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Chuck Yeager, RIP
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iSteve commenter syonredux points us toward this astringent passage from Chuck Yeager’s autobiography, written with the great ghostwriter Leo Janos:

Atrocities were committed by both sides. That fall our fighter group received orders from the Eighth Air Force to stage a maximum effort. Our seventy-five Mustangs were assigned an area of fifty miles by fifty miles inside Germany and ordered to strafe anything that moved. The object was to demoralize the German population. Nobody asked our opinion about whether we were actually demoralizing the survivors or maybe enraging them to stage their own maximum effort in behalf of the Nazi war effort. We weren’t asked how we felt zapping people. It was a miserable, dirty mission, but we all took off on time and did it. If it occurred to anyone to refuse to participate (nobody refused, as I recall) that person would have probably been court-martialed. I remember sitting next to Bochkay at the briefing and whispering to him “If we’re gonna do things like this, we sure as hell better make sure we’re on the winning side.” That’s still my view.

By definition, war is immoral; there is no such thing as a clean war. Once arimies are engaged, war is total. We were ordered to commit an atrocity, pure and simple but the brass who approved this action probably felt justified because wartime Germany wasn’t easily divided between “innocent civilians” and its military machine. The farmer tilling his potato field might have been feeding German Troops. And because German industry was wrecked by constant bombing, muntions-making was now a cottage industry, dispersed across the country in hundreds of homes and neighborhood factories, which was the British excuse for staging carpet bombing and fire bombing attacks on civilian targets. In war, the military will seldom hesitate to hit civilians if they are in the way, or to target them purposely for various strategic reasons. That’s been true in every war that has ever been fought and will be fought. That is the savage nature of war itself. I’m certainly not proud of that particular strafing mission against civilians. But it is there, on the record and in my memory.

Chuck Yeager, Leo Janos- Yeager: An Autobiography.

Also, Dick Allen, RIP.

Allen, who was known, to his dislike, as Richie Allen when he was National League rookie of the year in 1964 (presumably after former Philadelphia Phillies star Richie Ashburn) and later Rich Allen and finally Dick Allen, was a tremendous baseball slugger. But he was a petulant prima donna who did not mix well with Philadelphia’s obnoxious boo-bird fans. Bill James wrote of him:

The second-most controversial player in baseball history, behind Rogers Hornsby, Allen had baseball talent equal to that of Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, or Joe DiMaggio, and did have three or four seasons when he was as good a player as anyone in baseball, but lost half of his career or more to immaturity and emotional instability.

Modern statistical analysis shows that his 1972 MVP season with the Chicago White Sox was one of the better offensive years of the era.

During his baseball days, he drank a lot and spent more time at the horse track than working on his fielding, so it’s nice to see that he stabilized his life after he washed up at age 35, and lived a long life with his wife of 50+ years, finally dying at 78 in his hometown of Wampum, Pennsylvania.

 

 
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  1. On October 14, 1997, on the 50th anniversary of his historic flight past Mach 1, he flew a new Glamorous Glennis III, an F-15D Eagle, past Mach 1. The chase plane for the flight was an F-16 Fighting Falcon piloted by Bob Hoover, a longtime test, fighter and aerobatic pilot who had been Yeager’s wingman for the first supersonic flight. This was supposed to be Yeager’s last official flight with the U.S. Air Force. However he was called back into flying with the USAF in 2000 and continued to do so until the end of 2012.

    One of a kind. The best line in Right Stuff was when the Yeager character was in a bar and they were watching the fellow at the splashdown pooping the chute on national television and he said the guy did fine. Getting blasted into space on top a rocket was way more than enough or something like that.

    Although the opening was pretty damn awesome too.

    Breaking the sound barrier at age 89 is some kind of old guys’ record, no?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Morton's toes

    "One of a kind."

    That can be said for all of the Right Stuff pilots and first generation NASA dudes. After reading the Neil Armstrong biography, particularly his transition from combat to test pilot, it struck me that these guys had supernatural guts; clearly on the border between gonads of steel and the loony bin. Astronuts.

    Replies: @anonymous as usual

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Morton's toes

    "Breaking the sound barrier at age 89 is some kind of old guys’ record, no?"

    John Glenn was 77 when he went back into space on the Shuttle, which is pretty impressive. But Yeager was the daddy of them all.

    Steve - Queen Juliana's husband took a bribe to buy F104s for the Netherlands, rather than French Mirages. They out-bribed the French!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_bribery_scandals#The_Netherlands

  2. Ironically, just as I clicked on this post, a jet flew directly overhead.

  3. Mr. Yeager played Fred, the barkeep.

  4. Yeah, fine. We all read “the Right Stuff,” and some of us even played (and enjoyed) his flight simulator game.

    And then he’s retired, and he’s got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I’m good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn’t a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don’t – a soapbox, credibility – and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Yeah sure he was a war hero. And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won. That’s not hyperbole: compare the old third reich to modern day Pakistan, not even close. Last I checked, about 40% of the kids in Pakistan are so malnourished that they grow up physically stunted, and most of the rest are not much better off. In a generation or two, that’s where we’re headed. So what did Yeager really accomplish with his heroics?

    Just saying.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @TG


    And then he’s retired, and he’s got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I’m good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn’t a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don’t – a soapbox, credibility – and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.
     

    Indeed. A continuation of that here...

    https://www.twitter.com/KAlexanderAdams/status/1336076768751448067

    Replies: @Escher, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Sean
    @TG


    And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    No, Tojo. The Japanese fighting China for ever after would have been much preferable to the current situation, whereby Japan profits from China while being defended by the faltering US for free. If Japan had attacked the Soviet Union during Operation Barbarossa, then the USSR would have certainly been defeated. A 1939 battle between Japan and the USSR in Mongolia was the decisive moment of WW2. It is said the Chinese have little appreciation for irony.

    Replies: @36 ulster

    , @Muggles
    @TG


    Just saying.
     
    So what have you accomplished? You're an anonymous nobody (like everyone here) who so far as we know hasn't accomplished diddly-squat.

    I guess it make you feel better to demean a real hero who just died at 97. Because he wasn't superman or someone. Didn't solve all the world's problems for you. What a pity.

    The Envy and Hatred is strong in you.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    , @Joe Stalin
    @TG

    He inspired people. I know one person who decided to go into STEM when he saw a little article about him as a child in the 1950s. He has two patents now. I read a YT comment on a "The Right Stuff" video where someone decided to go into an aviation field after watching the movie as a child.

    I read where Wernher von Braun was asked by someone in Europe about what he should do after he got his degree; his reply, 'Come to America, we are going to the moon!'

    We can't do that anymore because we gave all that money to Blacks so they could increase their population, and always demand more resources for their insufferable cries of Equity!

    , @Jack D
    @TG


    before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    That's the sickest thing I've ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn't even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Yeager did more for America than 99.99% of us ever will. For you to posthumously vilify him because he did not do even more when he is not yet even in the ground is sick. It's lucky for you that he's gone now and that you're a coward hiding behind your anonymity because if he was still alive and you said this to his face, he would have punched out your pathetic ass.

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about "hunger in America". If you visit a place like Pakistan, you'll notice that poor people there are really, really skinny, like ribs sticking out skinny. I don't think I have ever met a single individual in America that looks like that (except for people who are terminal cancer patients or the like), and I would fear to have most American "poor people" sit on my kitchen chairs lest they collapse from the weight.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @JMcG, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Corn

    , @Excal
    @TG

    It's a fair question. All those heroics, and now look at us!

    But why focus on Yeager? Weren't there other heroes -- men who gave their entire lives to some cause or great work, which after all only amounted to some little brick or stone in some great edifice that would soon come toppling down? Some of them even lived to see their work destroyed -- and they too did nothing about it.

    Meanwhile, what did you or I do, in the prime of our years, while the countries of the West were collapsing? Complain about Chuck Yeager, a retired test pilot in his dotage, not coming to save us?

    It is right to praise great men, and doers of great deeds, even when they served a lost cause. If we give honour only to those who give us things we want, we are dogs, who will honour our masters for giving us food or merely for not beating us.

  5. One hell of a guy. Tom Wolfe has a great bit in The Right Stuff where he talks about the Chuck Yeager Voice:

    “Anyone who travels very much on airlines in the United States soon gets to know the voice of the airline pilot… coming over the intercom… with a particular drawl, a particular folksiness, a particular down-home calmness that is so exaggerated it begins to parody itself… the voice that tells you, as the airliner is caught in thunderheads and goes bolting up and down a thousand feet at a single gulp, to check your seat belts because ‘uh, folks, it might get a little choppy’… Who doesn’t know that voice! And who can forget it, – even after he is proved right and the emergency is over. That particular voice may sound vaguely Southern or Southwestern, but it is specifically Appalachian in origin. It originated in the mountains of West Virginia, in the coal country, in Lincoln County, so far up in the hollows that, as the saying went, ‘they had to pipe in daylight.’ In the late 1940s and early 1950s this up-hollow voice drifted down from on high, from over the high desert of California, down, down, down, from the upper reaches of the [Pilot] Brotherhood into all phases of American aviation. It was amazing. It was Pygmalion in reverse. Military pilots and then, soon, airline pilots, pilots from Maine and Massachusetts and the Dakotas and Oregon and everywhere else, began to talk in that poker-hollow West Virginia drawl, or as close to it as they could bend their native accents. It was the drawl of the most righteous of all the possessors of the right stuff: Chuck Yeager.”

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @syonredux

    We’ve got the Logo and the Voice and all y’all have are your tired inbreeding jokes.

    , @Dan Hayes
    @syonredux

    I am under the impression that Yeager’s achievements were forgotten till Wolfe resurrected them with his book and the movie! BTW, I was unimpressed with the movie but am still in awe of the printed work! Only an American patriot such as Wolfe could do justice to Chuck Jaeger.

    , @William Badwhite
    @syonredux

    A close relative met Yeager when he (the relative, not Yeager) was going through F-86 school. Yeager came and talked to their class then hung out in the O-Club bar later that night. He (the relative) asked Yeager what he thought as he approached the sound barrier. Yeager answered "I was skeered".

  6. Enlisted as a mechanic, broke the sound barrier at age 24 (and did an encore at 89), retired as a brigadier. High school education, son of West Virginia farmers.

    White, un-PC America was a different country, an incredible-but-brief period in the history of man like the Golden Age of Athens that will be unparalleled for ages.

    Woke, communist Amerika will never achieve anything even close to what people like Yeager did:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Nowak#Orlando_Airport_incident

    https://thegavoice.com/news/lesbian-astronaut-anne-mcclain-accused-of-first-space-crime/

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    @Dr. X

    It's amazing what men can accomplish when they stop trying to impress everyone with how "high class" and Really Smart they are, and just actually do things.

    The accomplishments of men like Wernher Von Braun, Chuck Yeager and Neil Armstrong will be remembered 2,000 years from now. The Really Smart Social Theories we've suffered under for 70 years won't get a footnote.

    , @AndrewR
    @Dr. X

    "Un-PC America" destroyed the civilizational dam that has led to the flood of degeneracy and evil we have seen over the last 75 years.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Dr. X

    Yeager also told JFK and RFK to go pound sand when they tried to force a black guy into the astronaut program. Curtis LeMay backed him up.

    Replies: @Greta Handel, @SunBakedSuburb, @David In TN

    , @Currahee
    @Dr. X

    re. your links:
    Dikes and crazy bitches do just fine, who need a Yeager man?

  7. I’m waiting for the remake with a proud woman of color, who overcomes not just the sound barrier, but a bad hair day. True heroism.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • LOL: 36 ulster
    • Replies: @Paul Rise
    @AnotherDad

    I was going to say, in a few years it will be accepted fact that the sound barrier was first broken by a BIPOC.

  8. His account of this crash in his autobiography was amazing. After punchout, the hot end of the ejection seat smashed his visor, burning his face badly. It then became briefly entangled with his parachute lines. He stated that after he landed, he grabbed the chute lines and pulled them apart with his hands. Very lucky to survive. I must have read his autobiography a dozen times as a teenager. Rest in peace, General.

  9. It’s sort of poetic that he died on the 89th anniversary of Pearl harbor. It was the attack on Pearl harbor that put into motion the events that would change his life. So I find it fitting he died on this day.

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @A new commenter

    79th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day, not the 89th. My parents and I were listening to the 64 dollar question show on the radio that Sunday afternoon when the program was interrupted by an announcement that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. Like untold numbers of other Americans our response was "Where is Pearl Harbor?"

    Replies: @Danindc, @duncsbaby

  10. This photo of Yeager always gives me a chuckle. He’s with Eva Gabor, showing her the cockpit of an F-86H.

    • LOL: HammerJack
    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    Perfect!

  11. …his hometown of Wampum, Pennsylvania.

    How long will this name last? Asbestos, Quebec and Providence Plantations bit the dust this year. At least Asbestos had been considering it all along. Their decision wasn’t Floydoid:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_name_changes_due_to_the_George_Floyd_protests

    Man, that guy’s influence shook more continents than the 2004 tsunami!

    Wampum, by the way, is 97% white, but shrinking. Small as it is, it produced the MLB Allen brothers, an NHL player, and a guy drafted by the NBA who turned them down. Medicine paid more in his day.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Hennon

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wampum,_Pennsylvania

  12. This is great, especially about 20 minutes in:

  13. I remember in the movie it was written like Yeager took the experimental jet up without authorization. I distinctly remember an interview Yeager gave around the time of the movie’s release, on Nightline I think it was, where he was asked about this- Yeager laughed at the idea that anyone, including himself, would take up a jet like that without authorization.

  14. Yeager certainly didn’t like the Brits much lol.

    • Replies: @would smashionalist
    @Bragadocious

    didn't like the Israelis, either. called them arrogant and suggested that their arrogance led to the loss of half their aircraft during the Yom Kippur war. he also righteously kicked the israelis out of Edwards Air Force base, where they were presumably spying on and stealing from us, as usual.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  15. “Modern statistical analysis shows that “:

    Xiden did not win;

    And you do “safe” stuff;

    And Epstein did not kill himself.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  16. It was something to see CY stumping for Duncan Hunter (in ‘08).

    Lower Old Glory.

  17. In other history, today is December 7. There may still be some terrible resolve left yet.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @anon

    New Secretary of Defense

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Austin_2013_2.jpg

    Replies: @AndrewR, @PhysicistDave, @Guy De Champlagne, @SteveRogers42

    , @anonymous
    @anon

    Also expect the National Security Council to be filled with gays.


    He will appoint senior leaders across the government who will champion global equality, including a point person for LGBTQ+ rights on the National Security Council to drive a cohesive message and strategy across our engagement with individual countries and regions.
     
    https://joebiden.com/lgbtq-policy/
    , @AnotherDad
    @anon


    There may still be some terrible resolve left yet.
     
    Yeah, "terrible resolve" to queer up the rest of the world.
  18. Although Chuck Yeager should be considered a true hero to our country; sadly many consider people like George Floyd a bigger contribution to our nation.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  19. Anonymous[363] • Disclaimer says:
    @TG
    Yeah, fine. We all read "the Right Stuff," and some of us even played (and enjoyed) his flight simulator game.

    And then he's retired, and he's got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I'm good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn't a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don't - a soapbox, credibility - and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Yeah sure he was a war hero. And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won. That's not hyperbole: compare the old third reich to modern day Pakistan, not even close. Last I checked, about 40% of the kids in Pakistan are so malnourished that they grow up physically stunted, and most of the rest are not much better off. In a generation or two, that's where we're headed. So what did Yeager really accomplish with his heroics?

    Just saying.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Sean, @Muggles, @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @Excal

    And then he’s retired, and he’s got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I’m good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn’t a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don’t – a soapbox, credibility – and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Indeed. A continuation of that here…

    https://www.twitter.com/KAlexanderAdams/status/1336076768751448067

    • Replies: @Escher
    @Anonymous

    That’s the future of America.
    Tightly packed mega cities like Hong Kong, with a hinterland that provides the means of sustenance.
    Only difference being the quality of the urban inhabitants.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Anonymous

    Thank God for that. Boris the globalist cretin has already extended them an invitation to settle. They'll more likely head for the US. Rather you than us, though ideally none of us.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_fool_theory

    The Chinese leadership has the same view of overseas Chinese that Israel's leaders have of the diaspora (which Mossad guy said he could knock on any Jewish door in the world and they'd help him?). This doesn't bode well for America.

    Back on topic, I hadn't realised just how many amazing aerospace projects were killed by Attlee's Labour government until I read the Eric Brown wiki, or how much the Brits led carrier technology. In those days.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Brown_(pilot)

    Supersonic aircraft scrapped, though the flying tail intended for the Miles M52 was fitted to the X-1 and enabled Yeager's flight. Proposals for sub-orbital space flight with an enlarged V2 turned down on cost grounds.

  20. @Anonymous
    This photo of Yeager always gives me a chuckle. He's with Eva Gabor, showing her the cockpit of an F-86H.

    https://i.imgur.com/5DoHRcm.jpg

    Replies: @anon

    Perfect!

  21. I still think the rightest stuff was possessed by Neil Armstrong: a naval aviator who flew 78 combat missions in Korea, X-15 test-pilot, command pilot of the first mission to demonstrate docking of two spacecraft (Gemini 8), commander of the first lunar landing, pilot of the first lunar landing, first man to walk on the Moon, professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Cincinatti. He was a nerd-hero.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, Neil gets the slight edge.

  22. @anon
    In other history, today is December 7. There may still be some terrible resolve left yet.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dn98oqd1E8w

    Replies: @anonymous, @anonymous, @AnotherDad

    New Secretary of Defense

    • LOL: Currahee
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @anonymous

    Intersectional neoliberal imperialism

    , @PhysicistDave
    @anonymous

    Did everyone see the clip on Tucker tonight of the Chinese prof at Renmin University explaining to a Chinese audience that Beijing did not own Trump but that now things are back under control with Biden in?

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    I assume by now that the Beijing regime has "disappeared" the prof.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    Replies: @El Dato, @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Guy De Champlagne
    @anonymous

    While it's progress of a kind that republicans at least like to pretend that they're the anti war party (or the working class party), the fact is, that as of now, it's all bullshit and that Biden's defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump's defense contractor shills were. And Trump wasn't any better than his appointments because they had to talk him out of crazy war mongering (when he was parroting non Carlson fox hosts) just like Trump (when he was parroting Tucker Carlson) had to talk them out of it.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @MollyA

    , @SteveRogers42
    @anonymous

    Not yet.

  23. anonymous[233] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    In other history, today is December 7. There may still be some terrible resolve left yet.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dn98oqd1E8w

    Replies: @anonymous, @anonymous, @AnotherDad

    Also expect the National Security Council to be filled with gays.

    He will appoint senior leaders across the government who will champion global equality, including a point person for LGBTQ+ rights on the National Security Council to drive a cohesive message and strategy across our engagement with individual countries and regions.

    https://joebiden.com/lgbtq-policy/

  24. @Dr. X
    Enlisted as a mechanic, broke the sound barrier at age 24 (and did an encore at 89), retired as a brigadier. High school education, son of West Virginia farmers.

    White, un-PC America was a different country, an incredible-but-brief period in the history of man like the Golden Age of Athens that will be unparalleled for ages.

    Woke, communist Amerika will never achieve anything even close to what people like Yeager did:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Nowak#Orlando_Airport_incident

    https://thegavoice.com/news/lesbian-astronaut-anne-mcclain-accused-of-first-space-crime/

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @AndrewR, @Jim Don Bob, @Currahee

    It’s amazing what men can accomplish when they stop trying to impress everyone with how “high class” and Really Smart they are, and just actually do things.

    The accomplishments of men like Wernher Von Braun, Chuck Yeager and Neil Armstrong will be remembered 2,000 years from now. The Really Smart Social Theories we’ve suffered under for 70 years won’t get a footnote.

    • Agree: GeneralRipper
  25. OT: Biden Cabinet thus far:

    Four Jews (Treasury, State, Homeland Security, Chief of Staff). One black (Defense). One Hispanic (Health & Human Services).

    White Gentiles: None.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Wilkey


    OT: Biden Cabinet thus far:

    Four Jews (Treasury, State, Homeland Security, Chief of Staff).
     

    That’s how the Democrats roll.

    And they’ll be animated by a drive to prevent Hitler (read: White Gentile America) from ever sniffing power again.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    , @Jack D
    @Wilkey

    He just announced Vilsack for Sec. of Agriculture. So there's at least one.

    This comes as a blow to the black lobby, who had wanted a black Ag. Secty who would refocus the dept away from white farmers and more toward giving (even more) stuff to black people. But then again they want EVERY secretary to be black.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  26. @Wilkey
    OT: Biden Cabinet thus far:

    Four Jews (Treasury, State, Homeland Security, Chief of Staff). One black (Defense). One Hispanic (Health & Human Services).

    White Gentiles: None.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jack D

    OT: Biden Cabinet thus far:

    Four Jews (Treasury, State, Homeland Security, Chief of Staff).

    That’s how the Democrats roll.

    And they’ll be animated by a drive to prevent Hitler (read: White Gentile America) from ever sniffing power again.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Anonymous

    Another day, another Jewish nominee: Biden nominates Rochelle Walensky to head the CDC.

    When are we going to start talking about the complete absence of non-Jewish whites in this administration?

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

  27. Wow, that F-104 was quite a plane.

    The guys who designed and built it really did have the right stuff.

    • Replies: @wren
    @wren

    Okay, I meant the guys who kept it from killing its pilots too regularly.

    Heroes.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @wren

    Hard to fly, though. My dad spent years trying to make it less lethal to European pilots who didn't have quite so much right stuff.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Old Prude

    , @Diversity Heretic
    @wren

    The Italian, Dutch ane German air forces lost about 30% of their F-104s to operational accidents. How Lockheed sold the F-104 as a general-purpose air superiority fighter is a marvel of mareting,but many pilots paid for it with their lives.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Negrolphin Pool

    , @Kibernetika
    @wren

    Salute, Chuck Yeager!

  28. @Bragadocious
    Yeager certainly didn't like the Brits much lol.

    Replies: @would smashionalist

    didn’t like the Israelis, either. called them arrogant and suggested that their arrogance led to the loss of half their aircraft during the Yom Kippur war. he also righteously kicked the israelis out of Edwards Air Force base, where they were presumably spying on and stealing from us, as usual.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @would smashionalist


    he also righteously kicked the israelis out of Edwards Air Force base, where they were presumably spying on and stealing from us, as usual.
     
    They don’t make ‘em like that anymore.
  29. Chuck Yeager

    “Check six!”

  30. @wren
    Wow, that F-104 was quite a plane.

    The guys who designed and built it really did have the right stuff.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @Kibernetika

    Okay, I meant the guys who kept it from killing its pilots too regularly.

    Heroes.

  31. I like this version …

  32. @Dr. X
    Enlisted as a mechanic, broke the sound barrier at age 24 (and did an encore at 89), retired as a brigadier. High school education, son of West Virginia farmers.

    White, un-PC America was a different country, an incredible-but-brief period in the history of man like the Golden Age of Athens that will be unparalleled for ages.

    Woke, communist Amerika will never achieve anything even close to what people like Yeager did:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Nowak#Orlando_Airport_incident

    https://thegavoice.com/news/lesbian-astronaut-anne-mcclain-accused-of-first-space-crime/

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @AndrewR, @Jim Don Bob, @Currahee

    “Un-PC America” destroyed the civilizational dam that has led to the flood of degeneracy and evil we have seen over the last 75 years.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @AndrewR


    “Un-PC America” destroyed the civilizational dam that has led to the flood of degeneracy and evil we have seen over the last 75 years.
     
    How? I thought it was “PC America” that did that?

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool

  33. @anonymous
    @anon

    New Secretary of Defense

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Austin_2013_2.jpg

    Replies: @AndrewR, @PhysicistDave, @Guy De Champlagne, @SteveRogers42

    Intersectional neoliberal imperialism

  34. @Anonymous
    @TG


    And then he’s retired, and he’s got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I’m good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn’t a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don’t – a soapbox, credibility – and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.
     

    Indeed. A continuation of that here...

    https://www.twitter.com/KAlexanderAdams/status/1336076768751448067

    Replies: @Escher, @YetAnotherAnon

    That’s the future of America.
    Tightly packed mega cities like Hong Kong, with a hinterland that provides the means of sustenance.
    Only difference being the quality of the urban inhabitants.

  35. @wren
    Wow, that F-104 was quite a plane.

    The guys who designed and built it really did have the right stuff.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @Kibernetika

    Hard to fly, though. My dad spent years trying to make it less lethal to European pilots who didn’t have quite so much right stuff.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    The F-104 Starfighter was built to be an air superiority fighter (i.e. to attack other fighter aircraft) rather than for the ground attack fighter-bomber role that it was being used for by the Luftwaffe. Lockheed, including your Dad from what you say, beefed up the plane and made it all-weather capable for that type of flying, but this was a very dangerous plane when used in that capacity. Almost 300 planes out of 900-odd planes of the German Air Force crashed, with 115 airmen killed.

    Take a look at the wings of the thing at a museum sometime, such as the one in Washington, FS (gotta be one in LA too). The wings are so thin, that the leading edges were fitted with safety equipment on the ground, and the wingspan is shorter than that of a 2-seat Cessna 152 (22 ft vs. 33 ft) that weighs 6% of the F-104's weight. Of course, the C-152 has never been known for it's ground attack, air superiority, or interceptor roles. (Some of the C-150s came with a rear-view mirror!)

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @nokangaroos, @Anonymous Jew

    , @Old Prude
    @Steve Sailer

    I recall being #1 for take off at a West German airbase when call-sign Dixie 101 called the tower and requested “one low pass, one touch and go, and one full stop”. Upon approval a Luftwaffe F-104 did a low pass down the runway inverted, rolled over, went around the pattern, touched down, hit the afterburner into a straight up vertical climb swinging back onto final for a full stop landing.

    The German tower controller’s reaction over the radio was “Very nice, Dixie vun oh vun”

    If that happened at an American airbase I bet all hell would have come down.

  36. Odd choice, titling an obit which, aside from the video, is 100% about Dick Allen, “Chuck Yeager, RIP”. Trying to figure out what Steve’s saying here.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @wren

    Hard to fly, though. My dad spent years trying to make it less lethal to European pilots who didn't have quite so much right stuff.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Old Prude

    The F-104 Starfighter was built to be an air superiority fighter (i.e. to attack other fighter aircraft) rather than for the ground attack fighter-bomber role that it was being used for by the Luftwaffe. Lockheed, including your Dad from what you say, beefed up the plane and made it all-weather capable for that type of flying, but this was a very dangerous plane when used in that capacity. Almost 300 planes out of 900-odd planes of the German Air Force crashed, with 115 airmen killed.

    Take a look at the wings of the thing at a museum sometime, such as the one in Washington, FS (gotta be one in LA too). The wings are so thin, that the leading edges were fitted with safety equipment on the ground, and the wingspan is shorter than that of a 2-seat Cessna 152 (22 ft vs. 33 ft) that weighs 6% of the F-104’s weight. Of course, the C-152 has never been known for it’s ground attack, air superiority, or interceptor roles. (Some of the C-150s came with a rear-view mirror!)

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I thought the original mission of the F-104 was a bomber interceptor and it was a stretch to get it to serve as a general air superiority fighter( e.g, was there room for a cannon?). Ground attack must have been pointless; how much ordnance could an F-104 carry? Enough to make the risks of a mission worthwhile?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Steve Sailer

    , @nokangaroos
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The 104 was more or less a design study for a nuclear-armed, low-level supersonic intruder (= the role of the much later Tornado) and so far beyond the possibilities of the day as to result in an unflyable design; it should have been shelved like countless others ... but it was so sexy :P

    , @Anonymous Jew
    @Achmed E. Newman

    More bomber interceptor, like the F4. They thought dogfighting would be replaced by long-range missiles. Those tiny wings didn’t generate enough lift for good maneuverability (ie dogfighting). I recall a F-104 pilot saying that when you wanted the plane to turn it was really just a suggestion. And then they bribed the Luftwaffe into taking them off our hands (which killed a lot of German pilots).

    After the lessons of Vietnam, the next (4th) generation of fighters were designed with high maneuverability in mind. Now we’ve gone full circle, and the small wings and poor kinematics of the F-35 are a contentious issue. Are modern missile systems finally advanced enough to end the era of dogfighting?

    Yeager was one of my childhood heroes, but I also heard that he was a bit of an asshat personality wise. They say never meet your heroes. Not sure if it applied to him. It’s too late now. Sadly, his death doesn’t even seem relevant in the Current Year. He outlived America.

  38. @would smashionalist
    @Bragadocious

    didn't like the Israelis, either. called them arrogant and suggested that their arrogance led to the loss of half their aircraft during the Yom Kippur war. he also righteously kicked the israelis out of Edwards Air Force base, where they were presumably spying on and stealing from us, as usual.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    he also righteously kicked the israelis out of Edwards Air Force base, where they were presumably spying on and stealing from us, as usual.

    They don’t make ‘em like that anymore.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  39. @AndrewR
    @Dr. X

    "Un-PC America" destroyed the civilizational dam that has led to the flood of degeneracy and evil we have seen over the last 75 years.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    “Un-PC America” destroyed the civilizational dam that has led to the flood of degeneracy and evil we have seen over the last 75 years.

    How? I thought it was “PC America” that did that?

    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    @Anonymous

    Like dry drunk Bush, avatar of our born-on-third kakistocrats, they didn't so much actively destroy it as let it happen on (their hedonistic) purpose.

  40. @wren
    Wow, that F-104 was quite a plane.

    The guys who designed and built it really did have the right stuff.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @Kibernetika

    The Italian, Dutch ane German air forces lost about 30% of their F-104s to operational accidents. How Lockheed sold the F-104 as a general-purpose air superiority fighter is a marvel of mareting,but many pilots paid for it with their lives.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Diversity Heretic

    In his 90s, my dad described the F-104 as, more or less, a kamikaze intended to shoot down Soviet nuclear bombers.

    Replies: @theMann

    , @Negrolphin Pool
    @Diversity Heretic

    It was exactly the cojones to build and fly barely winged rockets and unfusilaged wings that made Yeager and his pioneering cohort great.

    Good leaders avoid needless casualties. But meaningful innovation has always demanded its tribute in blood.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  41. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    The F-104 Starfighter was built to be an air superiority fighter (i.e. to attack other fighter aircraft) rather than for the ground attack fighter-bomber role that it was being used for by the Luftwaffe. Lockheed, including your Dad from what you say, beefed up the plane and made it all-weather capable for that type of flying, but this was a very dangerous plane when used in that capacity. Almost 300 planes out of 900-odd planes of the German Air Force crashed, with 115 airmen killed.

    Take a look at the wings of the thing at a museum sometime, such as the one in Washington, FS (gotta be one in LA too). The wings are so thin, that the leading edges were fitted with safety equipment on the ground, and the wingspan is shorter than that of a 2-seat Cessna 152 (22 ft vs. 33 ft) that weighs 6% of the F-104's weight. Of course, the C-152 has never been known for it's ground attack, air superiority, or interceptor roles. (Some of the C-150s came with a rear-view mirror!)

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @nokangaroos, @Anonymous Jew

    I thought the original mission of the F-104 was a bomber interceptor and it was a stretch to get it to serve as a general air superiority fighter( e.g, was there room for a cannon?). Ground attack must have been pointless; how much ordnance could an F-104 carry? Enough to make the risks of a mission worthwhile?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Diversity Heretic

    From what I've read, though it had the speed, it just didn't have the range to be a good interceptor either. Fuel couldn't be held in those thin wings, and when I see pictures of ordnance (including the "special" ordinance, as in nukes) and tanks hanging down, I can see why it needs to go fast as hell just to stay in the air!

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Diversity Heretic

    Oops, I forgot to answer this, D.H.: There was a cannon in that plane but it was taken out at some point, or at least not installed in newer models.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Diversity Heretic

    The German defense minister got a $10 million bribe to buy F-104s.

    Replies: @HunInTheSun

  42. @anonymous
    @anon

    New Secretary of Defense

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Austin_2013_2.jpg

    Replies: @AndrewR, @PhysicistDave, @Guy De Champlagne, @SteveRogers42

    Did everyone see the clip on Tucker tonight of the Chinese prof at Renmin University explaining to a Chinese audience that Beijing did not own Trump but that now things are back under control with Biden in?

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    I assume by now that the Beijing regime has “disappeared” the prof.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @PhysicistDave

    In a long time there is finally a power that dares show the US the finger and tell it that it is decrepit ass.

    "We are doomed"

    Get a grip.

    Yeah being number 1 is no longer on the table. So what.

    You want to get that decrepit ass situation under control.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    , @PhysicistDave
    @PhysicistDave

    From John Adams to John Taylor, 17 December 1814:


    Remember Democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes exhausts and murders itself. There never was a Democracy Yet, that did not commit suicide.
     

    Replies: @Excal

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @PhysicistDave

    I've seen it, Dave, but not on Tucker. It's possible that nothing will happen to that Mr. Dongshen. The Chinese government is arrogant, and doesn't care what we think. They figure Biden's in, and the good times are here again for them.

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @Guy De Champlagne
    @PhysicistDave

    Trump did nothing to reduce the US trade deficit with China (or the rest of the world). Don't kid yourself.

    https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html

    He may have increased the degree to which we pointlessly antagonized high level Chinese officials by placing sanctions on people like Carrie Lam, which the guy talks about. To the extent that that pushes the Chinese to develop their own international banking systems outside of US control that's probably a good thing for China and the US. But in the short term it doesn't help anyone.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @PhysicistDave


    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

     

    There was discussion on one YouTube thread about whether the term alien was less accurate than foreigner. Some said it was interchangeable in Chinese. One speaker of Chinese ancestry-- if it wasn't the impressive Eugenia Cheng, it was someone very similar to her-- told of going through immigration and customs in the US for the first time and seeing a sign for the aliens line. She immediately thought of space creatures, not realizing that it applied to her.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

     

    To us, it's a swamp. To them, it's endangered wetlands. The silver lining in this election is that half the adults in the land now know how corrupt the other half are. Corrupt, or naive. Knave, or fool.
  43. IIRC, the F-104 ejected the pilot downward to avoid the T-tail. Since the ejection seat was not zero-zero, a pilot ejecting at low altitude had to roll the plane on its back, which might have been difficult, given the other problems that made ejection necessary.

    The 104 was probably the worse of the Century-series fighters.

    • Replies: @mmack
    @Diversity Heretic

    The original version of the airplane, the F-104A, did have the downward firing ejection seat. Some sources also show the USAF flown B, C, and D versions had them. Due to problems with the design and pilots failing to eject and getting killed, Lockheed developed an upward firing ejection seat. It was retrofitted to earlier planes and one would imagine included on newly built aircraft.

    European versions used an upward firing Martin-Baker seat. Can't imagine rolling the aircraft over at low altitude to eject.

  44. 2020 keeps on delivering.

    But I don’t think you can just go and take a Widowmaker off the tarmac like that. That’s Star Wars grade Hollywood.

    Meanwhile:

    War is Peace.
    Freedom is Slavery.
    Diversity is Strength.
    Wear a Mask.

    ‘Wear a mask’ has been named the ‘most notable quote’ of 2020 – because ‘do what you’re told’ was too on the nose

    Fauci’s quote and nine others are set to be included in the Yale Book of Quotations, a compendium of memorable epigrams, witticisms, slogans, and other short lines. [Yale Law School librarian Fred Shapiro] Shapiro has previously explained he selects quotes that are “famous or revealing of the spirit of the times” rather than “eloquent or admirable”. But putting a banal, borderline-meaningless diktat like “wear a mask” next to famous lines such as PT Barnum’s “There’s a sucker born every minute” and Frederick Douglass’ “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will” comes off like a bad joke.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @El Dato

    "Facediaper" without question is the Word of 2020. And I invented it.

    The official Word or Phrase of 2020 declared by Merriam-Webster or somesuch will be "social distancing" or "masking" - bank on it - but we all know facediaper was the winner. Sorta how the fakestream media declared Creepy Pedo Joe the winner whilst our President will in fact get His second term.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

  45. @PhysicistDave
    @anonymous

    Did everyone see the clip on Tucker tonight of the Chinese prof at Renmin University explaining to a Chinese audience that Beijing did not own Trump but that now things are back under control with Biden in?

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    I assume by now that the Beijing regime has "disappeared" the prof.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    Replies: @El Dato, @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne, @Reg Cæsar

    In a long time there is finally a power that dares show the US the finger and tell it that it is decrepit ass.

    “We are doomed”

    Get a grip.

    Yeah being number 1 is no longer on the table. So what.

    You want to get that decrepit ass situation under control.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @El Dato

    You want to get your punk mouth situation under control.

  46. @PhysicistDave
    @anonymous

    Did everyone see the clip on Tucker tonight of the Chinese prof at Renmin University explaining to a Chinese audience that Beijing did not own Trump but that now things are back under control with Biden in?

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    I assume by now that the Beijing regime has "disappeared" the prof.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    Replies: @El Dato, @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne, @Reg Cæsar

    From John Adams to John Taylor, 17 December 1814:

    Remember Democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes exhausts and murders itself. There never was a Democracy Yet, that did not commit suicide.

    • Replies: @Excal
    @PhysicistDave

    I see that Adams had read his Plato quite thoroughly.

  47. “The second-most controversial player in baseball history, behind Rogers Hornsby, ”

    Uh, no, the second most controversial player in baseball history, behind Ty Cobb. And in modern yrs, behind Billy Martin, and Barry Bonds. No one ever threatened to shoot Hornsby if he showed up to play the A’s (ironically, in PHI), because he deliberately spiked their 3B on the basepaths. Hornsby’s entire team didn’t attempt to beat him up early in his career. Hornsby didn’t go into the stands to beat up a heckler. When it comes to controversy, compared to Ty Cobb, Hornsby was a choir boy.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Disclosure: When I read statements like this coming from Bill James, it does make me seriously question why exactly he is considered to be an authority on the American Pastime at all. After all, MLB existed, flourished, and prospered quite well and fine before Bill James was born and arrived on the scene. It was Bill James who ignored and then minimized the widespread and rampant use of PEDS in MLB. Once it could not be ignored and minimized, it was Bill James (as well as other leading authority figures that represented MLB) who claimed that the direct impact on MLB, as well as PEDS direct impact on Sabermetrics as a whole was non-existent.

    Clearly, this kind of fantasy world style of thinking has not been helpful for MLB. According to most reliable polls, MLB's demographic mean age is age 50+, meaning that MLB no longer is the US's number one sport of choice for sports fans. Obviously with more choices for their entertainment dollars is playing a factor for young people, but also another factor that shouldn't be so casually dismissed is that MLB has also taken the lead in siding with Woke politics.

    It will be interesting to see how MLB fares 10-20 yrs from now, will it still be as prosperous compared to other entertainment/sports that at present, have captured the younger demographics attention?

    For this aspect, and many others, (noted and otherwise left unsaid) Bill James deserves some of the responsibility regarding why MLB is no longer the US's National Pastime, much less the nation's number one sport in terms of profits and revenues.

    To cite one example: Who has more of a direct impact on Social Media, Mike Trout and Giancarlo Stanton, or Kim Kardashian and Justin Beiber? As sports (and thus MLB) is technically a part of the entertainment sector, it is a fair and apt question. For the most part, Social Media is for those under aged 30. MLB is not.

    Replies: @Up2Drew

    , @Ian M.
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    You should check out A Terrible Beauty by Charles Leehrsen. Leehrsen does an excellent job of rehabilitating Cobb's image. While not a saint, neither is Cobb the irredeemable SOB he's often portrayed as. Cobb’s reputation as a villain comes from a dishonest hatchet job written by Al Stump.

  48. Yes, may the Lord keep his soul. Read both his autobiography and Wolfe’s The Right Stuff a couple times. An American man who led a full life…

  49. @Mr. Anon
    I still think the rightest stuff was possessed by Neil Armstrong: a naval aviator who flew 78 combat missions in Korea, X-15 test-pilot, command pilot of the first mission to demonstrate docking of two spacecraft (Gemini 8), commander of the first lunar landing, pilot of the first lunar landing, first man to walk on the Moon, professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Cincinatti. He was a nerd-hero.

    Replies: @Danindc

    Yes, Neil gets the slight edge.

  50. @Diversity Heretic
    @wren

    The Italian, Dutch ane German air forces lost about 30% of their F-104s to operational accidents. How Lockheed sold the F-104 as a general-purpose air superiority fighter is a marvel of mareting,but many pilots paid for it with their lives.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Negrolphin Pool

    In his 90s, my dad described the F-104 as, more or less, a kamikaze intended to shoot down Soviet nuclear bombers.

    • Replies: @theMann
    @Steve Sailer

    The Widow Maker was followed up by the Lead Sled - it would be hard to concieve of more different fighters. It is as almost as if AF designers were at constant loggerheads over role, design, equipage, you name it.


    Meanwhile the Navy designed and deployed the most devastating air superiority fighter ever built.

    The future of air combat will be pure AI. You can pull massively greater g's, much riskier maneuvers, and have more fuel/payload without a human board.

  51. @A new commenter
    It's sort of poetic that he died on the 89th anniversary of Pearl harbor. It was the attack on Pearl harbor that put into motion the events that would change his life. So I find it fitting he died on this day.

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    79th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day, not the 89th. My parents and I were listening to the 64 dollar question show on the radio that Sunday afternoon when the program was interrupted by an announcement that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. Like untold numbers of other Americans our response was “Where is Pearl Harbor?”

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Anonymouse

    That’s hilarious and reminded me of when my dad found out. He was 6 and lived in Hyattsville, MD. The kids all played on the Anacostia River and they had a play area called Swirl Harbor. When he heard the news as a kid, he remembers thinking why would they bother to bomb swirl harbor? I’m going to ask him about this today - thanks.

    , @duncsbaby
    @Anonymouse

    My dad was 15 when the announcement was made on the radio and his mom started crying. He asked her why and she said because this means you're going to be drafted. He was drafted just after he graduated high school in '44 but just missed seeing any action. He did end up in the occupation army of Japan though. He saw Nagasaki and Tokyo in ruins, said Tokyo looked much worse after being fire bombed.

  52. @PhysicistDave
    @anonymous

    Did everyone see the clip on Tucker tonight of the Chinese prof at Renmin University explaining to a Chinese audience that Beijing did not own Trump but that now things are back under control with Biden in?

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    I assume by now that the Beijing regime has "disappeared" the prof.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    Replies: @El Dato, @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne, @Reg Cæsar

    I’ve seen it, Dave, but not on Tucker. It’s possible that nothing will happen to that Mr. Dongshen. The Chinese government is arrogant, and doesn’t care what we think. They figure Biden’s in, and the good times are here again for them.

    • Agree: J.Ross
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's just one professor's personal opinion about how the world works. His only first hand experience was getting a book promotion booking at Politics and Prose.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  53. @Diversity Heretic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I thought the original mission of the F-104 was a bomber interceptor and it was a stretch to get it to serve as a general air superiority fighter( e.g, was there room for a cannon?). Ground attack must have been pointless; how much ordnance could an F-104 carry? Enough to make the risks of a mission worthwhile?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Steve Sailer

    From what I’ve read, though it had the speed, it just didn’t have the range to be a good interceptor either. Fuel couldn’t be held in those thin wings, and when I see pictures of ordnance (including the “special” ordinance, as in nukes) and tanks hanging down, I can see why it needs to go fast as hell just to stay in the air!

  54. I recall Dick Allen late in his career, 2nd time with the Phillies. My main memory was him making a smart defensive play in real time. Basically, he intentionally short hopped a ball instead of making the easy catch, then tagged the runner (standing on first) then the first base bag in the right order to complete the DP. It took the umpires 5 minutes to convince the other teams manager the play was legal and executed correctly. Infield fly was not in effect because only a single base was occupied.

    Had Rocky Nelson executed this in the right order Oct 13 ’60 , Hal Smith would have had the game winning HR, but not a walk off.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    I remember during Dick Allen's one-year with the Dodgers, 1971, he did a lot of smart fielding and base-running plays like that.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    This play you are referring to in the top of the 9th inning of the 7th game of the 1960 World Series, the last game of the 16 team and 154 game season Old Order of baseball, was not available on video until about a decade ago when an early videotape of it was discovered in Bing Crosby's wine cellar a half-century after it was played.

    It was confusing to read about until it was available to see:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UQ3mBb8QIM

    With the Pirates up 9-8 in the top of the 9ths, with 1 out and Gil McDougald on third and Mickey Mantle on first, Yogi Berra ripped a line drive at the Pirates first baseman. He shorthopped the ball, which left him with 3 choices for getting the 3rd out, which would win the World Series:

    - step on first and throw home for the catcher to tag McDougald
    - throw to SS Dick Groat at second and back to first for the double play on the slow running Yogi Berra
    - step on first to put Berra out and tag Mickey Mantle out.

    He chose the third choice, but Mantle, being Mantle, eluded his tag and dove back to first safely while the tying run scored.

    Of course, in the bottom of the 9th, Bill Mazeroski hit the walk-off homer and the underdog Pirates won 10-9.

    But the play in the top of the 9th is now recognized as perhaps the most fascinating in baseball history.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @prime noticer, @David In TN

  55. @Dr. DoomNGloom
    I recall Dick Allen late in his career, 2nd time with the Phillies. My main memory was him making a smart defensive play in real time. Basically, he intentionally short hopped a ball instead of making the easy catch, then tagged the runner (standing on first) then the first base bag in the right order to complete the DP. It took the umpires 5 minutes to convince the other teams manager the play was legal and executed correctly. Infield fly was not in effect because only a single base was occupied.

    Had Rocky Nelson executed this in the right order Oct 13 '60 , Hal Smith would have had the game winning HR, but not a walk off.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    I remember during Dick Allen’s one-year with the Dodgers, 1971, he did a lot of smart fielding and base-running plays like that.

  56. @Anonymous
    @AndrewR


    “Un-PC America” destroyed the civilizational dam that has led to the flood of degeneracy and evil we have seen over the last 75 years.
     
    How? I thought it was “PC America” that did that?

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool

    Like dry drunk Bush, avatar of our born-on-third kakistocrats, they didn’t so much actively destroy it as let it happen on (their hedonistic) purpose.

  57. @Diversity Heretic
    @wren

    The Italian, Dutch ane German air forces lost about 30% of their F-104s to operational accidents. How Lockheed sold the F-104 as a general-purpose air superiority fighter is a marvel of mareting,but many pilots paid for it with their lives.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Negrolphin Pool

    It was exactly the cojones to build and fly barely winged rockets and unfusilaged wings that made Yeager and his pioneering cohort great.

    Good leaders avoid needless casualties. But meaningful innovation has always demanded its tribute in blood.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Negrolphin Pool

    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dave Archer, @Currahee, @Anonymous

  58. @PhysicistDave
    @anonymous

    Did everyone see the clip on Tucker tonight of the Chinese prof at Renmin University explaining to a Chinese audience that Beijing did not own Trump but that now things are back under control with Biden in?

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    I assume by now that the Beijing regime has "disappeared" the prof.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    Replies: @El Dato, @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne, @Reg Cæsar

    Trump did nothing to reduce the US trade deficit with China (or the rest of the world). Don’t kid yourself.

    https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html

    He may have increased the degree to which we pointlessly antagonized high level Chinese officials by placing sanctions on people like Carrie Lam, which the guy talks about. To the extent that that pushes the Chinese to develop their own international banking systems outside of US control that’s probably a good thing for China and the US. But in the short term it doesn’t help anyone.

  59. @anonymous
    @anon

    New Secretary of Defense

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Austin_2013_2.jpg

    Replies: @AndrewR, @PhysicistDave, @Guy De Champlagne, @SteveRogers42

    While it’s progress of a kind that republicans at least like to pretend that they’re the anti war party (or the working class party), the fact is, that as of now, it’s all bullshit and that Biden’s defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump’s defense contractor shills were. And Trump wasn’t any better than his appointments because they had to talk him out of crazy war mongering (when he was parroting non Carlson fox hosts) just like Trump (when he was parroting Tucker Carlson) had to talk them out of it.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Guy De Champlagne


    Biden’s defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump’s defense contractor shills were
     
    Except Trump didn't get "us" into any new wars. So other than being completely wrong, you make a good point.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne

    , @MollyA
    @Guy De Champlagne

    No wars started in four years. Compare that with 1980-2016. Not pretending. Personally though, I don't think the "party" membership has had a lot to do with it.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne

  60. @AnotherDad
    I'm waiting for the remake with a proud woman of color, who overcomes not just the sound barrier, but a bad hair day. True heroism.

    Replies: @Paul Rise

    I was going to say, in a few years it will be accepted fact that the sound barrier was first broken by a BIPOC.

  61. @Anonymouse
    @A new commenter

    79th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day, not the 89th. My parents and I were listening to the 64 dollar question show on the radio that Sunday afternoon when the program was interrupted by an announcement that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. Like untold numbers of other Americans our response was "Where is Pearl Harbor?"

    Replies: @Danindc, @duncsbaby

    That’s hilarious and reminded me of when my dad found out. He was 6 and lived in Hyattsville, MD. The kids all played on the Anacostia River and they had a play area called Swirl Harbor. When he heard the news as a kid, he remembers thinking why would they bother to bomb swirl harbor? I’m going to ask him about this today – thanks.

  62. @Achmed E. Newman
    @PhysicistDave

    I've seen it, Dave, but not on Tucker. It's possible that nothing will happen to that Mr. Dongshen. The Chinese government is arrogant, and doesn't care what we think. They figure Biden's in, and the good times are here again for them.

    Replies: @anonymous

    It’s just one professor’s personal opinion about how the world works. His only first hand experience was getting a book promotion booking at Politics and Prose.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anonymous

    His isolated personal opinion happens to perfectly describe the careers of Mark Kelly and certain others.

  63. He picked a good time to go.

    As Peter Turchin said, “the 2020s… thems that die’ll be the lucky ones…”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    Peter Turchin as the Josh Billings of 2020s...

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  64. @Chrisnonymous
    He picked a good time to go.

    As Peter Turchin said, "the 2020s... thems that die'll be the lucky ones..."

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Peter Turchin as the Josh Billings of 2020s…

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    or the Long John Silver of the 2020s, but your reference more obscure and informed > my reference, so you win.

  65. @Negrolphin Pool
    @Diversity Heretic

    It was exactly the cojones to build and fly barely winged rockets and unfusilaged wings that made Yeager and his pioneering cohort great.

    Good leaders avoid needless casualties. But meaningful innovation has always demanded its tribute in blood.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    Pretty high conditional on making it to retirement. Most comorbidities get screened out on the front end.

    , @Dave Archer
    @Steve Sailer

    These days the life expectancy of test pilots probably isn't much different than the rest of the population but back in the 1950's when jet technology was new the fatality rate was very high.In The Right Stuff it said they were averaging about one test pilot death per week.

    , @Currahee
    @Steve Sailer

    Yeager belies the saying: "old pilots and bold pilots; but no old, bold pilots."

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?
     
    Actually, Britain's closest equivalent to Yeager, Eric Brown, also lived to 97, dying in 2016. Even many aviation enthusiasts were shocked throughout the 21st c. to find out he was still alive--most of them simply assumed he had been killed in some tailless death trap back in the 50s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Brown_(pilot)

    Bob Hoover made it to 94: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Hoover
  66. @Diversity Heretic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I thought the original mission of the F-104 was a bomber interceptor and it was a stretch to get it to serve as a general air superiority fighter( e.g, was there room for a cannon?). Ground attack must have been pointless; how much ordnance could an F-104 carry? Enough to make the risks of a mission worthwhile?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Steve Sailer

    Oops, I forgot to answer this, D.H.: There was a cannon in that plane but it was taken out at some point, or at least not installed in newer models.

  67. @anon
    In other history, today is December 7. There may still be some terrible resolve left yet.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dn98oqd1E8w

    Replies: @anonymous, @anonymous, @AnotherDad

    There may still be some terrible resolve left yet.

    Yeah, “terrible resolve” to queer up the rest of the world.

  68. @TG
    Yeah, fine. We all read "the Right Stuff," and some of us even played (and enjoyed) his flight simulator game.

    And then he's retired, and he's got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I'm good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn't a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don't - a soapbox, credibility - and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Yeah sure he was a war hero. And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won. That's not hyperbole: compare the old third reich to modern day Pakistan, not even close. Last I checked, about 40% of the kids in Pakistan are so malnourished that they grow up physically stunted, and most of the rest are not much better off. In a generation or two, that's where we're headed. So what did Yeager really accomplish with his heroics?

    Just saying.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Sean, @Muggles, @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @Excal

    And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.

    No, Tojo. The Japanese fighting China for ever after would have been much preferable to the current situation, whereby Japan profits from China while being defended by the faltering US for free. If Japan had attacked the Soviet Union during Operation Barbarossa, then the USSR would have certainly been defeated. A 1939 battle between Japan and the USSR in Mongolia was the decisive moment of WW2. It is said the Chinese have little appreciation for irony.

    • Replies: @36 ulster
    @Sean

    One of the lesser-known (hell, virtually UN-known) battles of WWII. The Japanese often got the better of the Soviets in the air, but at Khalkhin Gol (Nomonhan to the Japanese), the Soviets won the infantry scrum and used their BT tanks to envelop the Japanese forces. An armistice was signed, but the Soviets maintained substantial forces on the Mongolian border. The Sorge spy ring in Tokyo followed up its warning of Germany's impending attack on the USSR with information that Japan was shifting its forces south (China) and east (Pacific Islands). Still, it would be months before the Soviets shipped their forces westward on the Trans-Siberian, in time to halt the Wehrmacht just short of Moscow. A not-well-known Japanese movie, with the awkward title Spy Sorge, is available on YouTube, with British actor Iain Glen in the title role. The German military attache' is portrayed by the same guy who played the Stasi officer in the German movie The Lives of Others.

    Replies: @anonymous as usual

  69. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    The F-104 Starfighter was built to be an air superiority fighter (i.e. to attack other fighter aircraft) rather than for the ground attack fighter-bomber role that it was being used for by the Luftwaffe. Lockheed, including your Dad from what you say, beefed up the plane and made it all-weather capable for that type of flying, but this was a very dangerous plane when used in that capacity. Almost 300 planes out of 900-odd planes of the German Air Force crashed, with 115 airmen killed.

    Take a look at the wings of the thing at a museum sometime, such as the one in Washington, FS (gotta be one in LA too). The wings are so thin, that the leading edges were fitted with safety equipment on the ground, and the wingspan is shorter than that of a 2-seat Cessna 152 (22 ft vs. 33 ft) that weighs 6% of the F-104's weight. Of course, the C-152 has never been known for it's ground attack, air superiority, or interceptor roles. (Some of the C-150s came with a rear-view mirror!)

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @nokangaroos, @Anonymous Jew

    The 104 was more or less a design study for a nuclear-armed, low-level supersonic intruder (= the role of the much later Tornado) and so far beyond the possibilities of the day as to result in an unflyable design; it should have been shelved like countless others … but it was so sexy 😛

  70. @syonredux
    One hell of a guy. Tom Wolfe has a great bit in The Right Stuff where he talks about the Chuck Yeager Voice:

    "Anyone who travels very much on airlines in the United States soon gets to know the voice of the airline pilot… coming over the intercom… with a particular drawl, a particular folksiness, a particular down-home calmness that is so exaggerated it begins to parody itself… the voice that tells you, as the airliner is caught in thunderheads and goes bolting up and down a thousand feet at a single gulp, to check your seat belts because ‘uh, folks, it might get a little choppy’… Who doesn’t know that voice! And who can forget it, – even after he is proved right and the emergency is over. That particular voice may sound vaguely Southern or Southwestern, but it is specifically Appalachian in origin. It originated in the mountains of West Virginia, in the coal country, in Lincoln County, so far up in the hollows that, as the saying went, ‘they had to pipe in daylight.’ In the late 1940s and early 1950s this up-hollow voice drifted down from on high, from over the high desert of California, down, down, down, from the upper reaches of the [Pilot] Brotherhood into all phases of American aviation. It was amazing. It was Pygmalion in reverse. Military pilots and then, soon, airline pilots, pilots from Maine and Massachusetts and the Dakotas and Oregon and everywhere else, began to talk in that poker-hollow West Virginia drawl, or as close to it as they could bend their native accents. It was the drawl of the most righteous of all the possessors of the right stuff: Chuck Yeager."

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dan Hayes, @William Badwhite

    We’ve got the Logo and the Voice and all y’all have are your tired inbreeding jokes.

  71. Is it okay to say that Chuck Yeager breaking the sound barrier was a proud moment in “White History”?

    • Replies: @Escher
    @Wake up

    Used to be just “American history”.

  72. @Steve Sailer
    @Negrolphin Pool

    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dave Archer, @Currahee, @Anonymous

    Pretty high conditional on making it to retirement. Most comorbidities get screened out on the front end.

  73. @syonredux
    One hell of a guy. Tom Wolfe has a great bit in The Right Stuff where he talks about the Chuck Yeager Voice:

    "Anyone who travels very much on airlines in the United States soon gets to know the voice of the airline pilot… coming over the intercom… with a particular drawl, a particular folksiness, a particular down-home calmness that is so exaggerated it begins to parody itself… the voice that tells you, as the airliner is caught in thunderheads and goes bolting up and down a thousand feet at a single gulp, to check your seat belts because ‘uh, folks, it might get a little choppy’… Who doesn’t know that voice! And who can forget it, – even after he is proved right and the emergency is over. That particular voice may sound vaguely Southern or Southwestern, but it is specifically Appalachian in origin. It originated in the mountains of West Virginia, in the coal country, in Lincoln County, so far up in the hollows that, as the saying went, ‘they had to pipe in daylight.’ In the late 1940s and early 1950s this up-hollow voice drifted down from on high, from over the high desert of California, down, down, down, from the upper reaches of the [Pilot] Brotherhood into all phases of American aviation. It was amazing. It was Pygmalion in reverse. Military pilots and then, soon, airline pilots, pilots from Maine and Massachusetts and the Dakotas and Oregon and everywhere else, began to talk in that poker-hollow West Virginia drawl, or as close to it as they could bend their native accents. It was the drawl of the most righteous of all the possessors of the right stuff: Chuck Yeager."

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dan Hayes, @William Badwhite

    I am under the impression that Yeager’s achievements were forgotten till Wolfe resurrected them with his book and the movie! BTW, I was unimpressed with the movie but am still in awe of the printed work! Only an American patriot such as Wolfe could do justice to Chuck Jaeger.

  74. @Dr. X
    Enlisted as a mechanic, broke the sound barrier at age 24 (and did an encore at 89), retired as a brigadier. High school education, son of West Virginia farmers.

    White, un-PC America was a different country, an incredible-but-brief period in the history of man like the Golden Age of Athens that will be unparalleled for ages.

    Woke, communist Amerika will never achieve anything even close to what people like Yeager did:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Nowak#Orlando_Airport_incident

    https://thegavoice.com/news/lesbian-astronaut-anne-mcclain-accused-of-first-space-crime/

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @AndrewR, @Jim Don Bob, @Currahee

    Yeager also told JFK and RFK to go pound sand when they tried to force a black guy into the astronaut program. Curtis LeMay backed him up.

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
    @Jim Don Bob

    Really?

    Spin aside (I know, I know), what do you think of the facts as reported in the NYT’s July 2019 “Ed Dwight Was Set to Be the First Black Astronaut. Here’s Why That Never Happened.”? According to that article, Mr. Dwight made it to and through the program, despite being pressured by Mr. Yeager to leave, which Mr. Yeager denied to at least some extent, saying that he was resistant to politicians interested in scoring points by interfering in his conduct of the program. There’s no indication that Mr. Yeager or Mr. LeMay was involved or even privy to the later selection of others, not including Mr. Dwight, from among the candidates.

    A lot of people in Establishia will no doubt be showing their Left stuff by dismissing Mr. Yeager as a race bigot. But those who want to embrace and defend that caricature show him no more respect. There’s more than one way to speak ill of the dead.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Brutusale

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Jim Don Bob

    "Curtis Le May"

    Because of the tiresome pro-JFK tilt I've usually thought of General Le May as a right-wing fanatic. He was a right-wing fanatic. But in this topsy-turvy mirrored funhouse carnival haunted house world where we are all in this together we could've used Bombs Away Le May in the battle against odd-looking Valerie Jarrett.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

    , @David In TN
    @Jim Don Bob

    And they are starting to attack Chuck Yeager for it.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  75. @Steve Sailer
    @Diversity Heretic

    In his 90s, my dad described the F-104 as, more or less, a kamikaze intended to shoot down Soviet nuclear bombers.

    Replies: @theMann

    The Widow Maker was followed up by the Lead Sled – it would be hard to concieve of more different fighters. It is as almost as if AF designers were at constant loggerheads over role, design, equipage, you name it.

    Meanwhile the Navy designed and deployed the most devastating air superiority fighter ever built.

    The future of air combat will be pure AI. You can pull massively greater g’s, much riskier maneuvers, and have more fuel/payload without a human board.

  76. @Dr. X
    Enlisted as a mechanic, broke the sound barrier at age 24 (and did an encore at 89), retired as a brigadier. High school education, son of West Virginia farmers.

    White, un-PC America was a different country, an incredible-but-brief period in the history of man like the Golden Age of Athens that will be unparalleled for ages.

    Woke, communist Amerika will never achieve anything even close to what people like Yeager did:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Nowak#Orlando_Airport_incident

    https://thegavoice.com/news/lesbian-astronaut-anne-mcclain-accused-of-first-space-crime/

    Replies: @RichardTaylor, @AndrewR, @Jim Don Bob, @Currahee

    re. your links:
    Dikes and crazy bitches do just fine, who need a Yeager man?

  77. @Dr. DoomNGloom
    I recall Dick Allen late in his career, 2nd time with the Phillies. My main memory was him making a smart defensive play in real time. Basically, he intentionally short hopped a ball instead of making the easy catch, then tagged the runner (standing on first) then the first base bag in the right order to complete the DP. It took the umpires 5 minutes to convince the other teams manager the play was legal and executed correctly. Infield fly was not in effect because only a single base was occupied.

    Had Rocky Nelson executed this in the right order Oct 13 '60 , Hal Smith would have had the game winning HR, but not a walk off.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Steve Sailer

    This play you are referring to in the top of the 9th inning of the 7th game of the 1960 World Series, the last game of the 16 team and 154 game season Old Order of baseball, was not available on video until about a decade ago when an early videotape of it was discovered in Bing Crosby’s wine cellar a half-century after it was played.

    It was confusing to read about until it was available to see:

    With the Pirates up 9-8 in the top of the 9ths, with 1 out and Gil McDougald on third and Mickey Mantle on first, Yogi Berra ripped a line drive at the Pirates first baseman. He shorthopped the ball, which left him with 3 choices for getting the 3rd out, which would win the World Series:

    – step on first and throw home for the catcher to tag McDougald
    – throw to SS Dick Groat at second and back to first for the double play on the slow running Yogi Berra
    – step on first to put Berra out and tag Mickey Mantle out.

    He chose the third choice, but Mantle, being Mantle, eluded his tag and dove back to first safely while the tying run scored.

    Of course, in the bottom of the 9th, Bill Mazeroski hit the walk-off homer and the underdog Pirates won 10-9.

    But the play in the top of the 9th is now recognized as perhaps the most fascinating in baseball history.

    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident
    @Steve Sailer

    There are a lot of good baseball trivia questions involved in that play.

    Harvey Haddix has a WS game 7 win, and a 12 perfect-inning loss.

    Mantle probably should have gone half way to second and gotten in a rundown, allowing McDougald to score.

    A Dick Groat hat trick should be: NL MVP, basketball All American, and sharing your name with a rare disease. He was still the color commentator for Pitt basketball until a year or two ago in his late eighties.

    Replies: @gsjackson, @David In TN

    , @prime noticer
    @Steve Sailer

    run this video thru the AI algorithm to see how slow this pitch is.

    , @David In TN
    @Steve Sailer

    I remember seeing the play on TV when it happened. I was rooting for the Yankees. Mickey Mantle diving back into first base is still in my mind's eye. One of the great baserunning moves of all time though it never was mentioned much in Mantle's lifetime. Mantle himself never made anything of it.

  78. @Wake up
    Is it okay to say that Chuck Yeager breaking the sound barrier was a proud moment in “White History”?

    Replies: @Escher

    Used to be just “American history”.

  79. Men like Chuck Yeager (experimental pilots) weren’t picked as astronaut candidates because it was felt that they would have trouble obeying orders. This caused one of them to hit back with the classic line “spam in a can” to describe the Mercury astronauts, whose space-piloting duties were minimal to non-existent.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @songbird

    "Men like Chuck Yeager (experimental pilots) weren’t picked as astronaut candidates because it was felt that they would have trouble obeying orders."

    I think it was Yeager's lack of college which kept him out. Neil Armstrong was a test pilot at Edwards. Al Shepard, Glenn, Grissom and Wally Schirra were test pilots too.

    Replies: @songbird

  80. @TG
    Yeah, fine. We all read "the Right Stuff," and some of us even played (and enjoyed) his flight simulator game.

    And then he's retired, and he's got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I'm good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn't a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don't - a soapbox, credibility - and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Yeah sure he was a war hero. And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won. That's not hyperbole: compare the old third reich to modern day Pakistan, not even close. Last I checked, about 40% of the kids in Pakistan are so malnourished that they grow up physically stunted, and most of the rest are not much better off. In a generation or two, that's where we're headed. So what did Yeager really accomplish with his heroics?

    Just saying.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Sean, @Muggles, @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @Excal

    Just saying.

    So what have you accomplished? You’re an anonymous nobody (like everyone here) who so far as we know hasn’t accomplished diddly-squat.

    I guess it make you feel better to demean a real hero who just died at 97. Because he wasn’t superman or someone. Didn’t solve all the world’s problems for you. What a pity.

    The Envy and Hatred is strong in you.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Polynikes
    @Muggles

    Some otherwise thoughtful people on here expect too much at times and can’t take wins, even if it means partial ones, when they get them. It’s why we lose the culture battle. The other side will do anything to tear it down and we’ll only protect it or honor it if it’s perfect in our own special way.

    Guys like Yeager should be held up as cultural heroes and examples for future generations of what they can accomplish. Instead we cry because long after their rightful retirement age they didn’t advocate on Capitol Hill for our pet causes? C’mon...

    Replies: @Muggles

  81. @Diversity Heretic
    IIRC, the F-104 ejected the pilot downward to avoid the T-tail. Since the ejection seat was not zero-zero, a pilot ejecting at low altitude had to roll the plane on its back, which might have been difficult, given the other problems that made ejection necessary.

    The 104 was probably the worse of the Century-series fighters.

    Replies: @mmack

    The original version of the airplane, the F-104A, did have the downward firing ejection seat. Some sources also show the USAF flown B, C, and D versions had them. Due to problems with the design and pilots failing to eject and getting killed, Lockheed developed an upward firing ejection seat. It was retrofitted to earlier planes and one would imagine included on newly built aircraft.

    European versions used an upward firing Martin-Baker seat. Can’t imagine rolling the aircraft over at low altitude to eject.

  82. @Steve Sailer
    @Negrolphin Pool

    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dave Archer, @Currahee, @Anonymous

    These days the life expectancy of test pilots probably isn’t much different than the rest of the population but back in the 1950’s when jet technology was new the fatality rate was very high.In The Right Stuff it said they were averaging about one test pilot death per week.

  83. @Jim Don Bob
    @Dr. X

    Yeager also told JFK and RFK to go pound sand when they tried to force a black guy into the astronaut program. Curtis LeMay backed him up.

    Replies: @Greta Handel, @SunBakedSuburb, @David In TN

    Really?

    Spin aside (I know, I know), what do you think of the facts as reported in the NYT’s July 2019 “Ed Dwight Was Set to Be the First Black Astronaut. Here’s Why That Never Happened.”? According to that article, Mr. Dwight made it to and through the program, despite being pressured by Mr. Yeager to leave, which Mr. Yeager denied to at least some extent, saying that he was resistant to politicians interested in scoring points by interfering in his conduct of the program. There’s no indication that Mr. Yeager or Mr. LeMay was involved or even privy to the later selection of others, not including Mr. Dwight, from among the candidates.

    A lot of people in Establishia will no doubt be showing their Left stuff by dismissing Mr. Yeager as a race bigot. But those who want to embrace and defend that caricature show him no more respect. There’s more than one way to speak ill of the dead.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Greta Handel

    I have not read the NYT article, and probably won't, because I think everything they publish has an agenda.

    IIRC, Dwight was in the program, and despite being coached up relentlessly, couldn't cut it compared to the other guys. He later accused Yeager of racism. I read another account of a black pilot who flew with Yeager in Europe in the 50s and loved it.

    Yeager didn't give a rat's ass what color you were if you had the right stuff. Dwight didn't, so Yeager bounced him, and LeMay backed him.

    , @J.Ross
    @Greta Handel

    This was extensively discussed in a previous thread, to include excerpts from books. I [approximately] quote one of the conclusions: Yeager saved that black man's life by excluding him from the highly dangerous early years of astronauting.

    , @Brutusale
    @Greta Handel

    https://victoriayeager.com/emmett-hatch/

    As the best, Yeager respected excellence.

  84. is the academic rank of West Point graduates publicly known? Would like to know how well the incoming secretary of defense did in college. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Austin

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    @Steve Richter

    Grandpa Badfinger will never be President, therefore that guy will never be SecDef.

    , @res
    @Steve Richter

    For 1977 and earlier (Austin was 1975) graduates were ranked by Cullum Number. Since then they only note distinguished graduates (top 5 or 10 percent, 1978-1991 and 1991-present respectively, more at https://www.west-point.org/wp/ring_recovery/RRP/RingPix/2010ROG_ReferencesSect5.pdf ).

    Until 1977 the Cullum Numbers were based on General Order of Merit (anyone know how well that correlates with academic rank?). This PDF gives the range of numbers applicable to each graduating class.
    https://www.westpointaog.org/file/cullumnumbers.pdf

    This page allows lookups of graduates, but you have to be a graduate, widow, or ex-cadet.
    https://www.westpointaog.org/registerofgraduates

    This site has Cullum Numbers up to 1883 (for instance, you can see Robert E. Lee second in the 1829 class).
    http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/home.html

  85. Allen was maybe the original black badass athlete of the ’60s — a forerunner to Tommy Smith, John Carlos, etc. Emphasis on the badass, and with high intelligence. A guy I knew — football and baseball player at Duke — had kind of a wise acre attitude, and running into Allen once at spring training asked him in a sort of sardonic way: “Hey Richie, how’d you get such strong wrists?” Allen broke into a big smile and made a gesture simulating masturbation.

    Regardless of off-field issues, his performance at the plate from 1964 to 1974 was on par with anyone in MLB. He’s a HOFer for sure on talent, and probably deserves to be for performance too if you factor in that he played in an era of pitcher dominance. A career .912 OBP.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @gsjackson

    A career .912 OBP.

    OPS, not OBP. Agree he should be HOFer.

    Replies: @gsjackson

  86. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    The F-104 Starfighter was built to be an air superiority fighter (i.e. to attack other fighter aircraft) rather than for the ground attack fighter-bomber role that it was being used for by the Luftwaffe. Lockheed, including your Dad from what you say, beefed up the plane and made it all-weather capable for that type of flying, but this was a very dangerous plane when used in that capacity. Almost 300 planes out of 900-odd planes of the German Air Force crashed, with 115 airmen killed.

    Take a look at the wings of the thing at a museum sometime, such as the one in Washington, FS (gotta be one in LA too). The wings are so thin, that the leading edges were fitted with safety equipment on the ground, and the wingspan is shorter than that of a 2-seat Cessna 152 (22 ft vs. 33 ft) that weighs 6% of the F-104's weight. Of course, the C-152 has never been known for it's ground attack, air superiority, or interceptor roles. (Some of the C-150s came with a rear-view mirror!)

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @nokangaroos, @Anonymous Jew

    More bomber interceptor, like the F4. They thought dogfighting would be replaced by long-range missiles. Those tiny wings didn’t generate enough lift for good maneuverability (ie dogfighting). I recall a F-104 pilot saying that when you wanted the plane to turn it was really just a suggestion. And then they bribed the Luftwaffe into taking them off our hands (which killed a lot of German pilots).

    After the lessons of Vietnam, the next (4th) generation of fighters were designed with high maneuverability in mind. Now we’ve gone full circle, and the small wings and poor kinematics of the F-35 are a contentious issue. Are modern missile systems finally advanced enough to end the era of dogfighting?

    Yeager was one of my childhood heroes, but I also heard that he was a bit of an asshat personality wise. They say never meet your heroes. Not sure if it applied to him. It’s too late now. Sadly, his death doesn’t even seem relevant in the Current Year. He outlived America.

  87. @Morton's toes

    On October 14, 1997, on the 50th anniversary of his historic flight past Mach 1, he flew a new Glamorous Glennis III, an F-15D Eagle, past Mach 1. The chase plane for the flight was an F-16 Fighting Falcon piloted by Bob Hoover, a longtime test, fighter and aerobatic pilot who had been Yeager's wingman for the first supersonic flight. This was supposed to be Yeager's last official flight with the U.S. Air Force. However he was called back into flying with the USAF in 2000 and continued to do so until the end of 2012.
     
    One of a kind. The best line in Right Stuff was when the Yeager character was in a bar and they were watching the fellow at the splashdown pooping the chute on national television and he said the guy did fine. Getting blasted into space on top a rocket was way more than enough or something like that.

    Although the opening was pretty damn awesome too.

    Breaking the sound barrier at age 89 is some kind of old guys' record, no?

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @YetAnotherAnon

    “One of a kind.”

    That can be said for all of the Right Stuff pilots and first generation NASA dudes. After reading the Neil Armstrong biography, particularly his transition from combat to test pilot, it struck me that these guys had supernatural guts; clearly on the border between gonads of steel and the loony bin. Astronuts.

    • Replies: @anonymous as usual
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Bullshit. "Supernatural guts" for doing a fun but dangerous job is hyperbole.

    About 5 percent of American males die young from car wrecks, shootouts, fights, or messing around with the wrong people, that sort of thing. Nothing supernatural about it - if you are a young guy who isn't rich, and you don't have guts, you don't get laid, or if you do get laid, it is probably only with fat chicks.

    I think Yeager was a wonderful guy, but there was nothing supernatural about his bravery. A great guy, and super brave, but so were millions of his contemporaries.

    Don't diss American males by pretending this one guy was an exception.

  88. @Steve Sailer
    @wren

    Hard to fly, though. My dad spent years trying to make it less lethal to European pilots who didn't have quite so much right stuff.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Old Prude

    I recall being #1 for take off at a West German airbase when call-sign Dixie 101 called the tower and requested “one low pass, one touch and go, and one full stop”. Upon approval a Luftwaffe F-104 did a low pass down the runway inverted, rolled over, went around the pattern, touched down, hit the afterburner into a straight up vertical climb swinging back onto final for a full stop landing.

    The German tower controller’s reaction over the radio was “Very nice, Dixie vun oh vun”

    If that happened at an American airbase I bet all hell would have come down.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  89. @Jim Don Bob
    @Dr. X

    Yeager also told JFK and RFK to go pound sand when they tried to force a black guy into the astronaut program. Curtis LeMay backed him up.

    Replies: @Greta Handel, @SunBakedSuburb, @David In TN

    “Curtis Le May”

    Because of the tiresome pro-JFK tilt I’ve usually thought of General Le May as a right-wing fanatic. He was a right-wing fanatic. But in this topsy-turvy mirrored funhouse carnival haunted house world where we are all in this together we could’ve used Bombs Away Le May in the battle against odd-looking Valerie Jarrett.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

    In Europe, LeMay flew combat missions, riding in the top turret to obseve bomber formation flying. He would wait at the tower for returning planes until all possibility that they could return had ended.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  90. @Steve Sailer
    @Negrolphin Pool

    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dave Archer, @Currahee, @Anonymous

    Yeager belies the saying: “old pilots and bold pilots; but no old, bold pilots.”

  91. anonymous[272] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve why not talk about the election like refusal to proceed with signature audit in Georgia? Why are you largely avoiding the election? Why does your support for Trump seem so lukewarm?

    In another attempt to prove that voter fraud cost him the election, President Donald Trump said on Saturday that Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger should allow a signature verification, which will “show large scale discrepancies.”

    “I will easily & quickly win Georgia if Governor @BrianKempGA or the Secretary of State permit a simple signature verification. Has not been done and will show large scale discrepancies. Why are these two ‘Republicans’ saying no? If we win Georgia, everything else falls in place,” he tweeted.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @anonymous

    "Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger should allow a signature verification, which will “show large scale discrepancies.”

    don't know if it was Crowder, Tim Pool or Scott Adams, but they addressed that very issue and concluded that it wasn't going to happen because the Guv and SOS are embarrassed that it happened under their watch and don't want to lose their jobs. Contrast that to the shit show that my Guv Whitmer and SOS Benson, throw in the carpet muncher AG Nessel, presided over, and they don't give 2 fuqs about it, and even encourage it. Difference between Republicans and Democrats.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Corn

    , @Bragadocious
    @anonymous

    Trump's an abrasive New Yorker. Proud Californian Sailer can't get past that. This is a socio-cultural issue, not ideological.

  92. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    This play you are referring to in the top of the 9th inning of the 7th game of the 1960 World Series, the last game of the 16 team and 154 game season Old Order of baseball, was not available on video until about a decade ago when an early videotape of it was discovered in Bing Crosby's wine cellar a half-century after it was played.

    It was confusing to read about until it was available to see:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UQ3mBb8QIM

    With the Pirates up 9-8 in the top of the 9ths, with 1 out and Gil McDougald on third and Mickey Mantle on first, Yogi Berra ripped a line drive at the Pirates first baseman. He shorthopped the ball, which left him with 3 choices for getting the 3rd out, which would win the World Series:

    - step on first and throw home for the catcher to tag McDougald
    - throw to SS Dick Groat at second and back to first for the double play on the slow running Yogi Berra
    - step on first to put Berra out and tag Mickey Mantle out.

    He chose the third choice, but Mantle, being Mantle, eluded his tag and dove back to first safely while the tying run scored.

    Of course, in the bottom of the 9th, Bill Mazeroski hit the walk-off homer and the underdog Pirates won 10-9.

    But the play in the top of the 9th is now recognized as perhaps the most fascinating in baseball history.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @prime noticer, @David In TN

    There are a lot of good baseball trivia questions involved in that play.

    Harvey Haddix has a WS game 7 win, and a 12 perfect-inning loss.

    Mantle probably should have gone half way to second and gotten in a rundown, allowing McDougald to score.

    A Dick Groat hat trick should be: NL MVP, basketball All American, and sharing your name with a rare disease. He was still the color commentator for Pitt basketball until a year or two ago in his late eighties.

    • Replies: @gsjackson
    @Magic Dirt Resident

    I think Groat is the only person in both the college basketball hall of fame and the college baseball hall of fame.

    , @David In TN
    @Magic Dirt Resident

    Had Mantle "gotten in a rundown," he would have given up an out.

  93. @TG
    Yeah, fine. We all read "the Right Stuff," and some of us even played (and enjoyed) his flight simulator game.

    And then he's retired, and he's got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I'm good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn't a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don't - a soapbox, credibility - and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Yeah sure he was a war hero. And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won. That's not hyperbole: compare the old third reich to modern day Pakistan, not even close. Last I checked, about 40% of the kids in Pakistan are so malnourished that they grow up physically stunted, and most of the rest are not much better off. In a generation or two, that's where we're headed. So what did Yeager really accomplish with his heroics?

    Just saying.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Sean, @Muggles, @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @Excal

    He inspired people. I know one person who decided to go into STEM when he saw a little article about him as a child in the 1950s. He has two patents now. I read a YT comment on a “The Right Stuff” video where someone decided to go into an aviation field after watching the movie as a child.

    I read where Wernher von Braun was asked by someone in Europe about what he should do after he got his degree; his reply, ‘Come to America, we are going to the moon!’

    We can’t do that anymore because we gave all that money to Blacks so they could increase their population, and always demand more resources for their insufferable cries of Equity!

    • Agree: 36 ulster
  94. Who cares about the coon. And to put some black loser that plays kids games with real White men that do real jobs…pffft!

  95. @TG
    Yeah, fine. We all read "the Right Stuff," and some of us even played (and enjoyed) his flight simulator game.

    And then he's retired, and he's got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I'm good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn't a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don't - a soapbox, credibility - and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Yeah sure he was a war hero. And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won. That's not hyperbole: compare the old third reich to modern day Pakistan, not even close. Last I checked, about 40% of the kids in Pakistan are so malnourished that they grow up physically stunted, and most of the rest are not much better off. In a generation or two, that's where we're headed. So what did Yeager really accomplish with his heroics?

    Just saying.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Sean, @Muggles, @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @Excal

    before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.

    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Yeager did more for America than 99.99% of us ever will. For you to posthumously vilify him because he did not do even more when he is not yet even in the ground is sick. It’s lucky for you that he’s gone now and that you’re a coward hiding behind your anonymity because if he was still alive and you said this to his face, he would have punched out your pathetic ass.

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about “hunger in America”. If you visit a place like Pakistan, you’ll notice that poor people there are really, really skinny, like ribs sticking out skinny. I don’t think I have ever met a single individual in America that looks like that (except for people who are terminal cancer patients or the like), and I would fear to have most American “poor people” sit on my kitchen chairs lest they collapse from the weight.

    • Disagree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident
    @Jack D


    Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.
     
    Do you honestly believe this? Germany tried and failed to invade the UK, so how were they supposed to invade and conquer a country 40x bigger across the ocean?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @JMcG
    @Jack D

    Hitler couldn’t conquer continental Europe, never mind the continental US. I’m counting western Russia as part of Europe here, before anyone jumps in.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.
     
    That is complete and utter BS. At the end of WWII Hitler was 56, strung out on uppers and Europe was sick of war. The US sits then, as ever, across an ocean where it cannot be successfully invaded. Within a short time it would have had many nuclear weapons, and from then on invasion would have been impossible. You know this.

    If Hitler had won, the Jews would have left the USSR, but aside from that, Hitler had already defeated and occupied the rest of Europe, so the difference in terms of Jewish population would not be much. There would be peace. The difference in terms of Jewish control in the world would be significant. You would have the European version of Hollywood though, and a lack of pro-Jewish central banks in Europe/USSR. Outside that, there would be Jewish control, except in East Asia.

    What would have happened is that given a few decades, maybe a century, Europe would have forgotten about the Jews and let them back in, and the cycle would have repeated probably.

    From your writings it seems like you don't care about our people. So why should we reciprocate and care about your kind? And not even to the point of life, but about your kind's control and power. What's in it for us?

    I don't think the fate of the world hinges on Chuck Yeager, nor should it, but AFAICT the outcome of WWII was a net loss for Europeans everywhere, even in the so-called winning countries. Objectively, Jewish leadership, influence and control has been bad for us. I wish it were not so, and it seems unecessary that it had to be like this, but here we are.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Johann Ricke

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist.
     
    a) You are not the alpha and omega of life.

    b) Steve, me ... pretty much everyone commenting here (bar just a few) would also not exist. History would be different.

    Hate to break it to you but you don't exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust ... the whole package. Our individual existences are highly contingent ... everything that leads up to pa on ma at a particular moment, with particular fish ready to fire.

    Perspective.

    ~~~

    The striking thing about the Nazis is they managed one of the greatest own-goals in human history. Everything they set out to achieve for Germany, Germans, "the Aryan Race", Central Europe, blocking Russian expansion, anti-communism, etc. they made much, much worse.

    Hitler wasn't alone in that. As in 1914 there was poor decision making all around that encouraged the crisis. But Hitler's megalomania fueled it.

    ~~~


    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite,
     
    Huh? Hey, I hate looking at fat people as much as then next guy. (And need to lose 10lbs myself.) Food abundance isn't a "problem". It's a great thing. Being fat is easily fixed by pushing back from the table and getting some exercise. Ok, his "malnutrition is coming" thing is ridiculous, but the reverse isn't our big problem either. (Ok, maybe it is our "big" problem, but certainly not our most important.)

    The serious problem Americans face is their nation is being stolen from themselves and their posterity, by traitorous, grasping, greedy minoritarian elites. That's the real problem--losing your nation, not being able to turn over to your children, your posterity a bright future in their own land, but a shrunken dystopian existence in a querulous globoslum.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Wilkey

    , @Corn
    @Jack D


    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about “hunger in America”
     
    I think honest liberals know it’s BS too. I remember awhile back I was browsing Reddit and some internet communist was ranting about “food insecurity”. Couldn’t even bring himself to say hunger.

    Replies: @36 ulster

  96. Ya gotta love Yeager’s old school Appalachian candor:

    Q: What about the Israelis,always heard they were DA best warpilots in the world… A: Arrogant. Didn’t listen. Lost half their a/c in war.

    That was then. You think that’s still a problem?

    I don’t know – haven’t interacted in a while. However, I did kick ’em off Edwards back in the ’60’s

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @syonredux

    Whatta guy!

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @syonredux

    I once knew an ex-USAF pilot. Quite an arrogant fellow.

    I’ve met many arrogant cadets (and civilians).

    I’ve read from a chief, I think on this blog, that freshly minted ensigns, aboard USN submarines, are quite arrogant.

    Arrogance is virtually synonymous with “naval aviator”. Indeed, the attitude is a stereotype: Recall that scene from Top Gun where “Viper” announced how much he admired “Mav’s” arrogance.

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    Replies: @syonredux, @JMcG, @kaganovitch

  97. Maybe this is a good time to repeat my story about how I learned that my father had met Chuck Yeager:

    [MORE]

    When I was thirteen years old, I built plastic model of the Bell X-1, the aircraft Yeager flew to fame beyond Mach 1. My father noticed it proudly displayed on my dresser. He said, “I met the pilot who flew that airplane.”

    Wow.

    Dad went on to explain. As a young engineer, years before I was born, his company had sent him to some kind of engineers’ dinner in San Francisco. Chuck Yeager, the man who had recently flown the X-1 through the sound barrier, would be the honored guest and speaker.

    As fate would have it, my father was seated next to Yeager. They had dinner together. The odd part is, Dad was not impressed!

    He told me about his conversation with the hero sitting next to him. Chuck was full of himself and had little to say, according to my father. Dad intimated that Yeager was not very intellectual or interested in things. (This is funny, because my father himself did not like “eggheads” as he called them.)

    Now, I am not comparing the two men, but they came from the same generation, both served in the military during the WWII era, Yeager in the Army/Air Force, my father in the Navy. (Hey, maybe that was the problem LOL.)

    Anyway, I was a little bit shocked and disappointed that my father had met the hero who flew the plane I had just built a model of and found that hero lacking. You have to understand men like that from that generation, though. They could be kind of deadpan. Dad was not at all telling his son that the first man to fly faster than sound was not a hero, he was just teaching me that we are all human. He was right.

    • Thanks: vhrm
  98. @syonredux
    Ya gotta love Yeager's old school Appalachian candor:

    Q: What about the Israelis,always heard they were DA best warpilots in the world... A: Arrogant. Didn't listen. Lost half their a/c in war.
     


    That was then. You think that's still a problem?


    I don't know - haven't interacted in a while. However, I did kick 'em off Edwards back in the '60's

     

    https://twitter.com/GenChuckYeager/status/931560082088669185

    https://twitter.com/GenChuckYeager/status/931718346902343680

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Abolish_public_education

    Whatta guy!

  99. @Guy De Champlagne
    @anonymous

    While it's progress of a kind that republicans at least like to pretend that they're the anti war party (or the working class party), the fact is, that as of now, it's all bullshit and that Biden's defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump's defense contractor shills were. And Trump wasn't any better than his appointments because they had to talk him out of crazy war mongering (when he was parroting non Carlson fox hosts) just like Trump (when he was parroting Tucker Carlson) had to talk them out of it.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @MollyA

    Biden’s defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump’s defense contractor shills were

    Except Trump didn’t get “us” into any new wars. So other than being completely wrong, you make a good point.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @William Badwhite

    Hahaa!

    (Gotta use that line. Thanks.)

    , @Guy De Champlagne
    @William Badwhite

    I'm perfectly comfortable saying that someone that bought a lottery ticket and won was still being irrational even if in one sense that lottery ticket had a 100% chance of winning and was a fantastically rational investment.

    We got through Trump's wack job israel obsessive appointments and horrible temperament through the skin of our teeth. We won the lottery but I don't want another ticket.

  100. @William Badwhite
    @Guy De Champlagne


    Biden’s defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump’s defense contractor shills were
     
    Except Trump didn't get "us" into any new wars. So other than being completely wrong, you make a good point.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne

    Hahaa!

    (Gotta use that line. Thanks.)

  101. @syonredux
    One hell of a guy. Tom Wolfe has a great bit in The Right Stuff where he talks about the Chuck Yeager Voice:

    "Anyone who travels very much on airlines in the United States soon gets to know the voice of the airline pilot… coming over the intercom… with a particular drawl, a particular folksiness, a particular down-home calmness that is so exaggerated it begins to parody itself… the voice that tells you, as the airliner is caught in thunderheads and goes bolting up and down a thousand feet at a single gulp, to check your seat belts because ‘uh, folks, it might get a little choppy’… Who doesn’t know that voice! And who can forget it, – even after he is proved right and the emergency is over. That particular voice may sound vaguely Southern or Southwestern, but it is specifically Appalachian in origin. It originated in the mountains of West Virginia, in the coal country, in Lincoln County, so far up in the hollows that, as the saying went, ‘they had to pipe in daylight.’ In the late 1940s and early 1950s this up-hollow voice drifted down from on high, from over the high desert of California, down, down, down, from the upper reaches of the [Pilot] Brotherhood into all phases of American aviation. It was amazing. It was Pygmalion in reverse. Military pilots and then, soon, airline pilots, pilots from Maine and Massachusetts and the Dakotas and Oregon and everywhere else, began to talk in that poker-hollow West Virginia drawl, or as close to it as they could bend their native accents. It was the drawl of the most righteous of all the possessors of the right stuff: Chuck Yeager."

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dan Hayes, @William Badwhite

    A close relative met Yeager when he (the relative, not Yeager) was going through F-86 school. Yeager came and talked to their class then hung out in the O-Club bar later that night. He (the relative) asked Yeager what he thought as he approached the sound barrier. Yeager answered “I was skeered”.

  102. @El Dato
    2020 keeps on delivering.

    But I don't think you can just go and take a Widowmaker off the tarmac like that. That's Star Wars grade Hollywood.

    Meanwhile:

    War is Peace.
    Freedom is Slavery.
    Diversity is Strength.
    Wear a Mask.

    ‘Wear a mask’ has been named the 'most notable quote' of 2020 – because ‘do what you’re told’ was too on the nose

    Fauci’s quote and nine others are set to be included in the Yale Book of Quotations, a compendium of memorable epigrams, witticisms, slogans, and other short lines. [Yale Law School librarian Fred Shapiro] Shapiro has previously explained he selects quotes that are “famous or revealing of the spirit of the times” rather than “eloquent or admirable”. But putting a banal, borderline-meaningless diktat like “wear a mask” next to famous lines such as PT Barnum’s “There’s a sucker born every minute” and Frederick Douglass’ “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will” comes off like a bad joke.
     

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “Facediaper” without question is the Word of 2020. And I invented it.

    The official Word or Phrase of 2020 declared by Merriam-Webster or somesuch will be “social distancing” or “masking” – bank on it – but we all know facediaper was the winner. Sorta how the fakestream media declared Creepy Pedo Joe the winner whilst our President will in fact get His second term.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    I love you bro, but what about Eric Peters? He was using it early-on in the Fauxdemic.

  103. @Guy De Champlagne
    @anonymous

    While it's progress of a kind that republicans at least like to pretend that they're the anti war party (or the working class party), the fact is, that as of now, it's all bullshit and that Biden's defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump's defense contractor shills were. And Trump wasn't any better than his appointments because they had to talk him out of crazy war mongering (when he was parroting non Carlson fox hosts) just like Trump (when he was parroting Tucker Carlson) had to talk them out of it.

    Replies: @William Badwhite, @MollyA

    No wars started in four years. Compare that with 1980-2016. Not pretending. Personally though, I don’t think the “party” membership has had a lot to do with it.

    • Replies: @Guy De Champlagne
    @MollyA

    It's not because of Trump either. He had to be talked out of all sorts of crazy anti iran and anti venezuela stuff. And still did plenty of it anyway.

    What counts as starting a war is ultimately semantics. There are things Obama did in eight years that Trump didn't and there are things Trump did that Obama didn't. Neither of them did anything that approaches Bush's actions in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  104. @Jack D
    @TG


    before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    That's the sickest thing I've ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn't even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Yeager did more for America than 99.99% of us ever will. For you to posthumously vilify him because he did not do even more when he is not yet even in the ground is sick. It's lucky for you that he's gone now and that you're a coward hiding behind your anonymity because if he was still alive and you said this to his face, he would have punched out your pathetic ass.

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about "hunger in America". If you visit a place like Pakistan, you'll notice that poor people there are really, really skinny, like ribs sticking out skinny. I don't think I have ever met a single individual in America that looks like that (except for people who are terminal cancer patients or the like), and I would fear to have most American "poor people" sit on my kitchen chairs lest they collapse from the weight.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @JMcG, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Corn

    Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Do you honestly believe this? Germany tried and failed to invade the UK, so how were they supposed to invade and conquer a country 40x bigger across the ocean?

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Magic Dirt Resident


    Do you honestly believe this? Germany tried and failed to invade the UK, so how were they supposed to invade and conquer a country 40x bigger across the ocean?
     
    Actually, Germany tried and failed to be allies with the UK. The UK spurned Germany’s peace entreaties. And Germany declined to invade the UK even when it had the opportunity.
  105. how did Steve manage to turn his post about Chuck Yeager into 4 paragraphs about a useless black sports ball player? especially as he fashions himself knowledgeable about US military aircraft. not one sentence about the tech used in the X-1.

    also straight back into statistics for said useless black sports ball player, but only 1 or 2 posts about the statistics that clearly show all the circumstantial and peripheral evidence of the biggest election fraud in US history. after he spent 6 months posting over and over about a virus with a 99.9% survival rate.

    Steve the statistics guy strangely uninterested in the United States becoming a banana republic, or should i say, a bagel republic. far more interested in trying to Stump The Scwhab on obscure sports data. no wonder Boomers lost the country to hostile aliens.

    • Replies: @Marty
    @prime noticer

    Boomers lost the country

    What Steve is saying is that if the Greatest who were in charge in 1964 had arrested Richie Allen for decking Frank Thomas like they should have, today’s jigs wouldn’t be so bold as to push out all the white election observers.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @prime noticer


    Steve the statistics guy strangely uninterested in the United States becoming a banana republic, or should i say, a bagel republic. far more interested in trying to Stump The Scwhab on obscure sports data. no wonder Boomers lost the country to hostile aliens.
     
    "Boomers" were too young to be held responsible for the long string of destructive "bagel" rulings from the Supreme Court-- Abingdon, Murray, Griswold, Epperson, Roe. They couldn't even vote in 46 states until 1967.

    Same is true of the immigration and "civil rights" legislation. Bill and Dubya and Donald had just turned eighteen. Draftable, but disfranchised.

    Find an older scapegoat.
  106. @Magic Dirt Resident
    @Steve Sailer

    There are a lot of good baseball trivia questions involved in that play.

    Harvey Haddix has a WS game 7 win, and a 12 perfect-inning loss.

    Mantle probably should have gone half way to second and gotten in a rundown, allowing McDougald to score.

    A Dick Groat hat trick should be: NL MVP, basketball All American, and sharing your name with a rare disease. He was still the color commentator for Pitt basketball until a year or two ago in his late eighties.

    Replies: @gsjackson, @David In TN

    I think Groat is the only person in both the college basketball hall of fame and the college baseball hall of fame.

  107. @anonymous
    @anon

    New Secretary of Defense

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Austin_2013_2.jpg

    Replies: @AndrewR, @PhysicistDave, @Guy De Champlagne, @SteveRogers42

    Not yet.

  108. @Steve Richter
    is the academic rank of West Point graduates publicly known? Would like to know how well the incoming secretary of defense did in college. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Austin

    Replies: @SteveRogers42, @res

    Grandpa Badfinger will never be President, therefore that guy will never be SecDef.

  109. General Mike Flynn doesn’t fare well in any comparison

  110. @anonymous
    Steve why not talk about the election like refusal to proceed with signature audit in Georgia? Why are you largely avoiding the election? Why does your support for Trump seem so lukewarm?

    In another attempt to prove that voter fraud cost him the election, President Donald Trump said on Saturday that Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger should allow a signature verification, which will "show large scale discrepancies."

    "I will easily & quickly win Georgia if Governor @BrianKempGA or the Secretary of State permit a simple signature verification. Has not been done and will show large scale discrepancies. Why are these two 'Republicans' saying no? If we win Georgia, everything else falls in place," he tweeted.
     

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Bragadocious

    “Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger should allow a signature verification, which will “show large scale discrepancies.”

    don’t know if it was Crowder, Tim Pool or Scott Adams, but they addressed that very issue and concluded that it wasn’t going to happen because the Guv and SOS are embarrassed that it happened under their watch and don’t want to lose their jobs. Contrast that to the shit show that my Guv Whitmer and SOS Benson, throw in the carpet muncher AG Nessel, presided over, and they don’t give 2 fuqs about it, and even encourage it. Difference between Republicans and Democrats.

    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Ron Mexico

    Gov Kemp's future son in law died last Friday in a crash. Could that have something to do with him backtracking?

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    , @Corn
    @Ron Mexico


    they addressed that very issue and concluded that it wasn’t going to happen because the Guv and SOS are embarrassed that it happened under their watch and don’t want to lose their jobs.
     
    I don’t want to pile conspiracy theories upon a convoluted situation but I’ve read it suggested (here at iSteve comments I think) that Kemp doesn’t want to shine a light on voter fraud in GA because maybe people will find out Stacy Abrams wasn’t making baseless accusations......
  111. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    This play you are referring to in the top of the 9th inning of the 7th game of the 1960 World Series, the last game of the 16 team and 154 game season Old Order of baseball, was not available on video until about a decade ago when an early videotape of it was discovered in Bing Crosby's wine cellar a half-century after it was played.

    It was confusing to read about until it was available to see:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UQ3mBb8QIM

    With the Pirates up 9-8 in the top of the 9ths, with 1 out and Gil McDougald on third and Mickey Mantle on first, Yogi Berra ripped a line drive at the Pirates first baseman. He shorthopped the ball, which left him with 3 choices for getting the 3rd out, which would win the World Series:

    - step on first and throw home for the catcher to tag McDougald
    - throw to SS Dick Groat at second and back to first for the double play on the slow running Yogi Berra
    - step on first to put Berra out and tag Mickey Mantle out.

    He chose the third choice, but Mantle, being Mantle, eluded his tag and dove back to first safely while the tying run scored.

    Of course, in the bottom of the 9th, Bill Mazeroski hit the walk-off homer and the underdog Pirates won 10-9.

    But the play in the top of the 9th is now recognized as perhaps the most fascinating in baseball history.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @prime noticer, @David In TN

    run this video thru the AI algorithm to see how slow this pitch is.

  112. @Muggles
    @TG


    Just saying.
     
    So what have you accomplished? You're an anonymous nobody (like everyone here) who so far as we know hasn't accomplished diddly-squat.

    I guess it make you feel better to demean a real hero who just died at 97. Because he wasn't superman or someone. Didn't solve all the world's problems for you. What a pity.

    The Envy and Hatred is strong in you.

    Replies: @Polynikes

    Some otherwise thoughtful people on here expect too much at times and can’t take wins, even if it means partial ones, when they get them. It’s why we lose the culture battle. The other side will do anything to tear it down and we’ll only protect it or honor it if it’s perfect in our own special way.

    Guys like Yeager should be held up as cultural heroes and examples for future generations of what they can accomplish. Instead we cry because long after their rightful retirement age they didn’t advocate on Capitol Hill for our pet causes? C’mon…

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Polynikes

    I fully agree.

    Though I can understand the frustration expressed here since most posters on iSteve are not that happy. We want things to be better. Not a bad idea.

    I get a bit too harsh on some folks who seem to express highly negative emotions when that seems over the top, like with Yeager. Email and computer posting (anonymously) doesn't bring out the best in us sometimes. Myself included.

    It does annoy me when a few vent hostility in the wrong direction. Bad mouthing the good doesn't stop the bad from being even worse. Still I should try to be more tolerant.

  113. i’m under the impression no turbojet could generate enough thrust to move an aircraft to the speed of sound, so X-1 used a rocket instead. not sure when mach 1 turbojets appeared, but probably the early 50s. i assume turbofans mostly replaced turbojets starting in the 60s.

    the early turbojets were weak enough that you needed 2 of them to fly. but by the time of Mig-15 and Sabre, they were good enough that you just needed 1. Buzz Aldrin flew a Sabre in Korea.

    i don’t think Ed Dwight was ever going to be an astronaut. Kennedy directly interfered to keep him in the astronaut program, where he gave his best effort but came in last in every test. once Kennedy was gone, Dwight was gone. Chuck Bolden was the real deal, but all somebody like Obama sees in a guy like that is that he’s african enough to be his bureaucrat. Ron McNair was the guy who got blown up in 86.

    even in the early Space Shuttle era, you can see that government agency NASA was interested in sending AAs into space. Sally Ride the aggressive lesbian was the first woman, and there were a couple africans long before any asians or straight women.

  114. @Greta Handel
    @Jim Don Bob

    Really?

    Spin aside (I know, I know), what do you think of the facts as reported in the NYT’s July 2019 “Ed Dwight Was Set to Be the First Black Astronaut. Here’s Why That Never Happened.”? According to that article, Mr. Dwight made it to and through the program, despite being pressured by Mr. Yeager to leave, which Mr. Yeager denied to at least some extent, saying that he was resistant to politicians interested in scoring points by interfering in his conduct of the program. There’s no indication that Mr. Yeager or Mr. LeMay was involved or even privy to the later selection of others, not including Mr. Dwight, from among the candidates.

    A lot of people in Establishia will no doubt be showing their Left stuff by dismissing Mr. Yeager as a race bigot. But those who want to embrace and defend that caricature show him no more respect. There’s more than one way to speak ill of the dead.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Brutusale

    I have not read the NYT article, and probably won’t, because I think everything they publish has an agenda.

    IIRC, Dwight was in the program, and despite being coached up relentlessly, couldn’t cut it compared to the other guys. He later accused Yeager of racism. I read another account of a black pilot who flew with Yeager in Europe in the 50s and loved it.

    Yeager didn’t give a rat’s ass what color you were if you had the right stuff. Dwight didn’t, so Yeager bounced him, and LeMay backed him.

  115. @Polynikes
    @Muggles

    Some otherwise thoughtful people on here expect too much at times and can’t take wins, even if it means partial ones, when they get them. It’s why we lose the culture battle. The other side will do anything to tear it down and we’ll only protect it or honor it if it’s perfect in our own special way.

    Guys like Yeager should be held up as cultural heroes and examples for future generations of what they can accomplish. Instead we cry because long after their rightful retirement age they didn’t advocate on Capitol Hill for our pet causes? C’mon...

    Replies: @Muggles

    I fully agree.

    Though I can understand the frustration expressed here since most posters on iSteve are not that happy. We want things to be better. Not a bad idea.

    I get a bit too harsh on some folks who seem to express highly negative emotions when that seems over the top, like with Yeager. Email and computer posting (anonymously) doesn’t bring out the best in us sometimes. Myself included.

    It does annoy me when a few vent hostility in the wrong direction. Bad mouthing the good doesn’t stop the bad from being even worse. Still I should try to be more tolerant.

  116. The same day you lost Yeager we Brits lost Doug Scott, the first man to climb Everest’s South West Face (alongside Dougal Haston in 1973 – they also spent the night just below the summit without sleeping bags), and a couple of weeks before that Hamish MacInnes, who was on Everest when it was still unclimbed, developed metal ice axes and the mountain stretchers used worldwide for rescue, and helped Clint Eastwood stay attached to the Eiger during filming.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamish_MacInnes

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/08/world/europe/doug-scott-dead.html

    Losing a lot of heroes, but at least they were of full age.

  117. @gsjackson
    Allen was maybe the original black badass athlete of the '60s -- a forerunner to Tommy Smith, John Carlos, etc. Emphasis on the badass, and with high intelligence. A guy I knew -- football and baseball player at Duke -- had kind of a wise acre attitude, and running into Allen once at spring training asked him in a sort of sardonic way: "Hey Richie, how'd you get such strong wrists?" Allen broke into a big smile and made a gesture simulating masturbation.

    Regardless of off-field issues, his performance at the plate from 1964 to 1974 was on par with anyone in MLB. He's a HOFer for sure on talent, and probably deserves to be for performance too if you factor in that he played in an era of pitcher dominance. A career .912 OBP.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    A career .912 OBP.

    OPS, not OBP. Agree he should be HOFer.

    • Replies: @gsjackson
    @kaganovitch

    Oops, senior moment. Thanks.

  118. @songbird
    Men like Chuck Yeager (experimental pilots) weren't picked as astronaut candidates because it was felt that they would have trouble obeying orders. This caused one of them to hit back with the classic line "spam in a can" to describe the Mercury astronauts, whose space-piloting duties were minimal to non-existent.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “Men like Chuck Yeager (experimental pilots) weren’t picked as astronaut candidates because it was felt that they would have trouble obeying orders.”

    I think it was Yeager’s lack of college which kept him out. Neil Armstrong was a test pilot at Edwards. Al Shepard, Glenn, Grissom and Wally Schirra were test pilots too.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I think it was probably "civilian test pilots." I guess Yeager was in WW2, but maybe they were attracted to career men?

    Just browsing a little, seems like he flew crazier stuff.

  119. @Jack D
    @TG


    before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    That's the sickest thing I've ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn't even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Yeager did more for America than 99.99% of us ever will. For you to posthumously vilify him because he did not do even more when he is not yet even in the ground is sick. It's lucky for you that he's gone now and that you're a coward hiding behind your anonymity because if he was still alive and you said this to his face, he would have punched out your pathetic ass.

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about "hunger in America". If you visit a place like Pakistan, you'll notice that poor people there are really, really skinny, like ribs sticking out skinny. I don't think I have ever met a single individual in America that looks like that (except for people who are terminal cancer patients or the like), and I would fear to have most American "poor people" sit on my kitchen chairs lest they collapse from the weight.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @JMcG, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Corn

    Hitler couldn’t conquer continental Europe, never mind the continental US. I’m counting western Russia as part of Europe here, before anyone jumps in.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    @JMcG

    For those into that sort of thing Military History Visualized a former German paratrooper studying military history has a series of videos on YT breaking down the German Military and why they did not win:

    A. they depended on highly trained men and could not sustain quality and training after war with Russia, they needed bouts of truce/peace to re-equip and retrain new soldiers. During Summer/Fall 1941 they lost quite a bit of military effectiveness and never regained it. By contrast the Soviets, British, and Americans were able to adapt new training methods and bring skilled troops into battle for the first time.
    B. The German military going back to Frederick the Great was geared to waging short wars with interior lines of communications, their logistics and supply chain was poor and so was their ability to organize such.
    C. Their industrial base though formidable was limited in industrial capacity even compared to the British let alone the Soviets.
    D. Their ability simply to replace dead soldiers with new ones was far inferior to the Soviets and even the British.
    E. Their weapons systems were overly complex mostly and prone to breaking down without detailed and costly maintenance.
    F. The German military was over-committed: to the Atlantic, North Africa (then Italy), the Balkans/Greece, and the Eastern Front.
    G. Like the Japanese the Germans could not generally get newer and more innovative fighters and bombers into large scale production after 1941 -- the fought generally with what they had in 1939 which was excellent then but outdated by 1944.

    Summary: lack of industrial resources, logistical ability, and the ability to train while fighting doomed the Reich.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  120. @anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's just one professor's personal opinion about how the world works. His only first hand experience was getting a book promotion booking at Politics and Prose.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    His isolated personal opinion happens to perfectly describe the careers of Mark Kelly and certain others.

  121. @Greta Handel
    @Jim Don Bob

    Really?

    Spin aside (I know, I know), what do you think of the facts as reported in the NYT’s July 2019 “Ed Dwight Was Set to Be the First Black Astronaut. Here’s Why That Never Happened.”? According to that article, Mr. Dwight made it to and through the program, despite being pressured by Mr. Yeager to leave, which Mr. Yeager denied to at least some extent, saying that he was resistant to politicians interested in scoring points by interfering in his conduct of the program. There’s no indication that Mr. Yeager or Mr. LeMay was involved or even privy to the later selection of others, not including Mr. Dwight, from among the candidates.

    A lot of people in Establishia will no doubt be showing their Left stuff by dismissing Mr. Yeager as a race bigot. But those who want to embrace and defend that caricature show him no more respect. There’s more than one way to speak ill of the dead.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Brutusale

    This was extensively discussed in a previous thread, to include excerpts from books. I [approximately] quote one of the conclusions: Yeager saved that black man’s life by excluding him from the highly dangerous early years of astronauting.

  122. @Ron Mexico
    @anonymous

    "Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger should allow a signature verification, which will “show large scale discrepancies.”

    don't know if it was Crowder, Tim Pool or Scott Adams, but they addressed that very issue and concluded that it wasn't going to happen because the Guv and SOS are embarrassed that it happened under their watch and don't want to lose their jobs. Contrast that to the shit show that my Guv Whitmer and SOS Benson, throw in the carpet muncher AG Nessel, presided over, and they don't give 2 fuqs about it, and even encourage it. Difference between Republicans and Democrats.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Corn

    Gov Kemp’s future son in law died last Friday in a crash. Could that have something to do with him backtracking?

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @anonymous

    "future son in law died last Friday in a crash"
    I heard that, but didn't know he was "related" to Kemp. Condolences.
    But that just opens up more suspicions. Message being sent to Kemp? The Dems have been doing this shit (terror, intimidation) since before a few of the 2020 Michigan voters were born.

  123. @Diversity Heretic
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I thought the original mission of the F-104 was a bomber interceptor and it was a stretch to get it to serve as a general air superiority fighter( e.g, was there room for a cannon?). Ground attack must have been pointless; how much ordnance could an F-104 carry? Enough to make the risks of a mission worthwhile?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @Steve Sailer

    The German defense minister got a $10 million bribe to buy F-104s.

    • Replies: @HunInTheSun
    @Steve Sailer

    At that point the Soviets must have been saying to themselves "How can we possibly lose to the West? Not only do the inexorable laws of scientific Socialism doom the capitalist economies, our enemies are corrupt right down to the battlefield."

  124. @Morton's toes

    On October 14, 1997, on the 50th anniversary of his historic flight past Mach 1, he flew a new Glamorous Glennis III, an F-15D Eagle, past Mach 1. The chase plane for the flight was an F-16 Fighting Falcon piloted by Bob Hoover, a longtime test, fighter and aerobatic pilot who had been Yeager's wingman for the first supersonic flight. This was supposed to be Yeager's last official flight with the U.S. Air Force. However he was called back into flying with the USAF in 2000 and continued to do so until the end of 2012.
     
    One of a kind. The best line in Right Stuff was when the Yeager character was in a bar and they were watching the fellow at the splashdown pooping the chute on national television and he said the guy did fine. Getting blasted into space on top a rocket was way more than enough or something like that.

    Although the opening was pretty damn awesome too.

    Breaking the sound barrier at age 89 is some kind of old guys' record, no?

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb, @YetAnotherAnon

    “Breaking the sound barrier at age 89 is some kind of old guys’ record, no?”

    John Glenn was 77 when he went back into space on the Shuttle, which is pretty impressive. But Yeager was the daddy of them all.

    Steve – Queen Juliana’s husband took a bribe to buy F104s for the Netherlands, rather than French Mirages. They out-bribed the French!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_bribery_scandals#The_Netherlands

  125. @PhysicistDave
    @anonymous

    Did everyone see the clip on Tucker tonight of the Chinese prof at Renmin University explaining to a Chinese audience that Beijing did not own Trump but that now things are back under control with Biden in?

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    I assume by now that the Beijing regime has "disappeared" the prof.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    Replies: @El Dato, @PhysicistDave, @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne, @Reg Cæsar

    My wife speaks enough Chinese to confirm that the English subtitles are basically accurate.

    There was discussion on one YouTube thread about whether the term alien was less accurate than foreigner. Some said it was interchangeable in Chinese. One speaker of Chinese ancestry– if it wasn’t the impressive Eugenia Cheng, it was someone very similar to her– told of going through immigration and customs in the US for the first time and seeing a sign for the aliens line. She immediately thought of space creatures, not realizing that it applied to her.

    Derb is right: we are indeed doomed.

    To us, it’s a swamp. To them, it’s endangered wetlands. The silver lining in this election is that half the adults in the land now know how corrupt the other half are. Corrupt, or naive. Knave, or fool.

  126. @kaganovitch
    @gsjackson

    A career .912 OBP.

    OPS, not OBP. Agree he should be HOFer.

    Replies: @gsjackson

    Oops, senior moment. Thanks.

  127. @Anonymous
    @Wilkey


    OT: Biden Cabinet thus far:

    Four Jews (Treasury, State, Homeland Security, Chief of Staff).
     

    That’s how the Democrats roll.

    And they’ll be animated by a drive to prevent Hitler (read: White Gentile America) from ever sniffing power again.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    Another day, another Jewish nominee: Biden nominates Rochelle Walensky to head the CDC.

    When are we going to start talking about the complete absence of non-Jewish whites in this administration?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @Wilkey

    What about the complete absence of non-Papists among the past few GOP Supreme Court nominations?

    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Wilkey

  128. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "The second-most controversial player in baseball history, behind Rogers Hornsby, "

    Uh, no, the second most controversial player in baseball history, behind Ty Cobb. And in modern yrs, behind Billy Martin, and Barry Bonds. No one ever threatened to shoot Hornsby if he showed up to play the A's (ironically, in PHI), because he deliberately spiked their 3B on the basepaths. Hornsby's entire team didn't attempt to beat him up early in his career. Hornsby didn't go into the stands to beat up a heckler. When it comes to controversy, compared to Ty Cobb, Hornsby was a choir boy.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Ian M.

    Disclosure: When I read statements like this coming from Bill James, it does make me seriously question why exactly he is considered to be an authority on the American Pastime at all. After all, MLB existed, flourished, and prospered quite well and fine before Bill James was born and arrived on the scene. It was Bill James who ignored and then minimized the widespread and rampant use of PEDS in MLB. Once it could not be ignored and minimized, it was Bill James (as well as other leading authority figures that represented MLB) who claimed that the direct impact on MLB, as well as PEDS direct impact on Sabermetrics as a whole was non-existent.

    Clearly, this kind of fantasy world style of thinking has not been helpful for MLB. According to most reliable polls, MLB’s demographic mean age is age 50+, meaning that MLB no longer is the US’s number one sport of choice for sports fans. Obviously with more choices for their entertainment dollars is playing a factor for young people, but also another factor that shouldn’t be so casually dismissed is that MLB has also taken the lead in siding with Woke politics.

    It will be interesting to see how MLB fares 10-20 yrs from now, will it still be as prosperous compared to other entertainment/sports that at present, have captured the younger demographics attention?

    For this aspect, and many others, (noted and otherwise left unsaid) Bill James deserves some of the responsibility regarding why MLB is no longer the US’s National Pastime, much less the nation’s number one sport in terms of profits and revenues.

    To cite one example: Who has more of a direct impact on Social Media, Mike Trout and Giancarlo Stanton, or Kim Kardashian and Justin Beiber? As sports (and thus MLB) is technically a part of the entertainment sector, it is a fair and apt question. For the most part, Social Media is for those under aged 30. MLB is not.

    • Replies: @Up2Drew
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    I was a frequent witness at the old Comiskey Park in 1972 and enjoyed Dick Allen at the height of his powers. Magnificently talented, charismatic as hell, made my beloved White Sox relevant for awhile. But he was also galaxy-class petulant, selfish, divisive, and childish. Allen came and went as he pleased, showed up at gametime, etc. He quit the team in 1974, just walked away. Allen's behavior was enabled by Sox manager Chuck Tanner, whose next act was to look the other way while the Pirates shoved half of Columbia up their noses. Ron Santo retired rather than watch another season of Tanner coddling Allen.

    Dick Allen was a great baseball player, but his demeanor gets an enormous pass through the veil of time. And don't give me the racism thing - he was absolutely worshiped on the South Side of Chicago, where I grew up and racial issues were a real factor in everyday life.

    Replies: @David In TN

  129. Anonymous[267] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @TG


    before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    That's the sickest thing I've ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn't even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Yeager did more for America than 99.99% of us ever will. For you to posthumously vilify him because he did not do even more when he is not yet even in the ground is sick. It's lucky for you that he's gone now and that you're a coward hiding behind your anonymity because if he was still alive and you said this to his face, he would have punched out your pathetic ass.

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about "hunger in America". If you visit a place like Pakistan, you'll notice that poor people there are really, really skinny, like ribs sticking out skinny. I don't think I have ever met a single individual in America that looks like that (except for people who are terminal cancer patients or the like), and I would fear to have most American "poor people" sit on my kitchen chairs lest they collapse from the weight.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @JMcG, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Corn

    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    That is complete and utter BS. At the end of WWII Hitler was 56, strung out on uppers and Europe was sick of war. The US sits then, as ever, across an ocean where it cannot be successfully invaded. Within a short time it would have had many nuclear weapons, and from then on invasion would have been impossible. You know this.

    If Hitler had won, the Jews would have left the USSR, but aside from that, Hitler had already defeated and occupied the rest of Europe, so the difference in terms of Jewish population would not be much. There would be peace. The difference in terms of Jewish control in the world would be significant. You would have the European version of Hollywood though, and a lack of pro-Jewish central banks in Europe/USSR. Outside that, there would be Jewish control, except in East Asia.

    What would have happened is that given a few decades, maybe a century, Europe would have forgotten about the Jews and let them back in, and the cycle would have repeated probably.

    From your writings it seems like you don’t care about our people. So why should we reciprocate and care about your kind? And not even to the point of life, but about your kind’s control and power. What’s in it for us?

    I don’t think the fate of the world hinges on Chuck Yeager, nor should it, but AFAICT the outcome of WWII was a net loss for Europeans everywhere, even in the so-called winning countries. Objectively, Jewish leadership, influence and control has been bad for us. I wish it were not so, and it seems unecessary that it had to be like this, but here we are.

    • Agree: Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The premise was what would have happened if Hitler had WON. The only way that alternate history could have come about would have been if the Manhattan Project had failed. The goal of the Manhattan Project was to nuke Berlin, not Nagasaki, but the war in Europe ended before that happened.

    You are so blinded by your Jew hatred that you apparently would have preferred Hitler. I have news for you buddy - Hitler didn't have anything good in mind for you and yours either. But at least when you were being starved to death you would have had the satisfaction of knowing that the Jews went first.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Anonymous


    From your writings it seems like you don’t care about our people. So why should we reciprocate and care about your kind? And not even to the point of life, but about your kind’s control and power. What’s in it for us?
     
    From your writings, you want every last Jew eliminated. What's in it for the Jews, that they should care about you and yours? Maybe they should take care of you before you take care of them.
  130. @YetAnotherAnon
    @songbird

    "Men like Chuck Yeager (experimental pilots) weren’t picked as astronaut candidates because it was felt that they would have trouble obeying orders."

    I think it was Yeager's lack of college which kept him out. Neil Armstrong was a test pilot at Edwards. Al Shepard, Glenn, Grissom and Wally Schirra were test pilots too.

    Replies: @songbird

    I think it was probably “civilian test pilots.” I guess Yeager was in WW2, but maybe they were attracted to career men?

    Just browsing a little, seems like he flew crazier stuff.

  131. @Jim Don Bob
    @Dr. X

    Yeager also told JFK and RFK to go pound sand when they tried to force a black guy into the astronaut program. Curtis LeMay backed him up.

    Replies: @Greta Handel, @SunBakedSuburb, @David In TN

    And they are starting to attack Chuck Yeager for it.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @David In TN

    a/c/t Wolfe, I think the top 11 astronaut candidates at Edwards would go on for further training and Ed Dwight was #14. When they as good as told Yeager that Dwight had to qualify, he sent 14 candidates on to the next stage, instead of 11.

    He rightly thought it would be unfair to #12 and #13 if Dwight qualified but they didn't, and he wasn't prepared to do it.

  132. @Steve Sailer
    @Diversity Heretic

    The German defense minister got a $10 million bribe to buy F-104s.

    Replies: @HunInTheSun

    At that point the Soviets must have been saying to themselves “How can we possibly lose to the West? Not only do the inexorable laws of scientific Socialism doom the capitalist economies, our enemies are corrupt right down to the battlefield.”

  133. Chuck Yeager. He will be missed. A true 20th Century Pioneer who was true to the spirit of the historic traditional American nation. A direct connection to a time when America was not only great, but it was obvious to the world at large as well as within the nation itself. When Chuck Yeager was growing up and during a large chunk of his life, such things as patriotism, honor, duty, etc were a living, relevant part of the American fabric. Coincidentally (or not), so was MLB as it too was considered a part of the decent virtues of society (something that can’t really be said of such persons as Bill James or even Jim Bouton, for that matter).

    Rest in Peace, trailblazer. We may never see another of his likeness for decades to come.

  134. @Steve Sailer
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    This play you are referring to in the top of the 9th inning of the 7th game of the 1960 World Series, the last game of the 16 team and 154 game season Old Order of baseball, was not available on video until about a decade ago when an early videotape of it was discovered in Bing Crosby's wine cellar a half-century after it was played.

    It was confusing to read about until it was available to see:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UQ3mBb8QIM

    With the Pirates up 9-8 in the top of the 9ths, with 1 out and Gil McDougald on third and Mickey Mantle on first, Yogi Berra ripped a line drive at the Pirates first baseman. He shorthopped the ball, which left him with 3 choices for getting the 3rd out, which would win the World Series:

    - step on first and throw home for the catcher to tag McDougald
    - throw to SS Dick Groat at second and back to first for the double play on the slow running Yogi Berra
    - step on first to put Berra out and tag Mickey Mantle out.

    He chose the third choice, but Mantle, being Mantle, eluded his tag and dove back to first safely while the tying run scored.

    Of course, in the bottom of the 9th, Bill Mazeroski hit the walk-off homer and the underdog Pirates won 10-9.

    But the play in the top of the 9th is now recognized as perhaps the most fascinating in baseball history.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @prime noticer, @David In TN

    I remember seeing the play on TV when it happened. I was rooting for the Yankees. Mickey Mantle diving back into first base is still in my mind’s eye. One of the great baserunning moves of all time though it never was mentioned much in Mantle’s lifetime. Mantle himself never made anything of it.

  135. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Jim Don Bob

    "Curtis Le May"

    Because of the tiresome pro-JFK tilt I've usually thought of General Le May as a right-wing fanatic. He was a right-wing fanatic. But in this topsy-turvy mirrored funhouse carnival haunted house world where we are all in this together we could've used Bombs Away Le May in the battle against odd-looking Valerie Jarrett.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

    In Europe, LeMay flew combat missions, riding in the top turret to obseve bomber formation flying. He would wait at the tower for returning planes until all possibility that they could return had ended.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Diversity Heretic


    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

     

    LeMay was man enough to admit he was a war criminal. Not that he was in any way abashed about it. Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Prof. Woland, @syonredux, @Dan Hayes

  136. @Magic Dirt Resident
    @Steve Sailer

    There are a lot of good baseball trivia questions involved in that play.

    Harvey Haddix has a WS game 7 win, and a 12 perfect-inning loss.

    Mantle probably should have gone half way to second and gotten in a rundown, allowing McDougald to score.

    A Dick Groat hat trick should be: NL MVP, basketball All American, and sharing your name with a rare disease. He was still the color commentator for Pitt basketball until a year or two ago in his late eighties.

    Replies: @gsjackson, @David In TN

    Had Mantle “gotten in a rundown,” he would have given up an out.

  137. @syonredux
    Ya gotta love Yeager's old school Appalachian candor:

    Q: What about the Israelis,always heard they were DA best warpilots in the world... A: Arrogant. Didn't listen. Lost half their a/c in war.
     


    That was then. You think that's still a problem?


    I don't know - haven't interacted in a while. However, I did kick 'em off Edwards back in the '60's

     

    https://twitter.com/GenChuckYeager/status/931560082088669185

    https://twitter.com/GenChuckYeager/status/931718346902343680

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Abolish_public_education

    I once knew an ex-USAF pilot. Quite an arrogant fellow.

    I’ve met many arrogant cadets (and civilians).

    I’ve read from a chief, I think on this blog, that freshly minted ensigns, aboard USN submarines, are quite arrogant.

    Arrogance is virtually synonymous with “naval aviator”. Indeed, the attitude is a stereotype: Recall that scene from Top Gun where “Viper” announced how much he admired “Mav’s” arrogance.

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Abolish_public_education

    Imagine how arrogant you have to be to offend a test pilot....

    , @JMcG
    @Abolish_public_education

    So that’s why they bombed the Liberty!!!

    , @kaganovitch
    @Abolish_public_education

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    That's not what Yeager said. These are 2 separate things. He thought the Israeli pilots were arrogant and thus lost half their air force in 1973 war. He also thought that they had no business being on Edwards base ,probably because he thought (I assume correctly) they were spying. While Yeager was mistaken about how much of the Israeli AF was lost in Yom Kippur war, around a quarter rather than a half, as well as IAF arrogance being a significant factor in that loss, that doesn't imply bias on his part, just a mistake. The eagerness to take offense and the absence of good will is one of the more annoying side effects of the destruction of our common culture.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  138. @anonymous
    @Ron Mexico

    Gov Kemp's future son in law died last Friday in a crash. Could that have something to do with him backtracking?

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    “future son in law died last Friday in a crash”
    I heard that, but didn’t know he was “related” to Kemp. Condolences.
    But that just opens up more suspicions. Message being sent to Kemp? The Dems have been doing this shit (terror, intimidation) since before a few of the 2020 Michigan voters were born.

  139. @prime noticer
    how did Steve manage to turn his post about Chuck Yeager into 4 paragraphs about a useless black sports ball player? especially as he fashions himself knowledgeable about US military aircraft. not one sentence about the tech used in the X-1.

    also straight back into statistics for said useless black sports ball player, but only 1 or 2 posts about the statistics that clearly show all the circumstantial and peripheral evidence of the biggest election fraud in US history. after he spent 6 months posting over and over about a virus with a 99.9% survival rate.

    Steve the statistics guy strangely uninterested in the United States becoming a banana republic, or should i say, a bagel republic. far more interested in trying to Stump The Scwhab on obscure sports data. no wonder Boomers lost the country to hostile aliens.

    Replies: @Marty, @Reg Cæsar

    Boomers lost the country

    What Steve is saying is that if the Greatest who were in charge in 1964 had arrested Richie Allen for decking Frank Thomas like they should have, today’s jigs wouldn’t be so bold as to push out all the white election observers.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Marty

    That feat of teasing out hidden meaning from a text is worthy of a Straussian.

  140. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @El Dato

    "Facediaper" without question is the Word of 2020. And I invented it.

    The official Word or Phrase of 2020 declared by Merriam-Webster or somesuch will be "social distancing" or "masking" - bank on it - but we all know facediaper was the winner. Sorta how the fakestream media declared Creepy Pedo Joe the winner whilst our President will in fact get His second term.

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

    I love you bro, but what about Eric Peters? He was using it early-on in the Fauxdemic.

  141. @Abolish_public_education
    @syonredux

    I once knew an ex-USAF pilot. Quite an arrogant fellow.

    I’ve met many arrogant cadets (and civilians).

    I’ve read from a chief, I think on this blog, that freshly minted ensigns, aboard USN submarines, are quite arrogant.

    Arrogance is virtually synonymous with “naval aviator”. Indeed, the attitude is a stereotype: Recall that scene from Top Gun where “Viper” announced how much he admired “Mav’s” arrogance.

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    Replies: @syonredux, @JMcG, @kaganovitch

    Imagine how arrogant you have to be to offend a test pilot….

  142. The F104 will forever be the coolest damn plane ever built.

    Chuck also put in a good word for the F20, but it sadly was not taken up.

  143. @Wilkey
    @Anonymous

    Another day, another Jewish nominee: Biden nominates Rochelle Walensky to head the CDC.

    When are we going to start talking about the complete absence of non-Jewish whites in this administration?

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

    What about the complete absence of non-Papists among the past few GOP Supreme Court nominations?

    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Paleo Liberal

    The word is "Catholics."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Wilkey
    @Paleo Liberal


    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.
     
    The Senate currently has 59 Protestants and 23 Catholics, plus 4 Mormons (who technically aren’t Protestant). That’s pretty representative of America as a whole. A whole lot more representative of America than Joe Biden’s Cabinet.

    There is no shortage of white Christian talent available if Joe Biden wanted it. But our incoming president is in middle stage dementia. He is not in charge of his own administration. We don’t really know who is, but with every new Cabinet member we begin to get an idea.

    The only good news is that Republicans seem to finally be pulling together on the Georgia Senate races, and there is a halfway decent chance that Biden won’t have any Supreme Court seats to fill.

    The bad news is that nearly four million immigrants are naturalized every four years, and the vast majority of them aren’t white. And Biden’s puppeteers appear to intend to do everything in their power to increase that number. And our geniuses in Congress, including the Republicans, just voted to accelerate the process.
  144. @Diversity Heretic
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

    In Europe, LeMay flew combat missions, riding in the top turret to obseve bomber formation flying. He would wait at the tower for returning planes until all possibility that they could return had ended.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

    LeMay was man enough to admit he was a war criminal. Not that he was in any way abashed about it. Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    One country viewing a General as a war criminal, oftentimes his home country views him as a hero, as in the case of LeMay. This used to be called being on the right side of history. For most of the nineteenth and into the twentieth century, and for most of the US, General Sherman was considered to be a hero, because of his work in the Civil War and on the frontier vs the Indians. The states that voted for LeMay recognized a legitimate war hero, as did their nineteenth century ancestors. That particular US region has always recognized and respected valor and courage on the battlefield (or those drawing up the tactics and war plans). Obviously during the Civil War, Sherman wasn't going to replace their adoration and respect for General Lee. During the 20th century, as a part of the US once more, they gave their adoration for LeMay.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Prof. Woland
    @Reg Cæsar

    My late father was training as a tail gunner in a B-29 and he got his orders to ship out to Saipan the day Japan surrendered. That is about as lucky as you get.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @syonredux
    @Reg Cæsar


    Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.
     
    Sherman destroyed property. During his entire March to the Sea, he never committed a single massacre. In contrast, LeMay and Sir Arthur Harris were responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians. Comparing those fellows to Sherman is goonishness of a high order.
    , @Dan Hayes
    @Reg Cæsar

    LeMay stated this to Robert MacNamara who was serving as an operational analyst selecting fire bombing sites!

  145. @prime noticer
    how did Steve manage to turn his post about Chuck Yeager into 4 paragraphs about a useless black sports ball player? especially as he fashions himself knowledgeable about US military aircraft. not one sentence about the tech used in the X-1.

    also straight back into statistics for said useless black sports ball player, but only 1 or 2 posts about the statistics that clearly show all the circumstantial and peripheral evidence of the biggest election fraud in US history. after he spent 6 months posting over and over about a virus with a 99.9% survival rate.

    Steve the statistics guy strangely uninterested in the United States becoming a banana republic, or should i say, a bagel republic. far more interested in trying to Stump The Scwhab on obscure sports data. no wonder Boomers lost the country to hostile aliens.

    Replies: @Marty, @Reg Cæsar

    Steve the statistics guy strangely uninterested in the United States becoming a banana republic, or should i say, a bagel republic. far more interested in trying to Stump The Scwhab on obscure sports data. no wonder Boomers lost the country to hostile aliens.

    “Boomers” were too young to be held responsible for the long string of destructive “bagel” rulings from the Supreme Court– Abingdon, Murray, Griswold, Epperson, Roe. They couldn’t even vote in 46 states until 1967.

    Same is true of the immigration and “civil rights” legislation. Bill and Dubya and Donald had just turned eighteen. Draftable, but disfranchised.

    Find an older scapegoat.

  146. What about the complete absence of non-Papists among the past few GOP Supreme Court nominations?

    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.

    Because the loyal ones aren’t educated and the educated ones aren’t loyal.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar

    The loyal ones don't tend to be Ivy Leaguers, especially undergraduate ones.

  147. Anonymous[959] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Negrolphin Pool

    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Dave Archer, @Currahee, @Anonymous

    What are the odds of a great test pilot living to 97?

    Actually, Britain’s closest equivalent to Yeager, Eric Brown, also lived to 97, dying in 2016. Even many aviation enthusiasts were shocked throughout the 21st c. to find out he was still alive–most of them simply assumed he had been killed in some tailless death trap back in the 50s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Brown_(pilot)

    Bob Hoover made it to 94: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Hoover

  148. @Abolish_public_education
    @syonredux

    I once knew an ex-USAF pilot. Quite an arrogant fellow.

    I’ve met many arrogant cadets (and civilians).

    I’ve read from a chief, I think on this blog, that freshly minted ensigns, aboard USN submarines, are quite arrogant.

    Arrogance is virtually synonymous with “naval aviator”. Indeed, the attitude is a stereotype: Recall that scene from Top Gun where “Viper” announced how much he admired “Mav’s” arrogance.

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    Replies: @syonredux, @JMcG, @kaganovitch

    So that’s why they bombed the Liberty!!!

  149. @anonymous
    Steve why not talk about the election like refusal to proceed with signature audit in Georgia? Why are you largely avoiding the election? Why does your support for Trump seem so lukewarm?

    In another attempt to prove that voter fraud cost him the election, President Donald Trump said on Saturday that Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger should allow a signature verification, which will "show large scale discrepancies."

    "I will easily & quickly win Georgia if Governor @BrianKempGA or the Secretary of State permit a simple signature verification. Has not been done and will show large scale discrepancies. Why are these two 'Republicans' saying no? If we win Georgia, everything else falls in place," he tweeted.
     

    Replies: @Ron Mexico, @Bragadocious

    Trump’s an abrasive New Yorker. Proud Californian Sailer can’t get past that. This is a socio-cultural issue, not ideological.

  150. @Jack D
    @TG


    before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    That's the sickest thing I've ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn't even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Yeager did more for America than 99.99% of us ever will. For you to posthumously vilify him because he did not do even more when he is not yet even in the ground is sick. It's lucky for you that he's gone now and that you're a coward hiding behind your anonymity because if he was still alive and you said this to his face, he would have punched out your pathetic ass.

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about "hunger in America". If you visit a place like Pakistan, you'll notice that poor people there are really, really skinny, like ribs sticking out skinny. I don't think I have ever met a single individual in America that looks like that (except for people who are terminal cancer patients or the like), and I would fear to have most American "poor people" sit on my kitchen chairs lest they collapse from the weight.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @JMcG, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Corn

    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist.

    a) You are not the alpha and omega of life.

    b) Steve, me … pretty much everyone commenting here (bar just a few) would also not exist. History would be different.

    Hate to break it to you but you don’t exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust … the whole package. Our individual existences are highly contingent … everything that leads up to pa on ma at a particular moment, with particular fish ready to fire.

    Perspective.

    ~~~

    The striking thing about the Nazis is they managed one of the greatest own-goals in human history. Everything they set out to achieve for Germany, Germans, “the Aryan Race”, Central Europe, blocking Russian expansion, anti-communism, etc. they made much, much worse.

    Hitler wasn’t alone in that. As in 1914 there was poor decision making all around that encouraged the crisis. But Hitler’s megalomania fueled it.

    ~~~

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite,

    Huh? Hey, I hate looking at fat people as much as then next guy. (And need to lose 10lbs myself.) Food abundance isn’t a “problem”. It’s a great thing. Being fat is easily fixed by pushing back from the table and getting some exercise. Ok, his “malnutrition is coming” thing is ridiculous, but the reverse isn’t our big problem either. (Ok, maybe it is our “big” problem, but certainly not our most important.)

    The serious problem Americans face is their nation is being stolen from themselves and their posterity, by traitorous, grasping, greedy minoritarian elites. That’s the real problem–losing your nation, not being able to turn over to your children, your posterity a bright future in their own land, but a shrunken dystopian existence in a querulous globoslum.

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @AnotherDad


    Hate to break it to you but you don’t exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust … the whole package.
     
    It's even more ironic than that - I owe my whole nice suburban American existence to Hitler. If the war hadn't happened, there's no way my father's son could have hoped to have gotten the kind of education and profession that I have here in Poland. No way that would have been accessible to an illiterate fisherman's son.
    , @Wilkey
    @AnotherDad


    Hate to break it to you but you don’t exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust … the whole package.
     
    If World War 2 hadn’t happened pretty much everyone alive today under the age of, oh, 80, would not have been born.

    Parents wouldn’t have met each other, or would have met at different times. Even if they had met and married, they would have had sex at slightly different times. Different sperm and/or ovum, even from the same parent, and you get a different child, even if that child had the same parents as you.

    What makes you you? The egg, the sperm, or both? Who knows?

    So the notion of inventing a time machine and going back to kill Hitler isn’t just preposterous. It would be genocide. Real genocide. The annihilation of 8 billion people. Kill Hitler and there would still probably be about 8 billion people on the planet. But they would almost all be different people - literally.

    Replies: @Inselaffen

  151. @Greta Handel
    @Jim Don Bob

    Really?

    Spin aside (I know, I know), what do you think of the facts as reported in the NYT’s July 2019 “Ed Dwight Was Set to Be the First Black Astronaut. Here’s Why That Never Happened.”? According to that article, Mr. Dwight made it to and through the program, despite being pressured by Mr. Yeager to leave, which Mr. Yeager denied to at least some extent, saying that he was resistant to politicians interested in scoring points by interfering in his conduct of the program. There’s no indication that Mr. Yeager or Mr. LeMay was involved or even privy to the later selection of others, not including Mr. Dwight, from among the candidates.

    A lot of people in Establishia will no doubt be showing their Left stuff by dismissing Mr. Yeager as a race bigot. But those who want to embrace and defend that caricature show him no more respect. There’s more than one way to speak ill of the dead.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross, @Brutusale

    https://victoriayeager.com/emmett-hatch/

    As the best, Yeager respected excellence.

  152. @TG
    Yeah, fine. We all read "the Right Stuff," and some of us even played (and enjoyed) his flight simulator game.

    And then he's retired, and he's got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I'm good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn't a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don't - a soapbox, credibility - and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.

    Yeah sure he was a war hero. And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won. That's not hyperbole: compare the old third reich to modern day Pakistan, not even close. Last I checked, about 40% of the kids in Pakistan are so malnourished that they grow up physically stunted, and most of the rest are not much better off. In a generation or two, that's where we're headed. So what did Yeager really accomplish with his heroics?

    Just saying.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Sean, @Muggles, @Joe Stalin, @Jack D, @Excal

    It’s a fair question. All those heroics, and now look at us!

    But why focus on Yeager? Weren’t there other heroes — men who gave their entire lives to some cause or great work, which after all only amounted to some little brick or stone in some great edifice that would soon come toppling down? Some of them even lived to see their work destroyed — and they too did nothing about it.

    Meanwhile, what did you or I do, in the prime of our years, while the countries of the West were collapsing? Complain about Chuck Yeager, a retired test pilot in his dotage, not coming to save us?

    It is right to praise great men, and doers of great deeds, even when they served a lost cause. If we give honour only to those who give us things we want, we are dogs, who will honour our masters for giving us food or merely for not beating us.

  153. @PhysicistDave
    @PhysicistDave

    From John Adams to John Taylor, 17 December 1814:


    Remember Democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes exhausts and murders itself. There never was a Democracy Yet, that did not commit suicide.
     

    Replies: @Excal

    I see that Adams had read his Plato quite thoroughly.

  154. Anonymous[402] • Disclaimer says:
    @Magic Dirt Resident
    @Jack D


    Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.
     
    Do you honestly believe this? Germany tried and failed to invade the UK, so how were they supposed to invade and conquer a country 40x bigger across the ocean?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Do you honestly believe this? Germany tried and failed to invade the UK, so how were they supposed to invade and conquer a country 40x bigger across the ocean?

    Actually, Germany tried and failed to be allies with the UK. The UK spurned Germany’s peace entreaties. And Germany declined to invade the UK even when it had the opportunity.

  155. @Wilkey
    OT: Biden Cabinet thus far:

    Four Jews (Treasury, State, Homeland Security, Chief of Staff). One black (Defense). One Hispanic (Health & Human Services).

    White Gentiles: None.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jack D

    He just announced Vilsack for Sec. of Agriculture. So there’s at least one.

    This comes as a blow to the black lobby, who had wanted a black Ag. Secty who would refocus the dept away from white farmers and more toward giving (even more) stuff to black people. But then again they want EVERY secretary to be black.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Jack D

    The agriculture industry is mostly non-Jewish white, apart from the field workers and slaughterhouse workers. Even then Bill Clinton managed to pick a Jewish Ag Secretary, Dan Glickman, who was a congressman from Kansas.

    Secretary of Agriculture is in the lower tier of cabinet members. It’s one of the leftovers, along with Transportation, Commerce, Labor, Veterans Affairs, and so on.

    Among cabinet positions, Defense, Treasury, State, and Justice are the Big Four. Homeland Security, the newest department, is extremely important now, because of immigration. And of course the chief of staff.

    Of those six, four have been filled by Jews, one by a black guy, and the last (Justice) has yet to be named. In all likelihood it won’t be a non-Jewish white, and it almost definitely won’t be a straight, non-Jewish white.

  156. @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.
     
    That is complete and utter BS. At the end of WWII Hitler was 56, strung out on uppers and Europe was sick of war. The US sits then, as ever, across an ocean where it cannot be successfully invaded. Within a short time it would have had many nuclear weapons, and from then on invasion would have been impossible. You know this.

    If Hitler had won, the Jews would have left the USSR, but aside from that, Hitler had already defeated and occupied the rest of Europe, so the difference in terms of Jewish population would not be much. There would be peace. The difference in terms of Jewish control in the world would be significant. You would have the European version of Hollywood though, and a lack of pro-Jewish central banks in Europe/USSR. Outside that, there would be Jewish control, except in East Asia.

    What would have happened is that given a few decades, maybe a century, Europe would have forgotten about the Jews and let them back in, and the cycle would have repeated probably.

    From your writings it seems like you don't care about our people. So why should we reciprocate and care about your kind? And not even to the point of life, but about your kind's control and power. What's in it for us?

    I don't think the fate of the world hinges on Chuck Yeager, nor should it, but AFAICT the outcome of WWII was a net loss for Europeans everywhere, even in the so-called winning countries. Objectively, Jewish leadership, influence and control has been bad for us. I wish it were not so, and it seems unecessary that it had to be like this, but here we are.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Johann Ricke

    The premise was what would have happened if Hitler had WON. The only way that alternate history could have come about would have been if the Manhattan Project had failed. The goal of the Manhattan Project was to nuke Berlin, not Nagasaki, but the war in Europe ended before that happened.

    You are so blinded by your Jew hatred that you apparently would have preferred Hitler. I have news for you buddy – Hitler didn’t have anything good in mind for you and yours either. But at least when you were being starved to death you would have had the satisfaction of knowing that the Jews went first.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    For Hitler to have won WWII requires quite a few things to have gone down differently. For that to have happened the war would have likely been over earlier, conclusively. At that point I guess your argument is that the USA eventually gets nukes and bombs Berlin and another city, with a wait for more bomb material to be made, and with a credible invasion fleet hovering out there that is not going to get fought off even without a remaining Eastern front. That's part of why the bomb was successful for getting the Japanese to capitulate, though they knew it would be hard fought on the main islands of Japan, the bomb was the tipping point.

    Part of the problem though is to get the bomb to Berlin. Who is to say in this alternate universe that Hitler didn't view Britain as a brother nation, and instead invaded them successfully?

    Germany also had better rocket technology, so maybe by the time the USA may have wished to lob bombs on Europe, the third Reich may have had their own bomb.

    I think there are too many hypotheticals, but it's hard to argue away the US advantage in carriers.


    You are so blinded by your Jew hatred that you apparently would have preferred Hitler.
     
    This is projection. You are so blinded by Hitler hatred that you would crazily turn on the allies who helped you defeat Hitler. All my known relatives who fought, fought on your side in that war. But now their descendents are being rewarded with race replacement. This policy is being enacted in every single nation of Europeans. It must be literally a hatred for Europeans that has brought this about.

    What conclusion from that should I draw? Should I then be overcome with love for the Jews? The strange thing is that I know individual Jews who are very grateful for our help in WWII. Not just by words, but by deeds. However it seems that the Jews with influence are sadly not of this view.

    I tell you one thing, this policy of influential Jewry does not win "hearts and minds" with the White goyim, to put it mildly. If roles were reversed, how would Jews respond? I might liken it to a "Judea declares war on Germany" situation. Note that they chose to declare war on the nation, not Hitler, not the Nazi party, but Germany, and in 1933 well before shots were fired.

    This is not to say that our people will adopt the same response, or that I endorse such a response, but I put that there for comparison. We are a people who understand reciprocity. I know that you have in your number people who also understand reciprocity though evidently plenty in high places who don't.

    There was a time in my life when a movie like Schindler's list once motivated me with tears. This was in the late 1990s. Now I would not watch it, because I see it as propaganda. And exhortations to hate Hitler and consider that the Anglosphere in part "won" WWII, I find it hard to be motivated to care about these days, any more so than I have a dog in the fight of the Peloponnesian War. That is all. Hearts and minds.

    What is worth more in life, a friend or a former dupe?
  157. @Reg Cæsar
    @Diversity Heretic


    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

     

    LeMay was man enough to admit he was a war criminal. Not that he was in any way abashed about it. Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Prof. Woland, @syonredux, @Dan Hayes

    One country viewing a General as a war criminal, oftentimes his home country views him as a hero, as in the case of LeMay. This used to be called being on the right side of history. For most of the nineteenth and into the twentieth century, and for most of the US, General Sherman was considered to be a hero, because of his work in the Civil War and on the frontier vs the Indians. The states that voted for LeMay recognized a legitimate war hero, as did their nineteenth century ancestors. That particular US region has always recognized and respected valor and courage on the battlefield (or those drawing up the tactics and war plans). Obviously during the Civil War, Sherman wasn’t going to replace their adoration and respect for General Lee. During the 20th century, as a part of the US once more, they gave their adoration for LeMay.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    ...General Sherman was considered to be a hero, because of his work in the Civil War and on the frontier vs the Indians.
     
    He'll be canceled for the latter eventually. It just happened to Sibley High, which is to Hüsker Dü what Punahou was to the Kingston Trio. The school is only 1% "Native American".


    Henry Sibley drops name amid complaints about treatment of Dakota people

    Perhaps they could rename it after the late Eh Da Lay.
  158. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "The second-most controversial player in baseball history, behind Rogers Hornsby, "

    Uh, no, the second most controversial player in baseball history, behind Ty Cobb. And in modern yrs, behind Billy Martin, and Barry Bonds. No one ever threatened to shoot Hornsby if he showed up to play the A's (ironically, in PHI), because he deliberately spiked their 3B on the basepaths. Hornsby's entire team didn't attempt to beat him up early in his career. Hornsby didn't go into the stands to beat up a heckler. When it comes to controversy, compared to Ty Cobb, Hornsby was a choir boy.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Ian M.

    You should check out A Terrible Beauty by Charles Leehrsen. Leehrsen does an excellent job of rehabilitating Cobb’s image. While not a saint, neither is Cobb the irredeemable SOB he’s often portrayed as. Cobb’s reputation as a villain comes from a dishonest hatchet job written by Al Stump.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Thanks: donut
  159. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Disclosure: When I read statements like this coming from Bill James, it does make me seriously question why exactly he is considered to be an authority on the American Pastime at all. After all, MLB existed, flourished, and prospered quite well and fine before Bill James was born and arrived on the scene. It was Bill James who ignored and then minimized the widespread and rampant use of PEDS in MLB. Once it could not be ignored and minimized, it was Bill James (as well as other leading authority figures that represented MLB) who claimed that the direct impact on MLB, as well as PEDS direct impact on Sabermetrics as a whole was non-existent.

    Clearly, this kind of fantasy world style of thinking has not been helpful for MLB. According to most reliable polls, MLB's demographic mean age is age 50+, meaning that MLB no longer is the US's number one sport of choice for sports fans. Obviously with more choices for their entertainment dollars is playing a factor for young people, but also another factor that shouldn't be so casually dismissed is that MLB has also taken the lead in siding with Woke politics.

    It will be interesting to see how MLB fares 10-20 yrs from now, will it still be as prosperous compared to other entertainment/sports that at present, have captured the younger demographics attention?

    For this aspect, and many others, (noted and otherwise left unsaid) Bill James deserves some of the responsibility regarding why MLB is no longer the US's National Pastime, much less the nation's number one sport in terms of profits and revenues.

    To cite one example: Who has more of a direct impact on Social Media, Mike Trout and Giancarlo Stanton, or Kim Kardashian and Justin Beiber? As sports (and thus MLB) is technically a part of the entertainment sector, it is a fair and apt question. For the most part, Social Media is for those under aged 30. MLB is not.

    Replies: @Up2Drew

    I was a frequent witness at the old Comiskey Park in 1972 and enjoyed Dick Allen at the height of his powers. Magnificently talented, charismatic as hell, made my beloved White Sox relevant for awhile. But he was also galaxy-class petulant, selfish, divisive, and childish. Allen came and went as he pleased, showed up at gametime, etc. He quit the team in 1974, just walked away. Allen’s behavior was enabled by Sox manager Chuck Tanner, whose next act was to look the other way while the Pirates shoved half of Columbia up their noses. Ron Santo retired rather than watch another season of Tanner coddling Allen.

    Dick Allen was a great baseball player, but his demeanor gets an enormous pass through the veil of time. And don’t give me the racism thing – he was absolutely worshiped on the South Side of Chicago, where I grew up and racial issues were a real factor in everyday life.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    @Up2Drew

    Bill James wrote much the same concerning Dick Allen in a book on the HOF.

  160. I highly recommend the account by Robert W. Smith, one of the other three test pilots in the NF-104 program. NF-104 was a F-104 with rocket engines added. From Smith’s perspective Yeager horned in on something he didn’t understand and didn’t prepare for. His crash was his fault, not the plane’s, but to save his glorious reputation, the NF-104 program died instead. Smith’s account is quite worthwhile even without the Yeager parts.

    http://www.kalimera.org/nf104/index.html

  161. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist.
     
    a) You are not the alpha and omega of life.

    b) Steve, me ... pretty much everyone commenting here (bar just a few) would also not exist. History would be different.

    Hate to break it to you but you don't exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust ... the whole package. Our individual existences are highly contingent ... everything that leads up to pa on ma at a particular moment, with particular fish ready to fire.

    Perspective.

    ~~~

    The striking thing about the Nazis is they managed one of the greatest own-goals in human history. Everything they set out to achieve for Germany, Germans, "the Aryan Race", Central Europe, blocking Russian expansion, anti-communism, etc. they made much, much worse.

    Hitler wasn't alone in that. As in 1914 there was poor decision making all around that encouraged the crisis. But Hitler's megalomania fueled it.

    ~~~


    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite,
     
    Huh? Hey, I hate looking at fat people as much as then next guy. (And need to lose 10lbs myself.) Food abundance isn't a "problem". It's a great thing. Being fat is easily fixed by pushing back from the table and getting some exercise. Ok, his "malnutrition is coming" thing is ridiculous, but the reverse isn't our big problem either. (Ok, maybe it is our "big" problem, but certainly not our most important.)

    The serious problem Americans face is their nation is being stolen from themselves and their posterity, by traitorous, grasping, greedy minoritarian elites. That's the real problem--losing your nation, not being able to turn over to your children, your posterity a bright future in their own land, but a shrunken dystopian existence in a querulous globoslum.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Wilkey

    Hate to break it to you but you don’t exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust … the whole package.

    It’s even more ironic than that – I owe my whole nice suburban American existence to Hitler. If the war hadn’t happened, there’s no way my father’s son could have hoped to have gotten the kind of education and profession that I have here in Poland. No way that would have been accessible to an illiterate fisherman’s son.

  162. From Robert W. Smith:

    Bob Rushworth, the lead X-15 test pilot at that time and ultimately the one with the most flights, flew one flight in the AST, a maximum zoom to 112,000 feet altitude, shortly before Yeager flew it. Bob was a college graduate in engineering and had been trained in the X-15 simulator and flown many X-15 flights before his uneventful AST zoom. His only flight, like 13 of mine in which I intentionally stayed within the envelope, made a strong case for the suitability and safety of AST for max zoom with an experienced test pilot, trained also to be aware of space stability and control, within the design mission This was a very strong argument against Yeager’s contention of some unexplainable airplane problem causing his accident. Chuck’s attitude in the circumstances can be understood, but the board chairman, Guy Townsend, ignoring such facts was inexcusable.

    Chuck Yeager found himself in a spin, which went flat because of the high altitude spin entry with low engine rpm, and could not recover, forcing his bail out. He was there by his own doing, an effort to revitalize his image, which had been diminished considerably by time, a natural event for all heroes. Surprisingly, he was able to turn the accident into great press, which proved as effective or more than a successful record, because of the risk factor.

    Chuck Yeager had proven that he was the master of airplanes, many times. In my close dealing with him in attempting his zoom flights he proved another thing. In briefing him repeatedly, I began to fear that he could not or would not accept that he needed to learn new techniques to fly a craft into a space-like environment. But as his attempts progressed I noticed that he was unable to perform the vital and necessary job of accurately flying a very steep climb, totally on instruments. He failed miserably on that and it caused his accident and loss of the airplane, and ultimately the loss of that project. I was terribly concerned that he was not equipped for the space portion of the flight, but we never had the chance to find that out.

    I have compared the technical realities and my AST experiences to many of Chucks claims in his 1985 autobiography “Yeager”, below. By his own account he displays a lack of understanding, not only of space flight technology, but aircraft stability and control. In so doing, he confirms the stand of an officer from his past who had refused to graduate him from test pilot school for lack of understanding of the technical aspects of stability and control, the bread and butter of a test pilot. Such a statement is certainly argumentative with Chuck’s accomplishments, but one difference may be in the fact that the AST zoom climb was totally on instruments in the most critical phase from the beginning of the pull-up until diving in recovery. Absolutely no view of earth was available for orientation which is not an ordinary situation for experimental testing.

    http://www.kalimera.org/nf104/stories/stories_12.html

  163. At various points in this old PBS segment, Yeager speaks about the movie and about having the right stuff. I can’t imagine a news item like this being made today. It is quite uncolored by ideology or a narrative “take.”

  164. @Abolish_public_education
    @syonredux

    I once knew an ex-USAF pilot. Quite an arrogant fellow.

    I’ve met many arrogant cadets (and civilians).

    I’ve read from a chief, I think on this blog, that freshly minted ensigns, aboard USN submarines, are quite arrogant.

    Arrogance is virtually synonymous with “naval aviator”. Indeed, the attitude is a stereotype: Recall that scene from Top Gun where “Viper” announced how much he admired “Mav’s” arrogance.

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    Replies: @syonredux, @JMcG, @kaganovitch

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    That’s not what Yeager said. These are 2 separate things. He thought the Israeli pilots were arrogant and thus lost half their air force in 1973 war. He also thought that they had no business being on Edwards base ,probably because he thought (I assume correctly) they were spying. While Yeager was mistaken about how much of the Israeli AF was lost in Yom Kippur war, around a quarter rather than a half, as well as IAF arrogance being a significant factor in that loss, that doesn’t imply bias on his part, just a mistake. The eagerness to take offense and the absence of good will is one of the more annoying side effects of the destruction of our common culture.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @kaganovitch

    Israeli pilots were also completely surprised by the Egyptians' use of SAMs, and lost many aircraft to them in the first days of the 1973 war.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

  165. @Paleo Liberal
    @Wilkey

    What about the complete absence of non-Papists among the past few GOP Supreme Court nominations?

    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Wilkey

    The word is “Catholics.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hibernian


    The word is “Catholics.”

     

    Some of us are White Anglo-Saxon Papists!
  166. @Reg Cæsar

    What about the complete absence of non-Papists among the past few GOP Supreme Court nominations?

    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.
     
    Because the loyal ones aren't educated and the educated ones aren't loyal.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    The loyal ones don’t tend to be Ivy Leaguers, especially undergraduate ones.

  167. @wren
    Wow, that F-104 was quite a plane.

    The guys who designed and built it really did have the right stuff.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @Diversity Heretic, @Kibernetika

    Salute, Chuck Yeager!

  168. FWIW, Yeager was a war criminal who strafed German civilians with his Mustang:

    https://twitter.com/Tarnseele/status/1336165239906324481/photo/1

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Anon

    Yeager's own words:


    Atrocities were committed by both sides. That fall our fighter group received orders from the Eighth Air Force to stage a maximum effort. Our seventy-five Mustangs were assigned an area of fifty miles by fifty miles inside Germany and ordered to strafe anything that moved. The object was to demoralize the German population. Nobody asked our opinion about whether we were actually demoralizing the survivors or maybe enraging them to stage their own maximum effort in behalf of the Nazi war effort. We weren't asked how we felt zapping people. It was a miserable, dirty mission, but we all took off on time and did it. If it occurred to anyone to refuse to participate (nobody refused, as I recall) that person would have probably been court-martialed. I remember sitting next to Bochkay at the briefing and whispering to him "If we're gonna do things like this, we sure as hell better make sure we're on the winning side. That's still my view.
     

    By definition, war is immoral; there is no such thing as a clean war. Once arimies are engaged, war is total. We were ordered to commit an atrocity, pure and simple but the brass who approved this action probably felt justified because wartime Germany wasn't easily divided between "innocent civilians" and its military machine. The farmer tilling his potato field might have been feeding German Troops. And because German industry was wrecked by constant bombing, muntions-making was now a cottage industry, dispersed across the country in hundreds of homes and neighborhood factories, which was the British excuse for staging carpet bombing and fire bombing attacks on civilian targets. In war, the military will seldom hesitate to hit civilians if they are in the way, or to target them purposely for various strategic reasons. That's been true in every war that has ever been fought and will be fought. That is the savage nature of war itself. I'm certainly not proud of that particular strafing mission against civilians. But it is there, on the record and in my memory.

     

    Chuck Yeager, Leo Janos- Yeager: An Autobiography.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  169. @Up2Drew
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    I was a frequent witness at the old Comiskey Park in 1972 and enjoyed Dick Allen at the height of his powers. Magnificently talented, charismatic as hell, made my beloved White Sox relevant for awhile. But he was also galaxy-class petulant, selfish, divisive, and childish. Allen came and went as he pleased, showed up at gametime, etc. He quit the team in 1974, just walked away. Allen's behavior was enabled by Sox manager Chuck Tanner, whose next act was to look the other way while the Pirates shoved half of Columbia up their noses. Ron Santo retired rather than watch another season of Tanner coddling Allen.

    Dick Allen was a great baseball player, but his demeanor gets an enormous pass through the veil of time. And don't give me the racism thing - he was absolutely worshiped on the South Side of Chicago, where I grew up and racial issues were a real factor in everyday life.

    Replies: @David In TN

    Bill James wrote much the same concerning Dick Allen in a book on the HOF.

  170. @MollyA
    @Guy De Champlagne

    No wars started in four years. Compare that with 1980-2016. Not pretending. Personally though, I don't think the "party" membership has had a lot to do with it.

    Replies: @Guy De Champlagne

    It’s not because of Trump either. He had to be talked out of all sorts of crazy anti iran and anti venezuela stuff. And still did plenty of it anyway.

    What counts as starting a war is ultimately semantics. There are things Obama did in eight years that Trump didn’t and there are things Trump did that Obama didn’t. Neither of them did anything that approaches Bush’s actions in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    • LOL: Gabe Ruth
  171. Anonymous[216] • Disclaimer says:

    Not denigrating Yeager, but during World War II, two of his credited air-to-air victories were for Me-109s whose pilots bailed out as soon as Yeager got on their tail and before he opened fire.
    During the Viet Nam war, one of my relatives, flying an F-8E, engaged a MiG-21 and stayed on his tail despite whatever maneuver the MiG pilot tried. Finally, the MiG pilot gave up trying to evade the Crusader and ejected. When my relative put in a claim for the kill, it was rejected with a hand-written comment in the margin of the report: “Navy kill for scaring pilot out of A/C? Shit!”
    But the Navy always has had very strict criteria for granting air-to-air victory claims.

  172. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    One country viewing a General as a war criminal, oftentimes his home country views him as a hero, as in the case of LeMay. This used to be called being on the right side of history. For most of the nineteenth and into the twentieth century, and for most of the US, General Sherman was considered to be a hero, because of his work in the Civil War and on the frontier vs the Indians. The states that voted for LeMay recognized a legitimate war hero, as did their nineteenth century ancestors. That particular US region has always recognized and respected valor and courage on the battlefield (or those drawing up the tactics and war plans). Obviously during the Civil War, Sherman wasn't going to replace their adoration and respect for General Lee. During the 20th century, as a part of the US once more, they gave their adoration for LeMay.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …General Sherman was considered to be a hero, because of his work in the Civil War and on the frontier vs the Indians.

    He’ll be canceled for the latter eventually. It just happened to Sibley High, which is to Hüsker Dü what Punahou was to the Kingston Trio. The school is only 1% “Native American”.

    Henry Sibley drops name amid complaints about treatment of Dakota people

    Perhaps they could rename it after the late Eh Da Lay.

  173. @Jack D
    @Wilkey

    He just announced Vilsack for Sec. of Agriculture. So there's at least one.

    This comes as a blow to the black lobby, who had wanted a black Ag. Secty who would refocus the dept away from white farmers and more toward giving (even more) stuff to black people. But then again they want EVERY secretary to be black.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    The agriculture industry is mostly non-Jewish white, apart from the field workers and slaughterhouse workers. Even then Bill Clinton managed to pick a Jewish Ag Secretary, Dan Glickman, who was a congressman from Kansas.

    Secretary of Agriculture is in the lower tier of cabinet members. It’s one of the leftovers, along with Transportation, Commerce, Labor, Veterans Affairs, and so on.

    Among cabinet positions, Defense, Treasury, State, and Justice are the Big Four. Homeland Security, the newest department, is extremely important now, because of immigration. And of course the chief of staff.

    Of those six, four have been filled by Jews, one by a black guy, and the last (Justice) has yet to be named. In all likelihood it won’t be a non-Jewish white, and it almost definitely won’t be a straight, non-Jewish white.

  174. @Hibernian
    @Paleo Liberal

    The word is "Catholics."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The word is “Catholics.”

    Some of us are White Anglo-Saxon Papists!

    • LOL: Hibernian
  175. @William Badwhite
    @Guy De Champlagne


    Biden’s defense contractor shill is substantially less likely to get us into wars than Trump’s defense contractor shills were
     
    Except Trump didn't get "us" into any new wars. So other than being completely wrong, you make a good point.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Guy De Champlagne

    I’m perfectly comfortable saying that someone that bought a lottery ticket and won was still being irrational even if in one sense that lottery ticket had a 100% chance of winning and was a fantastically rational investment.

    We got through Trump’s wack job israel obsessive appointments and horrible temperament through the skin of our teeth. We won the lottery but I don’t want another ticket.

  176. @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.
     
    That is complete and utter BS. At the end of WWII Hitler was 56, strung out on uppers and Europe was sick of war. The US sits then, as ever, across an ocean where it cannot be successfully invaded. Within a short time it would have had many nuclear weapons, and from then on invasion would have been impossible. You know this.

    If Hitler had won, the Jews would have left the USSR, but aside from that, Hitler had already defeated and occupied the rest of Europe, so the difference in terms of Jewish population would not be much. There would be peace. The difference in terms of Jewish control in the world would be significant. You would have the European version of Hollywood though, and a lack of pro-Jewish central banks in Europe/USSR. Outside that, there would be Jewish control, except in East Asia.

    What would have happened is that given a few decades, maybe a century, Europe would have forgotten about the Jews and let them back in, and the cycle would have repeated probably.

    From your writings it seems like you don't care about our people. So why should we reciprocate and care about your kind? And not even to the point of life, but about your kind's control and power. What's in it for us?

    I don't think the fate of the world hinges on Chuck Yeager, nor should it, but AFAICT the outcome of WWII was a net loss for Europeans everywhere, even in the so-called winning countries. Objectively, Jewish leadership, influence and control has been bad for us. I wish it were not so, and it seems unecessary that it had to be like this, but here we are.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Johann Ricke

    From your writings it seems like you don’t care about our people. So why should we reciprocate and care about your kind? And not even to the point of life, but about your kind’s control and power. What’s in it for us?

    From your writings, you want every last Jew eliminated. What’s in it for the Jews, that they should care about you and yours? Maybe they should take care of you before you take care of them.

  177. @AnotherDad
    @Jack D


    That’s the sickest thing I’ve ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn’t even exist.
     
    a) You are not the alpha and omega of life.

    b) Steve, me ... pretty much everyone commenting here (bar just a few) would also not exist. History would be different.

    Hate to break it to you but you don't exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust ... the whole package. Our individual existences are highly contingent ... everything that leads up to pa on ma at a particular moment, with particular fish ready to fire.

    Perspective.

    ~~~

    The striking thing about the Nazis is they managed one of the greatest own-goals in human history. Everything they set out to achieve for Germany, Germans, "the Aryan Race", Central Europe, blocking Russian expansion, anti-communism, etc. they made much, much worse.

    Hitler wasn't alone in that. As in 1914 there was poor decision making all around that encouraged the crisis. But Hitler's megalomania fueled it.

    ~~~


    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite,
     
    Huh? Hey, I hate looking at fat people as much as then next guy. (And need to lose 10lbs myself.) Food abundance isn't a "problem". It's a great thing. Being fat is easily fixed by pushing back from the table and getting some exercise. Ok, his "malnutrition is coming" thing is ridiculous, but the reverse isn't our big problem either. (Ok, maybe it is our "big" problem, but certainly not our most important.)

    The serious problem Americans face is their nation is being stolen from themselves and their posterity, by traitorous, grasping, greedy minoritarian elites. That's the real problem--losing your nation, not being able to turn over to your children, your posterity a bright future in their own land, but a shrunken dystopian existence in a querulous globoslum.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Wilkey

    Hate to break it to you but you don’t exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust … the whole package.

    If World War 2 hadn’t happened pretty much everyone alive today under the age of, oh, 80, would not have been born.

    Parents wouldn’t have met each other, or would have met at different times. Even if they had met and married, they would have had sex at slightly different times. Different sperm and/or ovum, even from the same parent, and you get a different child, even if that child had the same parents as you.

    What makes you you? The egg, the sperm, or both? Who knows?

    So the notion of inventing a time machine and going back to kill Hitler isn’t just preposterous. It would be genocide. Real genocide. The annihilation of 8 billion people. Kill Hitler and there would still probably be about 8 billion people on the planet. But they would almost all be different people – literally.

    • Replies: @Inselaffen
    @Wilkey

    'What makes you you? The egg, the sperm, or both? Who knows?'

    It's both, obviously. Change one or the other and it's an entirely different person-recipe that gets baked. Which is why stuff like 'it's just a lucky coincidence you were born in Europe/America and enjoy the privilege of that accident of birth, you could have just as easily been born a poor African' is nonsense (although it's a fairly common mode of thought).

    More interesting to think about is if you took the same 'you' but grew up in a completely different system (200 years ago, NS germany, the USSR, whatever), to what extent would you be the same person you are now? I guess this could be most relevant today to Koreans born just after the country split in two - would they be the 'same' person if they had grown up in the 'other' Korea? You'd be made of the same stuff, but your mental life would be very different...

  178. @El Dato
    @PhysicistDave

    In a long time there is finally a power that dares show the US the finger and tell it that it is decrepit ass.

    "We are doomed"

    Get a grip.

    Yeah being number 1 is no longer on the table. So what.

    You want to get that decrepit ass situation under control.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    You want to get your punk mouth situation under control.

  179. @Paleo Liberal
    @Wilkey

    What about the complete absence of non-Papists among the past few GOP Supreme Court nominations?

    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Wilkey

    Not a lot of white Protestants in the high levels of government these days.

    The Senate currently has 59 Protestants and 23 Catholics, plus 4 Mormons (who technically aren’t Protestant). That’s pretty representative of America as a whole. A whole lot more representative of America than Joe Biden’s Cabinet.

    There is no shortage of white Christian talent available if Joe Biden wanted it. But our incoming president is in middle stage dementia. He is not in charge of his own administration. We don’t really know who is, but with every new Cabinet member we begin to get an idea.

    The only good news is that Republicans seem to finally be pulling together on the Georgia Senate races, and there is a halfway decent chance that Biden won’t have any Supreme Court seats to fill.

    The bad news is that nearly four million immigrants are naturalized every four years, and the vast majority of them aren’t white. And Biden’s puppeteers appear to intend to do everything in their power to increase that number. And our geniuses in Congress, including the Republicans, just voted to accelerate the process.

  180. @Reg Cæsar
    @Diversity Heretic


    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

     

    LeMay was man enough to admit he was a war criminal. Not that he was in any way abashed about it. Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Prof. Woland, @syonredux, @Dan Hayes

    My late father was training as a tail gunner in a B-29 and he got his orders to ship out to Saipan the day Japan surrendered. That is about as lucky as you get.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Prof. Woland


    My late father was training as a tail gunner in a B-29 and he got his orders to ship out to Saipan the day Japan surrendered. That is about as lucky as you get.

     

    My father joined the Coast Guard in 1939, just after the war started in Europe. Whether he was being shrewd or just needed a job, I never thought to ask.

    One year, my birthday fell #366 on the draft lottery. Another year, the kid next door was #1.

    Replies: @Prof. Woland

  181. @JMcG
    @Jack D

    Hitler couldn’t conquer continental Europe, never mind the continental US. I’m counting western Russia as part of Europe here, before anyone jumps in.

    Replies: @Whiskey

    For those into that sort of thing Military History Visualized a former German paratrooper studying military history has a series of videos on YT breaking down the German Military and why they did not win:

    A. they depended on highly trained men and could not sustain quality and training after war with Russia, they needed bouts of truce/peace to re-equip and retrain new soldiers. During Summer/Fall 1941 they lost quite a bit of military effectiveness and never regained it. By contrast the Soviets, British, and Americans were able to adapt new training methods and bring skilled troops into battle for the first time.
    B. The German military going back to Frederick the Great was geared to waging short wars with interior lines of communications, their logistics and supply chain was poor and so was their ability to organize such.
    C. Their industrial base though formidable was limited in industrial capacity even compared to the British let alone the Soviets.
    D. Their ability simply to replace dead soldiers with new ones was far inferior to the Soviets and even the British.
    E. Their weapons systems were overly complex mostly and prone to breaking down without detailed and costly maintenance.
    F. The German military was over-committed: to the Atlantic, North Africa (then Italy), the Balkans/Greece, and the Eastern Front.
    G. Like the Japanese the Germans could not generally get newer and more innovative fighters and bombers into large scale production after 1941 — the fought generally with what they had in 1939 which was excellent then but outdated by 1944.

    Summary: lack of industrial resources, logistical ability, and the ability to train while fighting doomed the Reich.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Whiskey

    E. Their weapons systems were overly complex mostly and prone to breaking down without detailed and costly maintenance.

    But 75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?

    Replies: @Chris Renner, @The Wild Geese Howard

  182. @SunBakedSuburb
    @Morton's toes

    "One of a kind."

    That can be said for all of the Right Stuff pilots and first generation NASA dudes. After reading the Neil Armstrong biography, particularly his transition from combat to test pilot, it struck me that these guys had supernatural guts; clearly on the border between gonads of steel and the loony bin. Astronuts.

    Replies: @anonymous as usual

    Bullshit. “Supernatural guts” for doing a fun but dangerous job is hyperbole.

    About 5 percent of American males die young from car wrecks, shootouts, fights, or messing around with the wrong people, that sort of thing. Nothing supernatural about it – if you are a young guy who isn’t rich, and you don’t have guts, you don’t get laid, or if you do get laid, it is probably only with fat chicks.

    I think Yeager was a wonderful guy, but there was nothing supernatural about his bravery. A great guy, and super brave, but so were millions of his contemporaries.

    Don’t diss American males by pretending this one guy was an exception.

  183. @Whiskey
    @JMcG

    For those into that sort of thing Military History Visualized a former German paratrooper studying military history has a series of videos on YT breaking down the German Military and why they did not win:

    A. they depended on highly trained men and could not sustain quality and training after war with Russia, they needed bouts of truce/peace to re-equip and retrain new soldiers. During Summer/Fall 1941 they lost quite a bit of military effectiveness and never regained it. By contrast the Soviets, British, and Americans were able to adapt new training methods and bring skilled troops into battle for the first time.
    B. The German military going back to Frederick the Great was geared to waging short wars with interior lines of communications, their logistics and supply chain was poor and so was their ability to organize such.
    C. Their industrial base though formidable was limited in industrial capacity even compared to the British let alone the Soviets.
    D. Their ability simply to replace dead soldiers with new ones was far inferior to the Soviets and even the British.
    E. Their weapons systems were overly complex mostly and prone to breaking down without detailed and costly maintenance.
    F. The German military was over-committed: to the Atlantic, North Africa (then Italy), the Balkans/Greece, and the Eastern Front.
    G. Like the Japanese the Germans could not generally get newer and more innovative fighters and bombers into large scale production after 1941 -- the fought generally with what they had in 1939 which was excellent then but outdated by 1944.

    Summary: lack of industrial resources, logistical ability, and the ability to train while fighting doomed the Reich.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    E. Their weapons systems were overly complex mostly and prone to breaking down without detailed and costly maintenance.

    But 75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?

    • Replies: @Chris Renner
    @Steve Sailer


    75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?
     
    Not at all. /s

    Here's the back side of an Audi V8; for comparison, American and Japanese/Korean engines almost universally use a single chain or belt, mounted on the (much more accessible) front side of the engine.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Inquiring Mind

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Steve Sailer

    Voilà :

    https://youtu.be/OpEIl9LmkT4

  184. @Marty
    @prime noticer

    Boomers lost the country

    What Steve is saying is that if the Greatest who were in charge in 1964 had arrested Richie Allen for decking Frank Thomas like they should have, today’s jigs wouldn’t be so bold as to push out all the white election observers.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    That feat of teasing out hidden meaning from a text is worthy of a Straussian.

  185. @Prof. Woland
    @Reg Cæsar

    My late father was training as a tail gunner in a B-29 and he got his orders to ship out to Saipan the day Japan surrendered. That is about as lucky as you get.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    My late father was training as a tail gunner in a B-29 and he got his orders to ship out to Saipan the day Japan surrendered. That is about as lucky as you get.

    My father joined the Coast Guard in 1939, just after the war started in Europe. Whether he was being shrewd or just needed a job, I never thought to ask.

    One year, my birthday fell #366 on the draft lottery. Another year, the kid next door was #1.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    @Reg Cæsar

    When I was 8ish a man who lived next door to me was #2 for the Vietnam Draft. He fenagled his way to officer school and eventually became a dentist. He was shitting in his pants.

    Both of my grandfathers missed WW1 in similar to how my father lucked out. Both were born in 1900, one in October and the other in December. One was waiting to graduate from high school (the Southerner) and the other (the Yankee) was on a train on his way home from college to enlist when the war ended.

    On the other hand, my great great grandfather and his father, my great great great grandfather fought for the South in the same regiment ( I think they were 38 and 18 years old in 1861). After and before many bloody battles then ended up at Sharpsburg (better known in the North as Antietam) and ended up surviving. He had six notches in his musket which is hanging over my cousins fireplace.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  186. Yeager’s death really feels like the end of an era for American whites.

    Chuck Yeager and Neil Armstrong were basically Peak White America. They were two sides of a coin — Yeager was the brash jock, while Armstrong was the thoughtful nerd. Yet both excelled at every challenge they ever faced. (John Glenn was an interesting hybrid of the two extremes.)

    It really doesn’t seem like America makes these kinds of men anymore — largely because it no longer respects them. Sure, America still “respects” Yeager and Armstrong — but only because they were “winners.” It no longer respects the kind of dedication and effort that made Yeager into Yeager, or Armstrong into Armstrong. It regards those values as stupid at best; racist at worst.

    Such a loss. A sad day for America, indeed…

  187. @Reg Cæsar
    @Diversity Heretic


    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

     

    LeMay was man enough to admit he was a war criminal. Not that he was in any way abashed about it. Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Prof. Woland, @syonredux, @Dan Hayes

    Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.

    Sherman destroyed property. During his entire March to the Sea, he never committed a single massacre. In contrast, LeMay and Sir Arthur Harris were responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians. Comparing those fellows to Sherman is goonishness of a high order.

  188. @Anon
    FWIW, Yeager was a war criminal who strafed German civilians with his Mustang:

    https://twitter.com/Tarnseele/status/1336165239906324481/photo/1

    Replies: @syonredux

    Yeager’s own words:

    Atrocities were committed by both sides. That fall our fighter group received orders from the Eighth Air Force to stage a maximum effort. Our seventy-five Mustangs were assigned an area of fifty miles by fifty miles inside Germany and ordered to strafe anything that moved. The object was to demoralize the German population. Nobody asked our opinion about whether we were actually demoralizing the survivors or maybe enraging them to stage their own maximum effort in behalf of the Nazi war effort. We weren’t asked how we felt zapping people. It was a miserable, dirty mission, but we all took off on time and did it. If it occurred to anyone to refuse to participate (nobody refused, as I recall) that person would have probably been court-martialed. I remember sitting next to Bochkay at the briefing and whispering to him “If we’re gonna do things like this, we sure as hell better make sure we’re on the winning side. That’s still my view.

    By definition, war is immoral; there is no such thing as a clean war. Once arimies are engaged, war is total. We were ordered to commit an atrocity, pure and simple but the brass who approved this action probably felt justified because wartime Germany wasn’t easily divided between “innocent civilians” and its military machine. The farmer tilling his potato field might have been feeding German Troops. And because German industry was wrecked by constant bombing, muntions-making was now a cottage industry, dispersed across the country in hundreds of homes and neighborhood factories, which was the British excuse for staging carpet bombing and fire bombing attacks on civilian targets. In war, the military will seldom hesitate to hit civilians if they are in the way, or to target them purposely for various strategic reasons. That’s been true in every war that has ever been fought and will be fought. That is the savage nature of war itself. I’m certainly not proud of that particular strafing mission against civilians. But it is there, on the record and in my memory.

    Chuck Yeager, Leo Janos- Yeager: An Autobiography.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @syonredux

    Leo Janos was one helluva ghostwriter. Beside's Yeager's book, he did Ben Rich's "Skunk Works."

  189. @Steve Sailer
    @Whiskey

    E. Their weapons systems were overly complex mostly and prone to breaking down without detailed and costly maintenance.

    But 75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?

    Replies: @Chris Renner, @The Wild Geese Howard

    75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?

    Not at all. /s

    Here’s the back side of an Audi V8; for comparison, American and Japanese/Korean engines almost universally use a single chain or belt, mounted on the (much more accessible) front side of the engine.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Chris Renner

    Yep, that’s an engine-out job. It’ll probably run 6-7k. JMcG 2nd rule for readers: Never buy a German luxury car out of warranty. My 1st rule is, of course, never fly on a third world airline.

    , @Inquiring Mind
    @Chris Renner

    Shprokets!

  190. @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    Peter Turchin as the Josh Billings of 2020s...

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    or the Long John Silver of the 2020s, but your reference more obscure and informed > my reference, so you win.

  191. @syonredux
    @Anon

    Yeager's own words:


    Atrocities were committed by both sides. That fall our fighter group received orders from the Eighth Air Force to stage a maximum effort. Our seventy-five Mustangs were assigned an area of fifty miles by fifty miles inside Germany and ordered to strafe anything that moved. The object was to demoralize the German population. Nobody asked our opinion about whether we were actually demoralizing the survivors or maybe enraging them to stage their own maximum effort in behalf of the Nazi war effort. We weren't asked how we felt zapping people. It was a miserable, dirty mission, but we all took off on time and did it. If it occurred to anyone to refuse to participate (nobody refused, as I recall) that person would have probably been court-martialed. I remember sitting next to Bochkay at the briefing and whispering to him "If we're gonna do things like this, we sure as hell better make sure we're on the winning side. That's still my view.
     

    By definition, war is immoral; there is no such thing as a clean war. Once arimies are engaged, war is total. We were ordered to commit an atrocity, pure and simple but the brass who approved this action probably felt justified because wartime Germany wasn't easily divided between "innocent civilians" and its military machine. The farmer tilling his potato field might have been feeding German Troops. And because German industry was wrecked by constant bombing, muntions-making was now a cottage industry, dispersed across the country in hundreds of homes and neighborhood factories, which was the British excuse for staging carpet bombing and fire bombing attacks on civilian targets. In war, the military will seldom hesitate to hit civilians if they are in the way, or to target them purposely for various strategic reasons. That's been true in every war that has ever been fought and will be fought. That is the savage nature of war itself. I'm certainly not proud of that particular strafing mission against civilians. But it is there, on the record and in my memory.

     

    Chuck Yeager, Leo Janos- Yeager: An Autobiography.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Leo Janos was one helluva ghostwriter. Beside’s Yeager’s book, he did Ben Rich’s “Skunk Works.”

  192. @Chris Renner
    @Steve Sailer


    75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?
     
    Not at all. /s

    Here's the back side of an Audi V8; for comparison, American and Japanese/Korean engines almost universally use a single chain or belt, mounted on the (much more accessible) front side of the engine.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Inquiring Mind

    Yep, that’s an engine-out job. It’ll probably run 6-7k. JMcG 2nd rule for readers: Never buy a German luxury car out of warranty. My 1st rule is, of course, never fly on a third world airline.

  193. @Jack D
    @TG


    before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    That's the sickest thing I've ever heard. If Hitler had won, I wouldn't even exist. Eventually he would have gotten around to conquering the continental US and millions would have died.

    Yeager did more for America than 99.99% of us ever will. For you to posthumously vilify him because he did not do even more when he is not yet even in the ground is sick. It's lucky for you that he's gone now and that you're a coward hiding behind your anonymity because if he was still alive and you said this to his face, he would have punched out your pathetic ass.

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about "hunger in America". If you visit a place like Pakistan, you'll notice that poor people there are really, really skinny, like ribs sticking out skinny. I don't think I have ever met a single individual in America that looks like that (except for people who are terminal cancer patients or the like), and I would fear to have most American "poor people" sit on my kitchen chairs lest they collapse from the weight.

    Replies: @Magic Dirt Resident, @JMcG, @Anonymous, @AnotherDad, @Corn

    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about “hunger in America”

    I think honest liberals know it’s BS too. I remember awhile back I was browsing Reddit and some internet communist was ranting about “food insecurity”. Couldn’t even bring himself to say hunger.

    • Replies: @36 ulster
    @Corn

    Let's not forget that crocodile-tear-inducing phrase: "food desert."

  194. @Ron Mexico
    @anonymous

    "Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger should allow a signature verification, which will “show large scale discrepancies.”

    don't know if it was Crowder, Tim Pool or Scott Adams, but they addressed that very issue and concluded that it wasn't going to happen because the Guv and SOS are embarrassed that it happened under their watch and don't want to lose their jobs. Contrast that to the shit show that my Guv Whitmer and SOS Benson, throw in the carpet muncher AG Nessel, presided over, and they don't give 2 fuqs about it, and even encourage it. Difference between Republicans and Democrats.

    Replies: @anonymous, @Corn

    they addressed that very issue and concluded that it wasn’t going to happen because the Guv and SOS are embarrassed that it happened under their watch and don’t want to lose their jobs.

    I don’t want to pile conspiracy theories upon a convoluted situation but I’ve read it suggested (here at iSteve comments I think) that Kemp doesn’t want to shine a light on voter fraud in GA because maybe people will find out Stacy Abrams wasn’t making baseless accusations……

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  195. @kaganovitch
    @Abolish_public_education

    But, of course, flyboy arrogance is only an unbearable (can get a guy kicked off of a military base!) when the hotshot is a (presumably Jewish) Israeli.

    That's not what Yeager said. These are 2 separate things. He thought the Israeli pilots were arrogant and thus lost half their air force in 1973 war. He also thought that they had no business being on Edwards base ,probably because he thought (I assume correctly) they were spying. While Yeager was mistaken about how much of the Israeli AF was lost in Yom Kippur war, around a quarter rather than a half, as well as IAF arrogance being a significant factor in that loss, that doesn't imply bias on his part, just a mistake. The eagerness to take offense and the absence of good will is one of the more annoying side effects of the destruction of our common culture.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Israeli pilots were also completely surprised by the Egyptians’ use of SAMs, and lost many aircraft to them in the first days of the 1973 war.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Jim Don Bob

    Israeli pilots were also completely surprised by the Egyptians’ use of SAMs, and lost many aircraft to them in the first days of the 1973 war.

    Indeed the vast majority of the 100+ airframes the Israeli's lost in 1973 were to the SAM batteries (Syrian as well as Egyptian). This wasn't IAF arrogance as much as ignorance. No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then, and existing IAF doctrine and equipment was unequal to the task. That the IAF persisted in flying these almost suicidal sorties in the face of the SAM umbrella for the first two days of the war, was also not arrogance. The ground war was going so badly for the Israelis that they thought without close air support they would be entirely routed. It was more a case of "must needs when the devil drives".

    In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war. It was only the Sharon/Adan strike across the Suez that allowed the IDF to roll up the SAM batteries on the ground that gave the IAF control of the skies on the Egyptian front. On the Syrian front where the ground war stalemated after the taking of the Golan Heights, the SAM umbrella continued to thwart IAF effectiveness.

    Replies: @anon

  196. @Chris Renner
    @Steve Sailer


    75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?
     
    Not at all. /s

    Here's the back side of an Audi V8; for comparison, American and Japanese/Korean engines almost universally use a single chain or belt, mounted on the (much more accessible) front side of the engine.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Inquiring Mind

    Shprokets!

  197. @Reg Cæsar
    @Diversity Heretic


    Curtiss LeMay gets a lot of bad press but I remember one historian who said that if he had a son in the military he would want him to be commanded by a man like Curtiss LeMay.

     

    LeMay was man enough to admit he was a war criminal. Not that he was in any way abashed about it. Those states that voted for LeMay in 1968 (or Truman in 1948) forfeited the right to complain about Gen Sherman.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Prof. Woland, @syonredux, @Dan Hayes

    LeMay stated this to Robert MacNamara who was serving as an operational analyst selecting fire bombing sites!

  198. @David In TN
    @Jim Don Bob

    And they are starting to attack Chuck Yeager for it.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    a/c/t Wolfe, I think the top 11 astronaut candidates at Edwards would go on for further training and Ed Dwight was #14. When they as good as told Yeager that Dwight had to qualify, he sent 14 candidates on to the next stage, instead of 11.

    He rightly thought it would be unfair to #12 and #13 if Dwight qualified but they didn’t, and he wasn’t prepared to do it.

  199. @Sean
    @TG


    And the way things are going, before too long many Americans would be objectively better off if Hitler had won.
     
    No, Tojo. The Japanese fighting China for ever after would have been much preferable to the current situation, whereby Japan profits from China while being defended by the faltering US for free. If Japan had attacked the Soviet Union during Operation Barbarossa, then the USSR would have certainly been defeated. A 1939 battle between Japan and the USSR in Mongolia was the decisive moment of WW2. It is said the Chinese have little appreciation for irony.

    Replies: @36 ulster

    One of the lesser-known (hell, virtually UN-known) battles of WWII. The Japanese often got the better of the Soviets in the air, but at Khalkhin Gol (Nomonhan to the Japanese), the Soviets won the infantry scrum and used their BT tanks to envelop the Japanese forces. An armistice was signed, but the Soviets maintained substantial forces on the Mongolian border. The Sorge spy ring in Tokyo followed up its warning of Germany’s impending attack on the USSR with information that Japan was shifting its forces south (China) and east (Pacific Islands). Still, it would be months before the Soviets shipped their forces westward on the Trans-Siberian, in time to halt the Wehrmacht just short of Moscow. A not-well-known Japanese movie, with the awkward title Spy Sorge, is available on YouTube, with British actor Iain Glen in the title role. The German military attache’ is portrayed by the same guy who played the Stasi officer in the German movie The Lives of Others.

    • Replies: @anonymous as usual
    @36 ulster

    I don't know, I think that is a fairly well known battle.

    At least to the sort of people who care about such things -

  200. @Anonymous
    @TG


    And then he’s retired, and he’s got his, and the elites are selling out the nation for quick profits, and what does he do? Has fun, screw you, I’m good pal, see you.

    OK so he wasn’t a saint. Not everyone can be the second coming. But he had what a lot of the rest of us peons don’t – a soapbox, credibility – and he looked the other way as the nation was sold out.
     

    Indeed. A continuation of that here...

    https://www.twitter.com/KAlexanderAdams/status/1336076768751448067

    Replies: @Escher, @YetAnotherAnon

    Thank God for that. Boris the globalist cretin has already extended them an invitation to settle. They’ll more likely head for the US. Rather you than us, though ideally none of us.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_fool_theory

    The Chinese leadership has the same view of overseas Chinese that Israel’s leaders have of the diaspora (which Mossad guy said he could knock on any Jewish door in the world and they’d help him?). This doesn’t bode well for America.

    Back on topic, I hadn’t realised just how many amazing aerospace projects were killed by Attlee’s Labour government until I read the Eric Brown wiki, or how much the Brits led carrier technology. In those days.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Brown_(pilot)

    Supersonic aircraft scrapped, though the flying tail intended for the Miles M52 was fitted to the X-1 and enabled Yeager’s flight. Proposals for sub-orbital space flight with an enlarged V2 turned down on cost grounds.

  201. @Corn
    @Jack D


    PS as far as I can tell, the problem that most Americans face is not lack of food but the opposite, for all the BS you hear about “hunger in America”
     
    I think honest liberals know it’s BS too. I remember awhile back I was browsing Reddit and some internet communist was ranting about “food insecurity”. Couldn’t even bring himself to say hunger.

    Replies: @36 ulster

    Let’s not forget that crocodile-tear-inducing phrase: “food desert.”

    • Agree: Corn
  202. @Wilkey
    @AnotherDad


    Hate to break it to you but you don’t exist not just without the Allied victory but also without Hitler, the War, the Holocaust … the whole package.
     
    If World War 2 hadn’t happened pretty much everyone alive today under the age of, oh, 80, would not have been born.

    Parents wouldn’t have met each other, or would have met at different times. Even if they had met and married, they would have had sex at slightly different times. Different sperm and/or ovum, even from the same parent, and you get a different child, even if that child had the same parents as you.

    What makes you you? The egg, the sperm, or both? Who knows?

    So the notion of inventing a time machine and going back to kill Hitler isn’t just preposterous. It would be genocide. Real genocide. The annihilation of 8 billion people. Kill Hitler and there would still probably be about 8 billion people on the planet. But they would almost all be different people - literally.

    Replies: @Inselaffen

    ‘What makes you you? The egg, the sperm, or both? Who knows?’

    It’s both, obviously. Change one or the other and it’s an entirely different person-recipe that gets baked. Which is why stuff like ‘it’s just a lucky coincidence you were born in Europe/America and enjoy the privilege of that accident of birth, you could have just as easily been born a poor African’ is nonsense (although it’s a fairly common mode of thought).

    More interesting to think about is if you took the same ‘you’ but grew up in a completely different system (200 years ago, NS germany, the USSR, whatever), to what extent would you be the same person you are now? I guess this could be most relevant today to Koreans born just after the country split in two – would they be the ‘same’ person if they had grown up in the ‘other’ Korea? You’d be made of the same stuff, but your mental life would be very different…

  203. @36 ulster
    @Sean

    One of the lesser-known (hell, virtually UN-known) battles of WWII. The Japanese often got the better of the Soviets in the air, but at Khalkhin Gol (Nomonhan to the Japanese), the Soviets won the infantry scrum and used their BT tanks to envelop the Japanese forces. An armistice was signed, but the Soviets maintained substantial forces on the Mongolian border. The Sorge spy ring in Tokyo followed up its warning of Germany's impending attack on the USSR with information that Japan was shifting its forces south (China) and east (Pacific Islands). Still, it would be months before the Soviets shipped their forces westward on the Trans-Siberian, in time to halt the Wehrmacht just short of Moscow. A not-well-known Japanese movie, with the awkward title Spy Sorge, is available on YouTube, with British actor Iain Glen in the title role. The German military attache' is portrayed by the same guy who played the Stasi officer in the German movie The Lives of Others.

    Replies: @anonymous as usual

    I don’t know, I think that is a fairly well known battle.

    At least to the sort of people who care about such things –

  204. @Steve Sailer
    @Whiskey

    E. Their weapons systems were overly complex mostly and prone to breaking down without detailed and costly maintenance.

    But 75 years later, German luxury sedans are totally not like that, right? Right?

    Replies: @Chris Renner, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Voilà :

  205. Yeager’s treatment of Archer Bloood in 1971 is inexcusable.

    Siding with Pakistan and Kissinger over an American consulate worker standing under for what was moral and right places him in the Neocon hall of shame with all the other Invite the World, Invade the World crowd.

    Gary Bass details it in his book “The Blood Telegram.”

  206. @Steve Richter
    is the academic rank of West Point graduates publicly known? Would like to know how well the incoming secretary of defense did in college. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Austin

    Replies: @SteveRogers42, @res

    For 1977 and earlier (Austin was 1975) graduates were ranked by Cullum Number. Since then they only note distinguished graduates (top 5 or 10 percent, 1978-1991 and 1991-present respectively, more at https://www.west-point.org/wp/ring_recovery/RRP/RingPix/2010ROG_ReferencesSect5.pdf ).

    Until 1977 the Cullum Numbers were based on General Order of Merit (anyone know how well that correlates with academic rank?). This PDF gives the range of numbers applicable to each graduating class.
    https://www.westpointaog.org/file/cullumnumbers.pdf

    This page allows lookups of graduates, but you have to be a graduate, widow, or ex-cadet.
    https://www.westpointaog.org/registerofgraduates

    This site has Cullum Numbers up to 1883 (for instance, you can see Robert E. Lee second in the 1829 class).
    http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/home.html

    • Thanks: kaganovitch
  207. @Reg Cæsar
    @Prof. Woland


    My late father was training as a tail gunner in a B-29 and he got his orders to ship out to Saipan the day Japan surrendered. That is about as lucky as you get.

     

    My father joined the Coast Guard in 1939, just after the war started in Europe. Whether he was being shrewd or just needed a job, I never thought to ask.

    One year, my birthday fell #366 on the draft lottery. Another year, the kid next door was #1.

    Replies: @Prof. Woland

    When I was 8ish a man who lived next door to me was #2 for the Vietnam Draft. He fenagled his way to officer school and eventually became a dentist. He was shitting in his pants.

    Both of my grandfathers missed WW1 in similar to how my father lucked out. Both were born in 1900, one in October and the other in December. One was waiting to graduate from high school (the Southerner) and the other (the Yankee) was on a train on his way home from college to enlist when the war ended.

    On the other hand, my great great grandfather and his father, my great great great grandfather fought for the South in the same regiment ( I think they were 38 and 18 years old in 1861). After and before many bloody battles then ended up at Sharpsburg (better known in the North as Antietam) and ended up surviving. He had six notches in his musket which is hanging over my cousins fireplace.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Prof. Woland

    The draft ended before I turned 18. So that 366-ball wasn't necessary!

    My little brother, like Steve himself, wasn't even required to register. SSS was in "deep standby". That means they wouldn't have had a draft card. Mine was one of the last, and I still have it, laminated.


    http://historynet.com/wp-content/uploads/image/2010/Vietnam/Feb2010/Lottery/Pics/lottery-marquee2.jpg

  208. @Prof. Woland
    @Reg Cæsar

    When I was 8ish a man who lived next door to me was #2 for the Vietnam Draft. He fenagled his way to officer school and eventually became a dentist. He was shitting in his pants.

    Both of my grandfathers missed WW1 in similar to how my father lucked out. Both were born in 1900, one in October and the other in December. One was waiting to graduate from high school (the Southerner) and the other (the Yankee) was on a train on his way home from college to enlist when the war ended.

    On the other hand, my great great grandfather and his father, my great great great grandfather fought for the South in the same regiment ( I think they were 38 and 18 years old in 1861). After and before many bloody battles then ended up at Sharpsburg (better known in the North as Antietam) and ended up surviving. He had six notches in his musket which is hanging over my cousins fireplace.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The draft ended before I turned 18. So that 366-ball wasn’t necessary!

    My little brother, like Steve himself, wasn’t even required to register. SSS was in “deep standby”. That means they wouldn’t have had a draft card. Mine was one of the last, and I still have it, laminated.

  209. @Jim Don Bob
    @kaganovitch

    Israeli pilots were also completely surprised by the Egyptians' use of SAMs, and lost many aircraft to them in the first days of the 1973 war.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Israeli pilots were also completely surprised by the Egyptians’ use of SAMs, and lost many aircraft to them in the first days of the 1973 war.

    Indeed the vast majority of the 100+ airframes the Israeli’s lost in 1973 were to the SAM batteries (Syrian as well as Egyptian). This wasn’t IAF arrogance as much as ignorance. No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then, and existing IAF doctrine and equipment was unequal to the task. That the IAF persisted in flying these almost suicidal sorties in the face of the SAM umbrella for the first two days of the war, was also not arrogance. The ground war was going so badly for the Israelis that they thought without close air support they would be entirely routed. It was more a case of “must needs when the devil drives”.

    In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war. It was only the Sharon/Adan strike across the Suez that allowed the IDF to roll up the SAM batteries on the ground that gave the IAF control of the skies on the Egyptian front. On the Syrian front where the ground war stalemated after the taking of the Golan Heights, the SAM umbrella continued to thwart IAF effectiveness.

    • Replies: @anon
    @kaganovitch

    No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then

    Except for the US over Viet Nam, for about 7 years.

    Why do you suppose the US developed this particular aircraft, beginning in 1965?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_Weasel

    In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war.

    In 1973. You were writing something about "arrogance" and "IAF", what was it again?

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  210. In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war.

    The American air forces solved the SAM problem in the Viet Nam war:

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Anonymous

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPsHZ_-1kko

  211. @Anonymous

    In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war.
     
    The American air forces solved the SAM problem in the Viet Nam war:

    https://i.imgur.com/JVxNxeK.jpg

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  212. anon[289] • Disclaimer says:
    @kaganovitch
    @Jim Don Bob

    Israeli pilots were also completely surprised by the Egyptians’ use of SAMs, and lost many aircraft to them in the first days of the 1973 war.

    Indeed the vast majority of the 100+ airframes the Israeli's lost in 1973 were to the SAM batteries (Syrian as well as Egyptian). This wasn't IAF arrogance as much as ignorance. No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then, and existing IAF doctrine and equipment was unequal to the task. That the IAF persisted in flying these almost suicidal sorties in the face of the SAM umbrella for the first two days of the war, was also not arrogance. The ground war was going so badly for the Israelis that they thought without close air support they would be entirely routed. It was more a case of "must needs when the devil drives".

    In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war. It was only the Sharon/Adan strike across the Suez that allowed the IDF to roll up the SAM batteries on the ground that gave the IAF control of the skies on the Egyptian front. On the Syrian front where the ground war stalemated after the taking of the Golan Heights, the SAM umbrella continued to thwart IAF effectiveness.

    Replies: @anon

    No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then

    Except for the US over Viet Nam, for about 7 years.

    Why do you suppose the US developed this particular aircraft, beginning in 1965?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_Weasel

    In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war.

    In 1973. You were writing something about “arrogance” and “IAF”, what was it again?

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @anon



    No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then
     
    Except for the US over Viet Nam, for about 7 years.
     
    A more accurate statement might be - no one had ever encountered a SAM umbrella without taking serious losses. Total US aircraft losses? ~10,000.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_aircraft_losses_of_the_Vietnam_War

    Given that the US was in a position to put more aircraft in the air than the opposition had SAMs, these were serious losses. And in fact, the losses were well over 10x the entire equipment inventory of the Israeli air force, despite Uncle Sam fighting an Oriental adversary inferior in equipment and numbers to its Arab counterparts. As with the Israeli experience, the key to SAM neutralization at that point was infantry advances. For fear of triggering a wider war, an advance into North Vietnam was denied to US ground forces.
  213. Anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The premise was what would have happened if Hitler had WON. The only way that alternate history could have come about would have been if the Manhattan Project had failed. The goal of the Manhattan Project was to nuke Berlin, not Nagasaki, but the war in Europe ended before that happened.

    You are so blinded by your Jew hatred that you apparently would have preferred Hitler. I have news for you buddy - Hitler didn't have anything good in mind for you and yours either. But at least when you were being starved to death you would have had the satisfaction of knowing that the Jews went first.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    For Hitler to have won WWII requires quite a few things to have gone down differently. For that to have happened the war would have likely been over earlier, conclusively. At that point I guess your argument is that the USA eventually gets nukes and bombs Berlin and another city, with a wait for more bomb material to be made, and with a credible invasion fleet hovering out there that is not going to get fought off even without a remaining Eastern front. That’s part of why the bomb was successful for getting the Japanese to capitulate, though they knew it would be hard fought on the main islands of Japan, the bomb was the tipping point.

    Part of the problem though is to get the bomb to Berlin. Who is to say in this alternate universe that Hitler didn’t view Britain as a brother nation, and instead invaded them successfully?

    Germany also had better rocket technology, so maybe by the time the USA may have wished to lob bombs on Europe, the third Reich may have had their own bomb.

    I think there are too many hypotheticals, but it’s hard to argue away the US advantage in carriers.

    You are so blinded by your Jew hatred that you apparently would have preferred Hitler.

    This is projection. You are so blinded by Hitler hatred that you would crazily turn on the allies who helped you defeat Hitler. All my known relatives who fought, fought on your side in that war. But now their descendents are being rewarded with race replacement. This policy is being enacted in every single nation of Europeans. It must be literally a hatred for Europeans that has brought this about.

    What conclusion from that should I draw? Should I then be overcome with love for the Jews? The strange thing is that I know individual Jews who are very grateful for our help in WWII. Not just by words, but by deeds. However it seems that the Jews with influence are sadly not of this view.

    I tell you one thing, this policy of influential Jewry does not win “hearts and minds” with the White goyim, to put it mildly. If roles were reversed, how would Jews respond? I might liken it to a “Judea declares war on Germany” situation. Note that they chose to declare war on the nation, not Hitler, not the Nazi party, but Germany, and in 1933 well before shots were fired.

    This is not to say that our people will adopt the same response, or that I endorse such a response, but I put that there for comparison. We are a people who understand reciprocity. I know that you have in your number people who also understand reciprocity though evidently plenty in high places who don’t.

    There was a time in my life when a movie like Schindler’s list once motivated me with tears. This was in the late 1990s. Now I would not watch it, because I see it as propaganda. And exhortations to hate Hitler and consider that the Anglosphere in part “won” WWII, I find it hard to be motivated to care about these days, any more so than I have a dog in the fight of the Peloponnesian War. That is all. Hearts and minds.

    What is worth more in life, a friend or a former dupe?

  214. @Anonymouse
    @A new commenter

    79th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day, not the 89th. My parents and I were listening to the 64 dollar question show on the radio that Sunday afternoon when the program was interrupted by an announcement that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. Like untold numbers of other Americans our response was "Where is Pearl Harbor?"

    Replies: @Danindc, @duncsbaby

    My dad was 15 when the announcement was made on the radio and his mom started crying. He asked her why and she said because this means you’re going to be drafted. He was drafted just after he graduated high school in ’44 but just missed seeing any action. He did end up in the occupation army of Japan though. He saw Nagasaki and Tokyo in ruins, said Tokyo looked much worse after being fire bombed.

  215. @anon
    @kaganovitch

    No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then

    Except for the US over Viet Nam, for about 7 years.

    Why do you suppose the US developed this particular aircraft, beginning in 1965?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_Weasel

    In truth the IAF never solved the SAM problem in the Yom Kippur war.

    In 1973. You were writing something about "arrogance" and "IAF", what was it again?

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    No one had ever fought an army shielded by a SAM umbrella until then

    Except for the US over Viet Nam, for about 7 years.

    A more accurate statement might be – no one had ever encountered a SAM umbrella without taking serious losses. Total US aircraft losses? ~10,000.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_aircraft_losses_of_the_Vietnam_War

    Given that the US was in a position to put more aircraft in the air than the opposition had SAMs, these were serious losses. And in fact, the losses were well over 10x the entire equipment inventory of the Israeli air force, despite Uncle Sam fighting an Oriental adversary inferior in equipment and numbers to its Arab counterparts. As with the Israeli experience, the key to SAM neutralization at that point was infantry advances. For fear of triggering a wider war, an advance into North Vietnam was denied to US ground forces.

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