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CNN Conquistador-American Jim Acosta and Administration's Steven Miller Debate Statue of Liberty's Zeroth Amendment Poem
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-J4FvxtD9I

From today’s press conference given by Trump domestic policy advisor and speechwriter Stephen Miller with Jim Acosta, who looks kind of like George Clooney’s dad, but who is officially Diverse due to his precious Conquistador-American ancestry.

Screenshot 2017-08-02 14.46.35

OBEY GIANT

And from the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect:

Screenshot 2017-08-02 15.45.38

All your hiztory are belong to us

 
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  1. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    I guess Indians really don’t matter.

    I mean wasn’t Emma Lazarus endorsing Manifest Destiny?

    Her poem comes down to “Bring over more Europeans and Jews, hand out guns, and have them take the remaining land from the ‘red savages’.”

    It favored ‘huddled’ whites to truly huddled Indians holding onto diminishing territory.

  2. Miller deserves an award for that press conference and the manner in which he slaughtered that mental midget Acosta. The Left has gone apoplectic. Now if only Trump would fire McMaster my day would be complete.

    • Replies: @JohnnyD
    @MG

    After McMaster, Trump should find a way to fire Kushner.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @MG

    Obviously, this is Monday morning quarterbacking, but he would have been better off going down the road of "the Statue is not law" rather than "the poem was not original".

    Replies: @Opinionator

  3. I am disappointed that Miller resorted to calling Acosta the Real Racist™. There are many good arguments for these immigration proposals that do not rely on moral signalling. Miller himself formulated some of those arguments. Moreover Miller had no reason to mollify the black lady. She was indignant that he dared to refer to black people. Her reaction was moronic, in the medical sense.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Mikey Darmody

    What would you suggest he might have said in response instead?

    Replies: @Mikey Darmody

  4. This wasn’t a debate; it was an intellectual rout featuring a very impolite, angry, sullen, and inarticulate boor versus the star of Trump’s A team.

    • Replies: @Clark Westwood
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    This wasn’t a debate; it was an intellectual rout featuring a very impolite, angry, sullen, and inarticulate boor versus the star of Trump’s A team.
     
    That's why Progressives have perfected the point-and-splutter tactic. They know they'll get slaughtered in an honest debate on the merits.
  5. Although other Founders had a far more sensible opinion, Gen. George Washington wanted America to be “an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.” Let’s hope this secret doesn’t get out.

    [F]or, happy, thrice happy shall they be pronounced hereafter, who have contributed any thing, who have performed the meanest office in creating this stupendous fabric of freedom and empire on the broad basis of independency; who have assisted in protesting [i.e., proclaiming] the rights of human nature and establishing an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.
    – George Washington, Apr 18, 1783, General Orders

    • Replies: @yyrvjh
    @Mark Caplan

    (((George Washington)))

    EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.

    What's that you say? Not one of (((them)))?

    Oh but this is iSteve. Blaming (((them))) is our favorite pastime.

    Replies: @Chebyshev

    , @Barnard
    @Mark Caplan

    It is humane nature, not human. That sentence ends with of all nations of religions, not and religions. That isn't an in context quote, Washington is speaking specifically about people who aided the cause of the American Revolution. I don't think he was talking about present day El Salvador or Eritea.


    https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/99-01-02-11097

    , @anonymous
    @Mark Caplan

    Didn't George also sign the Naturalization Act of 1790?

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Mark Caplan

    Pssst, that same George Washington also signed the Naturalization Act of 1790 and the Naturalization Act of 1795. Both of which limited citizenship to free white persons of good character and said that citizenship did not descend to children whose fathers had never been residents of the US.

  6. The only way this exchange could get more iStevie is if the exchange devolved into an argument between the merits of the Redans at National Golf Links vs. Carmago.

    • Replies: @Shaq
    @Hodag

    Perhaps the greatest comment ever at this site.

  7. Stephen Miller should have starting barking a bit harder at Acosta. Miller had the opportunity to attack CNN, the corporate media and that Acosta twit, but he played the nice guy. No more Mr. nice guy anymore, attack.

    Stephen Miller says this of the Emma Lazarus poem and the Statue of Liberty:

    “the poem that you’re referring to was added later, is not actually part of the original Statue of Liberty.”

    Stephen Miller knows President Trump sometimes watches TV performances with the sound off to judge how visually powerful a particular TV bit is. I thought Stephen Miller hit a home run if you had the sound off.

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions, when he was in the US Senate, made a wise choice in hiring Stephen Miller. President Trump, when he was presidential candidate Trump, made a wise choice in hiring Stephen Miller. I just wish they would really lower the boom on these smug corporate propaganda whores like that Acosta bastard.

    SMASH THE CORPORATE MEDIA!

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Marat
    @Charles Pewitt

    Miller's the most media savvy, after Trump himself. My impression is he purposely let Acosta butt in several times in order to ensure it ended up in the night's headlines. Acosta blew CNN's entire allowance today in 'defending' the liberals' favorite emotional justification for cheap labor.

  8. Acosta is an obnoxious idiot. Miller cleaned his clock.

  9. As long as poetry appreciation is appropriate press conference material, I would’ve countered with a work by American poet W. Axl Rose, entitled “One in a Million”:

    Immigrants and f****ts
    They make no sense to me
    They come to our country
    And think they’ll do as they please
    Like start some mini-Iran
    Or spread some eff-ing disease
    They talk so many G-damn ways
    It’s all Greek to me

    He also says he’s a “small-town white boy,” though, and is not possessed of the vibrancy of a Lazarus. So nevermind.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @guest

    Funny story about that song.

    About, geez, 4 years ago when I was still married I went with my wife and a group of friends to a bar down the street from us. Gentrified neighbourhood, downtown Vancouver.

    After some time, we notice "One in a Million" is on the jukebox...

    In goes $20. The selection? "Raining Blood" by Slayer, followed by "One in a Million". Repeated 10x.

    You better believe the bar emptied of anyone mentioned in the lyrics you quoted.

    , @Abe
    @guest


    As long as poetry appreciation is appropriate press conference material, I would’ve countered with a work by American poet W. Axl Rose, entitled “One in a Million”:
     
    Here's a live performance at CBGB's:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEHXGfQk1d0

    Notice what doesn't happen:

    * no CBGB patrons burst into flames
    * no paramedics arrive at the scene treating multiple cases of 'what felt like a punch to the gut'
    * no white girls break into tears
    * MTV does not boycott the band's videos
    * GEFFEN RECORDS does not drop the band's albums
    * some DOJ flunky does not start ginning up a disparate impact case
    * the President does not divert a press conference at Reykjavik to denounce W. Axl Rose

    I saw another YOUTUBE clip where a contemporaneous MTV segment slams the band, yet interestingly enough the rap group they solicit comments from defends GUNS' right to speak their mind. I am pretty sure that rap group was NWA, one of whose members (big bad Ice Cube) now curls into a fetal ball whenever someone so much as whisphers the phrase 'house n****r'

    Replies: @guest

  10. @Mark Caplan
    Although other Founders had a far more sensible opinion, Gen. George Washington wanted America to be "an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions." Let's hope this secret doesn't get out.

    [F]or, happy, thrice happy shall they be pronounced hereafter, who have contributed any thing, who have performed the meanest office in creating this stupendous fabric of freedom and empire on the broad basis of independency; who have assisted in protesting [i.e., proclaiming] the rights of human nature and establishing an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.
    - George Washington, Apr 18, 1783, General Orders

     

    Replies: @yyrvjh, @Barnard, @anonymous, @Chris Mallory

    (((George Washington)))

    EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.

    What’s that you say? Not one of (((them)))?

    Oh but this is iSteve. Blaming (((them))) is our favorite pastime.

    • Replies: @Chebyshev
    @yyrvjh

    That's a good point.

  11. That’s journalism today, in all of it’s insightful and radiant glory.

    No story here, only narrative.

  12. @Mark Caplan
    Although other Founders had a far more sensible opinion, Gen. George Washington wanted America to be "an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions." Let's hope this secret doesn't get out.

    [F]or, happy, thrice happy shall they be pronounced hereafter, who have contributed any thing, who have performed the meanest office in creating this stupendous fabric of freedom and empire on the broad basis of independency; who have assisted in protesting [i.e., proclaiming] the rights of human nature and establishing an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.
    - George Washington, Apr 18, 1783, General Orders

     

    Replies: @yyrvjh, @Barnard, @anonymous, @Chris Mallory

    It is humane nature, not human. That sentence ends with of all nations of religions, not and religions. That isn’t an in context quote, Washington is speaking specifically about people who aided the cause of the American Revolution. I don’t think he was talking about present day El Salvador or Eritea.

    https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/99-01-02-11097

  13. Finally, we can stop talking about the latest godforsaken healthcare bill! Instead we can all do a close reading of the Lazarus poem.

    • Replies: @Immigrant from former USSR
    @Chebyshev

    Dear Pafnutij L'vovich !
    http://s-marshak.ru/works/trans/trans044.htm
    I can definitely make the statement that Samuil Marshak
    is Russian Poet.


    С. Маршак
    На Ньютона и Эйнштейна

    Был этот мир глубокой тьмой окутан.
    Да будет свет! И вот явился Ньютон.

    (Эпиграмма XVIII века)
    Перевод эпиграммы на Ньютона Александра Поупа (1688-1744)
    и эпиграммы на Эйнштейна Джона Сквайра (1884-1958), поэта и критика.

    Но сатана недолго ждал реванша.
    Пришел Эйнштейн - и стало все, как раньше.

    (Эпиграмма XX века)

    Сонет 66

    Зову я смерть. Мне видеть невтерпёж
    Достоинство, что просит подаянья,
    Над простотой глумящуюся ложь,
    Ничтожество в роскошном одеяньи,

    И совершенству ложный приговор,
    И девственность, поруганную грубо,
    И неуместной почести позор,
    И мощь в плену у немощи беззубой,

    И прямоту, что глупостью слывёт,
    И глупость в маске мудреца, пророка,
    И вдохновения зажатый рот,
    И праведность на службе у порока.

    Всё мерзостно, что вижу я вокруг…
    Но как тебя покинуть, милый друг!

    , перевод опубл. 1948
    wikilivres:Сонет 66 (Шекспир/Маршак)

     

    William Shakespeare
    Sonnet 66.

    Tired with all these for restful death I cry,
    As to behold desert a beggar born,
    And needy nothing trimmed in jollity,
    And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
    And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
    And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
    And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
    And strength by limping sway disabled
    And art made tongue-tied by authority,
    And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill,
    And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
    And captive good attending captain ill.
    Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
    Save that to die, I leave my love alone.
  14. Although there are a lot of things about Trump that make me grit my teeth, when I see something like this I am grateful to have people who are sane about immigration and its costs/benefits in the White House versus the open door jihadists.

  15. CNN is, and always has been, infotainment whose main product is its own ubiquity.

    But I have to wonder how Jim Acosta thinks the Huddled Masses can know the Law of the Land as retconned by a proto-Zionist daughter and heiress of Portuguese Jewish Triangle Trade slave-owning sugar refiners…if they can’t read the English she wrote it in.

    I guess from watching CNN.

    Note: the words quoted by Mark Caplan at #1 above were penned by Moses Mendes Seixas, Emma’s great-uncle IIRC, as an unctuous welcoming letter to Gen. Washington when he visited the Newport, RI, synagogue Jeshuat Israel. Washington later worked them into a speech we presume to stay on the good side of the New England moneylenders.

    Lazarus had a cousin on the Supreme Court IIRC.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Olorin

    Note: the words quoted by Mark Caplan at #1 above were penned by Moses Mendes Seixas, Emma’s great-uncle IIRC, as an unctuous welcoming letter to Gen. Washington when he visited the Newport, RI, synagogue Jeshuat Israel.

    So, to yyrvjh's point, in response to Mark Caplan's comment, then yeah. It kind of really is Every. Single. Time.

    Replies: @yyrvjh

  16. Conquistador-American Jim Acosta is essentially advocating for Hispanic Lebensraum.

  17. President Trump’s public support for Sen. Tom Cotton and Sen. David Perdue’s new immigration bill is a good start to get the question of legal immigration some much needed debate. The bill in question is said to reduce legal immigration by 50 percent and is said to refocus immigration policy towards accepting immigrants that have skills, English proficiency and substantial educational attainment. So far so good, but what is needed is a complete and total shutdown of all immigration coming into the United States.

    IMMIGRATION MORATORIUM NOW!

    Who are we as a nation was the subtext of the Stephen Miller vs. CNN Acosta dust up. That is good, because that will force the Democrat Party and Republican Party mass immigration enthusiasts such as Lindsey Graham to explain why they want to racially transform the United States through mass immigration.

    This video from 2015 is what we need more of. Make the Democrats and open borders immigration supporters in the GOP defend their mass immigration positions:

  18. One year before Emma Lazarus wrote that poem Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act – by a 2-1 margin in the Senate and more than a 5-1 margin in the House.

  19. From “Academy of American Poets”
    https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/feast-lights
    And why exactly is that lady is considered American Poet ?
    English is not my first language.
    So I make my conclusions by the contents of material below.

    The Feast of Lights
    Emma Lazarus, 1849 – 1887

    Kindle the taper like the steadfast star
    Ablaze on evening’s forehead o’er the earth,
    And add each night a lustre till afar
    An eightfold splendor shine above thy hearth.
    Clash, Israel, the cymbals, touch the lyre,
    Blow the brass trumpet and the harsh-tongued horn;
    Chant psalms of victory till the heart takes fire,
    The Maccabean spirit leap new-born.

    Remember how from wintry dawn till night,
    Such songs were sung in Zion, when again
    On the high altar flamed the sacred light,
    And, purified from every Syrian stain,
    The foam-white walls with golden shields were hung,
    With crowns and silken spoils, and at the shrine,
    Stood, midst their conqueror-tribe, five chieftains sprung
    From one heroic stock, one seed divine.

    Five branches grown from Mattathias’ stem,
    The Blessed John, the Keen-Eyed Jonathan,
    Simon the fair, the Burst-of Spring, the Gem,
    Eleazar, Help of-God; o’er all his clan
    Judas the Lion-Prince, the Avenging Rod,
    Towered in warrior-beauty, uncrowned king,
    Armed with the breastplate and the sword of God,
    Whose praise is: “He received the perishing.”

    They who had camped within the mountain-pass,
    Couched on the rock, and tented neath the sky,
    Who saw from Mizpah’s heights the tangled grass
    Choke the wide Temple-courts, the altar lie
    Disfigured and polluted–who had flung
    Their faces on the stones, and mourned aloud
    And rent their garments, wailing with one tongue,
    Crushed as a wind-swept bed of reeds is bowed,

    Even they by one voice fired, one heart of flame,
    Though broken reeds, had risen, and were men,
    They rushed upon the spoiler and o’ercame,
    Each arm for freedom had the strength of ten.
    Now is their mourning into dancing turned,
    Their sackcloth doffed for garments of delight,
    Week-long the festive torches shall be burned,
    Music and revelry wed day with night.

    Still ours the dance, the feast, the glorious Psalm,
    The mystic lights of emblem, and the Word.
    Where is our Judas? Where our five-branched palm?
    Where are the lion-warriors of the Lord?
    Clash, Israel, the cymbals, touch the lyre,
    Sound the brass trumpet and the harsh-tongued horn,
    Chant hymns of victory till the heart take fire,
    The Maccabean spirit leap new-born!

  20. Jewish Trump guy Miller calls Cuban CNN guy a “cosmopolitan.” Wow, just wow.

    • Replies: @e
    @Detective Club

    "Provincial" and "cosmopolitan" now have different connotations (although their denotations remain as they always were) as the well-travelled American with a fancy (but meaningless) degree shouts inanities while the provincial, sane American is quiet with common sense. So, yeah, wow. Worms turn.

    BTW, if you've watched "Ozark" this whole connotation thing will remind you of how a hillbilly doesn't mind being called a "hillbilly" but you ought not to call him a "redneck."

    Replies: @guest

  21. Stephen Miller CRUSHED it. Next time I hope he takes it to the next level and quotes some of Ted Kennedy’s arguments while trying to push through the ’65 immigration act.

  22. anon • Disclaimer says:

    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now “who we are” and if we don’t accept and welcome the “wretched refuse” of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    @anon


    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now “who we are” and if we don’t accept and welcome the “wretched refuse” of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW
     
    I do believe it has been said here a time or two, yes.
    , @syonredux
    @anon


    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now “who we are” and if we don’t accept and welcome the “wretched refuse” of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW
     
    Well, if we must base immigration policy on a poem, how about using this one:

    Kipling, "The Stranger"

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father's belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf--
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children's teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.
    , @Forbes
    @anon

    Dems think present day policies should be based on the status quo that they agree and insist upon. Any new policy, or reform of existing policies, likewise, are to be those Dems agree upon. Reps are merely placeholders to maintain the status quo.

  23. “City of God” Book XIX

    Chapter 7.— Of the Diversity of Languages, by Which the Intercourse of Men is Prevented; And of the Misery of Wars, Even of Those Called Just.

    After the state or city comes the world, the third circle of human society,— the first being the house, and the second the city. And the world, as it is larger, so it is fuller of dangers, as the greater sea is the more dangerous. And here, in the first place, man is separated from man by the difference of languages. For if two men, each ignorant of the other’s language, meet, and are not compelled to pass, but, on the contrary, to remain in company, dumb animals, though of different species, would more easily hold intercourse than they, human beings though they be. For their common nature is no help to friendliness when they are prevented by diversity of language from conveying their sentiments to one another; so that a man would more readily hold intercourse with his dog than with a foreigner.

    • Replies: @WR
    @Mick Jagger gathers no Mosque

    Undoubtedly this is an instance of hate speech. I wonder if St. Augustine had to face the rage of the 4th century SJW brigade.

  24. Let’s see now:

    First Steve kept on blaming Emma Lazarus for our immigration problems even though her poem only appeared on the Statue of Liberty long after she was dead.

    Then he references the ‘Anne Frank Center’ which he knows was established long after she was dead.

    What did he say about noticing ‘patterns’? I must be super-intelligent.

    • Replies: @anon
    @anony-mouse

    Steve must be feeling left out for not making the ADL's recent list.

    , @Frau Katze
    @anony-mouse

    There is zero equivalent to this poem in Canada (AFAIK).

    Yet the SWJs here are if anything even worse!

    There's an organization called "No One is Illegal" and they're just awful. They don't need sone old poem.

    Forget the poem. This desire to let anyone who shows up in as legal is all over Europe too.

    It's a civilization-wide problem. This poem is irrelevant.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  25. @Charles Pewitt
    Stephen Miller should have starting barking a bit harder at Acosta. Miller had the opportunity to attack CNN, the corporate media and that Acosta twit, but he played the nice guy. No more Mr. nice guy anymore, attack.

    Stephen Miller says this of the Emma Lazarus poem and the Statue of Liberty:

    “the poem that you're referring to was added later, is not actually part of the original Statue of Liberty.”

     

    Stephen Miller knows President Trump sometimes watches TV performances with the sound off to judge how visually powerful a particular TV bit is. I thought Stephen Miller hit a home run if you had the sound off.

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions, when he was in the US Senate, made a wise choice in hiring Stephen Miller. President Trump, when he was presidential candidate Trump, made a wise choice in hiring Stephen Miller. I just wish they would really lower the boom on these smug corporate propaganda whores like that Acosta bastard.

    SMASH THE CORPORATE MEDIA!

    Replies: @Marat

    Miller’s the most media savvy, after Trump himself. My impression is he purposely let Acosta butt in several times in order to ensure it ended up in the night’s headlines. Acosta blew CNN’s entire allowance today in ‘defending’ the liberals’ favorite emotional justification for cheap labor.

  26. @anon
    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now "who we are" and if we don't accept and welcome the "wretched refuse" of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @syonredux, @Forbes

    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now “who we are” and if we don’t accept and welcome the “wretched refuse” of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW

    I do believe it has been said here a time or two, yes.

  27. It is impossible to argue with those for whom the zeroth amendment is an article of faith. The left has succeeded in convincing a large fraction of the US population that this country is morally obligated to welcome with open arms whoever wants to settle down within its territorial borders. The more unqualified and potentially violent the immigrant, the bigger our responsibility to bring him/her here. I can attest that this has become a quasi religious dogma among millennials brainwashed by our educational system. If you were to show them this video clip, they would assert without hesitation that Jim Acosta won the mini-debate despite the moronic nature of his argument.

  28. Jim Acosta kept droning on non-stop as Miller attempted to respond to him. How does this strike the CNN audience? Do they see it as incredibly rude and obnoxious, as I do, or as some sort of heroic “truth to power” stand? (Rhetorical question, no need to respond.)

    Acosta reminds me of one of my sisters-in-law, who babbles away constantly, never listens to what anyone else has to say, interrupts conversations that other people are engaged in, and contributes nothing of value.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Harry Baldwin

    Presumably, anyone so brain dead as to watch CNN thinks that Acosta is doing heroic work as part of the Resistance.

    , @Olorin
    @Harry Baldwin


    How does this strike the CNN audience?
     
    CNN has an audience?

    Huh. I thought they just had, like, outlets in airports and bars and hotels and such. You know, a contract with Comcast basic cable.
  29. Baby steps, at some point the rejoinder to a hostile presstitute can only be:

    “We have a wonderful system. Did you know you can run for political office? Maybe a career change will benefit you and better serve the American people (if you can win of course!).

  30. If CNN Acosta is going to avoid the economic and technical aspects of the Cotton/Perdue immigration reduction bill, perhaps that can be used to steer the immigration debate towards questions of national identity and future demographic trends. That is to say if CNN Acosta and the rest of the corporate propaganda whores go to weepy Emma Lazarus crap as a matter of course, then that might benefit political leaders who want to bring the question of national identity to the fore.

    CNN Acosta went with the emotional attack on Stephen Miller and the immigration reduction bill. CNN Acosta did not ask about specific questions of immigrant numbers or other matters related to visas or green cards or other parts of the bill. CNN Acosta started in with the sentimentality immediately.

    White Core Americans should use this moment to fight back against the notion that the United States is some kind of multicultural dumping ground for random Third Worlders who happen to flop, crawl or swim across the border.

    The United States is a European Christian nation. Sam Huntington said the United States was a British Protestant nation. Who are we as a nation is a vital question to ask, and if the corporate propaganda whores want to talk about national identity, then White Core Americans should accept that invitation.

  31. @Chebyshev
    Finally, we can stop talking about the latest godforsaken healthcare bill! Instead we can all do a close reading of the Lazarus poem.

    Replies: @Immigrant from former USSR

    Dear Pafnutij L’vovich !
    http://s-marshak.ru/works/trans/trans044.htm
    I can definitely make the statement that Samuil Marshak
    is Russian Poet.

    С. Маршак
    На Ньютона и Эйнштейна

    Был этот мир глубокой тьмой окутан.
    Да будет свет! И вот явился Ньютон.

    (Эпиграмма XVIII века)
    Перевод эпиграммы на Ньютона Александра Поупа (1688-1744)
    и эпиграммы на Эйнштейна Джона Сквайра (1884-1958), поэта и критика.

    Но сатана недолго ждал реванша.
    Пришел Эйнштейн – и стало все, как раньше.

    (Эпиграмма XX века)

    Сонет 66

    Зову я смерть. Мне видеть невтерпёж
    Достоинство, что просит подаянья,
    Над простотой глумящуюся ложь,
    Ничтожество в роскошном одеяньи,

    И совершенству ложный приговор,
    И девственность, поруганную грубо,
    И неуместной почести позор,
    И мощь в плену у немощи беззубой,

    И прямоту, что глупостью слывёт,
    И глупость в маске мудреца, пророка,
    И вдохновения зажатый рот,
    И праведность на службе у порока.

    Всё мерзостно, что вижу я вокруг…
    Но как тебя покинуть, милый друг!

    , перевод опубл. 1948
    wikilivres:Сонет 66 (Шекспир/Маршак)

    William Shakespeare
    Sonnet 66.

    Tired with all these for restful death I cry,
    As to behold desert a beggar born,
    And needy nothing trimmed in jollity,
    And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
    And gilded honour shamefully misplaced,
    And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
    And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
    And strength by limping sway disabled
    And art made tongue-tied by authority,
    And folly (doctor-like) controlling skill,
    And simple truth miscalled simplicity,
    And captive good attending captain ill.
    Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
    Save that to die, I leave my love alone.

  32. @Jus' Sayin'...
    This wasn't a debate; it was an intellectual rout featuring a very impolite, angry, sullen, and inarticulate boor versus the star of Trump's A team.

    Replies: @Clark Westwood

    This wasn’t a debate; it was an intellectual rout featuring a very impolite, angry, sullen, and inarticulate boor versus the star of Trump’s A team.

    That’s why Progressives have perfected the point-and-splutter tactic. They know they’ll get slaughtered in an honest debate on the merits.

  33. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Total Twitter meltdown from the usual suspects and the upper-middle-class white female #Resistance. My favorite:

    My heart aches. This isn’t the America I grew up in.

    That’s right, if you thought mass Third World immigration would transform the America you grew up in beyond recognition, wait till you hear Miller’s speech against it.

    LazarusCare fact-checks are everywhere. Hard to tell if it’s religious scripture or a founding constitutional document.

    The bit about speaking English hit a nerve too. Because linguistic requirements would impede the demographic and cultural rout of America, and that’s just un-American.

    This is what liberals actually believe.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    That’s right, if you thought mass Third World immigration would transform the America you grew up in beyond recognition, wait till you hear Miller’s speech against it.

    These people also must think that America currently does just allow anyone who wants to immigrate to immigrate. It doesn't, and it never has, but in order to think that this isn't the America you grew up in, you would have to think that it did. Because, otherwise, you must just think that our previous immigration levels were some magical optimum that were somehow carved in stone.

    I wish Miller had made the point that, by focusing on people with skills and the willingness to assimilate, what we would actually be doing is emulating the system of our groovy neighbors to the north. I have a feeling that would have backfired somehow, though.

  34. @Mick Jagger gathers no Mosque
    "City of God" Book XIX

    Chapter 7.— Of the Diversity of Languages, by Which the Intercourse of Men is Prevented; And of the Misery of Wars, Even of Those Called Just.

    After the state or city comes the world, the third circle of human society,— the first being the house, and the second the city. And the world, as it is larger, so it is fuller of dangers, as the greater sea is the more dangerous. And here, in the first place, man is separated from man by the difference of languages. For if two men, each ignorant of the other's language, meet, and are not compelled to pass, but, on the contrary, to remain in company, dumb animals, though of different species, would more easily hold intercourse than they, human beings though they be. For their common nature is no help to friendliness when they are prevented by diversity of language from conveying their sentiments to one another; so that a man would more readily hold intercourse with his dog than with a foreigner.

    Replies: @WR

    Undoubtedly this is an instance of hate speech. I wonder if St. Augustine had to face the rage of the 4th century SJW brigade.

  35. Why does such a WH briefing/press conference allow reporters to constantly interrupt and talk over the presenting speaker? Essentially, Acosta was allowed to be rude, because he could continue to lobby his cause.

    Any similar function I’ve attended, the audience member asks a question, and the microphone is removed, with the speaker responding.

    That back-and-forth was insane, as a way of doing business. Commenters here may think Miller smoked Acosta, but the debate between the two was a waste of time.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Forbes

    Quite right. Even in the most intimate, informal, and congenial professional and academic conferences I have attended, such a "questioner" would have been civilly but firmly interrupted, told that he must ask a question, not make a statement, and, should he continue, be cut off, and escorted away by security staff if need be. In no event would the continuing speech and interruptions once the speaker began to respond be tolerated.

    Yet this passes for acceptable behaviour in a press conference, where time is much more precious, the stakes higher, etc. (it's pretty easy to find and speak with a speaker at a conference later over cocktails, or even just e-mail him if time runs out; not so with the president or his important subordinates...).

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

  36. @anon
    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now "who we are" and if we don't accept and welcome the "wretched refuse" of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @syonredux, @Forbes

    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now “who we are” and if we don’t accept and welcome the “wretched refuse” of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW

    Well, if we must base immigration policy on a poem, how about using this one:

    Kipling, “The Stranger”

    The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk–
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control–
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    The men of my own stock,
    Bitter bad they may be,
    But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
    And see the things I see;
    And whatever I think of them and their likes
    They think of the likes of me.

    This was my father’s belief
    And this is also mine:
    Let the corn be all one sheaf–
    And the grapes be all one vine,
    Ere our children’s teeth are set on edge
    By bitter bread and wine.

    • Agree: theo the kraut
  37. e says:
    @Detective Club
    Jewish Trump guy Miller calls Cuban CNN guy a "cosmopolitan." Wow, just wow.

    Replies: @e

    “Provincial” and “cosmopolitan” now have different connotations (although their denotations remain as they always were) as the well-travelled American with a fancy (but meaningless) degree shouts inanities while the provincial, sane American is quiet with common sense. So, yeah, wow. Worms turn.

    BTW, if you’ve watched “Ozark” this whole connotation thing will remind you of how a hillbilly doesn’t mind being called a “hillbilly” but you ought not to call him a “redneck.”

    • Replies: @guest
    @e

    I saw that, but didn't understand the distinction. Obviously hillbillies live in the hills, but redneck is a general term for rural folk who do farmwork, isn't it? Like another word for cracker, designating poor white folk. Hillbillies are poor white folk, too, and some of them are farm laborers. The character who drew the distinction on the show, in fact, owns and works a farm, growing a controlled substance.

    There is a difference between being a flatland cracker and hill cracker. But I'm not sure if both can't be rednecks.

    Replies: @Bastion

  38. @anon
    Its probably been said here before but the dems/left seems to think we should base present day US immigration policy on a hundred old POEM written by a (((leftist))) and plastered to the statue of liberty after the fact. Further its now "who we are" and if we don't accept and welcome the "wretched refuse" of the world we are betraying the very idea of America. WOW

    Replies: @Alec Leamas, @syonredux, @Forbes

    Dems think present day policies should be based on the status quo that they agree and insist upon. Any new policy, or reform of existing policies, likewise, are to be those Dems agree upon. Reps are merely placeholders to maintain the status quo.

  39. @Harry Baldwin
    Jim Acosta kept droning on non-stop as Miller attempted to respond to him. How does this strike the CNN audience? Do they see it as incredibly rude and obnoxious, as I do, or as some sort of heroic "truth to power" stand? (Rhetorical question, no need to respond.)

    Acosta reminds me of one of my sisters-in-law, who babbles away constantly, never listens to what anyone else has to say, interrupts conversations that other people are engaged in, and contributes nothing of value.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Olorin

    Presumably, anyone so brain dead as to watch CNN thinks that Acosta is doing heroic work as part of the Resistance.

  40. It was smart of Miller to point out the points system is similar to those used by Canada (and Australia). It is hard to argue something is extremist (or right wing) if Canada has been practicing it without much controversy for over four decades.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/28/opinion/canada-immigration-policy-trump.html

    http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/01/26/511625609/for-a-stark-contrast-to-u-s-immigration-policy-try-canada

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @epebble

    Ah yes, the points system.

    The entire janitorial corps seems to be staffed by middle-aged Filipinas and ancient Sikh men, Vancouver will be 70% non-white in two decades, the prime minister openly declares there's no core Canadian identity -- Multikulti über alles -- and the ones with the points are, unlike Mexican strawberry pickers, credentialed to engage in coalitional anti-white grievance-mongering at a high level; and anyone who doesn't want to wake up to find themselves a stranger in their own country can't say anything because the immigrants are just so gosh darn good at making money -- because they've got the points (and the ethics, and the guilt-free ethnic nepotism) you see.

    I doubt if Australia is any different.

    Replies: @anon

  41. I really liked Miller’s argument because it got at some of the obvious logical flaws in Acosta’s argument.

    The point about the ebb and flow of immigration over the many decades is exactly relevant. The logic of Acosta’s argument proves too much. It seems to imply that any number is too low, that only open borders can satisfy the Poem on the Colossus. But the numbers of immigration have gone up and down dramatically over the decades. When was it “American” and when “un-American”? When was The Poem satisfied, and when not, and why?

    One of the truly amazing things about the Trump phenomenon is how he and his policies have exposed the utter imbecility of the dogma our elite embraces. There is simply no coherent argument that the likes of Acosta can put together to support their policies.

    It’s obvious to any thinking person that immigration must be limited at some number, otherwise misery and chaos will ensue. How could the US possibly accommodate the billion or more people across the world who would seek to immigrate here if they were permitted? But if a billion is just obviously too much, where do we draw the line? Why assume it’s at our current numbers, rather than at a considerably smaller number? Why is one number “American” and another “un-American”? Again, they’ve got no coherent argument to make here. That’s why they have to point, sputter, and call people un-American and racists.

    Take away their taboo, and they’ve got nothing. And Trump has taken away their taboo.

    • Replies: @gregor
    @candid_observer

    Yeah, I guess American ideals demand some vaguely generous number of immigrants. The implication seems to be that whatever the practical limits, the precise number should be (quietly) set by trusted bureaucrats and it just isn't the place of regular people (or politicians) to entertain notions of "too many" immigrants. Additionally we must pretend like the post 1965 immigration tsunami is just business as usual, an unremarkable continuation of a time honored tradition. American history is simultaneously one of white supremacy and oppression on the one hand and commitment to the bedrock principle of non-white immigration on the other.

    I've had quite a few debates with leftists over these matters in the last two years and I eventually realized that they believe immigration is axiomatically beneficial. They won't admit that immigration could, even hypothetically, make a country worse, except possibly for overpopulation. Everyone is literally equal, so we can dismiss out of hand any suggestion that people from any other country might be immutably poor, uneducated, culturally incompatible, prone to crime, welfare dependent, etc. To the extent any group were to show these problems, they would be assumed to be due to our failure to provide equal opportunity.

    Replies: @Pat Boyle

  42. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Olorin
    CNN is, and always has been, infotainment whose main product is its own ubiquity.

    But I have to wonder how Jim Acosta thinks the Huddled Masses can know the Law of the Land as retconned by a proto-Zionist daughter and heiress of Portuguese Jewish Triangle Trade slave-owning sugar refiners...if they can't read the English she wrote it in.

    I guess from watching CNN.

    Note: the words quoted by Mark Caplan at #1 above were penned by Moses Mendes Seixas, Emma's great-uncle IIRC, as an unctuous welcoming letter to Gen. Washington when he visited the Newport, RI, synagogue Jeshuat Israel. Washington later worked them into a speech we presume to stay on the good side of the New England moneylenders.

    Lazarus had a cousin on the Supreme Court IIRC.

    Replies: @anon

    Note: the words quoted by Mark Caplan at #1 above were penned by Moses Mendes Seixas, Emma’s great-uncle IIRC, as an unctuous welcoming letter to Gen. Washington when he visited the Newport, RI, synagogue Jeshuat Israel.

    So, to yyrvjh’s point, in response to Mark Caplan’s comment, then yeah. It kind of really is Every. Single. Time.

    • Replies: @yyrvjh
    @anon

    Thank you for illustrating my point. No source was given for the claim that George Washington was re-using the words of one of (((them))), but let's assume this is true.

    That just goes to show that Washington was a smart man who did not hesitate to borrow a well-crafted phrase when he saw one. Or are you saying that he was a hypocrite who told people what they wanted to hear and did not stand up for principle? Or, worse, that Washington was a weak-willed fool who had his head turned by the insidious whisperings of (((them))) -- a puppet doing their bidding?

    Keep twisting yourself into ever more convoluted pretzel shapes to maintain your paranoid fantasy that (((they))) are to blame.

    Replies: @anon, @Olorin

  43. @anony-mouse
    Let's see now:

    First Steve kept on blaming Emma Lazarus for our immigration problems even though her poem only appeared on the Statue of Liberty long after she was dead.

    Then he references the 'Anne Frank Center' which he knows was established long after she was dead.

    What did he say about noticing 'patterns'? I must be super-intelligent.

    Replies: @anon, @Frau Katze

    Steve must be feeling left out for not making the ADL’s recent list.

  44. @MG
    Miller deserves an award for that press conference and the manner in which he slaughtered that mental midget Acosta. The Left has gone apoplectic. Now if only Trump would fire McMaster my day would be complete.

    Replies: @JohnnyD, @Chrisnonymous

    After McMaster, Trump should find a way to fire Kushner.

  45. If only there were more Stephen Millers in the American Jewish community….

  46. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Total Twitter meltdown from the usual suspects and the upper-middle-class white female #Resistance. My favorite:

    My heart aches. This isn't the America I grew up in.
     
    That's right, if you thought mass Third World immigration would transform the America you grew up in beyond recognition, wait till you hear Miller's speech against it.

    LazarusCare fact-checks are everywhere. Hard to tell if it's religious scripture or a founding constitutional document.

    The bit about speaking English hit a nerve too. Because linguistic requirements would impede the demographic and cultural rout of America, and that's just un-American.

    This is what liberals actually believe.

    Replies: @anon

    That’s right, if you thought mass Third World immigration would transform the America you grew up in beyond recognition, wait till you hear Miller’s speech against it.

    These people also must think that America currently does just allow anyone who wants to immigrate to immigrate. It doesn’t, and it never has, but in order to think that this isn’t the America you grew up in, you would have to think that it did. Because, otherwise, you must just think that our previous immigration levels were some magical optimum that were somehow carved in stone.

    I wish Miller had made the point that, by focusing on people with skills and the willingness to assimilate, what we would actually be doing is emulating the system of our groovy neighbors to the north. I have a feeling that would have backfired somehow, though.

  47. @Mark Caplan
    Although other Founders had a far more sensible opinion, Gen. George Washington wanted America to be "an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions." Let's hope this secret doesn't get out.

    [F]or, happy, thrice happy shall they be pronounced hereafter, who have contributed any thing, who have performed the meanest office in creating this stupendous fabric of freedom and empire on the broad basis of independency; who have assisted in protesting [i.e., proclaiming] the rights of human nature and establishing an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.
    - George Washington, Apr 18, 1783, General Orders

     

    Replies: @yyrvjh, @Barnard, @anonymous, @Chris Mallory

    Didn’t George also sign the Naturalization Act of 1790?

  48. Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect. Oh, yeah.

  49. @Forbes
    Why does such a WH briefing/press conference allow reporters to constantly interrupt and talk over the presenting speaker? Essentially, Acosta was allowed to be rude, because he could continue to lobby his cause.

    Any similar function I've attended, the audience member asks a question, and the microphone is removed, with the speaker responding.

    That back-and-forth was insane, as a way of doing business. Commenters here may think Miller smoked Acosta, but the debate between the two was a waste of time.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Quite right. Even in the most intimate, informal, and congenial professional and academic conferences I have attended, such a “questioner” would have been civilly but firmly interrupted, told that he must ask a question, not make a statement, and, should he continue, be cut off, and escorted away by security staff if need be. In no event would the continuing speech and interruptions once the speaker began to respond be tolerated.

    Yet this passes for acceptable behaviour in a press conference, where time is much more precious, the stakes higher, etc. (it’s pretty easy to find and speak with a speaker at a conference later over cocktails, or even just e-mail him if time runs out; not so with the president or his important subordinates…).

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Autochthon

    Autochthon:

    While your rules for civil discourse are undoubtedly true, they are irrelevant for the purpose of this press conference.

    The plan was to provide a venue to present Miller's views. This was to be accomplished by providing his response to some press interrogator. In this case the journalist interrogator was Acosta. Mission accomplished!

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Forbes

  50. Stephen Miller: “It’s the Current Year.”

  51. Miller demonstrated that he has the right thinking on these matters, but the way he phrased his question to Acosta wasn’t that compelling. He could’ve improved his (already decent) argument by saying this to Acosta: “Tell me what, in your mind, would constitute ‘too much immigration.’ ”

    The predictable non-answer from his opponent could then be characterized as the leftist belief that there’s no such thing as “too much immigration,” and that the administration has to protect Americans from this elitist mindset because it could ultimately result in 20 million or so of the world’s poorest people flooding into the US every year.

    Actually, Miller probably lingered too long on Acosta’s tirade. He should’ve made his point and moved on to the next reporter.

  52. @Mark Caplan
    Although other Founders had a far more sensible opinion, Gen. George Washington wanted America to be "an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions." Let's hope this secret doesn't get out.

    [F]or, happy, thrice happy shall they be pronounced hereafter, who have contributed any thing, who have performed the meanest office in creating this stupendous fabric of freedom and empire on the broad basis of independency; who have assisted in protesting [i.e., proclaiming] the rights of human nature and establishing an asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and religions.
    - George Washington, Apr 18, 1783, General Orders

     

    Replies: @yyrvjh, @Barnard, @anonymous, @Chris Mallory

    Pssst, that same George Washington also signed the Naturalization Act of 1790 and the Naturalization Act of 1795. Both of which limited citizenship to free white persons of good character and said that citizenship did not descend to children whose fathers had never been residents of the US.

  53. @e
    @Detective Club

    "Provincial" and "cosmopolitan" now have different connotations (although their denotations remain as they always were) as the well-travelled American with a fancy (but meaningless) degree shouts inanities while the provincial, sane American is quiet with common sense. So, yeah, wow. Worms turn.

    BTW, if you've watched "Ozark" this whole connotation thing will remind you of how a hillbilly doesn't mind being called a "hillbilly" but you ought not to call him a "redneck."

    Replies: @guest

    I saw that, but didn’t understand the distinction. Obviously hillbillies live in the hills, but redneck is a general term for rural folk who do farmwork, isn’t it? Like another word for cracker, designating poor white folk. Hillbillies are poor white folk, too, and some of them are farm laborers. The character who drew the distinction on the show, in fact, owns and works a farm, growing a controlled substance.

    There is a difference between being a flatland cracker and hill cracker. But I’m not sure if both can’t be rednecks.

    • Replies: @Bastion
    @guest

    Ozarkian here.

    Being called a hillbilly is, at worst, a mild admonishment. "Jim, don't clean those fish right on the picnic table, you hillbilly." If I think my children's heads are getting too big, I remind them they are only 2 generations from hillbilly on their father's side.

    Calling someone a redneck; you'd better be good friends with a rowdy sense of humor, or somebody is about to take a swing at someone else.

    Replies: @anon

  54. @Mikey Darmody
    I am disappointed that Miller resorted to calling Acosta the Real Racist™. There are many good arguments for these immigration proposals that do not rely on moral signalling. Miller himself formulated some of those arguments. Moreover Miller had no reason to mollify the black lady. She was indignant that he dared to refer to black people. Her reaction was moronic, in the medical sense.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    What would you suggest he might have said in response instead?

    • Replies: @Mikey Darmody
    @Opinionator

    He has a lot of good responses at hand. Acosta cut some of those responses off. IMHO Miller tried to take the moral high ground by arguing that his immigration restrictionism is better for blacks/Hispanics in general and the black/Hispanic working class in particular. This is because the litmus test for a good policy proposal in this day&age is if it is good for blacks (and, to a lesser degree, for Hispanics), even if only theoretically so. The Republicans believe that by advocating for policies that will benefit blacks in a moral sense that they will escape the stigma of being the racist party. So they argue in terms of getting more black people working, making them better citizens, etc. The Dems meanwhile understand that blacks just want money and power for their tribe, so they give the latter benefits programs and leadership positions. The irony of the exchange with Miller and the black reporter is incredible: Miller is arguing for benefitting black people morally, but this black lady is so dumb and so tribal that she is offended that he dared to mention black people at all and that he implied that black people are in need of any improvement. All of this is a charade, though. Even if the Hispanic and black working class were operating at max capacity, the country would still be in trouble. Frankly, the problems of the White working class are the most pressing. This group's success or failure will determine the success or failure of the country. Miller should be talking about these people.

  55. @Autochthon
    @Forbes

    Quite right. Even in the most intimate, informal, and congenial professional and academic conferences I have attended, such a "questioner" would have been civilly but firmly interrupted, told that he must ask a question, not make a statement, and, should he continue, be cut off, and escorted away by security staff if need be. In no event would the continuing speech and interruptions once the speaker began to respond be tolerated.

    Yet this passes for acceptable behaviour in a press conference, where time is much more precious, the stakes higher, etc. (it's pretty easy to find and speak with a speaker at a conference later over cocktails, or even just e-mail him if time runs out; not so with the president or his important subordinates...).

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Autochthon:

    While your rules for civil discourse are undoubtedly true, they are irrelevant for the purpose of this press conference.

    The plan was to provide a venue to present Miller’s views. This was to be accomplished by providing his response to some press interrogator. In this case the journalist interrogator was Acosta. Mission accomplished!

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Dan Hayes

    A fascinating perspective: Acosta unwittingly
    fulfilled a rôle as a boob and a foil to emphasise Miller's points about how astonishingly stupid are the views of The Narrative. Hence Miller's palpable relish. I find I agree with tour assessment that Acosta's boorish behaviour was heavensent for Miller's puposes and therefore permitted to continue. The more he sputtered, the more preposterous were his points and the more Miller had opportunities to contrast them with reality and truth.

    Acosta was like a femist, pearl-clutching female caller to Tom Leykis' show: nothing better to prove his points for him, so why not let let her drone on and on.

    CNN are now the Washington Generals.

    , @Forbes
    @Dan Hayes

    There's something to this. Acosta's been clowning himself for the entirety of this administration. Obviously any advance planning takes into account likely press questions, anticipated story lines, and various personalities. Letting Acosta drone on may be a "feature" rather than a "bug" for getting certain points across.

    I rarely watch these sorts of press briefings, as I have no patience for the rude behavior demonstrated by Acosta. But letting Acosta make a fool of himself is a small price to pay...

  56. The French designed, built, and paid for the statue. It symbolizes liberty. Emma Lazarus had nothing to do with building it, but the effect of her poem is as if she showed up at a birthday party and switched name tags claiming the gift was from her.

    The biggest shock, I think, for clowns like Acosta and his fellow travelers in the MSM is that someone is finally pushing back against their nonsense. For far too long even supposed “conservatives” felt like they had to get defensive everytime they were accused of being racist. Suddenly our guys are standing up for us and our beliefs, and the leftists know that the game is up.

  57. @anon
    @Olorin

    Note: the words quoted by Mark Caplan at #1 above were penned by Moses Mendes Seixas, Emma’s great-uncle IIRC, as an unctuous welcoming letter to Gen. Washington when he visited the Newport, RI, synagogue Jeshuat Israel.

    So, to yyrvjh's point, in response to Mark Caplan's comment, then yeah. It kind of really is Every. Single. Time.

    Replies: @yyrvjh

    Thank you for illustrating my point. No source was given for the claim that George Washington was re-using the words of one of (((them))), but let’s assume this is true.

    That just goes to show that Washington was a smart man who did not hesitate to borrow a well-crafted phrase when he saw one. Or are you saying that he was a hypocrite who told people what they wanted to hear and did not stand up for principle? Or, worse, that Washington was a weak-willed fool who had his head turned by the insidious whisperings of (((them))) — a puppet doing their bidding?

    Keep twisting yourself into ever more convoluted pretzel shapes to maintain your paranoid fantasy that (((they))) are to blame.

    • Replies: @anon
    @yyrvjh

    Or are you saying that he was a hypocrite who told people what they wanted to hear and did not stand up for principle?

    Perish the thought! No politician would ever act in such a fashion!

    Keep twisting yourself into ever more convoluted pretzel shapes to maintain your paranoid fantasy that (((they))) are to blame.


    Well, it really doesn't seem all that convoluted to me.

    Are you telling me that you genuinely don't find it even a little bit funny that you got your panties in a twist about everyone blaming "(((them))), and then, you used that speech by Washington to prove that "(((they)))" had nothing

    Replies: @anon

    , @Olorin
    @yyrvjh

    I like the way you deftly convert pattern recognition into (((blame))).

    A narrative mechanism that conjures victimization and constructs an enemy in one swoop.

  58. @anony-mouse
    Let's see now:

    First Steve kept on blaming Emma Lazarus for our immigration problems even though her poem only appeared on the Statue of Liberty long after she was dead.

    Then he references the 'Anne Frank Center' which he knows was established long after she was dead.

    What did he say about noticing 'patterns'? I must be super-intelligent.

    Replies: @anon, @Frau Katze

    There is zero equivalent to this poem in Canada (AFAIK).

    Yet the SWJs here are if anything even worse!

    There’s an organization called “No One is Illegal” and they’re just awful. They don’t need sone old poem.

    Forget the poem. This desire to let anyone who shows up in as legal is all over Europe too.

    It’s a civilization-wide problem. This poem is irrelevant.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Frau Katze


    This poem is irrelevant.
     
    While you are right that there need not be some reverently incanted poem to hypnotize the native masses into giving up their birthright, I strongly disagree that this poem is irrelevant.

    Failure to challenge Acosta-style historical retconning signals surrender. You haven’t given up, have you?
  59. It would be interesting to see Miller get into the same argument with Chuck Schumer.

    For reasons everyone here can guess, Schumer’s middle name is Ellis and his daughter’s middle name is Emma.

  60. WJ says:

    Acosta’s infuriating babble about a meaningless poem and his overall demeanor were very good television for Miller and the Trump administration. It indicates or confirms the belief that the differences in the country are irreconcilable and that no compromise will work. It also solidifies Trump’s ties with the base, who, even though they have been disappointed lately, realize more and more that there is no alternative. The insane open borders lobby detests them and have made it clear that they want them replaced.

  61. It would be interesting to see Miller get into the same argument with Chuck Schumer.

    For reasons everyone here can guess, Schumer’s middle name is Ellis and his daughter’s middle name is Emma.

  62. Another example of fake news from CNN. That Statute was completed in 1886. It was a gift from France to honor freedom in the USA after the slaves were freed (She has broken chains around her ankles). Other stuff was stuck on the bottom over the years, like allowing LEGAL immigrants. From Wiki:

    Inscriptions, plaques, and dedications
    The Statue of Liberty stands on Liberty Island.

    There are several plaques and dedicatory tablets on or near the Statue of Liberty.

    A plaque on the copper just under the figure in front declares that it is a colossal statue representing Liberty, designed by Bartholdi and built by the Paris firm of Gaget, Gauthier et Cie (Cie is the French abbreviation analogous to Co.). [168]
    A presentation tablet, also bearing Bartholdi’s name, declares the statue is a gift from the people of the Republic of France that honors “the Alliance of the two Nations in achieving the Independence of the United States of America and attests their abiding friendship.”[168]
    A tablet placed by the New York committee commemorates the fundraising done to build the pedestal.[168]
    The cornerstone bears a plaque placed by the Freemasons.[168]
    In 1903, a bronze tablet that bears the text of Emma Lazarus’s sonnet, “The New Colossus” (1883), was presented by friends of the poet. Until the 1986 renovation, it was mounted inside the pedestal; today it resides in the Statue of Liberty Museum, in the base.[168]
    “The New Colossus” tablet is accompanied by a tablet given by the Emma Lazarus Commemorative Committee in 1977, celebrating the poet’s life.[168]

    So there you have it! The Statue honors the Freemasons first! Honoring legal immigrants not til 1903.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Carlton Meyer

    Miller should have responded that the statue honors American INDEPENDENCE.

  63. @guest
    As long as poetry appreciation is appropriate press conference material, I would've countered with a work by American poet W. Axl Rose, entitled "One in a Million":

    Immigrants and f****ts
    They make no sense to me
    They come to our country
    And think they'll do as they please
    Like start some mini-Iran
    Or spread some eff-ing disease
    They talk so many G-damn ways
    It's all Greek to me

    He also says he's a "small-town white boy," though, and is not possessed of the vibrancy of a Lazarus. So nevermind.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @Abe

    Funny story about that song.

    About, geez, 4 years ago when I was still married I went with my wife and a group of friends to a bar down the street from us. Gentrified neighbourhood, downtown Vancouver.

    After some time, we notice “One in a Million” is on the jukebox…

    In goes $20. The selection? “Raining Blood” by Slayer, followed by “One in a Million”. Repeated 10x.

    You better believe the bar emptied of anyone mentioned in the lyrics you quoted.

  64. @Frau Katze
    @anony-mouse

    There is zero equivalent to this poem in Canada (AFAIK).

    Yet the SWJs here are if anything even worse!

    There's an organization called "No One is Illegal" and they're just awful. They don't need sone old poem.

    Forget the poem. This desire to let anyone who shows up in as legal is all over Europe too.

    It's a civilization-wide problem. This poem is irrelevant.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    This poem is irrelevant.

    While you are right that there need not be some reverently incanted poem to hypnotize the native masses into giving up their birthright, I strongly disagree that this poem is irrelevant.

    Failure to challenge Acosta-style historical retconning signals surrender. You haven’t given up, have you?

  65. Abe says: • Website
    @guest
    As long as poetry appreciation is appropriate press conference material, I would've countered with a work by American poet W. Axl Rose, entitled "One in a Million":

    Immigrants and f****ts
    They make no sense to me
    They come to our country
    And think they'll do as they please
    Like start some mini-Iran
    Or spread some eff-ing disease
    They talk so many G-damn ways
    It's all Greek to me

    He also says he's a "small-town white boy," though, and is not possessed of the vibrancy of a Lazarus. So nevermind.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @Abe

    As long as poetry appreciation is appropriate press conference material, I would’ve countered with a work by American poet W. Axl Rose, entitled “One in a Million”:

    Here’s a live performance at CBGB’s:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEHXGfQk1d0

    Notice what doesn’t happen:

    * no CBGB patrons burst into flames
    * no paramedics arrive at the scene treating multiple cases of ‘what felt like a punch to the gut’
    * no white girls break into tears
    * MTV does not boycott the band’s videos
    * GEFFEN RECORDS does not drop the band’s albums
    * some DOJ flunky does not start ginning up a disparate impact case
    * the President does not divert a press conference at Reykjavik to denounce W. Axl Rose

    I saw another YOUTUBE clip where a contemporaneous MTV segment slams the band, yet interestingly enough the rap group they solicit comments from defends GUNS’ right to speak their mind. I am pretty sure that rap group was NWA, one of whose members (big bad Ice Cube) now curls into a fetal ball whenever someone so much as whisphers the phrase ‘house n****r’

    • Replies: @guest
    @Abe

    I should add that song features the n-word as well. Rose's bandmate Slash (nee Saul Hudson) is half-black/half-English and didn't make a Thing out of it.

  66. The questions I would like to ask Jim Acosta:

    1. Do you think immigration should be unlimited, or there should be some restrictions to keep the numbers down to some manageable amount? (he will of course say not unlimited)

    2. Given you believe there should be some limits, what criteria to you think should be applied to determine who gets one of the limited immigration slots?

  67. @guest
    @e

    I saw that, but didn't understand the distinction. Obviously hillbillies live in the hills, but redneck is a general term for rural folk who do farmwork, isn't it? Like another word for cracker, designating poor white folk. Hillbillies are poor white folk, too, and some of them are farm laborers. The character who drew the distinction on the show, in fact, owns and works a farm, growing a controlled substance.

    There is a difference between being a flatland cracker and hill cracker. But I'm not sure if both can't be rednecks.

    Replies: @Bastion

    Ozarkian here.

    Being called a hillbilly is, at worst, a mild admonishment. “Jim, don’t clean those fish right on the picnic table, you hillbilly.” If I think my children’s heads are getting too big, I remind them they are only 2 generations from hillbilly on their father’s side.

    Calling someone a redneck; you’d better be good friends with a rowdy sense of humor, or somebody is about to take a swing at someone else.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Bastion

    That's really strange. Where I grew up, the country people called themselves "rednecks" as sort of a mark of pride. Maybe Jeff Foxworthy had something to do with that.

    Once in awhile, someone from town would call them "hillbillies", and that just made them laugh, probably due to the complete absence of any hills nearby.

    Then again, none of the people I knew seemed to have any stereotypical "redneck" habits. So maybe it's one of those words that only bothers you if you worry that it might actually be true.

  68. @Hodag
    The only way this exchange could get more iStevie is if the exchange devolved into an argument between the merits of the Redans at National Golf Links vs. Carmago.

    Replies: @Shaq

    Perhaps the greatest comment ever at this site.

  69. It’s the Statue of Liberty not the statue of immigration.

    I checked the census data for one of my ancestors in Gloucester Massachusetts in 1860. He was a house painter so this was a blue collar neighborhood. Of the 100 people listed on the two pages, only two were not born in the USA. A BLUE COLLAR NEIGHBORHOOD IN A PORT CITY,,,,

    Large scale immigration is not an American tradition.

  70. @candid_observer
    I really liked Miller's argument because it got at some of the obvious logical flaws in Acosta's argument.

    The point about the ebb and flow of immigration over the many decades is exactly relevant. The logic of Acosta's argument proves too much. It seems to imply that any number is too low, that only open borders can satisfy the Poem on the Colossus. But the numbers of immigration have gone up and down dramatically over the decades. When was it "American" and when "un-American"? When was The Poem satisfied, and when not, and why?

    One of the truly amazing things about the Trump phenomenon is how he and his policies have exposed the utter imbecility of the dogma our elite embraces. There is simply no coherent argument that the likes of Acosta can put together to support their policies.

    It's obvious to any thinking person that immigration must be limited at some number, otherwise misery and chaos will ensue. How could the US possibly accommodate the billion or more people across the world who would seek to immigrate here if they were permitted? But if a billion is just obviously too much, where do we draw the line? Why assume it's at our current numbers, rather than at a considerably smaller number? Why is one number "American" and another "un-American"? Again, they've got no coherent argument to make here. That's why they have to point, sputter, and call people un-American and racists.

    Take away their taboo, and they've got nothing. And Trump has taken away their taboo.

    Replies: @gregor

    Yeah, I guess American ideals demand some vaguely generous number of immigrants. The implication seems to be that whatever the practical limits, the precise number should be (quietly) set by trusted bureaucrats and it just isn’t the place of regular people (or politicians) to entertain notions of “too many” immigrants. Additionally we must pretend like the post 1965 immigration tsunami is just business as usual, an unremarkable continuation of a time honored tradition. American history is simultaneously one of white supremacy and oppression on the one hand and commitment to the bedrock principle of non-white immigration on the other.

    I’ve had quite a few debates with leftists over these matters in the last two years and I eventually realized that they believe immigration is axiomatically beneficial. They won’t admit that immigration could, even hypothetically, make a country worse, except possibly for overpopulation. Everyone is literally equal, so we can dismiss out of hand any suggestion that people from any other country might be immutably poor, uneducated, culturally incompatible, prone to crime, welfare dependent, etc. To the extent any group were to show these problems, they would be assumed to be due to our failure to provide equal opportunity.

    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    @gregor

    The reason almost all immigration is bad is simple. Most of the immigrants are genetically inferior to the a regular citizens.

    Some of you may react to these words but if you believe for example that blacks have an IQ some 15 points below that of whites and that most IQ differences are genetic - that's what it amounts to. Our discourse is civil but inaccurate. Speaking of all races as if they were comparable to Europeans or Asians is just indulging in fashionable error.

    If you fill your nation with inferior people you will have and inferior country.

  71. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @epebble
    It was smart of Miller to point out the points system is similar to those used by Canada (and Australia). It is hard to argue something is extremist (or right wing) if Canada has been practicing it without much controversy for over four decades.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/28/opinion/canada-immigration-policy-trump.html

    http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/01/26/511625609/for-a-stark-contrast-to-u-s-immigration-policy-try-canada

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Ah yes, the points system.

    The entire janitorial corps seems to be staffed by middle-aged Filipinas and ancient Sikh men, Vancouver will be 70% non-white in two decades, the prime minister openly declares there’s no core Canadian identity — Multikulti über alles — and the ones with the points are, unlike Mexican strawberry pickers, credentialed to engage in coalitional anti-white grievance-mongering at a high level; and anyone who doesn’t want to wake up to find themselves a stranger in their own country can’t say anything because the immigrants are just so gosh darn good at making money — because they’ve got the points (and the ethics, and the guilt-free ethnic nepotism) you see.

    I doubt if Australia is any different.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    I don't think RAISE bill will allow any janitorial folks. https://www.cotton.senate.gov/files/documents/170802_New_RAISE_Act_Bill_Text.pdf

    And surely we can use a lot of people who are "darn good at making money" than in eating it up, as is now the case. A cursory reading shows preference to those earning thrice the median income. That is so much better than any strawberry picker that I will happily forgo eating strawberries and allow it to rot in the fields!

  72. Trump’s decision on Transgenders in the military was his staking out a position for the 2020 elections and so is his endorsement of Cotton’s bill on immigration. He knows it will be a winner exactly the same way he staked out a position on building a wall the same day he announced his candidacy. The battle of health care (France) is over the battle for immigration (England) is about to begin. His main opponent now is Ryan not the Democrats. By getting out front, Ryan will be the one on defense. Ryan can either give in to a wall, which by definition will weed out the most unskilled and criminal of the lot, or risk the growing wrath within his own party because he still thinks he can get CIR which looks increasingly like it is out of his grasp.

  73. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Bastion
    @guest

    Ozarkian here.

    Being called a hillbilly is, at worst, a mild admonishment. "Jim, don't clean those fish right on the picnic table, you hillbilly." If I think my children's heads are getting too big, I remind them they are only 2 generations from hillbilly on their father's side.

    Calling someone a redneck; you'd better be good friends with a rowdy sense of humor, or somebody is about to take a swing at someone else.

    Replies: @anon

    That’s really strange. Where I grew up, the country people called themselves “rednecks” as sort of a mark of pride. Maybe Jeff Foxworthy had something to do with that.

    Once in awhile, someone from town would call them “hillbillies”, and that just made them laugh, probably due to the complete absence of any hills nearby.

    Then again, none of the people I knew seemed to have any stereotypical “redneck” habits. So maybe it’s one of those words that only bothers you if you worry that it might actually be true.

  74. @MG
    Miller deserves an award for that press conference and the manner in which he slaughtered that mental midget Acosta. The Left has gone apoplectic. Now if only Trump would fire McMaster my day would be complete.

    Replies: @JohnnyD, @Chrisnonymous

    Obviously, this is Monday morning quarterbacking, but he would have been better off going down the road of “the Statue is not law” rather than “the poem was not original”.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Chrisnonymous

    No, that is just a technicality. He needs to offer a competing narrative.

  75. Why did he try to be conciliatory towards the end? Miller did his best but to give them an inch means they take a mile and feel emboldened. I’m fine with watching one’s manners but these guys need to be eviscerated. He shouldn’t allow them to interrupt him, too.

  76. @Abe
    @guest


    As long as poetry appreciation is appropriate press conference material, I would’ve countered with a work by American poet W. Axl Rose, entitled “One in a Million”:
     
    Here's a live performance at CBGB's:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEHXGfQk1d0

    Notice what doesn't happen:

    * no CBGB patrons burst into flames
    * no paramedics arrive at the scene treating multiple cases of 'what felt like a punch to the gut'
    * no white girls break into tears
    * MTV does not boycott the band's videos
    * GEFFEN RECORDS does not drop the band's albums
    * some DOJ flunky does not start ginning up a disparate impact case
    * the President does not divert a press conference at Reykjavik to denounce W. Axl Rose

    I saw another YOUTUBE clip where a contemporaneous MTV segment slams the band, yet interestingly enough the rap group they solicit comments from defends GUNS' right to speak their mind. I am pretty sure that rap group was NWA, one of whose members (big bad Ice Cube) now curls into a fetal ball whenever someone so much as whisphers the phrase 'house n****r'

    Replies: @guest

    I should add that song features the n-word as well. Rose’s bandmate Slash (nee Saul Hudson) is half-black/half-English and didn’t make a Thing out of it.

  77. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @epebble

    Ah yes, the points system.

    The entire janitorial corps seems to be staffed by middle-aged Filipinas and ancient Sikh men, Vancouver will be 70% non-white in two decades, the prime minister openly declares there's no core Canadian identity -- Multikulti über alles -- and the ones with the points are, unlike Mexican strawberry pickers, credentialed to engage in coalitional anti-white grievance-mongering at a high level; and anyone who doesn't want to wake up to find themselves a stranger in their own country can't say anything because the immigrants are just so gosh darn good at making money -- because they've got the points (and the ethics, and the guilt-free ethnic nepotism) you see.

    I doubt if Australia is any different.

    Replies: @anon

    I don’t think RAISE bill will allow any janitorial folks. https://www.cotton.senate.gov/files/documents/170802_New_RAISE_Act_Bill_Text.pdf

    And surely we can use a lot of people who are “darn good at making money” than in eating it up, as is now the case. A cursory reading shows preference to those earning thrice the median income. That is so much better than any strawberry picker that I will happily forgo eating strawberries and allow it to rot in the fields!

  78. ‘Miller’s subpar knowledge of American history’?

    Can they actually cite any facts that Miller got wrong?

  79. What’s interesting is that if you visit the “Anne Frank Center” Twitter feed what you get are essentially a bunch of tweets calling on Miller to put his identity as a Jew ahead of his identity as an American.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Wilkey

    Citation?

    Replies: @Wilkey

  80. bored identity suddenly feels like it’s a summer of 2016….again.

    “…And this is overwhelmingly popular.

    And I challenge any news organization here:

    Do a poll.

    Ask these questions:

    Do you think we should favor applicants to our country who speaks English?

    Yes or No?

    Do you think that we should make sure that workers who come into our country don’t displace existing American workers?

    Do you think people who come into our country should receive welfare or be financially self-sufficient?

    Do you think we should prioritize people based on skill?

    Do you think that we should reduce overall net migration? Do you think we should have unlimited family chain migration?

    If you ask any of these questions — look at the polls.

    Look at the results you’ll get in your own news organizations, and they’ll be very clear.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/politics/2017/08/02/read-full-transcript-wednesday-press-briefing/jP2IHQrMiF1RA6UE1zOhGJ/story.html

  81. “His subpar knowledge of American history, as reflected in Emma Lazarus’ poem, means he couldn’t pass President Trump’s new immigration test.”

    I had to read this a few times to get it. The poem New Colossus reflects American history,and if you don’t have it down you don’t know American history. Trump has instituted a test for potential entrants to see whether they know American history or know the poem. Not sure which, but it doesn’t matter because they’re the same.

    As I think I heard Ted Danson say once, “Well, at least you got yourself a point of view, there.”

  82. @Opinionator
    @Mikey Darmody

    What would you suggest he might have said in response instead?

    Replies: @Mikey Darmody

    He has a lot of good responses at hand. Acosta cut some of those responses off. IMHO Miller tried to take the moral high ground by arguing that his immigration restrictionism is better for blacks/Hispanics in general and the black/Hispanic working class in particular. This is because the litmus test for a good policy proposal in this day&age is if it is good for blacks (and, to a lesser degree, for Hispanics), even if only theoretically so. The Republicans believe that by advocating for policies that will benefit blacks in a moral sense that they will escape the stigma of being the racist party. So they argue in terms of getting more black people working, making them better citizens, etc. The Dems meanwhile understand that blacks just want money and power for their tribe, so they give the latter benefits programs and leadership positions. The irony of the exchange with Miller and the black reporter is incredible: Miller is arguing for benefitting black people morally, but this black lady is so dumb and so tribal that she is offended that he dared to mention black people at all and that he implied that black people are in need of any improvement. All of this is a charade, though. Even if the Hispanic and black working class were operating at max capacity, the country would still be in trouble. Frankly, the problems of the White working class are the most pressing. This group’s success or failure will determine the success or failure of the country. Miller should be talking about these people.

  83. Anne Frank Center ?

    Must admit that hearing of the existence of such an organisation in the US made me simultaneously shake my head and roll my eyes .
    Talk about cultural appropriation .
    I see from Wikipedia that there is no association with the Frank family .
    Surely there are more than enough Jewish victims in the US to go around

  84. @Dan Hayes
    @Autochthon

    Autochthon:

    While your rules for civil discourse are undoubtedly true, they are irrelevant for the purpose of this press conference.

    The plan was to provide a venue to present Miller's views. This was to be accomplished by providing his response to some press interrogator. In this case the journalist interrogator was Acosta. Mission accomplished!

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Forbes

    A fascinating perspective: Acosta unwittingly
    fulfilled a rôle as a boob and a foil to emphasise Miller’s points about how astonishingly stupid are the views of The Narrative. Hence Miller’s palpable relish. I find I agree with tour assessment that Acosta’s boorish behaviour was heavensent for Miller’s puposes and therefore permitted to continue. The more he sputtered, the more preposterous were his points and the more Miller had opportunities to contrast them with reality and truth.

    Acosta was like a femist, pearl-clutching female caller to Tom Leykis’ show: nothing better to prove his points for him, so why not let let her drone on and on.

    CNN are now the Washington Generals.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  85. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Acosta

    Abilio James Acosta (born April 17, 1971) is an American journalist who is currently the Senior White House Correspondent for CNN.

    Acosta’s father is an immigrant from Cuba.[1]

    At a nationally televised news conference in November 2015, Acosta challenged President Obama on his administration’s strategy for destroying the terrorist organization known as ISIS. “Why can’t we take out these bastards,” Acosta asked.[7]

    In March 2016, Acosta traveled to Cuba to cover President Obama’s historic trip to the island. At a rare news conference in Havana featuring both Obama and Cuban president Raul Castro, Acosta pressed the Cuban leader on his country’s human rights record.[8]

    At a nationally televised news conference in May 2016, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump derisively called Acosta “a real beauty” for his reporting.[9] Interrupting Acosta, who was asking Trump about his ability to deal with scrutiny, Trump said sarcastically, “Excuse me, excuse me, I’ve watched you on TV. You’re a real beauty.”[10]

    During President-elect Trump’s first press conference on January 11th, 2017, Acosta attempted to ask a question to the President-elect regarding Russia, however, Trump called on other reporters instead, denouncing Acosta and CNN as “fake news”.[11]

  86. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @yyrvjh
    @anon

    Thank you for illustrating my point. No source was given for the claim that George Washington was re-using the words of one of (((them))), but let's assume this is true.

    That just goes to show that Washington was a smart man who did not hesitate to borrow a well-crafted phrase when he saw one. Or are you saying that he was a hypocrite who told people what they wanted to hear and did not stand up for principle? Or, worse, that Washington was a weak-willed fool who had his head turned by the insidious whisperings of (((them))) -- a puppet doing their bidding?

    Keep twisting yourself into ever more convoluted pretzel shapes to maintain your paranoid fantasy that (((they))) are to blame.

    Replies: @anon, @Olorin

    Or are you saying that he was a hypocrite who told people what they wanted to hear and did not stand up for principle?

    Perish the thought! No politician would ever act in such a fashion!

    Keep twisting yourself into ever more convoluted pretzel shapes to maintain your paranoid fantasy that (((they))) are to blame.

    Well, it really doesn’t seem all that convoluted to me.

    Are you telling me that you genuinely don’t find it even a little bit funny that you got your panties in a twist about everyone blaming “(((them))), and then, you used that speech by Washington to prove that “(((they)))” had nothing

    • Replies: @anon
    @anon

    Stupid lack of "Edit" function...

    As I was saying:

    Are you telling me that you genuinely don’t find it even a little bit funny that you got your panties in a twist about everyone blaming “(((them))), and then, you used that speech by Washington to prove that “(((they)))” had nothing to do with it, only to find out that it was written by one of "(((them))) after all? Because I find it pretty hysterical.

    And, rather than just not say anything, you act all high and mighty and pretend that this somehow proves your point. That's pretty funny too.

  87. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    @yyrvjh

    Or are you saying that he was a hypocrite who told people what they wanted to hear and did not stand up for principle?

    Perish the thought! No politician would ever act in such a fashion!

    Keep twisting yourself into ever more convoluted pretzel shapes to maintain your paranoid fantasy that (((they))) are to blame.


    Well, it really doesn't seem all that convoluted to me.

    Are you telling me that you genuinely don't find it even a little bit funny that you got your panties in a twist about everyone blaming "(((them))), and then, you used that speech by Washington to prove that "(((they)))" had nothing

    Replies: @anon

    Stupid lack of “Edit” function…

    As I was saying:

    Are you telling me that you genuinely don’t find it even a little bit funny that you got your panties in a twist about everyone blaming “(((them))), and then, you used that speech by Washington to prove that “(((they)))” had nothing to do with it, only to find out that it was written by one of “(((them))) after all? Because I find it pretty hysterical.

    And, rather than just not say anything, you act all high and mighty and pretend that this somehow proves your point. That’s pretty funny too.

  88. http://pagesix.com/2017/07/24/recently-separated-jim-acosta-of-cnn-is-loving-the-single-life/

    Recently separated CNN reporter is loving the single life

    By Richard Johnson
    July 24, 2017

    Women have been flocking to recently separated Jim Acosta, the CNN White House correspondent whom President Trump derisively called “a real beauty.”

    The handsome Cuban-American was married for 24 years to Sharon Mobley Stow, a registered nurse with whom he has two daughters and a son.

    But since the couple quietly split earlier this year and started divorce proceedings, Acosta has been embracing the single life in Washington, DC.

    “A friend lives in his building and [has seen] him with different women,” one White House colleague told me.

    Acosta also was quite popular on the recent presidential trip to Saudi Arabia, sources say.

  89. Miller got TRIGGERED like the little bitch he has ALWAYS been. I’d debate the scumbag any day and I wouldn’t rely on rhetoric. Well back to your broom closet at the back of Bannon’s office. Bitch.

    Stehphen Miller would have had a successful career in Germany in 1933-45 as goebbels apprentice

    You all are traitors to US history and just little stupid fanboys of that ridiculous amateurish orange blatherskite. period. sad. stupid as hell. you remind me of all the idiots of south park. no fcking idea of politics and policies.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Tiny Duck

    I’d debate the scumbag any day and I wouldn’t rely on rhetoric.

    That's pretty funny, because you won't even debate us.

    How would you copy and paste comments from other websites in a verbal debate, Tiny?

    Thanks for teaching me the word "blatherskite", though. I'll never use it, because it sounds stupid and try-hard to say, but thanks nonetheless.

  90. @Carlton Meyer
    Another example of fake news from CNN. That Statute was completed in 1886. It was a gift from France to honor freedom in the USA after the slaves were freed (She has broken chains around her ankles). Other stuff was stuck on the bottom over the years, like allowing LEGAL immigrants. From Wiki:

    Inscriptions, plaques, and dedications
    The Statue of Liberty stands on Liberty Island.

    There are several plaques and dedicatory tablets on or near the Statue of Liberty.

    A plaque on the copper just under the figure in front declares that it is a colossal statue representing Liberty, designed by Bartholdi and built by the Paris firm of Gaget, Gauthier et Cie (Cie is the French abbreviation analogous to Co.). [168]
    A presentation tablet, also bearing Bartholdi's name, declares the statue is a gift from the people of the Republic of France that honors "the Alliance of the two Nations in achieving the Independence of the United States of America and attests their abiding friendship."[168]
    A tablet placed by the New York committee commemorates the fundraising done to build the pedestal.[168]
    The cornerstone bears a plaque placed by the Freemasons.[168]
    In 1903, a bronze tablet that bears the text of Emma Lazarus's sonnet, "The New Colossus" (1883), was presented by friends of the poet. Until the 1986 renovation, it was mounted inside the pedestal; today it resides in the Statue of Liberty Museum, in the base.[168]
    "The New Colossus" tablet is accompanied by a tablet given by the Emma Lazarus Commemorative Committee in 1977, celebrating the poet's life.[168]


    So there you have it! The Statue honors the Freemasons first! Honoring legal immigrants not til 1903.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    Miller should have responded that the statue honors American INDEPENDENCE.

  91. @Chrisnonymous
    @MG

    Obviously, this is Monday morning quarterbacking, but he would have been better off going down the road of "the Statue is not law" rather than "the poem was not original".

    Replies: @Opinionator

    No, that is just a technicality. He needs to offer a competing narrative.

  92. @Wilkey
    What's interesting is that if you visit the "Anne Frank Center" Twitter feed what you get are essentially a bunch of tweets calling on Miller to put his identity as a Jew ahead of his identity as an American.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    Citation?

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Opinionator

    That was the citation - their Twitter feed. Read their tweets. Thy are outright references to the fact that Miller is Jewish.

  93. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Miller got TRIGGERED like the little bitch he has ALWAYS been. I'd debate the scumbag any day and I wouldn't rely on rhetoric. Well back to your broom closet at the back of Bannon's office. Bitch.

    Stehphen Miller would have had a successful career in Germany in 1933-45 as goebbels apprentice

    You all are traitors to US history and just little stupid fanboys of that ridiculous amateurish orange blatherskite. period. sad. stupid as hell. you remind me of all the idiots of south park. no fcking idea of politics and policies.

    Replies: @anon

    I’d debate the scumbag any day and I wouldn’t rely on rhetoric.

    That’s pretty funny, because you won’t even debate us.

    How would you copy and paste comments from other websites in a verbal debate, Tiny?

    Thanks for teaching me the word “blatherskite”, though. I’ll never use it, because it sounds stupid and try-hard to say, but thanks nonetheless.

  94. Our boy Steve Miller did well, but he needs to learn from his boss and give these traitors even less chance to speak out-of-turn.

    No “Jim….Jim….Jim….”

  95. @Dan Hayes
    @Autochthon

    Autochthon:

    While your rules for civil discourse are undoubtedly true, they are irrelevant for the purpose of this press conference.

    The plan was to provide a venue to present Miller's views. This was to be accomplished by providing his response to some press interrogator. In this case the journalist interrogator was Acosta. Mission accomplished!

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Forbes

    There’s something to this. Acosta’s been clowning himself for the entirety of this administration. Obviously any advance planning takes into account likely press questions, anticipated story lines, and various personalities. Letting Acosta drone on may be a “feature” rather than a “bug” for getting certain points across.

    I rarely watch these sorts of press briefings, as I have no patience for the rude behavior demonstrated by Acosta. But letting Acosta make a fool of himself is a small price to pay…

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  96. @Opinionator
    @Wilkey

    Citation?

    Replies: @Wilkey

    That was the citation – their Twitter feed. Read their tweets. Thy are outright references to the fact that Miller is Jewish.

  97. @Harry Baldwin
    Jim Acosta kept droning on non-stop as Miller attempted to respond to him. How does this strike the CNN audience? Do they see it as incredibly rude and obnoxious, as I do, or as some sort of heroic "truth to power" stand? (Rhetorical question, no need to respond.)

    Acosta reminds me of one of my sisters-in-law, who babbles away constantly, never listens to what anyone else has to say, interrupts conversations that other people are engaged in, and contributes nothing of value.

    Replies: @Forbes, @Olorin

    How does this strike the CNN audience?

    CNN has an audience?

    Huh. I thought they just had, like, outlets in airports and bars and hotels and such. You know, a contract with Comcast basic cable.

  98. @yyrvjh
    @anon

    Thank you for illustrating my point. No source was given for the claim that George Washington was re-using the words of one of (((them))), but let's assume this is true.

    That just goes to show that Washington was a smart man who did not hesitate to borrow a well-crafted phrase when he saw one. Or are you saying that he was a hypocrite who told people what they wanted to hear and did not stand up for principle? Or, worse, that Washington was a weak-willed fool who had his head turned by the insidious whisperings of (((them))) -- a puppet doing their bidding?

    Keep twisting yourself into ever more convoluted pretzel shapes to maintain your paranoid fantasy that (((they))) are to blame.

    Replies: @anon, @Olorin

    I like the way you deftly convert pattern recognition into (((blame))).

    A narrative mechanism that conjures victimization and constructs an enemy in one swoop.

  99. @gregor
    @candid_observer

    Yeah, I guess American ideals demand some vaguely generous number of immigrants. The implication seems to be that whatever the practical limits, the precise number should be (quietly) set by trusted bureaucrats and it just isn't the place of regular people (or politicians) to entertain notions of "too many" immigrants. Additionally we must pretend like the post 1965 immigration tsunami is just business as usual, an unremarkable continuation of a time honored tradition. American history is simultaneously one of white supremacy and oppression on the one hand and commitment to the bedrock principle of non-white immigration on the other.

    I've had quite a few debates with leftists over these matters in the last two years and I eventually realized that they believe immigration is axiomatically beneficial. They won't admit that immigration could, even hypothetically, make a country worse, except possibly for overpopulation. Everyone is literally equal, so we can dismiss out of hand any suggestion that people from any other country might be immutably poor, uneducated, culturally incompatible, prone to crime, welfare dependent, etc. To the extent any group were to show these problems, they would be assumed to be due to our failure to provide equal opportunity.

    Replies: @Pat Boyle

    The reason almost all immigration is bad is simple. Most of the immigrants are genetically inferior to the a regular citizens.

    Some of you may react to these words but if you believe for example that blacks have an IQ some 15 points below that of whites and that most IQ differences are genetic – that’s what it amounts to. Our discourse is civil but inaccurate. Speaking of all races as if they were comparable to Europeans or Asians is just indulging in fashionable error.

    If you fill your nation with inferior people you will have and inferior country.

  100. @yyrvjh
    @Mark Caplan

    (((George Washington)))

    EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.

    What's that you say? Not one of (((them)))?

    Oh but this is iSteve. Blaming (((them))) is our favorite pastime.

    Replies: @Chebyshev

    That’s a good point.

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