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From Palladium:

Competitive Hormone Supplementation Is Shaping America’s Future Business Titans

by BRIAN P. HOOVER JANUARY 1, 2019

There’s a natural, hormone-mediated life cycle to a businessman’s career: when he’s young, he goes for broke (and often goes broke). He borrows big, fights hard, doesn’t take no for an answer, and builds up an empire. In middle age, the business still expands, and the CEO’s waistline expands, too; he’s more content with steady growth, and doesn’t feel a need to do anything especially revolutionary. As he slows down, so does the business; retirement is a blessing.

All this closely tracks levels of testosterone: in addition to its well-known effects on variables like muscle mass and body hair, testosterone affects personality. People with higher levels of testosterone are more willing to take risks. They’re more assertive.

Hoover goes on to name names of three tycoons in particular he suspects are hitting the T.

… The power of artificial hormonal supplementation is creating a new generation of corporate leaders who will remain Young Men In A Hurry well into their seventies. We should expect more bold ventures, more oceans of tactically spilled red ink, epic financial feuds, and, of course, a staggering rise in inequality.

Mixing Drugs and Business—Two Precedents

But we can zoom back for a bit: this thesis seems extreme. Drugs have led to social changes, but have they changed business?

Of course.

I present, as a case study, the Dopaminergic Theory of Financial Bubbles.

The theory works like this: dopamine is a neurotransmitter that we think of as the pleasure signal, but it’s more the anticipation of pleasure signal. And speculation is just a form of competitive anticipation: you make a bet on treasuries, or oil futures, or a hot penny stock; somebody else takes the other side, and whoever anticipates the best wins.

So it’s no surprise that, in finance, drugs that affect dopamine have pretty high uptake. Generally intranasally.

There are two bubbles that we can attribute pretty directly to the availability of exciting new dopaminergic drugs. In the 1980s, the U.S. was flooded with cocaine. It wasn’t cheap, but yuppies were rich, so to the yuppies it went. The 1980s were also the era of the hostile takeover: find some sleepy old company, borrow 95% of the value of the company’s assets, buy it up, shut it down, liquidate the pension, and walk away with a big chunk.

This is total cokehead behavior, and in the 1980s, coke was ubiquitous on Wall Street. There’s probably a banker somewhere who didn’t even remember that he worked on the RJR-Nabisco deal until he read Barbarians at the Gate, just like Stephen King with Cujo. A few major Wall Street figures at the time either got caught doing cocaine, or quietly spent some time in rehab.

After the 80s, cocaine use declined, and the merger world changed. There were still blockbuster deals and stupid acquisitions, yes, but they lacked the hyperkinetic mile-a-minute nature of the Hostile Takeover Blizzard.

Two decades later, there was another hot net drug, not so much on the street as on The Street. It as another dopaminergic drug, with a slower release and a longer half-life: Adderall. Adderall is the drug of choice for rote, repetitive tasks that still requires some brainpower. Term papers, say. It’s not a good drug for boldness, but a great one for artful precision. And in the 2000s, the big boom wasn’t in swashbuckling buyouts: it was in complex credit derivatives.

To deal in credit derivatives, you need to deal in minutia. The difference in returns between two credit products might be 0.5% per year, but if you’re borrowing thirty times your equity, that’s a respectable 15%. Adderall helps people power through boring tasks, but it comes at a cost: as anyone who has popped a pill hoping to get some work done and wound up cleaning their room for six hours can attest, it doesn’t help you work on the right thing. …

I don’t know if this is true, but it’s definitely interesting to speculate about.

 
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  1. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Journalists are complaining about Bloomingdales T-shirts imprinted with “Fake News”: “denigrates journalists.”

    “Damage done to our democracy … perpetuating and celebrating the idea of fake news.”

    I’m old enough to remember (back to summer 2016) when progressives invented the term “fake news” to describe right wing internet propaganda (“from Russia”), published (in WaPo) a fake study about it, made algorithms to detect it, and so on.

    Trump has a knack for framing issues and coining soundbites that stick and support his storylines. The term “fake news” has been effectively co-opted by Trump and his ilk, and we can’t take it back.

    https://evidencefordemocracy.ca/en/content/why-im-done-saying-fake-news

    Should we stop saying ‘fake news’?

    It’s clear that the catch-all phrase for spreading intentionally false or misleading information for financial gain — which was deftly repurposed by White House adviser Kellyanne Conway last December — has had consequences only a few predicted (h/t to John Herrman at The New York Times, who wrote about this in November last year). And there is a growing group of media experts who say journalists should stop using “fake news” — that the phrase has been too weaponized to be useful.

    https://www.poynter.org/fact-checking/2017/should-we-stop-saying-fake-news/

    Then Donald Trump used to to refer to a mainstream journalist in a press conference and completely co-opted it. Boom, like that (as Ray Kroc would say). This is so funny that it’s done a complete 180. It’s like if progressives started wearing red caps saying “Make America Great Again,” and conservatives ended up complaining that they were somehow offensive to the right.

  2. In the immortal words of B Real,”Bro, I got to maintain!”

  3. Wilkey says:

    Can’t say anything about Musk or Brin. Brin’s mistress isn’t exactly a head-turner, but she’s younger and, given her job title, she’s probably pretty intelligent. That doesn’t strike me as a bad match overall. And it’s hard to tell from the pictures if Brin is juicing.

    Bezos, on the other hand…

    His business decisions seem calculated to piss off pretty much everyone. At least some companies are switching away from Amazon Web Services because they fear (or now actually have) Amazon as a competitor. AWS has long been Amazon’s cash cow, so that could eat into one source of Amazon’s profits. Is Bezos the guy you want as your business partner if you’re worried he’s going to be eating you for lunch next? Some of his business decisions seem more driven more by testosterone than by strategic necessity. But who am I to question the business impulses of the world’s richest dude?

    More importantly, his current romantic choices seem like the kind made by someone who is juicing. My experience with such people, from those in the news (the Guvernator) to a few I’ve known personally, is that they’ll hit anything that moves. And when I say anything I mean anything. They’ll hit on women an unemployed face-tattooed meth addict would consider beneath him.

    OK, I kid, but not by much.

    I mean if you’re a billionaire who wants to trade in your current wife for a younger and/or smarter model the temptation is certainly understandable. But Bezos dumps MacKenzie Tuttle, who seems elegant, smart, and helped him build his business (and just happens to be the mother of his four children) for…Lauren Sanchez, a menopausal 50 y.o. woman who is not only older than his wife but does not appear to be substantially (if at all) more attractive. That doesn’t just seem silly, but it seems like the kind of choice made to deliberately humiliate your soon-to-be ex. If Bezos had cheated on his wife with a hot 24 y.o. Stanford grad it would have been understandable, even if wrong. But Lauren Sanchez…

    Testosterone supplements might make you stronger, and even “younger,” but they affect your thinking in a way that just ain’t right.

  4. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:

    Re: Musk, I want to know what the deal is with his hair?

    Re: Bezos, his Medium post really changed how I think about the guy. I admire Amazon and all the businesses they’re in. But in his post he comes across really unfiltered, like some dweeb on the Daily Kos making some political point, really thin skinned, thinks he has some drop-the-mike point to make, vindictive, “I know Gavin de Becker.”

    “Here’s a piece of context: My ownership of the Washington Post is a complexifier for me.” “Complexifier”: Does he not know that his audience doesn’t talk like that? “Complexifier” is the sort of word you make up when all the normal domain names are taken.

    https://medium.com/@jeffreypbezos/no-thank-you-mr-pecker-146e3922310f

    I guess in the area of his marital and girlfriend troubles, he doesn’t have an advisor team like he has in business. Sort of like Steve Jobs, master of the universe in business, but when he had a medical problem he was googling for natural cures and had no real medical braintrust to advise him until too late. These guys are human after all.

    A smart executive would have said nothing publicly. Let it die on its own. If you want revenge, rethink it, but if upon reflection you still want revenge, don’t telegraph it. Don’t threaten to sue. Gather the evidence and do it. And don’t comment beyond the text of the complaint. But if you can’t deliver a kill shot like Peter Thiel did to Gawker, it’s best not to sue at all.

    • Agree: Prodigal son
    • LOL: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Mark P Miller
  5. Raydar says:

    Dan Harmon, of “Community” fame, admitted his reliance on Adderall to write and edit scripts throughout the run of the show until he was fired by NBC for his bizarre and/or shitty behavior. His reliance on alcohol to bring down the buzz might have contributed to his alcoholism. He also complained of the same problem of organizing everything around him ad nauseum, except the script. The unwise mix might have been what spurred him to harass at least one female employee, which he publicly apologized for.

    It’s been admitted that many of today’s television writers and even show-runners use Adderall as well as “micro-dosing” LSD and mushrooms to get their scripts done on time. Aaron Sorkin is a pretty well known micro-doser, and it shows in many of his scripts. I’ve always said “Breaking Bad” had a real micro-dosing flavor-flav to it.

    The pothead scripts are likely the ones where the cast is encouraged to improvise. The writer/directors who are well known for encouraging improv are often well known potheads.
    An exception would be Robin Williams, who was a notorious cokehead, and admitted to snorting his way through the entire run of Mork and Mindy. And we thought he just liked to talk fast. Coke seemed to agree with Robin, and boosted his creativity amazingly. For a while.

    Cocaine is considered a little lowbrow nowadays. Adderall and micro-dosing seems to be the popular drugs amongst television writers currently. Micro-dosing seems to give the most benefit with the least negative consequences, apparently.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  6. I thought the rise of complex investment products in the aughts had more to do with improved computers (and computer-assisted analysis and modeling) than Adderal.

  7. …for rote, repetitive tasks that still requires some brainpower.

    Tasks such as, say, verb-subject agreement?

    After the 80s, cocaine use declined…

    Someone was 60 years ahead of his time:

    I get no kick from cocaine.
    I know that if
    I took even one sniff,
    it would bore me terrif-
    ically, too.
    But I get a kick out of you.

  8. Lot says:

    The article was good, and the site was started by Daily Caller alums who seem HBD aware.

  9. @Wilkey

    If Bezos had cheated on his wife with a hot 24 y.o. Stanford grad it would have been understandable, even if wrong. But Lauren Sanchez…

    The late Florence King wondered why Prince Charles didn’t become a feminist hero. He ditched his trophy wife for “dear old Dutch”, rather than the more usual other-way-around.

    Oh, do I miss Florence.

  10. Sean says:

    Quincy Jones said Leni Riefenstahl told him many of the leading personalities of the Third Reich were coked out of their skulls for much of the time.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/nov/16/blitzed-drugs-in-nazi-germany-by-norman-ohler-review

    Ohler provides much detail on the drug regime to which Hitler was subjected by his personal physician Theodor Morell, especially during the war. His medication, above all Pervitin [methamphetamine] and Eudokal, an analgesic morphine derivative, propelled Hitler into a world of delusion in which the defeats and disasters of the last two years of the war could be brushed aside as irrelevant. His “chemically induced confidence” hardened his resolve and made him reject all thoughts of compromise. Generals who wanted to stage tactical withdrawals were dismissed by Hitler, intoxicated by the “artificial euphoria” induced by the pills and injections provided by Morell. The Führer’s genocidal aggression was fuelled not only by hatred of Jews and “Slavs” but by continual methamphetamine abuse. Hitler was a drug addict

    JFK was something similar (but worse),

    https://nypost.com/2013/04/21/the-kennedy-meth/
    In 1962, at the Carlyle Hotel in New York, a man “peeled off his clothing and began prancing around his hotel suite.” His bodyguards were cautiously amused, until the man “left the suite and began roaming through the corridor of the Carlyle.” The man in question was delusional, paranoid and suffering a “psychotic break” from the effects of an overdose of methamphetamine.

    He was also the president of the United States.

    The reason for John F. Kennedy’s bizarre behavior was that, according to an explosive new book, the president was — unbeknownst to him, at first — a meth addict. The man who supposedly made him so was Max Jacobson

    Bush Cameron Obama and you know who. The leaders of Western countries have all seriously indulged in their youth. They have irreversibly fried some important neurons for sure.

  11. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon

    I’m not sure if the term was ever seriously applied to them, but there were spoof sites that could neutrally and honestly wear the name “fake news” (if the term “spoof” did not already exist). The national lyingpress had burned up all its credibility, but people observed that local news tended to be much more honest. People know their own local news. The trick is people at another end of the country encountering a web site calling itself the New Framingham Herald-Courier or something like that. The lyingpress briefly tried to attach this illustration to the term to seem less dishonest, but immediately shot thenselves in the foot: they could not resist babbling about evil Russians even in situations where there was no apparent connection, they invoked sites that were never pro-Trump. Furthermore the spoof news sites were pretty easy to expose given a little bit of reading. Many were built very recently around a handful of stories and nothing they claimed could be substantiated or found quoted; they were also the only journalists in the country who did not just transcribe the wire services.

  12. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “It’s not a good drug for boldness”

    Try taking more.

  13. Lot says:

    Can we get Trump on T? I know just the guy.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  14. My experience with such people, from those in the news (the Guvernator) to a few I’ve known personally, is that they’ll hit anything that moves.

    I think steroids may make men attracted to transgendered ladies.

  15. @Sean

    I’d pay to see “A Conversation between Quincy Jones and Willie Brown.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  16. @Lot

    The article was good, and the site was started by Daily Caller alums who seem HBD aware.

    Palladium =

    Laid a plum.
    Pull a maid.
    I lump a lad.
    All up maid.

    Adderall =

    Dread all.
    All dared.
    Deal lard.

  17. @Sean

    Quincy Jones said Leni Riefenstahl told him many of the leading personalities of the Third Reich were coked out of their skulls for much of the time.

    You’d have to be, to sit through Triumph of the Will.

    She later found peace among a more gentle bunch, the long-schlonged Sudanese.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  18. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    Drug testing for CEOs and other high level business executives of publicly owned companies? The results could be listed in quarterly and annual reports, so that investors would be able to include the risks associated with drugged-up businessmen into their decision on whether or not to own a particular stock. Somehow I doubt this would ever fly.

  19. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    “Quincy Jones said Leni Riefenstahl told him …”

    Wait, what?!

    Quincy Jones and Leni Riefenstahl are hanging out? O.K., technically speaking their lilfespans overlapped, but …

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Space Ghost
    , @BB753
  20. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    Incidentally, both Morell and Jacobson were German Jewish. Jacobson fled the Nazi regime during the 30s. Morell was partially Jewish (some say as much as half).

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  21. @Anon

    When I hear fake news I immediately think of Fox and Limbaugh and the sort of moron who thinks global warming is a lefitst hoax. The fact that Trump is too stupid to realize that he is calling attention to his own dishonesty is part of the joke.

  22. Sean says:

    There’s a natural life cycle to a business because it is not just a man’s life but most things that go through a life cycle

    https://hkrbooks.com/2019/01/28/hkrb-interviews-graham-harman/

    I hypothesized that pretty much any object will experience five or six symbioses during its lifespan: irreversible changes that moves the object to a new stage of existence before it eventually stabilizes, rises, declines, and dies. This has some interesting corollaries. One of the ways we can be sure that the Dutch East India Company is a real object is because it has many early failures: a failure, as long as it does not destroy us, means that we are something real that does not yet fit easily into our environment. Something that immediately succeeds, by contrast, is often just a spare part for something that already exists perfectly well. Notice that important intellectuals often had a very rough time as students, while the “teacher’s pet” often has a thoroughly mediocre post-school career. I think the symbiosis model is a powerful tool, one that –among other things– allows us to determine that a great number of supposed objects aren’t real objects at all.

    The 1980s were also the era of the hostile takeover: find some sleepy old company, borrow 95% of the value of the company’s assets, buy it up, shut it down, liquidate the pension, and walk away with a big chunk.

    This is total cokehead behavior, and in the 1980s, coke was ubiquitous on Wall Street

    One could reverse the implied causuality here. It would seem to follow from that all these cokeheads were making the right business decisions for the time, a logic reason existed for cautious Wall Streeters taking cocaine it in that era even if they did not enjoy it because you could make much more money on it than clean.

  23. theMann says:

    Don’t know about corporate bigwigs, but the Tech Sector has been awash in drugs for as long as it has been around. A great many companies no longer even drug test their prospective IT employees, as I believe is also now true of DOD, NSA and so forth.

    Anyway, in the Tech Sector, the hot, not exactly new, drug is micro dosing LSD.

    To the point though, Americans are physically alive, but spiritually dead, in a way unprecedented in human history. The fact that at least a simple majority of Americans cannot function on a daily basis without being saturated with mood altering drugs tells you everything you need to know about America.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    , @Redneck farmer
  24. This is from GQ in 2017:

    Jeff Bezos’ Big-Ass Biceps Will Shame You Into Working Out This Weekend

    https://www.gq.com/story/jeff-bezos-is-buff-now

    The first time we saw him he was a stereotypical skinny nerd. Normal prerequisites for such people to get big ass biceps: 1.) pumping a shit-ton of iron AND 2.) chemical assistance. He would have to have an extremely unusual genetic makeup to do this without both.

    Then again it certainly is possible. If the deep state wants to leak his scrips next I would be much more curious about that than his intimate photos.

    Scott Sumner has posted different info on the prescriptions of choice in his psycho practice. A few years ago he wrote half the Valley was on modafinil. Then last year he wrote virtually every one of his new patients is a professional who wants adderall.

  25. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The conversation between Q and Riefenstahl would have been better.

    I always thought and still think it a great loss that she never got to film Rolling Stones show. The crowd reaction when Jagger hits the stage is exactly like the reaction to Hitler in Triumph of the Will.

    Albert Goldman correctly said as much: “The Führer would be gassed out of his kugel” at a Stones gig.
    Not by the music, but rather the crowd reaction.

    To be at the show and in the audience is a hair-raising thing, for those who have never seen the Rolling Stones in a big venue. Young and old, the curtain comes back and everyone is instantly on their feet.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  26. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Oh no, that sucks. It’s completely preposterous to talk about “calling attention to” a fake dead horse beaten every five minutes by the entire mainstream media.

  27. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Doesn’t surprise me in the least. Riefenstahl was not a Nazi, but even if she was, that doesn’t mean she would not enjoy conversing with Quincy Jones, who is definitely a fascinating conversationalist, and not stupid by any standard.

  28. @Anon

    She died in 2003 so there was plenty of time for them to hang out.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  29. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @simple_pseudonymic_handle

    He’s an ectomorph, like Dennis Mangan. If Mangan can put on muscle in his 60’s following a suboptimal lifting program, no reason Bezos can’t in his 50’s.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  30. @Peter Akuleyev

    …the sort of moron who thinks global warming is a lefitst hoax.

    What evidence is there that leftists believe it themselves? Have they stopped flying and driving? Do they bike everywhere? Do they bike anywhere?

    The only “journalist” who bikes to work, or did, that I can think of is Lucy Kellaway. And she’s retired.

  31. Anonymous[416] • Disclaimer says:

    The Beatles had a great song about a permissively prescribing doctor, Dr Robert. I thought about posting this when there were discussions about Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band in relation to audiophile stuff in a previous thread. They did some technical stuff to give it a feeling of drug inducement.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_Robert

    Certainly drugs have played a part in music, movies. Probably business, too.

    I have strong doubts about testosterone enhancing decisions made by CEOs. The young, risk taking stuff is done when your fluid intelligence is near its peak and your crystalized intelligence is building. You see new opportunities and you take them. In the middle there is still something in the tank with the fluid but you have enough knowledge you are probably at your peak, but it’s mainly building on ideas and understanding you have already come up with at that point. The near-retirement age is when your fluid intelligence is shot and you in effect become a walking library, imparting your knowledge via mentorship to up and coming proteges.

    Giving a permanent hard-on to a brain better suited to being a walking library is asking for trouble, and Bezos is probably a good example of this. “F***, fight, kill”, probably not the best states for your brain to be in at that age, unless you have your own harem and don’t have to worry about much else. And the body has likely been selected to provide an overall optimum fitness with testosterone doing what it is doing. It makes sense that your drives change as you pass through life.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  32. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    This. My argument against Global Warming policy changes remains that we share an atmosphere with out-of-control developing-world polluters.

  33. BB753 says:
    @Anon

    Once you go black, there’s no turning back.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  34. @Space Ghost

    She died in 2003 so there was plenty of time for them to hang out.

    At 101. I don’t want to think of what was “hanging out”.

    I believe the medical term is “prolapsed”.

  35. @Anonymous

    That wasn’t on the US release of Revolver, but on our Yesterday and Today with the cleaned-up cover.

  36. Wilkey says:
    @theMann

    The fact that at least a simple majority of Americans cannot function on a daily basis without being saturated with mood altering drugs tells you everything you need to know about America.

    If the mood-altering drug you’re referring to is caffeine then you’re talking about most of the planet, not just the USA. Tea is, after water, the most widely consumed beverage in the world. I wouldn’t be shocked if coffee is third. They both have similar amounts of caffeine.

    If any particular food says something uniquely bad about America it is the amount of sugar we consume, not the amount of caffeine. After some Polynesian countries and a few famously lazy ME countries, like Qatar and Egypt, Americans have the highest BMI in all the world. We also have the highest diabetes rates in the developed world. Both high BMI and diabetes rates are strongly linked to high sugar consumption and both rates are probably still insanely high even when you only look at America’s white population.

    • Agree: Lot
  37. BB753 says:

    Let’s hope Bill Gates doesn’t find his balls and starts juicing. Windows is already a mess as it is. Though ditching harrigan SJW Belinda Gates would be refreshing and so would stop throwing away money at Africa.
    I also dread the day when Zuckerberg finds out about testosterone and resumes his plans for world domination without Priscilla.

  38. I don’t know about Wall Street and cocaine, but I can tell you a shit-ton of people working as programmers and engineers in Mexinchifornia do enjoy the marihuana and modafinil. I can also attest – having attended enough shows there – that the Palladium (and North Hollywood in general) is indeed a place from which I’d imagine hormone supplementation is shaping America’s future: at least those parts of it attending universities in Los Angeles.

    There’s probably a banker somewhere who didn’t even remember that he worked on the RJR-Nabisco deal until he read Barbarians at the Gate, just like Stephen King with Cujo.

    I’m not sure what in the Hell this sentence means, but’s a special kind of shitty writing. I think it’s meant to convey something like:

    There’s probably a banker somewhere who didn’t even remember that he worked on the RJR-Nabisco deal until he read Barbarians at the Gate – similarly, Stephen King is reputed not have remembered he’s ever written a book about a vicious dog until he saw copies of Cujo in stores.

    I genuinely have no idea what in the Hell kind of relevance Stephen King’s Cujo has to the first part of the sentence, so I am inventing something vaguely plausible. What the author has actually written, of course, is that some banker read Barbarians at the Gate like (i.e., in the manner of) Stephen King with [a copy of?] Cujo. So if, say, when Stephen King reads, if he has a copy of Cujo nearby, he mumbles and scratches his balls a lot, then somewhere a banker probably remembered he worked on this deal only after he (the banker) happened to read Barbarians at the Gate while mumbling and scratching his balls. Say, what if the banker only remembered the deal because he was reading, mumbling, and scratching Stephen King’s balls? After all, Hoover does write “just like Stephen King with Cujo.”

    Maybe Hoover means to suggest the banker worked on the deal whilst using cocaine, and King wrote Cujo whilst using cocaine, such that neither remembered his acts until reminded later by reading the respective books (Barbarians at the Gate and Cujo). He might have written something to that effect.

    Stay thirsty for cocaine and hormones, my friends (and, go ahead and scratch while you read – no one will know).

    • Replies: @Jon
  39. @Wilkey

    Brin’s mistress isn’t exactly a head-turner, but she’s younger and, given her job title, she’s probably pretty intelligent.

    Are you using cocaine, Wilkey?

    The title you allude to is of course “marketing manager.” Have you ever even worked in a soulless corporation? Have you any idea what being a “marketing manager” actual entails? I say with near certainty, and with the power of my convictions, though I know ye not, sirrah: You have NOT!

    “Wow, I sure wish I were intelligent enough to become a marketing manager and get out of [writing code / reviewing statutes / designing circuits …] all day. That’s where the real action is!” – Said no actually intelligent employee of Alphabet, Inc. or any comparable outfit.

    “Wow, I sure wish I could get into the panties of one of those hot chicks from marketing; that’s where the real action is!” – Thinks every intelligent male employee of Alphabet, Inc. and every comparable outfit. (And the ones who are also the company’s executives get to follow through with it.)

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  40. it’s not true. not saying drugs don’t have an affect on finance, but nah on this one.

    tolerance for risk is definitely a T thing though. this is why there are very few east asians at the high levels of finance.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  41. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:

    The cocktailing of multiple drugs/therapies makes people act inappropriately.

    …steroids, T and HGH
    …anxiety meds like Valium
    …neurotropics for alertness, focus
    …depression treatments SSRI
    …plus rec drugs ecstasy, ganja
    …plus alcohol

    Don’t react to the guy in the Ferrari who cuts you off on the way to work! He’s a ticking time bomb.

  42. The “businessmen now do Adderall instead of coke” trope is interesting, but ultimately boring. Merhylphenidate, benzedrine, and dextroamphetamine have been around for far longer and are about as effective as Adderall. Rich businessmen do coke for a simple reason: it’s a rich person’s drug. Widely prescribed medications don’t have the glamor or status that cocaine does.

    The new, emerging fad with LSD micro-dosing and modafinil usage is likely because these are seen as “exotic” or “unorthodox” drugs.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  43. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    When I hear fake news I immediately think of Fox and Limbaugh and the sort of moron who thinks global warming is a lefitst hoax.

    The Tweets reproduced in the Titania account however show that your view of fake news is not the current majority view: left-leaning journalists today, 2019, take it as a slur against them, a source of grievance.

    But in 2016 your view prevailed. Here’s an infamous Washington Post article:

    Russian propaganda effort helped spread ‘fake news’ during election, experts say

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/russian-propaganda-effort-helped-spread-fake-news-during-election-experts-say/2016/11/24/793903b6-8a40-4ca9-b712-716af66098fe_story.html

    The flood of “fake news” this election season got support from a sophisticated Russian propaganda campaign that created and spread misleading articles online with the goal of punishing Democrat Hillary Clinton, helping Republican Donald Trump and undermining faith in American democracy, say independent researchers who tracked the operation.

    This particular story is infamous because it includes now a 150-word Editor’s Note admitting that one of the two sources they used was, for all practical purposes, fake news, an anonymous group of “experts” supposedly formed on Reddit, unidentified to this day.

    So my point is that Trump and Kellyanne Conway managed to completely flip the meaning of fake news over a mere few months. There was a short period of complaints that Trump’s use of fake news was fake news, then a period of agitating for people to use the “correct” meaning of fake news, then a resigned admission that the term, so effect against the right for a half a year in late 2016, was irredeemably co-opted and tarnished, and then finally a completely abandonment of the term by the left. It was at times like this that I reconsidered Scott Adams’s claim that Trump was a persuasion genius. No, he’s an idiot, I would tell myself, but, but … but … these things keep happening.

    • Replies: @peterike
  44. “To deal in credit derivatives, you need to deal in minutia. The difference in returns between two credit products might be 0.5% per year, but if you’re borrowing thirty times your equity, that’s a respectable 15%.”

    Sure, works great until liquidity dries up and your 15% turns into -60%.

  45. @theMann

    Back in the 19th century a common nickname for the US was “the alcoholic republic”. Working non-sober is an American institution.

    • Agree: Kyle
    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  46. @Reg Cæsar

    Heaps of journalists in London cycle. It often gets casually dropped into their articles. Here’s an exammple: https://www.spectator.co.uk/2019/01/the-scent-of-london-has-changed-all-i-can-smell-now-is-cannabis/amp/

  47. @Anonymous

    “To be at the show and in the audience is a hair-raising thing, for those who have never seen the Rolling Stones in a big venue. “

    The Stones must have been great in a small club in 1966, and pretty good at the Roundhouse in 1971.

    Those were my thoughts when I saw them in 1981. More enjoyable was Bill Haley and the Comets in 1976, perhaps because hundreds of Teds, dormant since the early 60s, had come out of the woodwork to attend. Great atmosphere if a tad menacing, they were rough chaps.

  48. @Steve

    This is indeed a interesting line of speculation; and the near-ubiquitous use of psychostimulants in this ‘elite’ group confirms what an insider friend has told me.

    (I guess this was the reality behind the media reports of ‘diet coke-fuelled’, day-night-day government meetings to address the financial crisis of 2008…)

    To testosterone should be added growth hormone – which seems to do much the same as T but works ‘better’, However, it is very expensive (daily injections, about 50 dollars a day).

    My insider friend also told me that SSRI-type ‘antidepressant’ usage is near universal in the same demographic, although more at the lower levels.

    These ‘antidepressant’ drugs have the effect of making people less emotionally reactive, less shy and anxious, more generally indifferent to things – ranging (according to dose, or personal susceptibility) from ‘don’t sweat the small stuff’ at the milder end; up to to a ‘hard’, non-empathic, personality, detached and cold, somewhat psychopathic – at the extreme.

    I recommend reading the following by Dr Simon Sobo, to understand what the Prozac-type antidepressants do:

    https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/articles/psychotherapy-perspectives-medication-management

    • Replies: @Carol
  49. Ok, ok. So then which drug(s) was businessman and now US President Donald J Trump taking from 1980’s, 2000’s, to now? Which ones? Which ones that enabled him to take risks, be assertive, etc? Because becoming President at the risk of going for broke and losing tons of money, businesses, etc is one helluvah risk. So which drugs did Trump take to get him to where he is in late life?

    • Replies: @Anonym
  50. Anonymous[167] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    What changes have you made in your life to reduce global warming? Do you drive, when you could walk or bike? Do you forgo trips that require air travel? Did you decrease your meat consumption?

    I believe there’s a good chance you use global warming primarily as a tool to feel morally and intellectually superior to others.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  51. @Redneck farmer

    I don’t think that is a uniquely American phenomenon. I’d bet in most of the world, the average working-class stiff is zapped up on something most days. I’d bet if you walked around Europe and looked closely enough, in addition to the tea and coffee already mentioned, you would observe a significant portion of the people are imbibing wine, beer, Grappa, vodka, whisky, Schnapps, you name it, on the side a little bit at lunch every day. That’s just the legal stuff; who knows what legal scrips and illegal black market stuff is being ingested. Hell, its true at all levels of society.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  52. Jon says:
    @Autochthon

    It’s pretty well known that King had a bad alcohol and coke problem in the 80’s. He’s been very open about the fact that he doesn’t remember working on a lot of his books during that period, including Cujo.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    , @Reg Cæsar
  53. Bleuteaux says:

    I guess this is my personal iSteve/universe singularity. After a year observing a bizarre new manager’s behavior, I realized last week that he is on some kind of upper, either or both from this article. Discussions with some medical friends suggest it is Adderall. This is in flyover country at a large manufacturing company.

    I’ve nicknamed him the Pacemaker for his inability to ever sit still in a meeting.

  54. @Wilkey

    “Testosterone supplements might make you stronger, and even “younger,” but they affect your thinking in a way that just ain’t right.”

    Absolutely – the literal essence of toxic masculinity is the male hormone that drives it. We should all start ingesting test blockers, grow man boobs, and binge watch Sex and the City.

    But you first.

    • LOL: Captain Tripps
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  55. Thea says:

    Elizabeth Holmes?

  56. @simple_pseudonymic_handle

    “… a stereotypical skinny nerd. Normal prerequisites for such people to get big ass biceps: 1.) pumping a shit-ton of iron AND 2.) chemical assistance.”

    Wrong. Following a weightlifting program that focuses on progressive muscle overload and maintaining a consistent caloric surplus to facilitate hypertrophy is adequate. Even for skinny people.

    That said – my guess is that Bezos was/is using HGH – human growth hormone as his primary enhancer, based on the changes in his overall physical appearance.

  57. Brutusale says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Of course you’re correct if someone is willing to spend the time in the gym. I doubt, however, that someone with Bezos’ responsibilities has the time it entails to get big without chemical help.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  58. Brutusale says:
    @al-Gharaniq

    An “emerging fad” in tech that Neal Stephenson was writing about 30 years ago in his novel Zodiac. The protagonist in the novel carried a library card in his wallet with a microdose of acid to use in times of extremity.

  59. Aardvark says:
    @Anon

    It seems to me that a T-shirt with “Fake News” emblazoned on it would best be worn by women who also wear padded bras.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  60. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Brutusale

    He doesn’t work crazy hours.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  61. @Jon

    I’d never heard of King’s using cocaine; I don’t read his schlocky books, and millions of othe persons doubtless share my ignorance. Anyhow, I reckon it’s more widely known a grown man, presumably paid to write for a popular publication, should know how to properly use prepositional phrases half intelligent children mastered in elementary school.

    Besides, readers’ happening to already know the thing you are failing to communicate by your shitty writing doesn’t make it okay to write nonsensical shite.

    Many more people know the Earth orbits the sun than know who Stephen King is, but that doesn’t mean an essay about the solar system must not adhere to the rules of grammar and logic for the essay to make any damned sense, just like Dave Thomas with mayonnaise.

  62. @Anon

    I consider the Bezos Affair a blessing for red-blooded males everywhere.

    We have been given ring side seats to a charade that demonstrates beyond a doubt that a terminal beta can never hide behind his bank account, no matter how many zeroes it may contain.

    Bezos is but the most prominent recent member of significant cohort of nerd males experiencing a belated — and false — ascendancy in the sexual market place during this upside down period in Western history. For all their business acumen, they are completely oblivious to the fact that their lack of quality pussy during what should have been the normal rutting season of adolescence has left them permanently scarred and disfigured.

    No amount of juicing, lifestyle neurasthenia, or cloying cougars at the end of their reproductive careers will correct for this mortal wound inflicted earlier. They will spend the remainder of their lives attempting to buy a form of respect that they can never achieve.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
  63. @Aardvark

    Fake Boobs would be more accurate for that shirt.

  64. @Reg Cæsar

    In 1987, I took a girl to see Sinatra at Pine Knob – we were less than half the median age of the audience.
    Anyway, Sinatra sang part of that song in a second-half sequence, but only the first verse and the refrain before segueing to something else.
    My date had no idea about the lyrics – she was the kind of girl who reciprocated by getting passes for us to see Pope John Paul II up close the next week in Hamtramck.

    I ‘m not aware of a Cole Porter song about going to see the pope . . .

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  65. @Anonymous

    Wow, check out the Wikipedia line on Herr Jacobson.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Jacobson

    Jacobson fled Berlin in 1936,[3][4] and set up an office on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, where he treated many famous individuals including Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Leonard Bernstein, Humphrey Bogart, Yul Brynner, Maria Callas, Truman Capote, Van Cliburn, Montgomery Clift, Rosemary Clooney, Maya Deren, Cecil B. DeMille, Marlene Dietrich, Eddie Fisher, Judy Garland, Hedy Lamarr, Alan Jay Lerner, Mickey Mantle, Liza Minnelli, Thelonious Monk, Marilyn Monroe, Zero Mostel, Elvis Presley, Anthony Quinn, Paul Robeson, Nelson Rockefeller, David O. Selznick, Elizabeth Taylor, Billy Wilder and Tennessee Williams.[5][6][7] Dubbed “Dr. Feelgood”, Jacobson was known for his “miracle tissue regenerator” shots, which consisted of amphetamines, animal hormones, bone marrow, enzymes, human placenta, painkillers, steroids, and multivitamins.

    I had no idea there was a real Miracle Max. Also, he seems to have treated every commie from the mid-20th century. Who knew that all that revolutionary activity stemmed from drug abuse?

    • Replies: @Wirly
  66. @Oddsbodkins

    yes

    I wonder if he keeps a spreadsheet on how many people make that goof.

  67. Carol says:
    @Bruce Charlton

    Interesting. It seems clear that if you don’t start with a “chemical imbalance,” the SSRI’s will sure as hell leave you with one. Or any other psychotropic drug for that matter.

    Great links in these comments!

  68. @Autochthon

    This was an extraordinarily low quality comment. You’re giving Corvino a run for his money.

  69. peterike says:
    @Anon

    So my point is that Trump and Kellyanne Conway managed to completely flip the meaning of fake news over a mere few months

    Yup. Basically, “fake news” was started by the press as shorthand to mean “anything that contradicts The Narrative.” And Trump flipped it to mean, “The Narrative itself is the fake news.”

    Which is a very dangerous proposition for our Chattering Classes, and probably amped up their Trump-hate even more, if that’s humanly possible.

  70. @Oddsbodkins

    I’ve read from that site a number of times and each time I think Scott Alexander a bit stranger. Now, I click over there (not from your link) and here’s what he has to say about himself:

    6. This is my first Valentine’s Day after breaking up with my primary partner and I’m feeling kind of down. If anyone knows someone you think would be a good match for me, feel free to try to set me up. I’m kind of poly, kind of asexual, want children, and live in the East Bay. My email is scott[at]slatestarcodex[dot]com.

    Primary partner?
    Kind of poly?
    Asexual?
    But still wanting children?

    Dear Heaven, please tell me these characterizations are not normal in the Bay Area now. If someone IRL told me such things I would quietly turn away and pray for our country.

  71. Joe Sweet says:

    The cokehead vulture capitalist thesis could explain Mitt Romney’s success, and his being owned by the dark side.

    Too bad for us there wasn’t another Mormon at Bain Capital to keep the rapacious Romney in check. Because, as everyone in Utah knows, you always take two Mormons fishing. If you only take one he’ll drink all your beer.

  72. Definitely an interesting topic. Both as to the natural effects of hormones and nootropics and the societal effects of artificial juicing.

    It also has a close tie-in to HBD issues. For example, the mechanisms by which genes effect individual/group cognitive abilities and personality traits may be largely mediated by hormones and enzymes.

  73. anonymous[192] • Disclaimer says:

    This is about Bezos and men in general. However, what about the women? It’s been claimed that 20-25% of women in their working age years are taking anti-depressants. What effect is this having on their overall behavior and what are the social effects, if any? Bezos has a more taut and sinewy appearance these days, perfectly explainable by exercise and keeping his body-fat level low. He’s no Schwarzenegger though with any bulking up apparent. He looks to be doing the so-called ‘convict conditioning’ program, rather popular these days. Pharmaceuticals wouldn’t be needed to achieve what he has. How many people are out there in daily life whose judgement is impaired by drug use, legal or illegal? Impossible to say. How many people have good, rational decision making skills who don’t touch any substances?

  74. @MikeatMikedotMike

    We should all start ingesting test blockers

    Or, we could level the playing field by mandating massive Testosterone and Adderall injections for all Americans.

    No more 37 genders — everyone would now simply identify as a highly competitive, raging alpha male.

    Either the gender pay gap would vanish overnight and America would turn into the world’s leading kick-ass economic dynamo. Or else it would be a Mad Max style apocalypse.

    But it would be an interesting experiment.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  75. Kyle says:
    @Anon

    The first time I heard the term fake news was “Q-tip” using it in a song.

    Goerge Orwell also had the concepts of newspeak and doublethink.

  76. AndrewR says:
    @Mark P Miller

    The allusion to “Western history” is bizarre, because for all of “Western history” until very recently (read: within Bezos’ own lifetime), few adolescent males got any “quality pussy” during their “rutting season” [one could argue this is still true, but I digress], and the ones that did tended to only sample a single one, whose owner they tended to marry. Yes, there have always been prostitutes, but “quality pussy” is unlikely to be a description that fits them more than it fits Lauren Sanchez. And in the pre-antibiotic and pre-latex days… consorting with whores was even riskier than it is today.

    And for all of “Western” and non-“Western” history and prehistory, the wealthiest men have tended to be more reproductively successful.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  77. @Lot

    Yes. I follow one of their guys on Twitter. I hope they make it.

  78. George says:

    Was Dick Cheney or Bush II on drugs? Which? How any Weinstein?

  79. @Mark P Miller

    MacKenzie Bezos is a perfectly good-looking sexual partner on whom he sired four(?) children so I’m not sure why he went for the sloppy-50ths with Lauren Sanchez.

    I know a number of wealthy men who married attractive but not beautiful women. It seems like a good strategy for a stable home life.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  80. Asagirian says: • Website

    People with higher levels of testosterone are more willing to take risks. They’re more assertive.

    Oligarchs on neo-steroids. Big Business Is Watching You. TRUMAN SHOW was ahead of its time in foreseeing a future in which we would all be prisoners, physically or psychologically or emotionally, to the corporate-created globotopia. We were led to believe: Capitalism = freedom, individuality, choice whereas Communism = repression, collectivism, and no choice, but elito-Capitalists(or ethno-capitalists esp) have found so many devious and subtle ways to create the illusion of choice and freedom while using their myriads powers and controls to ‘nudge, nudge’ us in the ‘correct’ direction. The Sheeple Prods, not as jolting as cattle prods but all the more effective for their subtlety. But when nudge doesn’t work, the power will push, and when push doesn’t work, it will shove, all the while pretending it is just nudge-nudging for our own good. They see humanity as a bunch of nudgepackers. So-called Liberal Democracy is Corporate Zionist Oligarchy.

    Look how censorship works these days. They don’t take away your freedom of speech but they censor you on social network monopolies that have become the defacto forum of society. Even though they serve the role of public forum, they are privately owned, and that means corporations can decide who gets to stay(Zionist imperialists, black supremacists, homo lunatics) and who must go(those who call out on Jewish, homo, and negro power). And then, banks deny you service. Without access to banking, one can’t live in the modern world. Banking is as essential as water and electricity. But because it’s controlled by private corporations(often Jewish), they can cut off service to people. And yet, when banks are in trouble, they go to government for bailouts. So, ALL the people are made to pay taxes to bail out banks, but banks can deny service to anyone they want. Banks act like the guy in JEAN DE FLORETTE, controlling the money-water supply. Americans are now treated like Palestinians in West Bank who are denied water.

    The mere illusion of choice. But if you deviate from the ‘correct’ path, they block you at every turn. No banking, no job, no place on social platform, no access to Uber and Airbnb, etc. But Zionist Supremacists get to control everything.

  81. @Hypnotoad666

    It’s a thought, it’s a thought…

    After all, high T European men built western civilization. Low T men build twitter, facebook, and lots of other trivial crap.

  82. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @prime noticer

    Asians are known for gambling though. Also, there’s little personal risk in high finance, as Nassim Taleb will tell you. Small businessmen take much greater personal risks, and there’s no “failing upwards” like there can be high finance.

  83. @Captain Tripps

    The title of Reese Witherspoon’s new cookbook says it all:

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  84. @Jon

    It’s pretty well known that King had a bad alcohol and coke problem in the 80’s.

    Until the final figure, I assumed that sentence was about a certain other King.

    That’s what I get for reading the comments from the bottom up!

  85. Pericles says:
    @Raydar

    It’s been admitted that many of today’s television writers and even show-runners use Adderall as well as “micro-dosing” LSD and mushrooms to get their scripts done on time. Aaron Sorkin is a pretty well known micro-doser, and it shows in many of his scripts. I’ve always said “Breaking Bad” had a real micro-dosing flavor-flav to it.

    What are the tell-tale signs?

  86. @Autochthon

    I read two of King’s shorter novels, Firestarter, and the other I forget– which says something right there. I thought even these were excessively wordy. But in those days, a trip to the supermarket left one with the feeling that popular fiction was actually produce, sold by the ounce and pound.

    He’s a lot more tolerable in short fiction, which he writes only for fun. Really, he should serialize his work on Twitter. The character-count discipline would be good for him.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
  87. Coked-up and/or testosteroned cage matches between older men might make an intriguing reality show. Say, Andrew Sullivan vs. Stephen King. Or anybody vs Rod Blagojevich. Too bad Rob Ford is no longer with us.

  88. Pericles says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    It’s his subordinates who get to work crazy hours.

  89. Jon says:
    @Autochthon

    You didn’t know King had a Coke problem, and yet you understood exactly what the writer meant when he made reference to King writing Cujo.

  90. @Paul Jolliffe

    I ‘m not aware of a Cole Porter song about going to see the pope . . .

    Popes were more serious in those days.

    Anyway, Sinatra sang part of that song in a second-half sequence, but only the first verse and the refrain before segueing to something else.

    Everyone in the business, and no one in the general public, knew about Porter’s semi-secret gay life. I find it quite revealing that Sinatra decided to ruin Porter’s great quintuple rhyme, “flying too high with some guy in the sky is my idea of nothing to do”, by changing it to “gal”.

    I mean, come on, there’s absolutely nothing erotic or suggestive about that line– if anything, it’s “homophobic”. But it was still too close for Blue Eyes’ comfort.

  91. @AndrewR

    And in the pre-antibiotic and pre-latex days… consorting with whores was even riskier than it is today.

    There were always sheep’s stomach linings.

  92. El Dato says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    You’d have to be, to sit through Triumph of the Will.

    Objection your Honor!

    It’s good, wholesome, practically all-american propaganda fare, complete with cat pictures.

    The only boring parts are the evidently Bierhalle-patronizing upwardly mobile functionaries in uniform trying to make a speech.

    Ok, here is something more funny:

  93. @Reg Cæsar

    I believe that first line is “Some get a kick from cocaine.” It agrees with the second line, “I’m sure that if”. He wouldn’t say “if” if he had actually ever used cocaine, and it must be “if” to rhyme with “sniff” and “terrif-”.

  94. Wirly says:
    @stillCARealist

    David Irving got ahold of Hitler’s doctor’s diaries and published them. A contemporary of Dr. Feelgood, Dr. Morell had Hitler on roughly the same cocktail that President Kennedy later enjoyed. Many German doctors were into “holistic” medicine back then, and tinkered with creating the perfect mix for a subject to attain peak performance.

    These mixes tended to work well, until they didn’t. By the time of his death, Hitler was shooting enough meth to kill a Clydesdale. I’m sure that surrounding circumstances gave the doctor a more liberal hand with the dosage.

  95. anonymous[355] • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t doubt most executives these days take something to help them perform. Being an executive in the global economy means you’re traveling around the world on a nearly weekly basis, and when you’re home you’re taking conference calls from dawn until late in the evening, vacations included. I have a close relative who is high up the food chain at a well-known SV company. Her fellow globe-trotting execs clued her in several years ago about taking ambien & adderall to combat the effects of jet lag. She used to use modafinil but since switched to adderall. She also has something to help lower her heart rate when she gives presentations to large audiences. She has a tidy little case of prescription meds so she probably takes other performance-enhancing things but I haven’t gotten good look at it lately.

  96. @Reg Cæsar

    NY columnist Murray Kempton was known for getting around by bike, even at an advanced age.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  97. vinteuil says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    grasshopper, you have far to go.

  98. Adderall? Is that even still a thing?

    The *afinils overtook Adderall in the late noughties: modafinil first, then armodafinil, and lately, adrafinil.

    *afinil use is pretty ubiquitous among folks in my circle who have to maintain very high levels of focused concentration; coders, lawyers, guys who do GIS/remote-sensing, and quants. Some journalists use it, but the results are mixed – huge volume of output, but suboptimal structure and a big editing task (that’s because the journalistic task doesn’t have a fixed, hard target: the objectives are slightly vague, whereas those other metiers have very concrete endpoints).

    The afinils give far better focus, and none of the adrenal burnout that happens with Adderall. afinils can also make you a bit OCD – temporarily. If you see a comment from me that goes on and on and on… that’s because I started writing before the ‘arma’ had fully worn off.

  99. vinteuil says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “I read two of King’s shorter novels.”

    So let me get this straight…you read one of his novels…and then you read another one?

    Oh dear me. Dear, dear me.

    To read one of them may be regarded as a misfortune. But to read two…

    The length is immaterial.

  100. @Autochthon

    +1000 – there are very few mid-pyramid job titles that signal less talent than “marketing manager” – e.g.,
    • literally any HR role;
    • media spokesperson;
    • cybersecurity [anything]

    Those really are the bullshit jobs. It should be mandatory that all encounters with a “media spokesperson” conclude with the spokesperson being punched in the mouth good and hard by anyone in the vicinity.

    They shit me almost as much as coders who call themselves “engineers” or “architects” or shit like that: if you’re any good, you don’t need nomenclature credentialism – you can just be a coder/hacker (I don’t really even like the term ‘developer’).

  101. So let me get this straight…you read one of his novels…and then you read another one?

    Hey, I was young. And considering writing for money.

    He was certainly a model for that.

  102. Anonym says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    So which drugs did Trump take to get him to where he is in late life?

    Some men in life just have a huge set of balls. Risk taking and banging hot chicks. It’s what they do.

  103. Anonymous[951] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    I know a number of wealthy men who married attractive but not beautiful women. It seems like a good strategy for a stable home life.

    Once they are saddled with 4 kids they don’t have time for mischief.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  104. Anonymous[951] • Disclaimer says:

    I sometimes use halved nicotine lozenges for getting through meetings when tired. That’s as far as my workplace drug use goes other than coffee. The downside is anger during the comedown, and the next day I am as vague as I was on point during the meeting.

    With all drugs I have experienced it is like using a credit card, only good for a temporary boost. It just costs you interest to load it up all the time.

  105. @Reg Cæsar

    Hmmm…whiskey seems to do a fine job of keeping Reese Witherspoon looking like…well, Reese Witherspoon; and that ain’t too shabby.

  106. Hmmm…whiskey seems to do a fine job of keeping Reese Witherspoon looking like…well, Reese Witherspoon; and that ain’t too shabby.

    Keep your grimy digits off Reese’s pieces!

  107. @BB753

    Once you go black, there’s no turning back

  108. @Anonymous

    I think the logic is they married at or below their SMV, never above, so the wife doesn’t engage in mischief.

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