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Chinese Guy Interrogates White Privilege to Culturally Appropriate Japanese Restaurants
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For a place with lots of hills, Los Angeles doesn’t have all that many restaurants with a view of Los Angeles. Fortunately, there’s Yamashiro, a fun old mock Japanese tourist restaurant with a great view of the lights of Hollywood. For a hundred years, people have been going to Yamashiro for a light-hearted night out.

But, now, these are Serious Times. From the Los Angeles Times:

Yamashiro, a century-old Japanese-style castle in Hollywood, tests limits of cultural appropriation debate

By FRANK SHYONG
APR 07, 2018 | 5:00 AM

Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me. Are you sure you aren’t a Chinese person appropriating Japanese culture? Or did the Japanese appropriate the only true culture, China’s, so it’s all good?

The Reclining Buddha Roll arrived on a spare white plate, a chilled log of rice and shrimp sliced and stacked to approximate the lumpy outline of a Buddha on his back, each piece dotted with what appeared to be Sriracha sauce.

I looked at the waiter, feeling as though there were some joke I didn’t understand. Was this sushi? Was I in a Japanese restaurant, as I had assumed when I booked a reservation here for my girlfriend’s birthday dinner? Should I apologize to my girlfriend?

Yamashiro is a century-old Los Angeles landmark that once served as a social club for Hollywood’s early elites. It is an utterly unique piece of architecture that incorporates American materials with pieces lifted from ancient Japan and pan-Asian architectural flourishes.

Isn’t the Mandarin-speaking Mr. Shyong pretending to get upset on behalf of the Japanese also a dubious pan-Asian flourish?

It is also an inauthentic fantasy of Japanese culture that has generated profits exclusively for non-Japanese people, protected by a listing on the National Register of Historic Places while longtime businesses in Little Tokyo face displacement.

Outcries over cultural appropriation are a regular presence in our news feeds. Every industry seems to be debating how we should portray and profit from other cultures — a natural outcome in a world where social media allows people to give feedback in real time. Most recently, critics including the Los Angeles Times’ Justin Chang pointed out how Japanese culture and people seemed to be a silent, decorative backdrop in Wes Anderson’s new film “Isle of Dogs.”

Amid all this, I wondered: How should I feel about Yamashiro?

Eventually, a white guy explains to the reporter that Yamashiro’s inauthenticity makes it authentically part of Los Angeles’s time-honored culture of inauthenticity.

 
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  1. Good thing it’s not named Yamamoto. Then, Shyong would attack it for another reason.

    Being Chinese, shouldn’t he go after the Chinese Hollywood theater?

  2. Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me.

    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn’t sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn’t sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.
     
    On the other hand, the Hmong have the world's longest franks.

    http://www.annievang.com/sites/default/files/hmong-sausage-raw-web_0.jpg
    , @Alden
    @Anon

    There is a famous Chinese restaurant in Sacramento ca called Fat Frank’s. It’s always full of politicians judges lobbyists and high level government types. Some presidents went there on visits to Ca.

    The owners last name was the common Chinese last name Fat. But in English fat is an adjective that goes before the noun. So he was called Fat Frank and his restaurant called Fat Frank’s.
    The name is written Frank Fat’s but is called Fat Frank's
    He made a fortune with that restaurant.

    It’s still there.

    Japanese eat a lot of curry. That was appropriated from India via the Portuguese of Nagasaki.

    And all those chili peppers so popular in Chinese Asian Indian and middle eastern cooking were appropriated from S America via the Spanish.

    The Mexican Indians appropriated chickens,horses cattle, pigs and goats from the Spanish. The animal meat allowed them to stop eating each other.

    I might write a letter to the LASlimes asking why they print this nonsense and pointing out that this kind of article is why no one reads their garbage any more.

    Immigrants don’t read it. Blacks can’t read it. Conservative Whites don’t read it. Whites under 70 don’t read it.

    So who reads it? Elderly White liberals

    The anti White liberal print media is going down the tubes thanks be to God.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    @Anon

    "Forget about it FRANK, it's Chinatown."

    , @Anonymous
    @Anon


    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn’t sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.
     

    For two or three decades following the war, adopting American names was in style, and is still in style among some entertainers.

    At any rate, there was Frank Nagai:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcsYsEQfzeY

    Frankie was more popular:

    Frankie Tamegai is a comedian:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72rBS8oDgbg

    Frankie Sakai was a comedic actor:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankie_Sakai

    Replies: @Pericles

  3. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    Los Angeles Times’ Justin Chang pointed out how Japanese culture and people seemed to be a silent, decorative backdrop in Wes Anderson’s new film “Isle of Dogs.”

    EVERYTHING is a decorative backdrop or wallpaper in Anderson’s movies.

    JUSTIN Chang just figured this out?

    I mean who really thought DARJEELING LIMITED was about India?

    • LOL: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The Grand Budapest Hotel was about frosting.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    , @Clifford Brown
    @Anon

    Chinese Americans pretended to take offense over Wes Anderson's cultural appropriation of Japanese culture in Isle of Dogs.

  4. Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me.

    Schlong?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Frank Shyong anagrams to "nag, fry honks".

    Replies: @Hail

  5. @Anon
    Los Angeles Times’ Justin Chang pointed out how Japanese culture and people seemed to be a silent, decorative backdrop in Wes Anderson’s new film “Isle of Dogs.”

    EVERYTHING is a decorative backdrop or wallpaper in Anderson's movies.

    JUSTIN Chang just figured this out?

    I mean who really thought DARJEELING LIMITED was about India?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Clifford Brown

    The Grand Budapest Hotel was about frosting.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Steve Sailer

    I guess I’m not smart enough to get Wes Anderson. The only one I’ve had the misfortune to sit all the way through was Royal Tenenbauns. I’ve started to watch Rushmore and Darjeeling and just couldn’t get into them (was Rushmore supposed to be a comedy? I couldn’t tell). To me, Wes Anderson’s trademarks are a plodding, muddled story, and strange, stilted dialogue from his actors. While those things make his movies unwatchable for me, I guess other people interpret that as brilliantly artistic.

    Replies: @cthulhu

  6. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    FRANK should go to China, a land of authenticity.

    Mao did a great job of preserving traditional Chinese culture, and Chinese today really appreciate authenticity:

    I find it amusing that two Chinese guys named JUSTIN and FRANK who chose to live in another country than their own are griping about lack of authenticity.

    Besides, it’s LA, the city of Hollywood and Disneyland. By the terms of LA, inauthentic is the new authentic. Has been for a long time.

    Just see it as Wakazukikanda or Wangkangda.

    I wonder what JUSTIN said about BLACK PANTHER. Was that authentic and real enough for him?

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Anon


    who chose to live in another country than their own
     
    Did they?
  7. As I pointed out the other day, the US has gotten very few Japanese immigrants in the last century, so there aren’t many purebred Japanese-Americans left to get triggered over this sort of thing, at least of the younger generations, so the Chinese and Korean SJWs feel free to pick up the slack. It’s rather bizarre, when you consider how brutally Japan treated China and Korea in the early 20th century, but social justice jihad is a helluva drug. Sticking it to YT trumps your grandparents’ grudges.

    And it’s quite possible that the Chinese-surnamed SJWs Steve mentions in this post are both of Japanese descent through a non-patrilineal line.

    • Agree: Abe
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @AndrewR


    so the Chinese and Korean SJWs feel free to pick up the slack. It’s rather bizarre, when you consider how brutally Japan treated China and Korea in the early 20th century, but social justice jihad is a helluva drug. Sticking it to YT trumps your grandparents’ grudges.

     

    It's not like Japan is China's best friend back home even now. But hey, there are gibs to be had over here so let's be practical.
  8. Anonymous[200] • Disclaimer says:

    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I’ve visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    There’s a television show in Japan where they will visit a Japanese restaurant somewhere outside of Japan that serves detarame (nonsense, bullshit, bogus, inaccurate) “Japanese” food and say that they are filming a documentary or news show. A Japanese person is supplied as a new employee, and the chef teaches him how to make “Japanese” food on camera.

    Coincidentally a famous Japanese chef will be visiting the town in a few days and will give a public demonstration. The Japanese chef will wear a Mexican pro wrestling mask with JAPAN on the forehead. He makes proper Japanese food, serves it to the audience, which includes the “Japanese” restaurant chef, and at the end pulls off the mask to reveal that he is the “student” in the documentary, shocking the foreign chef, who vows to reform his ways.

    As I write this, I can’t believe how stupid this show is, and it seems like the foreign chefs would catch on, and maybe they do. But it does surface some pretty awful manifestations of “Japanese food” outside of Japan. The weird thing is, to all appearances these restaurants seem to have been popular with their customers, so from a business standpoint there is no reason for them to become more authentic.

    I think that they are running out of bad Japanese restaurants to expose, because the most recent show had them exposing members of a detarame “samurai” club in Argentina. That they would target a bunch of fun-loving swordplay amateurs is strange, but the “expert” samurai they brought in to set them straight was a Japanese commedian who does samurai performances on the side. There are no actual living samurai in Japan, so who’s to say what is authentic.

    • Replies: @a boy and his dog
    @Anonymous

    That show was exposed as being fake. The directors were telling shops to put shocking ingredients in their food for ‘comedy’ purposes, and then portraying the food as being from the real menu.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Twinkie
    @Anonymous


    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I’ve visited are run by Koreans.
     
    I believe the Moonies control a big chunk of the sushi fish distribution in the U.S.
    , @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The strangest "Chinese" food I ever had was in Lithuania. It bore only the most vague resemblance to actual Chinese food ( I think there was soy sauce in it somewhere, maybe on the rice), even less related to actual Chinese food than chop suey did in the bad old days in America. The concept of detarame doesn't even touch how bogus this stuff was (although my Lithuanian hosts were eating it with relish). My son, who speaks Mandarin, spoke with the kitchen staff (who were Chinese even though the waitstaff wasn't) . They insisted that the locals wanted it that way and that if they made real Chinese food the Lithuanians would never eat it.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Whitehall

    , @Whitehall
    @Anonymous

    The worst sushi I've ever had was in the Ginza, not far from the Sony showroom.

    If LA needs to purge inauthenticities, start by burning down the Gamble House.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anonymous

    Where I live a Chinese buffet restaurant changed their name to a Japanese name with absolutely no accompanying change in the 10 varieties of factory-farmed chicken in the buffet in different sauces that must cost < $1 / lb. or else they'd lose money on some of the "hefty" customers that come in there.

    How do you say "You been here four hour!" in Spanish?

    , @Lurker
    @Anonymous

    I thought the whole point of immigration was to expand the range of authentic foreign cuisine available to the crass vulgar white folks. Is that not true after all?!

  9. What a sourpuss. Where I live I see many bizarre pan Asian mashups. Restaurants called Tokyo-Peking and Thai-Sushi. I am sure there is Sushi-Thai-Chinese place nearby. This clueless Chinese guy does not know that most sushi restaurants are Korean owned? And LA is full of authentic Japanese owned sushi place keep him happy, where you pay minimum $150 if has the cash.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Clyde


    What a sourpuss. Where I live I see many bizarre pan Asian mashups. Restaurants called Tokyo-Peking and Thai-Sushi. I am sure there is Sushi-Thai-Chinese place nearby
     
    The ultimate had to be that Chinese hole-in-the-wall Tokyo Shapiro, in Winston-Salem.

    Atari and Okabashi are American companies that chose Japanese names, the latter founded by an Iranian.

    Replies: @Clyde, @sayless

  10. Frank Shyong, meet your psychologist, Ted Kaczynski:

    [MORE]

    21. Leftists may claim that their activism is motivated by compassion or by moral principles, and moral principle does play a role for the leftist of the oversocialized type. But compassion and moral principle cannot be the main motives for leftist activism. Hostility is too prominent a component of leftist behavior; so is the drive for power. Moreover, much leftist behavior is not rationally calculated to be of benefit to the people whom the leftists claim to be trying to help. For example, if one believes that affirmative action is good for black people, does it make sense to demand affirmative action in hostile or dogmatic terms? Obviously it would be more productive to take a diplomatic and conciliatory approach that would make at least verbal and symbolic concessions to white people who think that affirmative action discriminates against them. But leftist activists do not take such an approach because it would not satisfy their emotional needs. Helping black people is not their real goal. Instead, race problems serve as an excuse for them to express their own hostility and frustrated need for power. In doing so they actually harm black people, because the activists’ hostile attitude toward the white majority tends to intensify race hatred.

    22. If our society had no social problems at all, the leftists would have to INVENT problems in order to provide themselves with an excuse for making a fuss.

    • Replies: @Mishra
    @schnellandine

    Wow, I really should have given that guy a better hearing.

  11. Some American white guy should open a restaurant named “Yasukuni” and serve Manchukuo and Taiwanese cuisine. The restaurant should have a Shinto Bushido ambience, with crossed samurai swords hanging over the door.

    Frankly, I’m getting tired of Chinese hypersensitivity. I lived there for a couple years, and the racial antagonism toward whites, Japanese and Hindus was over the top. China is a huge crybaby country that suckles off of the innovation and prosperity of others while fussing and screaming when it doesn’t get its way.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    @Bill P

    Heh. Don't tell that to DB Cooper. He is utterly convinced that China is always the victim, that China never invaded Tibet or never conducted any aggression towards any of its neighbors, and that China is the victim of unfair US trade practices even today.

    You should put him in his place when he shows up.

    Replies: @DB Cooper

    , @Twinkie
    @Bill P


    Some American white guy should open a restaurant named “Yasukuni” and serve Manchukuo and Taiwanese cuisine. The restaurant should have a Shinto Bushido ambience, with crossed samurai swords hanging over the door.
     
    Droll. Unfortunately the fun would end when someone opens its European counterpart, the Birkenau, serving Polish food.

    Replies: @Bill P

  12. I wondered: How should I feel about Yamashiro?

    They’re always asking us, and they’re always telling us. How should we feel? How should we think? Their newspaper articles are often titled “How to think about…”

    I swear, not a one of them sees any irony, not to mention anything troubling, about any of it. Such is our world now.

    • Replies: @CJ
    @Mishra


    Their newspaper articles are often titled “How to think about…”
     
    Yes, you see this all the time. It’s like there is an infiltrator from The Onion sabotaging progressive organs, but they are oblivious.
  13. @Bill P
    Some American white guy should open a restaurant named "Yasukuni" and serve Manchukuo and Taiwanese cuisine. The restaurant should have a Shinto Bushido ambience, with crossed samurai swords hanging over the door.

    Frankly, I'm getting tired of Chinese hypersensitivity. I lived there for a couple years, and the racial antagonism toward whites, Japanese and Hindus was over the top. China is a huge crybaby country that suckles off of the innovation and prosperity of others while fussing and screaming when it doesn't get its way.

    Replies: @Thomm, @Twinkie

    Heh. Don’t tell that to DB Cooper. He is utterly convinced that China is always the victim, that China never invaded Tibet or never conducted any aggression towards any of its neighbors, and that China is the victim of unfair US trade practices even today.

    You should put him in his place when he shows up.

    • Replies: @DB Cooper
    @Thomm

    Of course China never invaded Tibet. India did. And the reason Indian people are so fond of insisting this narrative is that it obfuscates the fact that it is India that invaded and is still occupying a piece of traditional Tibetan homeland.

    In 1951, four years after the British quit the subcontinent and India was created, India, in the traditional of its former master the Raj, move further northward and invaded Tawang. Tawang is the birthplace of the Sixth Dalai Lama and home to a four hundred years old Tibetan monastery. Tawang and South Tibet is still occupied by India to this day. In 1987 India renamed South Tibet to the so called Arunachal Pradesh, hoping that by giving it an Indian sounding name it will fool the people in the world that this is India territory.

    Replies: @Mishra, @Thomm, @Achmed E. Newman

  14. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    It’s a wacky world.

    Some Hispanicess complaining about Negro.

    Jewish Madeline Albright who said it was worth it to wipe out 500,000 Muslim kids calling herself a ‘Muslim’.

    Elizabeth Warren claiming to be a squaw.

    But I must say… the controversy about ‘Yamamoto’ was the stupidest thing I ever heard.
    It goes to show high IQ is no guarantee against sheer stupidity. A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed because his last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn’t responsible for attacking China).

    Even Onion can’t such nonsense up.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    Even Onion can’t such nonsense up.
     
    No, but the Sharknado franchise still can. My kids were watching 3 when I saw Ann Coulter and, I swear, Anthony Weiner, appear. I kinda doubt they were on the set at the same time.

    No serious shark movie would invite Ann aboard. After her, the poor beasts would be anticlimactic.
    , @Alden
    @Anon

    Some Warren family trivia. One of her ancestors was the Captain of the Tennessee militia who rounded up cherokees and brought them to the detention camp on the Mississippi River where they were confined until equipment and arrangements to send them to exile in Oklahoma on the trial of tears were ready

    Of course that doesn’t mean that at least one ancestor wasn’t Indian.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.

    It’s especially good for college students . Not only will you get into college and a scholarship but by fall semester of senior year you’ll be getting numerous letters begging you to accept a job.

    You don’t even have to look for work. They will beg you to come.

    Claiming to be an Indian can sometimes be tricky if one can’t produce a tribal certificate because the Indians naturally want their affirmative action quota for themselves.

    Replies: @Anon, @Mishra, @Twinkie

    , @songbird
    @Anon

    What will the Left do if a Korean or Vietnamese ever go off the PC reservation? I mean are they going to demand Nguyen or Kim be taken off everything?

    , @Abe
    @Anon


    last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn’t responsible for attacking China).
     
    Typical white man’s thinking. They don’t hate Yamamoto because he did or did attack China. They hate him because he got into Harvard.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Twinkie
    @Anon


    A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed
     
    That idea was nipped in the (Sakura) bud.
  15. @Buzz Mohawk

    Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me.

     

    Schlong?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Frank Shyong anagrams to “nag, fry honks”.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Reg Cæsar


    Frank Shyong anagrams to “nag, fry honks”.
     
    Fr nag honkys
  16. Cultural appropriation is a retarded concept, so naturally its popular among Asian SJWs, who like all other SJWs, need a regular dose of mental damage to get through the day.

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  17. @Anon
    It's a wacky world.

    Some Hispanicess complaining about Negro.

    Jewish Madeline Albright who said it was worth it to wipe out 500,000 Muslim kids calling herself a 'Muslim'.

    Elizabeth Warren claiming to be a squaw.

    But I must say... the controversy about 'Yamamoto' was the stupidest thing I ever heard.
    It goes to show high IQ is no guarantee against sheer stupidity. A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed because his last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn't responsible for attacking China).

    Even Onion can't such nonsense up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @songbird, @Abe, @Twinkie

    Even Onion can’t such nonsense up.

    No, but the Sharknado franchise still can. My kids were watching 3 when I saw Ann Coulter and, I swear, Anthony Weiner, appear. I kinda doubt they were on the set at the same time.

    No serious shark movie would invite Ann aboard. After her, the poor beasts would be anticlimactic.

  18. Off-topic, but on-topic for the ongoing iSteve coverage of rogue Harvard College ’87 alumni such as Buddy Fletcher and (in this case) Section 8 bottom-feeder Chris Stefanoni:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/sports/marina-stefanoni-squash.html

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @slumber_j

    More on Chris Stefanoni, from a story five years ago about his arrest for breach of peace in an important Darien Little League-related matter:

    https://www.darientimes.com/22139/darien-would-be-developer-arrested-after-courthouse-argument-with-little-league/

    , @Mishra
    @slumber_j

    Weird how they can get the NYT to provide free advertising/propaganda for the family like that.

  19. Isn’t the fact that this Chinese man is in America cultural appropriation? If you’re in Los Angeles and want to pay the high price you should goo.

    It’s a famous place to really impress a woman on the first date for marriage proposals, 50th anniversary parties and Important occasions.

    Does this guy actually live in Los Angeles? If he wants to appropriate Japanese culture and food he should come to old Sawtelle.

    If businesses in Little Tokyo struggle it’s because no one wants to wade through miles of one of the most crime ridden homeless skid row neighborhoods in the country to get there.

    Supposedly the Japanese government subsidizes little Tokyo. No one has to subdize Old Sawtelle because it’s in one of the safest neighborhoods in Loas Angeleno. People can walk home from Sawtelle restaurants at 2/ am on a weekly basis for years and no one is ever robbed. You can park your unlocked car with windows open for days in Sawtellevand the car is left alone.

    That’s why Little Tokyo exists only because the Japanese government subdizes it and Sawtelle thrives without any help.

    People go where it’s safe. Crime ridden areas like downtown Los Angeles go the way is Detroit because of black crime.

  20. anon[215] • Disclaimer says:

    Aren’t media outlets like the Los Angeles Times worried that completely inconsequential stories like these kind of destroy the illusion that the world is ending because of that evil Cheeto in the White House?

    Seems like it would be hard to take that narrative very seriously if people have time to worry about crap like this.

  21. The Benihana restaurant in north Dallas (just off the LBJ freeway at Coit Road) is designed as a small farmhouse, surrounded by a koi pond with lily pads. The hibachi tables are in small alcoves, two per room. It’s really pretty and a civilized place to have a meal. Hopefully Dallas will remain somewhat immune to the SJW wackos but I’m not that sanguine about it.

    In contrast, the Benihana closest to me in coastal SoCal is in a nondescript building and has all of the tables in a large open space, and once it’s more than about half full, it’s way too loud to enjoy oneself. The last time we were there, our chef was a blond surfer dude; he did a good job, but I was waiting for some snowflake to jump up and start protesting the gross cultural appropriation. Of course, Benihana, despite being founded by an authentic Nipponese, is kind of cultural appropriation on steroids anyway; that’s part of why I still go there 🙂

  22. But, now, these are Serious Times.

    Indeed. Have you caught Molly Ringwald’s article for The New Yorker this Friday on how problematic John Hughes’ work was? It’s getting a lot of attention and praise in the media.

    https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/what-about-the-breakfast-club-molly-ringwald-metoo-john-hughes-pretty-in-pink

    How are we meant to feel about art that we both love and oppose?**” Ringwald writes. “What if we are in the unusual position of having helped create it?” Over the course of the essay, she interviews her former co-stars, John Hughes’s collaborators, and even revisits his much more explicitly racist, homophobic, and misogynistic writing for National Lampoon.

    http://www.vulture.com/2018/04/molly-ringwald-wrote-about-john-hughes-in-the-era-of-metoo.html

    *This line of questioning is chilling to me.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AnotherGuessModel

    Perhaps Molly Ringwald's trust fund manager could weigh in on what she owes John Hughes?

    Replies: @JimB

    , @Autochthon
    @AnotherGuessModel

    I still don't know what Vulture is, but how can you focus on a has-been actress' efforts to regain attention by rushing the man to whom she owes everything when Cardi B. is pregnant with the child of Offset!?

    Priorities, people; thank goodness for Vulture's dedication to important journalism.

  23. @Thomm
    @Bill P

    Heh. Don't tell that to DB Cooper. He is utterly convinced that China is always the victim, that China never invaded Tibet or never conducted any aggression towards any of its neighbors, and that China is the victim of unfair US trade practices even today.

    You should put him in his place when he shows up.

    Replies: @DB Cooper

    Of course China never invaded Tibet. India did. And the reason Indian people are so fond of insisting this narrative is that it obfuscates the fact that it is India that invaded and is still occupying a piece of traditional Tibetan homeland.

    In 1951, four years after the British quit the subcontinent and India was created, India, in the traditional of its former master the Raj, move further northward and invaded Tawang. Tawang is the birthplace of the Sixth Dalai Lama and home to a four hundred years old Tibetan monastery. Tawang and South Tibet is still occupied by India to this day. In 1987 India renamed South Tibet to the so called Arunachal Pradesh, hoping that by giving it an Indian sounding name it will fool the people in the world that this is India territory.

    • Replies: @Mishra
    @DB Cooper

    There's this country in the way of your theory, it's full of Himalayan mountains and it starts with the letter N. Three guesses?

    Don't even get me started about Bhutan. Just don't.

    Replies: @DB Cooper

    , @Thomm
    @DB Cooper

    See what Bill P said in comment #11.

    Replies: @Thomm

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @DB Cooper

    That's of no concern to me whatsoever. Tell me what you did with the 200 large, and I will not tell the FBI about your presence on this blog. I really am impressed to begin with how you could have survived that jump into the Cascades, at night, in winter, way before the time of GPS or even steerable parachutes! If, after successfully completely a heist like that, you say India invaded Tibet, than who am I to argue about it ... not to mention I don't give a shit.

  24. ‘Cultural Appropriation’ is such a stupid concept that it is amazing that ‘conservatives’ allow this perverse incentive structure to form.

    Jorge Ramos is completely white, and the brown Aztecs in Mexico are fleeing *because* his class of people are keeping them down. Yet, he can come here and say Americans are the villain. Before Americans get mad, have they really fought back? Have Americans actually attacked Ramos (and Vicente Fox) as the real villains who created the race-based hierarchy in Mexico in the first place?

    Same goes for the new, very recent crop of Asian SJWs (who, three years prior, probably had no idea they would be in the business of feigning offense at such things).

  25. @Anon
    Los Angeles Times’ Justin Chang pointed out how Japanese culture and people seemed to be a silent, decorative backdrop in Wes Anderson’s new film “Isle of Dogs.”

    EVERYTHING is a decorative backdrop or wallpaper in Anderson's movies.

    JUSTIN Chang just figured this out?

    I mean who really thought DARJEELING LIMITED was about India?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Clifford Brown

    Chinese Americans pretended to take offense over Wes Anderson’s cultural appropriation of Japanese culture in Isle of Dogs.

  26. @Anon
    It's a wacky world.

    Some Hispanicess complaining about Negro.

    Jewish Madeline Albright who said it was worth it to wipe out 500,000 Muslim kids calling herself a 'Muslim'.

    Elizabeth Warren claiming to be a squaw.

    But I must say... the controversy about 'Yamamoto' was the stupidest thing I ever heard.
    It goes to show high IQ is no guarantee against sheer stupidity. A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed because his last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn't responsible for attacking China).

    Even Onion can't such nonsense up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @songbird, @Abe, @Twinkie

    Some Warren family trivia. One of her ancestors was the Captain of the Tennessee militia who rounded up cherokees and brought them to the detention camp on the Mississippi River where they were confined until equipment and arrangements to send them to exile in Oklahoma on the trial of tears were ready

    Of course that doesn’t mean that at least one ancestor wasn’t Indian.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.

    It’s especially good for college students . Not only will you get into college and a scholarship but by fall semester of senior year you’ll be getting numerous letters begging you to accept a job.

    You don’t even have to look for work. They will beg you to come.

    Claiming to be an Indian can sometimes be tricky if one can’t produce a tribal certificate because the Indians naturally want their affirmative action quota for themselves.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Alden

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White.

    Sheeeeeeeeiiiit. You don't say. I'm gonna go have me some wings.

    , @Mishra
    @Alden

    Just say you're mixed race. There's always a box for it nowadays.

    1) Principal virtue: Can't be disproven.

    2) We're always being lectured that no one is pure anything anyway.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @Twinkie
    @Alden


    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.
     
    The problem is that ALL whites would have to do it. Otherwise the honest whites who don’t would be the worst-off.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  27. @Clyde
    What a sourpuss. Where I live I see many bizarre pan Asian mashups. Restaurants called Tokyo-Peking and Thai-Sushi. I am sure there is Sushi-Thai-Chinese place nearby. This clueless Chinese guy does not know that most sushi restaurants are Korean owned? And LA is full of authentic Japanese owned sushi place keep him happy, where you pay minimum $150 if has the cash.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    What a sourpuss. Where I live I see many bizarre pan Asian mashups. Restaurants called Tokyo-Peking and Thai-Sushi. I am sure there is Sushi-Thai-Chinese place nearby

    The ultimate had to be that Chinese hole-in-the-wall Tokyo Shapiro, in Winston-Salem.

    Atari and Okabashi are American companies that chose Japanese names, the latter founded by an Iranian.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Reg Cæsar

    I looked at Chinaman Shapiro's menu and will be sure not to go there next time I am in town.

    , @sayless
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Chinese hole-in-the-wall Tokyo Shapiro in Winston-Salem"

    That reminds me of a joke:

    Have you heard about the new Jewish-Japanese restaurant?

    It's called So Sue Me.

  28. @slumber_j
    Off-topic, but on-topic for the ongoing iSteve coverage of rogue Harvard College '87 alumni such as Buddy Fletcher and (in this case) Section 8 bottom-feeder Chris Stefanoni:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/sports/marina-stefanoni-squash.html

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Mishra

    More on Chris Stefanoni, from a story five years ago about his arrest for breach of peace in an important Darien Little League-related matter:

    https://www.darientimes.com/22139/darien-would-be-developer-arrested-after-courthouse-argument-with-little-league/

  29. @AnotherGuessModel

    But, now, these are Serious Times.
     
    Indeed. Have you caught Molly Ringwald's article for The New Yorker this Friday on how problematic John Hughes' work was? It's getting a lot of attention and praise in the media.

    https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/what-about-the-breakfast-club-molly-ringwald-metoo-john-hughes-pretty-in-pink


    How are we meant to feel about art that we both love and oppose?**” Ringwald writes. “What if we are in the unusual position of having helped create it?” Over the course of the essay, she interviews her former co-stars, John Hughes’s collaborators, and even revisits his much more explicitly racist, homophobic, and misogynistic writing for National Lampoon.
     
    http://www.vulture.com/2018/04/molly-ringwald-wrote-about-john-hughes-in-the-era-of-metoo.html

    *This line of questioning is chilling to me.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Autochthon

    Perhaps Molly Ringwald’s trust fund manager could weigh in on what she owes John Hughes?

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Steve Sailer

    Didn't John Hughes kick Molly Ringwald to the curb for disloyalty, in effect bringing her annoying whiny film career to an end in the late 80's? This is all sour grapes on her part, it would seem.

  30. Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I’ve visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    Teppanyaki dog sounds like an underserved niche taste. There is a place called Akita Sushi in a St Paul suburb, but spitz is better served well-done.

  31. “China’s ‘Fake’ Cities Are Eerie Replicas of Paris, London and Jackson Hole, Wyoming”

    http://abcnews.go.com/International/chinas-fake-cities-eerie-replicas-paris-london-jackson/story?id=36525453

  32. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The Grand Budapest Hotel was about frosting.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    I guess I’m not smart enough to get Wes Anderson. The only one I’ve had the misfortune to sit all the way through was Royal Tenenbauns. I’ve started to watch Rushmore and Darjeeling and just couldn’t get into them (was Rushmore supposed to be a comedy? I couldn’t tell). To me, Wes Anderson’s trademarks are a plodding, muddled story, and strange, stilted dialogue from his actors. While those things make his movies unwatchable for me, I guess other people interpret that as brilliantly artistic.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Hapalong Cassidy



    I guess I’m not smart enough to get Wes Anderson.

     

    You might try The Grand Budapest Hotel; it seems much more accessible than his other stuff (I’m not a Wes Anderson fan but I loved TGBH).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  33. @Anonymous
    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I've visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    There's a television show in Japan where they will visit a Japanese restaurant somewhere outside of Japan that serves detarame (nonsense, bullshit, bogus, inaccurate) "Japanese" food and say that they are filming a documentary or news show. A Japanese person is supplied as a new employee, and the chef teaches him how to make "Japanese" food on camera.

    Coincidentally a famous Japanese chef will be visiting the town in a few days and will give a public demonstration. The Japanese chef will wear a Mexican pro wrestling mask with JAPAN on the forehead. He makes proper Japanese food, serves it to the audience, which includes the "Japanese" restaurant chef, and at the end pulls off the mask to reveal that he is the "student" in the documentary, shocking the foreign chef, who vows to reform his ways.

    As I write this, I can't believe how stupid this show is, and it seems like the foreign chefs would catch on, and maybe they do. But it does surface some pretty awful manifestations of "Japanese food" outside of Japan. The weird thing is, to all appearances these restaurants seem to have been popular with their customers, so from a business standpoint there is no reason for them to become more authentic.

    I think that they are running out of bad Japanese restaurants to expose, because the most recent show had them exposing members of a detarame "samurai" club in Argentina. That they would target a bunch of fun-loving swordplay amateurs is strange, but the "expert" samurai they brought in to set them straight was a Japanese commedian who does samurai performances on the side. There are no actual living samurai in Japan, so who's to say what is authentic.

    Replies: @a boy and his dog, @Twinkie, @Jack D, @Whitehall, @Achmed E. Newman, @Lurker

    That show was exposed as being fake. The directors were telling shops to put shocking ingredients in their food for ‘comedy’ purposes, and then portraying the food as being from the real menu.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @a boy and his dog

    I found this allegation of "yarase" for that show, "Bukkomi Japanese":
    https://tokyocheapo.com/editorial/japanese-tv-mocking-scottish-ramen-and-sushi-restaurant-exposed-as-fake/


    One of the places it highlighted was a small Japanese restaurant in Edinburgh. It proceeded to intone in melodramatic narration how crazy this establishment was. The dishes they serve at Maki & Ramen Sushi Bar are not correct Japanese cuisine and the prices are far too expensive. For crying out loud, they serve ramen with whisky and other wacky local variants! They even serve Korean-made instant noodles to innocent paying customers!
    :
    The owner and head chef, Teddy Lee, found out how they had been presented and responded with posts on Facebook (since deleted). In the posts they explained how they were asked by the director to use instant noodles and a certain sauce—none of which they normally use. In fact, they say, their ramen dishes are cheaper than the standard because they are in a student area. The dishes like “breakfast ramen” and ingredients like whisky were all added at the behest of the Japanese TV crew in order to make what they were told was a comedic piece of entertainment with some local Scottish touches.
     
    Here's the show:

    http://www.tbs.co.jp/bukkomi-japanese/

    And its Wikipedia page:

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/ぶっこみジャパニーズ

    The Wikipedia page mentions the Scottish incident, as well as a later incident when an anime song singer was coached into doing something ridiculous.

    So there seems to be a high degree of fakery in these variety show comedy "documentaries." But the Katie Couric fake gun documentary incident shows that the same can be true elsewhere, in purportedly real documentaries.

    I don't think that the directors and producers are told to go fake something (well, maybe they are, one on one at the fourth bar of the night). Rather, they are told to bring back usable material, and the message gets across. Every few years there is a scandal and someone is fired, but that's how it works if you want to work in television in Japan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  34. @Anon
    Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me.

    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn't sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Anonymous

    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn’t sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.

    On the other hand, the Hmong have the world’s longest franks.

  35. Well! Hope next time he’s in Denver he doesn’t check out Casa Bonita. His head might explode.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @asdf

    Having eaten at Casa Bonita several times over a period of four decades, I can speak from experience that the part of his anatomy that will explode is somewhat lower than his head. I grew up eating Tex-Mex and Northern New Mexican food, but something about Casa Bonita just doesn’t sit right with me.

    Six Flags/Taco Bueno fusion is how I would describe it. Back in the 1980’s it had the same parent company as Taco Bueno, but I don’t know whether that is still the case.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  36. Anonymous[641] • Disclaimer says:

    Cultural appropriation is just one example of how incoherent and internally contradictory most postmodern, critical theory concepts are. You immediately see problems with the idea of cultural appropriation. Who decides? How far back do you go to declare the point at which we decide what belonged to whom? What degree of purity? Do we have a Day of Appropriation every twenty years to reset things and have a new reference point?

    You’d think that the concept would be refined over time and strengthened and made more consistent and coherent. But it isn’t, because the postmodern left crowd does not deign to discuss or debate with anyone who disagrees with them. So they are often blessfully unaware of how stupid their ideas are.

    Every once in a while you get a little acknowledgement that they have heard some criticisms, such as when they came up with their response to “blacks are racist”: No, blacks cannot be racist, because they don’t have power. But this is where it stops. For instance, who decides who has power? Don’t blacks have considerable power and privilege today, especially in academia, in corporations, government, media? Aren’t certain jobs in effect reserved for blacks? But the discussion doesn’t extend this far.

    By the way, a couple of the writers at Quillette are doing articles in the vein of “I read all these seminal postmodern works so you don’t have to.” Very enlightening, and saves a lot of time wading through tedious obscurantism.

  37. @Anon
    It's a wacky world.

    Some Hispanicess complaining about Negro.

    Jewish Madeline Albright who said it was worth it to wipe out 500,000 Muslim kids calling herself a 'Muslim'.

    Elizabeth Warren claiming to be a squaw.

    But I must say... the controversy about 'Yamamoto' was the stupidest thing I ever heard.
    It goes to show high IQ is no guarantee against sheer stupidity. A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed because his last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn't responsible for attacking China).

    Even Onion can't such nonsense up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @songbird, @Abe, @Twinkie

    What will the Left do if a Korean or Vietnamese ever go off the PC reservation? I mean are they going to demand Nguyen or Kim be taken off everything?

  38. @Anon
    It's a wacky world.

    Some Hispanicess complaining about Negro.

    Jewish Madeline Albright who said it was worth it to wipe out 500,000 Muslim kids calling herself a 'Muslim'.

    Elizabeth Warren claiming to be a squaw.

    But I must say... the controversy about 'Yamamoto' was the stupidest thing I ever heard.
    It goes to show high IQ is no guarantee against sheer stupidity. A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed because his last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn't responsible for attacking China).

    Even Onion can't such nonsense up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @songbird, @Abe, @Twinkie

    last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn’t responsible for attacking China).

    Typical white man’s thinking. They don’t hate Yamamoto because he did or did attack China. They hate him because he got into Harvard.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Abe

    Yamamoto was actually against the attacks on China and the USA. His famous quote about attacking the USA meaning you would have to march across North America was truncated to sound like a bellicose boast when he was actually telling the Japanese government it was a stupid idea.

    But, he was a military man, and masterminded the tactically brilliant (but strategically awful, which he knew) attack on Pearl Harbor, which did huge damage to our fleet. We managed to shoot down his plane in WW2.

    It makes you think about the military virtues and the pity of war.

  39. @Anon
    Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me.

    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn't sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Anonymous

    There is a famous Chinese restaurant in Sacramento ca called Fat Frank’s. It’s always full of politicians judges lobbyists and high level government types. Some presidents went there on visits to Ca.

    The owners last name was the common Chinese last name Fat. But in English fat is an adjective that goes before the noun. So he was called Fat Frank and his restaurant called Fat Frank’s.
    The name is written Frank Fat’s but is called Fat Frank’s
    He made a fortune with that restaurant.

    It’s still there.

    Japanese eat a lot of curry. That was appropriated from India via the Portuguese of Nagasaki.

    And all those chili peppers so popular in Chinese Asian Indian and middle eastern cooking were appropriated from S America via the Spanish.

    The Mexican Indians appropriated chickens,horses cattle, pigs and goats from the Spanish. The animal meat allowed them to stop eating each other.

    I might write a letter to the LASlimes asking why they print this nonsense and pointing out that this kind of article is why no one reads their garbage any more.

    Immigrants don’t read it. Blacks can’t read it. Conservative Whites don’t read it. Whites under 70 don’t read it.

    So who reads it? Elderly White liberals

    The anti White liberal print media is going down the tubes thanks be to God.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Alden

    The owners last name was the common Chinese last name Fat.

    If Chow Yun Fat had come to America, he could had a restaurant chain called Fat Yum Chow.

    Ersatzy Chinese stuff is an endearing part of Americana. Like the scene in CHRISTMAS STORY.
    And the Chinese joint in HAIL CAESAR. And that weirdo place in eXistenZ.

    Besides, Chinese adapted their menu all over the world. So, what passes for Chinese food in Thailand may be nothing like what's in the US.

    This is funny.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1985/04/03/world/moscow-fare-chopstick-diplomacy.html

  40. I interrogate the all-you-can-eat sushi places in this country, overwhelmingly run by hard-nosed Chinese immigrants, and whose premise is hilariously opposite the Japanese ethos of restraint, but does reflect the Chinese proclivity for mass production, maximal exploitation, and mass saturation.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Coag


    hilariously opposite the Japanese ethos of restraint
     
    And quality.
  41. my mom grew up in Bel Air in the 1950s. It was common that the gardeners were Japanese. Somehow, they rose above that stereotype.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @eric

    That reminds me of when I was a kid in Los Angeles and my mom let the Japanese gardener go and hired a cheaper Mexican. The Mexican didn't work out for some reason I can't remember, quality or reliability, and my mom asked the Japanese guy to return. He wouldn't, I think just out of pride. Since he was working several houses on the street and Mexicans were poaching customers, he know what was going on.

  42. In a couple days when there are a hundred or more comments I’ll print them all out and send them to the editor and the author.

  43. @schnellandine
    Frank Shyong, meet your psychologist, Ted Kaczynski:

    21. Leftists may claim that their activism is motivated by compassion or by moral principles, and moral principle does play a role for the leftist of the oversocialized type. But compassion and moral principle cannot be the main motives for leftist activism. Hostility is too prominent a component of leftist behavior; so is the drive for power. Moreover, much leftist behavior is not rationally calculated to be of benefit to the people whom the leftists claim to be trying to help. For example, if one believes that affirmative action is good for black people, does it make sense to demand affirmative action in hostile or dogmatic terms? Obviously it would be more productive to take a diplomatic and conciliatory approach that would make at least verbal and symbolic concessions to white people who think that affirmative action discriminates against them. But leftist activists do not take such an approach because it would not satisfy their emotional needs. Helping black people is not their real goal. Instead, race problems serve as an excuse for them to express their own hostility and frustrated need for power. In doing so they actually harm black people, because the activists’ hostile attitude toward the white majority tends to intensify race hatred.

    22. If our society had no social problems at all, the leftists would have to INVENT problems in order to provide themselves with an excuse for making a fuss.
     

    Replies: @Mishra

    Wow, I really should have given that guy a better hearing.

  44. Anonymous[220] • Disclaimer says:

    As someone who has lived in various Asian countries for most of his life, I really get peeved at Asian Americans purporting to speak for Asians, or purporing to understand Asians. And I get peeved at the casting of Asian Americans as Asians in movies and television, speaking with San Fernando Valley accents.

    Asian Americans can speak with authority about their cutlure, which is Asian American culture. They can effectively portray characters of their culture, which is Asian American culture.

    There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions."

    But not Ken Watanabe, whom Christopher Nolan loves to cast in his movies.

    In general, Nolan movies seem intent upon driving people with less than perfect hearing to distraction. Thus, Nolan loves to cast Ken Watanabe because he can't really speak comprehensible English. Tom Hardy can, so Nolan likes to cover his Hardy's mouth with a mask, as in The Dark Night Rises and Dunkirk.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie, @Anonym, @Anonymous, @EdwardM

  45. @DB Cooper
    @Thomm

    Of course China never invaded Tibet. India did. And the reason Indian people are so fond of insisting this narrative is that it obfuscates the fact that it is India that invaded and is still occupying a piece of traditional Tibetan homeland.

    In 1951, four years after the British quit the subcontinent and India was created, India, in the traditional of its former master the Raj, move further northward and invaded Tawang. Tawang is the birthplace of the Sixth Dalai Lama and home to a four hundred years old Tibetan monastery. Tawang and South Tibet is still occupied by India to this day. In 1987 India renamed South Tibet to the so called Arunachal Pradesh, hoping that by giving it an Indian sounding name it will fool the people in the world that this is India territory.

    Replies: @Mishra, @Thomm, @Achmed E. Newman

    There’s this country in the way of your theory, it’s full of Himalayan mountains and it starts with the letter N. Three guesses?

    Don’t even get me started about Bhutan. Just don’t.

    • Replies: @DB Cooper
    @Mishra

    Yes Nepal is another country India has invaded. India is still occupying a piece of Nepalese territory since 1962.

    Replies: @Mishra

  46. @Alden
    @Anon

    Some Warren family trivia. One of her ancestors was the Captain of the Tennessee militia who rounded up cherokees and brought them to the detention camp on the Mississippi River where they were confined until equipment and arrangements to send them to exile in Oklahoma on the trial of tears were ready

    Of course that doesn’t mean that at least one ancestor wasn’t Indian.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.

    It’s especially good for college students . Not only will you get into college and a scholarship but by fall semester of senior year you’ll be getting numerous letters begging you to accept a job.

    You don’t even have to look for work. They will beg you to come.

    Claiming to be an Indian can sometimes be tricky if one can’t produce a tribal certificate because the Indians naturally want their affirmative action quota for themselves.

    Replies: @Anon, @Mishra, @Twinkie

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White.

    Sheeeeeeeeiiiit. You don’t say. I’m gonna go have me some wings.

  47. Don’t forget the greatest cultural appropriation of all time :

  48. @Anonymous
    As someone who has lived in various Asian countries for most of his life, I really get peeved at Asian Americans purporting to speak for Asians, or purporing to understand Asians. And I get peeved at the casting of Asian Americans as Asians in movies and television, speaking with San Fernando Valley accents.

    Asian Americans can speak with authority about their cutlure, which is Asian American culture. They can effectively portray characters of their culture, which is Asian American culture.

    There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions.”

    But not Ken Watanabe, whom Christopher Nolan loves to cast in his movies.

    In general, Nolan movies seem intent upon driving people with less than perfect hearing to distraction. Thus, Nolan loves to cast Ken Watanabe because he can’t really speak comprehensible English. Tom Hardy can, so Nolan likes to cover his Hardy’s mouth with a mask, as in The Dark Night Rises and Dunkirk.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    George Takei has a distinctive, sonorous, yet clarion English-speaking timbre. I mean, he could easily voice a Brit playing a Nazi in a 1950s cheesy American war movie. But somehow, for some reason, the guy seems to be thought, well, less-than-imposing... It's a mystery

    Replies: @Mishra

    , @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Very funny, sir! Well done.

    , @Anonym
    @Steve Sailer

    You are not the only one to notice this.

    https://youtu.be/8BfMivMDOBI

    That being said, Watanabe is awesome IMO.

    Here he is extolling the virtues of the KDR. Clint Eastwood was late to the party of Western directors using him, but what a role!

    Replies: @Anonym

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, Ken may not be around for long, what with the leukemia and now the stomach cancer.

    I wonder how his daughter's English is. Here she is in a Korean commercial. She's pretty ubiquitous in Japanese movies and television.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnppi2Cb6Y4

    Replies: @Clyde

    , @EdwardM
    @Steve Sailer

    I thought it was just my hearing going bad, but I couldn't hear much dialogue in Inception or Interstellar. They were excellent movies, better when I watched them at home with closed captioning on.

  49. @DB Cooper
    @Thomm

    Of course China never invaded Tibet. India did. And the reason Indian people are so fond of insisting this narrative is that it obfuscates the fact that it is India that invaded and is still occupying a piece of traditional Tibetan homeland.

    In 1951, four years after the British quit the subcontinent and India was created, India, in the traditional of its former master the Raj, move further northward and invaded Tawang. Tawang is the birthplace of the Sixth Dalai Lama and home to a four hundred years old Tibetan monastery. Tawang and South Tibet is still occupied by India to this day. In 1987 India renamed South Tibet to the so called Arunachal Pradesh, hoping that by giving it an Indian sounding name it will fool the people in the world that this is India territory.

    Replies: @Mishra, @Thomm, @Achmed E. Newman

    See what Bill P said in comment #11.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    @Thomm

    I can't help but notice that DB Cooper is too afraid to disagree with Bill P's statements about China in Comment #11.

    Noted.

  50. Anonymous[386] • Disclaimer says:

    “Tests limits?” I used to wonder when this trend of moronic mau-mau clickbait would finally run its course but it’s clearly gone past the point of no return. Sort of like how media is never going to hit Peak Gay–there is no practical ceiling on it. The purpose of these dumb articles cannot be merely to placate the more aggressive social-climbing nonwhites; there must also be a critical mass of white readers who avidly consume this chit

  51. @Mishra
    @DB Cooper

    There's this country in the way of your theory, it's full of Himalayan mountains and it starts with the letter N. Three guesses?

    Don't even get me started about Bhutan. Just don't.

    Replies: @DB Cooper

    Yes Nepal is another country India has invaded. India is still occupying a piece of Nepalese territory since 1962.

    • Replies: @Mishra
    @DB Cooper

    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe, whether we want them or not. The environmental cost alone is staggering, and until and unless the USA starts exporting tens of millions of its people to India and China, those two countries—and their people—are in a uniquely poor position from which to lecture the rest of us about anything.

    Replies: @Yan Shen

  52. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @Alden
    @Anon

    There is a famous Chinese restaurant in Sacramento ca called Fat Frank’s. It’s always full of politicians judges lobbyists and high level government types. Some presidents went there on visits to Ca.

    The owners last name was the common Chinese last name Fat. But in English fat is an adjective that goes before the noun. So he was called Fat Frank and his restaurant called Fat Frank’s.
    The name is written Frank Fat’s but is called Fat Frank's
    He made a fortune with that restaurant.

    It’s still there.

    Japanese eat a lot of curry. That was appropriated from India via the Portuguese of Nagasaki.

    And all those chili peppers so popular in Chinese Asian Indian and middle eastern cooking were appropriated from S America via the Spanish.

    The Mexican Indians appropriated chickens,horses cattle, pigs and goats from the Spanish. The animal meat allowed them to stop eating each other.

    I might write a letter to the LASlimes asking why they print this nonsense and pointing out that this kind of article is why no one reads their garbage any more.

    Immigrants don’t read it. Blacks can’t read it. Conservative Whites don’t read it. Whites under 70 don’t read it.

    So who reads it? Elderly White liberals

    The anti White liberal print media is going down the tubes thanks be to God.

    Replies: @Anon

    The owners last name was the common Chinese last name Fat.

    If Chow Yun Fat had come to America, he could had a restaurant chain called Fat Yum Chow.

    Ersatzy Chinese stuff is an endearing part of Americana. Like the scene in CHRISTMAS STORY.
    And the Chinese joint in HAIL CAESAR. And that weirdo place in eXistenZ.

    Besides, Chinese adapted their menu all over the world. So, what passes for Chinese food in Thailand may be nothing like what’s in the US.

    This is funny.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1985/04/03/world/moscow-fare-chopstick-diplomacy.html

  53. Amid all this, I wondered: How should I feel about Yamashiro?

    I don’t know. How about………………..is the food good?

    I know, I know – a crazy criterion upon which to judge a restaurant.

  54. Anonymous[386] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions."

    But not Ken Watanabe, whom Christopher Nolan loves to cast in his movies.

    In general, Nolan movies seem intent upon driving people with less than perfect hearing to distraction. Thus, Nolan loves to cast Ken Watanabe because he can't really speak comprehensible English. Tom Hardy can, so Nolan likes to cover his Hardy's mouth with a mask, as in The Dark Night Rises and Dunkirk.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie, @Anonym, @Anonymous, @EdwardM

    George Takei has a distinctive, sonorous, yet clarion English-speaking timbre. I mean, he could easily voice a Brit playing a Nazi in a 1950s cheesy American war movie. But somehow, for some reason, the guy seems to be thought, well, less-than-imposing… It’s a mystery

    • Replies: @Mishra
    @Anonymous

    You obviously no see Takei-san as Yakuza in most eminent Sterling Archer franchise!

    I tried transposing arr Rs and L's in that sentence but googre would not permit!

    Replies: @Autochthon

  55. @Alden
    @Anon

    Some Warren family trivia. One of her ancestors was the Captain of the Tennessee militia who rounded up cherokees and brought them to the detention camp on the Mississippi River where they were confined until equipment and arrangements to send them to exile in Oklahoma on the trial of tears were ready

    Of course that doesn’t mean that at least one ancestor wasn’t Indian.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.

    It’s especially good for college students . Not only will you get into college and a scholarship but by fall semester of senior year you’ll be getting numerous letters begging you to accept a job.

    You don’t even have to look for work. They will beg you to come.

    Claiming to be an Indian can sometimes be tricky if one can’t produce a tribal certificate because the Indians naturally want their affirmative action quota for themselves.

    Replies: @Anon, @Mishra, @Twinkie

    Just say you’re mixed race. There’s always a box for it nowadays.

    1) Principal virtue: Can’t be disproven.

    2) We’re always being lectured that no one is pure anything anyway.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Mishra

    Does "mixed race" help an employer with their quota requirements?

    Replies: @Mishra, @EdwardM

  56. @Anon
    FRANK should go to China, a land of authenticity.

    Mao did a great job of preserving traditional Chinese culture, and Chinese today really appreciate authenticity:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lYKRFrytwE

    I find it amusing that two Chinese guys named JUSTIN and FRANK who chose to live in another country than their own are griping about lack of authenticity.

    Besides, it's LA, the city of Hollywood and Disneyland. By the terms of LA, inauthentic is the new authentic. Has been for a long time.

    Just see it as Wakazukikanda or Wangkangda.

    I wonder what JUSTIN said about BLACK PANTHER. Was that authentic and real enough for him?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    who chose to live in another country than their own

    Did they?

  57. @Anonymous
    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I've visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    There's a television show in Japan where they will visit a Japanese restaurant somewhere outside of Japan that serves detarame (nonsense, bullshit, bogus, inaccurate) "Japanese" food and say that they are filming a documentary or news show. A Japanese person is supplied as a new employee, and the chef teaches him how to make "Japanese" food on camera.

    Coincidentally a famous Japanese chef will be visiting the town in a few days and will give a public demonstration. The Japanese chef will wear a Mexican pro wrestling mask with JAPAN on the forehead. He makes proper Japanese food, serves it to the audience, which includes the "Japanese" restaurant chef, and at the end pulls off the mask to reveal that he is the "student" in the documentary, shocking the foreign chef, who vows to reform his ways.

    As I write this, I can't believe how stupid this show is, and it seems like the foreign chefs would catch on, and maybe they do. But it does surface some pretty awful manifestations of "Japanese food" outside of Japan. The weird thing is, to all appearances these restaurants seem to have been popular with their customers, so from a business standpoint there is no reason for them to become more authentic.

    I think that they are running out of bad Japanese restaurants to expose, because the most recent show had them exposing members of a detarame "samurai" club in Argentina. That they would target a bunch of fun-loving swordplay amateurs is strange, but the "expert" samurai they brought in to set them straight was a Japanese commedian who does samurai performances on the side. There are no actual living samurai in Japan, so who's to say what is authentic.

    Replies: @a boy and his dog, @Twinkie, @Jack D, @Whitehall, @Achmed E. Newman, @Lurker

    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I’ve visited are run by Koreans.

    I believe the Moonies control a big chunk of the sushi fish distribution in the U.S.

  58. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Steve Sailer

    I guess I’m not smart enough to get Wes Anderson. The only one I’ve had the misfortune to sit all the way through was Royal Tenenbauns. I’ve started to watch Rushmore and Darjeeling and just couldn’t get into them (was Rushmore supposed to be a comedy? I couldn’t tell). To me, Wes Anderson’s trademarks are a plodding, muddled story, and strange, stilted dialogue from his actors. While those things make his movies unwatchable for me, I guess other people interpret that as brilliantly artistic.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    I guess I’m not smart enough to get Wes Anderson.

    You might try The Grand Budapest Hotel; it seems much more accessible than his other stuff (I’m not a Wes Anderson fan but I loved TGBH).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    "You might try The Grand Budapest Hotel; it seems much more accessible than his other stuff"

    Alternatively, The Grand Budapest Hotel might be Wes Anderson's most Wes Andersoniest movie.

    I never much liked any of his movies other than Bottle Rocket (and that's more the Wilson Brothers), until this one, but it won me over.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Chrisnonymous

  59. @Bill P
    Some American white guy should open a restaurant named "Yasukuni" and serve Manchukuo and Taiwanese cuisine. The restaurant should have a Shinto Bushido ambience, with crossed samurai swords hanging over the door.

    Frankly, I'm getting tired of Chinese hypersensitivity. I lived there for a couple years, and the racial antagonism toward whites, Japanese and Hindus was over the top. China is a huge crybaby country that suckles off of the innovation and prosperity of others while fussing and screaming when it doesn't get its way.

    Replies: @Thomm, @Twinkie

    Some American white guy should open a restaurant named “Yasukuni” and serve Manchukuo and Taiwanese cuisine. The restaurant should have a Shinto Bushido ambience, with crossed samurai swords hanging over the door.

    Droll. Unfortunately the fun would end when someone opens its European counterpart, the Birkenau, serving Polish food.

    • Replies: @Bill P
    @Twinkie

    There are nazi-themed restaurants all over Asia, so it wouldn't be anything new.

    The difference is that here, if you so much as have a Japanese themed party where white girls dress in kimonos (which is kind of cute, actually), you've got people like Frank Shyang spoiling all the fun.

    So why not move the overton window a little bit with an "I don't care about what you think about it in China" attitude? Why do white Americans have to be sensitive to everyone but ourselves? Chinese will tell you to your face that your feelings about their false and racist portrayals of whites in their movies, exhibits, etc. don't matter because "this is China," and they have a point.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  60. Shyong is not a common spelling, the people I know who use it are usually Malaysian/Singaporean-Chinese, usually from the same area as Konrad Ng, Obama’s Canadian-American brother-in-law.

  61. @Anon
    It's a wacky world.

    Some Hispanicess complaining about Negro.

    Jewish Madeline Albright who said it was worth it to wipe out 500,000 Muslim kids calling herself a 'Muslim'.

    Elizabeth Warren claiming to be a squaw.

    But I must say... the controversy about 'Yamamoto' was the stupidest thing I ever heard.
    It goes to show high IQ is no guarantee against sheer stupidity. A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed because his last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn't responsible for attacking China).

    Even Onion can't such nonsense up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @songbird, @Abe, @Twinkie

    A Japanese-American war hero gets nixed

    That idea was nipped in the (Sakura) bud.

  62. @Anonymous
    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I've visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    There's a television show in Japan where they will visit a Japanese restaurant somewhere outside of Japan that serves detarame (nonsense, bullshit, bogus, inaccurate) "Japanese" food and say that they are filming a documentary or news show. A Japanese person is supplied as a new employee, and the chef teaches him how to make "Japanese" food on camera.

    Coincidentally a famous Japanese chef will be visiting the town in a few days and will give a public demonstration. The Japanese chef will wear a Mexican pro wrestling mask with JAPAN on the forehead. He makes proper Japanese food, serves it to the audience, which includes the "Japanese" restaurant chef, and at the end pulls off the mask to reveal that he is the "student" in the documentary, shocking the foreign chef, who vows to reform his ways.

    As I write this, I can't believe how stupid this show is, and it seems like the foreign chefs would catch on, and maybe they do. But it does surface some pretty awful manifestations of "Japanese food" outside of Japan. The weird thing is, to all appearances these restaurants seem to have been popular with their customers, so from a business standpoint there is no reason for them to become more authentic.

    I think that they are running out of bad Japanese restaurants to expose, because the most recent show had them exposing members of a detarame "samurai" club in Argentina. That they would target a bunch of fun-loving swordplay amateurs is strange, but the "expert" samurai they brought in to set them straight was a Japanese commedian who does samurai performances on the side. There are no actual living samurai in Japan, so who's to say what is authentic.

    Replies: @a boy and his dog, @Twinkie, @Jack D, @Whitehall, @Achmed E. Newman, @Lurker

    The strangest “Chinese” food I ever had was in Lithuania. It bore only the most vague resemblance to actual Chinese food ( I think there was soy sauce in it somewhere, maybe on the rice), even less related to actual Chinese food than chop suey did in the bad old days in America. The concept of detarame doesn’t even touch how bogus this stuff was (although my Lithuanian hosts were eating it with relish). My son, who speaks Mandarin, spoke with the kitchen staff (who were Chinese even though the waitstaff wasn’t) . They insisted that the locals wanted it that way and that if they made real Chinese food the Lithuanians would never eat it.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Jack D

    After visiting China for a couple of weeks, I was relieved to come back to nice, well-made Chinese food made from good ingredients. Sweet and sour pork, I should never have doubted you!

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Whitehall
    @Jack D

    I once was hanging with a crew from America in Seoul starting a branch of P.F. Chang.

    Seemed a very roundabout way to do Asian fusion but it was packed when it opened.

    They told me they tweaked the recipes for local tastes.

    Still. I'd walk six blocks in the snow to get a Big Mac.

  63. @Coag
    I interrogate the all-you-can-eat sushi places in this country, overwhelmingly run by hard-nosed Chinese immigrants, and whose premise is hilariously opposite the Japanese ethos of restraint, but does reflect the Chinese proclivity for mass production, maximal exploitation, and mass saturation.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    hilariously opposite the Japanese ethos of restraint

    And quality.

  64. @cthulhu
    @Hapalong Cassidy



    I guess I’m not smart enough to get Wes Anderson.

     

    You might try The Grand Budapest Hotel; it seems much more accessible than his other stuff (I’m not a Wes Anderson fan but I loved TGBH).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “You might try The Grand Budapest Hotel; it seems much more accessible than his other stuff”

    Alternatively, The Grand Budapest Hotel might be Wes Anderson’s most Wes Andersoniest movie.

    I never much liked any of his movies other than Bottle Rocket (and that’s more the Wilson Brothers), until this one, but it won me over.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Because I enjoy absurdist humor, I liked all his movies, except Bottle Rocket. I found the Wilson Brothers annoying.

    Looking forward to “The Isle of Dogs.”

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, Make sure you check out the BBC Poirot episode that Anderson ripped off in making Grand Budapest.

  65. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions."

    But not Ken Watanabe, whom Christopher Nolan loves to cast in his movies.

    In general, Nolan movies seem intent upon driving people with less than perfect hearing to distraction. Thus, Nolan loves to cast Ken Watanabe because he can't really speak comprehensible English. Tom Hardy can, so Nolan likes to cover his Hardy's mouth with a mask, as in The Dark Night Rises and Dunkirk.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie, @Anonym, @Anonymous, @EdwardM

    Very funny, sir! Well done.

  66. If he wants to talk about cultural appropriation, he should look up the history of the fortune cookie. Fortune cookies are actually Japanese, not Chinese. When the Japanese-Americans were interned during WWII, the Chinese used that opportunity to take over the fortune cookie business. Talk about appropriation – it was more like expropriation.

  67. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    "You might try The Grand Budapest Hotel; it seems much more accessible than his other stuff"

    Alternatively, The Grand Budapest Hotel might be Wes Anderson's most Wes Andersoniest movie.

    I never much liked any of his movies other than Bottle Rocket (and that's more the Wilson Brothers), until this one, but it won me over.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Chrisnonymous

    Because I enjoy absurdist humor, I liked all his movies, except Bottle Rocket. I found the Wilson Brothers annoying.

    Looking forward to “The Isle of Dogs.”

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Twinkie

    No "The" in the title. It would detract from the pun.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIQC9M1qPAg

  68. @slumber_j
    Off-topic, but on-topic for the ongoing iSteve coverage of rogue Harvard College '87 alumni such as Buddy Fletcher and (in this case) Section 8 bottom-feeder Chris Stefanoni:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/sports/marina-stefanoni-squash.html

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Mishra

    Weird how they can get the NYT to provide free advertising/propaganda for the family like that.

  69. @Anon
    Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me.

    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn't sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Anonymous

    “Forget about it FRANK, it’s Chinatown.”

  70. @Alden
    @Anon

    Some Warren family trivia. One of her ancestors was the Captain of the Tennessee militia who rounded up cherokees and brought them to the detention camp on the Mississippi River where they were confined until equipment and arrangements to send them to exile in Oklahoma on the trial of tears were ready

    Of course that doesn’t mean that at least one ancestor wasn’t Indian.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.

    It’s especially good for college students . Not only will you get into college and a scholarship but by fall semester of senior year you’ll be getting numerous letters begging you to accept a job.

    You don’t even have to look for work. They will beg you to come.

    Claiming to be an Indian can sometimes be tricky if one can’t produce a tribal certificate because the Indians naturally want their affirmative action quota for themselves.

    Replies: @Anon, @Mishra, @Twinkie

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.

    The problem is that ALL whites would have to do it. Otherwise the honest whites who don’t would be the worst-off.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Twinkie

    If you were born in Alaska, you'd be an idiot not to check "American Indian or Alaska Native".

  71. I am all for culinary cross-pollination in all direction. If French started to go after Vietnamese for them culturally appropriation of French “Pot au Feu” into Pho, that would be a lose for all of us. London without Indian food would be dire. And if I may say so, the Rijsttafel in Amsterdam was very different from what Indonesians equivalent, but still delicious, that’s what matters.

    • Replies: @jim jones
    @1661er

    Borough Market is a foodie paradise:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9ZMEilRPBY

  72. @DB Cooper
    @Mishra

    Yes Nepal is another country India has invaded. India is still occupying a piece of Nepalese territory since 1962.

    Replies: @Mishra

    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe, whether we want them or not. The environmental cost alone is staggering, and until and unless the USA starts exporting tens of millions of its people to India and China, those two countries—and their people—are in a uniquely poor position from which to lecture the rest of us about anything.

    • Replies: @Yan Shen
    @Mishra


    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe
     
    5 million Chinese Americans 4 million Indian Americans out of mainland populations of 1380 million and 1320 million respectively. That ratio comes out to .36% and .30% respectively...

    Replies: @Mishra, @Reg Cæsar, @MikeatMikedotMike

  73. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    George Takei has a distinctive, sonorous, yet clarion English-speaking timbre. I mean, he could easily voice a Brit playing a Nazi in a 1950s cheesy American war movie. But somehow, for some reason, the guy seems to be thought, well, less-than-imposing... It's a mystery

    Replies: @Mishra

    You obviously no see Takei-san as Yakuza in most eminent Sterling Archer franchise!

    I tried transposing arr Rs and L’s in that sentence but googre would not permit!

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Mishra

    Quit your day job; that's the funniest thing I may have ever read here.

  74. Perhaps this restaurant was merely ahead of the game. Food exporters I talk to in Southeast Asia tell me that fusion food is the way to go because single cuisine restaurants eventually become tired and stale.

    They cite the example of Chinese restaurants in the West that have gone out of fashion; rapidly being followed by curry houses.

    I am not so sure; it seems too convenient for the steamroller that is Big Food which wants to wean the world away from authentic tastes for the sake of productivity.

  75. @Mishra
    @DB Cooper

    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe, whether we want them or not. The environmental cost alone is staggering, and until and unless the USA starts exporting tens of millions of its people to India and China, those two countries—and their people—are in a uniquely poor position from which to lecture the rest of us about anything.

    Replies: @Yan Shen

    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe

    5 million Chinese Americans 4 million Indian Americans out of mainland populations of 1380 million and 1320 million respectively. That ratio comes out to .36% and .30% respectively…

    • Replies: @Mishra
    @Yan Shen

    So your point is that China and India have the numbers to swamp any and every other country on earth? Without even batting an eyelash? Yeah, I think that was my point. Two colossal pestilences upon the globe.

    Replies: @Yan Shen

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Yan Shen

    It's hard to feel sorry for the fat guy when he's overhanging half the only open seat on the bus you've just boarded.

    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    @Yan Shen

    I know, a sense of proportion is an inconvenient thing when discussion whole numbers. 5 million Chinese, ("Americans" TBD) may be only .36% of China, but it's 1.5% of the US population. Taking 5 million from a larger population and adding them to a smaller population has a exponentially greater affect on the smaller population than the larger one. So your .36% is pretty meaningless in regard to real affect/value.

    I'd be willing to send China the least useful, adjusted equivalent % of the United States' largely African underclass in return though. China's youth could definitely benefit from a little ghetto lifestyle glorification and glamorization.

  76. Hmmm. It seems to me that Steve — and just about every commentator here –missed the point of the LA times article. Sure it starts out raising questions of cultural appropriation and authenticity with regards to the restaurant. But it’s generally balanced, citing various sources with differing opinions as to whether one should be offended or not. By the end of the article, though, the author seems to have sided with the camp that says “No, we’re being overly sensitive to the issue of cultural appropriation.”

    Here’s the last few paragraphs of the article.

    “Calling something cultural appropriation, and the repetitive, polarizing debate that label always sparks, often obscures important history, writes Minh-Ha Pham, a media studies professor at the Pratt Institute.

    When we argue about cultural appropriation, we don’t learn anything about history, she said. And the history of how we have reproduced, adapted and integrated other cultures in this country is far more complex and interesting than that debate allows for.

    Arguing about what to be offended over — or whether Sriracha on sushi is appropriate — misses the point. What we’re actually debating is which stories to tell about our cultures, and whose perspectives should be included.

    The question we should be asking is whether we know the full story. And in the case of Yamashiro, it’s important to take the time to learn the details.

    I looked down at the Reclining Buddha Roll, fixed a vision of a harmonious, multicultural society in my head, and tried to note its positive qualities.

    The roll was quite firmly wrapped, even though it used rice paper instead of seaweed and tasted more like a Vietnamese spring roll. The menu describes the restaurant’s food as California Asian fusion food, and that was certainly accurate. The rice was well-cooked, firm, not mushy or hard. The vegetables were crisp and the shrimp was fresh.

    I took one bite, and then another. Before I knew it, I had eaten the whole thing.”

    • Replies: @schnellandine
    @AnonJT

    In that finish you see redemption. I see hand wringing, sucking up to the intended audience of morons, and an air of guilt (for liking the food) better derived from the forced all-over-the-map drivel typical of populist writers jerking out pro forma "balance". He should be slapped for even mentioning the BS premise, and fired for the rightfeelz approach Mishra noted.

    , @Paco Wové
    @AnonJT

    So, it's the equivalent of one of those "History" Channel shows with titles like Did ALIENS build the Pyramids? that consists of 55 minutes of loons spewing their crackpot theories, and then in the last few minutes they bring on somebody sane to say, no, of course aliens didn't build the pyramids.

  77. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie
    @Alden


    I see absolutely nothing wrong with Whites escaping affirmative action discrimination by claiming to be non White. That’s how I got my job. All Whites should do it.
     
    The problem is that ALL whites would have to do it. Otherwise the honest whites who don’t would be the worst-off.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    If you were born in Alaska, you’d be an idiot not to check “American Indian or Alaska Native”.

  78. @Yan Shen
    @Mishra


    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe
     
    5 million Chinese Americans 4 million Indian Americans out of mainland populations of 1380 million and 1320 million respectively. That ratio comes out to .36% and .30% respectively...

    Replies: @Mishra, @Reg Cæsar, @MikeatMikedotMike

    So your point is that China and India have the numbers to swamp any and every other country on earth? Without even batting an eyelash? Yeah, I think that was my point. Two colossal pestilences upon the globe.

    • Replies: @Yan Shen
    @Mishra

    Right to follow on that 5 million Chinese Americans and 4 million Indian Americans comes out to 2.77% of the American population of 325 million. Now Americans are sometimes stereotyped as being innumerate...

    Replies: @Mishra

  79. @asdf
    Well! Hope next time he's in Denver he doesn't check out Casa Bonita. His head might explode.

    Replies: @FPD72

    Having eaten at Casa Bonita several times over a period of four decades, I can speak from experience that the part of his anatomy that will explode is somewhat lower than his head. I grew up eating Tex-Mex and Northern New Mexican food, but something about Casa Bonita just doesn’t sit right with me.

    Six Flags/Taco Bueno fusion is how I would describe it. Back in the 1980’s it had the same parent company as Taco Bueno, but I don’t know whether that is still the case.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @FPD72

    True fact; Satanists love Casa Bonita. In the nineties after the death of Anton LaVey, just about every single writer that knew LaVey, and many of which had been made Priests of his outfit, wrote about the place and how it lived up to the LaVeyan expectations for the "total environment".

    I've eaten there. The food sucks. Its enthusiasts admit this readily. Many take pride in this.

    Most theme parks I have been to have pretty good-for-fast-food food. Portions and/or price is sometimes out of line but the food is usually good for what it is.

    The old Pacific Ocean Park in California in the 60s was said to have positively revolting food, but that was before my time. We visited Disneyland and WDW in 1969 and 1971 respectively, Astroworld in Houston, and someplace in Ohio the next two years and I had a pass to Six Flags in St. Louis from '77 to '83 every summer. I remember the pizza and fried chicken at Six Flags were at least as good as any of the chains, albeit double the price.

    Disneyland, of course has the Club 33, a once secret and very exclusive very high end restaurant in the park. No experience with that.

    Replies: @Pericles

  80. @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Frank Shyong anagrams to "nag, fry honks".

    Replies: @Hail

    Frank Shyong anagrams to “nag, fry honks”.

    Fr nag honkys

  81. @Mishra
    @Yan Shen

    So your point is that China and India have the numbers to swamp any and every other country on earth? Without even batting an eyelash? Yeah, I think that was my point. Two colossal pestilences upon the globe.

    Replies: @Yan Shen

    Right to follow on that 5 million Chinese Americans and 4 million Indian Americans comes out to 2.77% of the American population of 325 million. Now Americans are sometimes stereotyped as being innumerate…

    • Replies: @Mishra
    @Yan Shen

    And 100 million Chinese and 100 million Indians will be half of the USA when it has 400 million people. And China and India won't miss them, will they.

    Meanwhile, since you disparage Americans so readily, why not go back to your own country? I'll tell you why--because the nation Americans built is 100x as attractive as yours, that's why.

    And this is why even 200 million Chinese and Indians would still be minorities in America--because the same people who are using you to wreck our country will be using even more Africans and Latinos for the same purpose.

    Replies: @Yan Shen

  82. @Steve Sailer
    @AnotherGuessModel

    Perhaps Molly Ringwald's trust fund manager could weigh in on what she owes John Hughes?

    Replies: @JimB

    Didn’t John Hughes kick Molly Ringwald to the curb for disloyalty, in effect bringing her annoying whiny film career to an end in the late 80’s? This is all sour grapes on her part, it would seem.

  83. A Chinaman accuses white people of cultural appropriation while China appropriates 600 billion dollars worth of white intellectual property every year. I can’t help but detect a faint whiff of irony.

  84. @Yan Shen
    @Mishra


    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe
     
    5 million Chinese Americans 4 million Indian Americans out of mainland populations of 1380 million and 1320 million respectively. That ratio comes out to .36% and .30% respectively...

    Replies: @Mishra, @Reg Cæsar, @MikeatMikedotMike

    It’s hard to feel sorry for the fat guy when he’s overhanging half the only open seat on the bus you’ve just boarded.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  85. @AnonJT
    Hmmm. It seems to me that Steve -- and just about every commentator here --missed the point of the LA times article. Sure it starts out raising questions of cultural appropriation and authenticity with regards to the restaurant. But it's generally balanced, citing various sources with differing opinions as to whether one should be offended or not. By the end of the article, though, the author seems to have sided with the camp that says "No, we're being overly sensitive to the issue of cultural appropriation."

    Here's the last few paragraphs of the article.

    "Calling something cultural appropriation, and the repetitive, polarizing debate that label always sparks, often obscures important history, writes Minh-Ha Pham, a media studies professor at the Pratt Institute.

    When we argue about cultural appropriation, we don't learn anything about history, she said. And the history of how we have reproduced, adapted and integrated other cultures in this country is far more complex and interesting than that debate allows for.

    Arguing about what to be offended over — or whether Sriracha on sushi is appropriate — misses the point. What we're actually debating is which stories to tell about our cultures, and whose perspectives should be included.

    The question we should be asking is whether we know the full story. And in the case of Yamashiro, it's important to take the time to learn the details.

    I looked down at the Reclining Buddha Roll, fixed a vision of a harmonious, multicultural society in my head, and tried to note its positive qualities.

    The roll was quite firmly wrapped, even though it used rice paper instead of seaweed and tasted more like a Vietnamese spring roll. The menu describes the restaurant's food as California Asian fusion food, and that was certainly accurate. The rice was well-cooked, firm, not mushy or hard. The vegetables were crisp and the shrimp was fresh.

    I took one bite, and then another. Before I knew it, I had eaten the whole thing."

    Replies: @schnellandine, @Paco Wové

    In that finish you see redemption. I see hand wringing, sucking up to the intended audience of morons, and an air of guilt (for liking the food) better derived from the forced all-over-the-map drivel typical of populist writers jerking out pro forma “balance”. He should be slapped for even mentioning the BS premise, and fired for the rightfeelz approach Mishra noted.

  86. @Mishra
    @Alden

    Just say you're mixed race. There's always a box for it nowadays.

    1) Principal virtue: Can't be disproven.

    2) We're always being lectured that no one is pure anything anyway.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Does “mixed race” help an employer with their quota requirements?

    • Replies: @Mishra
    @Almost Missouri

    A fair question. Depends on whom we elect, I daresay.

    In theory, anyway...

    , @EdwardM
    @Almost Missouri

    Every time you apply for a job in the U.S., you have to check boxes on various forms indicating your race, ethnicity, disability, and veterans status. These are labeled "OMB form XYZ," so they are apparently required by the Federal government.

    Why don't President Trump and Mick Mulvaney just abolish these burdensome, unnecessary, and invidious requirements? I suppose there's some law underlying them, but getting OMB to unilaterally cease the mandate would be consistent with what other administrations have done.

  87. @Yan Shen
    @Mishra

    Right to follow on that 5 million Chinese Americans and 4 million Indian Americans comes out to 2.77% of the American population of 325 million. Now Americans are sometimes stereotyped as being innumerate...

    Replies: @Mishra

    And 100 million Chinese and 100 million Indians will be half of the USA when it has 400 million people. And China and India won’t miss them, will they.

    Meanwhile, since you disparage Americans so readily, why not go back to your own country? I’ll tell you why–because the nation Americans built is 100x as attractive as yours, that’s why.

    And this is why even 200 million Chinese and Indians would still be minorities in America–because the same people who are using you to wreck our country will be using even more Africans and Latinos for the same purpose.

    • Replies: @Yan Shen
    @Mishra


    And 100 million Chinese and 100 million Indians will be half of the USA when it has 400 million people. And China and India won’t miss them, will they.
     
    Seems pretty unlikely that the Chinese American and Indian American populations will ever increase from 5 and 4 million to 100 and 100 million.

    I’ll tell you why–because the nation Americans built is 100x as attractive as yours, that’s why.
     
    First tier cities in China, i.e. Shenzhen, Beijing, Shanghai, are already near 1st world standards.

    because the same people who are using you to wreck our country
     
    Well Chinese and Indian Americans are massively over-represented in STEM in the USA, so on a per capita basis they probably add enormous value to America. Meanwhile, you're just someone who complains online...

    Replies: @Jack D

  88. @Almost Missouri
    @Mishra

    Does "mixed race" help an employer with their quota requirements?

    Replies: @Mishra, @EdwardM

    A fair question. Depends on whom we elect, I daresay.

    In theory, anyway…

  89. Anonymous[373] • Disclaimer says:
    @a boy and his dog
    @Anonymous

    That show was exposed as being fake. The directors were telling shops to put shocking ingredients in their food for ‘comedy’ purposes, and then portraying the food as being from the real menu.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I found this allegation of “yarase” for that show, “Bukkomi Japanese”:
    https://tokyocheapo.com/editorial/japanese-tv-mocking-scottish-ramen-and-sushi-restaurant-exposed-as-fake/

    One of the places it highlighted was a small Japanese restaurant in Edinburgh. It proceeded to intone in melodramatic narration how crazy this establishment was. The dishes they serve at Maki & Ramen Sushi Bar are not correct Japanese cuisine and the prices are far too expensive. For crying out loud, they serve ramen with whisky and other wacky local variants! They even serve Korean-made instant noodles to innocent paying customers!
    :
    The owner and head chef, Teddy Lee, found out how they had been presented and responded with posts on Facebook (since deleted). In the posts they explained how they were asked by the director to use instant noodles and a certain sauce—none of which they normally use. In fact, they say, their ramen dishes are cheaper than the standard because they are in a student area. The dishes like “breakfast ramen” and ingredients like whisky were all added at the behest of the Japanese TV crew in order to make what they were told was a comedic piece of entertainment with some local Scottish touches.

    Here’s the show:

    http://www.tbs.co.jp/bukkomi-japanese/

    And its Wikipedia page:

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/ぶっこみジャパニーズ

    The Wikipedia page mentions the Scottish incident, as well as a later incident when an anime song singer was coached into doing something ridiculous.

    So there seems to be a high degree of fakery in these variety show comedy “documentaries.” But the Katie Couric fake gun documentary incident shows that the same can be true elsewhere, in purportedly real documentaries.

    I don’t think that the directors and producers are told to go fake something (well, maybe they are, one on one at the fourth bar of the night). Rather, they are told to bring back usable material, and the message gets across. Every few years there is a scandal and someone is fired, but that’s how it works if you want to work in television in Japan.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    An appreciation for wacky Japanese TV shows is one reason (among several) why Haim Saban is a billionaire and I'm not.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  90. @Anonymous
    @a boy and his dog

    I found this allegation of "yarase" for that show, "Bukkomi Japanese":
    https://tokyocheapo.com/editorial/japanese-tv-mocking-scottish-ramen-and-sushi-restaurant-exposed-as-fake/


    One of the places it highlighted was a small Japanese restaurant in Edinburgh. It proceeded to intone in melodramatic narration how crazy this establishment was. The dishes they serve at Maki & Ramen Sushi Bar are not correct Japanese cuisine and the prices are far too expensive. For crying out loud, they serve ramen with whisky and other wacky local variants! They even serve Korean-made instant noodles to innocent paying customers!
    :
    The owner and head chef, Teddy Lee, found out how they had been presented and responded with posts on Facebook (since deleted). In the posts they explained how they were asked by the director to use instant noodles and a certain sauce—none of which they normally use. In fact, they say, their ramen dishes are cheaper than the standard because they are in a student area. The dishes like “breakfast ramen” and ingredients like whisky were all added at the behest of the Japanese TV crew in order to make what they were told was a comedic piece of entertainment with some local Scottish touches.
     
    Here's the show:

    http://www.tbs.co.jp/bukkomi-japanese/

    And its Wikipedia page:

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/ぶっこみジャパニーズ

    The Wikipedia page mentions the Scottish incident, as well as a later incident when an anime song singer was coached into doing something ridiculous.

    So there seems to be a high degree of fakery in these variety show comedy "documentaries." But the Katie Couric fake gun documentary incident shows that the same can be true elsewhere, in purportedly real documentaries.

    I don't think that the directors and producers are told to go fake something (well, maybe they are, one on one at the fourth bar of the night). Rather, they are told to bring back usable material, and the message gets across. Every few years there is a scandal and someone is fired, but that's how it works if you want to work in television in Japan.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    An appreciation for wacky Japanese TV shows is one reason (among several) why Haim Saban is a billionaire and I’m not.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Steve Sailer

    In my experience the adjectives wacky and Japanese are invariably redundant when preceding the phrase television shows; are there any other kind?

  91. Anonymous[373] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Shyong? That doesn’t sound very Japanese to me.

    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn't sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta, @Anonymous

    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn’t sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.

    For two or three decades following the war, adopting American names was in style, and is still in style among some entertainers.

    At any rate, there was Frank Nagai:

    Frankie was more popular:

    Frankie Tamegai is a comedian:

    Frankie Sakai was a comedic actor:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankie_Sakai

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Anonymous

    "So how do you pronounce it?"
    "Flank."

  92. @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Because I enjoy absurdist humor, I liked all his movies, except Bottle Rocket. I found the Wilson Brothers annoying.

    Looking forward to “The Isle of Dogs.”

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    No “The” in the title. It would detract from the pun.

  93. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions."

    But not Ken Watanabe, whom Christopher Nolan loves to cast in his movies.

    In general, Nolan movies seem intent upon driving people with less than perfect hearing to distraction. Thus, Nolan loves to cast Ken Watanabe because he can't really speak comprehensible English. Tom Hardy can, so Nolan likes to cover his Hardy's mouth with a mask, as in The Dark Night Rises and Dunkirk.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie, @Anonym, @Anonymous, @EdwardM

    You are not the only one to notice this.

    That being said, Watanabe is awesome IMO.

    Here he is extolling the virtues of the KDR. Clint Eastwood was late to the party of Western directors using him, but what a role!

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Anonym

    Here

    https://youtu.be/hrRBgYdPhIg

  94. @Anonym
    @Steve Sailer

    You are not the only one to notice this.

    https://youtu.be/8BfMivMDOBI

    That being said, Watanabe is awesome IMO.

    Here he is extolling the virtues of the KDR. Clint Eastwood was late to the party of Western directors using him, but what a role!

    Replies: @Anonym

    Here

  95. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @FPD72
    @asdf

    Having eaten at Casa Bonita several times over a period of four decades, I can speak from experience that the part of his anatomy that will explode is somewhat lower than his head. I grew up eating Tex-Mex and Northern New Mexican food, but something about Casa Bonita just doesn’t sit right with me.

    Six Flags/Taco Bueno fusion is how I would describe it. Back in the 1980’s it had the same parent company as Taco Bueno, but I don’t know whether that is still the case.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    True fact; Satanists love Casa Bonita. In the nineties after the death of Anton LaVey, just about every single writer that knew LaVey, and many of which had been made Priests of his outfit, wrote about the place and how it lived up to the LaVeyan expectations for the “total environment”.

    I’ve eaten there. The food sucks. Its enthusiasts admit this readily. Many take pride in this.

    Most theme parks I have been to have pretty good-for-fast-food food. Portions and/or price is sometimes out of line but the food is usually good for what it is.

    The old Pacific Ocean Park in California in the 60s was said to have positively revolting food, but that was before my time. We visited Disneyland and WDW in 1969 and 1971 respectively, Astroworld in Houston, and someplace in Ohio the next two years and I had a pass to Six Flags in St. Louis from ’77 to ’83 every summer. I remember the pizza and fried chicken at Six Flags were at least as good as any of the chains, albeit double the price.

    Disneyland, of course has the Club 33, a once secret and very exclusive very high end restaurant in the park. No experience with that.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Anonymous


    True fact; Satanists love Casa Bonita. In the nineties after the death of Anton LaVey, just about every single writer that knew LaVey, and many of which had been made Priests of his outfit, wrote about the place and how it lived up to the LaVeyan expectations for the “total environment”.

    I’ve eaten there. The food sucks. Its enthusiasts admit this readily. Many take pride in this.

     

    No doubt preparing for the next life.
  96. CCZ says:

    Submission and “cultural humility” are two tools for “good-whites” fighting cultural “mis-appropriation” (worse than mere cultural appropriation). A Unitarian (UU) Church in a town not far from Princeton NJ (with a predominantly female leadership!!) boasts of creating opportunities, “especially as white UUs, to live out our commitment to racial justice and changing a [white] culture that does not cultivate humility in relation to racial and cultural differences.”

    Two opportunities:

    “Practice cultural humility and empower People of Color led organizations to follow their own mission.”

    “Check out our assumptions about what it means to help and see how it may be complicit with white supremacy.”

    Altruism addiction and white self-loathing are not a pretty sight.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @CCZ

    This is why cross-cultural organizations like BLACKED exist.

    , @Alden
    @CCZ

    No wonder people don’t go to church anymore.

  97. Amid all this, I wondered: How should I feel about Yamashiro?

    This sounds like a contender for these really awkward “how should I react” / “how can I deal” / “how should I feel” questions regularly popping up on StackExchange.

    Consult your Goodthink Robot Manual, frontal-lobe deficient person.

    I wonder whether this is the right time to bring up cultural misappropriation of German elements before WWI?

  98. @CCZ
    Submission and “cultural humility” are two tools for “good-whites” fighting cultural “mis-appropriation” (worse than mere cultural appropriation). A Unitarian (UU) Church in a town not far from Princeton NJ (with a predominantly female leadership!!) boasts of creating opportunities, “especially as white UUs, to live out our commitment to racial justice and changing a [white] culture that does not cultivate humility in relation to racial and cultural differences.”

    Two opportunities:

    “Practice cultural humility and empower People of Color led organizations to follow their own mission.”

    “Check out our assumptions about what it means to help and see how it may be complicit with white supremacy.”

    Altruism addiction and white self-loathing are not a pretty sight.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Alden

    This is why cross-cultural organizations like BLACKED exist.

  99. Anonymous[373] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions."

    But not Ken Watanabe, whom Christopher Nolan loves to cast in his movies.

    In general, Nolan movies seem intent upon driving people with less than perfect hearing to distraction. Thus, Nolan loves to cast Ken Watanabe because he can't really speak comprehensible English. Tom Hardy can, so Nolan likes to cover his Hardy's mouth with a mask, as in The Dark Night Rises and Dunkirk.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie, @Anonym, @Anonymous, @EdwardM

    Well, Ken may not be around for long, what with the leukemia and now the stomach cancer.

    I wonder how his daughter’s English is. Here she is in a Korean commercial. She’s pretty ubiquitous in Japanese movies and television.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Anonymous


    Well, Ken Watanabe may not be around for long, what with the leukemia and now the stomach cancer.
     
    Stomach cancer is leading cancer in Japan.

    Japan and South Korea, two countries that have high rates of the disease, screen for stomach cancer.[2]
     
    For the NE Asian physiology smoking is a large cause for stomach cancer.
  100. @Twinkie
    @Bill P


    Some American white guy should open a restaurant named “Yasukuni” and serve Manchukuo and Taiwanese cuisine. The restaurant should have a Shinto Bushido ambience, with crossed samurai swords hanging over the door.
     
    Droll. Unfortunately the fun would end when someone opens its European counterpart, the Birkenau, serving Polish food.

    Replies: @Bill P

    There are nazi-themed restaurants all over Asia, so it wouldn’t be anything new.

    The difference is that here, if you so much as have a Japanese themed party where white girls dress in kimonos (which is kind of cute, actually), you’ve got people like Frank Shyang spoiling all the fun.

    So why not move the overton window a little bit with an “I don’t care about what you think about it in China” attitude? Why do white Americans have to be sensitive to everyone but ourselves? Chinese will tell you to your face that your feelings about their false and racist portrayals of whites in their movies, exhibits, etc. don’t matter because “this is China,” and they have a point.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Bill P


    There are nazi-themed restaurants all over Asia.
     
    No, there aren't.
  101. @AndrewR
    As I pointed out the other day, the US has gotten very few Japanese immigrants in the last century, so there aren't many purebred Japanese-Americans left to get triggered over this sort of thing, at least of the younger generations, so the Chinese and Korean SJWs feel free to pick up the slack. It's rather bizarre, when you consider how brutally Japan treated China and Korea in the early 20th century, but social justice jihad is a helluva drug. Sticking it to YT trumps your grandparents' grudges.

    And it's quite possible that the Chinese-surnamed SJWs Steve mentions in this post are both of Japanese descent through a non-patrilineal line.

    Replies: @Pericles

    so the Chinese and Korean SJWs feel free to pick up the slack. It’s rather bizarre, when you consider how brutally Japan treated China and Korea in the early 20th century, but social justice jihad is a helluva drug. Sticking it to YT trumps your grandparents’ grudges.

    It’s not like Japan is China’s best friend back home even now. But hey, there are gibs to be had over here so let’s be practical.

  102. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The strangest "Chinese" food I ever had was in Lithuania. It bore only the most vague resemblance to actual Chinese food ( I think there was soy sauce in it somewhere, maybe on the rice), even less related to actual Chinese food than chop suey did in the bad old days in America. The concept of detarame doesn't even touch how bogus this stuff was (although my Lithuanian hosts were eating it with relish). My son, who speaks Mandarin, spoke with the kitchen staff (who were Chinese even though the waitstaff wasn't) . They insisted that the locals wanted it that way and that if they made real Chinese food the Lithuanians would never eat it.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Whitehall

    After visiting China for a couple of weeks, I was relieved to come back to nice, well-made Chinese food made from good ingredients. Sweet and sour pork, I should never have doubted you!

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Pericles

    Chinese food in China is pretty different than what you get at P.F. Chang's (but not that different than what you might get in a big city US Chinatown). Naturally Chinese-American food is tailored to American tastes (lots of sugar!). Most people want something that is somewhat familiar tasting, even if it is supposed to be exotic - you want it to be a little different but not TOO different from what you are used to eating. Thus the strange Lithuanian Chinese food.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Johann Ricke

  103. @Anonymous
    @Anon


    What I find more interesting is his name FRANK.

    Doesn’t sound very Chinese or Japanese to me.
     

    For two or three decades following the war, adopting American names was in style, and is still in style among some entertainers.

    At any rate, there was Frank Nagai:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcsYsEQfzeY

    Frankie was more popular:

    Frankie Tamegai is a comedian:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72rBS8oDgbg

    Frankie Sakai was a comedic actor:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankie_Sakai

    Replies: @Pericles

    “So how do you pronounce it?”
    “Flank.”

  104. @Anonymous
    @FPD72

    True fact; Satanists love Casa Bonita. In the nineties after the death of Anton LaVey, just about every single writer that knew LaVey, and many of which had been made Priests of his outfit, wrote about the place and how it lived up to the LaVeyan expectations for the "total environment".

    I've eaten there. The food sucks. Its enthusiasts admit this readily. Many take pride in this.

    Most theme parks I have been to have pretty good-for-fast-food food. Portions and/or price is sometimes out of line but the food is usually good for what it is.

    The old Pacific Ocean Park in California in the 60s was said to have positively revolting food, but that was before my time. We visited Disneyland and WDW in 1969 and 1971 respectively, Astroworld in Houston, and someplace in Ohio the next two years and I had a pass to Six Flags in St. Louis from '77 to '83 every summer. I remember the pizza and fried chicken at Six Flags were at least as good as any of the chains, albeit double the price.

    Disneyland, of course has the Club 33, a once secret and very exclusive very high end restaurant in the park. No experience with that.

    Replies: @Pericles

    True fact; Satanists love Casa Bonita. In the nineties after the death of Anton LaVey, just about every single writer that knew LaVey, and many of which had been made Priests of his outfit, wrote about the place and how it lived up to the LaVeyan expectations for the “total environment”.

    I’ve eaten there. The food sucks. Its enthusiasts admit this readily. Many take pride in this.

    No doubt preparing for the next life.

    • LOL: sayless
  105. @Mishra
    @Yan Shen

    And 100 million Chinese and 100 million Indians will be half of the USA when it has 400 million people. And China and India won't miss them, will they.

    Meanwhile, since you disparage Americans so readily, why not go back to your own country? I'll tell you why--because the nation Americans built is 100x as attractive as yours, that's why.

    And this is why even 200 million Chinese and Indians would still be minorities in America--because the same people who are using you to wreck our country will be using even more Africans and Latinos for the same purpose.

    Replies: @Yan Shen

    And 100 million Chinese and 100 million Indians will be half of the USA when it has 400 million people. And China and India won’t miss them, will they.

    Seems pretty unlikely that the Chinese American and Indian American populations will ever increase from 5 and 4 million to 100 and 100 million.

    I’ll tell you why–because the nation Americans built is 100x as attractive as yours, that’s why.

    First tier cities in China, i.e. Shenzhen, Beijing, Shanghai, are already near 1st world standards.

    because the same people who are using you to wreck our country

    Well Chinese and Indian Americans are massively over-represented in STEM in the USA, so on a per capita basis they probably add enormous value to America. Meanwhile, you’re just someone who complains online…

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Yan Shen

    I think older Americans who grew up after WWII when America was king of the world don't get this. Big Chinese cities have much more modern infrastructure than US cities and the fact that labor is so much cheaper and there are no unions means that they have a lot more of it. Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown - people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren't worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    Of course out in the countryside it's not that great yet and a certain # of people still want to come to the US but I think that pretty soon it's going to be like Korea or Ireland where they no longer want to immigrate here.

    But in general Americans have no idea how much the rest of the world, especially China, has caught up with us so that we are not head and shoulders above the rest of the world the way we were say in 1958 when the average American was driving a huge sedan with tail fins and the average Chinese was lucky if he could afford a bicycle. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don't mean the historic buildings.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @keuril, @Mishra

  106. @CCZ
    Submission and “cultural humility” are two tools for “good-whites” fighting cultural “mis-appropriation” (worse than mere cultural appropriation). A Unitarian (UU) Church in a town not far from Princeton NJ (with a predominantly female leadership!!) boasts of creating opportunities, “especially as white UUs, to live out our commitment to racial justice and changing a [white] culture that does not cultivate humility in relation to racial and cultural differences.”

    Two opportunities:

    “Practice cultural humility and empower People of Color led organizations to follow their own mission.”

    “Check out our assumptions about what it means to help and see how it may be complicit with white supremacy.”

    Altruism addiction and white self-loathing are not a pretty sight.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Alden

    No wonder people don’t go to church anymore.

  107. Chinese are the world heavyweight champions of intellectual property theft and knockoffs, but they’re also way up there in the dishonesty department.

  108. @Reg Cæsar
    @Clyde


    What a sourpuss. Where I live I see many bizarre pan Asian mashups. Restaurants called Tokyo-Peking and Thai-Sushi. I am sure there is Sushi-Thai-Chinese place nearby
     
    The ultimate had to be that Chinese hole-in-the-wall Tokyo Shapiro, in Winston-Salem.

    Atari and Okabashi are American companies that chose Japanese names, the latter founded by an Iranian.

    Replies: @Clyde, @sayless

    I looked at Chinaman Shapiro’s menu and will be sure not to go there next time I am in town.

  109. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, Ken may not be around for long, what with the leukemia and now the stomach cancer.

    I wonder how his daughter's English is. Here she is in a Korean commercial. She's pretty ubiquitous in Japanese movies and television.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnppi2Cb6Y4

    Replies: @Clyde

    Well, Ken Watanabe may not be around for long, what with the leukemia and now the stomach cancer.

    Stomach cancer is leading cancer in Japan.

    Japan and South Korea, two countries that have high rates of the disease, screen for stomach cancer.[2]

    For the NE Asian physiology smoking is a large cause for stomach cancer.

  110. This overarching theme of these jackasses agonising regarding “how [they] should … feel about” the latest thing they’ve decided to analyze is the key to it all – the phony, insincere, disingenuous, contrived, bullshit of it all. One feels about something how one feels about it. Controlling feelings via intellectual ratiocination is extremely difficult (ask any brilliant scientist who’s ever been divorced!).

    One feels as one feels; there’s no point babbling about how one “should” feel as if a detached and clear-headed decision were being made (that’s to do with thinking, not feeling). “How should I feel about this?” is a question only asked by people inter sets in controlling others or being controlled, or the genuinely mentally disturbed (not mutually exclusive groups, of course).

  111. 5 million Chinese Americans 4 million Indian Americans out of mainland populations of 1380 million and 1320 million respectively. That ratio comes out to .36% and .30% respectively…

    Kato’s answer is bullshit, but that’s to be expected; he’s Chinese, and thus honesty-challenged.

    There are over 50m Chinese living outside China (2012 estimate):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overseas_Chinese

    Funny how often this gentile/gwailoh knows more about Jews/Chinese than the Jews/Chinese do.

    If I’m being kind, that is. It was probably just dishonesty; “Chinese Americans,” is specificity no one solicited, and is in fact a non-sequitur in the face of the statement he responded to:

    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe

    Globe. Did he see that part about the globe? That refers to the planet Earth. The whole thing.

    Maybe I’m being uncharitable; is it an ESL thing?

  112. Well Chinese and Indian Americans are massively over-represented in STEM in the USA

    They’re massively over-represented on planet Earth, too. Most of them would like to live in America, and their best tend to be the ones that succeed in achieving that goal.

  113. Well Chinese and Indian Americans are massively over-represented in STEM in the USA

    Yeah, that must be why American STEM does so well.

    No, that doesn’t make sense; Chinese and Indian STEM lags way behind American STEM, despite having 100% Chinese and Indian personnel.

    Maybe the export process is where the magic happens; should China staff their STEM exclusively with Indians, and vice-versa?

  114. @Anonymous
    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I've visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    There's a television show in Japan where they will visit a Japanese restaurant somewhere outside of Japan that serves detarame (nonsense, bullshit, bogus, inaccurate) "Japanese" food and say that they are filming a documentary or news show. A Japanese person is supplied as a new employee, and the chef teaches him how to make "Japanese" food on camera.

    Coincidentally a famous Japanese chef will be visiting the town in a few days and will give a public demonstration. The Japanese chef will wear a Mexican pro wrestling mask with JAPAN on the forehead. He makes proper Japanese food, serves it to the audience, which includes the "Japanese" restaurant chef, and at the end pulls off the mask to reveal that he is the "student" in the documentary, shocking the foreign chef, who vows to reform his ways.

    As I write this, I can't believe how stupid this show is, and it seems like the foreign chefs would catch on, and maybe they do. But it does surface some pretty awful manifestations of "Japanese food" outside of Japan. The weird thing is, to all appearances these restaurants seem to have been popular with their customers, so from a business standpoint there is no reason for them to become more authentic.

    I think that they are running out of bad Japanese restaurants to expose, because the most recent show had them exposing members of a detarame "samurai" club in Argentina. That they would target a bunch of fun-loving swordplay amateurs is strange, but the "expert" samurai they brought in to set them straight was a Japanese commedian who does samurai performances on the side. There are no actual living samurai in Japan, so who's to say what is authentic.

    Replies: @a boy and his dog, @Twinkie, @Jack D, @Whitehall, @Achmed E. Newman, @Lurker

    The worst sushi I’ve ever had was in the Ginza, not far from the Sony showroom.

    If LA needs to purge inauthenticities, start by burning down the Gamble House.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Whitehall

    Note, please don't burn down the Gamble House in Pasadena.

    Replies: @cthulhu

  115. @Yan Shen
    @Mishra


    And 100 million Chinese and 100 million Indians will be half of the USA when it has 400 million people. And China and India won’t miss them, will they.
     
    Seems pretty unlikely that the Chinese American and Indian American populations will ever increase from 5 and 4 million to 100 and 100 million.

    I’ll tell you why–because the nation Americans built is 100x as attractive as yours, that’s why.
     
    First tier cities in China, i.e. Shenzhen, Beijing, Shanghai, are already near 1st world standards.

    because the same people who are using you to wreck our country
     
    Well Chinese and Indian Americans are massively over-represented in STEM in the USA, so on a per capita basis they probably add enormous value to America. Meanwhile, you're just someone who complains online...

    Replies: @Jack D

    I think older Americans who grew up after WWII when America was king of the world don’t get this. Big Chinese cities have much more modern infrastructure than US cities and the fact that labor is so much cheaper and there are no unions means that they have a lot more of it. Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown – people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren’t worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    Of course out in the countryside it’s not that great yet and a certain # of people still want to come to the US but I think that pretty soon it’s going to be like Korea or Ireland where they no longer want to immigrate here.

    But in general Americans have no idea how much the rest of the world, especially China, has caught up with us so that we are not head and shoulders above the rest of the world the way we were say in 1958 when the average American was driving a huge sedan with tail fins and the average Chinese was lucky if he could afford a bicycle. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don’t mean the historic buildings.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Jack D

    Right! But, for the same reasons underlying your points, soon the F.U.S.A. will regain parity, as we too cultivate via overpopulation and the tyranny it enables pollution so bad breathing gives one cancer, the inability of all but the filthy rich to own land, wages assuring subsistence at best and more likely soul-crushing poverty, authoritarian and unaccountable government, and no freedoms regarding anything important – speech, assembly, firearms, association, travel, privacy....

    Why, soon we may even have an enormous mob of disenfranchised, disaffected men with no prospects for marriage or even sex. And it's all fabulous because the airports will be new and, hey, even more carcinogens from Yum! brands on every corner. Yessir, I cannot wait to live in China's brave, new world.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    There is no doubt much of what you say is right, Jack. The change in road and highway infrastructure, not to even mention the huge bright-lit cities, is another thing. I have seen a road that used to be a 4 hour ride between cities with say 60 mph traffic, unlimited-access though, become a 1/2 mile tunnels through the rock and many long bridges along the ridges as a 4-lane 75 mph limited access freeway. This is in an area that is nowhere near the big cities like Shanghai or Peking.

    In infrastructure, China has one big advantage over America, that the South used to have, say, 40-50 years back, over the "rust belt". That is, it's so much easier to build new stuff than to keep up the 100 year-old stuff. Look at NY city and the constant drilling in the streets, etc. Just think about trying to find water main links, and repair, if you're lucky, one lane at a time on the road. Imagine getting to start from scratch with big pavers, tunnel borers, etc. Oh, and it helps a whole lot not to have any projects managed by black city government.

    Let me break this up - another reply coming, Jack.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    Yes, many Americans still have a 30-year idea in their heads in their views of the 1st-worldliness of America vs. China - it has come damn close to flipping 180-degrees. However, and this is a big HOWEVER, the American society and ways of the past is not ALL gone, and Chinese culture can never match the amount of trust, freedom-thinking, and just Americanness of our culture. Worse still, the Chinese try to copy some of the worst of modern American culture, and do not know anything of our history. Due to this lack of history, they well wonder why Americans should be proud of anything. They all need to visit the national Air and Space museum.


    Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown – people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren’t worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!
     
    First off, that maglev train is a white elephant. I mean, it's a great deal for $8 round-trip to take the kids on a 300 mph train, but it's a big money-loser. Things that don't make money can't be the overall trend. The Chinese cross-country fast trains are another story.

    2ndly, the malls are EVERYWHERE. Wherever there is space to sell stuff, there is a mall. That is not something that gets me off, in any way. Yes, KFC, McDonalds, and Pizza hut made it fairly big, and again, that is a terrible representation of America. It does bring us back to the food, subject of Steve's post. Don't expect your Big Mac to taste the same.... "special sauce" can mean a lot of different things to a lawyer! This is not because they don't know how to make it, but because they tailor the taste and the menu items to the Chinese.

    Lastly in this regard, something tells me the young Chinese who enter KFC would think Colonel Sanders is one of the founders of our country, not a late chicken-franchise magnate. Then again, we may think the same of General Tso.
    , @keuril
    @Jack D


    I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country
     
    Shanghai is great, but you still can’t drink the water. And pack your own toilet paper if you plan to venture out from your five-star hotel. Chinese infrastructure development is very advanced in certain areas, incredibly lacking in others.

    Re becoming like Korea or Ireland where they don’t want to immigrate here, the desire to immigrate probably has more to do with soft infrastructure—educational, property rights, etc—than hard. Some things are not so easy to change.
    , @Mishra
    @Jack D

    All that's left is for you (or anyone who's actually up to the task) is to explain why these super-advanced Chinese keep coming here by the millions.

    BTW, there's another China, away from the glitzy skyscrapers in the big cities -- and it ain't pretty. It was made by the Chinese people too, and it might well be the answer to the question posed above.

    America needs millions more third-world immigrants much like it needs a hole in the head. They are pretty much the same thing in the end.

    Replies: @britishbrainsize

  116. I haven’t read through the comments here yet, but to me it seems there is simple everyday explanation for this deal.

    The guy, Mr. Schlong, just wants to make sure he will get more free meals. A restaurant critic can’t say the same old same-old about every restaurant. He’s a critic, so he’s got to be critical some times. His ridiculous PC complaint about this Yamashiro’s is his way of keeping the restauranteurs, if you will, on their toes. He wants them scared of him, so’s they cook the meals extra well (or at least medium-well) just for him, and treat him like one of the emperors of the old Poon Tang Dynasty.

    Mr. Schlong is not personally insulted – it’s strictly bidness.

  117. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    The strangest "Chinese" food I ever had was in Lithuania. It bore only the most vague resemblance to actual Chinese food ( I think there was soy sauce in it somewhere, maybe on the rice), even less related to actual Chinese food than chop suey did in the bad old days in America. The concept of detarame doesn't even touch how bogus this stuff was (although my Lithuanian hosts were eating it with relish). My son, who speaks Mandarin, spoke with the kitchen staff (who were Chinese even though the waitstaff wasn't) . They insisted that the locals wanted it that way and that if they made real Chinese food the Lithuanians would never eat it.

    Replies: @Pericles, @Whitehall

    I once was hanging with a crew from America in Seoul starting a branch of P.F. Chang.

    Seemed a very roundabout way to do Asian fusion but it was packed when it opened.

    They told me they tweaked the recipes for local tastes.

    Still. I’d walk six blocks in the snow to get a Big Mac.

  118. “Meanwhile at El Padrinos at the happy hour …”. … wait, the part is in reference to your great last line, Steve, where you authenticate the inauthenticness of Los Angelese

    Eventually, a white guy explains to the reporter that Yamashiro’s inauthenticity makes it authentically part of Los Angeles’s time-honored culture of inauthenticity.

    Great stuff, and here is the late Mr. Gerry Rafferty, a truly authentically hard-drinking Scotsman, with the best voice ever in Pop music:

    Welcome to Hollywood:

    “And you leave to see how the city feels.
    In the moonlight everything’s so unreal,
    but when the sun shines everything tastes so good,
    and the sign says “Welcome to Hollywood”.

    It’s from his Snakes and Ladders album. RIP, Gerry Rafferty

  119. @AnotherGuessModel

    But, now, these are Serious Times.
     
    Indeed. Have you caught Molly Ringwald's article for The New Yorker this Friday on how problematic John Hughes' work was? It's getting a lot of attention and praise in the media.

    https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/what-about-the-breakfast-club-molly-ringwald-metoo-john-hughes-pretty-in-pink


    How are we meant to feel about art that we both love and oppose?**” Ringwald writes. “What if we are in the unusual position of having helped create it?” Over the course of the essay, she interviews her former co-stars, John Hughes’s collaborators, and even revisits his much more explicitly racist, homophobic, and misogynistic writing for National Lampoon.
     
    http://www.vulture.com/2018/04/molly-ringwald-wrote-about-john-hughes-in-the-era-of-metoo.html

    *This line of questioning is chilling to me.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Autochthon

    I still don’t know what Vulture is, but how can you focus on a has-been actress’ efforts to regain attention by rushing the man to whom she owes everything when Cardi B. is pregnant with the child of Offset!?

    Priorities, people; thank goodness for Vulture‘s dedication to important journalism.

  120. @Anonymous
    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I've visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    There's a television show in Japan where they will visit a Japanese restaurant somewhere outside of Japan that serves detarame (nonsense, bullshit, bogus, inaccurate) "Japanese" food and say that they are filming a documentary or news show. A Japanese person is supplied as a new employee, and the chef teaches him how to make "Japanese" food on camera.

    Coincidentally a famous Japanese chef will be visiting the town in a few days and will give a public demonstration. The Japanese chef will wear a Mexican pro wrestling mask with JAPAN on the forehead. He makes proper Japanese food, serves it to the audience, which includes the "Japanese" restaurant chef, and at the end pulls off the mask to reveal that he is the "student" in the documentary, shocking the foreign chef, who vows to reform his ways.

    As I write this, I can't believe how stupid this show is, and it seems like the foreign chefs would catch on, and maybe they do. But it does surface some pretty awful manifestations of "Japanese food" outside of Japan. The weird thing is, to all appearances these restaurants seem to have been popular with their customers, so from a business standpoint there is no reason for them to become more authentic.

    I think that they are running out of bad Japanese restaurants to expose, because the most recent show had them exposing members of a detarame "samurai" club in Argentina. That they would target a bunch of fun-loving swordplay amateurs is strange, but the "expert" samurai they brought in to set them straight was a Japanese commedian who does samurai performances on the side. There are no actual living samurai in Japan, so who's to say what is authentic.

    Replies: @a boy and his dog, @Twinkie, @Jack D, @Whitehall, @Achmed E. Newman, @Lurker

    Where I live a Chinese buffet restaurant changed their name to a Japanese name with absolutely no accompanying change in the 10 varieties of factory-farmed chicken in the buffet in different sauces that must cost < $1 / lb. or else they'd lose money on some of the "hefty" customers that come in there.

    How do you say "You been here four hour!" in Spanish?

  121. I think Yamashiro should be bulldozed and replaced with a monument to indigenous people. They were pushed off their hilltop land by white people who then used the land to perform cultural appropriation of Japanese culture.

    After that, they need to rename Franklin Ave which is a bit lower on the hill, because it is named after Benjamin Franklin who owned slaves.

    • Replies: @Briny Schmuck
    @Tiny Duck

    White men literally invented slavery in 1492 CE.

    , @William Badwhite
    @Tiny Duck

    "cultural appropriation of Japanese culture" such as raping and beheading Chinese civilians.

    "After that, they need to rename Franklin Ave which is a bit lower on the hill, because it is named after Benjamin Franklin who owned slaves."

    Maybe it was named after Aretha Franklin. Or former Miami Dolphin Andra Franklin. Quit being racist Duck

  122. @1661er
    I am all for culinary cross-pollination in all direction. If French started to go after Vietnamese for them culturally appropriation of French "Pot au Feu" into Pho, that would be a lose for all of us. London without Indian food would be dire. And if I may say so, the Rijsttafel in Amsterdam was very different from what Indonesians equivalent, but still delicious, that's what matters.

    Replies: @jim jones

    Borough Market is a foodie paradise:

  123. @Pericles
    @Jack D

    After visiting China for a couple of weeks, I was relieved to come back to nice, well-made Chinese food made from good ingredients. Sweet and sour pork, I should never have doubted you!

    Replies: @Jack D

    Chinese food in China is pretty different than what you get at P.F. Chang’s (but not that different than what you might get in a big city US Chinatown). Naturally Chinese-American food is tailored to American tastes (lots of sugar!). Most people want something that is somewhat familiar tasting, even if it is supposed to be exotic – you want it to be a little different but not TOO different from what you are used to eating. Thus the strange Lithuanian Chinese food.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Jack D

    Reluctantly, I have to agree with Pericles. When I was in China, I ate in the north and in the south, in high-end restaurants and at street stalls, in tourist traps and at popular local places. Basically, the food in China was not very good. Also, flavor profiles ran toward the sweet and salty, like Chinese-American cuisine. Not exactly the same, but recognizably related.

    I was also given an entire garlic to eat by a restaurant owner who found out I had the sniffles. It practically killed me, and I had to hide part of it to stop eating it. She later revealed herself to be a Christian.

    Replies: @EdwardM

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Jack D


    Most people want something that is somewhat familiar tasting, even if it is supposed to be exotic – you want it to be a little different but not TOO different from what you are used to eating. Thus the strange Lithuanian Chinese food.
     
    I suspect the average non-Italian who visits Italy and has real Italian food might not quite as enthused about the genuine item as he is about the mongrelized version he gets back home.
  124. @Jack D
    @Yan Shen

    I think older Americans who grew up after WWII when America was king of the world don't get this. Big Chinese cities have much more modern infrastructure than US cities and the fact that labor is so much cheaper and there are no unions means that they have a lot more of it. Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown - people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren't worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    Of course out in the countryside it's not that great yet and a certain # of people still want to come to the US but I think that pretty soon it's going to be like Korea or Ireland where they no longer want to immigrate here.

    But in general Americans have no idea how much the rest of the world, especially China, has caught up with us so that we are not head and shoulders above the rest of the world the way we were say in 1958 when the average American was driving a huge sedan with tail fins and the average Chinese was lucky if he could afford a bicycle. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don't mean the historic buildings.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @keuril, @Mishra

    Right! But, for the same reasons underlying your points, soon the F.U.S.A. will regain parity, as we too cultivate via overpopulation and the tyranny it enables pollution so bad breathing gives one cancer, the inability of all but the filthy rich to own land, wages assuring subsistence at best and more likely soul-crushing poverty, authoritarian and unaccountable government, and no freedoms regarding anything important – speech, assembly, firearms, association, travel, privacy….

    Why, soon we may even have an enormous mob of disenfranchised, disaffected men with no prospects for marriage or even sex. And it’s all fabulous because the airports will be new and, hey, even more carcinogens from Yum! brands on every corner. Yessir, I cannot wait to live in China’s brave, new world.

  125. @Jack D
    @Yan Shen

    I think older Americans who grew up after WWII when America was king of the world don't get this. Big Chinese cities have much more modern infrastructure than US cities and the fact that labor is so much cheaper and there are no unions means that they have a lot more of it. Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown - people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren't worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    Of course out in the countryside it's not that great yet and a certain # of people still want to come to the US but I think that pretty soon it's going to be like Korea or Ireland where they no longer want to immigrate here.

    But in general Americans have no idea how much the rest of the world, especially China, has caught up with us so that we are not head and shoulders above the rest of the world the way we were say in 1958 when the average American was driving a huge sedan with tail fins and the average Chinese was lucky if he could afford a bicycle. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don't mean the historic buildings.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @keuril, @Mishra

    There is no doubt much of what you say is right, Jack. The change in road and highway infrastructure, not to even mention the huge bright-lit cities, is another thing. I have seen a road that used to be a 4 hour ride between cities with say 60 mph traffic, unlimited-access though, become a 1/2 mile tunnels through the rock and many long bridges along the ridges as a 4-lane 75 mph limited access freeway. This is in an area that is nowhere near the big cities like Shanghai or Peking.

    In infrastructure, China has one big advantage over America, that the South used to have, say, 40-50 years back, over the “rust belt”. That is, it’s so much easier to build new stuff than to keep up the 100 year-old stuff. Look at NY city and the constant drilling in the streets, etc. Just think about trying to find water main links, and repair, if you’re lucky, one lane at a time on the road. Imagine getting to start from scratch with big pavers, tunnel borers, etc. Oh, and it helps a whole lot not to have any projects managed by black city government.

    Let me break this up – another reply coming, Jack.

  126. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    An appreciation for wacky Japanese TV shows is one reason (among several) why Haim Saban is a billionaire and I'm not.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    In my experience the adjectives wacky and Japanese are invariably redundant when preceding the phrase television shows; are there any other kind?

  127. @Mishra
    @Anonymous

    You obviously no see Takei-san as Yakuza in most eminent Sterling Archer franchise!

    I tried transposing arr Rs and L's in that sentence but googre would not permit!

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Quit your day job; that’s the funniest thing I may have ever read here.

  128. @AnonJT
    Hmmm. It seems to me that Steve -- and just about every commentator here --missed the point of the LA times article. Sure it starts out raising questions of cultural appropriation and authenticity with regards to the restaurant. But it's generally balanced, citing various sources with differing opinions as to whether one should be offended or not. By the end of the article, though, the author seems to have sided with the camp that says "No, we're being overly sensitive to the issue of cultural appropriation."

    Here's the last few paragraphs of the article.

    "Calling something cultural appropriation, and the repetitive, polarizing debate that label always sparks, often obscures important history, writes Minh-Ha Pham, a media studies professor at the Pratt Institute.

    When we argue about cultural appropriation, we don't learn anything about history, she said. And the history of how we have reproduced, adapted and integrated other cultures in this country is far more complex and interesting than that debate allows for.

    Arguing about what to be offended over — or whether Sriracha on sushi is appropriate — misses the point. What we're actually debating is which stories to tell about our cultures, and whose perspectives should be included.

    The question we should be asking is whether we know the full story. And in the case of Yamashiro, it's important to take the time to learn the details.

    I looked down at the Reclining Buddha Roll, fixed a vision of a harmonious, multicultural society in my head, and tried to note its positive qualities.

    The roll was quite firmly wrapped, even though it used rice paper instead of seaweed and tasted more like a Vietnamese spring roll. The menu describes the restaurant's food as California Asian fusion food, and that was certainly accurate. The rice was well-cooked, firm, not mushy or hard. The vegetables were crisp and the shrimp was fresh.

    I took one bite, and then another. Before I knew it, I had eaten the whole thing."

    Replies: @schnellandine, @Paco Wové

    So, it’s the equivalent of one of those “History” Channel shows with titles like Did ALIENS build the Pyramids? that consists of 55 minutes of loons spewing their crackpot theories, and then in the last few minutes they bring on somebody sane to say, no, of course aliens didn’t build the pyramids.

  129. @Jack D
    @Yan Shen

    I think older Americans who grew up after WWII when America was king of the world don't get this. Big Chinese cities have much more modern infrastructure than US cities and the fact that labor is so much cheaper and there are no unions means that they have a lot more of it. Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown - people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren't worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    Of course out in the countryside it's not that great yet and a certain # of people still want to come to the US but I think that pretty soon it's going to be like Korea or Ireland where they no longer want to immigrate here.

    But in general Americans have no idea how much the rest of the world, especially China, has caught up with us so that we are not head and shoulders above the rest of the world the way we were say in 1958 when the average American was driving a huge sedan with tail fins and the average Chinese was lucky if he could afford a bicycle. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don't mean the historic buildings.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @keuril, @Mishra

    Yes, many Americans still have a 30-year idea in their heads in their views of the 1st-worldliness of America vs. China – it has come damn close to flipping 180-degrees. However, and this is a big HOWEVER, the American society and ways of the past is not ALL gone, and Chinese culture can never match the amount of trust, freedom-thinking, and just Americanness of our culture. Worse still, the Chinese try to copy some of the worst of modern American culture, and do not know anything of our history. Due to this lack of history, they well wonder why Americans should be proud of anything. They all need to visit the national Air and Space museum.

    Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown – people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren’t worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    First off, that maglev train is a white elephant. I mean, it’s a great deal for $8 round-trip to take the kids on a 300 mph train, but it’s a big money-loser. Things that don’t make money can’t be the overall trend. The Chinese cross-country fast trains are another story.

    2ndly, the malls are EVERYWHERE. Wherever there is space to sell stuff, there is a mall. That is not something that gets me off, in any way. Yes, KFC, McDonalds, and Pizza hut made it fairly big, and again, that is a terrible representation of America. It does bring us back to the food, subject of Steve’s post. Don’t expect your Big Mac to taste the same…. “special sauce” can mean a lot of different things to a lawyer! This is not because they don’t know how to make it, but because they tailor the taste and the menu items to the Chinese.

    Lastly in this regard, something tells me the young Chinese who enter KFC would think Colonel Sanders is one of the founders of our country, not a late chicken-franchise magnate. Then again, we may think the same of General Tso.

  130. @DB Cooper
    @Thomm

    Of course China never invaded Tibet. India did. And the reason Indian people are so fond of insisting this narrative is that it obfuscates the fact that it is India that invaded and is still occupying a piece of traditional Tibetan homeland.

    In 1951, four years after the British quit the subcontinent and India was created, India, in the traditional of its former master the Raj, move further northward and invaded Tawang. Tawang is the birthplace of the Sixth Dalai Lama and home to a four hundred years old Tibetan monastery. Tawang and South Tibet is still occupied by India to this day. In 1987 India renamed South Tibet to the so called Arunachal Pradesh, hoping that by giving it an Indian sounding name it will fool the people in the world that this is India territory.

    Replies: @Mishra, @Thomm, @Achmed E. Newman

    That’s of no concern to me whatsoever. Tell me what you did with the 200 large, and I will not tell the FBI about your presence on this blog. I really am impressed to begin with how you could have survived that jump into the Cascades, at night, in winter, way before the time of GPS or even steerable parachutes! If, after successfully completely a heist like that, you say India invaded Tibet, than who am I to argue about it … not to mention I don’t give a shit.

  131. @Yan Shen
    @Mishra


    My principal issue with this China vs India business is that both countries made way too many people, which they export to all corners of the globe
     
    5 million Chinese Americans 4 million Indian Americans out of mainland populations of 1380 million and 1320 million respectively. That ratio comes out to .36% and .30% respectively...

    Replies: @Mishra, @Reg Cæsar, @MikeatMikedotMike

    I know, a sense of proportion is an inconvenient thing when discussion whole numbers. 5 million Chinese, (“Americans” TBD) may be only .36% of China, but it’s 1.5% of the US population. Taking 5 million from a larger population and adding them to a smaller population has a exponentially greater affect on the smaller population than the larger one. So your .36% is pretty meaningless in regard to real affect/value.

    I’d be willing to send China the least useful, adjusted equivalent % of the United States’ largely African underclass in return though. China’s youth could definitely benefit from a little ghetto lifestyle glorification and glamorization.

  132. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    "You might try The Grand Budapest Hotel; it seems much more accessible than his other stuff"

    Alternatively, The Grand Budapest Hotel might be Wes Anderson's most Wes Andersoniest movie.

    I never much liked any of his movies other than Bottle Rocket (and that's more the Wilson Brothers), until this one, but it won me over.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Chrisnonymous

    Steve, Make sure you check out the BBC Poirot episode that Anderson ripped off in making Grand Budapest.

  133. SFG says:
    @Abe
    @Anon


    last name happened to be that of the Admiral(who, btw, wasn’t responsible for attacking China).
     
    Typical white man’s thinking. They don’t hate Yamamoto because he did or did attack China. They hate him because he got into Harvard.

    Replies: @SFG

    Yamamoto was actually against the attacks on China and the USA. His famous quote about attacking the USA meaning you would have to march across North America was truncated to sound like a bellicose boast when he was actually telling the Japanese government it was a stupid idea.

    But, he was a military man, and masterminded the tactically brilliant (but strategically awful, which he knew) attack on Pearl Harbor, which did huge damage to our fleet. We managed to shoot down his plane in WW2.

    It makes you think about the military virtues and the pity of war.

  134. @Jack D
    @Pericles

    Chinese food in China is pretty different than what you get at P.F. Chang's (but not that different than what you might get in a big city US Chinatown). Naturally Chinese-American food is tailored to American tastes (lots of sugar!). Most people want something that is somewhat familiar tasting, even if it is supposed to be exotic - you want it to be a little different but not TOO different from what you are used to eating. Thus the strange Lithuanian Chinese food.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Reluctantly, I have to agree with Pericles. When I was in China, I ate in the north and in the south, in high-end restaurants and at street stalls, in tourist traps and at popular local places. Basically, the food in China was not very good. Also, flavor profiles ran toward the sweet and salty, like Chinese-American cuisine. Not exactly the same, but recognizably related.

    I was also given an entire garlic to eat by a restaurant owner who found out I had the sniffles. It practically killed me, and I had to hide part of it to stop eating it. She later revealed herself to be a Christian.

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    @Chrisnonymous

    That's been my experience too. After eating at Joe's Shanghai, probably the best Chinese restaurant (certainly for the price) in the U.S., I said, I must go to Shanghai. I have also traveled extensively around the country tying everything in sight and have been quite disappointed. I thought that my favorite Chinese food was Sichuan, but I had poor experiences in Chengdu (with the dining that is -- it's a great place to visit otherwise).

    Of course, it might be my Americanized tastes, but much of the food is just not good and of poor quality to boot. I ended up eating at a lot of restaurants at Shangri-La hotels, which I suppose are ideal for my palate and were uniformly good, once I got over the fear that I was missing out by eating there.

    In contrast, I have spent a lot of time in India, eating in everything from road-side shacks to upscale restaurants, and have been almost uniformly delighted. There, the food is similar to Indian food in the U.S. but better.

  135. Nobody tell this guy about Grauman’s Chinese Theater.

  136. Aren’t the Chinese famous for building whole cities on foreign (usually American or European) themes?
    International/chinas-fake-cities-eerie-replicas-paris-london-jackson/story

    I heard a news report the other day about a Chinese entrepreneur who was building a replica of the Titanic as a theme park.

  137. Anonymous[382] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P
    @Twinkie

    There are nazi-themed restaurants all over Asia, so it wouldn't be anything new.

    The difference is that here, if you so much as have a Japanese themed party where white girls dress in kimonos (which is kind of cute, actually), you've got people like Frank Shyang spoiling all the fun.

    So why not move the overton window a little bit with an "I don't care about what you think about it in China" attitude? Why do white Americans have to be sensitive to everyone but ourselves? Chinese will tell you to your face that your feelings about their false and racist portrayals of whites in their movies, exhibits, etc. don't matter because "this is China," and they have a point.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    There are nazi-themed restaurants all over Asia.

    No, there aren’t.

  138. keuril says:
    @Jack D
    @Yan Shen

    I think older Americans who grew up after WWII when America was king of the world don't get this. Big Chinese cities have much more modern infrastructure than US cities and the fact that labor is so much cheaper and there are no unions means that they have a lot more of it. Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown - people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren't worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    Of course out in the countryside it's not that great yet and a certain # of people still want to come to the US but I think that pretty soon it's going to be like Korea or Ireland where they no longer want to immigrate here.

    But in general Americans have no idea how much the rest of the world, especially China, has caught up with us so that we are not head and shoulders above the rest of the world the way we were say in 1958 when the average American was driving a huge sedan with tail fins and the average Chinese was lucky if he could afford a bicycle. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don't mean the historic buildings.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @keuril, @Mishra

    I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country

    Shanghai is great, but you still can’t drink the water. And pack your own toilet paper if you plan to venture out from your five-star hotel. Chinese infrastructure development is very advanced in certain areas, incredibly lacking in others.

    Re becoming like Korea or Ireland where they don’t want to immigrate here, the desire to immigrate probably has more to do with soft infrastructure—educational, property rights, etc—than hard. Some things are not so easy to change.

  139. @Reg Cæsar
    @Clyde


    What a sourpuss. Where I live I see many bizarre pan Asian mashups. Restaurants called Tokyo-Peking and Thai-Sushi. I am sure there is Sushi-Thai-Chinese place nearby
     
    The ultimate had to be that Chinese hole-in-the-wall Tokyo Shapiro, in Winston-Salem.

    Atari and Okabashi are American companies that chose Japanese names, the latter founded by an Iranian.

    Replies: @Clyde, @sayless

    “Chinese hole-in-the-wall Tokyo Shapiro in Winston-Salem”

    That reminds me of a joke:

    Have you heard about the new Jewish-Japanese restaurant?

    It’s called So Sue Me.

  140. @Jack D
    @Pericles

    Chinese food in China is pretty different than what you get at P.F. Chang's (but not that different than what you might get in a big city US Chinatown). Naturally Chinese-American food is tailored to American tastes (lots of sugar!). Most people want something that is somewhat familiar tasting, even if it is supposed to be exotic - you want it to be a little different but not TOO different from what you are used to eating. Thus the strange Lithuanian Chinese food.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @Johann Ricke

    Most people want something that is somewhat familiar tasting, even if it is supposed to be exotic – you want it to be a little different but not TOO different from what you are used to eating. Thus the strange Lithuanian Chinese food.

    I suspect the average non-Italian who visits Italy and has real Italian food might not quite as enthused about the genuine item as he is about the mongrelized version he gets back home.

  141. I always wondered why all the quasi-fancy sit-down Chinese restaurants had aquariums next to the cash register “for good luck”…. but the a-la-Panda-Express fast joints do not

  142. @Jack D
    @Yan Shen

    I think older Americans who grew up after WWII when America was king of the world don't get this. Big Chinese cities have much more modern infrastructure than US cities and the fact that labor is so much cheaper and there are no unions means that they have a lot more of it. Brand spanking new airports and maglev trains and subway systems and highways, etc. that all make our stuff look old and pathetic. Shopping malls galore, good schools, low crime, no diverse people to mug you when you go downtown - people are out getting haircuts in the middle of the night because they aren't worried. They even have KFC and Pizza Hut!

    Of course out in the countryside it's not that great yet and a certain # of people still want to come to the US but I think that pretty soon it's going to be like Korea or Ireland where they no longer want to immigrate here.

    But in general Americans have no idea how much the rest of the world, especially China, has caught up with us so that we are not head and shoulders above the rest of the world the way we were say in 1958 when the average American was driving a huge sedan with tail fins and the average Chinese was lucky if he could afford a bicycle. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don't mean the historic buildings.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman, @keuril, @Mishra

    All that’s left is for you (or anyone who’s actually up to the task) is to explain why these super-advanced Chinese keep coming here by the millions.

    BTW, there’s another China, away from the glitzy skyscrapers in the big cities — and it ain’t pretty. It was made by the Chinese people too, and it might well be the answer to the question posed above.

    America needs millions more third-world immigrants much like it needs a hole in the head. They are pretty much the same thing in the end.

    • Replies: @britishbrainsize
    @Mishra

    the chinese have much better genes than everybody else that alone entitles them to be here he he he, seems like some asian dude sayed boo to you and your all shook your also resentful because chinese look down on indians

  143. @Thomm
    @DB Cooper

    See what Bill P said in comment #11.

    Replies: @Thomm

    I can’t help but notice that DB Cooper is too afraid to disagree with Bill P’s statements about China in Comment #11.

    Noted.

  144. @Mishra

    I wondered: How should I feel about Yamashiro?
     
    They're always asking us, and they're always telling us. How should we feel? How should we think? Their newspaper articles are often titled "How to think about..."

    I swear, not a one of them sees any irony, not to mention anything troubling, about any of it. Such is our world now.

    Replies: @CJ

    Their newspaper articles are often titled “How to think about…”

    Yes, you see this all the time. It’s like there is an infiltrator from The Onion sabotaging progressive organs, but they are oblivious.

  145. @Whitehall
    @Anonymous

    The worst sushi I've ever had was in the Ginza, not far from the Sony showroom.

    If LA needs to purge inauthenticities, start by burning down the Gamble House.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Note, please don’t burn down the Gamble House in Pasadena.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Steve Sailer



    Note, please don’t burn down the Gamble House in Pasadena.

     

    Amen, that’s the Holy Grail of California bungalow / Arts & Crafts design!

    And there was a walking tour of that house and one other yesterday, that I didn’t find out about until today :-( I would have driven up from points south if I had known. I’ve toured the Hollyhock House (simply spectacular) but the Gamble House and the Ennis House are still on my LA-area architecture bucket list.

    Replies: @Whitehall

  146. This article by Mr. Shyong has very strange overtones of shake-down.

    The paragraph beginning, “It is also an inauthentic … ” seems to define the REAL problem here as the failure of such establishments to pay off the ethnic group they are, “exploiting”. Take for example the phrase from that paragraph:
    “culture that has generated profits exclusively for non-Japanese people”

    Whatever this article might pretend, it isn’t about culture or “power”; it is about MONEY.

  147. @Anonymous
    Most Japanese restaurants in the U.S. that I've visited are run by Koreans. Chinese tend to run the buffet restaurants, which also have sushi.

    There's a television show in Japan where they will visit a Japanese restaurant somewhere outside of Japan that serves detarame (nonsense, bullshit, bogus, inaccurate) "Japanese" food and say that they are filming a documentary or news show. A Japanese person is supplied as a new employee, and the chef teaches him how to make "Japanese" food on camera.

    Coincidentally a famous Japanese chef will be visiting the town in a few days and will give a public demonstration. The Japanese chef will wear a Mexican pro wrestling mask with JAPAN on the forehead. He makes proper Japanese food, serves it to the audience, which includes the "Japanese" restaurant chef, and at the end pulls off the mask to reveal that he is the "student" in the documentary, shocking the foreign chef, who vows to reform his ways.

    As I write this, I can't believe how stupid this show is, and it seems like the foreign chefs would catch on, and maybe they do. But it does surface some pretty awful manifestations of "Japanese food" outside of Japan. The weird thing is, to all appearances these restaurants seem to have been popular with their customers, so from a business standpoint there is no reason for them to become more authentic.

    I think that they are running out of bad Japanese restaurants to expose, because the most recent show had them exposing members of a detarame "samurai" club in Argentina. That they would target a bunch of fun-loving swordplay amateurs is strange, but the "expert" samurai they brought in to set them straight was a Japanese commedian who does samurai performances on the side. There are no actual living samurai in Japan, so who's to say what is authentic.

    Replies: @a boy and his dog, @Twinkie, @Jack D, @Whitehall, @Achmed E. Newman, @Lurker

    I thought the whole point of immigration was to expand the range of authentic foreign cuisine available to the crass vulgar white folks. Is that not true after all?!

  148. @Steve Sailer
    @Whitehall

    Note, please don't burn down the Gamble House in Pasadena.

    Replies: @cthulhu

    Note, please don’t burn down the Gamble House in Pasadena.

    Amen, that’s the Holy Grail of California bungalow / Arts & Crafts design!

    And there was a walking tour of that house and one other yesterday, that I didn’t find out about until today 🙁 I would have driven up from points south if I had known. I’ve toured the Hollyhock House (simply spectacular) but the Gamble House and the Ennis House are still on my LA-area architecture bucket list.

    • Replies: @Whitehall
    @cthulhu

    I hope no one thought I was serious about burning down the Gamble House.

    Greene and Greene did a marvelous job of cultural appropriation with it.

    But nothing wrong with that!

  149. Personally, I’m concerned that all of those 7-11 stores in Japan (>20,000 at last count) are appropriating American culture in a very inauthentic fashion. Onigiri in a 7-11? Very problematic.

  150. @Tiny Duck
    I think Yamashiro should be bulldozed and replaced with a monument to indigenous people. They were pushed off their hilltop land by white people who then used the land to perform cultural appropriation of Japanese culture.

    After that, they need to rename Franklin Ave which is a bit lower on the hill, because it is named after Benjamin Franklin who owned slaves.

    Replies: @Briny Schmuck, @William Badwhite

    White men literally invented slavery in 1492 CE.

  151. Any place that has a Pork Shank Lollipop on the menu is okay with me.

    • Replies: @britishbrainsize
    @Jimmy the Fish

    say something everybody can understand not only twisted white brains you coward

  152. @cthulhu
    @Steve Sailer



    Note, please don’t burn down the Gamble House in Pasadena.

     

    Amen, that’s the Holy Grail of California bungalow / Arts & Crafts design!

    And there was a walking tour of that house and one other yesterday, that I didn’t find out about until today :-( I would have driven up from points south if I had known. I’ve toured the Hollyhock House (simply spectacular) but the Gamble House and the Ennis House are still on my LA-area architecture bucket list.

    Replies: @Whitehall

    I hope no one thought I was serious about burning down the Gamble House.

    Greene and Greene did a marvelous job of cultural appropriation with it.

    But nothing wrong with that!

  153. Lastly in this regard, something tells me the young Chinese who enter KFC would think Colonel Sanders is one of the founders of our country, not a late chicken-franchise magnate. Then again, we may think the same of General Tso.

    Sorta; General Tso is a name Chinese food-mongers made up to sell a recipe they made up to sell to Americans. It’s not “real Chinese” food, unless you consider it an offshoot of sesame chicken.

  154. the only reason Frank Shyong wrote this so he could expense his girlfriend’s birthday dinner, right?

  155. britishbrainsize [AKA "britishbrainsize1325cclol"] says:
    @Jimmy the Fish
    Any place that has a Pork Shank Lollipop on the menu is okay with me.

    Replies: @britishbrainsize

    say something everybody can understand not only twisted white brains you coward

  156. britishbrainsize [AKA "britishbrainsize1325cclol"] says:
    @Mishra
    @Jack D

    All that's left is for you (or anyone who's actually up to the task) is to explain why these super-advanced Chinese keep coming here by the millions.

    BTW, there's another China, away from the glitzy skyscrapers in the big cities -- and it ain't pretty. It was made by the Chinese people too, and it might well be the answer to the question posed above.

    America needs millions more third-world immigrants much like it needs a hole in the head. They are pretty much the same thing in the end.

    Replies: @britishbrainsize

    the chinese have much better genes than everybody else that alone entitles them to be here he he he, seems like some asian dude sayed boo to you and your all shook your also resentful because chinese look down on indians

  157. the chinese have much better genes than everybody else that alone entitles them to be here he he he, seems like some asian dude sayed boo to you and your all shook your also resentful because chinese look down on indians

    Oh look, it’s Thomm’s “Chinese” sock puppet.

  158. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "There are plenty of talented Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, born and bred, actors who can speak sufficient English to act in American productions."

    But not Ken Watanabe, whom Christopher Nolan loves to cast in his movies.

    In general, Nolan movies seem intent upon driving people with less than perfect hearing to distraction. Thus, Nolan loves to cast Ken Watanabe because he can't really speak comprehensible English. Tom Hardy can, so Nolan likes to cover his Hardy's mouth with a mask, as in The Dark Night Rises and Dunkirk.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie, @Anonym, @Anonymous, @EdwardM

    I thought it was just my hearing going bad, but I couldn’t hear much dialogue in Inception or Interstellar. They were excellent movies, better when I watched them at home with closed captioning on.

  159. @Almost Missouri
    @Mishra

    Does "mixed race" help an employer with their quota requirements?

    Replies: @Mishra, @EdwardM

    Every time you apply for a job in the U.S., you have to check boxes on various forms indicating your race, ethnicity, disability, and veterans status. These are labeled “OMB form XYZ,” so they are apparently required by the Federal government.

    Why don’t President Trump and Mick Mulvaney just abolish these burdensome, unnecessary, and invidious requirements? I suppose there’s some law underlying them, but getting OMB to unilaterally cease the mandate would be consistent with what other administrations have done.

  160. @Chrisnonymous
    @Jack D

    Reluctantly, I have to agree with Pericles. When I was in China, I ate in the north and in the south, in high-end restaurants and at street stalls, in tourist traps and at popular local places. Basically, the food in China was not very good. Also, flavor profiles ran toward the sweet and salty, like Chinese-American cuisine. Not exactly the same, but recognizably related.

    I was also given an entire garlic to eat by a restaurant owner who found out I had the sniffles. It practically killed me, and I had to hide part of it to stop eating it. She later revealed herself to be a Christian.

    Replies: @EdwardM

    That’s been my experience too. After eating at Joe’s Shanghai, probably the best Chinese restaurant (certainly for the price) in the U.S., I said, I must go to Shanghai. I have also traveled extensively around the country tying everything in sight and have been quite disappointed. I thought that my favorite Chinese food was Sichuan, but I had poor experiences in Chengdu (with the dining that is — it’s a great place to visit otherwise).

    Of course, it might be my Americanized tastes, but much of the food is just not good and of poor quality to boot. I ended up eating at a lot of restaurants at Shangri-La hotels, which I suppose are ideal for my palate and were uniformly good, once I got over the fear that I was missing out by eating there.

    In contrast, I have spent a lot of time in India, eating in everything from road-side shacks to upscale restaurants, and have been almost uniformly delighted. There, the food is similar to Indian food in the U.S. but better.

  161. I remember being shocked coming back from Shanghai and landing in Philly and realizing that Philly was the place that looked like a run down 3rd world country. Our stuff just looks old, and I don’t mean the historic buildings.

    Oh, I dunno. I had the exact same experience, except replace “Shanghai” with “Savannah, Georgia” and “landing” with “driving through.”

  162. @Tiny Duck
    I think Yamashiro should be bulldozed and replaced with a monument to indigenous people. They were pushed off their hilltop land by white people who then used the land to perform cultural appropriation of Japanese culture.

    After that, they need to rename Franklin Ave which is a bit lower on the hill, because it is named after Benjamin Franklin who owned slaves.

    Replies: @Briny Schmuck, @William Badwhite

    “cultural appropriation of Japanese culture” such as raping and beheading Chinese civilians.

    “After that, they need to rename Franklin Ave which is a bit lower on the hill, because it is named after Benjamin Franklin who owned slaves.”

    Maybe it was named after Aretha Franklin. Or former Miami Dolphin Andra Franklin. Quit being racist Duck

  163. Anon[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @eric
    my mom grew up in Bel Air in the 1950s. It was common that the gardeners were Japanese. Somehow, they rose above that stereotype.

    Replies: @Anon

    That reminds me of when I was a kid in Los Angeles and my mom let the Japanese gardener go and hired a cheaper Mexican. The Mexican didn’t work out for some reason I can’t remember, quality or reliability, and my mom asked the Japanese guy to return. He wouldn’t, I think just out of pride. Since he was working several houses on the street and Mexicans were poaching customers, he know what was going on.

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