s drive-thru

    Rayshard Brooks was on probation and faced going back to prison if he was charged with a DUI, DailyMail.com can reveal.

    It was the fear of incarceration that likely caused Brooks to panic in the face of imminent arrest and caused him to make a break for it.

    The charges to which Brooks pleaded guilty and for which he was still on probation dated back to August 2014 when he was convicted on four counts – False Imprisonment, Simple Battery/Family, Battery Simple and Felony Cruelty/Cruelty to Children.

    He was tried in Clayton County and sentenced to seven years on the first count, with one year in prison and six on probation and 12 months for each of the other three counts, sentences to be served concurrently.

    His sentence was revised, and he was sent back to prison for 12 months in July 2016 when he violated the terms of his probation.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8431801/Rayshard-Brooks-probation-faced-going-prison-charged-DUI.html

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @syonredux

    Yes, the charges all seem contemporaneous domestic violence charges, so perhaps they were related to the same incident. It would be interesting to know if the offenses were committed under the influence of alcohol.

    He would have been only 21 at the time and may have been sentenced as a young offender.

  90. @Jus' Sayin'...
    We are learning that those scenes in "Birth of a Nation", which depicted the operation of occupied state "governments" during Reconstruction were, contrary to the official ruling class narrative, quite accurate.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @captflee, @Alden

    There were New England Yankees and Southern scalawags who’d been Whigs before the war in the mix then. Not sure who the equivalents are now, but I’m afraid there aren’t any anymore, or they’re very week.

  91. Are police going to go on strike or protest over this?

  92. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Tiger Woods' DUI conviction was when he was found pulled over on the side of the highway.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Woods has never been a straight driver.

    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jonathan Mason


    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.
     
    No. The responsible thing to do is to not operate the vehicle at all.

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    Perhaps your IQ is not high enough to understand these things, but it is true.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Ozymandias, @ben tillman

    , @kaganovitch
    @Jonathan Mason

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    Of course. Amazon sells 40 different models.

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=home+breathalyzer&gclid=CjwKCAjw_qb3BRAVEiwAvwq6VnTbogWFlJr-vwpVC1N0s3yO6WcFw0Xdx4Isy8wmzPXA1RI9YP6MnRoChGQQAvD_BwE&hvadid=177756232997&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9004053&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=12731713170764211283&hvtargid=kwd-95336314&hydadcr=21633_9710633&tag=googhydr-20&ref=pd_sl_62923mhhpz_e

    , @jon
    @Jonathan Mason


    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

     

    Yes
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=breathalyzer&ref=nb_sb_noss

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @vhrm
    @Jonathan Mason

    You can buy a breathalyzer at best buy. The good ones are $80 and up, the cheap ones are $30


    https://www.amazon.com/iSOBER-Breathalyzer-Requirements-Accredited-Laboratory/dp/B07MWZSX38

    (but yeah, the current enforcement levels and severity of penalties are "moral panic" levels left over from MADD of the 80s and 90s rather than proportionate response, imo)

    Replies: @bruce county

  93. @Spud Boy
    The higher the charges, the more likely it is the officer will be acquitted.

    Might as well charge him with orchestrating the holocaust while they're at it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @bomag, @RAZ

    I’d guess these initial charges are to placate the mob; later proceedings will be for lighter consequences.

    Not a good look for the courts to be playing to the mob.

  94. @syonredux
    Looks as though Mr Brooks was not exactly a model citizen....



    EXCLUSIVE: Rayshard Brooks was on probation for four crimes - including cruelty to children - and faced going back to prison if charged with a DUI, when he was found asleep and intoxicated at Wendy's drive-thru

    Rayshard Brooks was on probation and faced going back to prison if he was charged with a DUI, DailyMail.com can reveal.
     

    It was the fear of incarceration that likely caused Brooks to panic in the face of imminent arrest and caused him to make a break for it.
     

    The charges to which Brooks pleaded guilty and for which he was still on probation dated back to August 2014 when he was convicted on four counts – False Imprisonment, Simple Battery/Family, Battery Simple and Felony Cruelty/Cruelty to Children.
     

    He was tried in Clayton County and sentenced to seven years on the first count, with one year in prison and six on probation and 12 months for each of the other three counts, sentences to be served concurrently.
     

    His sentence was revised, and he was sent back to prison for 12 months in July 2016 when he violated the terms of his probation.
     
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8431801/Rayshard-Brooks-probation-faced-going-prison-charged-DUI.html

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Yes, the charges all seem contemporaneous domestic violence charges, so perhaps they were related to the same incident. It would be interesting to know if the offenses were committed under the influence of alcohol.

    He would have been only 21 at the time and may have been sentenced as a young offender.

  95. This is an excellent opportunity for every corporation with annual revenues over $1M to immediately donate 8.46% of their profits to BLM in perpetuity.

  96. @Jesse
    It's more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.

    I do, however, agree with the general consensus that murder charges are the wrong route. Take the Daniel Shaver situation. It was a sadistic sergeant and the trigger happy twerp beside him, which raises questions about the department's hiring and promotion standards. Charging the twerp with murder and implying he was the one playing twisted Simon says allowed a clear structural rot to look like a horrible but isolated hiring error.

    TPTB are learning that the BLM types have no sense of nuance or proportion, or ability to wait even medium term for results. So they throw them a bone - in the form of anyone unfortunate enough to get caught on camera - and leave the structural issues alone. What this case warranted was a quiet sit down with the chief of police, and to quietly get the ball rolling on forcing these two incompetents out.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @Precious, @Anonymousse

    It’s more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.

    You can watch the full 45 minute video of the arrest. They can’t use their clubs. They cannot use chokeholds. Maybe they could have subdued the suspect if they could have put a knee on his neck. Perhaps take his keys and tell him to call a taxi?

    What did the cops do wrong?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Clifford Brown


    What did the cops do wrong?
     
    Get WOKE, bigot.They committed the ultimate crime: they tried to arrest a Black man.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown

    , @JimDandy
    @Clifford Brown

    There are actually memes going around on social media saying that the cops could have--and should have--gotten him home safely, as if it was not their duty to arrest a person guilty of a DUI.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @Ganderson

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Clifford Brown

    "What did the cops do wrong?"

    Nothing until one of them shot Brooks. If Brooks hadn't grabbed anything the shooting would be pretty clearly unlawful. If Brooks had grabbed the cop's gun the shooting would be pretty clearly lawful. As it is with Brooks grabbing the taser opinions will vary.

    , @Joseph Doaks
    @Clifford Brown

    "What did the cops do wrong?"

    They weren't fit enough or well trained enough that two of them together couldn't subdue Rayshard Brooks.

  97. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:16 am GMT • 100 Words   

    Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer.

    No, because the crime dies with the criminal. Since all men are presumed innocent until they are tried and convicted and you cannot try a dead man, Rayshard died an innocent man and will remain so, legally speaking. Same as Epstein.

    I’m not saying this is right or wrong but this is the logic of the common law (and generally speaking the common law has a lot of wisdom).

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Jack D


    Rayshard died an innocent man and will remain so, legally speaking. Same as Epstein.

     

    Well, Epstein at least was convicted.

    Replies: @RAZ

  98. @Polynikes
    @anon

    Correct. Many a men (even white ones!) have been charged with owi when found sleeping one off in the back seat. It’s bullshit, but it’s been SOP for twenty years. This Brooks case is just routine at this point. Well minus the everything that happened when he started attacking the cops.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Many a men (even white ones!) have been charged with owi when found sleeping one off in the back seat. It’s bullshit, but it’s been SOP for twenty years.

    And that could be one of the problems, that there are too many bullshit laws. Also note that some people consider jaywalking laws to discriminate against black citizens, because they give the police the power to arrest or harass people for something that is not even an offense in many countries.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Jonathan Mason

    It could be one of the problems. So could no knock warrants. I’d be inclined to agree on the legislative front.

    But that isn’t what these cases are about. And if they are the problem then the law needs changed. Charging a cop for doing his job following the law—even if it’s one that needs changed—with murder is ridiculous. It’s political grandstanding of the worst kind. And it will lead to awful outcomes.

    Replies: @iDeplorable

  99. @anon
    Arrest warrants have been issued for the two and they were asked to surrender by Thursday. With the felony murder charge, Rolfe could face the death penalty if convicted.

    The next time there's a drunk passed out in a fast food driveup line in Atlanta it may take quite a while for the po-lice to show up. Quite a while indeed. Especially for officers getting close to retirement.

    Can't wait for social workers to take this task over. I'm sure a 22 year old girl with a degree in sociology from Spellman is much better suited to deal with such things. Much better suited. Need to wear bodycams, though, because we can't rely on WorldStarHipHop for entertaining reports.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    OneFiveFive, in nearby Lockport, NY, in 2017 a young social worker was playing cards with three young men at the halfway where she worked . One of the men/teens had stolen $160 from a lock box at the residence. To cover his crime, he threw a blanket over the girl’s head and then beat her to death with a table leg. Why? Because he was not in prison where he belonged and she could send him to jail. In Buffalo, Sister Karen Klimczak ran a halfway house for recently released felons. Sister discovered one burglarizing her room. He beat and strangled her to death. Little women against a felon with murderous intent stand no chance. Some people are not worthy to share our air.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Buffalo Joe

    So hire big bad mean black men to do social work with other big bad mean black men.

    Reminds me of the gazillion programs in the last 60 years to hire black criminals to be gang counselors etc.

  100. @Clifford Brown
    @Jesse


    It’s more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.
     
    You can watch the full 45 minute video of the arrest. They can't use their clubs. They cannot use chokeholds. Maybe they could have subdued the suspect if they could have put a knee on his neck. Perhaps take his keys and tell him to call a taxi?

    What did the cops do wrong?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhdpG2XzRXQ

    Replies: @syonredux, @JimDandy, @James B. Shearer, @Joseph Doaks

    What did the cops do wrong?

    Get WOKE, bigot.They committed the ultimate crime: they tried to arrest a Black man.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    @syonredux

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally. I think a night in jail for someone who was ridiculously drunk behind the wheel like this fellow (falling asleep in the Wendy's drive thru should be approaching rock bottom) is meant to serve as a "wake up" call to alter one's behavior.

    Brooks reactions seemed shady. His story kept changing, it was variously different peoples' birthdays, he allegedly had a car rental, but he did not know from where. Comically, suspicious behavior, but not really worth a shooting of someone who seemed more pathetic than dangerous until of course he attacked the officers.

    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Jack D, @anon, @iDeplorable

  101. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Woods has never been a straight driver.

    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @kaganovitch, @jon, @vhrm

    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.

    No. The responsible thing to do is to not operate the vehicle at all.

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    Perhaps your IQ is not high enough to understand these things, but it is true.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

     

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    After all drivers have to make decisions at times as to whether they can continue to drive safely perhaps because they need to sleep due to being awake a long time or perhaps because they are taking some medication that makes them sleepy or perhaps because the weather is so bad for example heavy rain that they feel they cannot drive safely. If you stop because you are drowsy, then you were drowsy before you stopped, but saying that you should not have been driving in the first place is not much help.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Peripatetic Commenter, @anon

    , @Ozymandias
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.
     
    Incorrect. The cornerstone here is whether the keys to the vehicle are within your reach. I know this to be fact in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Wyoming.

    Replies: @vhrm

    , @ben tillman
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.
     
    That's not true. The state has to prove that you were over the limit when you were driving. Because alcohol doesn't go straight from the mouth to the bloodstream, a driver's BAC can increase and put him over the limit after he pulls over (depending on the facts).

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter

  102. @gongtao
    Shouldn't Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    “Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer.”

    The law isn’t usually applied in that way for obvious reasons. However suppose the cop’s shots had missed Brooks and killed an innocent third party while Brooks survived. Then Brooks might be guilty be guilty of felony murder. I am pretty sure he would be if the cop’s shots were deemed lawful and he might be even if the cop’s shots were deemed unlawful.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @James B. Shearer

    I believe there are cases where two guys rob a liquor store and one gets killed by the cops and the other gets charged with felony murder.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Charon

    , @Truth
    @James B. Shearer

    Well now, I didn't pass the bar, but I believe that crime is called "suicide."

    Replies: @Marty

  103. @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    Right wing para military squads consist of FBI informants ATF informants DOJ Civil Rights division informants ADL AJC $PLC antifa informants and provocateurs and other White hating liberals and government workers funded by the Ford Foundation

    • Agree: Anonymousse
  104. @Clifford Brown
    @Jesse


    It’s more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.
     
    You can watch the full 45 minute video of the arrest. They can't use their clubs. They cannot use chokeholds. Maybe they could have subdued the suspect if they could have put a knee on his neck. Perhaps take his keys and tell him to call a taxi?

    What did the cops do wrong?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhdpG2XzRXQ

    Replies: @syonredux, @JimDandy, @James B. Shearer, @Joseph Doaks

    There are actually memes going around on social media saying that the cops could have–and should have–gotten him home safely, as if it was not their duty to arrest a person guilty of a DUI.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    @JimDandy

    In a high trust society, this approach could work, but if the suspect is extremely intoxicated a night in jail is meant to encourage the person to change their life choices.

    Part of the DUI fee could be a $100 Uber surcharge. Maybe that becomes the new norm. I once ate a burrito in the backseat of an Uber with the permission of the driver and was charged $150 for the rice I allegedly spilled in the backseat. I have not eaten in an Uber since.

    In a low trust society, smart phones and technology possibly could be used to avoid these types of interactions. Possibly smart cars in the future will be able to determine if the driver is drunk and automatically pull over.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Charon

    , @Ganderson
    @JimDandy

    It was often the case, 50 years ago. The cops had a number of options- follow you home, take away your keys- tell you to sleep it off. There was a tolerance for drunk driving in those days that was probably too lenient. As we often do, however, we’ve gone way overboard- the legal standard for DWI isn’ t even drunk!

    Replies: @JimDandy

  105. @George
    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    Replies: @anon, @kaganovitch, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Alden

    I think a person drunk alone in a parked car can be arrested on the grounds that if left in the car he might start driving again under the influence.

  106. @vhrm
    @Rosie

    Felony murder rule is total crap, imo. Most of the time i hear about it it's being used against some dumb kid sitting in the back of a car when the driver's friend shoots someone in a convenience store robbery.
    (or something similar).

    even as generally a law and order guy i can't stand American prosecutors and their charging ways (at least what makes the news)

    Replies: @R.G. Camara, @James B. Shearer

    “Felony murder rule is total crap, imo. Most of the time i hear about it it’s being used against some dumb kid sitting in the back of a car when the driver’s friend shoots someone in a convenience store robbery.
    (or something similar).”

    That’s because you only hear about the cases where the application of the rule seems harsh. Just like you don’t hear much about uneventful arrests.

    “even as generally a law and order guy i can’t stand American prosecutors and their charging ways (at least what makes the news)”

    The felony murder rule originated in English common law hundreds of years ago.

  107. Anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    Ha ha, how long have you worked for the F.B.I., sir?

    How about a peaceful march? Why can't sane people pull something like that off?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Pericles

    Oh no, don’t misunderstand me. I don’t mean do anything against the law. I mean don’t lift a finger to help white liberals and where possible, push policies that make them bear the cost of their actions.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    Yeah. For sure. It really depresses me to see so many people I know personally turn into deranged, slavering cult members. Mind-blowing.

  108. @James B. Shearer
    @gongtao

    "Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer."

    The law isn't usually applied in that way for obvious reasons. However suppose the cop's shots had missed Brooks and killed an innocent third party while Brooks survived. Then Brooks might be guilty be guilty of felony murder. I am pretty sure he would be if the cop's shots were deemed lawful and he might be even if the cop's shots were deemed unlawful.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Truth

    I believe there are cases where two guys rob a liquor store and one gets killed by the cops and the other gets charged with felony murder.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, here's an example, but it's a homeowner who shot in self-defense: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/car-owner-kills-teen-suspect-during-attempted-theft-five-other-n1042786

    , @Charon
    @Steve Sailer

    Don't forget Ryan Holle: life in prison without parole for a murder committed while he was asleep. The murderer's accomplice had borrowed Ryan's car.

  109. Mystic55 says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:32 am GMT • 100 Words   

    Atlanta Police Use of Force Policy:

    An employee may use deadly force to apprehend a suspected felon only when:
    1. He or she reasonably believes that the suspect possesses a deadly weapon or any object, device, or instrument which, when used offensively against a person, is likely to or actually does result in serious bodily injury and when he or she reasonably believes that the suspect poses an immediate threat of serious bodily injury to the officer or others; or
    2. When there is probable cause to believe that the suspect has committed a crime involving the infliction or threatened infliction of serious physical harm (O.C.G.A. Section 17-4-20) and the employee reasonably believes that the suspect’s escape would create a continuing danger of serious physical harm to any person.

  110. @allahu akbar
    The current rumor on /pol/ is that most (if not all) of the Atlanta police department is walking off the job tonight, Robocop style.

    This evening, Atlanta may very well be the first fully depoliced major city in the U.S.

    Replies: @Cortes, @Charon, @Lot, @Anon, @Alden, @Buffalo Joe

    allahu, cooler heads will prevail. I am sure that this would be a violation of their contract which could nullify the compact and result in summary dismisals. And then you get the GBI, State Troopers and maybe the National Guard and no real policing. A real shit storm. And to your point, the Atlanta Police Chief basically walked off the job when she resigned.

  111. @Hibernian
    @vhrm

    We live in a new world.

    Replies: @Stan

    The African world.

  112. After this treachery, why would anyone choose to become a cop anymore? A hard, thankless job, now ten times worse because pols and brass across the USA are lining up to stab the cops in the back. All in a futile attempt to appease a mob.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @gutta percha


    After this treachery, why would anyone choose to become a cop anymore?
     
    Where else is a not-too-bright bully with a diploma going to make $100,000?
  113. @syonredux
    @Clifford Brown


    What did the cops do wrong?
     
    Get WOKE, bigot.They committed the ultimate crime: they tried to arrest a Black man.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally. I think a night in jail for someone who was ridiculously drunk behind the wheel like this fellow (falling asleep in the Wendy’s drive thru should be approaching rock bottom) is meant to serve as a “wake up” call to alter one’s behavior.

    Brooks reactions seemed shady. His story kept changing, it was variously different peoples’ birthdays, he allegedly had a car rental, but he did not know from where. Comically, suspicious behavior, but not really worth a shooting of someone who seemed more pathetic than dangerous until of course he attacked the officers.

    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Clifford Brown


    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.
     
    Billy clubs -> choke holds -> Taser -> Bullets.

    Where do you want a cop to start when someone resists arrest?
    , @Jack D
    @Clifford Brown


    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally.
     
    This is pretty much what is done for a first offense in most states. Yes, someone has to come and bail you out and they make you attend some kind of course, but that's pretty much it. If you do it again (and again) then the penalties become progressively higher.

    You can't do this more than once because repeated slaps on the wrist will send the message that it's OK to drive drunk and if you drive drunk you are playing Russian Roulette and it's only a matter of time before you kill someone (including yourself).

    Brooks would have been fine up until the point where he grabbed the taser. In 99% of these BLM deaths, the B is the author of his own destruction. Conceivably, Brooks could have tased the officer, then taken his gun and killed him and the police could not chance that.

    B's INSIST on fighting with the police and then are wildly upset when the fight goes against them. It's not supposed to be a fair fight between the police and the person under arrest. It's not trial by combat. Don't want to get shot by the po-po? Don't try to grab their weapons. It's not hard.

    You would think that every black man in America has had the Talk with his father (if only he had a father). When you are stopped by the cops, be respectful. If you are really nice, they might even let you off with a warning (for a minor offense). If you are belligerent, they are going to go hard on you, regardless of what color you are. It might make you feel better and more manly to spit in the cop's face, but it's gonna cost you. Even if they don't shoot you, you might "slip" when you are cuffed and land on your face or maybe you will "accidentally" bump your head as you are being put in the police car. Or maybe you'll get a "rough ride" on the way downtown. You know how it is - with the terrible winter weather in (Atlanta, Miami, Houston, LA) the streets are just full of potholes. For every criminal that dies in police custody, there are 10 or 100 who get handled a little roughly because they are not cooperative. So be compliant (but not to the point of answering their questions) because you will gain nothing and lose much by doing otherwise.
    , @anon
    @Clifford Brown

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber.

    Something like that could have been done back maybe 50 years ago. But now...that's for state legislatures and governors. You'll be going up against 40 years of precedent. Because cops do not have the discretion to do that in most states, not for the last 30 years or more.

    Most people just don't realize how much discretion has been taken away from cops over the last 30 - 40 years. Mandatory arrest, zero tolerance, etc. applies to a lot of situations including the cops at every high school.

    , @iDeplorable
    @Clifford Brown


    meant to serve as a “wake up” call to alter one’s behavior.
     
    A guy with numerous prior convictions isn't going to wake up when the "wake up" call comes. He's only 27 and he's already signaled loudly that he has no intention of ceasing the committing of crimes. He's a "career criminal". For someone like Brooks, repeated stretches of incarceration are just part of life, like paying taxes for the rest of us. The idea that there is any correcting going on in the Dept of Corrections is silly.

    For a lot of blacks like Brooks, they don't really think they're doing anything wrong -- driving drunk, stealing stuff, beating up people, buying/selling/using drugs, abusing his kids (they'd not likely think it abuse) -- its just part of living life. Perhaps that's one reason they get so irritated when the police periodically haul them in - it seems like just random harassment to them.

    And to a people with the mores and values of American blacks, it IS somewhat a form of random harassment, because they are white man's rules. They seemingly don't want to live in a world where they can't drive drunk, litter everywhere, take drugs, slap their women, steal with impunity, fight each other to the brink of death (or past it) over violations of various arbitrary ghetto rules. The only reason to force them to live by these rules is because 1) we've decided we need to all live together and 2) whites don't want to live in a society with that kind of mayhem and crime.

    Maintaining segregation while polishing some of the more glaring inequalities would have been vastly preferable to what we're doing.
  114. @Clifford Brown
    @Jesse


    It’s more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.
     
    You can watch the full 45 minute video of the arrest. They can't use their clubs. They cannot use chokeholds. Maybe they could have subdued the suspect if they could have put a knee on his neck. Perhaps take his keys and tell him to call a taxi?

    What did the cops do wrong?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhdpG2XzRXQ

    Replies: @syonredux, @JimDandy, @James B. Shearer, @Joseph Doaks

    “What did the cops do wrong?”

    Nothing until one of them shot Brooks. If Brooks hadn’t grabbed anything the shooting would be pretty clearly unlawful. If Brooks had grabbed the cop’s gun the shooting would be pretty clearly lawful. As it is with Brooks grabbing the taser opinions will vary.

  115. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:37 am GMT • 300 Words   
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond
    "Felony murder" is a no good doctrine in the first place, much like "the truth is no defense". As a juror I wouldn't convict anyone of it under any circumstances.

    The refusal to use it in cases like the FBI shooting Vicki Weaver further proves it is a whorish and malignant idea.

    Replies: @Rosie, @Jack D

    “The truth is no defense” is not, generally speaking, a part of American law while the felony murder rule is ancient (going back to at least the 12 century or “time immemorial” (i.e. before the law was written down).

    Felony murder relates to the concept that to be guilty of murder, you need both a dead person and you need “malice”. Malice with no dead person might be attempted murder (or no crime at all if the malice was entirely in your head and you never left your arm chair) but it’s not murder. A dead person without malice might be manslaughter but its not murder either. Dead person PLUS malice – murder.

    Malice is, roughly speaking, the evil state of mind which one has when one about to commit a serious crime. Say that you intend to shoot the lock off of a safe and the bullet ricochets off the lock and kills the bank officer instead. You have a dead person and you have “malice” and the malice of shooting the lock off is transferred to the killing so now you have all of the ingredients for murder, even though you did not intend to kill the bank officer. Your evil or malicious intent in shooting the lock off is transferred to the murder.

    Is this right or wrong? Generally speaking I think it is fair. If you start out intending to commit an evil, felonious deed and someone dies as a result, you should be responsible for his death – it was no “accident”. Once you embark on the path of felony, whatever follows is on you. Don’t want to be guilty of felony murder – don’t commit any felonies.

    • Thanks: Charlotte, Peter Johnson, Cato
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Jack D

    What felony did the officer commit.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Jane Plain
    @Jack D

    Is it at all possible that the DA is bringing a case that he cannot possibly win?

    Which doesn't lessen the horror for Rolfe, but still.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Jack D

    To kill somebody with malice aforethought is murder. You don't need to charge felony murder when you can charge them with murder. Felony murder exists for cases in which somebody dies because you intended a different felony than murder: e.g., you commit arson to collect the fire insurance, but a fireman dies fighting the blaze.

    So, what's the felony.

    Replies: @JimDandy

  116. RAZ says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:39 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Spud Boy
    The higher the charges, the more likely it is the officer will be acquitted.

    Might as well charge him with orchestrating the holocaust while they're at it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @bomag, @RAZ

    True that higher charges more likely to lead to acquittal.

    George Zimmerman was overcharged with 2nd degree murder because Sharpton et al demanded it. They probably would’ve gotten a conviction on a lesser charge. Speaking of which, he’s managed to stay out of trouble for awhile. I figured it was just a matter of time till he effed up enough to get himself convicted for something if he stayed in the US and thought he’d be better going to his mom’s native Peru. But after some drama I haven’t heard about him for awhile.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @RAZ


    George Zimmerman was overcharged with 2nd degree murder because Sharpton et al demanded it.
     
    Littering would have been overcharging. There was no conceivable lesser offense.
    , @jon
    @RAZ


    George Zimmerman

     

    He apparently is trying to sue the Martin family, wasn't anything more recent about how the case is proceeding.
    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/12/04/us/george-zimmerman-lawsuit-trayvon-martin-mother/index.html
    , @Art Deco
    @RAZ

    They probably would’ve gotten a conviction on a lesser charge. S

    The jury had the option of convicting on a lesser included offense and passed on that. That aside, he had a valid self-defense claim, so why convict him on anything? Trayvon Martin walked 75 yards down an alley and attacked GZ as he stood loitering around waiting for the police to arrive. Martin did that for no discernable reason other than to amuse himself. If he'd been minding his own business, he'd have gone indoors (he was right there at the back door of the place he was staying) and watched the ball game with Brandi Green's son.

  117. Wilkey says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:39 am GMT • 200 Words   

    I’m still trying to wrap my head around all of this. The Democrats have doubled down on batshit crazy just in time for the elections. I have long known that this is where we were headed, but I guess maybe I doubted we would really get here – perhaps I was just paranoid? – and definitely not this soon.

    I get that Trump is a clown, a buffoon, and quite possibly insane. But he is one single person. Meanwhile all the rioters, all the cancel-culturists, all the MSM a-holes, all the Leftist politicians endorsing their behavior, and all the Dem stalwarts apparently unphased by it all. This apparently is all totally ok by them.

    As crazy as Trump may be it’s not really even a close call. This is what the Left wants for America. Endless shaming and blaming and racist nonsense directed at white people. How f—ing crazy does anyone, as a white person, have to be to vote for all of this?

    This is the grand, glorious future the multi-cultists wanted for this country, and it’s even scarier and more demented than I ever imagined it would be.

  118. @anon
    @George

    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    Allegedly he blew 0.108 which is over the limit of 0.08.

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    We've been over this. There's precedent and USSC decisions that extended "DUI" to parked vehicles on the side of a public road, and "public road" includes shopping mall parking lots & so forth. Much of this dates back to the 1980's when Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) was very influential in state legislatures as well as in the Congress and the Reagan administration. It's all old news and settled law that nobody is going to challenge in any court.

    Suggest you view the bodycam vid. The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Polynikes, @Jim Don Bob, @Truth

    I know a guy who pulled over to sleep it off who got popped for DUI because his keys were in the ignition. Ok with me.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Jim Don Bob

    Same thing happened to my father... He was in his own driveway!!!!!

  119. @JimDandy
    @Clifford Brown

    There are actually memes going around on social media saying that the cops could have--and should have--gotten him home safely, as if it was not their duty to arrest a person guilty of a DUI.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @Ganderson

    In a high trust society, this approach could work, but if the suspect is extremely intoxicated a night in jail is meant to encourage the person to change their life choices.

    Part of the DUI fee could be a $100 Uber surcharge. Maybe that becomes the new norm. I once ate a burrito in the backseat of an Uber with the permission of the driver and was charged $150 for the rice I allegedly spilled in the backseat. I have not eaten in an Uber since.

    In a low trust society, smart phones and technology possibly could be used to avoid these types of interactions. Possibly smart cars in the future will be able to determine if the driver is drunk and automatically pull over.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Clifford Brown

    D.U.I. is supposedly a bad crime that threatens innocent people of all colors, and the vast majority of Democrats think people should be arrested for it. But there's also the matter of the fact that he was violating his parole for child cruelty and other things. Kinda have to arrest someone for driving drunk and passing out behind the wheel of a car when they are on parole. But enough about that. Let us celebrate the life of this man. Isn't he, when it comes down to it, all of us?

    Just another child-abusin', drunk-drivin', cop-attackin', taser-stealin', taser-shootin' innocent saint. When will this racist genocide end?

    , @Charon
    @Clifford Brown

    A surcharge would never stick against POCs. Disparate Impact.

    Remember they no longer have to pay fines, water and electric bills, registration fees, insurance premiums, rent and grocery expenses, and on and on.

  120. Having worked drive-thru at a fast food franchise as a high school kid, I’ve got to call out Rayshard’s behavior as being atypical. Can’t recall anyone ever having passed out in the drive-thru lane. Perhaps it’s now commonplace. That was even before Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

    The works of Boethius and Epictetus are kept close at hand.

    • LOL: Cortes
  121. @A.Lawyer
    This is becoming something of an IQ test for white cops, and they are not performing well. Here's a little free legal advice. If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    Replies: @vhrm, @kaganovitch, @black sea, @Anonymousse

    If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    You do know it’s not 1972 anymore? All police cars are GPSed to the gills. Dispatch can see where you are relative to address just as if you were driving an Uber.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @kaganovitch


    You do know it’s not 1972 anymore? All police cars are GPSed to the gills. Dispatch can see where you are relative to address just as if you were driving an Uber.
     
    Come on, cops just need to mentally prepare for that dreaded dispatch call they will inevitably face in their career and how to best respond.

    “10 Adam 12... we have an assault in progress at ABC Liquor... please respond code 3...”

    Code 3. Lights and siren.

    “Unit 10 Adam 12... caller describes suspect as code 1 [black] male...”

    😳

    “Dispatch... this is 10 Adam 12... my cruiser just hit a curb and I’ll need a tow.”

    , @Charon
    @kaganovitch

    This is why I keep a wide berth between me and the criminal justice system. I'd probably end up with a lawyer like that one.

  122. jon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:57 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Inquiring Mind
    @Daniel Williams

    I can understand the gunshot wound to the back -- it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.

    How are officers trained? My understanding is that they are put in "simulators" where they are shown videos of at first glance persons not an immediate threat who then turn to shoot the officer in the simulator, and then the officer is told he would have been shot in the absence of "responding to the threat."

    This should be offered as a court room defense, not just a "reasonable person" test but how police are trained to react, and react quickly to such situations. That Mr. Brooks was shot in the back is something that can be examined as to what posture was assumed at what moment in running away, turning to point a gun-like object at the officer and then turning to keep running. Are the police trained to say, "He pointed what appeared to be a gun and shoot it at me, but he turned again to run away, and that is a safe-harbor provision where suspect (of committing assault on the officers arresting him for drunk driving) can count on not being shot by the police?

    As to the disrespect charge, this is the first I ever heard of this -- has anyone seeing any of the videos seen such a thing. Is there any video imagery supporting this, given body cameras and bystanders and everything being recorded, or is this the recollection of eye witnesses and we know how that all "goes down."

    Replies: @jon, @Charon, @Adam Smith

    it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him

    Don’t rely on what has been said, just watch the video yourself. This is a short news clip from a local Atlanta station that has the Wendy’s security cam footage:

    You can clearly see that while running away, he turns toward the officer, fires the taser, and then gets shot almost immediately after.

  123. Polynikes says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:58 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Jonathan Mason
    @Polynikes


    Many a men (even white ones!) have been charged with owi when found sleeping one off in the back seat. It’s bullshit, but it’s been SOP for twenty years.
     
    And that could be one of the problems, that there are too many bullshit laws. Also note that some people consider jaywalking laws to discriminate against black citizens, because they give the police the power to arrest or harass people for something that is not even an offense in many countries.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    It could be one of the problems. So could no knock warrants. I’d be inclined to agree on the legislative front.

    But that isn’t what these cases are about. And if they are the problem then the law needs changed. Charging a cop for doing his job following the law—even if it’s one that needs changed—with murder is ridiculous. It’s political grandstanding of the worst kind. And it will lead to awful outcomes.

    • Replies: @iDeplorable
    @Polynikes


    Charging a cop for doing his job following the law—even if it’s one that needs changed—with murder is ridiculous. It’s political grandstanding of the worst kind.
     
    Its the kind of thing to expect from blacks in positions of authority: Low IQ (too dumb to foresee the aftermath of the acquittal), high time preference, and blatant racial unity. There is no principle at all - its just "I'm mad, the mob is mad, I have power so now will use it".
  124. @Clifford Brown
    @syonredux

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally. I think a night in jail for someone who was ridiculously drunk behind the wheel like this fellow (falling asleep in the Wendy's drive thru should be approaching rock bottom) is meant to serve as a "wake up" call to alter one's behavior.

    Brooks reactions seemed shady. His story kept changing, it was variously different peoples' birthdays, he allegedly had a car rental, but he did not know from where. Comically, suspicious behavior, but not really worth a shooting of someone who seemed more pathetic than dangerous until of course he attacked the officers.

    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Jack D, @anon, @iDeplorable

    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.

    Billy clubs -> choke holds -> Taser -> Bullets.

    Where do you want a cop to start when someone resists arrest?

  125. JimDandy says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:00 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Clifford Brown
    @JimDandy

    In a high trust society, this approach could work, but if the suspect is extremely intoxicated a night in jail is meant to encourage the person to change their life choices.

    Part of the DUI fee could be a $100 Uber surcharge. Maybe that becomes the new norm. I once ate a burrito in the backseat of an Uber with the permission of the driver and was charged $150 for the rice I allegedly spilled in the backseat. I have not eaten in an Uber since.

    In a low trust society, smart phones and technology possibly could be used to avoid these types of interactions. Possibly smart cars in the future will be able to determine if the driver is drunk and automatically pull over.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Charon

    D.U.I. is supposedly a bad crime that threatens innocent people of all colors, and the vast majority of Democrats think people should be arrested for it. But there’s also the matter of the fact that he was violating his parole for child cruelty and other things. Kinda have to arrest someone for driving drunk and passing out behind the wheel of a car when they are on parole. But enough about that. Let us celebrate the life of this man. Isn’t he, when it comes down to it, all of us?

    Just another child-abusin’, drunk-drivin’, cop-attackin’, taser-stealin’, taser-shootin’ innocent saint. When will this racist genocide end?

  126. Mohamed Atta and his crew should have skipped the pilot training and become cops. A few videos of them committing “police violence” could have resulted in less property damage than 9/11, but it is the wedge driven so deeply into our society that does the most harm.

  127. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Woods has never been a straight driver.

    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @kaganovitch, @jon, @vhrm

  128. @Altai
    The English Premiere League returned today to play in empty stadiums. All the players and referees took a knee. The best part of the footage is the piped in crowd noise, there's a metaphor there for something.

    https://twitter.com/SkySportsPL/status/1273301775844626443

    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with 'Black Lives Matter'. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level. But a man was killed in America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Eau27NHWsAMHVV8.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EavmK-pX0AIwRVN.jpg

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @Agathoklis, @Pericles, @Gordo, @Dannyboy

    When Greek Cypriot APOEL fans make political statements about Turkish occupation and Greek patriotism they get sanctioned by UEFA.

    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Altai
    @Agathoklis

    This goes beyond fans or players though. This is an official act by the League itself and the teams. There have been fines before for Poppy wearing but there is no way UEFA or FIFA would dare say a word about all this.

  129. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:02 am GMT • 400 Words   
    @Clifford Brown
    @syonredux

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally. I think a night in jail for someone who was ridiculously drunk behind the wheel like this fellow (falling asleep in the Wendy's drive thru should be approaching rock bottom) is meant to serve as a "wake up" call to alter one's behavior.

    Brooks reactions seemed shady. His story kept changing, it was variously different peoples' birthdays, he allegedly had a car rental, but he did not know from where. Comically, suspicious behavior, but not really worth a shooting of someone who seemed more pathetic than dangerous until of course he attacked the officers.

    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Jack D, @anon, @iDeplorable

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally.

    This is pretty much what is done for a first offense in most states. Yes, someone has to come and bail you out and they make you attend some kind of course, but that’s pretty much it. If you do it again (and again) then the penalties become progressively higher.

    You can’t do this more than once because repeated slaps on the wrist will send the message that it’s OK to drive drunk and if you drive drunk you are playing Russian Roulette and it’s only a matter of time before you kill someone (including yourself).

    Brooks would have been fine up until the point where he grabbed the taser. In 99% of these BLM deaths, the B is the author of his own destruction. Conceivably, Brooks could have tased the officer, then taken his gun and killed him and the police could not chance that.

    B’s INSIST on fighting with the police and then are wildly upset when the fight goes against them. It’s not supposed to be a fair fight between the police and the person under arrest. It’s not trial by combat. Don’t want to get shot by the po-po? Don’t try to grab their weapons. It’s not hard.

    You would think that every black man in America has had the Talk with his father (if only he had a father). When you are stopped by the cops, be respectful. If you are really nice, they might even let you off with a warning (for a minor offense). If you are belligerent, they are going to go hard on you, regardless of what color you are. It might make you feel better and more manly to spit in the cop’s face, but it’s gonna cost you. Even if they don’t shoot you, you might “slip” when you are cuffed and land on your face or maybe you will “accidentally” bump your head as you are being put in the police car. Or maybe you’ll get a “rough ride” on the way downtown. You know how it is – with the terrible winter weather in (Atlanta, Miami, Houston, LA) the streets are just full of potholes. For every criminal that dies in police custody, there are 10 or 100 who get handled a little roughly because they are not cooperative. So be compliant (but not to the point of answering their questions) because you will gain nothing and lose much by doing otherwise.

  130. @Inquiring Mind
    @Daniel Williams

    I can understand the gunshot wound to the back -- it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.

    How are officers trained? My understanding is that they are put in "simulators" where they are shown videos of at first glance persons not an immediate threat who then turn to shoot the officer in the simulator, and then the officer is told he would have been shot in the absence of "responding to the threat."

    This should be offered as a court room defense, not just a "reasonable person" test but how police are trained to react, and react quickly to such situations. That Mr. Brooks was shot in the back is something that can be examined as to what posture was assumed at what moment in running away, turning to point a gun-like object at the officer and then turning to keep running. Are the police trained to say, "He pointed what appeared to be a gun and shoot it at me, but he turned again to run away, and that is a safe-harbor provision where suspect (of committing assault on the officers arresting him for drunk driving) can count on not being shot by the police?

    As to the disrespect charge, this is the first I ever heard of this -- has anyone seeing any of the videos seen such a thing. Is there any video imagery supporting this, given body cameras and bystanders and everything being recorded, or is this the recollection of eye witnesses and we know how that all "goes down."

    Replies: @jon, @Charon, @Adam Smith

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn’t look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    That said, isn’t it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court’s jurisdiction.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Charon

    Homicide—‘‘occurs when death results from...’’ an injury or poisoning or
    from ‘‘...a volitional act committed by another person to cause fear, harm,
    or death. Intent to cause death is a common element but is not required for
    classification as homicide.’’


    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/hb_me.pdf

    , @jon
    @Charon


    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case.
     
    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn't shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Charon

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Charon

    "That said, isn’t it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court’s jurisdiction."

    No, this is completely standard. It just means he was killed whether lawfully or unlawfully. If he was legally executed the death certificate would say homicide.

    , @Charlotte
    @Charon

    Homicide just means he was killed by another person. It isn’t a determination of the legality of the killing.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Charon


    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn’t look good no matter what else may or may not be true.
     
    To a jury out for blood, perhaps. Not one that critically views the video footage. Just before he was shot, he turned and pointed a weapon at Officer Rolfe. You don't get to shoot at cops (which - for all we know - is what Rolfe thought was happening) and then turn to run some more and expect that you won't be shot.

    Anyway, what does "shot in the back" mean? Square in the back, like he was running away? Or sideways into the back region, like he had just turned toward Rolfe. It matters.

    I highly doubt that white cops are just itching to put a bullet into a black suspect just a week after world-wide riots/looting/protests over George Floyd. I think the cop in question was even recorded at the scene (prior to the arrest) as saying something to the effect of "Is this even worth it?". Evidently, for him, it wasn't. Expect Cops around the country to get the message. A whole class of criminals is going to get a pass, and the country is going to get a lot more dangerous.
  131. @Anonymous
    @JimDandy

    Oh no, don’t misunderstand me. I don’t mean do anything against the law. I mean don’t lift a finger to help white liberals and where possible, push policies that make them bear the cost of their actions.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Yeah. For sure. It really depresses me to see so many people I know personally turn into deranged, slavering cult members. Mind-blowing.

    • Agree: Coemgen
  132. @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Woods has never been a straight driver.

    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @kaganovitch, @jon, @vhrm

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    Yes
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=breathalyzer&ref=nb_sb_noss

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @jon

    Costco will sell you a breathalyzer that plugs into your auto ignition so that you can't drunk drive your own car. Costco only carries a narrow range of popular items, which suggests that's a common thing.

    Replies: @vhrm, @Sam Haysom

  133. Frankly, I’m shocked by the ignorance here–on all online discussion forums really–about the history of DUI policing and enforcement in this country and MADD’s aggressive lobbying towards this end.

    It seems the Boomers just weren’t paying attention, and the Millennials…well, they’re clueless about everything.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @SanJoaquinSam

    MADD’s got a lot to answer for. Cab and Uber drivers make a lot of money though, because no one wants to risk driving after a couple drinks.
    Karens LTD.

    Actually, MADD wasn’t a grass roots uprising against drunk drivers. It was a front for the medical insurance companies. As EMTs became better trained and equipped, more and more victims of traffic accidents made it to the ER and their lives were saved.

    But they often didn’t recover and were seriously handicapped and in need of medical care, wheelchairs and even nursing homes for the rest of their lives.

    Enter the medical insurance companies and MADD was created. Of course EMTs and medics joined in. As did police departments eager to hand out more tickets and DAs who wanted more easily winnable cases to add to their success rate.

  134. @NJ Transit Commuter
    If I were a cop, I would immediately do two things.
    1. Start looking for a new job. And in the meantime,
    2. Stop doing my job. Don’t go looking for suspects. Any trouble arresting someone? Subject escaped. End of story.
    Once criminals realize this (and it won’t take long) crime rates will soar.

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities. In previous eras, despite crime and filth, business required centralized offices to get business done. That preserved enough of a tax base to keep cities from collapsing. But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime...

    Replies: @trelane, @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Anonymous, @Skyler_the_Weird, @obwandiyag

    But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime…

    This is absolute nonsense. How the hell do you think society will maintain the infrastructure necessary to allow people to work remotely if they can’t even defend a building sitting on a piece of real property?

    “Remote work” is a hothouse flower that will not survive any serious difficulty. The end result of this period of unrest will be that any meaningful activity that must be carried on is going to become much more centralized and defended, not less.

    • Agree: VinnyVette
    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @Intelligent Dasein

    You can't defend anything from Blacks. They are holy. Can't do it.

    Its over.

    , @usNthem
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I hope you’re right, but at present it depends on who or what the meaningful activity or building is being defended from. If it’s a certain segment of our population, that defense may carry an onerous liability in the current (& perhaps future) environment - thus we see the police abandoning their precinct station to the mob in Minneapolis and a several block area in Seattle being occupied by rioters with no meaningful pushback. Seemingly everyone supposedly on the side of law and order is terrified of taking a hard line. Until that changes, I think these troubles will persist and probably deteriorate.

  135. Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer.

    Good point.

  136. @Jim Don Bob
    @anon

    I know a guy who pulled over to sleep it off who got popped for DUI because his keys were in the ignition. Ok with me.

    Replies: @bruce county

    Same thing happened to my father… He was in his own driveway!!!!!

  137. vhrm says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:26 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Woods has never been a straight driver.

    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.

    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @kaganovitch, @jon, @vhrm

    You can buy a breathalyzer at best buy. The good ones are $80 and up, the cheap ones are $30

    (but yeah, the current enforcement levels and severity of penalties are “moral panic” levels left over from MADD of the 80s and 90s rather than proportionate response, imo)

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @vhrm

    Cops pulled me over for suspected impaired driving. He asks me my name. I told him Bob..He asked me my last name..I said it was Loblaw. The cop looked at me and said your. name is Bob Loblaw. I said yes..Bob blah blah. Needless to say I got a roadside suspension. He saw no humor in the joke..

  138. @The Wild Geese Howard
    I predict a lot of current cops retiring or just quitting.

    I predict a lot of new cops like Mohammed Noor.

    Replies: @OscarWildeLoveChild, @ChrisZ

    Yep, those jobs will be filled, but with another demographic. Which, if the cities stay black, it may be for the best.

  139. Anonymous[300] • Disclaimer says:
    @trelane
    A DWI case gone terribly wrong.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    A DWI case gone terribly wrong.

    What do you mean?

  140. Bernard says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:27 am GMT • 100 Words   

    Steve Sailer says: • Website
    June 18, 2020 at 1:29 am GMT

    I believe there are cases where two guys rob a liquor store and one gets killed by the cops and the other gets charged with felony murder.

    This is correct. As much as dislike criminals, this is one interpretation of the law I disagree with. The death of the second robber is an occupational hazard.

  141. Anon[352] • Disclaimer says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:28 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @kaganovitch
    @A.Lawyer

    If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    You do know it's not 1972 anymore? All police cars are GPSed to the gills. Dispatch can see where you are relative to address just as if you were driving an Uber.

    Replies: @Anon, @Charon

    You do know it’s not 1972 anymore? All police cars are GPSed to the gills. Dispatch can see where you are relative to address just as if you were driving an Uber.

    Come on, cops just need to mentally prepare for that dreaded dispatch call they will inevitably face in their career and how to best respond.

    “10 Adam 12… we have an assault in progress at ABC Liquor… please respond code 3…”

    Code 3. Lights and siren.

    “Unit 10 Adam 12… caller describes suspect as code 1 [black] male…”

    😳

    “Dispatch… this is 10 Adam 12… my cruiser just hit a curb and I’ll need a tow.”

    • Agree: bruce county
  142. Altai [AKA "Altai_2"] says:
    @Agathoklis
    @Altai

    When Greek Cypriot APOEL fans make political statements about Turkish occupation and Greek patriotism they get sanctioned by UEFA.

    Replies: @Altai

    This goes beyond fans or players though. This is an official act by the League itself and the teams. There have been fines before for Poppy wearing but there is no way UEFA or FIFA would dare say a word about all this.

  143. ATBOTL says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:30 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Dr. X

    what happened to murder rates the last two times white elites decided that cops were the Bad Guys and inner city black knuckleheads were the Good Guys.
     
    Cops can be bad guys. Probably a minority of them, but still too many, and thugs and goons. That being said, for some reason people don't get outraged and start riots over the really egregious examples, like the Daniel Shaver shooting.

    The black in Ferguson who attacked the cop, the black in Atlanta who stole the taser, and even Rodney King are not exactly textbook cases of police brutality. The George Floyd case was, but the cops got charged.

    And it's incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XExqABO4kc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvoQRdSFiDw

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @Anon, @ATBOTL, @David In TN

    Because most white people will side with police against an innocent white civilian every time. That is part of the cuck psychology of the American white man. If a pig shot a white baby sleeping in a stroller for no reason and then set the baby on fire before throwing the baby over Niagara falls, most white Americans would blame the white baby and say the pig was justified. Until that changes, there is no chance of any kind of white resistance. We have to push back against the pro-police, “blue lives matter” nonsense.

    Worship of the police is a uniquely white American value and one of the many reasons modern white American culture doesn’t deserve to survive. We can’t do anything without changing our culture first. That is the battle.

    • Agree: VinnyVette
    • Replies: @Aeronerauk
    @ATBOTL

    That might genuinely be the most insane thing i've ever seen written here. White people do side with the police over criminals more often than not, but corrupt cops were a common trope in media before all this anti police hysteria. Do people who like the movie Copland worship cops?

    Most are like you, though perhaps less demented hatred and more resigned eye rolling. By the way, I'm sorry about that speeding ticket they gave you.

    , @bruce county
    @ATBOTL

    Go back to your basement and your game console. You remind me of the people who stand there and video the police doing their jobs but cry like a little girl when you have an interaction with them. People like you are the first to call the police if you get a scratch on your BMW.

    , @William Badwhite
    @ATBOTL

    I generally agree with your point about the excessive deference to police by whites, but your point would be made better without the name-calling ("pigs").

    Replies: @Jane Plain

  144. Arrest warrants have been issued for the two and they were asked to surrender by Thursday. With the felony murder charge, Rolfe could face the death penalty if convicted.

    Idiot. It’s obviously NOT felony murder. The felony that turns the homicide into a murder can’t be the force that results in the killing. It’s just plain murder, or at least that’s the prosecutor’s theory.

  145. @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    Depends on how successful they are.

  146. @Charon
    @Inquiring Mind

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn't look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    That said, isn't it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court's jurisdiction.

    Replies: @bruce county, @jon, @James B. Shearer, @Charlotte, @Mr. Anon

    Homicide—‘‘occurs when death results from…’’ an injury or poisoning or
    from ‘‘…a volitional act committed by another person to cause fear, harm,
    or death. Intent to cause death is a common element but is not required for
    classification as homicide.’’

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/hb_me.pdf

  147. Whiskey says: • Website
    June 18, 2020 at 2:38 am GMT • 300 Words   

    The cop is going to be convicted. Slam dunk. He’s White. That’s enough.

    And no, the cops are not going to walk off the job. Not going to happen.

    Most White cops are going to be fired or be forced to resign. Not just in Atlanta but nationwide. And no, no Black person will ever be arrested again. Not going to happen. Just as Jeh Johnson demanded.

    Nor will ex cops form death squad or paramilitaries. They will be just like every other White person fired. They will do nothing. White people are well pussies. We don’t fight because we can’t — its genetic. Look at the USA vs. every non-White nation after Japan. Defeat after defeat. We never win. We can’t. Its not in is. We are not fighters.

    What this will do is make every place with Black people have massive, uncontrollable crime. This is just what Dems, the media, the Military want. Expect the Military to replace all their White soldiers etc. too. And a general purge of all White people everywhere. In fact the Purge movie is coming. All crime (against Whites) will be legal.

    Trump is totally absent. He’s beaten and knows it. He is busy making deals to lose even bigger to get some small mercy for Jared as he knows he’s going to prison for a very, very long time.

    I told you this would happen. Now imagine what will happen under President Abrams. Enjoy your cars and houses while you can. Soon they will belong to Black people. President Abrams will not allow you to keep all that — the only reason you have it is racist privilege of being White. By rights they belong to Black people and that’s exactly what will happen.

    BTW, the massive crime increase? White women will love it. Their very own rap video that never ends.

    • LOL: Truth
  148. @vhrm
    @Jonathan Mason

    You can buy a breathalyzer at best buy. The good ones are $80 and up, the cheap ones are $30


    https://www.amazon.com/iSOBER-Breathalyzer-Requirements-Accredited-Laboratory/dp/B07MWZSX38

    (but yeah, the current enforcement levels and severity of penalties are "moral panic" levels left over from MADD of the 80s and 90s rather than proportionate response, imo)

    Replies: @bruce county

    Cops pulled me over for suspected impaired driving. He asks me my name. I told him Bob..He asked me my last name..I said it was Loblaw. The cop looked at me and said your. name is Bob Loblaw. I said yes..Bob blah blah. Needless to say I got a roadside suspension. He saw no humor in the joke..

  149. I don’t know anything about the business and politics of being a public prosecutor, but tactically speaking, doesn’t filing such a charge actually make sense from a political point of view?

    The mob is satisfied that the cop has been hit with the most severe charge. At the same time, the prosecutor is ensuring that the charge is so disproportionate to the offense and the situation surrounding the shooting, that he is practically ensuring that the cop will be found not guilty—as the necessary legal standards for conviction can’t be met.

    Or is no D.A. really that sly?

  150. @RAZ
    @Spud Boy

    True that higher charges more likely to lead to acquittal.

    George Zimmerman was overcharged with 2nd degree murder because Sharpton et al demanded it. They probably would've gotten a conviction on a lesser charge. Speaking of which, he's managed to stay out of trouble for awhile. I figured it was just a matter of time till he effed up enough to get himself convicted for something if he stayed in the US and thought he'd be better going to his mom's native Peru. But after some drama I haven't heard about him for awhile.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @jon, @Art Deco

    George Zimmerman was overcharged with 2nd degree murder because Sharpton et al demanded it.

    Littering would have been overcharging. There was no conceivable lesser offense.

  151. @Intelligent Dasein
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime…
     
    This is absolute nonsense. How the hell do you think society will maintain the infrastructure necessary to allow people to work remotely if they can't even defend a building sitting on a piece of real property?

    "Remote work" is a hothouse flower that will not survive any serious difficulty. The end result of this period of unrest will be that any meaningful activity that must be carried on is going to become much more centralized and defended, not less.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @usNthem

    You can’t defend anything from Blacks. They are holy. Can’t do it.

    Its over.

  152. Kronos says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:47 am GMT • 200 Words   
    @Redneck farmer
    @Kronos

    Not for this kind of case. Good book, though.

    Replies: @Kronos

    True, the legal background is different. White cop shoots armed black dude compared to black athlete allegedly rapes daughter of wealthy white Atlanta figure. But the racial dimensions and potential for explosive violence is still there. Blacks will likely do more than shake their collective booties at a fancy drivers club.

    (Honestly, I only got halfway so no spoilers. There was a new Warhammer 40,000 book that got me sidetracked but I’ll finish “A Man in Full” sometime in the future. Don’t give me any crap for switching from gold to trash.)

    Strangely enough, Trump very much resembles a New York version of Charles Croker. Or, Captain Charlie resembles a Atlanta version of Trump (minus the football and generation background.) Both demonstrate great showmanship and are confident at navigating either high society or working class gatherings.

    (Just don’t call your potential Jewish customers “Heeb” by accident or even show clients how horses are bred.)

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Kronos

    I finally read one of the Warhammer 40K books. I will be buying more. Sometimes it's nice to read without fully engaging your brain.

  153. @jon
    @Jonathan Mason


    Can you buy a kit to test your own alcohol level?

     

    Yes
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=breathalyzer&ref=nb_sb_noss

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Costco will sell you a breathalyzer that plugs into your auto ignition so that you can’t drunk drive your own car. Costco only carries a narrow range of popular items, which suggests that’s a common thing.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Steve Sailer

    It's common for courts (and/or insurance companies) to order repeat offenders to install one in their vehicle as a condition of getting back their license.

    , @Sam Haysom
    @Steve Sailer

    Costco also definitely experiments with new to market products that have a distinct benefit and offer them enough margin. As an intern for a CPG we sold them a new to market item that wasn’t carried in any other stores. But they only purchased it for 15 stores in the north east.

  154. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:50 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @JimDandy
    Wow. My God. What do we do?

    Replies: @Red Pill Angel, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Nothing. There are ways to help a defendant in a criminal trial, but it’s safe to say if anyone is considering them they wouldn’t say anything about it on the internet. Maybe there will be a bitcoin link created?

    The people who should be doing something are our Republican politicians, but they prefer warmongering and tax cutting. I’ll be writing in “drop table” in November.

    I remember an article Steve wrote justifying his refusals to comment on the latest Trump controversy. At that time, the Trump controversies were mostly Trump insulting the looks of some starlet, stuff an intelligent person should ignore. But now with stuff like the Bolton accusations, why isn’t he saying anything? There’s really no way to defend Trump. Either he did what Bolton accuses him of doing, or he hired a neocon traitor he was loudly warned against hiring.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Anonymous


    There’s really no way to defend Trump.
     
    How many discrete criticisms of Trump have been lodged since he announced his candidacy in June 2015?

    100s? 1000s?

    Normies are still trying to process the Trump-Russia accusations. Give us a break. We don't need any more. We'll never get to process them anyhow.

    If you really feel the need to criticize or undermine a power center, do us all a favor and work on the "Interagency" (AKA "Intelligence Community").
    , @vhrm
    @Anonymous


    I’ll be writing in “drop table” in November.
     
    I guess lil Bobby Tables probably IS old enough to run for office now but probably not for president.

    https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/exploits_of_a_mom.png

    https://xkcd.com/327/
  155. @Steve Sailer
    @jon

    Costco will sell you a breathalyzer that plugs into your auto ignition so that you can't drunk drive your own car. Costco only carries a narrow range of popular items, which suggests that's a common thing.

    Replies: @vhrm, @Sam Haysom

    It’s common for courts (and/or insurance companies) to order repeat offenders to install one in their vehicle as a condition of getting back their license.

  156. Precious says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:52 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Jesse
    It's more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.

    I do, however, agree with the general consensus that murder charges are the wrong route. Take the Daniel Shaver situation. It was a sadistic sergeant and the trigger happy twerp beside him, which raises questions about the department's hiring and promotion standards. Charging the twerp with murder and implying he was the one playing twisted Simon says allowed a clear structural rot to look like a horrible but isolated hiring error.

    TPTB are learning that the BLM types have no sense of nuance or proportion, or ability to wait even medium term for results. So they throw them a bone - in the form of anyone unfortunate enough to get caught on camera - and leave the structural issues alone. What this case warranted was a quiet sit down with the chief of police, and to quietly get the ball rolling on forcing these two incompetents out.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @Precious, @Anonymousse

    But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.

    ^What a load of baloney. The cops were exceedingly patient and polite. It got to that moment in the first place because they didn’t sucker punch or pistol whip the guy without warning. Black people are not children. If they expect to be coddled like children then they can give up their right to alcohol and the right to vote.

    • Agree: sayless
  157. @trelane
    @Wyatt

    Not easy. Wrong. Bad answer. Much more complicated than that.

    Replies: @Charon

    Not much more. He’s describing Copenhagen, more or less. There’s just one other relevant factor, but I don’t want to lose my job by saying it out loud.

  158. @RAZ
    @Spud Boy

    True that higher charges more likely to lead to acquittal.

    George Zimmerman was overcharged with 2nd degree murder because Sharpton et al demanded it. They probably would've gotten a conviction on a lesser charge. Speaking of which, he's managed to stay out of trouble for awhile. I figured it was just a matter of time till he effed up enough to get himself convicted for something if he stayed in the US and thought he'd be better going to his mom's native Peru. But after some drama I haven't heard about him for awhile.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @jon, @Art Deco

    George Zimmerman

    He apparently is trying to sue the Martin family, wasn’t anything more recent about how the case is proceeding.
    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/12/04/us/george-zimmerman-lawsuit-trayvon-martin-mother/index.html

  159. @theMann
    Can you say "Right Wing Paramilitary?"

    Cops are going to be flowing into those so fast it won't even be funny.

    This is going to get interesting much sooner than anybody realizes.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Clifford Brown, @Kratoklastes

    The United States is not yet Ulster or South America. Cops generally do their jobs because they pay well. Most police officers are not particularly ideological and virtually none have strong ethnic or clannish identities that inspire right wing paramilitary reaction. American cops may have authoritarian personalities according to the Frankfort School, but they are not political radicals nor do they have they have the tribal identity that is needed to rebel against the State.

    At this point, Americans, especially cops, are still far too comfortable.

    Cops could quit en masse and join private security forces for the rich in elite cities under the auspices of Blackwater or Academi as it calls itself this week. This Brazilification of urban law enforcement is far more likely than the rise of an Ulster Volunteer Force in Manhattan.

  160. @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    They do if they have Henry Winkler on board:

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Reg Cæsar

    The money bennies scene is at 50 minutes. No idea why the time stamp doesn't work.

  161. @Clifford Brown
    @JimDandy

    In a high trust society, this approach could work, but if the suspect is extremely intoxicated a night in jail is meant to encourage the person to change their life choices.

    Part of the DUI fee could be a $100 Uber surcharge. Maybe that becomes the new norm. I once ate a burrito in the backseat of an Uber with the permission of the driver and was charged $150 for the rice I allegedly spilled in the backseat. I have not eaten in an Uber since.

    In a low trust society, smart phones and technology possibly could be used to avoid these types of interactions. Possibly smart cars in the future will be able to determine if the driver is drunk and automatically pull over.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Charon

    A surcharge would never stick against POCs. Disparate Impact.

    Remember they no longer have to pay fines, water and electric bills, registration fees, insurance premiums, rent and grocery expenses, and on and on.

  162. jon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:03 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Charon
    @Inquiring Mind

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn't look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    That said, isn't it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court's jurisdiction.

    Replies: @bruce county, @jon, @James B. Shearer, @Charlotte, @Mr. Anon

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case.

    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn’t shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @jon


    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn’t shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.
     
    And the cop who shot him didn't necessarily know it was a taser either. It was his partner's taser that Brooks grabbed and ran off with. As far as Rolfe knew, he might have grabbed his partner's gun. Or had a gun hidden on him.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @James B. Shearer, @Truth

    , @Charon
    @jon

    I watched the video and I agree with you, but bullet holes in the back are a real problem when this gets to court, not to mention now.

    Replies: @Charlotte

  163. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:07 am GMT • 200 Words   
    @Thucydides
    If you are a police officer forced to shoot a Black in self-defense, and that's what the video shows, you get charged with murder. Police should start looking for other employment.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jordi

    Police should start looking to spend more time at the donut shop. And they will, my friend, they will.

    Every police officer indicted for “overzealous” policing means 10 more blacks (and maybe a couple of whites) murdered because the cops are not as interested in arresting felons.

    And it take a LOT of arrests under our system to get someone off the street permanently. Basim Henry, the getaway driver in the carjacking murder of young lawyer Justin Friedland, killed for his Range Rover, had, at the age of 36, been arrested seven times as a juvenile, fourteen times as an adult, convicted of unlawful possession of an assault firearm, and convicted of bank robbery and STILL he was free to walk the streets until he committed his final crime (not counting those he may commit in prison during his life plus 10 year sentence). Not only had he been given a 2nd chance, he had been given a 3rd and a 4th and a 21st (this is not counting all the times he committed crimes for which he was not caught – probably 10x as many). These are the black lives that are said to “matter”. They do matter because for decades such predators have made our big cities unlivable and they will again given the chance. But to even mention the Basim Henry’s of the world or attribute any agency to them is “racist” in today’s environment.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Jack D


    And it take a LOT of arrests under our system to get someone off the street permanently.
     
    The guy in New York who knocked an elderly woman down, causing her to hit her head against a fire hydrant, has a record of more than 100 arrests. He's 31 years old. He has a long career ahead of him.
    , @Anonymousse
    @Jack D

    Well as long as James Fields gets over 400 years we can all rest easy at night.

  164. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?
     
    They do if they have Henry Winkler on board:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFYlpTEdyDM&t=50m05s

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The money bennies scene is at 50 minutes. No idea why the time stamp doesn’t work.

  165. anon[247] • Disclaimer says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:11 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Clifford Brown
    @syonredux

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally. I think a night in jail for someone who was ridiculously drunk behind the wheel like this fellow (falling asleep in the Wendy's drive thru should be approaching rock bottom) is meant to serve as a "wake up" call to alter one's behavior.

    Brooks reactions seemed shady. His story kept changing, it was variously different peoples' birthdays, he allegedly had a car rental, but he did not know from where. Comically, suspicious behavior, but not really worth a shooting of someone who seemed more pathetic than dangerous until of course he attacked the officers.

    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Jack D, @anon, @iDeplorable

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber.

    Something like that could have been done back maybe 50 years ago. But now…that’s for state legislatures and governors. You’ll be going up against 40 years of precedent. Because cops do not have the discretion to do that in most states, not for the last 30 years or more.

    Most people just don’t realize how much discretion has been taken away from cops over the last 30 – 40 years. Mandatory arrest, zero tolerance, etc. applies to a lot of situations including the cops at every high school.

  166. anonymous[238] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @James B. Shearer

    I believe there are cases where two guys rob a liquor store and one gets killed by the cops and the other gets charged with felony murder.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Charon

    Yes, here’s an example, but it’s a homeowner who shot in self-defense: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/car-owner-kills-teen-suspect-during-attempted-theft-five-other-n1042786

  167. captflee says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:13 am GMT • 200 Words   
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    We are learning that those scenes in "Birth of a Nation", which depicted the operation of occupied state "governments" during Reconstruction were, contrary to the official ruling class narrative, quite accurate.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @captflee, @Alden

    The carnival of corruption that attended the Grand Army of the Republic at its every stop and in its aftermath must have been truly something to behold. Despite a century and a half of assiduous efforts by those most diligent of camp followers, the “historians” (only card carrying Marxists or Strauss & Jaffa acolytes need apply), to put an utterly unwarranted gloss on that dubious and sleazy Marxoid enterprise, the stench is still easily discernible.

    From time to time I grow weary and fail to remember that one cannot really expect from that august organisation, the Grand Old Party, much in the way of help, founded as it was as a regional party, in the main dedicated to the conquest and looting (whether by ballot or by bayonet) of other sections of the Union, sending forth their blue uniformed minions to settle accounts with anyone not along for the grift. They’ve got their priorities, ya see.

  168. ChrisZ says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:20 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @The Wild Geese Howard
    I predict a lot of current cops retiring or just quitting.

    I predict a lot of new cops like Mohammed Noor.

    Replies: @OscarWildeLoveChild, @ChrisZ

    That’s always been the idea. They’re more pliant to arbitrary authority, with less allegiance to the country and people they’re supposed to protect. We underestimate how much the religious and patriotic loyalties of ethnic White cops have restrained them from being mere shock troops of elites, as police are in other countries. Our soulless leaders are taking us in the latter direction.

  169. @Jack D
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond

    "The truth is no defense" is not, generally speaking, a part of American law while the felony murder rule is ancient (going back to at least the 12 century or "time immemorial" (i.e. before the law was written down).

    Felony murder relates to the concept that to be guilty of murder, you need both a dead person and you need "malice". Malice with no dead person might be attempted murder (or no crime at all if the malice was entirely in your head and you never left your arm chair) but it's not murder. A dead person without malice might be manslaughter but its not murder either. Dead person PLUS malice - murder.

    Malice is, roughly speaking, the evil state of mind which one has when one about to commit a serious crime. Say that you intend to shoot the lock off of a safe and the bullet ricochets off the lock and kills the bank officer instead. You have a dead person and you have "malice" and the malice of shooting the lock off is transferred to the killing so now you have all of the ingredients for murder, even though you did not intend to kill the bank officer. Your evil or malicious intent in shooting the lock off is transferred to the murder.

    Is this right or wrong? Generally speaking I think it is fair. If you start out intending to commit an evil, felonious deed and someone dies as a result, you should be responsible for his death - it was no "accident". Once you embark on the path of felony, whatever follows is on you. Don't want to be guilty of felony murder - don't commit any felonies.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Jane Plain, @Steve Sailer

    What felony did the officer commit.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @MBlanc46


    What felony did the officer commit.
     
    I don't know that he committed any (nor will anyone else until the judge or jury reaches a verdict) but the underlying felony that he is charged with is "aggravated assault".

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  170. @Thucydides
    If you are a police officer forced to shoot a Black in self-defense, and that's what the video shows, you get charged with murder. Police should start looking for other employment.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jordi

    Police will focus on ticketing motorists, bullying middle class divorcees for « emotional abuse » and paperwork.

    No need for them to resign… or confront dindus.

  171. Has blue flu hit Atlanta yet?

    Forget it.

    I’m late. The flu is in Atlanta.

  172. Coemgen says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:23 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Anonymous
    @JimDandy

    Nothing. There are ways to help a defendant in a criminal trial, but it's safe to say if anyone is considering them they wouldn't say anything about it on the internet. Maybe there will be a bitcoin link created?

    The people who should be doing something are our Republican politicians, but they prefer warmongering and tax cutting. I'll be writing in "drop table" in November.

    I remember an article Steve wrote justifying his refusals to comment on the latest Trump controversy. At that time, the Trump controversies were mostly Trump insulting the looks of some starlet, stuff an intelligent person should ignore. But now with stuff like the Bolton accusations, why isn't he saying anything? There's really no way to defend Trump. Either he did what Bolton accuses him of doing, or he hired a neocon traitor he was loudly warned against hiring.

    Replies: @Coemgen, @vhrm

    There’s really no way to defend Trump.

    How many discrete criticisms of Trump have been lodged since he announced his candidacy in June 2015?

    100s? 1000s?

    Normies are still trying to process the Trump-Russia accusations. Give us a break. We don’t need any more. We’ll never get to process them anyhow.

    If you really feel the need to criticize or undermine a power center, do us all a favor and work on the “Interagency” (AKA “Intelligence Community”).

  173. And Trump goes on TV whining about Bolton.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Jane Plain


    Trump goes on TV whining about Bolton.
     
    What a bizarre hire that was. Mustachio Wilford Brimley whose answer to every question is "more war", and Trump who had as a key pillar of his campaign "no more endless war" brings him on board?

    And right on cue, the bloodthirsty weirdo is attempting to affect the outcome of the election. As if more criticism of Trump from swamp denizens is going to swing anybody's opinion.
  174. usNthem says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:27 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Intelligent Dasein
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime…
     
    This is absolute nonsense. How the hell do you think society will maintain the infrastructure necessary to allow people to work remotely if they can't even defend a building sitting on a piece of real property?

    "Remote work" is a hothouse flower that will not survive any serious difficulty. The end result of this period of unrest will be that any meaningful activity that must be carried on is going to become much more centralized and defended, not less.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @usNthem

    I hope you’re right, but at present it depends on who or what the meaningful activity or building is being defended from. If it’s a certain segment of our population, that defense may carry an onerous liability in the current (& perhaps future) environment – thus we see the police abandoning their precinct station to the mob in Minneapolis and a several block area in Seattle being occupied by rioters with no meaningful pushback. Seemingly everyone supposedly on the side of law and order is terrified of taking a hard line. Until that changes, I think these troubles will persist and probably deteriorate.

  175. @JimDandy
    @Barnard

    Did he say that?

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    I can’t believe you chumps.

    Do you think that Trump gives a shit about this cop? He just signed an EO banning police misconduct, or some such bullshit.

    It was drafted by his advisor, some black guy with an apostrophe in the middle of his first name. Ja’Von something.

    Trump isn’t going to say anything or do anything.

    He. Does. Not. Care.

    My suggestion: a very focused strike, to take down an important target.

    The NFL.

    But it will never happen.

  176. @Jack D
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond

    "The truth is no defense" is not, generally speaking, a part of American law while the felony murder rule is ancient (going back to at least the 12 century or "time immemorial" (i.e. before the law was written down).

    Felony murder relates to the concept that to be guilty of murder, you need both a dead person and you need "malice". Malice with no dead person might be attempted murder (or no crime at all if the malice was entirely in your head and you never left your arm chair) but it's not murder. A dead person without malice might be manslaughter but its not murder either. Dead person PLUS malice - murder.

    Malice is, roughly speaking, the evil state of mind which one has when one about to commit a serious crime. Say that you intend to shoot the lock off of a safe and the bullet ricochets off the lock and kills the bank officer instead. You have a dead person and you have "malice" and the malice of shooting the lock off is transferred to the killing so now you have all of the ingredients for murder, even though you did not intend to kill the bank officer. Your evil or malicious intent in shooting the lock off is transferred to the murder.

    Is this right or wrong? Generally speaking I think it is fair. If you start out intending to commit an evil, felonious deed and someone dies as a result, you should be responsible for his death - it was no "accident". Once you embark on the path of felony, whatever follows is on you. Don't want to be guilty of felony murder - don't commit any felonies.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Jane Plain, @Steve Sailer

    Is it at all possible that the DA is bringing a case that he cannot possibly win?

    Which doesn’t lessen the horror for Rolfe, but still.

  177. @Steve Sailer
    @jon

    Costco will sell you a breathalyzer that plugs into your auto ignition so that you can't drunk drive your own car. Costco only carries a narrow range of popular items, which suggests that's a common thing.

    Replies: @vhrm, @Sam Haysom

    Costco also definitely experiments with new to market products that have a distinct benefit and offer them enough margin. As an intern for a CPG we sold them a new to market item that wasn’t carried in any other stores. But they only purchased it for 15 stores in the north east.

  178. @JimDandy
    @Art Deco

    Why won't there be a massive march in his defense?

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

    Because white Americans are demoralized by 50 years of having the deck stacked against them.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Joseph Doaks

    That's one way of putting it. Another way is: Because white Americans are short-sighted and self-centered and mistake their lack of tribal loyalty for morality.

    , @Truth
    @Joseph Doaks

    Br-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-h, what are you talking about?

    The white man has had the deck stacked against him for fo' hunnit years! You didn't land on Plymouth Rock...

    ...Oh, wait, yes you did, I got confused.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  179. Veracitor says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:46 am GMT • 200 Words   

    1. I like your Common Law analysis . Let’s have some fun: A clever honest District Attorney would divert the attention of the Googles by indicting Rolfe’s pistol and asking a coroner’s jury to declare it deodand and forfeit (instead of charging Rolfe, that is).

    2. The Establishment which runs most large American local governments really has adopted a special kind of anarcho-tyranny scheme for its own police forces. Normally even very brutal or crooked cops are tolerated, protected by corrupt prosecutors, by their unions, by “qualified immunity,” by “police officer bill of rights” laws, by “multiagency task forces,”[1] etc. But every once in a while a rush of negative publicity briefly frightens the Establishment and then it inflicts harsh penalties on any street cops involved[2] regardless of their actual guilt. In these cases the Establishment often won’t accept acquittals; if designated scapegoats win their first trials, the Establishment re-indicts them on Federal “civil rights” charges. This random hurling of Jovian thunderbolts by the Establishment does not deter police misconduct, because good cops are as likely to be struck as bad ones.

    [1] When cops on a “multi-agency task force” misbehave, each agency tells complainants to go after the others and in the end none is responsible at all.

    [2] Street cops are punished capriciously but higher-ups are almost never punished at all.

  180. @Dr. X

    what happened to murder rates the last two times white elites decided that cops were the Bad Guys and inner city black knuckleheads were the Good Guys.
     
    Cops can be bad guys. Probably a minority of them, but still too many, and thugs and goons. That being said, for some reason people don't get outraged and start riots over the really egregious examples, like the Daniel Shaver shooting.

    The black in Ferguson who attacked the cop, the black in Atlanta who stole the taser, and even Rodney King are not exactly textbook cases of police brutality. The George Floyd case was, but the cops got charged.

    And it's incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XExqABO4kc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvoQRdSFiDw

    Replies: @Daniel Williams, @Anon, @ATBOTL, @David In TN

    “And it’s incredible how everybody refuses to acknowledge that white people are the targets of police brutality far more than blacks are:”

    What do you expect with the MSM, politicians, and especially Conservatism Inc. peddling the BLM lies?”

  181. @Anonymous
    @JimDandy

    Nothing. There are ways to help a defendant in a criminal trial, but it's safe to say if anyone is considering them they wouldn't say anything about it on the internet. Maybe there will be a bitcoin link created?

    The people who should be doing something are our Republican politicians, but they prefer warmongering and tax cutting. I'll be writing in "drop table" in November.

    I remember an article Steve wrote justifying his refusals to comment on the latest Trump controversy. At that time, the Trump controversies were mostly Trump insulting the looks of some starlet, stuff an intelligent person should ignore. But now with stuff like the Bolton accusations, why isn't he saying anything? There's really no way to defend Trump. Either he did what Bolton accuses him of doing, or he hired a neocon traitor he was loudly warned against hiring.

    Replies: @Coemgen, @vhrm

    I’ll be writing in “drop table” in November.

    I guess lil Bobby Tables probably IS old enough to run for office now but probably not for president.

    https://xkcd.com/327/

  182. Daniel H says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:54 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Lot
    On topic:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sE-8MTP37uY

    I noticed on a census map that the suburban counties around Atlanta have the fastest growing black populations in America by several measures.

    For example:

    “ Gwinnett County is often cited as one of the counties in the US that has demographically changed the most rapidly. As recently as 1990, over 90% of Gwinnett County's population was white. By 2007, the county was considered majority-minority.”

    https://video.newsserve.net/v/20190206/1902062031-Stacey-Abrams-Responds-to-Trump-State-of_hires.jpg

    Replies: @Daniel H

    I noticed on a census map that the suburban counties around Atlanta have the fastest growing black populations in America by several measures.

    Serves them/us right. We/they have been voting for the cucks for 40 years now, demanding nothing in return.

    It’s up to you people. 2020 is a watershed year. just say not to cucks. Destroy the cuck/Republican faction. The cucks are the problem. They are the greater enemy.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Daniel H

    You’re right about cucks being a problem, but apparently due to a painful family situation Lot hates the use of that term and tries to police it.

    He actually told me “cuck” is a “stale forced meme in 2020.” LOL.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-old-weird-california/#comment-1770366 (#15)

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/what-is-canada-doing-right/#comment-3809195 (#246)

  183. @Steve Sailer
    @James B. Shearer

    I believe there are cases where two guys rob a liquor store and one gets killed by the cops and the other gets charged with felony murder.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Charon

    Don’t forget Ryan Holle: life in prison without parole for a murder committed while he was asleep. The murderer’s accomplice had borrowed Ryan’s car.

  184. A lot of the public outrage over the deaths of George Floyd and this Brooks fellow is not really about them at all. BLM is capitalizing on the public mood shift of course, and Woke Capital is capitalizing on BLM (because, at bottom, Woke Capital is incredibly stupid), but that isn’t what it’s really about. Nor is it about racial tensions.

    This is about years and years of pent-up frustration with a system that no longer works. The average, law-abiding person today feels like a sucker for playing by the rules; he feels like the powers that be are militating against his little life with an incomprehensible degree of arrogance and callousness, and that he has much more to lose to the system than what he gains by it. The average man not only cannot get ahead, he is one missed payment or doctor’s visit or altercation with a careless cop away from total ruin.

    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people’s dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses, never face justice for their excessive force, and walk away from it all with the kind of six-figure pensions and cadillac care that Joe Blow can only dream about. There is a seething frustration with all this just under the surface. It cannot articulate itself; it has no verbal or political outlet, so it bursts out in strange ways using words not really its own.

    Looked at in this way, it makes a curious kind of sense that the men whose deaths finally occasioned the long overdue day of reckoning, Floyd and Brooks, have nothing personally commendable about them. It isn’t about them at all. It’s about ordinary people saying “Screw it!” Opting out is, I believe, the polite terminology.

    An innocent victim could not have generated this sort of outrage. If the cops had gunned down a mother and her baby, for instance, it either would have been dismissed as an accident or it would have been dealt with in the ordinary course of law or it would have been added to the smoldering pile of silent resentment that we all already feel. We already have psychological compartments for dealing with such clear-cut evils. But when the evil is of the diffused, generalized variety that hides within the respectable forms of the cop, the banker, and the CEO, it is difficult to express it because any such expression is, first of all, an admission of weakness. These people don’t kill us directly, but they degrade and insult us on a constant basis. They don’t come sneaking out of the bushes to beat us on the back of the head and take our wallets, but they do take away our freedom, our dignity, and our manhood. Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say “I am George Floyd” when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived? It’s because his symbolic value is not in how he lived but in how he died. We are all George Floyd because we all can’t breathe. We all have our faces smashed into the ground by The Man and we’re freaking sick of it. Nobody knows how to say this, so instead they say “Black Lives Matter.”

    Today they come for the cops. Tomorrow they will be coming for the banks. This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race. Do not confuse the yodel with the avalanche.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Intelligent Dasein

    "This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race."

    Sure

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Intelligent Dasein

    "Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say 'I am George Floyd' when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived?"

    Ordinary white people? Not a chance.

    An ordinary white who acted and talked like that would be an abject coward, imitating a black supremacist.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Intelligent Dasein


    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people’s dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses …
     
    Hahaha, where the heck do you live? It sounds wild! I live among civilized Whites; ain’t none of that stuff happening here.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @vinteuil
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Leave it to the weirdly energetic parodist "Intelligent Dasein" to come up with the single looniest take on all this.

    At least he didn't bring Schubert's Sonatas into it, this time around.

    Anybody who thinks he's anything other than a troll need only check out his recent guest-post on Audacious Epigone's blog.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I think you're right to the extent that a better-functioning society could prevent people from becoming loony. If antifa were tilling the soil instead of sitting in front of computer monitors all day, none of this would have happened. However, you're wrong that this is about frustration over society rather than race. The younger people I know are really bonkers about racial issues and many hate western civilization. It's because of the school systems. They have been carefully taught since grade school.

  185. @Steve Sailer
    @Spud Boy

    Wait until tomorrow.

    Replies: @Kronos, @Mr. Anon

    Wait until tomorrow.

    We are told that these actions by the police are the result of institutional racism. Given that, shouldn’t the entire Police Department and City government of Atlanta, and the Fulton County DAs office, be indicted for conspiracy to commit murder?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Mr. Anon

    Too serious for LOL, and I don't want to click Agree, and be taken as believing yes they should be. I agree with your point.

  186. @Anonymous
    White men....

    Why join the military and fight Wars for Israel?

    Why join the police and fight battles for gentrification?

    Why especially when those behind both hate you and scapegoat you for everything?

    Let the smarmy 'liberal' urban elites defend themselves. Besides, they got nothing to worry about from angelic blacks.

    All this policing was based on the 'racist' fantasy that blacks commit lots of crime.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Why join the military and fight Wars for Israel?

    There are no Wars for Israel outside your imagination.

    • LOL: donut, Anonymousse, kihowi
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    There are no Wars for Israel outside your imagination.
     
    Sure, the US just happens to be bellicose towards every country with which Israel has a beef. It is purely coincidence.

    You are such a stupid, dull-witted drone. Do you think anyone thinks you to be some kind of infallible font of wisdom? You are an idiot and a clown.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  187. Mr. Anon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:02 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @jon
    @Charon


    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case.
     
    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn't shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Charon

    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn’t shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.

    And the cop who shot him didn’t necessarily know it was a taser either. It was his partner’s taser that Brooks grabbed and ran off with. As far as Rolfe knew, he might have grabbed his partner’s gun. Or had a gun hidden on him.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Mr. Anon


    And the cop who shot him didn’t necessarily know it was a taser either. It was his partner’s taser that Brooks grabbed and ran off with. As far as Rolfe knew, he might have grabbed his partner’s gun. Or had a gun hidden on him.
     
    That's right, and that's the winning defense. You *can* shoot a fleeing felon in the back if letting him escape poses a danger to others.
    , @James B. Shearer
    @Mr. Anon

    "... Or had a gun hidden on him."

    Reportedly, they had searched him.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Truth
    @Mr. Anon

    The tasers are painted in flourescent colors for that very reason, grasshopper. And they were going to handcuff him with a gun on his posession?

  188. @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    Why join the military and fight Wars for Israel?

    There are no Wars for Israel outside your imagination.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    There are no Wars for Israel outside your imagination.

    Sure, the US just happens to be bellicose towards every country with which Israel has a beef. It is purely coincidence.

    You are such a stupid, dull-witted drone. Do you think anyone thinks you to be some kind of infallible font of wisdom? You are an idiot and a clown.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    You are such a stupid, dull-witted drone. Do you think anyone thinks you to be some kind of infallible font of wisdom? You are an idiot and a clown.

    It doesn't matter how much hot air you emit. There are still no wars for Israel outside your imagination.



    the US just happens to be bellicose towards every country with which Israel has a beef. It is purely coincidence.

    We have conflicts with Iran, Syria, and Turkey. All of which they initiated (and with none of which have we been at war).

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  189. @Clifford Brown
    @Jesse


    It’s more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.
     
    You can watch the full 45 minute video of the arrest. They can't use their clubs. They cannot use chokeholds. Maybe they could have subdued the suspect if they could have put a knee on his neck. Perhaps take his keys and tell him to call a taxi?

    What did the cops do wrong?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhdpG2XzRXQ

    Replies: @syonredux, @JimDandy, @James B. Shearer, @Joseph Doaks

    “What did the cops do wrong?”

    They weren’t fit enough or well trained enough that two of them together couldn’t subdue Rayshard Brooks.

  190. @anon
    @George

    Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    Allegedly he blew 0.108 which is over the limit of 0.08.

    My understanding is Mr Brooks was in, but not operating, the parked vehicle.

    We've been over this. There's precedent and USSC decisions that extended "DUI" to parked vehicles on the side of a public road, and "public road" includes shopping mall parking lots & so forth. Much of this dates back to the 1980's when Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) was very influential in state legislatures as well as in the Congress and the Reagan administration. It's all old news and settled law that nobody is going to challenge in any court.

    Suggest you view the bodycam vid. The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Polynikes, @Jim Don Bob, @Truth

    The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.

    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn’t give them to police, they’d give them a second firearm.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Truth


    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn’t give them to police, they’d give them a second firearm.
     
    They give cops night-sticks. Has nobody ever been beaten to death with a baton? Cops have arms. Has nobody ever died in a choke-hold? People have probaby been killed with rubber bullets. People have probably even died from pepper-spray. All violence can kill. Tasers aren't "non-lethal". They are "less-lethal".

    Replies: @Truth

    , @VinnyVette
    @Truth

    A Taser is a weapon period! Your rationalization doesn't change that! The cop was justified.

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Truth

    It's pretty difficult to restrain a healthy adult male. The universal default of mankind is grab him around his neck and threaten to cut off his airway, but that's risky on several levels. Or you inflict enough pain to render somebody temporarily insensate. That's hard to do under current rules of engagement--formerly you'd just whack him with a baton. Joint locks require a solid strength or positional advantage that's hard to set up in a fight.

    The Tazer is an attempt to avoid all that risky fighting. Unless it gets stolen--now the cop is in danger of becoming disabled and losing his firearm. And the guy flees from an arrest and points it at you--wtf?!--so deadly force. Lots to process in a couple of seconds in a parking lot at night. The DA gets to pore over videotape and read statutes for four days. Of course, none of this was premeditated--the cop was just being a cop and trying to check off all the evidence boxes and effect an arrest of an obvious drunk driver. The next cop will tell the Wendy's shift manager to just deal with it somehow.

    Replies: @Truth

    , @jsm
    @Truth

    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he's incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @vhrm, @Truth

  191. captflee says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:10 am GMT • 400 Words   
    @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    My only experience with death squad personnel was in the lobby of my apartment building in Rio, on Avenida Atlantica down by Arpoador, where Copacabana ends and Ipanema begins. Whiling away some time before strolling up to Mariu’s for some dinner, I was inflicting my muito mal Portugues on the two doormen, when I noted a rather dapper older gent, sporting some very nice Harris tweed and a particularly flamboyant ascot, mounting the stairs on the Rua Vinicius de Moraes side, inbound. The effect on the doormen was instantaneous and profound. Out came the shotguns,and our heretofore casual doormen snapped into a quite serviceable position of attention and commenced a decent rendition of the manual of arms as he glided silently past, apparently quite above noticing any of us.

    My attempts to gather any information at all as to who or what was this fellow drew no reply from my erstwhile buddies, and it was not until a day or two later that I was able to discuss with one of my neighbors what I had seen; according to him he was a very powerful man, highly placed within the organs of the previous military government, now carrying on much as before, just not for the government of the day. Even my neighbor, himself a man of means and even more a man of influence, would speak of that dapper gent in hushed and fearful tones, imploring me to never mention our conversation. I had marveled at the tranquility of the immediate area of my building in comparison to the free for all ongoing all around us, only a block or so away, on the beach across the Avenue, not to mention over on Nossa Senhora, site of frequent Wild West style robberies of buses, the take from which generally amounted to a few dollars worth of currency and a couple of five dollar plastic watches. Even the morons from the favelas behind us apparently got the word and stayed well clear.

    So, at least at the top of the hierarchy, Steve, life was pretty good, or as good as it can get when cruzado inflation was running 100% per month against the greenback.

  192. Art Deco says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:14 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @RAZ
    @Spud Boy

    True that higher charges more likely to lead to acquittal.

    George Zimmerman was overcharged with 2nd degree murder because Sharpton et al demanded it. They probably would've gotten a conviction on a lesser charge. Speaking of which, he's managed to stay out of trouble for awhile. I figured it was just a matter of time till he effed up enough to get himself convicted for something if he stayed in the US and thought he'd be better going to his mom's native Peru. But after some drama I haven't heard about him for awhile.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @jon, @Art Deco

    They probably would’ve gotten a conviction on a lesser charge. S

    The jury had the option of convicting on a lesser included offense and passed on that. That aside, he had a valid self-defense claim, so why convict him on anything? Trayvon Martin walked 75 yards down an alley and attacked GZ as he stood loitering around waiting for the police to arrive. Martin did that for no discernable reason other than to amuse himself. If he’d been minding his own business, he’d have gone indoors (he was right there at the back door of the place he was staying) and watched the ball game with Brandi Green’s son.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  193. @kaganovitch
    @A.Lawyer

    If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    You do know it's not 1972 anymore? All police cars are GPSed to the gills. Dispatch can see where you are relative to address just as if you were driving an Uber.

    Replies: @Anon, @Charon

    This is why I keep a wide berth between me and the criminal justice system. I’d probably end up with a lawyer like that one.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  194. @James B. Shearer
    @gongtao

    "Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer."

    The law isn't usually applied in that way for obvious reasons. However suppose the cop's shots had missed Brooks and killed an innocent third party while Brooks survived. Then Brooks might be guilty be guilty of felony murder. I am pretty sure he would be if the cop's shots were deemed lawful and he might be even if the cop's shots were deemed unlawful.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Truth

    Well now, I didn’t pass the bar, but I believe that crime is called “suicide.”

    • Replies: @Marty
    @Truth

    You’d get extra time for the bar.

    Replies: @Truth

  195. @gutta percha
    After this treachery, why would anyone choose to become a cop anymore? A hard, thankless job, now ten times worse because pols and brass across the USA are lining up to stab the cops in the back. All in a futile attempt to appease a mob.

    Replies: @Truth

    After this treachery, why would anyone choose to become a cop anymore?

    Where else is a not-too-bright bully with a diploma going to make $100,000?

  196. @jon
    @Charon


    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case.
     
    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn't shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Charon

    I watched the video and I agree with you, but bullet holes in the back are a real problem when this gets to court, not to mention now.

    • Replies: @Charlotte
    @Charon

    I agree that shooting someone in the back is morally ambiguous. Yet, not allowing officers to shoot fleeing suspects creates an incentive to flee rather than submit to arrest. Why stick around to be arrested if you know all you’ve got to do is run faster than the cop(s) on the scene?

  197. @Art Deco
    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Kronos, @vhrm, @ben tillman, @AnotherDad

    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    I know the chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court from before he was a judge. I know nothing about what he has done with the Georgia Supreme Court. .

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @ben tillman

    He's still a rather conservative, law-and-order guy. Of course, he also likes having a fairly normal life and not being stalked by crazed activists who are convinced this was legal murder.

    This ignorant, aging DA has set a terrible chain of events in motion and things will just have to run their course.

  198. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:26 am GMT • 100 Words   

    Whites have this thing called ‘suicide by cop’.

    Will loser blacks look at stuff like the Floyd deification and hanker for martyrdom?

    Apotheosis by Cop.

    You can do some stupid shit, provoke a cop to kill you, or die accidentally in presence of cops, and suddenly you go from a nobody and loser to black christ and object of cult worship.

    Not a bad deal.

  199. @Intelligent Dasein
    A lot of the public outrage over the deaths of George Floyd and this Brooks fellow is not really about them at all. BLM is capitalizing on the public mood shift of course, and Woke Capital is capitalizing on BLM (because, at bottom, Woke Capital is incredibly stupid), but that isn't what it's really about. Nor is it about racial tensions.

    This is about years and years of pent-up frustration with a system that no longer works. The average, law-abiding person today feels like a sucker for playing by the rules; he feels like the powers that be are militating against his little life with an incomprehensible degree of arrogance and callousness, and that he has much more to lose to the system than what he gains by it. The average man not only cannot get ahead, he is one missed payment or doctor's visit or altercation with a careless cop away from total ruin.

    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people's dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses, never face justice for their excessive force, and walk away from it all with the kind of six-figure pensions and cadillac care that Joe Blow can only dream about. There is a seething frustration with all this just under the surface. It cannot articulate itself; it has no verbal or political outlet, so it bursts out in strange ways using words not really its own.

    Looked at in this way, it makes a curious kind of sense that the men whose deaths finally occasioned the long overdue day of reckoning, Floyd and Brooks, have nothing personally commendable about them. It isn't about them at all. It's about ordinary people saying "Screw it!" Opting out is, I believe, the polite terminology.

    An innocent victim could not have generated this sort of outrage. If the cops had gunned down a mother and her baby, for instance, it either would have been dismissed as an accident or it would have been dealt with in the ordinary course of law or it would have been added to the smoldering pile of silent resentment that we all already feel. We already have psychological compartments for dealing with such clear-cut evils. But when the evil is of the diffused, generalized variety that hides within the respectable forms of the cop, the banker, and the CEO, it is difficult to express it because any such expression is, first of all, an admission of weakness. These people don't kill us directly, but they degrade and insult us on a constant basis. They don't come sneaking out of the bushes to beat us on the back of the head and take our wallets, but they do take away our freedom, our dignity, and our manhood. Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say "I am George Floyd" when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived? It's because his symbolic value is not in how he lived but in how he died. We are all George Floyd because we all can't breathe. We all have our faces smashed into the ground by The Man and we're freaking sick of it. Nobody knows how to say this, so instead they say "Black Lives Matter."

    Today they come for the cops. Tomorrow they will be coming for the banks. This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race. Do not confuse the yodel with the avalanche.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @vinteuil, @Chrisnonymous

    “This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race.”

    Sure

  200. @6dust6
    I cannot verify this information, but heard from a MA
    State Trooper that Brooks was recently released from prison
    doing time for beating his wife and kids. The corona virus
    got him out of jail. This encounter with Atlanta police, he
    knew, would send him back to the can. That is the reason
    he freaked out and resisted arrest. Candace Owens also reported
    this information.

    Replies: @Charlotte

  201. Whiskey says: • Website
    June 18, 2020 at 4:37 am GMT • 500 Words   

    Black people have the divine right of Kangz! to attack anyone who is not Black for any reason. Its not 2012 anymore. White people are now defacto illegal. Open season on them, if you have not drawn the conclusion.

    What this is going to do is enact the Purge movies in real life. Its what young White women have wanted for years, as well as noodle armed soy boys and those would-be upper class feminist studies majors and the like who figure they should be elite but are living in a one room apartment walk-up while writing Vox clickbait articles.

    Yes Blacks will make every city where they are a sizeable population unliveable as cops retreat to donut shops those few not defunded/fired. But it won’t stop there — and yes the Governors and Mayors will call out the Guard to disarm even the Mexican/Central American militias. Its all Black worship of Kangz all the time.

    But after the Black criminal class which is most urban Blacks — Floyd George and Rayshawn’s criminal history is bog standard for all but Elite Michelle Robinson Blacks — have looted out their own cities, they will have to start looting out in the suburbs. The case of the Jogger Ahmaud Arbery (spelling?) is indicative. Black criminals know there is no enforcement now possible even in suburbs.

    Think the local Sheriff’s Deputies and cops are going to do anything but chase crullers and coffee at Dunkin? There will also be random driving around and tickets only for Whites. Of which there will have to be many, many as that’s the primary funding source for many departments.

    You are now completely and totally vulnerable. Call the police and they WILL NOT COME. Why would they? Odds are the perps are Black and they know that. If they do ANYTHING they will be crucified and they know it. Shoot a vibrant cultural enricher who shows up in your bedroom at 3 AM looking to vibrantly culturally enrich your wife, daughter, etc. and you will sentenced to death quite rapidly.

    Ironically the safest places will be isolated rural ones, where people will simply shoot/shovel like they do mountain lions, other protected species that is illegal to kill under any circumstances.

    EVERY other place will be vibrantly culturally enriched. And the thing is — its wildly popular. Black Lives Matter polls so highly even Trump shut up. White people WANT THIS. Particularly White women. Its a way to replace their men with rappers and live just like a Kardashian. After all, White men are neither needed or required to have White levels of prosperity as everyone knows from watching Black Panther which was a documentary.

    In fact the dog that is not barking is Trump. After a few tweets threatening to shoot looters and arsonists he’s totally shut up. I figure he knows he will lose all fifty states with internal polling, and he’s looking to make deals to save Jared and Ivanka knowing he himself will spend the rest of his life in Prison under President Abrams.

    Trump has been silent for weeks. When has that ever happened with Trump before?

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Whiskey

    Whiskey, tell us about your Naval Flight Training again.

    , @donut
    @Whiskey

    Trump is trying to think of something to tweet that he can actually do .

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  202. black sea says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:39 am GMT • 200 Words   
    @A.Lawyer
    This is becoming something of an IQ test for white cops, and they are not performing well. Here's a little free legal advice. If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    Replies: @vhrm, @kaganovitch, @black sea, @Anonymousse

    I used to know an Atlanta cop. He said that there were officers who would get out of their car and confront a criminal situation and, if necessary, chase people down (or try to), and then there were other officers who would find all sorts of reasons to stay in the car for as much time as possible and wouldn’t consider chasing someone down because — in addition to being difficult — it increases the risk level for the officer considerably.

    He also said that the latter were widely resented by the former. But I can see why after a certain number of years on the job, you would realize the career dangers and the legal dangers — in addition to the physical dangers — of taking on bad people doing bad things and conclude that you weren’t really being paid to put yourself in such situations.

    Downtown Atlanta is never going to be urban destination of choice, but without some serious policing, it’s going to revert to its natural state, which is as an exclusionary zone for people with money and options.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @black sea


    Downtown Atlanta is never going to be urban destination of choice, but without some serious policing, it’s going to revert to its natural state, which is as an exclusionary zone for people with money and options.
     
    I visited Atlanta a few years ago and stayed downtown because I was attending an event at the Convention Center and I was really kind of shocked to see how run down the retail area along Peachtree St. was, with "Beauty Supply" stores and wig shops and such catering to a poor black clientele with "youths" on the street. And "Underground Atlanta" appeared to be boarded up completely. I was there in broad daylight but I would not have gone back at night, or for that matter gone back at all.

    Replies: @black sea

  203. @Anonymous
    @JimDandy


    Wow. My God. What do we do?
     
    It’s a terrible situation. But first and foremost, we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible. They made this happen.

    Trust me, they did not have “good intentions“.

    Make them eat the pain.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Mike_from_SGV, @TomSchmidt

    An insightful comment. White libs are the true villains. The street thugs are just dim bulbs who grab what they can; not the brains of the operation.Cut off the snakes head, not the tail.

  204. @MBlanc46
    @Jack D

    What felony did the officer commit.

    Replies: @Jack D

    What felony did the officer commit.

    I don’t know that he committed any (nor will anyone else until the judge or jury reaches a verdict) but the underlying felony that he is charged with is “aggravated assault”.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jack D

    For what?

    Replies: @Lugash

  205. Charlotte says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:46 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Charon
    @jon

    I watched the video and I agree with you, but bullet holes in the back are a real problem when this gets to court, not to mention now.

    Replies: @Charlotte

    I agree that shooting someone in the back is morally ambiguous. Yet, not allowing officers to shoot fleeing suspects creates an incentive to flee rather than submit to arrest. Why stick around to be arrested if you know all you’ve got to do is run faster than the cop(s) on the scene?

  206. @Jus' Sayin'...
    We are learning that those scenes in "Birth of a Nation", which depicted the operation of occupied state "governments" during Reconstruction were, contrary to the official ruling class narrative, quite accurate.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @captflee, @Alden

    I’ve been listening to confederate civil war songs today. My favorite is I’m a good ol rebel. Love it I hate this yankee Nation I won’t be re constructed are my motto.

    • Replies: @Veracitor
    @Alden

    How about wistful songs from when even Leftist-Americans sympathized with folks caught up in circumstances:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nnS9M03F-fA

    Replies: @S

  207. @Precious
    So … What’s the felony? Attempting to arrest a black man for drunk driving?

    The prosecutor is a moron. Oh, no wait, now that I see his picture, I see he isn't a moron, he is just taking the opportunity to settle some scores.

    Three of the counts against Rolfe are for aggravated assault related to a bullet he fired that hit an occupied vehicle nearby in the Wendy’s lot.

    I was wondering where the third bullet ended up.

    Brosnan’s three charges include two counts of violations of oath of office.

    That's...even more stupid than the felony murder charge.

    Replies: @usNthem, @ben tillman

    Brosnan’s three charges include two counts of violations of oath of office.

    That’s…even more stupid than the felony murder charge.

    Where do you get the idea that there is a felony murder charge? Surely that’s just an idiot reporter misusing/misunderstanding legal terms.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    No, he is charged with felony murder. No misunderstanding at all.

    https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/da-paul-howard-expected-make-announcement-possible-charges-rayshard-brooks-shooting/EZ5T5RIXTRHO3O5LYBX6W3VN5U/

    Many other news stories confirm same. Whether the charges will stick is another question but that is what he is charged with.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  208. @Mr. Anon
    @jon


    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn’t shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.
     
    And the cop who shot him didn't necessarily know it was a taser either. It was his partner's taser that Brooks grabbed and ran off with. As far as Rolfe knew, he might have grabbed his partner's gun. Or had a gun hidden on him.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @James B. Shearer, @Truth

    And the cop who shot him didn’t necessarily know it was a taser either. It was his partner’s taser that Brooks grabbed and ran off with. As far as Rolfe knew, he might have grabbed his partner’s gun. Or had a gun hidden on him.

    That’s right, and that’s the winning defense. You *can* shoot a fleeing felon in the back if letting him escape poses a danger to others.

    • Thanks: Charon
  209. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:59 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @black sea
    @A.Lawyer

    I used to know an Atlanta cop. He said that there were officers who would get out of their car and confront a criminal situation and, if necessary, chase people down (or try to), and then there were other officers who would find all sorts of reasons to stay in the car for as much time as possible and wouldn't consider chasing someone down because -- in addition to being difficult -- it increases the risk level for the officer considerably.

    He also said that the latter were widely resented by the former. But I can see why after a certain number of years on the job, you would realize the career dangers and the legal dangers -- in addition to the physical dangers -- of taking on bad people doing bad things and conclude that you weren't really being paid to put yourself in such situations.

    Downtown Atlanta is never going to be urban destination of choice, but without some serious policing, it's going to revert to its natural state, which is as an exclusionary zone for people with money and options.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Downtown Atlanta is never going to be urban destination of choice, but without some serious policing, it’s going to revert to its natural state, which is as an exclusionary zone for people with money and options.

    I visited Atlanta a few years ago and stayed downtown because I was attending an event at the Convention Center and I was really kind of shocked to see how run down the retail area along Peachtree St. was, with “Beauty Supply” stores and wig shops and such catering to a poor black clientele with “youths” on the street. And “Underground Atlanta” appeared to be boarded up completely. I was there in broad daylight but I would not have gone back at night, or for that matter gone back at all.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Jack D

    When I was growing up, a woman in our suburban neighborhood in Sandy Springs took a job (possibly as a volunteer) showing the wives of conventioneers the sights of Atlanta. I guess the tour started at Underground Atlanta, because it was still fairly early in the morning when she and the other ladies came upon a dead body on the steps.

    I wonder if they enjoyed the rest of their tour.

  210. @Buffalo Joe
    @anon

    OneFiveFive, in nearby Lockport, NY, in 2017 a young social worker was playing cards with three young men at the halfway where she worked . One of the men/teens had stolen $160 from a lock box at the residence. To cover his crime, he threw a blanket over the girl's head and then beat her to death with a table leg. Why? Because he was not in prison where he belonged and she could send him to jail. In Buffalo, Sister Karen Klimczak ran a halfway house for recently released felons. Sister discovered one burglarizing her room. He beat and strangled her to death. Little women against a felon with murderous intent stand no chance. Some people are not worthy to share our air.

    Replies: @Alden

    So hire big bad mean black men to do social work with other big bad mean black men.

    Reminds me of the gazillion programs in the last 60 years to hire black criminals to be gang counselors etc.

  211. @ben tillman
    @Precious



    Brosnan’s three charges include two counts of violations of oath of office.
     
    That’s…even more stupid than the felony murder charge.
     
    Where do you get the idea that there is a felony murder charge? Surely that's just an idiot reporter misusing/misunderstanding legal terms.

    Replies: @Jack D

    No, he is charged with felony murder. No misunderstanding at all.

    https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/da-paul-howard-expected-make-announcement-possible-charges-rayshard-brooks-shooting/EZ5T5RIXTRHO3O5LYBX6W3VN5U/

    Many other news stories confirm same. Whether the charges will stick is another question but that is what he is charged with.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Jack D

    News stories and indictments aren't the same thing. It can't be felony murder because (a) it doesn't meet the requirements for felony murder and (b) it meets the requirements for regular murder anyway (before application of laws regarding justification and affirmative defenses), so there's no need to resort to felony murder. I'll believe it when I see the indictment. I'm getting the sense there isn't one at this point.

    Just to emphasize the absurd bias of the DA:

    Earlier this month the same DA claimed a Taser was classified as a deadly weapon under Georgia law in justifying his decision to charge five APD officers with aggravated assault after they used a Taser on college students who were attempting to leave a protest. Here is the video where you can see him say it:

    https://twitter.com/greg_price11/status/1273378926744739842

    Now, he's claiming that the Taser Brooks took from one of the officers before he was shot wasn't considered a "deadly weapon," making Rolfe's shooting of Brooks "not justified."

    Under Georgia law, a peace officer may use deadly force to 1. arrest a suspected felon when he reasonably believes that the suspect poses an immediate threat of physical violence to the officer or others, 2. to protect himself and others from a life-threatening injury, and 3. to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. See O.C.G.A. § 17-4-20 and O.C.G.A. § 16-3-21.

    Replies: @Jack D

  212. black sea says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:05 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Jack D
    @Thucydides

    Police should start looking to spend more time at the donut shop. And they will, my friend, they will.

    Every police officer indicted for "overzealous" policing means 10 more blacks (and maybe a couple of whites) murdered because the cops are not as interested in arresting felons.

    And it take a LOT of arrests under our system to get someone off the street permanently. Basim Henry, the getaway driver in the carjacking murder of young lawyer Justin Friedland, killed for his Range Rover, had, at the age of 36, been arrested seven times as a juvenile, fourteen times as an adult, convicted of unlawful possession of an assault firearm, and convicted of bank robbery and STILL he was free to walk the streets until he committed his final crime (not counting those he may commit in prison during his life plus 10 year sentence). Not only had he been given a 2nd chance, he had been given a 3rd and a 4th and a 21st (this is not counting all the times he committed crimes for which he was not caught - probably 10x as many). These are the black lives that are said to "matter". They do matter because for decades such predators have made our big cities unlivable and they will again given the chance. But to even mention the Basim Henry's of the world or attribute any agency to them is "racist" in today's environment.

    Replies: @black sea, @Anonymousse

    And it take a LOT of arrests under our system to get someone off the street permanently.

    The guy in New York who knocked an elderly woman down, causing her to hit her head against a fire hydrant, has a record of more than 100 arrests. He’s 31 years old. He has a long career ahead of him.

  213. @Charon
    @Inquiring Mind

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn't look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    That said, isn't it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court's jurisdiction.

    Replies: @bruce county, @jon, @James B. Shearer, @Charlotte, @Mr. Anon

    “That said, isn’t it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court’s jurisdiction.”

    No, this is completely standard. It just means he was killed whether lawfully or unlawfully. If he was legally executed the death certificate would say homicide.

    • Agree: Jack D
  214. @Intelligent Dasein
    A lot of the public outrage over the deaths of George Floyd and this Brooks fellow is not really about them at all. BLM is capitalizing on the public mood shift of course, and Woke Capital is capitalizing on BLM (because, at bottom, Woke Capital is incredibly stupid), but that isn't what it's really about. Nor is it about racial tensions.

    This is about years and years of pent-up frustration with a system that no longer works. The average, law-abiding person today feels like a sucker for playing by the rules; he feels like the powers that be are militating against his little life with an incomprehensible degree of arrogance and callousness, and that he has much more to lose to the system than what he gains by it. The average man not only cannot get ahead, he is one missed payment or doctor's visit or altercation with a careless cop away from total ruin.

    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people's dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses, never face justice for their excessive force, and walk away from it all with the kind of six-figure pensions and cadillac care that Joe Blow can only dream about. There is a seething frustration with all this just under the surface. It cannot articulate itself; it has no verbal or political outlet, so it bursts out in strange ways using words not really its own.

    Looked at in this way, it makes a curious kind of sense that the men whose deaths finally occasioned the long overdue day of reckoning, Floyd and Brooks, have nothing personally commendable about them. It isn't about them at all. It's about ordinary people saying "Screw it!" Opting out is, I believe, the polite terminology.

    An innocent victim could not have generated this sort of outrage. If the cops had gunned down a mother and her baby, for instance, it either would have been dismissed as an accident or it would have been dealt with in the ordinary course of law or it would have been added to the smoldering pile of silent resentment that we all already feel. We already have psychological compartments for dealing with such clear-cut evils. But when the evil is of the diffused, generalized variety that hides within the respectable forms of the cop, the banker, and the CEO, it is difficult to express it because any such expression is, first of all, an admission of weakness. These people don't kill us directly, but they degrade and insult us on a constant basis. They don't come sneaking out of the bushes to beat us on the back of the head and take our wallets, but they do take away our freedom, our dignity, and our manhood. Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say "I am George Floyd" when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived? It's because his symbolic value is not in how he lived but in how he died. We are all George Floyd because we all can't breathe. We all have our faces smashed into the ground by The Man and we're freaking sick of it. Nobody knows how to say this, so instead they say "Black Lives Matter."

    Today they come for the cops. Tomorrow they will be coming for the banks. This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race. Do not confuse the yodel with the avalanche.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @vinteuil, @Chrisnonymous

    “Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say ‘I am George Floyd’ when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived?”

    Ordinary white people? Not a chance.

    An ordinary white who acted and talked like that would be an abject coward, imitating a black supremacist.

  215. Blacks have a license to kill, while whites have a duty to die.

  216. Alden says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:18 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @SanJoaquinSam
    Frankly, I'm shocked by the ignorance here--on all online discussion forums really--about the history of DUI policing and enforcement in this country and MADD's aggressive lobbying towards this end.

    It seems the Boomers just weren't paying attention, and the Millennials...well, they're clueless about everything.

    Replies: @Alden

    MADD’s got a lot to answer for. Cab and Uber drivers make a lot of money though, because no one wants to risk driving after a couple drinks.
    Karens LTD.

    Actually, MADD wasn’t a grass roots uprising against drunk drivers. It was a front for the medical insurance companies. As EMTs became better trained and equipped, more and more victims of traffic accidents made it to the ER and their lives were saved.

    But they often didn’t recover and were seriously handicapped and in need of medical care, wheelchairs and even nursing homes for the rest of their lives.

    Enter the medical insurance companies and MADD was created. Of course EMTs and medics joined in. As did police departments eager to hand out more tickets and DAs who wanted more easily winnable cases to add to their success rate.

    • Agree: Neoconned
  217. @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Wait until tomorrow.
     
    We are told that these actions by the police are the result of institutional racism. Given that, shouldn't the entire Police Department and City government of Atlanta, and the Fulton County DAs office, be indicted for conspiracy to commit murder?

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Too serious for LOL, and I don’t want to click Agree, and be taken as believing yes they should be. I agree with your point.

  218. @Mr. Anon
    @jon


    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn’t shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.
     
    And the cop who shot him didn't necessarily know it was a taser either. It was his partner's taser that Brooks grabbed and ran off with. As far as Rolfe knew, he might have grabbed his partner's gun. Or had a gun hidden on him.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @James B. Shearer, @Truth

    “… Or had a gun hidden on him.”

    Reportedly, they had searched him.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @James B. Shearer

    I expect they would have. But in the melee, did Rolfe know that Brooks had taken his partner's taser? Maybe they searched him and missed something? Maybe Brooks retrieved a gun he had beneath the seat of his car? You see somebody point something that looks like a gun at you in the half-light of a parking-lot, you're first (and probably best) instinct is to assume that it is a gun.

    I don't know that any of this is the case, but it is a reasonable supposition at this point.

  219. Ron Unz says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:22 am GMT • 100 Words   

    This really is totally crazy, probably crazier than anything that happened during the 1960s with regard to the police.

    Frankly, I’m not sure if a police officer anywhere in the world has ever been charged under these circumstances.

    Coming right after an international day of mourning for that Minneapolis criminal who apparently OD’d on Fentanyl, I think we’ve really reached uncharted territory in lunacy…

    • Agree: Alden, Goatweed
    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @Ron Unz

    "Frankly, I’m not sure if a police officer anywhere in the world has ever been charged under these circumstances."

    The Freddie Gray charges were less justified.

    , @JimDandy
    @Ron Unz

    Where does it go from here? We are living in a strange situation where, time and time again, the mainstream is so cowed that they provide zero pushback to the radical left, and even seem ready to totally surrender. But without the discipline of pushback, the radical left pushes too far and forces the mainstream out of its stupor. "Condemn police brutality and accept the lie of systematic racist? I can get on board with that. But what's this? Defund the police? A black gangsta rapper warlord has taken over downtown Seattle? A white policeman faces the death penalty for heroically stopping a crazed criminal? I guess I will be voting for Trump after all."

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Ron Unz


    I think we’ve really reached uncharted territory in lunacy…

     

    Douglas Murray. The Madness of Crows - Gender, Race and Identity


    (Jonathan Haidt/ Gregg Lukianoff - The coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are settling Up a Generation for Failure  )
    Joni Mitchell - Twisted

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iisYw0epV_Q  
  220. @Charon
    @Inquiring Mind

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn't look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    That said, isn't it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court's jurisdiction.

    Replies: @bruce county, @jon, @James B. Shearer, @Charlotte, @Mr. Anon

    Homicide just means he was killed by another person. It isn’t a determination of the legality of the killing.

  221. Officer Garrett Rolfe broke no law, and is supported by the USSC’s Garner v. TN decision. There are no legal grounds for charging him with anything.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @Nicholas Stix

    Nicholas Stix -- love your work, all you do, its awesome. Thanks for all you have written.

    That being said, the cops are guilty: of being White and Male. That's a crime and has been one since the 1990s and the Clintons. The officer will be found guilty swiftly and be executed post-haste. That's already been determined.

    We have no law, only men. We are no different from the Cultural Revolution Chinese, who we resemble in great detail. The only difference is that Mao and his Wife directed the carnage, here its the Democratic National Committee.

    And all that being said, the Intelligent Daseign guy has a point -- millions, mostly young White women, not just here in the US but around the globe, have turned out for George Floyd a man of no good points at all. None. A man whose main claim to fame was a part time porn actor gig, fathering five kids with three different women none of whom he supported, being a convicted home invader threatening to kill a pregnant woman and her unborn child. These facts are known or generally known to the young White women (it is always them) protesting. I saw a bunch last Saturday at Irvine City Hall here in Orange County California.

    Young White women see in this the ability to dispose of their most hated enemy: the beta White male. Its who they have the most rage for, the sin of losing and being unsexy. No woman will forgive any man for being her equal. Much less her inferior. Meanwhile for selling the fantasy of being a rapper's whore, not just Kim but Khloe, Kylie, Klamidya, Kondom and the other Kardashians/Jenners are billionaires each in their own right or nearly there. You will notice almost a complete absence of White men in these protests save the noodle armed but highly dangerous anti-fa in Seattle and Minneapolis and Portland and LA/NYC. The few White men not anti-fa are the miserable boyfriends/husbands of the protesting White women who look about as happy as they'd be at a Twilight convention. Or a Fifty Shades of Grey book signing.

    You see this rage in the White female led destruction of everything White beta males enjoy: the Terminator movies ("lesbian twitter went berserk" noted the female producer after totally wrecking the series by killing off the hero and promoting some lesbian twig to disastrous results but it burnt the series to the ground), Star Trek, Star Wars, Marvel Movies (now all featuring gay/lesbian heroes), Video games, everything that gives a bit of joy and comfort to White males must be destroyed totally. Black dudes looting and burning "White male" stuff even if its really a Black owned business is just more of the same.

    BLM is turbo charged on White female HATE HATE HATE for White men. We just are not dominant, violent, and stupid enough to be sexy and therefore we are punished for it to no end in sight.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Nicholas Stix

    , @Hibernian
    @Nicholas Stix

    .


    ..the USSC’s Garner v. TN decision.
     
    Which may soon go the way of Bowers v. Hardwick.
  222. @Joseph Doaks
    @JimDandy

    Because white Americans are demoralized by 50 years of having the deck stacked against them.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Truth

    That’s one way of putting it. Another way is: Because white Americans are short-sighted and self-centered and mistake their lack of tribal loyalty for morality.

  223. @Ron Unz
    This really is totally crazy, probably crazier than anything that happened during the 1960s with regard to the police.

    Frankly, I'm not sure if a police officer anywhere in the world has ever been charged under these circumstances.

    Coming right after an international day of mourning for that Minneapolis criminal who apparently OD'd on Fentanyl, I think we've really reached uncharted territory in lunacy...

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @JimDandy, @Dieter Kief

    “Frankly, I’m not sure if a police officer anywhere in the world has ever been charged under these circumstances.”

    The Freddie Gray charges were less justified.

  224. Art Deco says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:41 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    There are no Wars for Israel outside your imagination.
     
    Sure, the US just happens to be bellicose towards every country with which Israel has a beef. It is purely coincidence.

    You are such a stupid, dull-witted drone. Do you think anyone thinks you to be some kind of infallible font of wisdom? You are an idiot and a clown.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    You are such a stupid, dull-witted drone. Do you think anyone thinks you to be some kind of infallible font of wisdom? You are an idiot and a clown.

    It doesn’t matter how much hot air you emit. There are still no wars for Israel outside your imagination.

    the US just happens to be bellicose towards every country with which Israel has a beef. It is purely coincidence.

    We have conflicts with Iran, Syria, and Turkey. All of which they initiated (and with none of which have we been at war).

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    How did Syria initiate a conflict with the US? And how does said conflict serve American interests? And you conveniently ignored Iraq. That was a pretty big war, and an utterly foolish one, that also served no actual American interest.

    Like I said - you are a stupid, dull-witted drone. Your thoughts and utterances are banal. Nobody cares what you think.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  225. JimDandy says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:45 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Ron Unz
    This really is totally crazy, probably crazier than anything that happened during the 1960s with regard to the police.

    Frankly, I'm not sure if a police officer anywhere in the world has ever been charged under these circumstances.

    Coming right after an international day of mourning for that Minneapolis criminal who apparently OD'd on Fentanyl, I think we've really reached uncharted territory in lunacy...

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @JimDandy, @Dieter Kief

    Where does it go from here? We are living in a strange situation where, time and time again, the mainstream is so cowed that they provide zero pushback to the radical left, and even seem ready to totally surrender. But without the discipline of pushback, the radical left pushes too far and forces the mainstream out of its stupor. “Condemn police brutality and accept the lie of systematic racist? I can get on board with that. But what’s this? Defund the police? A black gangsta rapper warlord has taken over downtown Seattle? A white policeman faces the death penalty for heroically stopping a crazed criminal? I guess I will be voting for Trump after all.”

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @JimDandy

    "But without the discipline of pushback..."

    When was the last time the GOP pushed back? I blame them, including the cowardly lion, for everything.

  226. black sea says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:47 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Jack D
    @black sea


    Downtown Atlanta is never going to be urban destination of choice, but without some serious policing, it’s going to revert to its natural state, which is as an exclusionary zone for people with money and options.
     
    I visited Atlanta a few years ago and stayed downtown because I was attending an event at the Convention Center and I was really kind of shocked to see how run down the retail area along Peachtree St. was, with "Beauty Supply" stores and wig shops and such catering to a poor black clientele with "youths" on the street. And "Underground Atlanta" appeared to be boarded up completely. I was there in broad daylight but I would not have gone back at night, or for that matter gone back at all.

    Replies: @black sea

    When I was growing up, a woman in our suburban neighborhood in Sandy Springs took a job (possibly as a volunteer) showing the wives of conventioneers the sights of Atlanta. I guess the tour started at Underground Atlanta, because it was still fairly early in the morning when she and the other ladies came upon a dead body on the steps.

    I wonder if they enjoyed the rest of their tour.

  227. @Jack D
    @CarlosHathitachitheSecond

    "The truth is no defense" is not, generally speaking, a part of American law while the felony murder rule is ancient (going back to at least the 12 century or "time immemorial" (i.e. before the law was written down).

    Felony murder relates to the concept that to be guilty of murder, you need both a dead person and you need "malice". Malice with no dead person might be attempted murder (or no crime at all if the malice was entirely in your head and you never left your arm chair) but it's not murder. A dead person without malice might be manslaughter but its not murder either. Dead person PLUS malice - murder.

    Malice is, roughly speaking, the evil state of mind which one has when one about to commit a serious crime. Say that you intend to shoot the lock off of a safe and the bullet ricochets off the lock and kills the bank officer instead. You have a dead person and you have "malice" and the malice of shooting the lock off is transferred to the killing so now you have all of the ingredients for murder, even though you did not intend to kill the bank officer. Your evil or malicious intent in shooting the lock off is transferred to the murder.

    Is this right or wrong? Generally speaking I think it is fair. If you start out intending to commit an evil, felonious deed and someone dies as a result, you should be responsible for his death - it was no "accident". Once you embark on the path of felony, whatever follows is on you. Don't want to be guilty of felony murder - don't commit any felonies.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Jane Plain, @Steve Sailer

    To kill somebody with malice aforethought is murder. You don’t need to charge felony murder when you can charge them with murder. Felony murder exists for cases in which somebody dies because you intended a different felony than murder: e.g., you commit arson to collect the fire insurance, but a fireman dies fighting the blaze.

    So, what’s the felony.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Steve Sailer

    Have you not watched Paul Howard explain his rationale? Mr. Brooks had been traumatized in jail, so he was forced to batter those racist cops and steal the taser and fire it at them because they were going to give Brother Rayshard a D.U.I. just because he was driving drunk! How much more proof do you need that they were racist monsters? They could have very easily just taken him home! A D.U.I. isn't a serious crime. It's like jaywalking, basically. It's like jaywalking, but you're in a car, and you're drunk. A good, non-racist cop would have proven his lack of racist malice by telling him, "Ah, what the heck, you're out on parole for cruelty to children, and you drove drunk, but... Ha ha... we'll just take you home, you rascal."

  228. Very thorough rebuttal of the post-modern/CultMarx narrative from the Georgia Law Enforcement Organization (https://www.georgialeo.org/post/apd):

    “APD SHOOTING EXPLAINED”

    Before reading below, remember that officers are afforded the same constitutional rights as citizens, so whether they’re charged for political reasons or not, the facts of the case remain the same until their day in court:

    In order to understand this situation, you’ve got to set feelings and emotions aside to understand objective reasonableness.

    So looking at this case, what do we know?

    A DUI investigation determined that he was too intoxicated to drive. The bodycam showed the officers being overly nice and polite to him the entire time all the way up until the handcuffs were about to go on, as they should’ve been.

    As soon as they tried to cuff him, an all out brawl took place. Not just resisting, but punching them in the face and throwing them around.

    He took one officer’s taser, threw him face first into the asphalt, stood up, and took off.
    ___________
    So let’s pause there and see where we’re at legally.

    Charges:
    DUI
    Obstruction X2 – Felony
    Battery on an officer X2
    Aggravated assault X2 – Felony
    Strong Armed Robbery – Felony
    And believe it or not….
    Possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime – Felony

    Per Georgia Law, a taser is classified as a “less-lethal” FIREARM as they do occasionally cause death.
    (OCGA 16-11-106)
    ______________
    These offenses are important because there is a case law called Tennessee v Garner

    What Tennessee v Garner states is:
    “When a non-violent felon is ordered to stop and submit to police, ignoring that order does not give rise to a reasonable good-faith belief that the use of deadly force is necessary, UNLESS it has been threatened.”

    So this goes back to the taser being classified as a firearm that can cause death or great bodily harm.
    _________
    So,
    They fought
    He stole the taser
    He got up and ran

    The 2nd officer chased after him and tried to use his own taser against him, but he didn’t get a good connection.

    Brooks then turns, aims the taser at the officer, and fires. Statutorily, this is no different than firing a gun.

    (The taser that APD carries has 2 cartridges, so Brooks could have potentially shot the officer twice.)

    The officer dropped his taser from his left hand after it appears he was hit by a barb on the video, draws his sidearm, fires 3 shots, falls against a car in the parking lot and Brooks goes down.

    Brooks was not only a continuing threat to the officer since he could still fire the taser again, but he also showed and EXTREME desire to get away, with a weapon. So it is not unreasonable to have the fear that he would use that weapon to carjack a motorist sitting in the drive-thru line, take a hostage, or otherwise hurt another innocent party.

    What does Georgia Law say about deadly force?
    OCGA 17-4-20 (b):
    Sheriffs and peace officers may use deadly force:
    1.) to apprehend a suspected felon only when the officer reasonably believes that the suspect possesses a deadly weapon. (He did)
    2.) to apprehend a suspected felon who possesses any object, device, or instrument which, when used offensively against a person, is likely to or actually does result in serious bodily injury. (He did)
    3.) to apprehend a suspected felon when the officer reasonably believes that the suspect poses an immediate threat of physical violence to the officer or others (He did)
    4.) to apprehend a suspected felon when there is probable cause to believe that the suspect has committed a crime involving the infliction or threatened infliction of serious physical harm (He did)

    The officer only needed one of those requirements, but he had all 4……..

    Now the reason taser’s are considered “less-lethal” is because when used appropriately, you are “less likely” to kill someone vs using a gun. But Brooks hasn’t been through the training to know how to avoid certain vulnerable parts of the body, and he doesn’t understand how neuromuscular incapacitation (NMI) works, which makes it MORE likely for him to cause great bodily injury or death than if an officer used it.

    And just to support the fact that tasers can and do kill, there is an East Point Officer currently sitting in prison for improperly using a taser and killing a man a few years ago.
    (Eberhart v Georgia)

    “He could’ve shot him in the leg!”

    Right off the top, it is unconstitutional to do so. It is considered cruel and unusual punishment to employ a gun in that manner. Either an officer felt deadly force was necessary, or he should use a lesser response.

    We could just leave it at that, but that’s too much of a cop out, so let’s discuss WHY it has been deemed unconstitutional. For one thing, that’s an extremely difficult shot to make. The target is quite narrow, and in continuous motion as the suspect runs away/charges the officer. Under the best of conditions trying to hit the leg is challenging…to be generous about it. But in a life or death encounter, the officer’s fine motor skills will be eroded by the stress of the encounter making the shot, turning a leg shot into a very low probability feat.

    Assuming a round does hit the leg, then what? The only way a shot to the leg would immediately stop a threat is by shattering one of the bones, and stopping the threat is the ultimate goal. While it is very difficult to find a shot to the leg that will immediately stop a threat, it is actually comparatively easy to find shots to the leg which eventually prove fatal. Human legs have very large blood vessels which are essentially unprotected (femoral artery)

    Now remember, we’ve had days to sit back, watch videos, discuss, and analyze this entire thing. The officers had less than a minute from the time the fight started, and less than 5 seconds to interpret EVERYTHING you just read while running, getting shot at with a taser, and returning fire

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Shan'neqious Washington

    Blah blah blah.

    There are only two questions that matter:
     ① did the officer commit a felony? My answer: maybe - he [incompetently] discharged a firearm. Worse, he did so in such a manner that a round hit the property of someone who doesn't suck at the tax tit. That by itself should invite the death penalty for anybody whose entire life is paid for by stealing money from the productive.

     ② Did someone die while he was doing his "Can't shoot straight" schtick? Yup. Absolutely, certainly yup.

    So since ② is clear, it's only one question.

    The only question is whether this tax-tit-sucker's incompetence with his firearm, rises to a level where it can be considered a felony.

    If the answer to ① turns out to be "Yes" (i.e., if the damage caused by his amateurish, piss-poor, D-grade, retard-mongoloid-level control of his weapon is determined to rise to a felony) then he's on the hook for capital murder.

    This isn't rocket surgery, cabron.

    In Jaw-juh (hyuk hyuk), if someone dies while "Person A" is committing a felony, then "Person A" faces a trial for capital murder (even in the person who dies, doesn't die at the hand of "Person A").

    They just never counted on a white cop being on the receiving end of that piece of legislative genius (which people like me have argued against for 50 years).

    If a guy is committing a drive-by and inadvertently shoots a bystander and the bystander dies: capital murder.

    Shitholes like Jaw-Juh (hyuk hyuk) decided to overturn the millennium-old concept of mens rea, thinking it would only affect niggers.

    Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind, you dip-chewin' motherfuckers. I hope the cunt gets the needle.


    OT: "chinga tu pelo" is a thing now. We stand a reasonable chance of winning World War Hair, so long as BadgeBunnies - or worse, Badge-Lickers (badge-bunnies without vaginas - so 'oral/anal experts') - can be excised from our population.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  229. JimDandy says:
    June 18, 2020 at 6:07 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Steve Sailer
    @Jack D

    To kill somebody with malice aforethought is murder. You don't need to charge felony murder when you can charge them with murder. Felony murder exists for cases in which somebody dies because you intended a different felony than murder: e.g., you commit arson to collect the fire insurance, but a fireman dies fighting the blaze.

    So, what's the felony.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Have you not watched Paul Howard explain his rationale? Mr. Brooks had been traumatized in jail, so he was forced to batter those racist cops and steal the taser and fire it at them because they were going to give Brother Rayshard a D.U.I. just because he was driving drunk! How much more proof do you need that they were racist monsters? They could have very easily just taken him home! A D.U.I. isn’t a serious crime. It’s like jaywalking, basically. It’s like jaywalking, but you’re in a car, and you’re drunk. A good, non-racist cop would have proven his lack of racist malice by telling him, “Ah, what the heck, you’re out on parole for cruelty to children, and you drove drunk, but… Ha ha… we’ll just take you home, you rascal.”

  230. @Jack D
    @MBlanc46


    What felony did the officer commit.
     
    I don't know that he committed any (nor will anyone else until the judge or jury reaches a verdict) but the underlying felony that he is charged with is "aggravated assault".

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    For what?

    • Replies: @Lugash
    @Steve Sailer

    The three shots were somewhat in the direction of people in line at Wendy's. Yes, I'm dead serious, that's what this Talented 1 Percenter is basing the felony murder off of.

    Edit: One round did embed itself in one of the cars, so that's considered aggravated assault.

    Replies: @Jack D

  231. Mr. Anon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 6:28 am GMT • 200 Words   
    @Charon
    @Inquiring Mind

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn't look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    That said, isn't it odd for the county medical examiner to issue a verdict of homicide? I sort of thought that was in the court's jurisdiction.

    Replies: @bruce county, @jon, @James B. Shearer, @Charlotte, @Mr. Anon

    Brooks having been shot in the back puts rather a different complexion on the case. That doesn’t look good no matter what else may or may not be true.

    To a jury out for blood, perhaps. Not one that critically views the video footage. Just before he was shot, he turned and pointed a weapon at Officer Rolfe. You don’t get to shoot at cops (which – for all we know – is what Rolfe thought was happening) and then turn to run some more and expect that you won’t be shot.

    Anyway, what does “shot in the back” mean? Square in the back, like he was running away? Or sideways into the back region, like he had just turned toward Rolfe. It matters.

    I highly doubt that white cops are just itching to put a bullet into a black suspect just a week after world-wide riots/looting/protests over George Floyd. I think the cop in question was even recorded at the scene (prior to the arrest) as saying something to the effect of “Is this even worth it?”. Evidently, for him, it wasn’t. Expect Cops around the country to get the message. A whole class of criminals is going to get a pass, and the country is going to get a lot more dangerous.

  232. Whiskey says: • Website
    June 18, 2020 at 6:29 am GMT • 500 Words   
    @Nicholas Stix
    Officer Garrett Rolfe broke no law, and is supported by the USSC's Garner v. TN decision. There are no legal grounds for charging him with anything.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Hibernian

    Nicholas Stix — love your work, all you do, its awesome. Thanks for all you have written.

    That being said, the cops are guilty: of being White and Male. That’s a crime and has been one since the 1990s and the Clintons. The officer will be found guilty swiftly and be executed post-haste. That’s already been determined.

    We have no law, only men. We are no different from the Cultural Revolution Chinese, who we resemble in great detail. The only difference is that Mao and his Wife directed the carnage, here its the Democratic National Committee.

    And all that being said, the Intelligent Daseign guy has a point — millions, mostly young White women, not just here in the US but around the globe, have turned out for George Floyd a man of no good points at all. None. A man whose main claim to fame was a part time porn actor gig, fathering five kids with three different women none of whom he supported, being a convicted home invader threatening to kill a pregnant woman and her unborn child. These facts are known or generally known to the young White women (it is always them) protesting. I saw a bunch last Saturday at Irvine City Hall here in Orange County California.

    Young White women see in this the ability to dispose of their most hated enemy: the beta White male. Its who they have the most rage for, the sin of losing and being unsexy. No woman will forgive any man for being her equal. Much less her inferior. Meanwhile for selling the fantasy of being a rapper’s whore, not just Kim but Khloe, Kylie, Klamidya, Kondom and the other Kardashians/Jenners are billionaires each in their own right or nearly there. You will notice almost a complete absence of White men in these protests save the noodle armed but highly dangerous anti-fa in Seattle and Minneapolis and Portland and LA/NYC. The few White men not anti-fa are the miserable boyfriends/husbands of the protesting White women who look about as happy as they’d be at a Twilight convention. Or a Fifty Shades of Grey book signing.

    You see this rage in the White female led destruction of everything White beta males enjoy: the Terminator movies (“lesbian twitter went berserk” noted the female producer after totally wrecking the series by killing off the hero and promoting some lesbian twig to disastrous results but it burnt the series to the ground), Star Trek, Star Wars, Marvel Movies (now all featuring gay/lesbian heroes), Video games, everything that gives a bit of joy and comfort to White males must be destroyed totally. Black dudes looting and burning “White male” stuff even if its really a Black owned business is just more of the same.

    BLM is turbo charged on White female HATE HATE HATE for White men. We just are not dominant, violent, and stupid enough to be sexy and therefore we are punished for it to no end in sight.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Whiskey


    The officer will be found guilty swiftly and be executed post-haste.
     
    Whiskey continues his unbroken string of wrong predictions. If there's any word NOT associated with the death penalty in modern America it's haste. Back in the day, yes, criminals would be tried and convicted and executed within a few months or sometimes even days after their crime. We also used to do things like build transcontinental railroads and fly men to the moon, but that was a different America.

    In America 2020 the average stay on Death Row is 15 YEARS. The most common cause of death for death row inmates is old age.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Whiskey

    Thank you for your kind words, Whiskey.

  233. @Steve Sailer
    @Jack D

    For what?

    Replies: @Lugash

    The three shots were somewhat in the direction of people in line at Wendy’s. Yes, I’m dead serious, that’s what this Talented 1 Percenter is basing the felony murder off of.

    Edit: One round did embed itself in one of the cars, so that’s considered aggravated assault.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Lugash

    The shots in the direction of witnesses are charged as aggravated assault. The bullet in the car is charged as criminal damage to property.

  234. Mr. Anon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 6:32 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @James B. Shearer
    @Mr. Anon

    "... Or had a gun hidden on him."

    Reportedly, they had searched him.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I expect they would have. But in the melee, did Rolfe know that Brooks had taken his partner’s taser? Maybe they searched him and missed something? Maybe Brooks retrieved a gun he had beneath the seat of his car? You see somebody point something that looks like a gun at you in the half-light of a parking-lot, you’re first (and probably best) instinct is to assume that it is a gun.

    I don’t know that any of this is the case, but it is a reasonable supposition at this point.

  235. @Ron Unz
    This really is totally crazy, probably crazier than anything that happened during the 1960s with regard to the police.

    Frankly, I'm not sure if a police officer anywhere in the world has ever been charged under these circumstances.

    Coming right after an international day of mourning for that Minneapolis criminal who apparently OD'd on Fentanyl, I think we've really reached uncharted territory in lunacy...

    Replies: @James B. Shearer, @JimDandy, @Dieter Kief

    I think we’ve really reached uncharted territory in lunacy…

    Douglas Murray. The Madness of Crows – Gender, Race and Identity

    (Jonathan Haidt/ Gregg Lukianoff – The coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are settling Up a Generation for Failure  )
    Joni Mitchell – Twisted

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iisYw0epV_Q  

  236. @Shan'neqious Washington
    Very thorough rebuttal of the post-modern/CultMarx narrative from the Georgia Law Enforcement Organization (https://www.georgialeo.org/post/apd):

    "APD SHOOTING EXPLAINED”

    Before reading below, remember that officers are afforded the same constitutional rights as citizens, so whether they’re charged for political reasons or not, the facts of the case remain the same until their day in court:

    In order to understand this situation, you’ve got to set feelings and emotions aside to understand objective reasonableness.

    So looking at this case, what do we know?

    A DUI investigation determined that he was too intoxicated to drive. The bodycam showed the officers being overly nice and polite to him the entire time all the way up until the handcuffs were about to go on, as they should’ve been.

    As soon as they tried to cuff him, an all out brawl took place. Not just resisting, but punching them in the face and throwing them around.

    He took one officer’s taser, threw him face first into the asphalt, stood up, and took off.
    ___________
    So let’s pause there and see where we’re at legally.

    Charges:
    DUI
    Obstruction X2 - Felony
    Battery on an officer X2
    Aggravated assault X2 - Felony
    Strong Armed Robbery - Felony
    And believe it or not....
    Possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime - Felony

    Per Georgia Law, a taser is classified as a “less-lethal” FIREARM as they do occasionally cause death.
    (OCGA 16-11-106)
    ______________
    These offenses are important because there is a case law called Tennessee v Garner

    What Tennessee v Garner states is:
    “When a non-violent felon is ordered to stop and submit to police, ignoring that order does not give rise to a reasonable good-faith belief that the use of deadly force is necessary, UNLESS it has been threatened.”

    So this goes back to the taser being classified as a firearm that can cause death or great bodily harm.
    _________
    So,
    They fought
    He stole the taser
    He got up and ran

    The 2nd officer chased after him and tried to use his own taser against him, but he didn’t get a good connection.

    Brooks then turns, aims the taser at the officer, and fires. Statutorily, this is no different than firing a gun.

    (The taser that APD carries has 2 cartridges, so Brooks could have potentially shot the officer twice.)

    The officer dropped his taser from his left hand after it appears he was hit by a barb on the video, draws his sidearm, fires 3 shots, falls against a car in the parking lot and Brooks goes down.

    Brooks was not only a continuing threat to the officer since he could still fire the taser again, but he also showed and EXTREME desire to get away, with a weapon. So it is not unreasonable to have the fear that he would use that weapon to carjack a motorist sitting in the drive-thru line, take a hostage, or otherwise hurt another innocent party.

    What does Georgia Law say about deadly force?
    OCGA 17-4-20 (b):
    Sheriffs and peace officers may use deadly force:
    1.) to apprehend a suspected felon only when the officer reasonably believes that the suspect possesses a deadly weapon. (He did)
    2.) to apprehend a suspected felon who possesses any object, device, or instrument which, when used offensively against a person, is likely to or actually does result in serious bodily injury. (He did)
    3.) to apprehend a suspected felon when the officer reasonably believes that the suspect poses an immediate threat of physical violence to the officer or others (He did)
    4.) to apprehend a suspected felon when there is probable cause to believe that the suspect has committed a crime involving the infliction or threatened infliction of serious physical harm (He did)

    The officer only needed one of those requirements, but he had all 4........

    Now the reason taser’s are considered “less-lethal” is because when used appropriately, you are “less likely” to kill someone vs using a gun. But Brooks hasn’t been through the training to know how to avoid certain vulnerable parts of the body, and he doesn’t understand how neuromuscular incapacitation (NMI) works, which makes it MORE likely for him to cause great bodily injury or death than if an officer used it.

    And just to support the fact that tasers can and do kill, there is an East Point Officer currently sitting in prison for improperly using a taser and killing a man a few years ago.
    (Eberhart v Georgia)

    “He could’ve shot him in the leg!”

    Right off the top, it is unconstitutional to do so. It is considered cruel and unusual punishment to employ a gun in that manner. Either an officer felt deadly force was necessary, or he should use a lesser response.

    We could just leave it at that, but that's too much of a cop out, so let's discuss WHY it has been deemed unconstitutional. For one thing, that's an extremely difficult shot to make. The target is quite narrow, and in continuous motion as the suspect runs away/charges the officer. Under the best of conditions trying to hit the leg is challenging...to be generous about it. But in a life or death encounter, the officer's fine motor skills will be eroded by the stress of the encounter making the shot, turning a leg shot into a very low probability feat.

    Assuming a round does hit the leg, then what? The only way a shot to the leg would immediately stop a threat is by shattering one of the bones, and stopping the threat is the ultimate goal. While it is very difficult to find a shot to the leg that will immediately stop a threat, it is actually comparatively easy to find shots to the leg which eventually prove fatal. Human legs have very large blood vessels which are essentially unprotected (femoral artery)

    Now remember, we’ve had days to sit back, watch videos, discuss, and analyze this entire thing. The officers had less than a minute from the time the fight started, and less than 5 seconds to interpret EVERYTHING you just read while running, getting shot at with a taser, and returning fire

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    Blah blah blah.

    There are only two questions that matter:
     ① did the officer commit a felony? My answer: maybe – he [incompetently] discharged a firearm. Worse, he did so in such a manner that a round hit the property of someone who doesn’t suck at the tax tit. That by itself should invite the death penalty for anybody whose entire life is paid for by stealing money from the productive.

     ② Did someone die while he was doing his “Can’t shoot straight” schtick? Yup. Absolutely, certainly yup.

    So since ② is clear, it’s only one question.

    The only question is whether this tax-tit-sucker’s incompetence with his firearm, rises to a level where it can be considered a felony.

    If the answer to ① turns out to be “Yes” (i.e., if the damage caused by his amateurish, piss-poor, D-grade, retard-mongoloid-level control of his weapon is determined to rise to a felony) then he’s on the hook for capital murder.

    This isn’t rocket surgery, cabron.

    In Jaw-juh (hyuk hyuk), if someone dies while “Person A” is committing a felony, then “Person A” faces a trial for capital murder (even in the person who dies, doesn’t die at the hand of “Person A”).

    They just never counted on a white cop being on the receiving end of that piece of legislative genius (which people like me have argued against for 50 years).

    If a guy is committing a drive-by and inadvertently shoots a bystander and the bystander dies: capital murder.

    Shitholes like Jaw-Juh (hyuk hyuk) decided to overturn the millennium-old concept of mens rea, thinking it would only affect niggers.

    Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind, you dip-chewin’ motherfuckers. I hope the cunt gets the needle.

    OT: “chinga tu pelo” is a thing now. We stand a reasonable chance of winning World War Hair, so long as BadgeBunnies – or worse, Badge-Lickers (badge-bunnies without vaginas – so ‘oral/anal experts’) – can be excised from our population.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Kratoklastes

    Did someone die while he was doing his “Can’t shoot straight” schtick?

    The cop is in trouble for shooting straight.

  237. Mr. Anon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 6:40 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Truth
    @anon


    The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.
     
    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn't give them to police, they'd give them a second firearm.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @VinnyVette, @The Anti-Gnostic, @jsm

    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn’t give them to police, they’d give them a second firearm.

    They give cops night-sticks. Has nobody ever been beaten to death with a baton? Cops have arms. Has nobody ever died in a choke-hold? People have probaby been killed with rubber bullets. People have probably even died from pepper-spray. All violence can kill. Tasers aren’t “non-lethal”. They are “less-lethal”.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Mr. Anon


    All violence can kill. Tasers aren’t “non-lethal”. They are “less-lethal”.
     
    So is a box of spaghetti if you use it in the right way. The point is it is MEANT to be used with marinara sauce, just as a taser is MEANT to temporarily incapacitate someone without lasting harm.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon

  238. @Anonymous (n)
    @Koffeefutures

    I don't think we're very far away from a point where "the culture" celebrates all violence committed by blacks against whites as great, laudable instances of social justice and karmic payback while any white who dares resist being violated by a Black King or Queen (TM) is publicly and legally destroyed as an offender worse than a pedophile or rapist.

    Whether the reaction to the Floyd non event was engineered by TPTB or was in fact a spontaneous product of the current demographic and societal zeitgeist doesn't even matter. What it has shown is that we are now in a world where objective reality is no longer even a tenuous lifeline for whites. Some black guy can keel over and die of a heart attack in his own bedroom tomorrow and a savvy provocateur with media backing can create a wave of nationwide outrage over it to stir anti-white hatred at this stage. Anyone who would dare point out that there wasn't a white within a mile of the black when he died would be immediately silenced and then utterly destroyed. The hysteria is such that whites can now be forced to kneel before blacks like slaves before masters and resistance to kneeling is punished by public disgrace and career death in the best case, or immediate physical assault in the worst case. If a white resists the physical assault, he is arrested and charged while those who assaulted him are brought on as witnesses to the crime of lese majeste.

    Today, you must literally kneel in front of a photo of a dead black thug and offer assurances of obeisance in order to avoid destruction if the Eye of Sauron deigns to focus its gaze upon you and demands it. A few more years and cycles of this insanity, and it is very easy to envision that whites will be entirely barred from serving in law enforcement capacities and objecting to this will be as suicidal as publicly questioning the death of saint floyd is today. When the police patrolling your neighborhood looks like the crips and your local Soros funded DA has been fully unleashed the real fun begins.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    LOL, relax. You’re like watered-down Whiskey.

    Are you going to kneel? Have you been kneeling?

    Give us the details, oh trembling one.

    • Troll: Anonymous (n)
  239. @Daniel H
    @Lot

    I noticed on a census map that the suburban counties around Atlanta have the fastest growing black populations in America by several measures.

    Serves them/us right. We/they have been voting for the cucks for 40 years now, demanding nothing in return.

    It's up to you people. 2020 is a watershed year. just say not to cucks. Destroy the cuck/Republican faction. The cucks are the problem. They are the greater enemy.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You’re right about cucks being a problem, but apparently due to a painful family situation Lot hates the use of that term and tries to police it.

    He actually told me “cuck” is a “stale forced meme in 2020.” LOL.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-old-weird-california/#comment-1770366 (#15)

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/what-is-canada-doing-right/#comment-3809195 (#246)

  240. @theMann
    Can you say "Right Wing Paramilitary?"

    Cops are going to be flowing into those so fast it won't even be funny.

    This is going to get interesting much sooner than anybody realizes.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Clifford Brown, @Kratoklastes

    Right-wing paramilitaries would do well to screen for pigs wanting to join, and to blackball the fuck out of them – because cops are cowards first and foremost. They have the same psychotype as snitches.

    If any group I encounter contains a cop who claims he’s a fellow-traveller, I try to get him booted – and then try to identify his undercover mate (e.g., Mark Kennedy).

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @Kratoklastes

    Lighten up Francis

  241. @Intelligent Dasein
    A lot of the public outrage over the deaths of George Floyd and this Brooks fellow is not really about them at all. BLM is capitalizing on the public mood shift of course, and Woke Capital is capitalizing on BLM (because, at bottom, Woke Capital is incredibly stupid), but that isn't what it's really about. Nor is it about racial tensions.

    This is about years and years of pent-up frustration with a system that no longer works. The average, law-abiding person today feels like a sucker for playing by the rules; he feels like the powers that be are militating against his little life with an incomprehensible degree of arrogance and callousness, and that he has much more to lose to the system than what he gains by it. The average man not only cannot get ahead, he is one missed payment or doctor's visit or altercation with a careless cop away from total ruin.

    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people's dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses, never face justice for their excessive force, and walk away from it all with the kind of six-figure pensions and cadillac care that Joe Blow can only dream about. There is a seething frustration with all this just under the surface. It cannot articulate itself; it has no verbal or political outlet, so it bursts out in strange ways using words not really its own.

    Looked at in this way, it makes a curious kind of sense that the men whose deaths finally occasioned the long overdue day of reckoning, Floyd and Brooks, have nothing personally commendable about them. It isn't about them at all. It's about ordinary people saying "Screw it!" Opting out is, I believe, the polite terminology.

    An innocent victim could not have generated this sort of outrage. If the cops had gunned down a mother and her baby, for instance, it either would have been dismissed as an accident or it would have been dealt with in the ordinary course of law or it would have been added to the smoldering pile of silent resentment that we all already feel. We already have psychological compartments for dealing with such clear-cut evils. But when the evil is of the diffused, generalized variety that hides within the respectable forms of the cop, the banker, and the CEO, it is difficult to express it because any such expression is, first of all, an admission of weakness. These people don't kill us directly, but they degrade and insult us on a constant basis. They don't come sneaking out of the bushes to beat us on the back of the head and take our wallets, but they do take away our freedom, our dignity, and our manhood. Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say "I am George Floyd" when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived? It's because his symbolic value is not in how he lived but in how he died. We are all George Floyd because we all can't breathe. We all have our faces smashed into the ground by The Man and we're freaking sick of it. Nobody knows how to say this, so instead they say "Black Lives Matter."

    Today they come for the cops. Tomorrow they will be coming for the banks. This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race. Do not confuse the yodel with the avalanche.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @vinteuil, @Chrisnonymous

    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people’s dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses …

    Hahaha, where the heck do you live? It sounds wild! I live among civilized Whites; ain’t none of that stuff happening here.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You are both right in different ways. The actual incidents are not so common, but they loom larger in a world of instant 24 hour outrage news in the palm of your hand. They do happen. I mean, a SWAT team to arrest Roger Stone? Gimme a break.

  242. @Prester John
    Death penalty? That's just to feed the beasts. Ain't happenin'.

    Even the Stacey Abrams crowd isn't that stupid.

    Replies: @Charon, @Tono Bungay

    It sometimes seems as if the prosecutors overcharge on purpose. Is it to appease the crowd or is it to make it easier for the defense at trial? The three other officers in the Floyd affair are each charged with crimes that could mean 40 years in prison. Does that make any sense at all? Some of them were in their first weeks of work. It’s utterly implausible to expect a rookie to interfere with an experienced officer.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks, Cato
    • Replies: @anon
    @Tono Bungay

    It sometimes seems as if the prosecutors overcharge on purpose.

    It's common practice, leading to a plea bargain in many cases. Because most people can't fight 10 different charges in court, when the prosecutor offers to drop 9 in exchange for copping a plea on the smallest one, it's a deal that is hard to refuse. However in some cases it can backfire, that's possible here.

  243. This is a transcript of Sam Harris’ podcast about George Floyd, CO-19 and the ongoing public craze

    https://intoyourself.net/highlighted-transcripts/  

    Here’s one of the central quotes from Sam Harris’ podcast (my emphasis):

    Well, what do I do if someone’s breaking into my house and middle of the night? Who do I call? Right. And her first response to that question was. You need to recognize what a statement of privilege that question is. Now, she’s had to walk that back because it’s one of the most galling and embarrassing things a public official has ever said. But this is how close the Democratic Party is to sounding completely insane. You cannot say that if someone is breaking into your house and you’re terrified and you want a police force that can respond, that that fear is a symptom of white privilege.That’s where democratic politics goes to die. And again, what is alarming about this is this woke analysis of the breakdown of law and order.

  244. @Kratoklastes
    @Shan'neqious Washington

    Blah blah blah.

    There are only two questions that matter:
     ① did the officer commit a felony? My answer: maybe - he [incompetently] discharged a firearm. Worse, he did so in such a manner that a round hit the property of someone who doesn't suck at the tax tit. That by itself should invite the death penalty for anybody whose entire life is paid for by stealing money from the productive.

     ② Did someone die while he was doing his "Can't shoot straight" schtick? Yup. Absolutely, certainly yup.

    So since ② is clear, it's only one question.

    The only question is whether this tax-tit-sucker's incompetence with his firearm, rises to a level where it can be considered a felony.

    If the answer to ① turns out to be "Yes" (i.e., if the damage caused by his amateurish, piss-poor, D-grade, retard-mongoloid-level control of his weapon is determined to rise to a felony) then he's on the hook for capital murder.

    This isn't rocket surgery, cabron.

    In Jaw-juh (hyuk hyuk), if someone dies while "Person A" is committing a felony, then "Person A" faces a trial for capital murder (even in the person who dies, doesn't die at the hand of "Person A").

    They just never counted on a white cop being on the receiving end of that piece of legislative genius (which people like me have argued against for 50 years).

    If a guy is committing a drive-by and inadvertently shoots a bystander and the bystander dies: capital murder.

    Shitholes like Jaw-Juh (hyuk hyuk) decided to overturn the millennium-old concept of mens rea, thinking it would only affect niggers.

    Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind, you dip-chewin' motherfuckers. I hope the cunt gets the needle.


    OT: "chinga tu pelo" is a thing now. We stand a reasonable chance of winning World War Hair, so long as BadgeBunnies - or worse, Badge-Lickers (badge-bunnies without vaginas - so 'oral/anal experts') - can be excised from our population.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Did someone die while he was doing his “Can’t shoot straight” schtick?

    The cop is in trouble for shooting straight.

    • LOL: Aeronerauk
  245. @Alden
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I’ve been listening to confederate civil war songs today. My favorite is I’m a good ol rebel. Love it I hate this yankee Nation I won’t be re constructed are my motto.

    Replies: @Veracitor

    How about wistful songs from when even Leftist-Americans sympathized with folks caught up in circumstances:

    • Replies: @S
    @Veracitor

    Why, that's almost as bad as if she had sung Dixie. Has she confessed and apologized yet?

    Replies: @sayless

  246. Pericles says:
    June 18, 2020 at 9:06 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Altai
    The English Premiere League returned today to play in empty stadiums. All the players and referees took a knee. The best part of the footage is the piped in crowd noise, there's a metaphor there for something.

    https://twitter.com/SkySportsPL/status/1273301775844626443

    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with 'Black Lives Matter'. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level. But a man was killed in America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Eau27NHWsAMHVV8.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EavmK-pX0AIwRVN.jpg

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @Agathoklis, @Pericles, @Gordo, @Dannyboy

    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with ‘Black Lives Matter’. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level.

    Good point.

    I had a look at the FIFA and UEFA websites, but they weren’t very forthcoming with how the public could report such flagrant violations.

    • Replies: @Altai
    @Pericles

    Public? They're well aware of this and would have fined or censored them. (As they have done at the international level when England and Scotland players wore poppies recently) But I suspect they won't dare in this case despite it being the most insane case ever. The most watched league in the world just had not just all the players take a knee but in a fit of total silliness have 'Black Lives Matter' printed in place of every players name.

    But, of course, BLM isn't a political issue, that's why, like the poppy, everyone is expected to pledge allegiance and not donning one or affirming BLM is seen as the political act. And yet I don't think there will be too many articles about 'BLM fascism'.

    And that's why Doritos posted a long message supporting Black Lives Matter and haven't figured out how to post anything else since for many weeks. You can't delete the message and you can't post about the new 'Ultra Spicy Jalapeno Doritos' afterwards.

    Replies: @Pericles

  247. @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    Ha ha, how long have you worked for the F.B.I., sir?

    How about a peaceful march? Why can't sane people pull something like that off?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Pericles

    How about a peaceful march? Why can’t sane people pull something like that off?

    Judging from recent years:

    1. Antifa show up and beat the tar out of you.
    2. If you defend yourself, you get arrested, charged, and convicted while the antifa walk.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Pericles

    Yeah, after I posted that I essentially answered my own question.

  248. @Jack D

    Shouldn’t Rayshard Brooks be the one guilty of felony murder? His own death was caused by his felony assault on a police officer.
     
    No, because the crime dies with the criminal. Since all men are presumed innocent until they are tried and convicted and you cannot try a dead man, Rayshard died an innocent man and will remain so, legally speaking. Same as Epstein.

    I'm not saying this is right or wrong but this is the logic of the common law (and generally speaking the common law has a lot of wisdom).

    Replies: @Pericles

    Rayshard died an innocent man and will remain so, legally speaking. Same as Epstein.

    Well, Epstein at least was convicted.

    • Replies: @RAZ
    @Pericles

    Not a lawyer, but dying before your appeal is heard apparently vacates convictions.

    Think Aaron Hernandez from the Patriots does not go down in the record book as a murderer since his appeal was not heard and the conviction is vacated. The Netflix documentary series on him made something of the idea that Hernandez thought that his suicide would overturn his conviction and his daughter would then receive money due to Aaron. But the state of MA changed the law after his suicide and don't think his daughter was going to be getting this.

    Kenneth Lay from Enron died before appeal was heard. So he is apparently not legally guilty of charges the jury convicted him of.

    Epstein was convicted of charges from earlier and served very cushy time for them. But not tried for the charges he was being held on when he committed suicide . . . or The Clintons had him killed. Whichever you want to believe.

    Replies: @Pericles

  249. @Kronos
    @Redneck farmer

    True, the legal background is different. White cop shoots armed black dude compared to black athlete allegedly rapes daughter of wealthy white Atlanta figure. But the racial dimensions and potential for explosive violence is still there. Blacks will likely do more than shake their collective booties at a fancy drivers club.

    https://youtu.be/-vKdpQRS3RI

    (Honestly, I only got halfway so no spoilers. There was a new Warhammer 40,000 book that got me sidetracked but I’ll finish “A Man in Full” sometime in the future. Don’t give me any crap for switching from gold to trash.)

    Strangely enough, Trump very much resembles a New York version of Charles Croker. Or, Captain Charlie resembles a Atlanta version of Trump (minus the football and generation background.) Both demonstrate great showmanship and are confident at navigating either high society or working class gatherings.

    (Just don’t call your potential Jewish customers “Heeb” by accident or even show clients how horses are bred.)

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    I finally read one of the Warhammer 40K books. I will be buying more. Sometimes it’s nice to read without fully engaging your brain.

  250. @JimDandy
    @Cloudbuster

    No riots--a peaceful march. A MASSIVE peaceful march.

    Replies: @Very Nice Boy

    Do I need to point out the naivety of this idea?

    Do you think any such march won’t be met with thousands of bused in “anti-racists” who will, according to CNN, be there to confront the abhorrent racists who came to march?

    Do you imagine that the, quite likely, very ugly violence inflicted on the marchers by the “anti-racists” will be reported on at all fairly by any media organization?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Very Nice Boy

    It's true, but.

    Saturday in Tulsa seems destined to turn into something along those lines, but Fox and others will report with an at least somewhat positive eye, and the juxtaposition of Trump's cheering, flag-waving crowd with the masked scum outside will most likely benefit Trump.

    Send a couple dozen uniformed cops from every city to join supporters in a march to support this officer, a clean-cut young man who is facing the death penalty for protecting the public from a monster. It would be a different animal than Charlottesville.

  251. Anonymous[173] • Disclaimer says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter
    If I were a cop, I would immediately do two things.
    1. Start looking for a new job. And in the meantime,
    2. Stop doing my job. Don’t go looking for suspects. Any trouble arresting someone? Subject escaped. End of story.
    Once criminals realize this (and it won’t take long) crime rates will soar.

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities. In previous eras, despite crime and filth, business required centralized offices to get business done. That preserved enough of a tax base to keep cities from collapsing. But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime...

    Replies: @trelane, @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Anonymous, @Skyler_the_Weird, @obwandiyag

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities.

    Yep. Big cities have been on politically supplied life support since the 1960s, by which time they’d lost their economic base to containerization, cheaper transport (Interstate in the US), better communications. Cities have been economically obsolete for about 60 years.

    And this year they visibly break up.

    Election of POTUS Trump was a sign that city political support was below critical level. This year, cities and city dominated states can’t make budget. The CHAS / Riot business was a distraction for city populations, “You might not have a home and money or even food, but we’re staging a revolution to change all that”.
    Claims of revolution succeeded in raising support for urban funding in the 1960s, but apparently not this time. Antifa has been rejected as “revolutionary leadership”. The effective end of policing in Atlanta means that few or none of the trucking companies will be bringing in supplies. Their drivers and their insurance companies won’t risk going to non-policed ares. Already inadequate tax revenues will be down considerably; same with real-estate values, and POTUS Trump won’t make up the shortfall. Patronage jobs vanish; subsidies to political workers vanish; basic infrastructure/services degrade even more, start to fail. And on and on and _on_, as is typical of cascade failures when feedback in a complex system fails.

    Again, remember that this is a major change, and it’s probably worldwide. In the midst of an inadvertent bioweapon release, which appears to have been the proximate cause of the major change for cities.
    Don’t get hit by splatter. Willie and Joe cartoon, WW II, comment on the attempted revolution in Germany: “Get down so they don’t hit you with a wild shot.”

  252. @NJ Transit Commuter
    If I were a cop, I would immediately do two things.
    1. Start looking for a new job. And in the meantime,
    2. Stop doing my job. Don’t go looking for suspects. Any trouble arresting someone? Subject escaped. End of story.
    Once criminals realize this (and it won’t take long) crime rates will soar.

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities. In previous eras, despite crime and filth, business required centralized offices to get business done. That preserved enough of a tax base to keep cities from collapsing. But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime...

    Replies: @trelane, @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Anonymous, @Skyler_the_Weird, @obwandiyag

    Thanks to Corona Chan Big Business has found its Remote Employees function quite well and are now looking offshore to replace them with new employees willing to work remotely for half the Salary and no benefits.

  253. @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jonathan Mason


    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.
     
    No. The responsible thing to do is to not operate the vehicle at all.

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    Perhaps your IQ is not high enough to understand these things, but it is true.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Ozymandias, @ben tillman

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    After all drivers have to make decisions at times as to whether they can continue to drive safely perhaps because they need to sleep due to being awake a long time or perhaps because they are taking some medication that makes them sleepy or perhaps because the weather is so bad for example heavy rain that they feel they cannot drive safely. If you stop because you are drowsy, then you were drowsy before you stopped, but saying that you should not have been driving in the first place is not much help.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    If someone is found drunk and asleep in his car which is NOT parked in the parking lot of a tavern and there are no bottles in the car, is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @ben tillman

    , @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jonathan Mason




    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.
     
    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.
     
    It is the case in CA, but I get it now. You are trying to tell me how blacks feel about the law:


    If no one be snitchin' and the cops didn't see me do it, I dindu nuffin!

    Anyway, the law should not apply to blacks!

     

    There are certain legal principles that everyone should be aware of, and which are eminently sensible, at least to those who can think:

    1. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.

    From which follows, Ignorance of the law in your state is no excuse!

    Further, if you are moving around from state to state you should assume the worst case.

    2. Circumstantial evidence is "as probative as direct evidence and may even be more persuasive".

    https://www.law.com/newyorklawjournal/sites/newyorklawjournal/2017/11/27/circumstantial-evidence-an-important-source-of-proof/?slreturn=20200518084134
    , @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jonathan Mason



    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

     

    Ahhh, so the main problem with laws against violence is those people who chronically commit violence.

    I can see where you are going there.

    Perhaps there should be certain exclusions for all laws. Perhaps they should be racially based.

    Yeah, that will work, I am sure.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @anon
    @Jonathan Mason

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California.

    Then provide a cite to support your sweet understanding.

    If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    Strawman.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    I think the USSC didn't care when they ruled it was legal back in the 70's. What most people feel often doesn't really matter. Your career in corrections should have provided you with that sweet understanding.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit.

    My belief is that you make stuff up in your head and pretend it is real.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Lol. Now I know you're just trolling, nobody's that dumb.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  254. Altai [AKA "Altai_2"] says:
    @Pericles
    @Altai



    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with ‘Black Lives Matter’. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level.

     

    Good point.

    I had a look at the FIFA and UEFA websites, but they weren't very forthcoming with how the public could report such flagrant violations.

    Replies: @Altai

    Public? They’re well aware of this and would have fined or censored them. (As they have done at the international level when England and Scotland players wore poppies recently) But I suspect they won’t dare in this case despite it being the most insane case ever. The most watched league in the world just had not just all the players take a knee but in a fit of total silliness have ‘Black Lives Matter’ printed in place of every players name.

    But, of course, BLM isn’t a political issue, that’s why, like the poppy, everyone is expected to pledge allegiance and not donning one or affirming BLM is seen as the political act. And yet I don’t think there will be too many articles about ‘BLM fascism’.

    And that’s why Doritos posted a long message supporting Black Lives Matter and haven’t figured out how to post anything else since for many weeks. You can’t delete the message and you can’t post about the new ‘Ultra Spicy Jalapeno Doritos’ afterwards.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Altai

    Of course they are aware, they just would prefer to ignore the issue. Note that it won't help to raise this bit of hypocrisy sometime in the future when they're back to fining the deplorables.

    Alinsky rule 4: "Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules."

  255. @Koffeefutures
    White cops will have to call for Blackup every they confront poc perps.

    Like a squad of black cops can be at the ready to handle their fellow blacks.

    Replies: @Anonymous (n), @Ron Mexico

    Inner city units should all be k9 units. Resisting would go down considerably.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    @Ron Mexico

    That would not end well either. Some dread would end up shooting a dog or the dogs would be targeted by the nogs. Of course the animal rights groups would be yelping and the canine units would be pulled back. The dogs would be sent to good black homes to live out their lives unchained, well fed and unabused.

  256. @Truth
    @anon


    The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.
     
    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn't give them to police, they'd give them a second firearm.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @VinnyVette, @The Anti-Gnostic, @jsm

    A Taser is a weapon period! Your rationalization doesn’t change that! The cop was justified.

  257. Jack D says:
    @Whiskey
    @Nicholas Stix

    Nicholas Stix -- love your work, all you do, its awesome. Thanks for all you have written.

    That being said, the cops are guilty: of being White and Male. That's a crime and has been one since the 1990s and the Clintons. The officer will be found guilty swiftly and be executed post-haste. That's already been determined.

    We have no law, only men. We are no different from the Cultural Revolution Chinese, who we resemble in great detail. The only difference is that Mao and his Wife directed the carnage, here its the Democratic National Committee.

    And all that being said, the Intelligent Daseign guy has a point -- millions, mostly young White women, not just here in the US but around the globe, have turned out for George Floyd a man of no good points at all. None. A man whose main claim to fame was a part time porn actor gig, fathering five kids with three different women none of whom he supported, being a convicted home invader threatening to kill a pregnant woman and her unborn child. These facts are known or generally known to the young White women (it is always them) protesting. I saw a bunch last Saturday at Irvine City Hall here in Orange County California.

    Young White women see in this the ability to dispose of their most hated enemy: the beta White male. Its who they have the most rage for, the sin of losing and being unsexy. No woman will forgive any man for being her equal. Much less her inferior. Meanwhile for selling the fantasy of being a rapper's whore, not just Kim but Khloe, Kylie, Klamidya, Kondom and the other Kardashians/Jenners are billionaires each in their own right or nearly there. You will notice almost a complete absence of White men in these protests save the noodle armed but highly dangerous anti-fa in Seattle and Minneapolis and Portland and LA/NYC. The few White men not anti-fa are the miserable boyfriends/husbands of the protesting White women who look about as happy as they'd be at a Twilight convention. Or a Fifty Shades of Grey book signing.

    You see this rage in the White female led destruction of everything White beta males enjoy: the Terminator movies ("lesbian twitter went berserk" noted the female producer after totally wrecking the series by killing off the hero and promoting some lesbian twig to disastrous results but it burnt the series to the ground), Star Trek, Star Wars, Marvel Movies (now all featuring gay/lesbian heroes), Video games, everything that gives a bit of joy and comfort to White males must be destroyed totally. Black dudes looting and burning "White male" stuff even if its really a Black owned business is just more of the same.

    BLM is turbo charged on White female HATE HATE HATE for White men. We just are not dominant, violent, and stupid enough to be sexy and therefore we are punished for it to no end in sight.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Nicholas Stix

    The officer will be found guilty swiftly and be executed post-haste.

    Whiskey continues his unbroken string of wrong predictions. If there’s any word NOT associated with the death penalty in modern America it’s haste. Back in the day, yes, criminals would be tried and convicted and executed within a few months or sometimes even days after their crime. We also used to do things like build transcontinental railroads and fly men to the moon, but that was a different America.

    In America 2020 the average stay on Death Row is 15 YEARS. The most common cause of death for death row inmates is old age.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @Jack D

    Oh but you forget. We are ruled not by law but by Kangz! I would not be surprised in the least if the officer was paraded in front of a Black mob that in fact will lynch him.

    This your future White man. Know your place and kneel.

    Replies: @Neoconned

  258. @Lot
    @allahu akbar

    Confirmed by Erik Erikson, Atlanta talk radio host who says he talked with two different Atlanta PD cops, one high ranking.

    Inshallah PBUH habibi!

    Also, the KKK is loose and hanging noose in Oakland!

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/17/nooses-oakland-hate-crime-hanging-california

    The Guardian doesn’t even contemplate a tiny chance it is a hate hoax, rather it is “the latest in a spate of racist, anti-black related crimes.”

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    More El Noose-ra-cabra sightings!

  259. @Kratoklastes
    @theMann

    Right-wing paramilitaries would do well to screen for pigs wanting to join, and to blackball the fuck out of them - because cops are cowards first and foremost. They have the same psychotype as snitches.

    If any group I encounter contains a cop who claims he's a fellow-traveller, I try to get him booted - and then try to identify his undercover mate (e.g., Mark Kennedy).

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    Lighten up Francis

  260. @Truth
    @anon


    The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.
     
    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn't give them to police, they'd give them a second firearm.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @VinnyVette, @The Anti-Gnostic, @jsm

    It’s pretty difficult to restrain a healthy adult male. The universal default of mankind is grab him around his neck and threaten to cut off his airway, but that’s risky on several levels. Or you inflict enough pain to render somebody temporarily insensate. That’s hard to do under current rules of engagement–formerly you’d just whack him with a baton. Joint locks require a solid strength or positional advantage that’s hard to set up in a fight.

    The Tazer is an attempt to avoid all that risky fighting. Unless it gets stolen–now the cop is in danger of becoming disabled and losing his firearm. And the guy flees from an arrest and points it at you–wtf?!–so deadly force. Lots to process in a couple of seconds in a parking lot at night. The DA gets to pore over videotape and read statutes for four days. Of course, none of this was premeditated–the cop was just being a cop and trying to check off all the evidence boxes and effect an arrest of an obvious drunk driver. The next cop will tell the Wendy’s shift manager to just deal with it somehow.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It’s pretty difficult to restrain a healthy adult male.
     
    Right, so a lot of gentlemen on the police force should become cyber coders or salesmen.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  261. @ben tillman
    @Art Deco


    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.
     
    I know the chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court from before he was a judge. I know nothing about what he has done with the Georgia Supreme Court. .

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    He’s still a rather conservative, law-and-order guy. Of course, he also likes having a fairly normal life and not being stalked by crazed activists who are convinced this was legal murder.

    This ignorant, aging DA has set a terrible chain of events in motion and things will just have to run their course.

  262. @JimDandy
    @Ron Unz

    Where does it go from here? We are living in a strange situation where, time and time again, the mainstream is so cowed that they provide zero pushback to the radical left, and even seem ready to totally surrender. But without the discipline of pushback, the radical left pushes too far and forces the mainstream out of its stupor. "Condemn police brutality and accept the lie of systematic racist? I can get on board with that. But what's this? Defund the police? A black gangsta rapper warlord has taken over downtown Seattle? A white policeman faces the death penalty for heroically stopping a crazed criminal? I guess I will be voting for Trump after all."

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    “But without the discipline of pushback…”

    When was the last time the GOP pushed back? I blame them, including the cowardly lion, for everything.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks, Mr. Anon
  263. @JimDandy
    @Red Pill Angel

    I assume there's a chance Trump will address this to work up his rally crowds. But why aren't there ever marches for sanity?

    Replies: @Barnard, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Because at 61% white and falling, and half the whites hating the other half of the whites and wishing they were dead, there aren’t enough adult, angry white people to march for sanity. They’d face a larger crowd of screaming, angrier Team Browns and Team Goodwhites. It’s not your country any more, Badwhite.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    And yet, who is our president?

  264. @Whiskey
    @Nicholas Stix

    Nicholas Stix -- love your work, all you do, its awesome. Thanks for all you have written.

    That being said, the cops are guilty: of being White and Male. That's a crime and has been one since the 1990s and the Clintons. The officer will be found guilty swiftly and be executed post-haste. That's already been determined.

    We have no law, only men. We are no different from the Cultural Revolution Chinese, who we resemble in great detail. The only difference is that Mao and his Wife directed the carnage, here its the Democratic National Committee.

    And all that being said, the Intelligent Daseign guy has a point -- millions, mostly young White women, not just here in the US but around the globe, have turned out for George Floyd a man of no good points at all. None. A man whose main claim to fame was a part time porn actor gig, fathering five kids with three different women none of whom he supported, being a convicted home invader threatening to kill a pregnant woman and her unborn child. These facts are known or generally known to the young White women (it is always them) protesting. I saw a bunch last Saturday at Irvine City Hall here in Orange County California.

    Young White women see in this the ability to dispose of their most hated enemy: the beta White male. Its who they have the most rage for, the sin of losing and being unsexy. No woman will forgive any man for being her equal. Much less her inferior. Meanwhile for selling the fantasy of being a rapper's whore, not just Kim but Khloe, Kylie, Klamidya, Kondom and the other Kardashians/Jenners are billionaires each in their own right or nearly there. You will notice almost a complete absence of White men in these protests save the noodle armed but highly dangerous anti-fa in Seattle and Minneapolis and Portland and LA/NYC. The few White men not anti-fa are the miserable boyfriends/husbands of the protesting White women who look about as happy as they'd be at a Twilight convention. Or a Fifty Shades of Grey book signing.

    You see this rage in the White female led destruction of everything White beta males enjoy: the Terminator movies ("lesbian twitter went berserk" noted the female producer after totally wrecking the series by killing off the hero and promoting some lesbian twig to disastrous results but it burnt the series to the ground), Star Trek, Star Wars, Marvel Movies (now all featuring gay/lesbian heroes), Video games, everything that gives a bit of joy and comfort to White males must be destroyed totally. Black dudes looting and burning "White male" stuff even if its really a Black owned business is just more of the same.

    BLM is turbo charged on White female HATE HATE HATE for White men. We just are not dominant, violent, and stupid enough to be sexy and therefore we are punished for it to no end in sight.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Nicholas Stix

    Thank you for your kind words, Whiskey.

  265. @Lugash
    @Steve Sailer

    The three shots were somewhat in the direction of people in line at Wendy's. Yes, I'm dead serious, that's what this Talented 1 Percenter is basing the felony murder off of.

    Edit: One round did embed itself in one of the cars, so that's considered aggravated assault.

    Replies: @Jack D

    The shots in the direction of witnesses are charged as aggravated assault. The bullet in the car is charged as criminal damage to property.

  266. Jack D says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

     

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    After all drivers have to make decisions at times as to whether they can continue to drive safely perhaps because they need to sleep due to being awake a long time or perhaps because they are taking some medication that makes them sleepy or perhaps because the weather is so bad for example heavy rain that they feel they cannot drive safely. If you stop because you are drowsy, then you were drowsy before you stopped, but saying that you should not have been driving in the first place is not much help.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Peripatetic Commenter, @anon

    If someone is found drunk and asleep in his car which is NOT parked in the parking lot of a tavern and there are no bottles in the car, is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D


    ... is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?
     
    It is reasonable to assume that, but it is all a question of how officious do the police want to be in enforcing the law. Apparently the first officer on the scene didn't want to arrest him and might have worked out some alternative to arrest if he had been alone.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Hibernian

    , @ben tillman
    @Jack D

    Yes, it is reasonable, and the arresting officers do not have to be certain. That's not the standard.

    The defendant can present a defense stating that he did the drinking after he stopped the car and that he disposed of the bottles and then returned to the car. Or whatever. But the cops absolutely have probable cause to arrest him without a warrant even if there is a conceivable state of facts that would show he wasn't guilty. That's why they have the trial, after all.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

  267. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

     

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    After all drivers have to make decisions at times as to whether they can continue to drive safely perhaps because they need to sleep due to being awake a long time or perhaps because they are taking some medication that makes them sleepy or perhaps because the weather is so bad for example heavy rain that they feel they cannot drive safely. If you stop because you are drowsy, then you were drowsy before you stopped, but saying that you should not have been driving in the first place is not much help.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Peripatetic Commenter, @anon

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    It is the case in CA, but I get it now. You are trying to tell me how blacks feel about the law:

    If no one be snitchin’ and the cops didn’t see me do it, I dindu nuffin!

    Anyway, the law should not apply to blacks!

    There are certain legal principles that everyone should be aware of, and which are eminently sensible, at least to those who can think:

    1. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.

    From which follows, Ignorance of the law in your state is no excuse!

    Further, if you are moving around from state to state you should assume the worst case.

    2. Circumstantial evidence is “as probative as direct evidence and may even be more persuasive”.

    https://www.law.com/newyorklawjournal/sites/newyorklawjournal/2017/11/27/circumstantial-evidence-an-important-source-of-proof/?slreturn=20200518084134

  268. JackOH says:
    June 18, 2020 at 1:40 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Steve Sailer
    @theMann

    Do right wing paramilitary squads come with pensions, plus benefits including dental and eyecare?

    Replies: @usNthem, @theMann, @Alden, @Steve Johnson, @Reg Cæsar, @captflee, @JackOH

    Yep. A decent-enough steady job, wife and children, the goodwill and respect–whether nominal or genuine–of neighbors, friends, and colleagues, recognized position within one’s occupation or other civic group, etc., make rhetorical dissent, let alone “resistance”, difficult, quixotic, and just plain crazy.

    The disgruntled big-city cop earning $80 grand a year with OT will be okay with a small-town gig in a low-cost area earning half that. Dodgy ex-cops have paid options working as muscle, legal security or legal investigative work, or over-the-line “persuasion” on behalf of bullshit civic leaders.

    Ideologically motivated paramilitary ops–probably not.

  269. @Jonathan Mason
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

     

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    After all drivers have to make decisions at times as to whether they can continue to drive safely perhaps because they need to sleep due to being awake a long time or perhaps because they are taking some medication that makes them sleepy or perhaps because the weather is so bad for example heavy rain that they feel they cannot drive safely. If you stop because you are drowsy, then you were drowsy before you stopped, but saying that you should not have been driving in the first place is not much help.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Peripatetic Commenter, @anon

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

    Ahhh, so the main problem with laws against violence is those people who chronically commit violence.

    I can see where you are going there.

    Perhaps there should be certain exclusions for all laws. Perhaps they should be racially based.

    Yeah, that will work, I am sure.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. P

    I gather your frame of reference is the UK.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

  270. @Pericles
    @JimDandy


    How about a peaceful march? Why can’t sane people pull something like that off?

     

    Judging from recent years:

    1. Antifa show up and beat the tar out of you.
    2. If you defend yourself, you get arrested, charged, and convicted while the antifa walk.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Yeah, after I posted that I essentially answered my own question.

  271. @Joseph Doaks
    @JimDandy

    Because white Americans are demoralized by 50 years of having the deck stacked against them.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Truth

    Br-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-h, what are you talking about?

    The white man has had the deck stacked against him for fo’ hunnit years! You didn’t land on Plymouth Rock…

    …Oh, wait, yes you did, I got confused.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Truth

    My grandfather landed in Hoboken in 1902, and got on a train for Milwaukee. A common story.

  272. @Art Deco
    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Kronos, @vhrm, @ben tillman, @AnotherDad

    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.

    What we are really going to get is a test of the jury system. Specifically, whether it can work in this day and age. Whether a jury can function in the age of Antifa mau-mauing and official acquiesence?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @AnotherDad


    What we are really going to get is a test of the jury system. Specifically, whether it can work in this day and age.
     
    The jury system has been pretty creaky for a long time. But is there anything to stop the officer from requesting a bench trial? That would put the onus on the opinion of one person, the judge, rather than relying on a capricious jury.

    If this case is not resolved by a plea deal and does actually go to trial, it will have some of the characteristics of the Scopes Monkey trial, being not a real trial, but a public show trial as a test case to determine what the police can and can't do, or should and shouldn't do.

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

  273. @Mr. Anon
    @jon


    Watch the video. He is running away, turns to fire the taser at the cops, then is immediately shot as he continues running. He wasn’t shot because he was attempting to flee, he was shot because he fired at the cops.
     
    And the cop who shot him didn't necessarily know it was a taser either. It was his partner's taser that Brooks grabbed and ran off with. As far as Rolfe knew, he might have grabbed his partner's gun. Or had a gun hidden on him.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @James B. Shearer, @Truth

    The tasers are painted in flourescent colors for that very reason, grasshopper. And they were going to handcuff him with a gun on his posession?

  274. @Whiskey
    Black people have the divine right of Kangz! to attack anyone who is not Black for any reason. Its not 2012 anymore. White people are now defacto illegal. Open season on them, if you have not drawn the conclusion.

    What this is going to do is enact the Purge movies in real life. Its what young White women have wanted for years, as well as noodle armed soy boys and those would-be upper class feminist studies majors and the like who figure they should be elite but are living in a one room apartment walk-up while writing Vox clickbait articles.

    Yes Blacks will make every city where they are a sizeable population unliveable as cops retreat to donut shops those few not defunded/fired. But it won't stop there -- and yes the Governors and Mayors will call out the Guard to disarm even the Mexican/Central American militias. Its all Black worship of Kangz all the time.

    But after the Black criminal class which is most urban Blacks -- Floyd George and Rayshawn's criminal history is bog standard for all but Elite Michelle Robinson Blacks -- have looted out their own cities, they will have to start looting out in the suburbs. The case of the Jogger Ahmaud Arbery (spelling?) is indicative. Black criminals know there is no enforcement now possible even in suburbs.

    Think the local Sheriff's Deputies and cops are going to do anything but chase crullers and coffee at Dunkin? There will also be random driving around and tickets only for Whites. Of which there will have to be many, many as that's the primary funding source for many departments.

    You are now completely and totally vulnerable. Call the police and they WILL NOT COME. Why would they? Odds are the perps are Black and they know that. If they do ANYTHING they will be crucified and they know it. Shoot a vibrant cultural enricher who shows up in your bedroom at 3 AM looking to vibrantly culturally enrich your wife, daughter, etc. and you will sentenced to death quite rapidly.

    Ironically the safest places will be isolated rural ones, where people will simply shoot/shovel like they do mountain lions, other protected species that is illegal to kill under any circumstances.

    EVERY other place will be vibrantly culturally enriched. And the thing is -- its wildly popular. Black Lives Matter polls so highly even Trump shut up. White people WANT THIS. Particularly White women. Its a way to replace their men with rappers and live just like a Kardashian. After all, White men are neither needed or required to have White levels of prosperity as everyone knows from watching Black Panther which was a documentary.

    In fact the dog that is not barking is Trump. After a few tweets threatening to shoot looters and arsonists he's totally shut up. I figure he knows he will lose all fifty states with internal polling, and he's looking to make deals to save Jared and Ivanka knowing he himself will spend the rest of his life in Prison under President Abrams.

    Trump has been silent for weeks. When has that ever happened with Trump before?

    Replies: @Truth, @donut

    Whiskey, tell us about your Naval Flight Training again.

  275. @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    If someone is found drunk and asleep in his car which is NOT parked in the parking lot of a tavern and there are no bottles in the car, is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @ben tillman

    … is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?

    It is reasonable to assume that, but it is all a question of how officious do the police want to be in enforcing the law. Apparently the first officer on the scene didn’t want to arrest him and might have worked out some alternative to arrest if he had been alone.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason


    but it is all a question of how officious do the police want to be in enforcing the law.
     
    It's damned if you do and damned if you don't. Let's say they "worked something out" with Rayshard. The next night Rayshard proceeds to get drunk and drive again and this time he is in a head on collision and kills 5 black teenagers. The papers would be full of stories about the police not doing their job and not caring about or protecting black people, blah, blah, blah. Why only the night before, Rayshard had been caught driving drunk and the police did nothing to stop him from doing it again, etc.

    The police in Atlanta have already commenced a "sick out". We'll see how well the citizens of Atlanta like it when the police no longer do their jobs. Black people will probably like it ok since they generally prefer that the law NOT be enforced against young black males who are, if not themselves, their sons, grandsons, brothers, cousins, etc. so they have more to lose than to gain from strict law enforcement, but white people not so much.
    , @Hibernian
    @Jonathan Mason

    The second officer on the scene was an expert in DUI enforcement and was called at least in part for that reason.

  276. @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    No, he is charged with felony murder. No misunderstanding at all.

    https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/da-paul-howard-expected-make-announcement-possible-charges-rayshard-brooks-shooting/EZ5T5RIXTRHO3O5LYBX6W3VN5U/

    Many other news stories confirm same. Whether the charges will stick is another question but that is what he is charged with.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    News stories and indictments aren’t the same thing. It can’t be felony murder because (a) it doesn’t meet the requirements for felony murder and (b) it meets the requirements for regular murder anyway (before application of laws regarding justification and affirmative defenses), so there’s no need to resort to felony murder. I’ll believe it when I see the indictment. I’m getting the sense there isn’t one at this point.

    Just to emphasize the absurd bias of the DA:

    Earlier this month the same DA claimed a Taser was classified as a deadly weapon under Georgia law in justifying his decision to charge five APD officers with aggravated assault after they used a Taser on college students who were attempting to leave a protest. Here is the video where you can see him say it:

    Now, he’s claiming that the Taser Brooks took from one of the officers before he was shot wasn’t considered a “deadly weapon,” making Rolfe’s shooting of Brooks “not justified.”

    Under Georgia law, a peace officer may use deadly force to 1. arrest a suspected felon when he reasonably believes that the suspect poses an immediate threat of physical violence to the officer or others, 2. to protect himself and others from a life-threatening injury, and 3. to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. See O.C.G.A. § 17-4-20 and O.C.G.A. § 16-3-21.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    I believe there's no indictment but there's an arrest warrant signed by a judge. The warrant (and the supporting affidavit) is very short and goes into no detail. It just says that the cop unlawfully during the course of committing the felony of aggravated assault caused the death of another human.

    From the transcript of the DA's press conference:

    District Attorney Paul Howard: (18:19)


    So these are the charges that we have had filed a day, signed by one of our superior court judges. These are the 11 charges against Officer Rolfe. The first charge is felony murder. This is the death that is as a result of a underlying felony. And in this case, the underlying felony is aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.
     
    This could not be more clear. Maybe Howard is wrong. Maybe Howard is an idiot. I have no idea why he charged felony murder instead of malice murder (which is what it is called in GA) but he did and all the press accounts are correct as to what was charged in the warrant.

    https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/da-announces-charges-in-atlanta-rayshard-brooks-killing-press-conference-transcript

    https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/mdjonline.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6d/76df4952-b0e4-11ea-8545-db5872bba93b/5eea90191ea32.pdf.pdf

    Replies: @Art Deco

  277. @AnotherDad
    @Art Deco


    I suppose we get to see how corrupted Georgia courts are soon.
     
    What we are really going to get is a test of the jury system. Specifically, whether it can work in this day and age. Whether a jury can function in the age of Antifa mau-mauing and official acquiesence?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    What we are really going to get is a test of the jury system. Specifically, whether it can work in this day and age.

    The jury system has been pretty creaky for a long time. But is there anything to stop the officer from requesting a bench trial? That would put the onus on the opinion of one person, the judge, rather than relying on a capricious jury.

    If this case is not resolved by a plea deal and does actually go to trial, it will have some of the characteristics of the Scopes Monkey trial, being not a real trial, but a public show trial as a test case to determine what the police can and can’t do, or should and shouldn’t do.

    • Replies: @Joseph Doaks
    @Jonathan Mason

    "is there anything to stop the officer from requesting a bench trial?"

    Only the fact that most local judges are cowards, or incompetent political hacks. Or am I being too judgmental?

  278. @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    If someone is found drunk and asleep in his car which is NOT parked in the parking lot of a tavern and there are no bottles in the car, is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @ben tillman

    Yes, it is reasonable, and the arresting officers do not have to be certain. That’s not the standard.

    The defendant can present a defense stating that he did the drinking after he stopped the car and that he disposed of the bottles and then returned to the car. Or whatever. But the cops absolutely have probable cause to arrest him without a warrant even if there is a conceivable state of facts that would show he wasn’t guilty. That’s why they have the trial, after all.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @ben tillman

    "Yes, your honor, I parked my car in the Wendy's drive through, consumed a lot of alcohol, threw the bottles in the trash, and got back in my car and fell asleep."

    Yup, I can see that being a solid defense.

  279. @ATBOTL
    @Dr. X

    Because most white people will side with police against an innocent white civilian every time. That is part of the cuck psychology of the American white man. If a pig shot a white baby sleeping in a stroller for no reason and then set the baby on fire before throwing the baby over Niagara falls, most white Americans would blame the white baby and say the pig was justified. Until that changes, there is no chance of any kind of white resistance. We have to push back against the pro-police, "blue lives matter" nonsense.

    Worship of the police is a uniquely white American value and one of the many reasons modern white American culture doesn't deserve to survive. We can't do anything without changing our culture first. That is the battle.

    Replies: @Aeronerauk, @bruce county, @William Badwhite

    That might genuinely be the most insane thing i’ve ever seen written here. White people do side with the police over criminals more often than not, but corrupt cops were a common trope in media before all this anti police hysteria. Do people who like the movie Copland worship cops?

    Most are like you, though perhaps less demented hatred and more resigned eye rolling. By the way, I’m sorry about that speeding ticket they gave you.

    • Thanks: Jane Plain
  280. Ganderson says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:27 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @JimDandy
    @Clifford Brown

    There are actually memes going around on social media saying that the cops could have--and should have--gotten him home safely, as if it was not their duty to arrest a person guilty of a DUI.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @Ganderson

    It was often the case, 50 years ago. The cops had a number of options- follow you home, take away your keys- tell you to sleep it off. There was a tolerance for drunk driving in those days that was probably too lenient. As we often do, however, we’ve gone way overboard- the legal standard for DWI isn’ t even drunk!

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Ganderson

    Yeah. But the cops are under great pressure today to enforce D.U.I. laws. And whatever the legal standard should be, a guy who passes out drunk behind the wheel of his car while waiting for fast food is too drunk to drive. Furthermore, the guy was on parole for serious crimes, and this was a violation. For a top prosecutor to shake his head primly and condemn a cop for not just letting this guy go--and insinuating that it is evidence of racism--is peak absurdity.

    Replies: @Ganderson

  281. @Altai
    @Pericles

    Public? They're well aware of this and would have fined or censored them. (As they have done at the international level when England and Scotland players wore poppies recently) But I suspect they won't dare in this case despite it being the most insane case ever. The most watched league in the world just had not just all the players take a knee but in a fit of total silliness have 'Black Lives Matter' printed in place of every players name.

    But, of course, BLM isn't a political issue, that's why, like the poppy, everyone is expected to pledge allegiance and not donning one or affirming BLM is seen as the political act. And yet I don't think there will be too many articles about 'BLM fascism'.

    And that's why Doritos posted a long message supporting Black Lives Matter and haven't figured out how to post anything else since for many weeks. You can't delete the message and you can't post about the new 'Ultra Spicy Jalapeno Doritos' afterwards.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Of course they are aware, they just would prefer to ignore the issue. Note that it won’t help to raise this bit of hypocrisy sometime in the future when they’re back to fining the deplorables.

    Alinsky rule 4: “Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules.”

  282. @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jonathan Mason


    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.
     
    No. The responsible thing to do is to not operate the vehicle at all.

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    Perhaps your IQ is not high enough to understand these things, but it is true.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Ozymandias, @ben tillman

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    Incorrect. The cornerstone here is whether the keys to the vehicle are within your reach. I know this to be fact in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Wyoming.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Ozymandias


    Incorrect. The cornerstone here is whether the keys to the vehicle are within your reach. I know this to be fact in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Wyoming.
     
    Whatever the details in particular states this is all legalistic, "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin" stuff that they just use to bust people with on their misguided zero tolerance ways.

    In reality you can be in the bar or asleep in your bed and be no more than 60 seconds away from driving your car is the feeling strikes you. So the "keys within reach" is pretty meaningless.

    Replies: @Ozymandias

  283. @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jonathan Mason


    These points are true, and yet drunken driving is an offense in which the driver can only make an educated guess at to whether he is breaking the law, and the responsible thing to do if in doubt is to pull over and sleep it off until sober rather than continue and endanger other road users.
     
    No. The responsible thing to do is to not operate the vehicle at all.

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    Perhaps your IQ is not high enough to understand these things, but it is true.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Ozymandias, @ben tillman

    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

    That’s not true. The state has to prove that you were over the limit when you were driving. Because alcohol doesn’t go straight from the mouth to the bloodstream, a driver’s BAC can increase and put him over the limit after he pulls over (depending on the facts).

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    We have 50 states and 50 statutes but lets talk about Georgia. The Georgia DUI statute says it's a crime for

    “any person to drive or be in actual physical control of any moving vehicle while the person's alcohol concentration is 0.08 grams or more at any time within three hours after such driving or being in actual physical control from alcohol consumed before such driving or being in actual physical control ended.”

    So you don't have to be driving, just in "actual physical control" and your alcohol level can be measured up to 3 hours later. In Georgia. YMMV depending on what state you live in.

    What happens is that there is back and forth between the legislature and DUI lawyers. DUI lawyer gets a guy off because he is not driving at the time, next session the statute is amended to say "actual physical control". DUI lawyer gets a guy off because his blood was not tested immediately after his arrest - legislature amends the law to allow a 3 hour window. Etc.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    , @Peripatetic Commenter
    @ben tillman

    https://www.expertlawfirm.com/can-get-dui-sleeping-car/



    The California legislature enacted Vehicle Code section 40300.5 which doesn’t require that the officer observe driving. In other words, the law allows for an arrest even if the violation did not occur in front of the officer.
    Vehicle Code section 40300.5 provides that an officer is permitted to make a DUI arrest whenever they have probable cause to believe that the person has been driving while under the influence and the person:
    - may cause injury to himself or herself or damage property unless immediately arrested;
    - may destroy or conceal evidence of the crime unless immediately arrested;
    - was involved in a traffic accident of any type;
    - is in or about a vehicle that is obstructing a roadway; or
    - will not be apprehended unless immediately arrested.

     

    You can quibble all you like, but the people who sleep alone in their car after drinking are less likely to have mitigating factors reducing the rate at which alcohol enters their bloodstream.
  284. JimDandy says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:42 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Very Nice Boy
    @JimDandy

    Do I need to point out the naivety of this idea?

    Do you think any such march won't be met with thousands of bused in "anti-racists" who will, according to CNN, be there to confront the abhorrent racists who came to march?

    Do you imagine that the, quite likely, very ugly violence inflicted on the marchers by the "anti-racists" will be reported on at all fairly by any media organization?

    Replies: @JimDandy

    It’s true, but.

    Saturday in Tulsa seems destined to turn into something along those lines, but Fox and others will report with an at least somewhat positive eye, and the juxtaposition of Trump’s cheering, flag-waving crowd with the masked scum outside will most likely benefit Trump.

    Send a couple dozen uniformed cops from every city to join supporters in a march to support this officer, a clean-cut young man who is facing the death penalty for protecting the public from a monster. It would be a different animal than Charlottesville.

  285. @ben tillman
    @Jack D

    Yes, it is reasonable, and the arresting officers do not have to be certain. That's not the standard.

    The defendant can present a defense stating that he did the drinking after he stopped the car and that he disposed of the bottles and then returned to the car. Or whatever. But the cops absolutely have probable cause to arrest him without a warrant even if there is a conceivable state of facts that would show he wasn't guilty. That's why they have the trial, after all.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    “Yes, your honor, I parked my car in the Wendy’s drive through, consumed a lot of alcohol, threw the bottles in the trash, and got back in my car and fell asleep.”

    Yup, I can see that being a solid defense.

  286. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:42 pm GMT • 200 Words   
    @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D


    ... is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?
     
    It is reasonable to assume that, but it is all a question of how officious do the police want to be in enforcing the law. Apparently the first officer on the scene didn't want to arrest him and might have worked out some alternative to arrest if he had been alone.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Hibernian

    but it is all a question of how officious do the police want to be in enforcing the law.

    It’s damned if you do and damned if you don’t. Let’s say they “worked something out” with Rayshard. The next night Rayshard proceeds to get drunk and drive again and this time he is in a head on collision and kills 5 black teenagers. The papers would be full of stories about the police not doing their job and not caring about or protecting black people, blah, blah, blah. Why only the night before, Rayshard had been caught driving drunk and the police did nothing to stop him from doing it again, etc.

    The police in Atlanta have already commenced a “sick out”. We’ll see how well the citizens of Atlanta like it when the police no longer do their jobs. Black people will probably like it ok since they generally prefer that the law NOT be enforced against young black males who are, if not themselves, their sons, grandsons, brothers, cousins, etc. so they have more to lose than to gain from strict law enforcement, but white people not so much.

  287. Just curious and not from prejudice: what is the precedent for legally shooting someone in the back?

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Currahee


    Just curious and not from prejudice: what is the precedent for legally shooting someone in the back?
     
    A few things:
    1) https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleeing_felon_rule

    Shooting a cop with a taser i think falls into the category of dangerous to society

    2) If you watch the video you'll note the guy ran. Turned to shoot the taser and then turned to run again.

    The cop was chasing him and didn't even draw his gun until the dude shot him with the taser. From there the shooting is pretty much one action.

    Even in the Monday-morningest of quarterbacking sessions, claiming that a "reasonable person" would have assumed that the prep had disengaged in the time between the taser shot and the time the gun came on target is a stretch.

    (though I'm sure the DA is going to argue that too.)
    , @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Currahee

    There are a couple of circumstances where someone can end up shot in the back.

    One is a fleeing felon.

    The other is where Person A attacks Person B or looks like they will attack Person B, but Person B is armed and makes the decision to shoot. However, between perceiving the attack and pulling the trigger is around three quarters of a second.

    In that time Person A may have turned around to run away.

    The cops know about this issue.

  288. @ATBOTL
    @Dr. X

    Because most white people will side with police against an innocent white civilian every time. That is part of the cuck psychology of the American white man. If a pig shot a white baby sleeping in a stroller for no reason and then set the baby on fire before throwing the baby over Niagara falls, most white Americans would blame the white baby and say the pig was justified. Until that changes, there is no chance of any kind of white resistance. We have to push back against the pro-police, "blue lives matter" nonsense.

    Worship of the police is a uniquely white American value and one of the many reasons modern white American culture doesn't deserve to survive. We can't do anything without changing our culture first. That is the battle.

    Replies: @Aeronerauk, @bruce county, @William Badwhite

    Go back to your basement and your game console. You remind me of the people who stand there and video the police doing their jobs but cry like a little girl when you have an interaction with them. People like you are the first to call the police if you get a scratch on your BMW.

  289. @Ron Mexico
    @Koffeefutures

    Inner city units should all be k9 units. Resisting would go down considerably.

    Replies: @bruce county

    That would not end well either. Some dread would end up shooting a dog or the dogs would be targeted by the nogs. Of course the animal rights groups would be yelping and the canine units would be pulled back. The dogs would be sent to good black homes to live out their lives unchained, well fed and unabused.

  290. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 2:59 pm GMT • 200 Words   
    @ben tillman
    @Jack D

    News stories and indictments aren't the same thing. It can't be felony murder because (a) it doesn't meet the requirements for felony murder and (b) it meets the requirements for regular murder anyway (before application of laws regarding justification and affirmative defenses), so there's no need to resort to felony murder. I'll believe it when I see the indictment. I'm getting the sense there isn't one at this point.

    Just to emphasize the absurd bias of the DA:

    Earlier this month the same DA claimed a Taser was classified as a deadly weapon under Georgia law in justifying his decision to charge five APD officers with aggravated assault after they used a Taser on college students who were attempting to leave a protest. Here is the video where you can see him say it:

    https://twitter.com/greg_price11/status/1273378926744739842

    Now, he's claiming that the Taser Brooks took from one of the officers before he was shot wasn't considered a "deadly weapon," making Rolfe's shooting of Brooks "not justified."

    Under Georgia law, a peace officer may use deadly force to 1. arrest a suspected felon when he reasonably believes that the suspect poses an immediate threat of physical violence to the officer or others, 2. to protect himself and others from a life-threatening injury, and 3. to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. See O.C.G.A. § 17-4-20 and O.C.G.A. § 16-3-21.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I believe there’s no indictment but there’s an arrest warrant signed by a judge. The warrant (and the supporting affidavit) is very short and goes into no detail. It just says that the cop unlawfully during the course of committing the felony of aggravated assault caused the death of another human.

    From the transcript of the DA’s press conference:

    District Attorney Paul Howard: (18:19)

    So these are the charges that we have had filed a day, signed by one of our superior court judges. These are the 11 charges against Officer Rolfe. The first charge is felony murder. This is the death that is as a result of a underlying felony. And in this case, the underlying felony is aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

    This could not be more clear. Maybe Howard is wrong. Maybe Howard is an idiot. I have no idea why he charged felony murder instead of malice murder (which is what it is called in GA) but he did and all the press accounts are correct as to what was charged in the warrant.

    https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/da-announces-charges-in-atlanta-rayshard-brooks-killing-press-conference-transcript

    https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/mdjonline.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6d/76df4952-b0e4-11ea-8545-db5872bba93b/5eea90191ea32.pdf.pdf

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    Maybe Howard is wrong. Maybe Howard is an idiot.

    He's been on government payrolls for about 90% of his career in law.

  291. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:08 pm GMT • 200 Words   
    @ben tillman
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.
     
    That's not true. The state has to prove that you were over the limit when you were driving. Because alcohol doesn't go straight from the mouth to the bloodstream, a driver's BAC can increase and put him over the limit after he pulls over (depending on the facts).

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter

    We have 50 states and 50 statutes but lets talk about Georgia. The Georgia DUI statute says it’s a crime for

    “any person to drive or be in actual physical control of any moving vehicle while the person’s alcohol concentration is 0.08 grams or more at any time within three hours after such driving or being in actual physical control from alcohol consumed before such driving or being in actual physical control ended.”

    So you don’t have to be driving, just in “actual physical control” and your alcohol level can be measured up to 3 hours later. In Georgia. YMMV depending on what state you live in.

    What happens is that there is back and forth between the legislature and DUI lawyers. DUI lawyer gets a guy off because he is not driving at the time, next session the statute is amended to say “actual physical control”. DUI lawyer gets a guy off because his blood was not tested immediately after his arrest – legislature amends the law to allow a 3 hour window. Etc.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Jack D

    The language of that statute is not even intelligible.

    Replies: @Jack D

  292. Truth says:
    June 18, 2020 at 3:08 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Mr. Anon
    @Truth


    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn’t give them to police, they’d give them a second firearm.
     
    They give cops night-sticks. Has nobody ever been beaten to death with a baton? Cops have arms. Has nobody ever died in a choke-hold? People have probaby been killed with rubber bullets. People have probably even died from pepper-spray. All violence can kill. Tasers aren't "non-lethal". They are "less-lethal".

    Replies: @Truth

    All violence can kill. Tasers aren’t “non-lethal”. They are “less-lethal”.

    So is a box of spaghetti if you use it in the right way. The point is it is MEANT to be used with marinara sauce, just as a taser is MEANT to temporarily incapacitate someone without lasting harm.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Truth

    Thanks Johnny Cochran. Though your point would be stronger if you made it rhyme.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Truth

    Try attacking a cop with a nightstick and see how far you get. He's not gonna play quarter-staff with you like you're Little John and he's Robin Hood. Cops are not obliged to fight duels of honor with suspects they are trying to arrest - they don't preface their lawful use of violence with "choose your weapons, sir!"

  293. @ben tillman
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.
     
    That's not true. The state has to prove that you were over the limit when you were driving. Because alcohol doesn't go straight from the mouth to the bloodstream, a driver's BAC can increase and put him over the limit after he pulls over (depending on the facts).

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter

    https://www.expertlawfirm.com/can-get-dui-sleeping-car/

    The California legislature enacted Vehicle Code section 40300.5 which doesn’t require that the officer observe driving. In other words, the law allows for an arrest even if the violation did not occur in front of the officer.
    Vehicle Code section 40300.5 provides that an officer is permitted to make a DUI arrest whenever they have probable cause to believe that the person has been driving while under the influence and the person:
    – may cause injury to himself or herself or damage property unless immediately arrested;
    – may destroy or conceal evidence of the crime unless immediately arrested;
    – was involved in a traffic accident of any type;
    – is in or about a vehicle that is obstructing a roadway; or
    – will not be apprehended unless immediately arrested.

    You can quibble all you like, but the people who sleep alone in their car after drinking are less likely to have mitigating factors reducing the rate at which alcohol enters their bloodstream.

  294. @Jesse
    It's more complicated than that. Yes, they were justified in what they did at that moment. But a bigger question is just how they let it get to that moment in the first place. It was terrible policing.

    I do, however, agree with the general consensus that murder charges are the wrong route. Take the Daniel Shaver situation. It was a sadistic sergeant and the trigger happy twerp beside him, which raises questions about the department's hiring and promotion standards. Charging the twerp with murder and implying he was the one playing twisted Simon says allowed a clear structural rot to look like a horrible but isolated hiring error.

    TPTB are learning that the BLM types have no sense of nuance or proportion, or ability to wait even medium term for results. So they throw them a bone - in the form of anyone unfortunate enough to get caught on camera - and leave the structural issues alone. What this case warranted was a quiet sit down with the chief of police, and to quietly get the ball rolling on forcing these two incompetents out.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown, @Precious, @Anonymousse

    Would love to have YOU, the jogger whisperer, out there showing em’ how it’s done.

  295. @Jonathan Mason
    @AnotherDad


    What we are really going to get is a test of the jury system. Specifically, whether it can work in this day and age.
     
    The jury system has been pretty creaky for a long time. But is there anything to stop the officer from requesting a bench trial? That would put the onus on the opinion of one person, the judge, rather than relying on a capricious jury.

    If this case is not resolved by a plea deal and does actually go to trial, it will have some of the characteristics of the Scopes Monkey trial, being not a real trial, but a public show trial as a test case to determine what the police can and can't do, or should and shouldn't do.

    Replies: @Joseph Doaks

    “is there anything to stop the officer from requesting a bench trial?”

    Only the fact that most local judges are cowards, or incompetent political hacks. Or am I being too judgmental?

  296. @A.Lawyer
    This is becoming something of an IQ test for white cops, and they are not performing well. Here's a little free legal advice. If you are a white cop in a blue city, county, or state and you receive a call pertaining to a black suspect, you need to: (a) drive aimlessly to the wrong address; (b) stay in your car; (c) report to dispatch that you are not able to locate the suspect; and (d) drive away. How hard is this to remember?

    Replies: @vhrm, @kaganovitch, @black sea, @Anonymousse

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/06/11/us/chicago-officers-in-congressmans-office/index.html

    Some cops were spotted trying the “hide out to avoid an officially organized impossible situation” strategy in Chicago.

    They are now targets of media rage for not being out there being out there getting beaten up/and or prosecuted for resisting getting beaten up. The politicians feel that this was the officers just desserts and it was shameful of them to try to avoid receiving them.

    The cops also had the temerity to impugn the integrity of BOBBY RUSH! They went so far as to imply that the honorable Revered Dr Bobby Rush Jr. asked for VIP police protection from mobs of his own righteously angry peacefully protesting people.

    So yeah… there is no way to win. A white cop who isn’t in the process of quitting is either insane or (less likely) an actual saint.

  297. @moshe
    @Kronos

    It would be interesting to see a composite Zillow chart of real estate values by city to see whether any got more or less expensive over the past few weeks.

    I assume such a chart must exist somewhere.But where?

    Replies: @David

    You got me wondering. Here’s a Zillow site where you can download what your asking for. I suggest the Raw median list price report for metro regions. It’s through May. June should start to tell us something.

    https://www.zillow.com/research/data/

  298. @Whiskey
    Black people have the divine right of Kangz! to attack anyone who is not Black for any reason. Its not 2012 anymore. White people are now defacto illegal. Open season on them, if you have not drawn the conclusion.

    What this is going to do is enact the Purge movies in real life. Its what young White women have wanted for years, as well as noodle armed soy boys and those would-be upper class feminist studies majors and the like who figure they should be elite but are living in a one room apartment walk-up while writing Vox clickbait articles.

    Yes Blacks will make every city where they are a sizeable population unliveable as cops retreat to donut shops those few not defunded/fired. But it won't stop there -- and yes the Governors and Mayors will call out the Guard to disarm even the Mexican/Central American militias. Its all Black worship of Kangz all the time.

    But after the Black criminal class which is most urban Blacks -- Floyd George and Rayshawn's criminal history is bog standard for all but Elite Michelle Robinson Blacks -- have looted out their own cities, they will have to start looting out in the suburbs. The case of the Jogger Ahmaud Arbery (spelling?) is indicative. Black criminals know there is no enforcement now possible even in suburbs.

    Think the local Sheriff's Deputies and cops are going to do anything but chase crullers and coffee at Dunkin? There will also be random driving around and tickets only for Whites. Of which there will have to be many, many as that's the primary funding source for many departments.

    You are now completely and totally vulnerable. Call the police and they WILL NOT COME. Why would they? Odds are the perps are Black and they know that. If they do ANYTHING they will be crucified and they know it. Shoot a vibrant cultural enricher who shows up in your bedroom at 3 AM looking to vibrantly culturally enrich your wife, daughter, etc. and you will sentenced to death quite rapidly.

    Ironically the safest places will be isolated rural ones, where people will simply shoot/shovel like they do mountain lions, other protected species that is illegal to kill under any circumstances.

    EVERY other place will be vibrantly culturally enriched. And the thing is -- its wildly popular. Black Lives Matter polls so highly even Trump shut up. White people WANT THIS. Particularly White women. Its a way to replace their men with rappers and live just like a Kardashian. After all, White men are neither needed or required to have White levels of prosperity as everyone knows from watching Black Panther which was a documentary.

    In fact the dog that is not barking is Trump. After a few tweets threatening to shoot looters and arsonists he's totally shut up. I figure he knows he will lose all fifty states with internal polling, and he's looking to make deals to save Jared and Ivanka knowing he himself will spend the rest of his life in Prison under President Abrams.

    Trump has been silent for weeks. When has that ever happened with Trump before?

    Replies: @Truth, @donut

    Trump is trying to think of something to tweet that he can actually do .

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @donut

    Ave atque vale Aristippus! We hardly knew ye.

  299. @Jack D
    @Whiskey


    The officer will be found guilty swiftly and be executed post-haste.
     
    Whiskey continues his unbroken string of wrong predictions. If there's any word NOT associated with the death penalty in modern America it's haste. Back in the day, yes, criminals would be tried and convicted and executed within a few months or sometimes even days after their crime. We also used to do things like build transcontinental railroads and fly men to the moon, but that was a different America.

    In America 2020 the average stay on Death Row is 15 YEARS. The most common cause of death for death row inmates is old age.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    Oh but you forget. We are ruled not by law but by Kangz! I would not be surprised in the least if the officer was paraded in front of a Black mob that in fact will lynch him.

    This your future White man. Know your place and kneel.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @Whiskey

    Wasn't that the user Lot I think....

    WE WUZ KANGZ!

  300. @Jack D
    @Thucydides

    Police should start looking to spend more time at the donut shop. And they will, my friend, they will.

    Every police officer indicted for "overzealous" policing means 10 more blacks (and maybe a couple of whites) murdered because the cops are not as interested in arresting felons.

    And it take a LOT of arrests under our system to get someone off the street permanently. Basim Henry, the getaway driver in the carjacking murder of young lawyer Justin Friedland, killed for his Range Rover, had, at the age of 36, been arrested seven times as a juvenile, fourteen times as an adult, convicted of unlawful possession of an assault firearm, and convicted of bank robbery and STILL he was free to walk the streets until he committed his final crime (not counting those he may commit in prison during his life plus 10 year sentence). Not only had he been given a 2nd chance, he had been given a 3rd and a 4th and a 21st (this is not counting all the times he committed crimes for which he was not caught - probably 10x as many). These are the black lives that are said to "matter". They do matter because for decades such predators have made our big cities unlivable and they will again given the chance. But to even mention the Basim Henry's of the world or attribute any agency to them is "racist" in today's environment.

    Replies: @black sea, @Anonymousse

    Well as long as James Fields gets over 400 years we can all rest easy at night.

  301. Mr. Anon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:03 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    You are such a stupid, dull-witted drone. Do you think anyone thinks you to be some kind of infallible font of wisdom? You are an idiot and a clown.

    It doesn't matter how much hot air you emit. There are still no wars for Israel outside your imagination.



    the US just happens to be bellicose towards every country with which Israel has a beef. It is purely coincidence.

    We have conflicts with Iran, Syria, and Turkey. All of which they initiated (and with none of which have we been at war).

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    How did Syria initiate a conflict with the US? And how does said conflict serve American interests? And you conveniently ignored Iraq. That was a pretty big war, and an utterly foolish one, that also served no actual American interest.

    Like I said – you are a stupid, dull-witted drone. Your thoughts and utterances are banal. Nobody cares what you think.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    How did Syria initiate a conflict with the US?

    Syria was a Soviet client state from about 1955 onward. Then they participated in Gamal Abd el-Nasser's chicken games in 1967, which cost them the Golan Heights. Then they allied themselves with Iran after 1979. This isn't that difficult.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Mr. Anon

  302. @Inquiring Mind
    @Daniel Williams

    I can understand the gunshot wound to the back -- it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.

    How are officers trained? My understanding is that they are put in "simulators" where they are shown videos of at first glance persons not an immediate threat who then turn to shoot the officer in the simulator, and then the officer is told he would have been shot in the absence of "responding to the threat."

    This should be offered as a court room defense, not just a "reasonable person" test but how police are trained to react, and react quickly to such situations. That Mr. Brooks was shot in the back is something that can be examined as to what posture was assumed at what moment in running away, turning to point a gun-like object at the officer and then turning to keep running. Are the police trained to say, "He pointed what appeared to be a gun and shoot it at me, but he turned again to run away, and that is a safe-harbor provision where suspect (of committing assault on the officers arresting him for drunk driving) can count on not being shot by the police?

    As to the disrespect charge, this is the first I ever heard of this -- has anyone seeing any of the videos seen such a thing. Is there any video imagery supporting this, given body cameras and bystanders and everything being recorded, or is this the recollection of eye witnesses and we know how that all "goes down."

    Replies: @jon, @Charon, @Adam Smith

    it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.

    Here is the full video. The action starts about 28 minutes in…

    Brooks was indeed running away.

    Rolfe was not in any danger as tasers are non-lethal especially once discharged.

    Let Brooks run. No need to shoot him in the back while he is fleeing for his life.

    Not sure anyone can be charged with disrespect but it seems to me that 25 minutes of playing simon says is harassment. Brooks blew a .108 on the breathalyzer.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Adam Smith

    Thanks for the link.

    It proves that Rolfe was 100% justified.

  303. @Altai
    The English Premiere League returned today to play in empty stadiums. All the players and referees took a knee. The best part of the footage is the piped in crowd noise, there's a metaphor there for something.

    https://twitter.com/SkySportsPL/status/1273301775844626443

    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with 'Black Lives Matter'. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level. But a man was killed in America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Eau27NHWsAMHVV8.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EavmK-pX0AIwRVN.jpg

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @Agathoklis, @Pericles, @Gordo, @Dannyboy

    Mercenaries, not one had the balls to say no.

  304. Mr. Anon says:
    June 18, 2020 at 4:17 pm GMT • 100 Words   

    And – as usual – the martry of the moment was a choirboy:

    EXCLUSIVE: Rayshard Brooks was on probation for four crimes – including cruelty to children – and faced going back to prison if charged with a DUI, when he was found asleep and intoxicated at Wendy’s drive-thru

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8431801/Rayshard-Brooks-probation-faced-going-prison-charged-DUI.html

    I don’t know what exactly “cruelty to children” entails under Georgia law.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Mr. Anon

    Come on man, that could describe all of us, even President Trump, surely.

  305. I’ve been defending criminal resistance offenses for years. Once a cop beats the crap out of you, you will be charged with a resistance offense to preclude you from suing the police civilly. Brooks would have been lit up with a felony had the cops been able to restrain him.

    I’ve also been prosecuting police misconduct cases in Federal civil court for the same number of years. The Brooks family won’t have any 4th Amendment claim because parolees do not enjoy such protections.

    I don’t think that this case isn’t even a remotely egregious case. The cop knew he was being fired upon by his partner’s Taser because (a) the audio reveals his partner told him so; and (b) Tasers are brightly colored and have a flashlight, which can be easily seen in the video.

    The fact that Brooks aimed for his face demonstrates he clearly didn’t know what he was doing while fleeing. Definitely not a smart thing to do. I see a jury aquittal on the horizon because overcharging is the prosecutorial norm in this country.

    Remember, there isn’t a decent or honest law enforcement agency in this country. I say this because even so-called “good cops” won’t rat out their fellow officers if they see something wrong. The only thing cops “serve and protect” are their own paychecks. My dad was a cop and I know how they operate. They avoid bystander liability at all costs. The fact his partner is going to be a state’s witness is an extreme anomoly.

    Also, there is no law, and there is no Constitution. It’s all made up by tyrants in black robes. Gorsuch proved that this week. The only rights you have are those which you can actually enforce. Qualified immunity is doctrine completely fabricated from thin air.

    If you want to see a good case of excessive force and murder, look no further than the case of Eliuth Penaloza:

    Mr. Penaloza was out of his mind, high on meth. The family called the police on him because had a gun and was acting crazy. He brandished a C02 pistol at Anaheim PD and took off in his pickup truck. At most, he was guilty of violating Cal. Penal Code section 417 – brandishing a weapon – a misdemeanor. The shooter was fired but of course – being this is Orange County – no criminal prosecution ensued. No marches, no protests, no burning and looting. Watching the video reminds me of a first person shooter video game.

    • Replies: @Marty
    @petit bourgeois

    Hey counselor, here’s a story for your “crooked” file. About 60 days after a misdemeanor arrest, I received a letter from the D.A. saying come pick up the arrest report/impeachment file, $40. Since my prior bad acts were more than 10 years old, I knew all I wanted was the arrest report, which was free. So I go up to the D.A.’s office, and a beefy white guy comes out holding a thick file. He’s behind bulletproof glass and I’m standing about 6 feet back of that. I tell him, “just give me the arrest report.” He says, “okay, NOW I understand.” A few weeks later I’m at the pre-trial, which is a negotiation over diversion terms. The courtroom D.A., a young Latina, tells the judge, “we have a report that Marty was confrontational when picking up his documents.”

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    , @JackOH
    @petit bourgeois

    pb, thanks. My Dad trained as a cop in the 1930s (joined the military soon after). I share his genes about public rectitude, deportment, all that. Give the cops a break in questionable cases was my default position.

    In my early 50s I discovered how blind I was. I've written a bit about cops' corrupt practices here.

    Thanks for contributing.

  306. @Truth
    @James B. Shearer

    Well now, I didn't pass the bar, but I believe that crime is called "suicide."

    Replies: @Marty

    You’d get extra time for the bar.

    • Replies: @Truth
    @Marty

    Hey, if they throw in, "you don't have to attend law school", they have a deal.

  307. @Veracitor
    @Alden

    How about wistful songs from when even Leftist-Americans sympathized with folks caught up in circumstances:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nnS9M03F-fA

    Replies: @S

    Why, that’s almost as bad as if she had sung Dixie. Has she confessed and apologized yet?

    • Replies: @sayless
    @S

    Joan Baez can be sharp when she's a mind to. She might confess and apologize but she might also say, Don't listen to it if you don't like it.

  308. bixnood mufagahs

  309. @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    I believe there's no indictment but there's an arrest warrant signed by a judge. The warrant (and the supporting affidavit) is very short and goes into no detail. It just says that the cop unlawfully during the course of committing the felony of aggravated assault caused the death of another human.

    From the transcript of the DA's press conference:

    District Attorney Paul Howard: (18:19)


    So these are the charges that we have had filed a day, signed by one of our superior court judges. These are the 11 charges against Officer Rolfe. The first charge is felony murder. This is the death that is as a result of a underlying felony. And in this case, the underlying felony is aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.
     
    This could not be more clear. Maybe Howard is wrong. Maybe Howard is an idiot. I have no idea why he charged felony murder instead of malice murder (which is what it is called in GA) but he did and all the press accounts are correct as to what was charged in the warrant.

    https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/da-announces-charges-in-atlanta-rayshard-brooks-killing-press-conference-transcript

    https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/mdjonline.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/6d/76df4952-b0e4-11ea-8545-db5872bba93b/5eea90191ea32.pdf.pdf

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Maybe Howard is wrong. Maybe Howard is an idiot.

    He’s been on government payrolls for about 90% of his career in law.

  310. anon[403] • Disclaimer says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:24 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Tono Bungay
    @Prester John

    It sometimes seems as if the prosecutors overcharge on purpose. Is it to appease the crowd or is it to make it easier for the defense at trial? The three other officers in the Floyd affair are each charged with crimes that could mean 40 years in prison. Does that make any sense at all? Some of them were in their first weeks of work. It's utterly implausible to expect a rookie to interfere with an experienced officer.

    Replies: @anon

    It sometimes seems as if the prosecutors overcharge on purpose.

    It’s common practice, leading to a plea bargain in many cases. Because most people can’t fight 10 different charges in court, when the prosecutor offers to drop 9 in exchange for copping a plea on the smallest one, it’s a deal that is hard to refuse. However in some cases it can backfire, that’s possible here.

  311. RAZ says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:24 pm GMT • 200 Words   
    @Pericles
    @Jack D


    Rayshard died an innocent man and will remain so, legally speaking. Same as Epstein.

     

    Well, Epstein at least was convicted.

    Replies: @RAZ

    Not a lawyer, but dying before your appeal is heard apparently vacates convictions.

    Think Aaron Hernandez from the Patriots does not go down in the record book as a murderer since his appeal was not heard and the conviction is vacated. The Netflix documentary series on him made something of the idea that Hernandez thought that his suicide would overturn his conviction and his daughter would then receive money due to Aaron. But the state of MA changed the law after his suicide and don’t think his daughter was going to be getting this.

    Kenneth Lay from Enron died before appeal was heard. So he is apparently not legally guilty of charges the jury convicted him of.

    Epstein was convicted of charges from earlier and served very cushy time for them. But not tried for the charges he was being held on when he committed suicide . . . or The Clintons had him killed. Whichever you want to believe.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @RAZ


    Epstein was convicted of charges from earlier and served very cushy time for them.

     

    Yes.

    But not tried for the charges he was being held on when he committed suicide . . . or The Clintons had him killed. Whichever you want to believe.

     

    Lol, I know what I think.

    Replies: @RAZ

  312. @Truth
    @anon


    The Tazer grab alone constituted a threat of grave bodily harm or death.
     
    No, Old Sport, if a Tazer was intended to cause grave bodily harm or death, they wouldn't give them to police, they'd give them a second firearm.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @VinnyVette, @The Anti-Gnostic, @jsm

    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @jsm

    While I do not take exception with your first statement, this needs thought:



    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

     

    Once a taser is discharged can it be discharged again before a new cartridge is loaded?

    If not, the cop may not have been in any danger, however, in the heat of the moment he might not have thought of that.

    Any, in any event, my understanding is that the cops can shoot a fleeing individual who was guilty of felony assault.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    , @vhrm
    @jsm


    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.
     
    Dude watch the video. There's no indication the dude wanted to kill the cop. He just wanted to run away. And if he hadn't stopped to tazer the cop he might have made it. (and would have probably turned himself in after sobering up and realizing they know who he is and where he lives)

    You can support the cop's shooting as justifiable (which i do; though it wasn't ideal) without blowing the perp's actions out of proportion.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @jsm

    , @Truth
    @jsm


    @Truth
    You dumb shit.
    Tazer...
     
    The word is "taser" bro.

    Replies: @jsm

  313. anon[403] • Disclaimer says:
    June 18, 2020 at 5:34 pm GMT • 200 Words   
    @Jonathan Mason
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.

     

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California. If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    After all drivers have to make decisions at times as to whether they can continue to drive safely perhaps because they need to sleep due to being awake a long time or perhaps because they are taking some medication that makes them sleepy or perhaps because the weather is so bad for example heavy rain that they feel they cannot drive safely. If you stop because you are drowsy, then you were drowsy before you stopped, but saying that you should not have been driving in the first place is not much help.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Peripatetic Commenter, @Peripatetic Commenter, @anon

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California.

    Then provide a cite to support your sweet understanding.

    If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    Strawman.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    I think the USSC didn’t care when they ruled it was legal back in the 70’s. What most people feel often doesn’t really matter. Your career in corrections should have provided you with that sweet understanding.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit.

    My belief is that you make stuff up in your head and pretend it is real.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Lol. Now I know you’re just trolling, nobody’s that dumb.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @anon

    I don't know what the term 'sweet understanding' means to you, but when the phrase occured in my original post it was just a dictation artifact that I failed to spot and delete in time. I guess that is how new phrases enter the language.

  314. @Clifford Brown
    @syonredux

    Perhaps the new approach to DUI is to just take the keys of the suspect and call an Uber. That might work if it was applied universally. I think a night in jail for someone who was ridiculously drunk behind the wheel like this fellow (falling asleep in the Wendy's drive thru should be approaching rock bottom) is meant to serve as a "wake up" call to alter one's behavior.

    Brooks reactions seemed shady. His story kept changing, it was variously different peoples' birthdays, he allegedly had a car rental, but he did not know from where. Comically, suspicious behavior, but not really worth a shooting of someone who seemed more pathetic than dangerous until of course he attacked the officers.

    Maybe we just bring back billy clubs. On average, that may be the most humane approach.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Jack D, @anon, @iDeplorable

    meant to serve as a “wake up” call to alter one’s behavior.

    A guy with numerous prior convictions isn’t going to wake up when the “wake up” call comes. He’s only 27 and he’s already signaled loudly that he has no intention of ceasing the committing of crimes. He’s a “career criminal”. For someone like Brooks, repeated stretches of incarceration are just part of life, like paying taxes for the rest of us. The idea that there is any correcting going on in the Dept of Corrections is silly.

    For a lot of blacks like Brooks, they don’t really think they’re doing anything wrong — driving drunk, stealing stuff, beating up people, buying/selling/using drugs, abusing his kids (they’d not likely think it abuse) — its just part of living life. Perhaps that’s one reason they get so irritated when the police periodically haul them in – it seems like just random harassment to them.

    And to a people with the mores and values of American blacks, it IS somewhat a form of random harassment, because they are white man’s rules. They seemingly don’t want to live in a world where they can’t drive drunk, litter everywhere, take drugs, slap their women, steal with impunity, fight each other to the brink of death (or past it) over violations of various arbitrary ghetto rules. The only reason to force them to live by these rules is because 1) we’ve decided we need to all live together and 2) whites don’t want to live in a society with that kind of mayhem and crime.

    Maintaining segregation while polishing some of the more glaring inequalities would have been vastly preferable to what we’re doing.

    • Agree: usNthem
  315. JimDandy says:
    June 18, 2020 at 6:51 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Ganderson
    @JimDandy

    It was often the case, 50 years ago. The cops had a number of options- follow you home, take away your keys- tell you to sleep it off. There was a tolerance for drunk driving in those days that was probably too lenient. As we often do, however, we’ve gone way overboard- the legal standard for DWI isn’ t even drunk!

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Yeah. But the cops are under great pressure today to enforce D.U.I. laws. And whatever the legal standard should be, a guy who passes out drunk behind the wheel of his car while waiting for fast food is too drunk to drive. Furthermore, the guy was on parole for serious crimes, and this was a violation. For a top prosecutor to shake his head primly and condemn a cop for not just letting this guy go–and insinuating that it is evidence of racism–is peak absurdity.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @JimDandy

    Agreed

  316. @Polynikes
    @Jonathan Mason

    It could be one of the problems. So could no knock warrants. I’d be inclined to agree on the legislative front.

    But that isn’t what these cases are about. And if they are the problem then the law needs changed. Charging a cop for doing his job following the law—even if it’s one that needs changed—with murder is ridiculous. It’s political grandstanding of the worst kind. And it will lead to awful outcomes.

    Replies: @iDeplorable

    Charging a cop for doing his job following the law—even if it’s one that needs changed—with murder is ridiculous. It’s political grandstanding of the worst kind.

    Its the kind of thing to expect from blacks in positions of authority: Low IQ (too dumb to foresee the aftermath of the acquittal), high time preference, and blatant racial unity. There is no principle at all – its just “I’m mad, the mob is mad, I have power so now will use it”.

  317. @Mr. Anon
    And - as usual - the martry of the moment was a choirboy:

    EXCLUSIVE: Rayshard Brooks was on probation for four crimes - including cruelty to children - and faced going back to prison if charged with a DUI, when he was found asleep and intoxicated at Wendy's drive-thru

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8431801/Rayshard-Brooks-probation-faced-going-prison-charged-DUI.html
     
    I don't know what exactly "cruelty to children" entails under Georgia law.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    Come on man, that could describe all of us, even President Trump, surely.

  318. @ATBOTL
    @Dr. X

    Because most white people will side with police against an innocent white civilian every time. That is part of the cuck psychology of the American white man. If a pig shot a white baby sleeping in a stroller for no reason and then set the baby on fire before throwing the baby over Niagara falls, most white Americans would blame the white baby and say the pig was justified. Until that changes, there is no chance of any kind of white resistance. We have to push back against the pro-police, "blue lives matter" nonsense.

    Worship of the police is a uniquely white American value and one of the many reasons modern white American culture doesn't deserve to survive. We can't do anything without changing our culture first. That is the battle.

    Replies: @Aeronerauk, @bruce county, @William Badwhite

    I generally agree with your point about the excessive deference to police by whites, but your point would be made better without the name-calling (“pigs”).

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @William Badwhite

    Very sad you would agree with a psychopath. (But he probably could make a good living in Hollywood.)

  319. @jsm
    @Truth

    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he's incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @vhrm, @Truth

    While I do not take exception with your first statement, this needs thought:

    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

    Once a taser is discharged can it be discharged again before a new cartridge is loaded?

    If not, the cop may not have been in any danger, however, in the heat of the moment he might not have thought of that.

    Any, in any event, my understanding is that the cops can shoot a fleeing individual who was guilty of felony assault.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    So, it turns out that there are two types of of taser:

    1. One shot, and
    3. Three shot.

    If the taser was a three-shot taser, then the cop has a better case that the felon had a deadly weapon (according to the DA only one or two weeks earlier.)

  320. @Altai
    The English Premiere League returned today to play in empty stadiums. All the players and referees took a knee. The best part of the footage is the piped in crowd noise, there's a metaphor there for something.

    https://twitter.com/SkySportsPL/status/1273301775844626443

    All the players had their names replaced on the backs of their shirts with 'Black Lives Matter'. This is all in violation of FIFA and UEFA rules on the display of political messages and imagery at an official league level. But a man was killed in America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Eau27NHWsAMHVV8.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EavmK-pX0AIwRVN.jpg

    Replies: @Change that Matters, @Agathoklis, @Pericles, @Gordo, @Dannyboy

    ANY white man who still watches/ supports professional or college sports is just a pussy cuck who should Fed Ex his nuts in a jar to the DNC and be done with it.

  321. Marty says:
    June 18, 2020 at 7:11 pm GMT • 100 Words   

    How about this coincidence? I’m sitting in my car reading Whiskey’s description of Antifa whites as skinny-armed weaklings, when a 60-ish white guy comes swaggering down the street. He’s about 6’4”/210, dressed all in black, with a white fu-Manchu. I’d say he’s probably an old ironworker if he didn’t look just ex-Raider defensive end Ben Davidson. Some of his t-shirt is obscured by the warm-up jacket, but I can make out NTIF. I circle around the block to see where he goes. He ends up at a converted ‘60’s motel, obviously now some kind of halfway house. Wonder how many antifa are muscular white felons like this guy.

  322. @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    We have 50 states and 50 statutes but lets talk about Georgia. The Georgia DUI statute says it's a crime for

    “any person to drive or be in actual physical control of any moving vehicle while the person's alcohol concentration is 0.08 grams or more at any time within three hours after such driving or being in actual physical control from alcohol consumed before such driving or being in actual physical control ended.”

    So you don't have to be driving, just in "actual physical control" and your alcohol level can be measured up to 3 hours later. In Georgia. YMMV depending on what state you live in.

    What happens is that there is back and forth between the legislature and DUI lawyers. DUI lawyer gets a guy off because he is not driving at the time, next session the statute is amended to say "actual physical control". DUI lawyer gets a guy off because his blood was not tested immediately after his arrest - legislature amends the law to allow a 3 hour window. Etc.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    The language of that statute is not even intelligible.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ben tillman

    It's not intelligible because it's patchwork. I haven't looked up the actual legislative history but my guess is the original statute read:

    [It's a crime for]

    “any person to drive any moving vehicle while the person’s alcohol concentration is 0.xx grams or more .”

    And the rest got added on later for the reasons I gave - basically to preempt all the defenses that you raised in your original post.

  323. Jack D says:
    June 18, 2020 at 7:43 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @ben tillman
    @Jack D

    The language of that statute is not even intelligible.

    Replies: @Jack D

    It’s not intelligible because it’s patchwork. I haven’t looked up the actual legislative history but my guess is the original statute read:

    [It’s a crime for]

    “any person to drive any moving vehicle while the person’s alcohol concentration is 0.xx grams or more .”

    And the rest got added on later for the reasons I gave – basically to preempt all the defenses that you raised in your original post.

  324. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @JimDandy

    Because at 61% white and falling, and half the whites hating the other half of the whites and wishing they were dead, there aren't enough adult, angry white people to march for sanity. They'd face a larger crowd of screaming, angrier Team Browns and Team Goodwhites. It's not your country any more, Badwhite.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    And yet, who is our president?

  325. vhrm says:
    June 18, 2020 at 8:12 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Ozymandias
    @Peripatetic Commenter


    Once you have driven the vehicle, even if you pull over and sleep it off, if you are found to have a BAC over the limit then you are guilty of drunk driving.
     
    Incorrect. The cornerstone here is whether the keys to the vehicle are within your reach. I know this to be fact in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Wyoming.

    Replies: @vhrm

    Incorrect. The cornerstone here is whether the keys to the vehicle are within your reach. I know this to be fact in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Wyoming.

    Whatever the details in particular states this is all legalistic, “how many angels can dance on the head of a pin” stuff that they just use to bust people with on their misguided zero tolerance ways.

    In reality you can be in the bar or asleep in your bed and be no more than 60 seconds away from driving your car is the feeling strikes you. So the “keys within reach” is pretty meaningless.

    • Replies: @Ozymandias
    @vhrm


    So the “keys within reach” is pretty meaningless
     
    Saved me from three DUIs. I found that quite meaningful.
  326. @Jane Plain
    And Trump goes on TV whining about Bolton.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    Trump goes on TV whining about Bolton.

    What a bizarre hire that was. Mustachio Wilford Brimley whose answer to every question is “more war”, and Trump who had as a key pillar of his campaign “no more endless war” brings him on board?

    And right on cue, the bloodthirsty weirdo is attempting to affect the outcome of the election. As if more criticism of Trump from swamp denizens is going to swing anybody’s opinion.

  327. But we knew that.

    It’s Trump who is the bizarro-in-Chief. Why can’t people here see that?

    Is Paul Craig Roberts right about Americans? Are the really dumbshits?

  328. vhrm says:
    June 18, 2020 at 8:25 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Currahee
    Just curious and not from prejudice: what is the precedent for legally shooting someone in the back?

    Replies: @vhrm, @Peripatetic Commenter

    Just curious and not from prejudice: what is the precedent for legally shooting someone in the back?

    A few things:
    1) https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleeing_felon_rule

    Shooting a cop with a taser i think falls into the category of dangerous to society

    2) If you watch the video you’ll note the guy ran. Turned to shoot the taser and then turned to run again.

    The cop was chasing him and didn’t even draw his gun until the dude shot him with the taser. From there the shooting is pretty much one action.

    Even in the Monday-morningest of quarterbacking sessions, claiming that a “reasonable person” would have assumed that the prep had disengaged in the time between the taser shot and the time the gun came on target is a stretch.

    (though I’m sure the DA is going to argue that too.)

  329. @William Badwhite
    @ATBOTL

    I generally agree with your point about the excessive deference to police by whites, but your point would be made better without the name-calling ("pigs").

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    Very sad you would agree with a psychopath. (But he probably could make a good living in Hollywood.)

  330. @RAZ
    @Pericles

    Not a lawyer, but dying before your appeal is heard apparently vacates convictions.

    Think Aaron Hernandez from the Patriots does not go down in the record book as a murderer since his appeal was not heard and the conviction is vacated. The Netflix documentary series on him made something of the idea that Hernandez thought that his suicide would overturn his conviction and his daughter would then receive money due to Aaron. But the state of MA changed the law after his suicide and don't think his daughter was going to be getting this.

    Kenneth Lay from Enron died before appeal was heard. So he is apparently not legally guilty of charges the jury convicted him of.

    Epstein was convicted of charges from earlier and served very cushy time for them. But not tried for the charges he was being held on when he committed suicide . . . or The Clintons had him killed. Whichever you want to believe.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Epstein was convicted of charges from earlier and served very cushy time for them.

    Yes.

    But not tried for the charges he was being held on when he committed suicide . . . or The Clintons had him killed. Whichever you want to believe.

    Lol, I know what I think.

    • Replies: @RAZ
    @Pericles

    Unlike everyone at Zerohedge or a lot of people here I'm not normally a conspiracy theorist. In this case, I dunno. So many rich and powerful people who did not want him talking about what he knew about them and what they did. But he apparently wired his island home with hidden cameras. Bill C made multiple trips to the island. Wonder if video of him will ever see the light of day. DJT had some dealings with him but haven't heard anything about him visiting the island or leaving his place in Palm Beach to go to Epstein's.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Jonathan Mason

  331. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Truth

    It's pretty difficult to restrain a healthy adult male. The universal default of mankind is grab him around his neck and threaten to cut off his airway, but that's risky on several levels. Or you inflict enough pain to render somebody temporarily insensate. That's hard to do under current rules of engagement--formerly you'd just whack him with a baton. Joint locks require a solid strength or positional advantage that's hard to set up in a fight.

    The Tazer is an attempt to avoid all that risky fighting. Unless it gets stolen--now the cop is in danger of becoming disabled and losing his firearm. And the guy flees from an arrest and points it at you--wtf?!--so deadly force. Lots to process in a couple of seconds in a parking lot at night. The DA gets to pore over videotape and read statutes for four days. Of course, none of this was premeditated--the cop was just being a cop and trying to check off all the evidence boxes and effect an arrest of an obvious drunk driver. The next cop will tell the Wendy's shift manager to just deal with it somehow.

    Replies: @Truth

    It’s pretty difficult to restrain a healthy adult male.

    Right, so a lot of gentlemen on the police force should become cyber coders or salesmen.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Truth

    It would be a good idea to have height/weight minimums for cops, but then women couldn't be cops so the minimums would get tossed by the courts. And how many inordinately strong, fit guys who want to be cops are there to deal with all the stupid, violent people?

    It would be nice if, like England once upon a time, the US demographic was so enamored of civil order we could literally disarm our cops, like the English bobbies who would borrow firearms from citizens in an emergency.

  332. vhrm says:
    June 18, 2020 at 8:40 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @jsm
    @Truth

    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he's incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @vhrm, @Truth

    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

    Dude watch the video. There’s no indication the dude wanted to kill the cop. He just wanted to run away. And if he hadn’t stopped to tazer the cop he might have made it. (and would have probably turned himself in after sobering up and realizing they know who he is and where he lives)

    You can support the cop’s shooting as justifiable (which i do; though it wasn’t ideal) without blowing the perp’s actions out of proportion.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @vhrm

    There's every indication that the cop correctly considered the man a potentially deadly threat--you only find out if you were absolutely right when you're dead. The drunk already stole one deadly weapon, and he used said deadly weapon on the cop. He was clearly trying to escape, yes--and he showed at several different points that he was willing to use violence to achieve that goal.

    He got exactly what he deserved. Case closed. The fact that the cop was charged with anything is an outrage. He should be up for a commendation.

    , @jsm
    @vhrm


    He just wanted to run away. And if he hadn’t stopped to tazer the cop he might have made it.
     
    This is the 3rd most stunningly batshit insane thing I've read in a week full of batshit insanity.
    Stopping to taze a guy is the very definition of NOT wanting to run away.

    Wow.


    Oh, and I'm not a dude.
  333. @Marty
    @Truth

    You’d get extra time for the bar.

    Replies: @Truth

    Hey, if they throw in, “you don’t have to attend law school”, they have a deal.

  334. @jsm
    @Truth

    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he's incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter, @vhrm, @Truth


    You dumb shit.
    Tazer…

    The word is “taser” bro.

    • Replies: @jsm
    @Truth

    Ok, dumbshit,
    if you're going to correct my spelling, at least get your capitalization right.
    TASER

    https://www.axon.com/products/taser-x2

    Replies: @Truth

  335. @Truth
    @Mr. Anon


    All violence can kill. Tasers aren’t “non-lethal”. They are “less-lethal”.
     
    So is a box of spaghetti if you use it in the right way. The point is it is MEANT to be used with marinara sauce, just as a taser is MEANT to temporarily incapacitate someone without lasting harm.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon

    Thanks Johnny Cochran. Though your point would be stronger if you made it rhyme.

  336. @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jonathan Mason



    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. Perhaps it should be illegal for people to drive to and from meetings of alcoholics anonymous due to the fact that alcohol is sold in gas stations, but on the other hand you would want to encourage people to get treatment.

     

    Ahhh, so the main problem with laws against violence is those people who chronically commit violence.

    I can see where you are going there.

    Perhaps there should be certain exclusions for all laws. Perhaps they should be racially based.

    Yeah, that will work, I am sure.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. P

    I gather your frame of reference is the UK.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Art Deco

    I was responding to someone else's comment there (the part you quoted.)

    So I don't understand your comment.

  337. @vhrm
    @Ozymandias


    Incorrect. The cornerstone here is whether the keys to the vehicle are within your reach. I know this to be fact in the states of Nebraska, Kansas, and Wyoming.
     
    Whatever the details in particular states this is all legalistic, "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin" stuff that they just use to bust people with on their misguided zero tolerance ways.

    In reality you can be in the bar or asleep in your bed and be no more than 60 seconds away from driving your car is the feeling strikes you. So the "keys within reach" is pretty meaningless.

    Replies: @Ozymandias

    So the “keys within reach” is pretty meaningless

    Saved me from three DUIs. I found that quite meaningful.

  338. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    How did Syria initiate a conflict with the US? And how does said conflict serve American interests? And you conveniently ignored Iraq. That was a pretty big war, and an utterly foolish one, that also served no actual American interest.

    Like I said - you are a stupid, dull-witted drone. Your thoughts and utterances are banal. Nobody cares what you think.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    How did Syria initiate a conflict with the US?

    Syria was a Soviet client state from about 1955 onward. Then they participated in Gamal Abd el-Nasser’s chicken games in 1967, which cost them the Golan Heights. Then they allied themselves with Iran after 1979. This isn’t that difficult.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Art Deco

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn't make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself.

    So why can't we just disengage?

    Replies: @anon, @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    Syria was a Soviet client state from about 1955 onward. Then they participated in Gamal Abd el-Nasser’s chicken games in 1967, which cost them the Golan Heights. Then they allied themselves with Iran after 1979. This isn’t that difficult.
     
    1979? And yet we were uninvolved militarily there until about 2013.

    Again - tell us - what compelling interest do we have in involving ourselves in their affairs? Spell it out for us like you're talking to the retarded children you obviously take all of us to be, you insufferable ninny.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  339. @Currahee
    Just curious and not from prejudice: what is the precedent for legally shooting someone in the back?

    Replies: @vhrm, @Peripatetic Commenter

    There are a couple of circumstances where someone can end up shot in the back.

    One is a fleeing felon.

    The other is where Person A attacks Person B or looks like they will attack Person B, but Person B is armed and makes the decision to shoot. However, between perceiving the attack and pulling the trigger is around three quarters of a second.

    In that time Person A may have turned around to run away.

    The cops know about this issue.

  340. I suspect he’ll be acquitted. I certainly hope so. I wouldn’t be overly surprised if the murder charge gets thrown out at the preliminary hearing (or otherwise prior to trial). They may be able to hang some lesser charge on him, unfortunately.

  341. @donut
    @Whiskey

    Trump is trying to think of something to tweet that he can actually do .

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Ave atque vale Aristippus! We hardly knew ye.

  342. Until they stop murdering people, maybe this is a good way to get their attention. And the more “unfair” the accusation is, the better. Light a fire under their dumb asses.

    I hear a lot of them are quitting. Good riddance.

    • Troll: usNthem
  343. I don’t know. But I learned from the John Wayne westerns you people so honor, that shooting people in the back is dishonorable. Cowardly. No matter why you did it.

  344. @NJ Transit Commuter
    If I were a cop, I would immediately do two things.
    1. Start looking for a new job. And in the meantime,
    2. Stop doing my job. Don’t go looking for suspects. Any trouble arresting someone? Subject escaped. End of story.
    Once criminals realize this (and it won’t take long) crime rates will soar.

    I really think 2020 spells the start of a permanent decline for big cities. In previous eras, despite crime and filth, business required centralized offices to get business done. That preserved enough of a tax base to keep cities from collapsing. But, now, after the Corona lockdowns have shown business they can function remotely? Cities were going to have a hard enough time convincing companies to stay even without riots, looting and an increase in crime...

    Replies: @trelane, @Achmed E. Newman, @Intelligent Dasein, @Anonymous, @Skyler_the_Weird, @obwandiyag

    They already don’t do their job, mook. What do you think this is, Adam Twelve?

    You watch too much TV if you think cops do anything more than eat donuts, give innocent people outrageous tickets, and then shoot people rather than having to deal with them.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    @obwandiyag

    The truth is the "community" has much more to do with the crime rate in a town (or city) than the number of cops. I live in the Lilly white burbs where we don't have crime. It makes it much easier on us and the police. When a murder is committed every 10 years it is usually outsiders having a "mansion party" where it has nothing to do with anybody living there or someone from Oakland slithers through the Caldecott Tunnel and botches a robbery.

    It is much easier on the police when their time and resources and not sucked up by feral man-children. One reason drunk driving is a problem is that is takes about 6-8 man hours to arrest and book a drunk. That means if you live in a town where on a Sunday night there are only two cops on duty, you have effectively reduced your police force by half. It is the same reason border walls help the border patrol. The cops are not babysitters.

  345. @Whiskey
    @Jack D

    Oh but you forget. We are ruled not by law but by Kangz! I would not be surprised in the least if the officer was paraded in front of a Black mob that in fact will lynch him.

    This your future White man. Know your place and kneel.

    Replies: @Neoconned

    Wasn’t that the user Lot I think….

    WE WUZ KANGZ!

  346. Marty says:
    @petit bourgeois
    I've been defending criminal resistance offenses for years. Once a cop beats the crap out of you, you will be charged with a resistance offense to preclude you from suing the police civilly. Brooks would have been lit up with a felony had the cops been able to restrain him.

    I've also been prosecuting police misconduct cases in Federal civil court for the same number of years. The Brooks family won't have any 4th Amendment claim because parolees do not enjoy such protections.

    I don't think that this case isn't even a remotely egregious case. The cop knew he was being fired upon by his partner's Taser because (a) the audio reveals his partner told him so; and (b) Tasers are brightly colored and have a flashlight, which can be easily seen in the video.

    The fact that Brooks aimed for his face demonstrates he clearly didn't know what he was doing while fleeing. Definitely not a smart thing to do. I see a jury aquittal on the horizon because overcharging is the prosecutorial norm in this country.

    Remember, there isn't a decent or honest law enforcement agency in this country. I say this because even so-called "good cops" won't rat out their fellow officers if they see something wrong. The only thing cops "serve and protect" are their own paychecks. My dad was a cop and I know how they operate. They avoid bystander liability at all costs. The fact his partner is going to be a state's witness is an extreme anomoly.

    Also, there is no law, and there is no Constitution. It's all made up by tyrants in black robes. Gorsuch proved that this week. The only rights you have are those which you can actually enforce. Qualified immunity is doctrine completely fabricated from thin air.

    If you want to see a good case of excessive force and murder, look no further than the case of Eliuth Penaloza:

    https://youtu.be/blBjSoexoDw

    Mr. Penaloza was out of his mind, high on meth. The family called the police on him because had a gun and was acting crazy. He brandished a C02 pistol at Anaheim PD and took off in his pickup truck. At most, he was guilty of violating Cal. Penal Code section 417 - brandishing a weapon - a misdemeanor. The shooter was fired but of course - being this is Orange County - no criminal prosecution ensued. No marches, no protests, no burning and looting. Watching the video reminds me of a first person shooter video game.

    Replies: @Marty, @JackOH

    Hey counselor, here’s a story for your “crooked” file. About 60 days after a misdemeanor arrest, I received a letter from the D.A. saying come pick up the arrest report/impeachment file, $40. Since my prior bad acts were more than 10 years old, I knew all I wanted was the arrest report, which was free. So I go up to the D.A.’s office, and a beefy white guy comes out holding a thick file. He’s behind bulletproof glass and I’m standing about 6 feet back of that. I tell him, “just give me the arrest report.” He says, “okay, NOW I understand.” A few weeks later I’m at the pre-trial, which is a negotiation over diversion terms. The courtroom D.A., a young Latina, tells the judge, “we have a report that Marty was confrontational when picking up his documents.”

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    @Marty

    Don't confuse me with a lawyer. In fact, I'm quite proud to be a non-lawyer. I just do all the work without any of the money or glory. All I do is sit at a desk and crank out the work product. I've had a few victories in the Ninth Circus and SCOTUS recently. I'm doing the Lord's work, son.

    Here in California, they can charge you for the police report as a criminal defendant. I don't-a make-a da rules, I just-a follow dem.

    Write your congresscritters/state reps if you don't want to pay for your fabricated evidence / materially false statements / omissions of fact. Or beg the court for your police report in forma pauperis.

    I'm not giving legal advice, just practical advice.

    If you want to get back at the police state, beat the rap, comrade.

  347. @Peripatetic Commenter
    @jsm

    While I do not take exception with your first statement, this needs thought:



    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.

     

    Once a taser is discharged can it be discharged again before a new cartridge is loaded?

    If not, the cop may not have been in any danger, however, in the heat of the moment he might not have thought of that.

    Any, in any event, my understanding is that the cops can shoot a fleeing individual who was guilty of felony assault.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    So, it turns out that there are two types of of taser:

    1. One shot, and
    3. Three shot.

    If the taser was a three-shot taser, then the cop has a better case that the felon had a deadly weapon (according to the DA only one or two weeks earlier.)

  348. @Art Deco
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit. P

    I gather your frame of reference is the UK.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    I was responding to someone else’s comment there (the part you quoted.)

    So I don’t understand your comment.

  349. @Nicholas Stix
    Officer Garrett Rolfe broke no law, and is supported by the USSC's Garner v. TN decision. There are no legal grounds for charging him with anything.

    Replies: @Whiskey, @Hibernian

    .

    ..the USSC’s Garner v. TN decision.

    Which may soon go the way of Bowers v. Hardwick.

  350. @Cloudbuster
    Will nobody riot for Rolfe?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Cato

    Will nobody riot for Rolfe?

    No, but when he is acquited, expect an LA-1992 style riot.

  351. JackOH says:
    @petit bourgeois
    I've been defending criminal resistance offenses for years. Once a cop beats the crap out of you, you will be charged with a resistance offense to preclude you from suing the police civilly. Brooks would have been lit up with a felony had the cops been able to restrain him.

    I've also been prosecuting police misconduct cases in Federal civil court for the same number of years. The Brooks family won't have any 4th Amendment claim because parolees do not enjoy such protections.

    I don't think that this case isn't even a remotely egregious case. The cop knew he was being fired upon by his partner's Taser because (a) the audio reveals his partner told him so; and (b) Tasers are brightly colored and have a flashlight, which can be easily seen in the video.

    The fact that Brooks aimed for his face demonstrates he clearly didn't know what he was doing while fleeing. Definitely not a smart thing to do. I see a jury aquittal on the horizon because overcharging is the prosecutorial norm in this country.

    Remember, there isn't a decent or honest law enforcement agency in this country. I say this because even so-called "good cops" won't rat out their fellow officers if they see something wrong. The only thing cops "serve and protect" are their own paychecks. My dad was a cop and I know how they operate. They avoid bystander liability at all costs. The fact his partner is going to be a state's witness is an extreme anomoly.

    Also, there is no law, and there is no Constitution. It's all made up by tyrants in black robes. Gorsuch proved that this week. The only rights you have are those which you can actually enforce. Qualified immunity is doctrine completely fabricated from thin air.

    If you want to see a good case of excessive force and murder, look no further than the case of Eliuth Penaloza:

    https://youtu.be/blBjSoexoDw

    Mr. Penaloza was out of his mind, high on meth. The family called the police on him because had a gun and was acting crazy. He brandished a C02 pistol at Anaheim PD and took off in his pickup truck. At most, he was guilty of violating Cal. Penal Code section 417 - brandishing a weapon - a misdemeanor. The shooter was fired but of course - being this is Orange County - no criminal prosecution ensued. No marches, no protests, no burning and looting. Watching the video reminds me of a first person shooter video game.

    Replies: @Marty, @JackOH

    pb, thanks. My Dad trained as a cop in the 1930s (joined the military soon after). I share his genes about public rectitude, deportment, all that. Give the cops a break in questionable cases was my default position.

    In my early 50s I discovered how blind I was. I’ve written a bit about cops’ corrupt practices here.

    Thanks for contributing.

  352. JimDandy says:
    @vhrm
    @jsm


    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.
     
    Dude watch the video. There's no indication the dude wanted to kill the cop. He just wanted to run away. And if he hadn't stopped to tazer the cop he might have made it. (and would have probably turned himself in after sobering up and realizing they know who he is and where he lives)

    You can support the cop's shooting as justifiable (which i do; though it wasn't ideal) without blowing the perp's actions out of proportion.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @jsm

    There’s every indication that the cop correctly considered the man a potentially deadly threat–you only find out if you were absolutely right when you’re dead. The drunk already stole one deadly weapon, and he used said deadly weapon on the cop. He was clearly trying to escape, yes–and he showed at several different points that he was willing to use violence to achieve that goal.

    He got exactly what he deserved. Case closed. The fact that the cop was charged with anything is an outrage. He should be up for a commendation.

  353. @Truth
    @Joseph Doaks

    Br-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-h, what are you talking about?

    The white man has had the deck stacked against him for fo' hunnit years! You didn't land on Plymouth Rock...

    ...Oh, wait, yes you did, I got confused.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    My grandfather landed in Hoboken in 1902, and got on a train for Milwaukee. A common story.

  354. @Jonathan Mason
    @Jack D


    ... is it not reasonable to infer that in order to get to that point he must have driven drunk on the highway first?
     
    It is reasonable to assume that, but it is all a question of how officious do the police want to be in enforcing the law. Apparently the first officer on the scene didn't want to arrest him and might have worked out some alternative to arrest if he had been alone.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Hibernian

    The second officer on the scene was an expert in DUI enforcement and was called at least in part for that reason.

  355. vinteuil says:
    @Intelligent Dasein
    A lot of the public outrage over the deaths of George Floyd and this Brooks fellow is not really about them at all. BLM is capitalizing on the public mood shift of course, and Woke Capital is capitalizing on BLM (because, at bottom, Woke Capital is incredibly stupid), but that isn't what it's really about. Nor is it about racial tensions.

    This is about years and years of pent-up frustration with a system that no longer works. The average, law-abiding person today feels like a sucker for playing by the rules; he feels like the powers that be are militating against his little life with an incomprehensible degree of arrogance and callousness, and that he has much more to lose to the system than what he gains by it. The average man not only cannot get ahead, he is one missed payment or doctor's visit or altercation with a careless cop away from total ruin.

    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people's dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses, never face justice for their excessive force, and walk away from it all with the kind of six-figure pensions and cadillac care that Joe Blow can only dream about. There is a seething frustration with all this just under the surface. It cannot articulate itself; it has no verbal or political outlet, so it bursts out in strange ways using words not really its own.

    Looked at in this way, it makes a curious kind of sense that the men whose deaths finally occasioned the long overdue day of reckoning, Floyd and Brooks, have nothing personally commendable about them. It isn't about them at all. It's about ordinary people saying "Screw it!" Opting out is, I believe, the polite terminology.

    An innocent victim could not have generated this sort of outrage. If the cops had gunned down a mother and her baby, for instance, it either would have been dismissed as an accident or it would have been dealt with in the ordinary course of law or it would have been added to the smoldering pile of silent resentment that we all already feel. We already have psychological compartments for dealing with such clear-cut evils. But when the evil is of the diffused, generalized variety that hides within the respectable forms of the cop, the banker, and the CEO, it is difficult to express it because any such expression is, first of all, an admission of weakness. These people don't kill us directly, but they degrade and insult us on a constant basis. They don't come sneaking out of the bushes to beat us on the back of the head and take our wallets, but they do take away our freedom, our dignity, and our manhood. Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say "I am George Floyd" when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived? It's because his symbolic value is not in how he lived but in how he died. We are all George Floyd because we all can't breathe. We all have our faces smashed into the ground by The Man and we're freaking sick of it. Nobody knows how to say this, so instead they say "Black Lives Matter."

    Today they come for the cops. Tomorrow they will be coming for the banks. This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race. Do not confuse the yodel with the avalanche.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @vinteuil, @Chrisnonymous

    Leave it to the weirdly energetic parodist “Intelligent Dasein” to come up with the single looniest take on all this.

    At least he didn’t bring Schubert’s Sonatas into it, this time around.

    Anybody who thinks he’s anything other than a troll need only check out his recent guest-post on Audacious Epigone’s blog.

  356. RAZ says:
    @Pericles
    @RAZ


    Epstein was convicted of charges from earlier and served very cushy time for them.

     

    Yes.

    But not tried for the charges he was being held on when he committed suicide . . . or The Clintons had him killed. Whichever you want to believe.

     

    Lol, I know what I think.

    Replies: @RAZ

    Unlike everyone at Zerohedge or a lot of people here I’m not normally a conspiracy theorist. In this case, I dunno. So many rich and powerful people who did not want him talking about what he knew about them and what they did. But he apparently wired his island home with hidden cameras. Bill C made multiple trips to the island. Wonder if video of him will ever see the light of day. DJT had some dealings with him but haven’t heard anything about him visiting the island or leaving his place in Palm Beach to go to Epstein’s.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @RAZ

    Epstein presumably had a lot of tape on many powerful people and it seems obvious someone thought he would squeal. Perhaps his paymasters decided to clean house.

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @RAZ

    Bill C has denied that he ever went to the island, so what is the source of your information that he was there several times?

  357. vinteuil says:
    @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    How did Syria initiate a conflict with the US?

    Syria was a Soviet client state from about 1955 onward. Then they participated in Gamal Abd el-Nasser's chicken games in 1967, which cost them the Golan Heights. Then they allied themselves with Iran after 1979. This isn't that difficult.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Mr. Anon

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn’t make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself.

    So why can’t we just disengage?

    • Replies: @anon
    @vinteuil

    So why can’t we just disengage?

    Hey, watch it with the anti-Semitism!

    , @Art Deco
    @vinteuil

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn’t make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself. So why can’t we just disengage?

    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we've done any policing of note in the last 30 years.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @vinteuil

    , @Mr. Anon
    @vinteuil

    Because then Art Deco would have to admit that he's a frustrated, insignificant nobody holding forth from his library reference desk.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  358. @Adam Smith
    @Inquiring Mind


    it has been said by persons who have viewed the videos that Mr. Brooks ran away and then turned to point a gun-shaped Taser at the officer chasing him.
     
    Here is the full video. The action starts about 28 minutes in...

    https://youtu.be/a-FVrZio2-8

    Brooks was indeed running away.

    Rolfe was not in any danger as tasers are non-lethal especially once discharged.

    Let Brooks run. No need to shoot him in the back while he is fleeing for his life.

    Not sure anyone can be charged with disrespect but it seems to me that 25 minutes of playing simon says is harassment. Brooks blew a .108 on the breathalyzer.

    Replies: @vinteuil

    Thanks for the link.

    It proves that Rolfe was 100% justified.

    • Disagree: Chrisnonymous
  359. @Anonymous
    @JimDandy


    Wow. My God. What do we do?
     
    It’s a terrible situation. But first and foremost, we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible. They made this happen.

    Trust me, they did not have “good intentions“.

    Make them eat the pain.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Mike_from_SGV, @TomSchmidt

    “we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible.”

    Insist that they change the name of Yale University. Elihu Yale both owned slaves and was a slave trader. Rub it in their faces.

    Make Hillary, Bill, and W defend the name. Better yet, make them advocate to change the name.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @TomSchmidt


    Insist that they change the name of Yale University. Elihu Yale both owned slaves and was a slave trader. Rub it in their faces.

     

    Now that ... is a good idea. Change.org, anyone? And who is a fine, downtrodden slave to rename it for?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  360. @Daniel Williams
    To be fair, the officer didn’t just kill the guy. He dissed him, too. The death penalty kinda makes sense if you think about it.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @lysias

    Dissing somebody deserves the death penalty?

  361. @vinteuil
    @Art Deco

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn't make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself.

    So why can't we just disengage?

    Replies: @anon, @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    So why can’t we just disengage?

    Hey, watch it with the anti-Semitism!

  362. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Intelligent Dasein


    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people’s dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses …
     
    Hahaha, where the heck do you live? It sounds wild! I live among civilized Whites; ain’t none of that stuff happening here.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    You are both right in different ways. The actual incidents are not so common, but they loom larger in a world of instant 24 hour outrage news in the palm of your hand. They do happen. I mean, a SWAT team to arrest Roger Stone? Gimme a break.

  363. @Intelligent Dasein
    A lot of the public outrage over the deaths of George Floyd and this Brooks fellow is not really about them at all. BLM is capitalizing on the public mood shift of course, and Woke Capital is capitalizing on BLM (because, at bottom, Woke Capital is incredibly stupid), but that isn't what it's really about. Nor is it about racial tensions.

    This is about years and years of pent-up frustration with a system that no longer works. The average, law-abiding person today feels like a sucker for playing by the rules; he feels like the powers that be are militating against his little life with an incomprehensible degree of arrogance and callousness, and that he has much more to lose to the system than what he gains by it. The average man not only cannot get ahead, he is one missed payment or doctor's visit or altercation with a careless cop away from total ruin.

    The police are very visible symbols of this broken system. For years we have watched the cops blow away people with impunity, shoot people's dogs, walk around peaceful neighborhoods and schools in combat armor, harass decent citizens for trivial offenses, never face justice for their excessive force, and walk away from it all with the kind of six-figure pensions and cadillac care that Joe Blow can only dream about. There is a seething frustration with all this just under the surface. It cannot articulate itself; it has no verbal or political outlet, so it bursts out in strange ways using words not really its own.

    Looked at in this way, it makes a curious kind of sense that the men whose deaths finally occasioned the long overdue day of reckoning, Floyd and Brooks, have nothing personally commendable about them. It isn't about them at all. It's about ordinary people saying "Screw it!" Opting out is, I believe, the polite terminology.

    An innocent victim could not have generated this sort of outrage. If the cops had gunned down a mother and her baby, for instance, it either would have been dismissed as an accident or it would have been dealt with in the ordinary course of law or it would have been added to the smoldering pile of silent resentment that we all already feel. We already have psychological compartments for dealing with such clear-cut evils. But when the evil is of the diffused, generalized variety that hides within the respectable forms of the cop, the banker, and the CEO, it is difficult to express it because any such expression is, first of all, an admission of weakness. These people don't kill us directly, but they degrade and insult us on a constant basis. They don't come sneaking out of the bushes to beat us on the back of the head and take our wallets, but they do take away our freedom, our dignity, and our manhood. Why is it that so many ordinary people want to stand up and say "I am George Floyd" when such people never would have come within a million miles of the kind of life that he lived? It's because his symbolic value is not in how he lived but in how he died. We are all George Floyd because we all can't breathe. We all have our faces smashed into the ground by The Man and we're freaking sick of it. Nobody knows how to say this, so instead they say "Black Lives Matter."

    Today they come for the cops. Tomorrow they will be coming for the banks. This is all quite deserved and has very little to do with race. Do not confuse the yodel with the avalanche.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Nicholas Stix, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @vinteuil, @Chrisnonymous

    I think you’re right to the extent that a better-functioning society could prevent people from becoming loony. If antifa were tilling the soil instead of sitting in front of computer monitors all day, none of this would have happened. However, you’re wrong that this is about frustration over society rather than race. The younger people I know are really bonkers about racial issues and many hate western civilization. It’s because of the school systems. They have been carefully taught since grade school.

  364. jsm says:
    June 19, 2020 at 2:06 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @vhrm
    @jsm


    You dumb shit.
    Tazer the cop and while he’s incapacitated take his gun and kill him.
    OF COURSE the thug intended to kill that cop.
     
    Dude watch the video. There's no indication the dude wanted to kill the cop. He just wanted to run away. And if he hadn't stopped to tazer the cop he might have made it. (and would have probably turned himself in after sobering up and realizing they know who he is and where he lives)

    You can support the cop's shooting as justifiable (which i do; though it wasn't ideal) without blowing the perp's actions out of proportion.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @jsm

    He just wanted to run away. And if he hadn’t stopped to tazer the cop he might have made it.

    This is the 3rd most stunningly batshit insane thing I’ve read in a week full of batshit insanity.
    Stopping to taze a guy is the very definition of NOT wanting to run away.

    Wow.

    Oh, and I’m not a dude.

  365. @Truth
    @jsm


    @Truth
    You dumb shit.
    Tazer...
     
    The word is "taser" bro.

    Replies: @jsm

    Ok, dumbshit,
    if you’re going to correct my spelling, at least get your capitalization right.
    TASER

    https://www.axon.com/products/taser-x2

    • Replies: @Truth
    @jsm

    (I swear Ronnie, your site just keeps getting better and better...)

  366. Art Deco says:
    June 19, 2020 at 2:17 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @vinteuil
    @Art Deco

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn't make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself.

    So why can't we just disengage?

    Replies: @anon, @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn’t make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself. So why can’t we just disengage?

    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we’ve done any policing of note in the last 30 years.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we’ve done any policing of note in the last 30 years.
     
    It isn't all just about money, you stupid idiot. We have wreaked a lot of havoc in the area - destroying lives and bringing down misery on countless thousands of people. Including the thousands of American soldiers who have been killed and maimed. And you are conveniently forgetting that the war in Iraq - we sent more than just a few people there - it was over a hundred thousand men under arms, you twit.

    I'm not going to pretend that you are just a pedantic busybody or a misguided fool (both of which you are). But you also really are a loathsome, despicable piece of s**t.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Truth

    , @vinteuil
    @Art Deco

    Well, AD, that just invites the question: given that our military role in the Near East, Central Asia, & North Africa is so trivial, and given that we get so much grief over it...why not disengage?

    Replies: @Art Deco

  367. @Marty
    @petit bourgeois

    Hey counselor, here’s a story for your “crooked” file. About 60 days after a misdemeanor arrest, I received a letter from the D.A. saying come pick up the arrest report/impeachment file, $40. Since my prior bad acts were more than 10 years old, I knew all I wanted was the arrest report, which was free. So I go up to the D.A.’s office, and a beefy white guy comes out holding a thick file. He’s behind bulletproof glass and I’m standing about 6 feet back of that. I tell him, “just give me the arrest report.” He says, “okay, NOW I understand.” A few weeks later I’m at the pre-trial, which is a negotiation over diversion terms. The courtroom D.A., a young Latina, tells the judge, “we have a report that Marty was confrontational when picking up his documents.”

    Replies: @petit bourgeois

    Don’t confuse me with a lawyer. In fact, I’m quite proud to be a non-lawyer. I just do all the work without any of the money or glory. All I do is sit at a desk and crank out the work product. I’ve had a few victories in the Ninth Circus and SCOTUS recently. I’m doing the Lord’s work, son.

    Here in California, they can charge you for the police report as a criminal defendant. I don’t-a make-a da rules, I just-a follow dem.

    Write your congresscritters/state reps if you don’t want to pay for your fabricated evidence / materially false statements / omissions of fact. Or beg the court for your police report in forma pauperis.

    I’m not giving legal advice, just practical advice.

    If you want to get back at the police state, beat the rap, comrade.

  368. Mr. Anon says:
    June 19, 2020 at 3:39 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    How did Syria initiate a conflict with the US?

    Syria was a Soviet client state from about 1955 onward. Then they participated in Gamal Abd el-Nasser's chicken games in 1967, which cost them the Golan Heights. Then they allied themselves with Iran after 1979. This isn't that difficult.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Mr. Anon

    Syria was a Soviet client state from about 1955 onward. Then they participated in Gamal Abd el-Nasser’s chicken games in 1967, which cost them the Golan Heights. Then they allied themselves with Iran after 1979. This isn’t that difficult.

    1979? And yet we were uninvolved militarily there until about 2013.

    Again – tell us – what compelling interest do we have in involving ourselves in their affairs? Spell it out for us like you’re talking to the retarded children you obviously take all of us to be, you insufferable ninny.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    You're not a retarded child, just an emotions-driven opinionated blowhard. No clue how you got that way.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  369. Mr. Anon says:
    June 19, 2020 at 3:45 am GMT • 200 Words   
    @Art Deco
    @vinteuil

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn’t make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself. So why can’t we just disengage?

    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we've done any policing of note in the last 30 years.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @vinteuil

    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we’ve done any policing of note in the last 30 years.

    It isn’t all just about money, you stupid idiot. We have wreaked a lot of havoc in the area – destroying lives and bringing down misery on countless thousands of people. Including the thousands of American soldiers who have been killed and maimed. And you are conveniently forgetting that the war in Iraq – we sent more than just a few people there – it was over a hundred thousand men under arms, you twit.

    I’m not going to pretend that you are just a pedantic busybody or a misguided fool (both of which you are). But you also really are a loathsome, despicable piece of s**t.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Actually, no, American military action is the least of their problems. It doesn't seem to occur to you that the political life of the Near East, Central Asia, and North Africa makes Latin America look tranquil. It doesn't matter whether American troops are present or not and it hardly matters what they're doing, those places do not cohere particularly well as political societies and some of the violence they suffer is baffling in its pointlessness. There have, for example been five insurgencies in the Maghreb since 1954, five in the Arabian peninsula, three notable civil wars in the Fertile Crescent, multi-episode insurgencies in Transcaucasia, Afghanistan &c. See Stanley Kurtz on some of the vectors which make public life problematic in the Muslim World in a way it is not other places.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    , @Truth
    @Mr. Anon

    Hey, you guys have been at it for like 10 years now. Funny thing, I can't really pick a winner.

  370. @vinteuil
    @Art Deco

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn't make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself.

    So why can't we just disengage?

    Replies: @anon, @Art Deco, @Mr. Anon

    Because then Art Deco would have to admit that he’s a frustrated, insignificant nobody holding forth from his library reference desk.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    frustrated, insignificant nobody

    Whereas, if I were a person of consequence, I'd be stalking people in comboxes. Your wisdom is ever appreciated.

  371. @RAZ
    @Pericles

    Unlike everyone at Zerohedge or a lot of people here I'm not normally a conspiracy theorist. In this case, I dunno. So many rich and powerful people who did not want him talking about what he knew about them and what they did. But he apparently wired his island home with hidden cameras. Bill C made multiple trips to the island. Wonder if video of him will ever see the light of day. DJT had some dealings with him but haven't heard anything about him visiting the island or leaving his place in Palm Beach to go to Epstein's.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Jonathan Mason

    Epstein presumably had a lot of tape on many powerful people and it seems obvious someone thought he would squeal. Perhaps his paymasters decided to clean house.

  372. @TomSchmidt
    @Anonymous

    "we need to impose as much suffering on the white liberals as possible."

    Insist that they change the name of Yale University. Elihu Yale both owned slaves and was a slave trader. Rub it in their faces.

    Make Hillary, Bill, and W defend the name. Better yet, make them advocate to change the name.

    Replies: @Pericles

    Insist that they change the name of Yale University. Elihu Yale both owned slaves and was a slave trader. Rub it in their faces.

    Now that … is a good idea. Change.org, anyone? And who is a fine, downtrodden slave to rename it for?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Pericles

    Yale U. --> Floyd U.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @TomSchmidt

  373. @Pericles
    @TomSchmidt


    Insist that they change the name of Yale University. Elihu Yale both owned slaves and was a slave trader. Rub it in their faces.

     

    Now that ... is a good idea. Change.org, anyone? And who is a fine, downtrodden slave to rename it for?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Yale U. –> Floyd U.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer


    Yale U. –> Floyd U.

     

    I don't know, Steve. The Ivies are still more traditionalist in many ways. Maybe the erstwhile Yalies would like to hearken back to the ur-victim in this current Reign of Wokeness, hence:

    Trayvon U > Floyd U

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Steve Sailer

    The elites have had no skin in the game for a long time. What do they care if the little people are looted and their historical figures mocked?

    I can see it now: get a progressive city council to pass a radical anti-slavery, anti-genocide resolution. They will not permit the use of money with people who spoke out in favor of or owned slaves; that would eliminate Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Franklin; Grant and Jackson were involved in genocide against Indians.

    Then insist that you will not hire ANYone from Yale unless the applicant has shown evidence that they have signed a petition demanding that the university rename itself. Start a Rename Yale at Change.Org.

    Either the Elites destroy the premier brand in education in subjection to the mob (which they won't do), or they cut the nonsense out.

  374. @Steve Sailer
    @Pericles

    Yale U. --> Floyd U.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @TomSchmidt

    Yale U. –> Floyd U.

    I don’t know, Steve. The Ivies are still more traditionalist in many ways. Maybe the erstwhile Yalies would like to hearken back to the ur-victim in this current Reign of Wokeness, hence:

    Trayvon U > Floyd U

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The Ur-victim isn't Trayvon, but Emmitt.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  375. @JimDandy
    @Ganderson

    Yeah. But the cops are under great pressure today to enforce D.U.I. laws. And whatever the legal standard should be, a guy who passes out drunk behind the wheel of his car while waiting for fast food is too drunk to drive. Furthermore, the guy was on parole for serious crimes, and this was a violation. For a top prosecutor to shake his head primly and condemn a cop for not just letting this guy go--and insinuating that it is evidence of racism--is peak absurdity.

    Replies: @Ganderson

    Agreed

  376. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    Syria was a Soviet client state from about 1955 onward. Then they participated in Gamal Abd el-Nasser’s chicken games in 1967, which cost them the Golan Heights. Then they allied themselves with Iran after 1979. This isn’t that difficult.
     
    1979? And yet we were uninvolved militarily there until about 2013.

    Again - tell us - what compelling interest do we have in involving ourselves in their affairs? Spell it out for us like you're talking to the retarded children you obviously take all of us to be, you insufferable ninny.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    You’re not a retarded child, just an emotions-driven opinionated blowhard. No clue how you got that way.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco

    And you didn't explain how we benefit from military involvement in the mideast.

    Opinionated blowhard? Talk about projection.

  377. Art Deco says:
    June 19, 2020 at 6:44 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we’ve done any policing of note in the last 30 years.
     
    It isn't all just about money, you stupid idiot. We have wreaked a lot of havoc in the area - destroying lives and bringing down misery on countless thousands of people. Including the thousands of American soldiers who have been killed and maimed. And you are conveniently forgetting that the war in Iraq - we sent more than just a few people there - it was over a hundred thousand men under arms, you twit.

    I'm not going to pretend that you are just a pedantic busybody or a misguided fool (both of which you are). But you also really are a loathsome, despicable piece of s**t.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Truth

    Actually, no, American military action is the least of their problems. It doesn’t seem to occur to you that the political life of the Near East, Central Asia, and North Africa makes Latin America look tranquil. It doesn’t matter whether American troops are present or not and it hardly matters what they’re doing, those places do not cohere particularly well as political societies and some of the violence they suffer is baffling in its pointlessness. There have, for example been five insurgencies in the Maghreb since 1954, five in the Arabian peninsula, three notable civil wars in the Fertile Crescent, multi-episode insurgencies in Transcaucasia, Afghanistan &c. See Stanley Kurtz on some of the vectors which make public life problematic in the Muslim World in a way it is not other places.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Art Deco


    those places do not cohere particularly well as political societies and some of the violence they suffer is baffling in its pointlessness.
     
    Violence is pointless until it succeeds. These repetitive cycles occur because the ruling caste is too focused on its own interests to open up the economy so that geographic, tribal, religious or ethnic outgroups may prosper. But in many cases, there are longstanding grievances that cannot be resolved except through partition. And the problem with allowing an economic opening is that those outgroups may grow strong enough to overthrow the ancien regime. A farmer generally has no issues with maximizing the welfare of his livestock, because there is no possibility of revolt. The same can't be said of a ruler.
  378. @Mr. Anon
    @vinteuil

    Because then Art Deco would have to admit that he's a frustrated, insignificant nobody holding forth from his library reference desk.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    frustrated, insignificant nobody

    Whereas, if I were a person of consequence, I’d be stalking people in comboxes. Your wisdom is ever appreciated.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  379. @obwandiyag
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    They already don't do their job, mook. What do you think this is, Adam Twelve?

    You watch too much TV if you think cops do anything more than eat donuts, give innocent people outrageous tickets, and then shoot people rather than having to deal with them.

    Replies: @Prof. Woland

    The truth is the “community” has much more to do with the crime rate in a town (or city) than the number of cops. I live in the Lilly white burbs where we don’t have crime. It makes it much easier on us and the police. When a murder is committed every 10 years it is usually outsiders having a “mansion party” where it has nothing to do with anybody living there or someone from Oakland slithers through the Caldecott Tunnel and botches a robbery.

    It is much easier on the police when their time and resources and not sucked up by feral man-children. One reason drunk driving is a problem is that is takes about 6-8 man hours to arrest and book a drunk. That means if you live in a town where on a Sunday night there are only two cops on duty, you have effectively reduced your police force by half. It is the same reason border walls help the border patrol. The cops are not babysitters.

  380. sayless says:
    June 19, 2020 at 7:30 pm GMT • 100 Words   
    @theMann
    @Steve Sailer

    Do pensions get paid when the local and State tax bases collapse? Do your medical and dental "benefits" mean anything when the people providing those services are systematically going out of business?

    The police have been systematically set up to take the fall for the actions of stupendously corrupt and dishonest Politicians and they know it. They aren't somewhat unhappy, they are enraged.

    And btw, you can be an active duty policeman and still join a semi-secret organization. Especially if you start with the IRA as a model.

    Replies: @sayless

    “–they are enraged”

    They sure are. In NYC DeBlasio has just accused the cops of being racist for holding some Blue Lives Matter event. He seems to really hate law enforcement people, I wonder why.

    How did we come to deserve this creature? I know New Yorkers are bad, but we aren’t that bad.

  381. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    Actually, no, American military action is the least of their problems. It doesn't seem to occur to you that the political life of the Near East, Central Asia, and North Africa makes Latin America look tranquil. It doesn't matter whether American troops are present or not and it hardly matters what they're doing, those places do not cohere particularly well as political societies and some of the violence they suffer is baffling in its pointlessness. There have, for example been five insurgencies in the Maghreb since 1954, five in the Arabian peninsula, three notable civil wars in the Fertile Crescent, multi-episode insurgencies in Transcaucasia, Afghanistan &c. See Stanley Kurtz on some of the vectors which make public life problematic in the Muslim World in a way it is not other places.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    those places do not cohere particularly well as political societies and some of the violence they suffer is baffling in its pointlessness.

    Violence is pointless until it succeeds. These repetitive cycles occur because the ruling caste is too focused on its own interests to open up the economy so that geographic, tribal, religious or ethnic outgroups may prosper. But in many cases, there are longstanding grievances that cannot be resolved except through partition. And the problem with allowing an economic opening is that those outgroups may grow strong enough to overthrow the ancien regime. A farmer generally has no issues with maximizing the welfare of his livestock, because there is no possibility of revolt. The same can’t be said of a ruler.

  382. @S
    @Veracitor

    Why, that's almost as bad as if she had sung Dixie. Has she confessed and apologized yet?

    Replies: @sayless

    Joan Baez can be sharp when she’s a mind to. She might confess and apologize but she might also say, Don’t listen to it if you don’t like it.

  383. @Art Deco
    @vinteuil

    AD, I mostly love your stuff. But I think it ought to be perfectly obvious to everybody by now that our continuing role as World Policeman doesn’t make any of our lives better, in any way at all. And Israel is perfectly capable of taking care of itself. So why can’t we just disengage?

    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we've done any policing of note in the last 30 years.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @vinteuil

    Well, AD, that just invites the question: given that our military role in the Near East, Central Asia, & North Africa is so trivial, and given that we get so much grief over it…why not disengage?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @vinteuil

    We're already disengaged. In the whole of the region, we had in 2017 fewer billets (35,000) than we had in Japan alone. At that time, about 60% of them were scattered various places which were free of any shooting wars. In Iraq, there's a residue of about 4,000 American soldiers. The number of people they've killed in the last three years is close to nil.

  384. Art Deco says:
    @vinteuil
    @Art Deco

    Well, AD, that just invites the question: given that our military role in the Near East, Central Asia, & North Africa is so trivial, and given that we get so much grief over it...why not disengage?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    We’re already disengaged. In the whole of the region, we had in 2017 fewer billets (35,000) than we had in Japan alone. At that time, about 60% of them were scattered various places which were free of any shooting wars. In Iraq, there’s a residue of about 4,000 American soldiers. The number of people they’ve killed in the last three years is close to nil.

  385. @Art Deco
    @Mr. Anon

    You're not a retarded child, just an emotions-driven opinionated blowhard. No clue how you got that way.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    And you didn’t explain how we benefit from military involvement in the mideast.

    Opinionated blowhard? Talk about projection.

  386. @jsm
    @Truth

    Ok, dumbshit,
    if you're going to correct my spelling, at least get your capitalization right.
    TASER

    https://www.axon.com/products/taser-x2

    Replies: @Truth

    (I swear Ronnie, your site just keeps getting better and better…)

  387. @Mr. Anon
    @Art Deco


    The ratio of military expenditure to domestic product (at around 0.038) is as low as it has been since 1940 and 87% of our manpower is billeted on American territory. Just 2% of our manpower is in the Near East, Central Asia, or North Africa, the only part of the world we’ve done any policing of note in the last 30 years.
     
    It isn't all just about money, you stupid idiot. We have wreaked a lot of havoc in the area - destroying lives and bringing down misery on countless thousands of people. Including the thousands of American soldiers who have been killed and maimed. And you are conveniently forgetting that the war in Iraq - we sent more than just a few people there - it was over a hundred thousand men under arms, you twit.

    I'm not going to pretend that you are just a pedantic busybody or a misguided fool (both of which you are). But you also really are a loathsome, despicable piece of s**t.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Truth

    Hey, you guys have been at it for like 10 years now. Funny thing, I can’t really pick a winner.

  388. Mr. Anon says:
    June 20, 2020 at 2:43 am GMT • 100 Words   
    @Truth
    @Mr. Anon


    All violence can kill. Tasers aren’t “non-lethal”. They are “less-lethal”.
     
    So is a box of spaghetti if you use it in the right way. The point is it is MEANT to be used with marinara sauce, just as a taser is MEANT to temporarily incapacitate someone without lasting harm.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @Mr. Anon

    Try attacking a cop with a nightstick and see how far you get. He’s not gonna play quarter-staff with you like you’re Little John and he’s Robin Hood. Cops are not obliged to fight duels of honor with suspects they are trying to arrest – they don’t preface their lawful use of violence with “choose your weapons, sir!”

    • Agree: The Anti-Gnostic
  389. @anon
    @Jonathan Mason

    My sweet understanding is that this is not equally the case in all states or jurisdictions and for example may not be the case in California.

    Then provide a cite to support your sweet understanding.

    If it is not universal then it was not written in stone on Mount Sinai and handed down to Moses as an immutable truth.

    Strawman.

    I think a lot of people who are not lawyers would feel that it is not really fair to be charged with drunken driving unless you are actually driving on a public road.

    I think the USSC didn't care when they ruled it was legal back in the 70's. What most people feel often doesn't really matter. Your career in corrections should have provided you with that sweet understanding.

    Anyway, my belief is that the main problem is chronic alcoholics whose blood level is chronically over the limit.

    My belief is that you make stuff up in your head and pretend it is real.

    Laws have to be reasonable to be accepted by the population at large.

    Lol. Now I know you're just trolling, nobody's that dumb.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I don’t know what the term ‘sweet understanding’ means to you, but when the phrase occured in my original post it was just a dictation artifact that I failed to spot and delete in time. I guess that is how new phrases enter the language.

  390. @RAZ
    @Pericles

    Unlike everyone at Zerohedge or a lot of people here I'm not normally a conspiracy theorist. In this case, I dunno. So many rich and powerful people who did not want him talking about what he knew about them and what they did. But he apparently wired his island home with hidden cameras. Bill C made multiple trips to the island. Wonder if video of him will ever see the light of day. DJT had some dealings with him but haven't heard anything about him visiting the island or leaving his place in Palm Beach to go to Epstein's.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Jonathan Mason

    Bill C has denied that he ever went to the island, so what is the source of your information that he was there several times?

  391. @Steve Sailer
    @Pericles

    Yale U. --> Floyd U.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @TomSchmidt

    The elites have had no skin in the game for a long time. What do they care if the little people are looted and their historical figures mocked?

    I can see it now: get a progressive city council to pass a radical anti-slavery, anti-genocide resolution. They will not permit the use of money with people who spoke out in favor of or owned slaves; that would eliminate Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Franklin; Grant and Jackson were involved in genocide against Indians.

    Then insist that you will not hire ANYone from Yale unless the applicant has shown evidence that they have signed a petition demanding that the university rename itself. Start a Rename Yale at Change.Org.

    Either the Elites destroy the premier brand in education in subjection to the mob (which they won’t do), or they cut the nonsense out.

  392. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Steve Sailer


    Yale U. –> Floyd U.

     

    I don't know, Steve. The Ivies are still more traditionalist in many ways. Maybe the erstwhile Yalies would like to hearken back to the ur-victim in this current Reign of Wokeness, hence:

    Trayvon U > Floyd U

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    The Ur-victim isn’t Trayvon, but Emmitt.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @TomSchmidt

    Excellent point.

  393. @TomSchmidt
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The Ur-victim isn't Trayvon, but Emmitt.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Excellent point.

  394. @Truth
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It’s pretty difficult to restrain a healthy adult male.
     
    Right, so a lot of gentlemen on the police force should become cyber coders or salesmen.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    It would be a good idea to have height/weight minimums for cops, but then women couldn’t be cops so the minimums would get tossed by the courts. And how many inordinately strong, fit guys who want to be cops are there to deal with all the stupid, violent people?

    It would be nice if, like England once upon a time, the US demographic was so enamored of civil order we could literally disarm our cops, like the English bobbies who would borrow firearms from citizens in an emergency.

  395. Rayshard was an idiot who stole a weapon from a cop. You reap what you sow, and it’s your own damn fault, unless of course you’re black.

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