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Using a borrowed phone, NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof tweets from the top of Mt. Whitney after completing backpacking the 2000 mile Pacific Crest Trail.

Kristof’s epic journey has kept him out of touch with civilization since Memorial Day.

Nick adds:

By the way, has anything happened after “the first five months of this year” since I left on Memorial Day?

 
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  1. Who can you trust? This academic or your lying eyes?

  2. Who conducted this study, and how did they decide which wing of extremism was to blame?

    Lemme guess: black violence doesn’t count because they’re righteously above politics, and every time a candybar wrapper blows onto a synagogue’s lawn that counts as violence.

    • Agree: bomag
  3. anon[266] • Disclaimer says:

    “A study found…”

    As soon as I hear those words from a political partisan I close my ears.
    My answer is, “I dismiss your study out-of-hand and won’t believe it unless I first hear the leading rebuttal to it. If the rebuttal makes your study sound interesting I will back track and read the study itself.”

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @anon


    “A study found…”
     
    Liberals treat the term "studies find that...." as if it is conclusive refutation of whatever you may happen to think. As if studies are all created equal. Or rather, as if the studies that reach conclusions they agree with must be right and all others wrong. Studies? Which studies? Whose studies? How were they conducted? You can't evaluate the conclusions of a study without knowing something about how it was done. They may as well say "Teacher said that......". It's really rather childish.
    , @Aardvark
    @anon

    I simply go by whether or not it was said by a lefty, then almost universally, the opposite of what they said is true, or they are projecting themselves on to some other party.
    In this case both were true.

    , @Desiderius
    @anon

    Studies conducted under duress don't tell you much.

  4. Even for the period he cites, his stats are undoubtedly bullshit and shouldn’t be legitimized

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Crank

    You're doubtless correct, but that wouldn't stop millions of people from sharing Kristof's claim all over social media if it were today. And who would argue with it? 1) It's from the New York Times! Our most credible news source in the whole world for like, forever and 2) it cites a study! Checkmate!

  5. He’s just a sloppy liar whose opinion doesn’t matter, unless he’s advisimg you on a good cathouse. Meamwhile PJ Media is claiming that insurance companies are refusing to cover the costs of the peaceful protesters and Minneapolis will not be rebuilt.
    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/jim-treacher/2020/08/31/riot-ravaged-minneapolis-businesses-cant-rebuild-because-the-insurance-wont-cover-it-n867003

    • Replies: @Alden
    @J.Ross

    I knew this would happen. Excellent!!!!👍👌

    Let Minneapolis become Detroit or Camden.

    How to destroy a German Scandinavian Socialist paradise in 40 years.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    , @HA
    @J.Ross

    "Meamwhile PJ Media is claiming that insurance companies are refusing to cover the costs of the peaceful protesters"

    In the NYT and WaPo versions, the headline will be "The Return of Redlining."

  6. Michelle Malkin:

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair…will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @syonredux

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair…will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.

    Right. And this is why I haven't been to "church" in nearly a decade. Not sure what they're up to these days, and I don't much care!

    Replies: @Warner

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @syonredux

    White privilege is unfair says a priest who lives on the largess of White parishioners and who doles out money to the poor donated by those same parishioners. This man saddens me.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @Dan Hayes
    @syonredux

    A couple of things:
    This church is the "in" homosexual RC church in NYC. The associated high school was a military academy (!) when Antonin Scalia was a student. In the interim the church and school and their Jesuit overseers have come a long, long way!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Mike_from_SGV
    @syonredux

    Organized religion in many or most cases has become just another leftist-captured institution.

  7. Will he make it to Canada by Election Day?

  8. Last year, I think, VDare deconstructed one of those lists of “right-wing violence” and found that it was largely a big frame-up. They included as right-wing violence acts by people who had never expressed any political leanings or motivations for their acts, but who “fit the profile” and included even things like domestic violence calls — acts that had no political motivation, if they were committed by someone who had ever said or posted anything that counted as right wing.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Cloudbuster

    Yep; I read that. Pretty much any crime committed by a white person counts as White Supremacist Terrorism and when you consider the totality of their worldview, it's not so surprising. Remember that your speech is violence and your silence is violence. Breathing really isn't that far behind.

  9. It’s been fascinating to watch the Establishment circle the wagons and trot out a new argument since riots started chipping away at Biden’s lead in the polls.

    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case. I think it’s more a matter of the Echo Chamber effect. Establishment media people and politicians read an article or blog and simply repeat what they have read.

    Of course, this argument is simply a variation of “blame the victim.” Trump won’t do what his political opponents want, so if they violently react, its his fault. When the Establishment still had a shred of credibility, it abhorred this line of reasoning, a great example being violence against women, hence the popularity of “slut walks,” etc. a few years ago. (remember them?). But now that Trump has to be beaten at the election, its no holds barred.

    Getting the genie back in the bottle isn’t going to be as easy as these people imagine, I fear. I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Well, I must say I was pleased to see the DOJ and FBI finally take action against conspirators crossing state lines to riot, commit arson, attack federal officers and federal courthouses, commit racial intimidation, threaten to murder and commit genocide against a majority racial group, etc.

    DOJ/FBI SWAT teams have been rolling them up in major raids accompanied by air cover and gunboats:



    https://static.westernjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Stone-raid.jpg
    https://thefederalistpapers.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Roger-Stone-Raid.jpg
    https://www.teaparty.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Guns-at-the-Door-Roger-Stone-600x358-1.jpg

     

    Oh, sorry, my bad. This raid was actually to apprehend a senior citizen with no criminal history who mischaracterized a joke about kidnapping a friend’s dog because the friend was not feeding him enough. Anyway, so glad they safely rolled up this joke mischaracterizing monster!

    DOJ/FBI is the new Cheka.

    Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey

    , @Moral Stone
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse. Certainly some of it is the copy/paste of a lazy echo chamber. Some is likely due to people with very similar ideologies and taboos organically alighting on the few permissible and potentially effective rebuttals. And finally, one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging. This always struck me as conspiracy talk but mailing lists for that purpose have existed before, and might still. Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.

    Replies: @anon, @Harry Baldwin, @peterike

    , @martin_2
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    President Trump is certainly shortening and Joe Biden is drifting. On betfair they are both now even money. Biden was as short as 0.61 to 1 earlier.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    After eight years of Obama and looking forward to eight years of Hillary, the left figured it had triumphed once and for all. Policies would be set in place that would crush all future political opposition. Legalize millions more illegal aliens and get them on the voter rolls, and get a few reliable left wingers on the SCOTUS to ban guns and prohibit "hate" speech. Use lawfare to harass conservative organizations. Apply the rules of a typical college campus to America in toto. Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.

    Then Trump came along and upset the apple cart. Hence the insane rage.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon, @res

    , @Pop Warner
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case
     
    It's tempting to think that because it's happened before. The JournoList did exactly that, bringing hundreds of journalists together to coordinate their narratives until it was exposed and ostensibly shut down in 2010. Considering it was the brainchild of Ezra Klein I wouldn't be at all surprised if something like it still existed, especially since journalism has purged far more dissent in the past 10 years
  10. Amazing to be able to go away from society for 3 months then return and the narrative is automatically reinstalled. NPC indeed.

    • Replies: @anon
    @newrouter

    NPC indeed

    https://media.breitbart.com/media/2018/10/NPC-13-groupthink.jpg

  11. “A study found…”

    “According to experts…”

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Patrick in SC

    Patrick in SC says:
    September 1, 2020 at 12:57 am GMT ⇑
    “A study found…”

    “According to experts…”

    I respond:

    Yes, very true. Also, watch out for the lead in by the likes of super ugly NPR (back in the day) Ninna Tottenberg.

    "But critics say"....

    These unarmed "Critics" are always her same old, same old, PC Lib Leftist New York Jewish hate White people world view.

    So when some state voters vote to ban affirmative action and giving jobs, admissions to unqualified racial, sexual groups, Nina T and her kind will go:

    California voted to ban the use of race in determining college admissions, but critics say that this will infect increase racism, sexism and promote intolerance and hatred.

  12. @syonredux
    Michelle Malkin:

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair...will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.
     
    https://twitter.com/michellemalkin/status/1300500336977739781

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Buffalo Joe, @Dan Hayes, @Mike_from_SGV

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair…will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.

    Right. And this is why I haven’t been to “church” in nearly a decade. Not sure what they’re up to these days, and I don’t much care!

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @Warner
    @Kibernetika

    That's the gay church in the gay neighborhood. Of all the churches in NTC why let the media turn you away by their focus on the one gay church. Plenty of churches all do traditional Latin Mass. You don't see any articles about them. If you are interested I'll give you a list of where to go.

  13. Anonymous[360] • Disclaimer says:

    Using a borrowed phone, NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof tweets from the top of Mt. Whitney after completing backpacking the 2000 mile Pacific Crest Trail.

    Is he the first Jewish guy to hike the whole thing?

    https://www.jweekly.com/2007/06/22/getting-out-in-nature-can-expose-the-higher-power-of-hiking/

    “Some friends and relatives laughed at my forays into the forest, saying things like “a Jewish hike is from Macy’s to Nordstrom.” Or, as a former boss teased, “Jews don’t hike.””

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Kristof is Armenian-Polish on his father's side and standard American white on his mother's side.

    Replies: @anon

    , @anon
    @Anonymous

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJLFcRdjW4o

    , @kaganovitch
    @Anonymous

    Is he the first Jewish guy to hike the whole thing?

    Kristof is not Jewish.

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Anonymous

    Type 1 error. But really, the name Kristof (“bearing Christ”) should have tipped you off.

    Jamie Dimon, Mark Steyn I can understand. But really, Nicholas Kristof??

  14. Note for the record that this post is a joke: Nicholas Kristof isn’t currently on top of Mt. Whitney and his Instagram post of his daughter is from 2016.

    He’s a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.

    Sometimes I think it’s funny to make up an admirable reason that would explain a really dumb take.

    The problem is that many people can’t imagine somebody else doing that so they assume it must be true.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Steve Sailer


    Note for the record that this post is a joke:
     
    Steve, be kind to your readers.

    Jokes are now verboten as initial subjects since the factual snippets you use are often indistinguishable from satire sites like the Onion.

    Really, in Clown World up is down, black is white, right is left, etc.

    But after the election things will be different. Either we can laugh freely at the jokes we tell in our new gulag homes, or we can laugh at the Wokesters lining up to jump off cliffs near your fabulous Southern California mansion. Either way, more laughs than today.
    , @Mr McKenna
    @Steve Sailer


    Note for the record that this post is a joke
     
    Probably could stand to be clarified in the OP, since it's hardly incredible.
    , @Thirdtwin
    @Steve Sailer

    Good one, Steve. You could have at least dropped Mark Sanford into the hoax to clue us in.

    , @res
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks for the clarification. I would not have figured it out except for noticing the little 216w in the Instagram image. Well, the final paragraph was a pretty good clue, but wouldn't have been sure that was not just standard issue sarcasm.

    , @Bernard
    @Steve Sailer


    He’s a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.
     
    Steve,
    How you would know this nugget of information is beyond my understanding. But that’s what makes you ISteve I suppose. Keep it up.
  15. Could we please have a new Establishment?

  16. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter
    It’s been fascinating to watch the Establishment circle the wagons and trot out a new argument since riots started chipping away at Biden’s lead in the polls.

    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case. I think it’s more a matter of the Echo Chamber effect. Establishment media people and politicians read an article or blog and simply repeat what they have read.

    Of course, this argument is simply a variation of “blame the victim.” Trump won’t do what his political opponents want, so if they violently react, its his fault. When the Establishment still had a shred of credibility, it abhorred this line of reasoning, a great example being violence against women, hence the popularity of “slut walks,” etc. a few years ago. (remember them?). But now that Trump has to be beaten at the election, its no holds barred.

    Getting the genie back in the bottle isn’t going to be as easy as these people imagine, I fear. I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    Replies: @Anon, @Moral Stone, @martin_2, @Harry Baldwin, @Pop Warner

    Well, I must say I was pleased to see the DOJ and FBI finally take action against conspirators crossing state lines to riot, commit arson, attack federal officers and federal courthouses, commit racial intimidation, threaten to murder and commit genocide against a majority racial group, etc.

    DOJ/FBI SWAT teams have been rolling them up in major raids accompanied by air cover and gunboats:

    Oh, sorry, my bad. This raid was actually to apprehend a senior citizen with no criminal history who mischaracterized a joke about kidnapping a friend’s dog because the friend was not feeding him enough. Anyway, so glad they safely rolled up this joke mischaracterizing monster!

    DOJ/FBI is the new Cheka.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey
    @Anon

    Carlos personcia purloined jokes from other comics perhaps you should raid him . Hey hey this annoy,ous tip has been brought to you by Kristy the klown.

  17. Pacific Crest Trail so white.

    BLM.

  18. Forbes: Sports fans watch sports because they want to see sports, not as a reward for ideological purity on the part of the players.

    The NFL might think it best to target the coveted 18-49 demo, thinking younger fans watch for different reasons. That would be wrong. Among fans in this demo whose favorite sport is the NFL, 71% do not care about the politics of any individual athlete, edging out the 50+ set (69%). Fans whose favorite sport is the NHL (80%), NASCAR (76%) and MLB (74%) are uniformly disinterested in the politics of athletes. Even among those whose first love is the NBA, the large majority (59%) of the 18-49 demo has no interest in player politics.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/kirkwakefield/2020/08/28/escape-from-2020–a-case-to-separate-sports-and-politics-for-more-fans-and-higher-ratings/#3e16a8776ada

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @J.Ross

    are uniformly disinterested in the politics of athletes

    It appears that the battle to preserve the meaning of "disinterested" has been lost. This sentence would actually have read better with "uniformly uninterested."

  19. Anonymous[541] • Disclaimer says:

    As the election cycle moves into high gear, pay attention to the blacks and the gays of the entrepreneurial order. Entrepreneurial gays helped him snag the presidency last time, they’re still on board for obvious reasons, but the Trump train has been quietly catering to entrepreneurial black folks, and even the black regular joe’s for the last year, and you will see it in the polls. The Dems are just noticing now, apparently.

    Furthermore, enough black men are also entrepreneurial AND gay to make a difference as a power block in the voting booths. The Dems noticed too late to provide any meaningful countermeasure.

    Stick a fork in Biden. He’s done.

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
  20. @NJ Transit Commuter
    It’s been fascinating to watch the Establishment circle the wagons and trot out a new argument since riots started chipping away at Biden’s lead in the polls.

    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case. I think it’s more a matter of the Echo Chamber effect. Establishment media people and politicians read an article or blog and simply repeat what they have read.

    Of course, this argument is simply a variation of “blame the victim.” Trump won’t do what his political opponents want, so if they violently react, its his fault. When the Establishment still had a shred of credibility, it abhorred this line of reasoning, a great example being violence against women, hence the popularity of “slut walks,” etc. a few years ago. (remember them?). But now that Trump has to be beaten at the election, its no holds barred.

    Getting the genie back in the bottle isn’t going to be as easy as these people imagine, I fear. I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    Replies: @Anon, @Moral Stone, @martin_2, @Harry Baldwin, @Pop Warner

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse. Certainly some of it is the copy/paste of a lazy echo chamber. Some is likely due to people with very similar ideologies and taboos organically alighting on the few permissible and potentially effective rebuttals. And finally, one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging. This always struck me as conspiracy talk but mailing lists for that purpose have existed before, and might still. Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Moral Stone

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse.

    https://www.fort-russ.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/npc-group.png

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Moral Stone

    one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging.

    On the talk shows, they'll often string together clips from all the networks in which everyone uses exactly the same phrasing. After the first night of the Republican convention, everyone in the MSM described it as "dark and divisive." Can this really be anything but concerted action?

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    , @peterike
    @Moral Stone


    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse... Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.
     
    Same thing. Reporters get memos from the DNC and they all fire off the same talking points at the same time. It's that simple and that coordinated.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  21. @Anonymous

    Using a borrowed phone, NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof tweets from the top of Mt. Whitney after completing backpacking the 2000 mile Pacific Crest Trail.
     
    Is he the first Jewish guy to hike the whole thing?

    https://www.jweekly.com/2007/06/22/getting-out-in-nature-can-expose-the-higher-power-of-hiking/

    "Some friends and relatives laughed at my forays into the forest, saying things like “a Jewish hike is from Macy’s to Nordstrom.” Or, as a former boss teased, “Jews don’t hike.”"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @kaganovitch, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Kristof is Armenian-Polish on his father’s side and standard American white on his mother’s side.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    So you're saying his odiousness comes from his Armenian side?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  22. @syonredux
    Michelle Malkin:

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair...will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.
     
    https://twitter.com/michellemalkin/status/1300500336977739781

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Buffalo Joe, @Dan Hayes, @Mike_from_SGV

    White privilege is unfair says a priest who lives on the largess of White parishioners and who doles out money to the poor donated by those same parishioners. This man saddens me.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Buffalo Joe

    If there really were white privilege, with whites able to ignore public laws and obey only private laws (literally, privilege), you'd probably agree that that was unfair. I would.

    Does it exist?

    Replies: @bomag, @Ben tillman

  23. @Steve Sailer
    Note for the record that this post is a joke: Nicholas Kristof isn't currently on top of Mt. Whitney and his Instagram post of his daughter is from 2016.

    He's a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.

    Sometimes I think it's funny to make up an admirable reason that would explain a really dumb take.

    The problem is that many people can't imagine somebody else doing that so they assume it must be true.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Mr McKenna, @Thirdtwin, @res, @Bernard

    Note for the record that this post is a joke:

    Steve, be kind to your readers.

    Jokes are now verboten as initial subjects since the factual snippets you use are often indistinguishable from satire sites like the Onion.

    Really, in Clown World up is down, black is white, right is left, etc.

    But after the election things will be different. Either we can laugh freely at the jokes we tell in our new gulag homes, or we can laugh at the Wokesters lining up to jump off cliffs near your fabulous Southern California mansion. Either way, more laughs than today.

  24. Does Kristof know that founder John Muir has been cancelled by the Sierra Club?

  25. @J.Ross
    He's just a sloppy liar whose opinion doesn't matter, unless he's advisimg you on a good cathouse. Meamwhile PJ Media is claiming that insurance companies are refusing to cover the costs of the peaceful protesters and Minneapolis will not be rebuilt.
    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/jim-treacher/2020/08/31/riot-ravaged-minneapolis-businesses-cant-rebuild-because-the-insurance-wont-cover-it-n867003

    Replies: @Alden, @HA

    I knew this would happen. Excellent!!!!👍👌

    Let Minneapolis become Detroit or Camden.

    How to destroy a German Scandinavian Socialist paradise in 40 years.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Alden

    Detroit or Gary or Camden but with Somalis!

  26. @Anonymous

    Using a borrowed phone, NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof tweets from the top of Mt. Whitney after completing backpacking the 2000 mile Pacific Crest Trail.
     
    Is he the first Jewish guy to hike the whole thing?

    https://www.jweekly.com/2007/06/22/getting-out-in-nature-can-expose-the-higher-power-of-hiking/

    "Some friends and relatives laughed at my forays into the forest, saying things like “a Jewish hike is from Macy’s to Nordstrom.” Or, as a former boss teased, “Jews don’t hike.”"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @kaganovitch, @Ghost of Bull Moose

  27. @newrouter
    Amazing to be able to go away from society for 3 months then return and the narrative is automatically reinstalled. NPC indeed.

    Replies: @anon

    NPC indeed

  28. @Moral Stone
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse. Certainly some of it is the copy/paste of a lazy echo chamber. Some is likely due to people with very similar ideologies and taboos organically alighting on the few permissible and potentially effective rebuttals. And finally, one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging. This always struck me as conspiracy talk but mailing lists for that purpose have existed before, and might still. Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.

    Replies: @anon, @Harry Baldwin, @peterike

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse.

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @anon

    By stomping on the face of any dissenters who question authority. The media conspiracy with the democrats is an extension of our education system, our youth has been indoctrinated since kindergarten by leftist teachers , leftists preachers etc...But even those who do not get indoctrinated and question the teachers quickly understand the consequences of questioning authority will be significant with long lasting repercussions on their future.

    Anyone in journalism school today must have seen how they fired Andrew Sullivan for questioning the narrative 25 years ago. The consequences of questioning the narrative will last your entire life. You will be fired for asking the wrong questions. You may even lose your job in 20 years for something you wrote in your high school newspaper years ago.

  29. I had a joke ready but saw your yellow-backgrounded comment in the Nick of time. I’ll tell you what, Steve, you were the one who’s been telling us that one can get cancelled for tweets going back years, if not decades, OK, no, not decades.

    John Muir is on the outs with the Sierra Club now, even though he was one of the founders and helped create the wonderful National Parks that Nick walked through in ’16 and I’ve been to recently (another one, that is). I was so pissed about it, that I had cusswords even in the titles of my 2 posts about this stupidity – see Part 1 and Part 2.

    Well, now I see that Buffalo Joe just above is aware of this too, so not new news, but doesn’t this cancelling out business get pretty contagious sometimes, with an Ro of a coupla’ hundred or so? Not only did Nick Krisoff know who John Muir is in ’16, but he walked 2,000 miles on John Muir’s trail! If that ain’t reason to be cancelled, than I don’t know what is. Don’t give me this “didn’t know” crap, either, Nick, ignorance of the narrative is no excuse. There’s no non-retroactivity clause in the Constitution of Cancellation.

    Just a tip for you, Steve. Get this guy cancelled.

    (No charge.)

    • Agree: The Alarmist
  30. @NJ Transit Commuter
    It’s been fascinating to watch the Establishment circle the wagons and trot out a new argument since riots started chipping away at Biden’s lead in the polls.

    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case. I think it’s more a matter of the Echo Chamber effect. Establishment media people and politicians read an article or blog and simply repeat what they have read.

    Of course, this argument is simply a variation of “blame the victim.” Trump won’t do what his political opponents want, so if they violently react, its his fault. When the Establishment still had a shred of credibility, it abhorred this line of reasoning, a great example being violence against women, hence the popularity of “slut walks,” etc. a few years ago. (remember them?). But now that Trump has to be beaten at the election, its no holds barred.

    Getting the genie back in the bottle isn’t going to be as easy as these people imagine, I fear. I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    Replies: @Anon, @Moral Stone, @martin_2, @Harry Baldwin, @Pop Warner

    President Trump is certainly shortening and Joe Biden is drifting. On betfair they are both now even money. Biden was as short as 0.61 to 1 earlier.

  31. Off topic

    Trump’s decided not to meet with the Blake family because they insisted their lawyers be present. Good for Trump. Blacks and liberals will always twist not just White’s words but facial expressions into racism.

    He will be in Kenosha tomorrow. Maybe I’ll watch TV for the first time in months.

  32. I wonder if this study put Islamist terrorists in the right wing extremism column . Socially conservative, scriptural literalists, ethnocentric, anti-modern…

  33. OT: Another noose of doom

    Red rope with a noose hanged from tree at home of Black family in Southern California

    Someone left a red rope with a noose knot at the end hanging from a tree outside the home of a Black family in Diamond Bar, and the woman who has lived there more than a quarter-century said Sunday the act was being investigated as a hate crime.

    “I’m taking it as a personal threat to me and my family,” Lillian Rucker, who owns the home, said by telephone Sunday.

    “I’ve been here 26 years. I am not moving. To me that was like a threat of, ‘You shouldn’t be here, and you need to leave.’ I’m not going anywhere,” she said.

    “I have two African American sons and three grandsons, and in today’s climate, you have to take everything seriously,” she said.

    Saturday, one of her sons noticed the rope with the noose at the front of the family home on Silver Cloud Drive, and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies from the department’s Walnut Station were called to the home about 11:30 a.m.

    Rucker said the deputies took the rope with them as evidence. She said the report she received from them said the matter would be investigated as a hate crime.

    Deputy Juanita Suarez-Navarro confirmed the incident was under investigation.

    “I want the community to know that this stuff is happening,” said Rucker. There have been no such incidents before during her time living in Diamond Bar, she said.

    “We live in a nice neighborhood, nice community, nice people. It doesn’t mean that this kind of stuff can’t touch us, which is unfortunate … If this can happen to me, it can happen to you. There’s not that many African Americans living in Diamond Bar, but there are a few.”

    https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2020/08/31/red-rope-with-a-noose-hanged-from-tree-at-home-of-black-family-in-diamond-bar/

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Ripple Earthdevil

    Diamond Bar has a lot of Indian immigrants. 99.9 % chance the Rucker’s hung the rope themselves. Used to be 2 sticks nailed in a cross shape the blacks would plant in their yards. Now it’s rope and string.

    Remember the college campus that was locked down in hysteria because a catholic chaplain was walking across campus in his white robe. Another campus was locked down because a neurotic hysteric saw some white lab coats hanging on a rack.

    Now that UCLA’s open again, maybe I’ll
    put on my white coat and walk around. See the reaction. Most UCLA women wear black T shirts and black leggings so I’ll stand out in white.

    , @Mr McKenna
    @Ripple Earthdevil


    "If this can happen to me, it can happen to you."
     
    What, a hoax? Sure, I guess it can. But it won't be my own doing, and that's yet another thing which separates us in a very fundamental way.

    It's a source of some fascination that each and every hoaxer thinks 1) they're so clever, 2) they'll never get caught and 3) they're the first person ever to try it, despite the thousands which have preceded them.

    Of course, the MSM are largely responsible for #3, since they're careful to memory-hole the few instances when they're forced to admit the facts.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Ripple Earthdevil

    '... We live in a nice neighborhood, nice community, nice people...There’s not that many African Americans living in Diamond Bar...”'

    Redundant.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  34. @Crank
    Even for the period he cites, his stats are undoubtedly bullshit and shouldn't be legitimized

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    You’re doubtless correct, but that wouldn’t stop millions of people from sharing Kristof’s claim all over social media if it were today. And who would argue with it? 1) It’s from the New York Times! Our most credible news source in the whole world for like, forever and 2) it cites a study! Checkmate!

  35. Steve, you are wrong. We know that Kristof returned from Mt. Whitney in June. He then spent the month of July in Portland, looking high and low for anarchists. He failed in his search and had to ask for help from his readers: “Help Me Find Trump’s ‘Anarchists’ in Portland.”

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @inertial

    While Kristof was searching high and low for violent anarchists in Portland, he should have tried wearing a MAGA hat. They would have congregated around him and introduced themselves.

  36. @Cloudbuster
    Last year, I think, VDare deconstructed one of those lists of "right-wing violence" and found that it was largely a big frame-up. They included as right-wing violence acts by people who had never expressed any political leanings or motivations for their acts, but who "fit the profile" and included even things like domestic violence calls -- acts that had no political motivation, if they were committed by someone who had ever said or posted anything that counted as right wing.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    Yep; I read that. Pretty much any crime committed by a white person counts as White Supremacist Terrorism and when you consider the totality of their worldview, it’s not so surprising. Remember that your speech is violence and your silence is violence. Breathing really isn’t that far behind.

    • Agree: Lurker, sayless
  37. I nominate Nick Kristof for the prestigious Walter Duranty Award.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  38. @Steve Sailer
    Note for the record that this post is a joke: Nicholas Kristof isn't currently on top of Mt. Whitney and his Instagram post of his daughter is from 2016.

    He's a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.

    Sometimes I think it's funny to make up an admirable reason that would explain a really dumb take.

    The problem is that many people can't imagine somebody else doing that so they assume it must be true.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Mr McKenna, @Thirdtwin, @res, @Bernard

    Note for the record that this post is a joke

    Probably could stand to be clarified in the OP, since it’s hardly incredible.

  39. OT:

    The violence level of the ol knock out game sure has escalated these days: link

    tldw: a male POC slams a brick into the back of a white man’s head as he was walking down the street minding his own business.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anon

    Serves him right, he relaxed.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

  40. Man its going to be funny when you guys start crying and fuming about the terrorist Kyle Rittenhouse being sentenced to jail for life

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Benny Golden

    It’s going to be funny when a couple of your beloved blacks put you in a wheel chair for the rest of your life.

    , @Lurker
    @Benny Golden

    https://i.imgflip.com/4da3f0.jpg

    , @guest
    @Benny Golden

    Terrorists kill innocent people, my dude.

  41. @Steve Sailer
    Note for the record that this post is a joke: Nicholas Kristof isn't currently on top of Mt. Whitney and his Instagram post of his daughter is from 2016.

    He's a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.

    Sometimes I think it's funny to make up an admirable reason that would explain a really dumb take.

    The problem is that many people can't imagine somebody else doing that so they assume it must be true.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Mr McKenna, @Thirdtwin, @res, @Bernard

    Good one, Steve. You could have at least dropped Mark Sanford into the hoax to clue us in.

  42. Anon[230] • Disclaimer says:

    John Muir Trail? Well, there’s this thing called the Sierra High Route that puts it to shame. Former Yosemite big wall climber and editor Steve Roper “invented” it and published a great book on it detailing the whole route using portions of old USGS 15-minute topo maps accompanied by a written description. Portions follow the JMT, but mostly it’s off-trail, above the timberline, the central concept being to follow the highest Sierra Nevada ridge, to its west or east, all the way down the range, with no climbing skills required above class 3 (simple hands and feet scrambling with exposure). With GPS and mobile phones a lot more people are trying it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Sounds fun. Is it marked well enough from people getting into dead ends, pushing forward, and finding themselves stuck overnight?

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Anon

    TwoThreeZero, the Sierra Club, which John Muir founded, has cancelled him as a racist. Not too much press maybe don't want to lose donors.

  43. @syonredux
    Michelle Malkin:

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair...will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.
     
    https://twitter.com/michellemalkin/status/1300500336977739781

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Buffalo Joe, @Dan Hayes, @Mike_from_SGV

    A couple of things:
    This church is the “in” homosexual RC church in NYC. The associated high school was a military academy (!) when Antonin Scalia was a student. In the interim the church and school and their Jesuit overseers have come a long, long way!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dan Hayes


    This church is the “in” homosexual RC church in NYC.
     
    The equivalent in Minneapolis is St Joan of Arc. The real Joan would have them burnt at the stake. She couldn't even tolerate Hus:


    Joan of Arc's Letter to the Hussites (March 23, 1430)

    ...but if I don't find out that you have reformed yourselves I might leave the English behind and go against you, so that by the sword - if I can't do it any other way - I will eliminate your false and vile superstition and relieve you of either your heresy or your life.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @anon, @Ganderson

  44. @Anonymous

    Using a borrowed phone, NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof tweets from the top of Mt. Whitney after completing backpacking the 2000 mile Pacific Crest Trail.
     
    Is he the first Jewish guy to hike the whole thing?

    https://www.jweekly.com/2007/06/22/getting-out-in-nature-can-expose-the-higher-power-of-hiking/

    "Some friends and relatives laughed at my forays into the forest, saying things like “a Jewish hike is from Macy’s to Nordstrom.” Or, as a former boss teased, “Jews don’t hike.”"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @kaganovitch, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Is he the first Jewish guy to hike the whole thing?

    Kristof is not Jewish.

  45. @Kibernetika
    @syonredux

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair…will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.

    Right. And this is why I haven't been to "church" in nearly a decade. Not sure what they're up to these days, and I don't much care!

    Replies: @Warner

    That’s the gay church in the gay neighborhood. Of all the churches in NTC why let the media turn you away by their focus on the one gay church. Plenty of churches all do traditional Latin Mass. You don’t see any articles about them. If you are interested I’ll give you a list of where to go.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  46. @Anon
    John Muir Trail? Well, there's this thing called the Sierra High Route that puts it to shame. Former Yosemite big wall climber and editor Steve Roper "invented" it and published a great book on it detailing the whole route using portions of old USGS 15-minute topo maps accompanied by a written description. Portions follow the JMT, but mostly it's off-trail, above the timberline, the central concept being to follow the highest Sierra Nevada ridge, to its west or east, all the way down the range, with no climbing skills required above class 3 (simple hands and feet scrambling with exposure). With GPS and mobile phones a lot more people are trying it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe

    Sounds fun. Is it marked well enough from people getting into dead ends, pushing forward, and finding themselves stuck overnight?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Sounds fun. Is it marked well enough from people getting into dead ends, pushing forward, and finding themselves stuck overnight?
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Sierra-High-Route-Traversing-Timberline/dp/0898865069/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=steve+roper&qid=1598938922&sr=8-1

    I wouldn't recommend the Kindle version. The book is chock full of detailed maps and black and white photos. Roper is a talented writer, like many mountaineers. He wrote an interesting memoir, Camp 4, about the early days of Yosemite big wall climbing. Camp 4 is the bring-your-own-tent camp between Yosemite Lodge and the trail head for the Yosemite Falls trail in the Valley. Sierra High Route has a lengthy Chapter 1 that relates the mountaineering/exploring history of the Sierras from first "discovery" by whites. The Sierra Club used to organize 100-horse assaults into Kings Canyon to bring members into the wilderness in style. Roper talks about a handful of eccentric climbers who spent their lives traveling all over the Sierras grabbing first ascents of unnamed peaks.

    If you are into maps and the outdoors this is a great armchair explorer book even for those who never plan to set foot on any part of the route.

    This is a good page showing the scenery and describing the route, and apparently there is an extension of the route on the south end now by a couple of other trail imagineers:

    https://www.thehikinglife.com/2018/03/a-quick-dirty-guide-to-the-sierra-high-route/

    If I remember correctly, Roper himself never traveled his own route in one piece. He took time off to go and explore and test candidate sections of the route, but after he had it all pieced together he never went back.

    Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_High_Route

    Roper first person account of developing the route, at Archive.org:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20100507103222/http://www.gorp.com/parks-guide/travel-ta-inyo-national-forest-yosemite-bishop-sierra-nevada-mountains-sidwcmdev_054016.html

    Ah, here he talks about how he went about it:


    Over two summers I explored my Sierra High Route, gathering notes for a guidebook and wearing out boots and partners in my quest for the ideal passage. Certain notches that appeared feasible on the map seemed, in situ, too sheer and loose for most backpackers. And since the High Route was never intended as a technical climbing route — no ropes are needed — I devised alternate ways. I had lots of fun — and lots of trouble explaining to my friends that the project constituted a "real job."

    Finally, I was finished. The High Route stretched 195 miles from Kings Canyon National Park to just beyond the northern edge of Yosemite National Park. In between the two parks the route wandered through several National Forest Wilderness Areas, including two that bear the names of Sierra notables: John Muir and Ansel Adams. Most of the route traversed that resplendent belt between 9,500 and 11,000 feet, and it was trailless for some 100 miles.
     
    Man, he had a near first-explorer experience:

    When I scouted the region north of the Ritter Range, I was guessing about where to go. I knew a Sierra Club party had been in the vicinity in 1907, but their published account was tantalizingly vague. So too was a brief description in a 1934 guidebook that ended with the phrase, "This is a fairly rough but short and spectacular route for knapsackers."

    Short it wasn't. Rough and spectacular it was. I can still see Kathy wading the North Fork, waist deep, a look of intense concern on her face as she contemplated the frothing gorge below. I can easily take myself back to that alpine meadow in Bench Canyon, where perhaps a million wildflowers, of ten species, covered acres of slope.
     
    No problem if you get lost and take a different route (as long as it doesn't exceed your technical ability):

    One feature of the High Route that I especially like is that hikers can travel wherever they wish, bypassing entire sections or turning lakes on their"wrong" sides. It would be so easy to forget an elemental truth: The High Route is not a trail. It is simply a recommendation about how and where to travel the length of the Sierra at timberline, in summertime.
     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Colin Wright

  47. OT: Someone came up with a slogan for Kamala Harris. Remember Hillary’s slogan, I’m with Her? Kamala’s is “I’m with Ho.”

    That sums it up nicely.

  48. “A study” shows that readers of the New York Times exhibit the same sorts of debilitating mental issues as people with lead poisoning.

  49. OT: Stop whining and urge your national leaders for WAY more immigration; don’t you want to stay on top?

    The Case for Adding 672 Million More Americans

    When America faced down Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, we were the big dog. We had more people, more wealth, and more industrial capacity. (Back in 1938, the gross domestic product of the U.S. alone was larger than that of Germany, Japan, and Italy combined.) But against China, we are the little dog: There are more than 1 billion of them to about 330 million of us. Chinese people don’t need to become as rich as Americans for China’s overall economy to outweigh ours. If they managed to become about half as rich as we are on a per person basis, like the Bahamas or Spain, then their economy would be far larger than ours in the aggregate. To become one-third as rich as we are, like Portugal or Greece, would be enough to pull even. To stay on top, we probably need to grow the country threefold — to one billion Americans.

    (Excerpted from One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger, by Matthew Yglesias)

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon7

    Great. Brilliant strategy for dealing with China coming from the left since the early 1990s...

    Instead of taking them on when they are much poorer, behind technologically, and militarily weaker, let's help them grow their economy at our expense for 40-50 years. Then--when they have space dominance, hypersonic nuclear weapons, superior cyber-warfare, and a larger economy heavily weighted with expendable young single men--then, let's triple our population so we have lots of cannon fodder.

  50. @Ripple Earthdevil
    OT: Another noose of doom

    Red rope with a noose hanged from tree at home of Black family in Southern California

    Someone left a red rope with a noose knot at the end hanging from a tree outside the home of a Black family in Diamond Bar, and the woman who has lived there more than a quarter-century said Sunday the act was being investigated as a hate crime.

    “I’m taking it as a personal threat to me and my family,” Lillian Rucker, who owns the home, said by telephone Sunday.

    “I’ve been here 26 years. I am not moving. To me that was like a threat of, ‘You shouldn’t be here, and you need to leave.’ I’m not going anywhere,” she said.

    “I have two African American sons and three grandsons, and in today’s climate, you have to take everything seriously,” she said.

    Saturday, one of her sons noticed the rope with the noose at the front of the family home on Silver Cloud Drive, and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies from the department’s Walnut Station were called to the home about 11:30 a.m.

    Rucker said the deputies took the rope with them as evidence. She said the report she received from them said the matter would be investigated as a hate crime.

    Deputy Juanita Suarez-Navarro confirmed the incident was under investigation.

    “I want the community to know that this stuff is happening,” said Rucker. There have been no such incidents before during her time living in Diamond Bar, she said.

    “We live in a nice neighborhood, nice community, nice people. It doesn’t mean that this kind of stuff can’t touch us, which is unfortunate … If this can happen to me, it can happen to you. There’s not that many African Americans living in Diamond Bar, but there are a few.”

    https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2020/08/31/red-rope-with-a-noose-hanged-from-tree-at-home-of-black-family-in-diamond-bar/

    Replies: @Alden, @Mr McKenna, @Colin Wright

    Diamond Bar has a lot of Indian immigrants. 99.9 % chance the Rucker’s hung the rope themselves. Used to be 2 sticks nailed in a cross shape the blacks would plant in their yards. Now it’s rope and string.

    Remember the college campus that was locked down in hysteria because a catholic chaplain was walking across campus in his white robe. Another campus was locked down because a neurotic hysteric saw some white lab coats hanging on a rack.

    Now that UCLA’s open again, maybe I’ll
    put on my white coat and walk around. See the reaction. Most UCLA women wear black T shirts and black leggings so I’ll stand out in white.

  51. @Benny Golden
    Man its going to be funny when you guys start crying and fuming about the terrorist Kyle Rittenhouse being sentenced to jail for life

    Replies: @Alden, @Lurker, @guest

    It’s going to be funny when a couple of your beloved blacks put you in a wheel chair for the rest of your life.

  52. @anon
    OT:

    The violence level of the ol knock out game sure has escalated these days: link

    tldw: a male POC slams a brick into the back of a white man's head as he was walking down the street minding his own business.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Serves him right, he relaxed.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @J.Ross

    Plus he was silent at the time, and we all know how silence is weaponized by white people in the Current Year.

    Plus he wasn't on his knees--what's up with that? Oh well, fixed.

  53. Using a borrowed phone, NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof tweets from the top of Mt. Whitney…

    How soon till Ta-Nehisi or Ibram X tweets from the top of Britton Hill?

  54. OT
    Petition to replace some cracker with with Chad Boseman.

    https://www.thewrap.com/chadwick-boseman-memorial-replace-anderson-south-carolina-confederate-statue-petition/

    Nothing symbolic here, just a simple request.

  55. @NJ Transit Commuter
    It’s been fascinating to watch the Establishment circle the wagons and trot out a new argument since riots started chipping away at Biden’s lead in the polls.

    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case. I think it’s more a matter of the Echo Chamber effect. Establishment media people and politicians read an article or blog and simply repeat what they have read.

    Of course, this argument is simply a variation of “blame the victim.” Trump won’t do what his political opponents want, so if they violently react, its his fault. When the Establishment still had a shred of credibility, it abhorred this line of reasoning, a great example being violence against women, hence the popularity of “slut walks,” etc. a few years ago. (remember them?). But now that Trump has to be beaten at the election, its no holds barred.

    Getting the genie back in the bottle isn’t going to be as easy as these people imagine, I fear. I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    Replies: @Anon, @Moral Stone, @martin_2, @Harry Baldwin, @Pop Warner

    I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    After eight years of Obama and looking forward to eight years of Hillary, the left figured it had triumphed once and for all. Policies would be set in place that would crush all future political opposition. Legalize millions more illegal aliens and get them on the voter rolls, and get a few reliable left wingers on the SCOTUS to ban guns and prohibit “hate” speech. Use lawfare to harass conservative organizations. Apply the rules of a typical college campus to America in toto. Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.

    Then Trump came along and upset the apple cart. Hence the insane rage.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin


    Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.
     
    You sure he meant after?


    https://thumbs-prod.si-cdn.com/RJG7wMcW4oo_XkIzt3N1y_ei2dw=/800x600/filters:no_upscale()/https://public-media.si-cdn.com/filer/19/30/19309dcd-aed9-42e9-bbde-2ec4f15a2f3d/berlin-_the_capture_and_aftermath_of_war_1945-1947_c5284.jpg
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin


    Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.
     
    That was this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Tushnet

    Replies: @Anon, @William Badwhite

    , @res
    @Harry Baldwin

    Thanks. Here is that blog post from Mark Tushnet.
    https://balkin.blogspot.com/2016/05/abandoning-defensive-crouch-liberal.html

    The relevant section.


    2 The culture wars are over; they lost, we won. Remember, they were the ones who characterized constitutional disputes as culture wars (see Justice Scalia in Romer v. Evans, and the Wikipedia entry for culture wars, which describes conservative activists, not liberals, using the term.) And they had opportunities to reach a cease fire, but rejected them in favor of a scorched earth policy. The earth that was scorched, though, was their own. (No conservatives demonstrated any interest in trading off recognition of LGBT rights for “religious liberty” protections. Only now that they’ve lost the battle over LGBT rights, have they made those protections central – seeing them, I suppose, as a new front in the culture wars. But, again, they’ve already lost the war.). For liberals, the question now is how to deal with the losers in the culture wars. That’s mostly a question of tactics. My own judgment is that taking a hard line (“You lost, live with it”) is better than trying to accommodate the losers, who – remember – defended, and are defending, positions that liberals regard as having no normative pull at all. Trying to be nice to the losers didn’t work well after the Civil War, nor after Brown. (And taking a hard line seemed to work reasonably well in Germany and Japan after 1945.) I should note that LGBT activists in particular seem to have settled on the hard-line approach, while some liberal academics defend more accommodating approaches. When specific battles in the culture wars were being fought, it might have made sense to try to be accommodating after a local victory, because other related fights were going on, and a hard line might have stiffened the opposition in those fights. But the war’s over, and we won.
     
    The post as a whole seems like a good guide to some of the strategies they have in mind. Worth reading.

    Replies: @bomag

  56. @Dan Hayes
    @syonredux

    A couple of things:
    This church is the "in" homosexual RC church in NYC. The associated high school was a military academy (!) when Antonin Scalia was a student. In the interim the church and school and their Jesuit overseers have come a long, long way!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    This church is the “in” homosexual RC church in NYC.

    The equivalent in Minneapolis is St Joan of Arc. The real Joan would have them burnt at the stake. She couldn’t even tolerate Hus:

    Joan of Arc’s Letter to the Hussites (March 23, 1430)

    …but if I don’t find out that you have reformed yourselves I might leave the English behind and go against you, so that by the sword – if I can’t do it any other way – I will eliminate your false and vile superstition and relieve you of either your heresy or your life.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Reg Cæsar

    Now I can finally appreciate why Mark Twain was so enthralled by Joan of Arc!

    , @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.

    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections. It would be good for you.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @HA, @Tex

    , @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    A LONG time ago I took a girl I was interested in to Mass at St. Joan’s... you don’t have to be the amazing Kreskin to figure out why... Was that a mortal or a venial sin?

    Didn’t work, by the way.

  57. @J.Ross
    Forbes: Sports fans watch sports because they want to see sports, not as a reward for ideological purity on the part of the players.

    The NFL might think it best to target the coveted 18-49 demo, thinking younger fans watch for different reasons. That would be wrong. Among fans in this demo whose favorite sport is the NFL, 71% do not care about the politics of any individual athlete, edging out the 50+ set (69%). Fans whose favorite sport is the NHL (80%), NASCAR (76%) and MLB (74%) are uniformly disinterested in the politics of athletes. Even among those whose first love is the NBA, the large majority (59%) of the 18-49 demo has no interest in player politics.
     
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/kirkwakefield/2020/08/28/escape-from-2020--a-case-to-separate-sports-and-politics-for-more-fans-and-higher-ratings/#3e16a8776ada

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    are uniformly disinterested in the politics of athletes

    It appears that the battle to preserve the meaning of “disinterested” has been lost. This sentence would actually have read better with “uniformly uninterested.”

  58. @Moral Stone
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse. Certainly some of it is the copy/paste of a lazy echo chamber. Some is likely due to people with very similar ideologies and taboos organically alighting on the few permissible and potentially effective rebuttals. And finally, one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging. This always struck me as conspiracy talk but mailing lists for that purpose have existed before, and might still. Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.

    Replies: @anon, @Harry Baldwin, @peterike

    one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging.

    On the talk shows, they’ll often string together clips from all the networks in which everyone uses exactly the same phrasing. After the first night of the Republican convention, everyone in the MSM described it as “dark and divisive.” Can this really be anything but concerted action?

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Harry Baldwin

    It's concerted--sure. But mainly it's a matter of the fact that they are generally parrots. If they were capable of original, independent thought that would entail a re-evaluation of their entire worldviews. To which a horrible death is surely preferable.

    When you are published in a 'noteworthy' journal one of the first surprises is how many reporters and editors for other 'noteworthy' journals will call you up and fish for ideas for their own stories.

  59. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dan Hayes


    This church is the “in” homosexual RC church in NYC.
     
    The equivalent in Minneapolis is St Joan of Arc. The real Joan would have them burnt at the stake. She couldn't even tolerate Hus:


    Joan of Arc's Letter to the Hussites (March 23, 1430)

    ...but if I don't find out that you have reformed yourselves I might leave the English behind and go against you, so that by the sword - if I can't do it any other way - I will eliminate your false and vile superstition and relieve you of either your heresy or your life.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @anon, @Ganderson

    Now I can finally appreciate why Mark Twain was so enthralled by Joan of Arc!

  60. @Harry Baldwin
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    After eight years of Obama and looking forward to eight years of Hillary, the left figured it had triumphed once and for all. Policies would be set in place that would crush all future political opposition. Legalize millions more illegal aliens and get them on the voter rolls, and get a few reliable left wingers on the SCOTUS to ban guns and prohibit "hate" speech. Use lawfare to harass conservative organizations. Apply the rules of a typical college campus to America in toto. Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.

    Then Trump came along and upset the apple cart. Hence the insane rage.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon, @res

    Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.

    You sure he meant after?

    • LOL: bomag
  61. @Benny Golden
    Man its going to be funny when you guys start crying and fuming about the terrorist Kyle Rittenhouse being sentenced to jail for life

    Replies: @Alden, @Lurker, @guest

    • Thanks: Clyde, Dan Hayes
  62. @Ripple Earthdevil
    OT: Another noose of doom

    Red rope with a noose hanged from tree at home of Black family in Southern California

    Someone left a red rope with a noose knot at the end hanging from a tree outside the home of a Black family in Diamond Bar, and the woman who has lived there more than a quarter-century said Sunday the act was being investigated as a hate crime.

    “I’m taking it as a personal threat to me and my family,” Lillian Rucker, who owns the home, said by telephone Sunday.

    “I’ve been here 26 years. I am not moving. To me that was like a threat of, ‘You shouldn’t be here, and you need to leave.’ I’m not going anywhere,” she said.

    “I have two African American sons and three grandsons, and in today’s climate, you have to take everything seriously,” she said.

    Saturday, one of her sons noticed the rope with the noose at the front of the family home on Silver Cloud Drive, and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies from the department’s Walnut Station were called to the home about 11:30 a.m.

    Rucker said the deputies took the rope with them as evidence. She said the report she received from them said the matter would be investigated as a hate crime.

    Deputy Juanita Suarez-Navarro confirmed the incident was under investigation.

    “I want the community to know that this stuff is happening,” said Rucker. There have been no such incidents before during her time living in Diamond Bar, she said.

    “We live in a nice neighborhood, nice community, nice people. It doesn’t mean that this kind of stuff can’t touch us, which is unfortunate … If this can happen to me, it can happen to you. There’s not that many African Americans living in Diamond Bar, but there are a few.”

    https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2020/08/31/red-rope-with-a-noose-hanged-from-tree-at-home-of-black-family-in-diamond-bar/

    Replies: @Alden, @Mr McKenna, @Colin Wright

    “If this can happen to me, it can happen to you.”

    What, a hoax? Sure, I guess it can. But it won’t be my own doing, and that’s yet another thing which separates us in a very fundamental way.

    It’s a source of some fascination that each and every hoaxer thinks 1) they’re so clever, 2) they’ll never get caught and 3) they’re the first person ever to try it, despite the thousands which have preceded them.

    Of course, the MSM are largely responsible for #3, since they’re careful to memory-hole the few instances when they’re forced to admit the facts.

  63. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dan Hayes


    This church is the “in” homosexual RC church in NYC.
     
    The equivalent in Minneapolis is St Joan of Arc. The real Joan would have them burnt at the stake. She couldn't even tolerate Hus:


    Joan of Arc's Letter to the Hussites (March 23, 1430)

    ...but if I don't find out that you have reformed yourselves I might leave the English behind and go against you, so that by the sword - if I can't do it any other way - I will eliminate your false and vile superstition and relieve you of either your heresy or your life.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @anon, @Ganderson

    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.

    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections. It would be good for you.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @anon


    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.
     
    That's much more believable than her taking on the English. But few deny that.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @anon

    Next you'll be telling us that that illiterate peasant over in Arabia didn't compose the book people have been quoting for thirteen centuries. That it was dictated by God, instead.

    Illiterates can sure stir up a lot of trouble.

    , @HA
    @anon

    "Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words"

    Being almost illiterate (apart from eventually learning to sign her name), Joan of Arc relied on her trusted scribes Father Pasquerel or her page to actually write her letters. While it's true that the letter to the Hussites is of a different style than the rest, so that according to some, was probably written by Pasquerel himself after obtaining her permission (the signature on the letter was actually his, not Joan's), the same cannot be said of the others that are attributed to her which actually do bear her signature (from which it can be determined that she was left-handed). One of them was addressed to the Duke of Burgundy and stipulates that "if it should please you to make war, then go against the Saracens". To the extent that she was -- by way of her more learned contacts -- aware of the Crusades, there's no reason to assume her incapable of having likewise been made aware of Hus's rebellion, enough to grant permission to Pasquerel. It wouldn't be the first time a commander relied on a speechwriter to pen a document that was subsequently attributed to the former. Ask any number of our (slightly more literate) presidents about that.

    https://www.jeanne-darc.info/biography/letters/

    Replies: @Anon, @Dan Hayes

    , @Tex
    @anon


    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections.
     
    Yeah, you know how it is. The Unz comment section always ends up arguing about the Hussites.
  64. @J.Ross
    @anon

    Serves him right, he relaxed.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    Plus he was silent at the time, and we all know how silence is weaponized by white people in the Current Year.

    Plus he wasn’t on his knees–what’s up with that? Oh well, fixed.

  65. @Harry Baldwin
    @Moral Stone

    one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging.

    On the talk shows, they'll often string together clips from all the networks in which everyone uses exactly the same phrasing. After the first night of the Republican convention, everyone in the MSM described it as "dark and divisive." Can this really be anything but concerted action?

    Replies: @Mr McKenna

    It’s concerted–sure. But mainly it’s a matter of the fact that they are generally parrots. If they were capable of original, independent thought that would entail a re-evaluation of their entire worldviews. To which a horrible death is surely preferable.

    When you are published in a ‘noteworthy’ journal one of the first surprises is how many reporters and editors for other ‘noteworthy’ journals will call you up and fish for ideas for their own stories.

  66. @anon

    "A study found..."
     
    As soon as I hear those words from a political partisan I close my ears.
    My answer is, "I dismiss your study out-of-hand and won't believe it unless I first hear the leading rebuttal to it. If the rebuttal makes your study sound interesting I will back track and read the study itself."

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Aardvark, @Desiderius

    “A study found…”

    Liberals treat the term “studies find that….” as if it is conclusive refutation of whatever you may happen to think. As if studies are all created equal. Or rather, as if the studies that reach conclusions they agree with must be right and all others wrong. Studies? Which studies? Whose studies? How were they conducted? You can’t evaluate the conclusions of a study without knowing something about how it was done. They may as well say “Teacher said that……”. It’s really rather childish.

  67. @J.Ross
    He's just a sloppy liar whose opinion doesn't matter, unless he's advisimg you on a good cathouse. Meamwhile PJ Media is claiming that insurance companies are refusing to cover the costs of the peaceful protesters and Minneapolis will not be rebuilt.
    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/jim-treacher/2020/08/31/riot-ravaged-minneapolis-businesses-cant-rebuild-because-the-insurance-wont-cover-it-n867003

    Replies: @Alden, @HA

    “Meamwhile PJ Media is claiming that insurance companies are refusing to cover the costs of the peaceful protesters”

    In the NYT and WaPo versions, the headline will be “The Return of Redlining.”

  68. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.

    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections. It would be good for you.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @HA, @Tex

    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.

    That’s much more believable than her taking on the English. But few deny that.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Replies: @Charon, @Clyde, @Clyde, @bomag, @Reg Cæsar, @iDeplorable

  69. @Harry Baldwin
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    After eight years of Obama and looking forward to eight years of Hillary, the left figured it had triumphed once and for all. Policies would be set in place that would crush all future political opposition. Legalize millions more illegal aliens and get them on the voter rolls, and get a few reliable left wingers on the SCOTUS to ban guns and prohibit "hate" speech. Use lawfare to harass conservative organizations. Apply the rules of a typical college campus to America in toto. Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.

    Then Trump came along and upset the apple cart. Hence the insane rage.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon, @res

    Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.

    That was this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Tushnet

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Mr. Anon

    Early life checks out

    , @William Badwhite
    @Mr. Anon


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Tushnet
     
    From the wiki: Tushnet is Jewish

    Well I never! Shocker...

    Their other daughter Eve is a celibate lesbian Roman Catholic author and blogger.

    A houseful of freaks.
  70. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.

    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections. It would be good for you.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @HA, @Tex

    Next you’ll be telling us that that illiterate peasant over in Arabia didn’t compose the book people have been quoting for thirteen centuries. That it was dictated by God, instead.

    Illiterates can sure stir up a lot of trouble.

  71. @Ripple Earthdevil
    OT: Another noose of doom

    Red rope with a noose hanged from tree at home of Black family in Southern California

    Someone left a red rope with a noose knot at the end hanging from a tree outside the home of a Black family in Diamond Bar, and the woman who has lived there more than a quarter-century said Sunday the act was being investigated as a hate crime.

    “I’m taking it as a personal threat to me and my family,” Lillian Rucker, who owns the home, said by telephone Sunday.

    “I’ve been here 26 years. I am not moving. To me that was like a threat of, ‘You shouldn’t be here, and you need to leave.’ I’m not going anywhere,” she said.

    “I have two African American sons and three grandsons, and in today’s climate, you have to take everything seriously,” she said.

    Saturday, one of her sons noticed the rope with the noose at the front of the family home on Silver Cloud Drive, and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies from the department’s Walnut Station were called to the home about 11:30 a.m.

    Rucker said the deputies took the rope with them as evidence. She said the report she received from them said the matter would be investigated as a hate crime.

    Deputy Juanita Suarez-Navarro confirmed the incident was under investigation.

    “I want the community to know that this stuff is happening,” said Rucker. There have been no such incidents before during her time living in Diamond Bar, she said.

    “We live in a nice neighborhood, nice community, nice people. It doesn’t mean that this kind of stuff can’t touch us, which is unfortunate … If this can happen to me, it can happen to you. There’s not that many African Americans living in Diamond Bar, but there are a few.”

    https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2020/08/31/red-rope-with-a-noose-hanged-from-tree-at-home-of-black-family-in-diamond-bar/

    Replies: @Alden, @Mr McKenna, @Colin Wright

    ‘… We live in a nice neighborhood, nice community, nice people…There’s not that many African Americans living in Diamond Bar…”’

    Redundant.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Colin Wright

    Colin, now that is funny.

  72. @Reg Cæsar
    @anon


    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.
     
    That's much more believable than her taking on the English. But few deny that.

    Replies: @anon

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    • Replies: @Charon
    @anon

    Apparently he drew some blood from you at some point, Mr "anonymous"

    , @Clyde
    @anon


    @Reg Cæsar
    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?
     
    Unz/Steve Sailer is a hobby for him. Keeps him out of trouble, keeps him from jaywalking through heavy traffic. Perhaps Reg is retired with lots of money. You too can aspire to this. Why are you wasting your presumably valuable time being petty and mean to good ol' Reg? A superior content provider here. For most here you are yet another silly anon who we do not know. Though I will admit we get some superior comments from some of the anons. I have no clue if you are sporadically one of them Mr. anon[374] dufus.
    , @Clyde
    @anon

    It seems you are anon 217 too as seen on this thread. Nitwit. So you are 217 and 374. Any others?

    , @bomag
    @anon


    ...a life outside of Unz comments
     
    Commenting on unz really, really bothers the evil doers of the world; it's one of the most productive things one can do!
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @anon


    Look at how much time you spend here
     
    Not that much time. Maybe an hour in the morning and evening. I developed a rapid-fire response method during rare free moments my hectic job, and now that I'm retired...

    There are a lot more comments by "anon" here, so you're obviously busier.

    Also, it's just too tempting to reply to those who claim Joan of Arc never existed. Perhaps you're an Illigist?


    Bizarre Phantom Time Hypothesis Theory Says It’s Actually The Year 1720 Because The Early Middle Ages Were Faked
    , @iDeplorable
    @anon


    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here,
     
    Reg is clocking in at almost 4,800 comments just in 2020. 600 per month. Almost 20/day. Most of them are off topic - here he is blathering on about Joan of Arc.

    However the other commenters don't seem to mind his keyboard diarrhea so all that can be done is add him to your Commenters to Ignore list. I'd suspect he and Corvinus are by far on the most versions of that list.
  73. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.

    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections. It would be good for you.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @HA, @Tex

    “Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words”

    Being almost illiterate (apart from eventually learning to sign her name), Joan of Arc relied on her trusted scribes Father Pasquerel or her page to actually write her letters. While it’s true that the letter to the Hussites is of a different style than the rest, so that according to some, was probably written by Pasquerel himself after obtaining her permission (the signature on the letter was actually his, not Joan’s), the same cannot be said of the others that are attributed to her which actually do bear her signature (from which it can be determined that she was left-handed). One of them was addressed to the Duke of Burgundy and stipulates that “if it should please you to make war, then go against the Saracens”. To the extent that she was — by way of her more learned contacts — aware of the Crusades, there’s no reason to assume her incapable of having likewise been made aware of Hus’s rebellion, enough to grant permission to Pasquerel. It wouldn’t be the first time a commander relied on a speechwriter to pen a document that was subsequently attributed to the former. Ask any number of our (slightly more literate) presidents about that.

    https://www.jeanne-darc.info/biography/letters/

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna, bomag
    • Replies: @Anon
    @HA

    Interesting. My Joan of Arc knowledge was limited to this song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQ3yC5Kjk3E

    These cheery singers came to my high school auditorium in the early 1970s and we bough their album.

    Replies: @HA

    , @Dan Hayes
    @HA

    Once again the UR proves to be a treasure trove of information (in this case St Joan's letters)! Thank you and Ron, this site's benevolent overseer.

  74. Anon[230] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    Sounds fun. Is it marked well enough from people getting into dead ends, pushing forward, and finding themselves stuck overnight?

    Replies: @Anon

    Sounds fun. Is it marked well enough from people getting into dead ends, pushing forward, and finding themselves stuck overnight?

    I wouldn’t recommend the Kindle version. The book is chock full of detailed maps and black and white photos. Roper is a talented writer, like many mountaineers. He wrote an interesting memoir, Camp 4, about the early days of Yosemite big wall climbing. Camp 4 is the bring-your-own-tent camp between Yosemite Lodge and the trail head for the Yosemite Falls trail in the Valley. Sierra High Route has a lengthy Chapter 1 that relates the mountaineering/exploring history of the Sierras from first “discovery” by whites. The Sierra Club used to organize 100-horse assaults into Kings Canyon to bring members into the wilderness in style. Roper talks about a handful of eccentric climbers who spent their lives traveling all over the Sierras grabbing first ascents of unnamed peaks.

    If you are into maps and the outdoors this is a great armchair explorer book even for those who never plan to set foot on any part of the route.

    This is a good page showing the scenery and describing the route, and apparently there is an extension of the route on the south end now by a couple of other trail imagineers:

    https://www.thehikinglife.com/2018/03/a-quick-dirty-guide-to-the-sierra-high-route/

    If I remember correctly, Roper himself never traveled his own route in one piece. He took time off to go and explore and test candidate sections of the route, but after he had it all pieced together he never went back.

    Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_High_Route

    Roper first person account of developing the route, at Archive.org:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20100507103222/http://www.gorp.com/parks-guide/travel-ta-inyo-national-forest-yosemite-bishop-sierra-nevada-mountains-sidwcmdev_054016.html

    Ah, here he talks about how he went about it:

    [MORE]

    Over two summers I explored my Sierra High Route, gathering notes for a guidebook and wearing out boots and partners in my quest for the ideal passage. Certain notches that appeared feasible on the map seemed, in situ, too sheer and loose for most backpackers. And since the High Route was never intended as a technical climbing route — no ropes are needed — I devised alternate ways. I had lots of fun — and lots of trouble explaining to my friends that the project constituted a “real job.”

    Finally, I was finished. The High Route stretched 195 miles from Kings Canyon National Park to just beyond the northern edge of Yosemite National Park. In between the two parks the route wandered through several National Forest Wilderness Areas, including two that bear the names of Sierra notables: John Muir and Ansel Adams. Most of the route traversed that resplendent belt between 9,500 and 11,000 feet, and it was trailless for some 100 miles.

    Man, he had a near first-explorer experience:

    When I scouted the region north of the Ritter Range, I was guessing about where to go. I knew a Sierra Club party had been in the vicinity in 1907, but their published account was tantalizingly vague. So too was a brief description in a 1934 guidebook that ended with the phrase, “This is a fairly rough but short and spectacular route for knapsackers.”

    Short it wasn’t. Rough and spectacular it was. I can still see Kathy wading the North Fork, waist deep, a look of intense concern on her face as she contemplated the frothing gorge below. I can easily take myself back to that alpine meadow in Bench Canyon, where perhaps a million wildflowers, of ten species, covered acres of slope.

    No problem if you get lost and take a different route (as long as it doesn’t exceed your technical ability):

    One feature of the High Route that I especially like is that hikers can travel wherever they wish, bypassing entire sections or turning lakes on their”wrong” sides. It would be so easy to forget an elemental truth: The High Route is not a trail. It is simply a recommendation about how and where to travel the length of the Sierra at timberline, in summertime.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Anon

    Fascinating. And if the excerpts you provided are any indication, a good writer indeed.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Anon

    'If I remember correctly, Roper himself never traveled his own route in one piece. He took time off to go and explore and test candidate sections of the route, but after he had it all pieced together he never went back.'

    I can relate. When I've gone backpacking, after about day five there's exactly one thing in life I want.

    A good, hot shower.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  75. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Replies: @Charon, @Clyde, @Clyde, @bomag, @Reg Cæsar, @iDeplorable

    Apparently he drew some blood from you at some point, Mr “anonymous”

  76. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Sounds fun. Is it marked well enough from people getting into dead ends, pushing forward, and finding themselves stuck overnight?
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Sierra-High-Route-Traversing-Timberline/dp/0898865069/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=steve+roper&qid=1598938922&sr=8-1

    I wouldn't recommend the Kindle version. The book is chock full of detailed maps and black and white photos. Roper is a talented writer, like many mountaineers. He wrote an interesting memoir, Camp 4, about the early days of Yosemite big wall climbing. Camp 4 is the bring-your-own-tent camp between Yosemite Lodge and the trail head for the Yosemite Falls trail in the Valley. Sierra High Route has a lengthy Chapter 1 that relates the mountaineering/exploring history of the Sierras from first "discovery" by whites. The Sierra Club used to organize 100-horse assaults into Kings Canyon to bring members into the wilderness in style. Roper talks about a handful of eccentric climbers who spent their lives traveling all over the Sierras grabbing first ascents of unnamed peaks.

    If you are into maps and the outdoors this is a great armchair explorer book even for those who never plan to set foot on any part of the route.

    This is a good page showing the scenery and describing the route, and apparently there is an extension of the route on the south end now by a couple of other trail imagineers:

    https://www.thehikinglife.com/2018/03/a-quick-dirty-guide-to-the-sierra-high-route/

    If I remember correctly, Roper himself never traveled his own route in one piece. He took time off to go and explore and test candidate sections of the route, but after he had it all pieced together he never went back.

    Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_High_Route

    Roper first person account of developing the route, at Archive.org:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20100507103222/http://www.gorp.com/parks-guide/travel-ta-inyo-national-forest-yosemite-bishop-sierra-nevada-mountains-sidwcmdev_054016.html

    Ah, here he talks about how he went about it:


    Over two summers I explored my Sierra High Route, gathering notes for a guidebook and wearing out boots and partners in my quest for the ideal passage. Certain notches that appeared feasible on the map seemed, in situ, too sheer and loose for most backpackers. And since the High Route was never intended as a technical climbing route — no ropes are needed — I devised alternate ways. I had lots of fun — and lots of trouble explaining to my friends that the project constituted a "real job."

    Finally, I was finished. The High Route stretched 195 miles from Kings Canyon National Park to just beyond the northern edge of Yosemite National Park. In between the two parks the route wandered through several National Forest Wilderness Areas, including two that bear the names of Sierra notables: John Muir and Ansel Adams. Most of the route traversed that resplendent belt between 9,500 and 11,000 feet, and it was trailless for some 100 miles.
     
    Man, he had a near first-explorer experience:

    When I scouted the region north of the Ritter Range, I was guessing about where to go. I knew a Sierra Club party had been in the vicinity in 1907, but their published account was tantalizingly vague. So too was a brief description in a 1934 guidebook that ended with the phrase, "This is a fairly rough but short and spectacular route for knapsackers."

    Short it wasn't. Rough and spectacular it was. I can still see Kathy wading the North Fork, waist deep, a look of intense concern on her face as she contemplated the frothing gorge below. I can easily take myself back to that alpine meadow in Bench Canyon, where perhaps a million wildflowers, of ten species, covered acres of slope.
     
    No problem if you get lost and take a different route (as long as it doesn't exceed your technical ability):

    One feature of the High Route that I especially like is that hikers can travel wherever they wish, bypassing entire sections or turning lakes on their"wrong" sides. It would be so easy to forget an elemental truth: The High Route is not a trail. It is simply a recommendation about how and where to travel the length of the Sierra at timberline, in summertime.
     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Colin Wright

    Fascinating. And if the excerpts you provided are any indication, a good writer indeed.

  77. By the way, has anything happened after “the first five months of this year” since I left on Memorial Day?

    Yeah, while you were diddling yourself in the High Sierra, Apple announced macOS 11 Big Sur. Time to upgrade your OS.

  78. @Buffalo Joe
    @syonredux

    White privilege is unfair says a priest who lives on the largess of White parishioners and who doles out money to the poor donated by those same parishioners. This man saddens me.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    If there really were white privilege, with whites able to ignore public laws and obey only private laws (literally, privilege), you’d probably agree that that was unfair. I would.

    Does it exist?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @TomSchmidt


    If there really were privilege, with Blacks able to ignore public laws and obey only private laws (literally, privilege), you’d probably agree that that was unfair. I would.
     
    FIFY
    , @Ben tillman
    @TomSchmidt

    Nice etymology lesson!

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

  79. @Benny Golden
    Man its going to be funny when you guys start crying and fuming about the terrorist Kyle Rittenhouse being sentenced to jail for life

    Replies: @Alden, @Lurker, @guest

    Terrorists kill innocent people, my dude.

  80. @Anon
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Well, I must say I was pleased to see the DOJ and FBI finally take action against conspirators crossing state lines to riot, commit arson, attack federal officers and federal courthouses, commit racial intimidation, threaten to murder and commit genocide against a majority racial group, etc.

    DOJ/FBI SWAT teams have been rolling them up in major raids accompanied by air cover and gunboats:



    https://static.westernjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Stone-raid.jpg
    https://thefederalistpapers.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Roger-Stone-Raid.jpg
    https://www.teaparty.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Guns-at-the-Door-Roger-Stone-600x358-1.jpg

     

    Oh, sorry, my bad. This raid was actually to apprehend a senior citizen with no criminal history who mischaracterized a joke about kidnapping a friend’s dog because the friend was not feeding him enough. Anyway, so glad they safely rolled up this joke mischaracterizing monster!

    DOJ/FBI is the new Cheka.

    Replies: @Gianni in Guernsey

    Carlos personcia purloined jokes from other comics perhaps you should raid him . Hey hey this annoy,ous tip has been brought to you by Kristy the klown.

  81. You have to experience Kristof in person – his irritating, prissy sounding voice and goody-two-shoes demeanor — to really appreciate what a smarmy, self-promoting, snake oil salesman he is. Some years ago I sat through a slide show he gave at a university in Ohio, the content, as I vaguely remember, the tear-jerking details of one of his many sojourns through a third world hell hole. All in all, however, the talk was all about Kristof. He is a master of what now is called “virtue signaling” – following the proper grievance mongering protocols, publically voicing your deep concern for the oppressed, the point being that everyone needs to know that goodness beats in your heart — and a university audience was the perfect venue for him to hit all of the right notes to demonstrate his compassion for the right kinds of people, who are, of course, victimized by the worst sorts of people, and, we all know who those people are.

    http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/2016/12/nicholas-kristof-away-with-hitler.html

    • Thanks: Clyde
  82. Kristof is a testosterone deficient guy who talks and comes off, for the lack of a better word, like a big sissy, one of those, goody-goody, suck-up-to-administration nerds from tenth grade student council, is always painful to watch. He’s been a long-time Hillary court- suck-up. Nicky in 2016 was the “woman” interlocutor in a Woman in the World Summit to bring out the inner-Hillary, the very best we have come to expect from the only Presidential candidate of a major party to run for office while under a major Federal investigation.

    http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/2017/04/hillary-clinton-nicholas-kristiof.html

  83. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Replies: @Charon, @Clyde, @Clyde, @bomag, @Reg Cæsar, @iDeplorable


    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Unz/Steve Sailer is a hobby for him. Keeps him out of trouble, keeps him from jaywalking through heavy traffic. Perhaps Reg is retired with lots of money. You too can aspire to this. Why are you wasting your presumably valuable time being petty and mean to good ol’ Reg? A superior content provider here. For most here you are yet another silly anon who we do not know. Though I will admit we get some superior comments from some of the anons. I have no clue if you are sporadically one of them Mr. anon[374] dufus.

  84. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Replies: @Charon, @Clyde, @Clyde, @bomag, @Reg Cæsar, @iDeplorable

    It seems you are anon 217 too as seen on this thread. Nitwit. So you are 217 and 374. Any others?

  85. Maybe Kayleigh has some time to help the press figure some stuff out…

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Anonymous

    Ayanna Presley, poor woman, nobody ever asks to touch her wool...uh, ‘hair.’

  86. @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin


    Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.
     
    That was this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Tushnet

    Replies: @Anon, @William Badwhite

    Early life checks out

  87. @Moral Stone
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse. Certainly some of it is the copy/paste of a lazy echo chamber. Some is likely due to people with very similar ideologies and taboos organically alighting on the few permissible and potentially effective rebuttals. And finally, one can’t rule out actual efforts at coordinating messaging. This always struck me as conspiracy talk but mailing lists for that purpose have existed before, and might still. Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.

    Replies: @anon, @Harry Baldwin, @peterike

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse… Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.

    Same thing. Reporters get memos from the DNC and they all fire off the same talking points at the same time. It’s that simple and that coordinated.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @peterike

    Everybody on the right on Monday responded en masse to Biden's tweet about there'll be more violence is Trump is re-elected with a variant on the mafioso shakedown joke.

    Same thing.

    Replies: @Skylark Thibedeau

  88. @anon
    @Moral Stone

    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse.

    https://www.fort-russ.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/npc-group.png

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    By stomping on the face of any dissenters who question authority. The media conspiracy with the democrats is an extension of our education system, our youth has been indoctrinated since kindergarten by leftist teachers , leftists preachers etc…But even those who do not get indoctrinated and question the teachers quickly understand the consequences of questioning authority will be significant with long lasting repercussions on their future.

    Anyone in journalism school today must have seen how they fired Andrew Sullivan for questioning the narrative 25 years ago. The consequences of questioning the narrative will last your entire life. You will be fired for asking the wrong questions. You may even lose your job in 20 years for something you wrote in your high school newspaper years ago.

    • Agree: Clyde, JohnnyWalker123
  89. @TomSchmidt
    @Buffalo Joe

    If there really were white privilege, with whites able to ignore public laws and obey only private laws (literally, privilege), you'd probably agree that that was unfair. I would.

    Does it exist?

    Replies: @bomag, @Ben tillman

    If there really were privilege, with Blacks able to ignore public laws and obey only private laws (literally, privilege), you’d probably agree that that was unfair. I would.

    FIFY

  90. @inertial
    Steve, you are wrong. We know that Kristof returned from Mt. Whitney in June. He then spent the month of July in Portland, looking high and low for anarchists. He failed in his search and had to ask for help from his readers: "Help Me Find Trump's 'Anarchists' in Portland."

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    While Kristof was searching high and low for violent anarchists in Portland, he should have tried wearing a MAGA hat. They would have congregated around him and introduced themselves.

    • Agree: inertial
    • LOL: Muggles
  91. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Replies: @Charon, @Clyde, @Clyde, @bomag, @Reg Cæsar, @iDeplorable

    …a life outside of Unz comments

    Commenting on unz really, really bothers the evil doers of the world; it’s one of the most productive things one can do!

  92. @peterike
    @Moral Stone


    One of the most interesting politics/media questions is how do they coordinate their narratives en masse... Also the DNC routinely emails their minions in the MSM warnings about what they can and cannot say about political candidates.
     
    Same thing. Reporters get memos from the DNC and they all fire off the same talking points at the same time. It's that simple and that coordinated.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Everybody on the right on Monday responded en masse to Biden’s tweet about there’ll be more violence is Trump is re-elected with a variant on the mafioso shakedown joke.

    Same thing.

    • Replies: @Skylark Thibedeau
    @Steve Sailer

    It's not called the JournoList that doesn't exist

  93. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dan Hayes


    This church is the “in” homosexual RC church in NYC.
     
    The equivalent in Minneapolis is St Joan of Arc. The real Joan would have them burnt at the stake. She couldn't even tolerate Hus:


    Joan of Arc's Letter to the Hussites (March 23, 1430)

    ...but if I don't find out that you have reformed yourselves I might leave the English behind and go against you, so that by the sword - if I can't do it any other way - I will eliminate your false and vile superstition and relieve you of either your heresy or your life.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @anon, @Ganderson

    A LONG time ago I took a girl I was interested in to Mass at St. Joan’s… you don’t have to be the amazing Kreskin to figure out why… Was that a mortal or a venial sin?

    Didn’t work, by the way.

  94. @Anon7
    OT: Stop whining and urge your national leaders for WAY more immigration; don't you want to stay on top?

    The Case for Adding 672 Million More Americans

    When America faced down Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, we were the big dog. We had more people, more wealth, and more industrial capacity. (Back in 1938, the gross domestic product of the U.S. alone was larger than that of Germany, Japan, and Italy combined.) But against China, we are the little dog: There are more than 1 billion of them to about 330 million of us. Chinese people don’t need to become as rich as Americans for China’s overall economy to outweigh ours. If they managed to become about half as rich as we are on a per person basis, like the Bahamas or Spain, then their economy would be far larger than ours in the aggregate. To become one-third as rich as we are, like Portugal or Greece, would be enough to pull even. To stay on top, we probably need to grow the country threefold — to one billion Americans.

    (Excerpted from One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger, by Matthew Yglesias)
     

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Great. Brilliant strategy for dealing with China coming from the left since the early 1990s…

    Instead of taking them on when they are much poorer, behind technologically, and militarily weaker, let’s help them grow their economy at our expense for 40-50 years. Then–when they have space dominance, hypersonic nuclear weapons, superior cyber-warfare, and a larger economy heavily weighted with expendable young single men–then, let’s triple our population so we have lots of cannon fodder.

  95. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Replies: @Charon, @Clyde, @Clyde, @bomag, @Reg Cæsar, @iDeplorable

    Look at how much time you spend here

    Not that much time. Maybe an hour in the morning and evening. I developed a rapid-fire response method during rare free moments my hectic job, and now that I’m retired…

    There are a lot more comments by “anon” here, so you’re obviously busier.

    Also, it’s just too tempting to reply to those who claim Joan of Arc never existed. Perhaps you’re an Illigist?

    Bizarre Phantom Time Hypothesis Theory Says It’s Actually The Year 1720 Because The Early Middle Ages Were Faked

  96. @HA
    @anon

    "Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words"

    Being almost illiterate (apart from eventually learning to sign her name), Joan of Arc relied on her trusted scribes Father Pasquerel or her page to actually write her letters. While it's true that the letter to the Hussites is of a different style than the rest, so that according to some, was probably written by Pasquerel himself after obtaining her permission (the signature on the letter was actually his, not Joan's), the same cannot be said of the others that are attributed to her which actually do bear her signature (from which it can be determined that she was left-handed). One of them was addressed to the Duke of Burgundy and stipulates that "if it should please you to make war, then go against the Saracens". To the extent that she was -- by way of her more learned contacts -- aware of the Crusades, there's no reason to assume her incapable of having likewise been made aware of Hus's rebellion, enough to grant permission to Pasquerel. It wouldn't be the first time a commander relied on a speechwriter to pen a document that was subsequently attributed to the former. Ask any number of our (slightly more literate) presidents about that.

    https://www.jeanne-darc.info/biography/letters/

    Replies: @Anon, @Dan Hayes

    Interesting. My Joan of Arc knowledge was limited to this song:

    These cheery singers came to my high school auditorium in the early 1970s and we bough their album.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Anon

    "My Joan of Arc knowledge was limited to this song..."

    Fair enough. I'd ordinarily strongly advise against tossing in an "Up With People" song as a historical reference right after needling someone about "having a life" (not to mention reflecting on the stark unworldliness of an illiterate French farm lass), but in this case, it seems oddly appropriate, however much as it undercuts the earlier claim.

  97. @syonredux
    Michelle Malkin:

    A tipster sent me this revolting BLM prayer at St Xavier Catholic Church in NYC yesterday: “Do you affirm that white privilege is unfair...will you commit to helping transform our church culture” and worship daily at altar of “racial justice.” St. George Floyd replaces Jesus.
     
    https://twitter.com/michellemalkin/status/1300500336977739781

    Replies: @Kibernetika, @Buffalo Joe, @Dan Hayes, @Mike_from_SGV

    Organized religion in many or most cases has become just another leftist-captured institution.

  98. @anon

    "A study found..."
     
    As soon as I hear those words from a political partisan I close my ears.
    My answer is, "I dismiss your study out-of-hand and won't believe it unless I first hear the leading rebuttal to it. If the rebuttal makes your study sound interesting I will back track and read the study itself."

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Aardvark, @Desiderius

    I simply go by whether or not it was said by a lefty, then almost universally, the opposite of what they said is true, or they are projecting themselves on to some other party.
    In this case both were true.

  99. @Anonymous

    Using a borrowed phone, NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof tweets from the top of Mt. Whitney after completing backpacking the 2000 mile Pacific Crest Trail.
     
    Is he the first Jewish guy to hike the whole thing?

    https://www.jweekly.com/2007/06/22/getting-out-in-nature-can-expose-the-higher-power-of-hiking/

    "Some friends and relatives laughed at my forays into the forest, saying things like “a Jewish hike is from Macy’s to Nordstrom.” Or, as a former boss teased, “Jews don’t hike.”"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @anon, @kaganovitch, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Type 1 error. But really, the name Kristof (“bearing Christ”) should have tipped you off.

    Jamie Dimon, Mark Steyn I can understand. But really, Nicholas Kristof??

  100. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words or even had any idea what the situation in Bohemia was. Or where Bohemia is, for that matter.

    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections. It would be good for you.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar, @HA, @Tex

    Consider having a life outside of Unz comment sections.

    Yeah, you know how it is. The Unz comment section always ends up arguing about the Hussites.

    • LOL: Muggles
  101. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Kristof is Armenian-Polish on his father's side and standard American white on his mother's side.

    Replies: @anon

    So you’re saying his odiousness comes from his Armenian side?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @anon

    Yes.

  102. @Anonymous
    Maybe Kayleigh has some time to help the press figure some stuff out...

    https://youtu.be/jhnHtD_lB58

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Ayanna Presley, poor woman, nobody ever asks to touch her wool…uh, ‘hair.’

  103. @Steve Sailer
    Note for the record that this post is a joke: Nicholas Kristof isn't currently on top of Mt. Whitney and his Instagram post of his daughter is from 2016.

    He's a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.

    Sometimes I think it's funny to make up an admirable reason that would explain a really dumb take.

    The problem is that many people can't imagine somebody else doing that so they assume it must be true.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Mr McKenna, @Thirdtwin, @res, @Bernard

    Thanks for the clarification. I would not have figured it out except for noticing the little 216w in the Instagram image. Well, the final paragraph was a pretty good clue, but wouldn’t have been sure that was not just standard issue sarcasm.

  104. @Steve Sailer
    @peterike

    Everybody on the right on Monday responded en masse to Biden's tweet about there'll be more violence is Trump is re-elected with a variant on the mafioso shakedown joke.

    Same thing.

    Replies: @Skylark Thibedeau

    It’s not called the JournoList that doesn’t exist

  105. @Harry Baldwin
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    After eight years of Obama and looking forward to eight years of Hillary, the left figured it had triumphed once and for all. Policies would be set in place that would crush all future political opposition. Legalize millions more illegal aliens and get them on the voter rolls, and get a few reliable left wingers on the SCOTUS to ban guns and prohibit "hate" speech. Use lawfare to harass conservative organizations. Apply the rules of a typical college campus to America in toto. Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.

    Then Trump came along and upset the apple cart. Hence the insane rage.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon, @res

    Thanks. Here is that blog post from Mark Tushnet.
    https://balkin.blogspot.com/2016/05/abandoning-defensive-crouch-liberal.html

    The relevant section.

    2 The culture wars are over; they lost, we won. Remember, they were the ones who characterized constitutional disputes as culture wars (see Justice Scalia in Romer v. Evans, and the Wikipedia entry for culture wars, which describes conservative activists, not liberals, using the term.) And they had opportunities to reach a cease fire, but rejected them in favor of a scorched earth policy. The earth that was scorched, though, was their own. (No conservatives demonstrated any interest in trading off recognition of LGBT rights for “religious liberty” protections. Only now that they’ve lost the battle over LGBT rights, have they made those protections central – seeing them, I suppose, as a new front in the culture wars. But, again, they’ve already lost the war.). For liberals, the question now is how to deal with the losers in the culture wars. That’s mostly a question of tactics. My own judgment is that taking a hard line (“You lost, live with it”) is better than trying to accommodate the losers, who – remember – defended, and are defending, positions that liberals regard as having no normative pull at all. Trying to be nice to the losers didn’t work well after the Civil War, nor after Brown. (And taking a hard line seemed to work reasonably well in Germany and Japan after 1945.) I should note that LGBT activists in particular seem to have settled on the hard-line approach, while some liberal academics defend more accommodating approaches. When specific battles in the culture wars were being fought, it might have made sense to try to be accommodating after a local victory, because other related fights were going on, and a hard line might have stiffened the opposition in those fights. But the war’s over, and we won.

    The post as a whole seems like a good guide to some of the strategies they have in mind. Worth reading.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @res

    There was a kind of creepy remorselessness in that article: "all is a war; we must attain total victory"; while conservatives think in terms of negotiate and conciliate. Thus we get the left staking out ever more extreme positions so the compromising right concedes to an ever more leftward ratchet. Now our side has Mitt Romney marching in BLM protests while Dem cities are facilitating political violence. Astonishing.

  106. OT: The Democrat debate plans:

    Around September 25th, it will be announced that, because of his bold campaign activities, Biden has been exposed to COVID-19 and he will be in quarantine for six weeks, sadly missing all three debates.

    Alternatively, it will be announced that Biden contracted COVID-19. He will fight it bravely for six weeks and will recover fully just before the election, having missed the debates. He will be hailed as a heroic survivor of the disease.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Jim Don Bob


    Alternatively, it will be announced that Biden contracted COVID-19. He will fight it bravely for six weeks and will recover fully just before the election, having missed the debates. He will be hailed as a heroic survivor of the disease.
     
    Or, in another alternative scenario, one I believe more likely, he will struggle heroically with COVID-19 thru the election day and post election.

    But sometime after the election and before the Electoral College vote, he will tragically pass away. Big funeral, lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda, etc. "He died so we could have Justice!"

    Commala (Kamala, the Hindu spelling) will then be elected President. Mayor Pete will round out the ticket, thus pleasing all of the Woke voters.

    By the beginning of February 2021 newly appointed Attorney General "Beto" O'Rourke will begin mass roundups of suspected owners of "assault weapons" who didn't rush to turn them in.

    But the Good News is that many of our iSteve Unz commentators will be in for a reunion at those Alaska tundra re-education camps. We can make name tags for our commentator handles and continue to enjoy the banter. We will of course wonder what exactly happened to poor Mr. Sailer.

  107. @NJ Transit Commuter
    It’s been fascinating to watch the Establishment circle the wagons and trot out a new argument since riots started chipping away at Biden’s lead in the polls.

    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case. I think it’s more a matter of the Echo Chamber effect. Establishment media people and politicians read an article or blog and simply repeat what they have read.

    Of course, this argument is simply a variation of “blame the victim.” Trump won’t do what his political opponents want, so if they violently react, its his fault. When the Establishment still had a shred of credibility, it abhorred this line of reasoning, a great example being violence against women, hence the popularity of “slut walks,” etc. a few years ago. (remember them?). But now that Trump has to be beaten at the election, its no holds barred.

    Getting the genie back in the bottle isn’t going to be as easy as these people imagine, I fear. I still scratch my head and wonder why it was Trump that triggered this insanity.

    Replies: @Anon, @Moral Stone, @martin_2, @Harry Baldwin, @Pop Warner

    It’s tempting to think that the “Trump is the real cause of political violence” is a coordinated campaign. But, I don’t think that’s the case

    It’s tempting to think that because it’s happened before. The JournoList did exactly that, bringing hundreds of journalists together to coordinate their narratives until it was exposed and ostensibly shut down in 2010. Considering it was the brainchild of Ezra Klein I wouldn’t be at all surprised if something like it still existed, especially since journalism has purged far more dissent in the past 10 years

  108. @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin


    Assuming the election of Hillary, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard wrote that Republicans should be treated like the Germans and Japanese after WW II.
     
    That was this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Tushnet

    Replies: @Anon, @William Badwhite

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Tushnet

    From the wiki: Tushnet is Jewish

    Well I never! Shocker…

    Their other daughter Eve is a celibate lesbian Roman Catholic author and blogger.

    A houseful of freaks.

  109. @HA
    @anon

    "Lol, no illiterate peasant girl wrote those words"

    Being almost illiterate (apart from eventually learning to sign her name), Joan of Arc relied on her trusted scribes Father Pasquerel or her page to actually write her letters. While it's true that the letter to the Hussites is of a different style than the rest, so that according to some, was probably written by Pasquerel himself after obtaining her permission (the signature on the letter was actually his, not Joan's), the same cannot be said of the others that are attributed to her which actually do bear her signature (from which it can be determined that she was left-handed). One of them was addressed to the Duke of Burgundy and stipulates that "if it should please you to make war, then go against the Saracens". To the extent that she was -- by way of her more learned contacts -- aware of the Crusades, there's no reason to assume her incapable of having likewise been made aware of Hus's rebellion, enough to grant permission to Pasquerel. It wouldn't be the first time a commander relied on a speechwriter to pen a document that was subsequently attributed to the former. Ask any number of our (slightly more literate) presidents about that.

    https://www.jeanne-darc.info/biography/letters/

    Replies: @Anon, @Dan Hayes

    Once again the UR proves to be a treasure trove of information (in this case St Joan’s letters)! Thank you and Ron, this site’s benevolent overseer.

  110. @anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here, yet you claim to have a family including children and other duties. Is endless trolling on this site truly a fit vocation?

    Replies: @Charon, @Clyde, @Clyde, @bomag, @Reg Cæsar, @iDeplorable

    Seriously, you should consider having a life outside of Unz comments. Look at how much time you spend here,

    Reg is clocking in at almost 4,800 comments just in 2020. 600 per month. Almost 20/day. Most of them are off topic – here he is blathering on about Joan of Arc.

    However the other commenters don’t seem to mind his keyboard diarrhea so all that can be done is add him to your Commenters to Ignore list. I’d suspect he and Corvinus are by far on the most versions of that list.

    • Troll: Clyde
  111. @Anon
    @HA

    Interesting. My Joan of Arc knowledge was limited to this song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQ3yC5Kjk3E

    These cheery singers came to my high school auditorium in the early 1970s and we bough their album.

    Replies: @HA

    “My Joan of Arc knowledge was limited to this song…”

    Fair enough. I’d ordinarily strongly advise against tossing in an “Up With People” song as a historical reference right after needling someone about “having a life” (not to mention reflecting on the stark unworldliness of an illiterate French farm lass), but in this case, it seems oddly appropriate, however much as it undercuts the earlier claim.

  112. @Steve Sailer
    Note for the record that this post is a joke: Nicholas Kristof isn't currently on top of Mt. Whitney and his Instagram post of his daughter is from 2016.

    He's a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.

    Sometimes I think it's funny to make up an admirable reason that would explain a really dumb take.

    The problem is that many people can't imagine somebody else doing that so they assume it must be true.

    Replies: @Muggles, @Mr McKenna, @Thirdtwin, @res, @Bernard

    He’s a big backpacker and has hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail, although not in a single hike, but over the course of a number of years.

    Steve,
    How you would know this nugget of information is beyond my understanding. But that’s what makes you ISteve I suppose. Keep it up.

  113. @Jim Don Bob
    OT: The Democrat debate plans:

    Around September 25th, it will be announced that, because of his bold campaign activities, Biden has been exposed to COVID-19 and he will be in quarantine for six weeks, sadly missing all three debates.

    Alternatively, it will be announced that Biden contracted COVID-19. He will fight it bravely for six weeks and will recover fully just before the election, having missed the debates. He will be hailed as a heroic survivor of the disease.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Alternatively, it will be announced that Biden contracted COVID-19. He will fight it bravely for six weeks and will recover fully just before the election, having missed the debates. He will be hailed as a heroic survivor of the disease.

    Or, in another alternative scenario, one I believe more likely, he will struggle heroically with COVID-19 thru the election day and post election.

    But sometime after the election and before the Electoral College vote, he will tragically pass away. Big funeral, lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda, etc. “He died so we could have Justice!”

    Commala (Kamala, the Hindu spelling) will then be elected President. Mayor Pete will round out the ticket, thus pleasing all of the Woke voters.

    By the beginning of February 2021 newly appointed Attorney General “Beto” O’Rourke will begin mass roundups of suspected owners of “assault weapons” who didn’t rush to turn them in.

    But the Good News is that many of our iSteve Unz commentators will be in for a reunion at those Alaska tundra re-education camps. We can make name tags for our commentator handles and continue to enjoy the banter. We will of course wonder what exactly happened to poor Mr. Sailer.

  114. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Patrick in SC
    "A study found..."

    "According to experts..."

    Replies: @anonymous

    Patrick in SC says:
    September 1, 2020 at 12:57 am GMT ⇑
    “A study found…”

    “According to experts…”

    I respond:

    Yes, very true. Also, watch out for the lead in by the likes of super ugly NPR (back in the day) Ninna Tottenberg.

    “But critics say”….

    These unarmed “Critics” are always her same old, same old, PC Lib Leftist New York Jewish hate White people world view.

    So when some state voters vote to ban affirmative action and giving jobs, admissions to unqualified racial, sexual groups, Nina T and her kind will go:

    California voted to ban the use of race in determining college admissions, but critics say that this will infect increase racism, sexism and promote intolerance and hatred.

  115. What the hell are “the attacks” this lying lunatic is referring to?

  116. @TomSchmidt
    @Buffalo Joe

    If there really were white privilege, with whites able to ignore public laws and obey only private laws (literally, privilege), you'd probably agree that that was unfair. I would.

    Does it exist?

    Replies: @bomag, @Ben tillman

    Nice etymology lesson!

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Ben tillman

    It's a useful tool to make a contrast with people who do not have to obey public law. Like people who can resist arrest, attack a cop, go for his gun, get shot, and yet have a whole social movement arise to defend their actions. They literally are obeying some nonpublic law, and if they get away with it they prove access to a private law that you and I don't get.

  117. @Alden
    @J.Ross

    I knew this would happen. Excellent!!!!👍👌

    Let Minneapolis become Detroit or Camden.

    How to destroy a German Scandinavian Socialist paradise in 40 years.

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    Detroit or Gary or Camden but with Somalis!

  118. @Ben tillman
    @TomSchmidt

    Nice etymology lesson!

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    It’s a useful tool to make a contrast with people who do not have to obey public law. Like people who can resist arrest, attack a cop, go for his gun, get shot, and yet have a whole social movement arise to defend their actions. They literally are obeying some nonpublic law, and if they get away with it they prove access to a private law that you and I don’t get.

  119. D.C. committee recommends stripping the names of Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Francis Scott Key and others from city government buildings

    A committee reporting to D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser has recommended renaming dozens of public schools, parks and government buildings in the nation’s capital — including those named for seven U.S. presidents — after studying the historical namesakes’ connections to slavery and oppression.

    The report also recommends adding plaques or other efforts to “contextualize” some of the most famed federal locales in the city, including the Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial, both honoring presidents who owned enslaved people.

    Travis Timmerman, a Seton Hall University philosopher who has researched monument removals, said addressing the scores of places cited by the committee would put the District far beyond most U.S. cities, which have mostly focused on whether to remove public honorifics for Confederate icons.

    The committee said in its report that it considered whether the honorees owned enslaved people or supported the institution of slavery, whether they created laws and policies that disadvantaged women and minorities, whether they belonged to “any supremacist organization,” and whether they discriminated against marginalized groups in a way that would violate D.C. law.

    Along with public housing complexes, parks and playgrounds, the committee recommends renaming 21 public schools — from Eliot-Hine Middle School, named for former Harvard University president and advocate of racist ideas Charles William Eliot; to Brookland Middle School, named for D.C. landowner and Andrew Jackson administration official Jehiel Brooks.

    Others whose names the committee would remove include presidents Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, Tyler, Zachary Taylor and Woodrow Wilson.

    “With Alexander Graham Bell, there was talk about his involvement with eugenics as something that was very, very serious,” Reyes-Gavilan said in an interview, explaining why the inventor was on the list.

    ;Perry cited founding father Franklin’s history as a slaveowner and a racist line from his writing in 1751: “Why increase the sons of Africa, by planting them in America, where we have so fair an opportunity, by excluding all blacks and tawnys, of increasing the lovely white and red?”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2020/09/01/dc-building-school-renaming/

  120. @Anon
    John Muir Trail? Well, there's this thing called the Sierra High Route that puts it to shame. Former Yosemite big wall climber and editor Steve Roper "invented" it and published a great book on it detailing the whole route using portions of old USGS 15-minute topo maps accompanied by a written description. Portions follow the JMT, but mostly it's off-trail, above the timberline, the central concept being to follow the highest Sierra Nevada ridge, to its west or east, all the way down the range, with no climbing skills required above class 3 (simple hands and feet scrambling with exposure). With GPS and mobile phones a lot more people are trying it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Buffalo Joe

    TwoThreeZero, the Sierra Club, which John Muir founded, has cancelled him as a racist. Not too much press maybe don’t want to lose donors.

  121. @Colin Wright
    @Ripple Earthdevil

    '... We live in a nice neighborhood, nice community, nice people...There’s not that many African Americans living in Diamond Bar...”'

    Redundant.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Colin, now that is funny.

    • Thanks: Colin Wright
  122. @anon

    "A study found..."
     
    As soon as I hear those words from a political partisan I close my ears.
    My answer is, "I dismiss your study out-of-hand and won't believe it unless I first hear the leading rebuttal to it. If the rebuttal makes your study sound interesting I will back track and read the study itself."

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Aardvark, @Desiderius

    Studies conducted under duress don’t tell you much.

  123. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Sounds fun. Is it marked well enough from people getting into dead ends, pushing forward, and finding themselves stuck overnight?
     
    https://www.amazon.com/Sierra-High-Route-Traversing-Timberline/dp/0898865069/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=steve+roper&qid=1598938922&sr=8-1

    I wouldn't recommend the Kindle version. The book is chock full of detailed maps and black and white photos. Roper is a talented writer, like many mountaineers. He wrote an interesting memoir, Camp 4, about the early days of Yosemite big wall climbing. Camp 4 is the bring-your-own-tent camp between Yosemite Lodge and the trail head for the Yosemite Falls trail in the Valley. Sierra High Route has a lengthy Chapter 1 that relates the mountaineering/exploring history of the Sierras from first "discovery" by whites. The Sierra Club used to organize 100-horse assaults into Kings Canyon to bring members into the wilderness in style. Roper talks about a handful of eccentric climbers who spent their lives traveling all over the Sierras grabbing first ascents of unnamed peaks.

    If you are into maps and the outdoors this is a great armchair explorer book even for those who never plan to set foot on any part of the route.

    This is a good page showing the scenery and describing the route, and apparently there is an extension of the route on the south end now by a couple of other trail imagineers:

    https://www.thehikinglife.com/2018/03/a-quick-dirty-guide-to-the-sierra-high-route/

    If I remember correctly, Roper himself never traveled his own route in one piece. He took time off to go and explore and test candidate sections of the route, but after he had it all pieced together he never went back.

    Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_High_Route

    Roper first person account of developing the route, at Archive.org:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20100507103222/http://www.gorp.com/parks-guide/travel-ta-inyo-national-forest-yosemite-bishop-sierra-nevada-mountains-sidwcmdev_054016.html

    Ah, here he talks about how he went about it:


    Over two summers I explored my Sierra High Route, gathering notes for a guidebook and wearing out boots and partners in my quest for the ideal passage. Certain notches that appeared feasible on the map seemed, in situ, too sheer and loose for most backpackers. And since the High Route was never intended as a technical climbing route — no ropes are needed — I devised alternate ways. I had lots of fun — and lots of trouble explaining to my friends that the project constituted a "real job."

    Finally, I was finished. The High Route stretched 195 miles from Kings Canyon National Park to just beyond the northern edge of Yosemite National Park. In between the two parks the route wandered through several National Forest Wilderness Areas, including two that bear the names of Sierra notables: John Muir and Ansel Adams. Most of the route traversed that resplendent belt between 9,500 and 11,000 feet, and it was trailless for some 100 miles.
     
    Man, he had a near first-explorer experience:

    When I scouted the region north of the Ritter Range, I was guessing about where to go. I knew a Sierra Club party had been in the vicinity in 1907, but their published account was tantalizingly vague. So too was a brief description in a 1934 guidebook that ended with the phrase, "This is a fairly rough but short and spectacular route for knapsackers."

    Short it wasn't. Rough and spectacular it was. I can still see Kathy wading the North Fork, waist deep, a look of intense concern on her face as she contemplated the frothing gorge below. I can easily take myself back to that alpine meadow in Bench Canyon, where perhaps a million wildflowers, of ten species, covered acres of slope.
     
    No problem if you get lost and take a different route (as long as it doesn't exceed your technical ability):

    One feature of the High Route that I especially like is that hikers can travel wherever they wish, bypassing entire sections or turning lakes on their"wrong" sides. It would be so easy to forget an elemental truth: The High Route is not a trail. It is simply a recommendation about how and where to travel the length of the Sierra at timberline, in summertime.
     

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Colin Wright

    ‘If I remember correctly, Roper himself never traveled his own route in one piece. He took time off to go and explore and test candidate sections of the route, but after he had it all pieced together he never went back.’

    I can relate. When I’ve gone backpacking, after about day five there’s exactly one thing in life I want.

    A good, hot shower.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The longest backpacking trip I did was 9 days when I was 12 in the High Sierra, averaging about 10,000 feet elevation.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  124. @Colin Wright
    @Anon

    'If I remember correctly, Roper himself never traveled his own route in one piece. He took time off to go and explore and test candidate sections of the route, but after he had it all pieced together he never went back.'

    I can relate. When I've gone backpacking, after about day five there's exactly one thing in life I want.

    A good, hot shower.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The longest backpacking trip I did was 9 days when I was 12 in the High Sierra, averaging about 10,000 feet elevation.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Steve Sailer

    'The longest backpacking trip I did was 9 days when I was 12 in the High Sierra, averaging about 10,000 feet elevation.'

    When I was a kid, I would go with my dad (who had been born in 1914). The thing is, he would take so much crap that we would average about eight miles a day. I remember that when I was ten, my pack weighed forty five pounds. The pack -- a 'Trapper Nelson' -- had a wooden frame.

    I kid you not. Too, he would complain if we saw more than two other parties in a day.

    Different world. The first time he'd gone backpacking (back in the thirties), he'd taken dog biscuits. Everything else cost too much, or weighed too much.

    It was frigging cold in the morning. I still remember being trapped: I had to pee, but I was not about to get out of that sleeping bag.

  125. Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail is a real accomplishment. Let’s see, to have done that in three months — 2000 miles in 90 days — that would be 22.2 miles/day. I’m skeptical. From the first guy to write about hiking the trail, to today, there have been so many notorious fakers. People who skipped the hard parts; people who claimed to have done 30 miles of boulder hopping in one day; people who the locals saw standing out on the highway with the thumb out. An old guy like Kristof — certain to be a faker.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Cato

    Kristof and his daughter took 6 years to hike the Pacific Crest Trail.

    I don't see much point in hiking the PCT south of, say, Mt. Whitney. There is a real nasty stretch between the Sierras and the San Bernardino mountains through the desert. Then there is nice high country around San Gorgonio and San Jacinto, but it's anticlimactic after the Sierras, and then the mountains around San Diego, while pleasant local hikes, are not something I'd bother with if I was from Washington or Oregon. It more or less is all downhill after Mt. Whitney.

    Replies: @Cato

  126. @Cato
    Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail is a real accomplishment. Let's see, to have done that in three months -- 2000 miles in 90 days -- that would be 22.2 miles/day. I'm skeptical. From the first guy to write about hiking the trail, to today, there have been so many notorious fakers. People who skipped the hard parts; people who claimed to have done 30 miles of boulder hopping in one day; people who the locals saw standing out on the highway with the thumb out. An old guy like Kristof -- certain to be a faker.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Kristof and his daughter took 6 years to hike the Pacific Crest Trail.

    I don’t see much point in hiking the PCT south of, say, Mt. Whitney. There is a real nasty stretch between the Sierras and the San Bernardino mountains through the desert. Then there is nice high country around San Gorgonio and San Jacinto, but it’s anticlimactic after the Sierras, and then the mountains around San Diego, while pleasant local hikes, are not something I’d bother with if I was from Washington or Oregon. It more or less is all downhill after Mt. Whitney.

    • Replies: @Cato
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks. Sorry about the rush to judgment. Hiking the PCT with one's daughter would be wonderful, especially were she willing to stretch it out over six years.

    Thanks also for the testimony about the Southern California portion. I hiked only the section from Steven's Pass to Rainy Pass, about eight days (mid-summer). Friends who had through-hiked the whole thing --twice-- had told me that the North Cascades were the peak experience, so that's what I sampled. It was indeed amazing, the way that you could walk in meadows above the clouds, and even then, despite the distance, Mount Rainier would hold you spellbound.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  127. @res
    @Harry Baldwin

    Thanks. Here is that blog post from Mark Tushnet.
    https://balkin.blogspot.com/2016/05/abandoning-defensive-crouch-liberal.html

    The relevant section.


    2 The culture wars are over; they lost, we won. Remember, they were the ones who characterized constitutional disputes as culture wars (see Justice Scalia in Romer v. Evans, and the Wikipedia entry for culture wars, which describes conservative activists, not liberals, using the term.) And they had opportunities to reach a cease fire, but rejected them in favor of a scorched earth policy. The earth that was scorched, though, was their own. (No conservatives demonstrated any interest in trading off recognition of LGBT rights for “religious liberty” protections. Only now that they’ve lost the battle over LGBT rights, have they made those protections central – seeing them, I suppose, as a new front in the culture wars. But, again, they’ve already lost the war.). For liberals, the question now is how to deal with the losers in the culture wars. That’s mostly a question of tactics. My own judgment is that taking a hard line (“You lost, live with it”) is better than trying to accommodate the losers, who – remember – defended, and are defending, positions that liberals regard as having no normative pull at all. Trying to be nice to the losers didn’t work well after the Civil War, nor after Brown. (And taking a hard line seemed to work reasonably well in Germany and Japan after 1945.) I should note that LGBT activists in particular seem to have settled on the hard-line approach, while some liberal academics defend more accommodating approaches. When specific battles in the culture wars were being fought, it might have made sense to try to be accommodating after a local victory, because other related fights were going on, and a hard line might have stiffened the opposition in those fights. But the war’s over, and we won.
     
    The post as a whole seems like a good guide to some of the strategies they have in mind. Worth reading.

    Replies: @bomag

    There was a kind of creepy remorselessness in that article: “all is a war; we must attain total victory”; while conservatives think in terms of negotiate and conciliate. Thus we get the left staking out ever more extreme positions so the compromising right concedes to an ever more leftward ratchet. Now our side has Mitt Romney marching in BLM protests while Dem cities are facilitating political violence. Astonishing.

    • Agree: res
  128. @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    So you're saying his odiousness comes from his Armenian side?

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Yes.

  129. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The longest backpacking trip I did was 9 days when I was 12 in the High Sierra, averaging about 10,000 feet elevation.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘The longest backpacking trip I did was 9 days when I was 12 in the High Sierra, averaging about 10,000 feet elevation.’

    When I was a kid, I would go with my dad (who had been born in 1914). The thing is, he would take so much crap that we would average about eight miles a day. I remember that when I was ten, my pack weighed forty five pounds. The pack — a ‘Trapper Nelson’ — had a wooden frame.

    I kid you not. Too, he would complain if we saw more than two other parties in a day.

    Different world. The first time he’d gone backpacking (back in the thirties), he’d taken dog biscuits. Everything else cost too much, or weighed too much.

    It was frigging cold in the morning. I still remember being trapped: I had to pee, but I was not about to get out of that sleeping bag.

  130. @Steve Sailer
    @Cato

    Kristof and his daughter took 6 years to hike the Pacific Crest Trail.

    I don't see much point in hiking the PCT south of, say, Mt. Whitney. There is a real nasty stretch between the Sierras and the San Bernardino mountains through the desert. Then there is nice high country around San Gorgonio and San Jacinto, but it's anticlimactic after the Sierras, and then the mountains around San Diego, while pleasant local hikes, are not something I'd bother with if I was from Washington or Oregon. It more or less is all downhill after Mt. Whitney.

    Replies: @Cato

    Thanks. Sorry about the rush to judgment. Hiking the PCT with one’s daughter would be wonderful, especially were she willing to stretch it out over six years.

    Thanks also for the testimony about the Southern California portion. I hiked only the section from Steven’s Pass to Rainy Pass, about eight days (mid-summer). Friends who had through-hiked the whole thing –twice– had told me that the North Cascades were the peak experience, so that’s what I sampled. It was indeed amazing, the way that you could walk in meadows above the clouds, and even then, despite the distance, Mount Rainier would hold you spellbound.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Cato

    I've never been to the North Cascades, but the scenery in "The Deer Hunter" is awe-inspiring.

  131. @Cato
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks. Sorry about the rush to judgment. Hiking the PCT with one's daughter would be wonderful, especially were she willing to stretch it out over six years.

    Thanks also for the testimony about the Southern California portion. I hiked only the section from Steven's Pass to Rainy Pass, about eight days (mid-summer). Friends who had through-hiked the whole thing --twice-- had told me that the North Cascades were the peak experience, so that's what I sampled. It was indeed amazing, the way that you could walk in meadows above the clouds, and even then, despite the distance, Mount Rainier would hold you spellbound.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I’ve never been to the North Cascades, but the scenery in “The Deer Hunter” is awe-inspiring.

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