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From MetroTimes:

Major outlets that spell ‘Black’ with a capital B now include ‘LA Times,’ ‘BuzzFeed News,’ and MSNBC
Posted By Lee DeVito on Fri, Jun 12, 2020 at 2:17 pm

The Los Angeles Times, BuzzFeed News, NBC News, and MSNBC are among the latest publications to change their style guides to capitalize “Black” when referring to people of the African diaspora — something that industry leaders the Associated Press and New York Times have still not yet called for.

On Thursday, Sarah Glover, the former president of the National Association for Black Journalists, said “the time has come for all news media to capitalize the B in Black” in an open letter calling on The Associated Press to update its style guide. …

Los Angeles Times journalist Erin B. Logan made the announcement that their newsroom was making the change on Tuesday, referring to a memo sent from the paper’s executive editor Norman Pearlstine. “The conversation taking place at The Los Angeles Times and across the country reflects a necessary and long overdue shift in thinking about racism,” he wrote. “Without exception The Times is opposed to racism.”

… On Friday, Erik Wemple, who reports on media for The Washington Post, tweeted that NBC News and MSNBC would also make the change. …

“This step is a good first step to affirm the significance of being Black in America,” Glover wrote in her open letter. “This matters. It’s to bring humanity to a group of people who have experienced forms of oppression and discrimination since they first came to the United States 401 years ago as enslaved people.”…

This is the kind of childish thing that 5th graders get worked up over: let’s spell black with a capital “B” and white with a small “w!”

Perhaps the metaphor of blacks as our Sacred Cow should be modified to blacks as our Golden Calf?

 
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  1. Charles Erwin Wilson [AKA "Charles Erwin Wilson Three"] says:

    Perhaps the metaphor of blacks as our Sacred Cow should be modified to blacks as our Golden Calf?

    Yes. Finally you begin to see.

  2. JimDandy says:

    So it’s ok to call black people Black people?

  3. Is the “w” in white capitalized, too? Do I even need to ask?

  4. bomag says:

    Maybe this is analogous to “Ghost Dancing” in the waning days of the plains Indians: when you see your lifestyle slipping away, try the old ceremonies even harder.

    Blacks and their White caretakers see the US shifting to a Mestizo/Asian/Middle East/immigrant African et al influence, so its time to try the old civil rights struggle even harder as it becomes more irrelevant in the face of outsourcing our industry to China/India; and outsourcing our politics to Ilhan Omar’s clan.

  5. Maybe you shouldn’t have done dlavery and racism

    Quit complaining about language

    white men are the most fragile people in existence

    • Replies: @vhrm
    , @fish
    , @anonymous
  6. I’m watching the third of the Nolan Batman films. At least Bane, also with a capital “B”, was worthy of his role.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  7. Dan Hayes says:

    A sure thing never to be changed: whites to Whites!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  8. There was a similar question about newspapers capitalizing “Negro” back in the early 20th century.

    HL Mencken goes over it in one chapter of his book The American Language.

    Sorry no link (I read it on paper years ago), but that should be enough to track it down if you are really interested.

  9. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, in Torrance, a Racist Latina “Karen” goes on a racial tirade against a cute Asian jogger who was stretching in Racist Latina Karen’s park. And yes, Racist Latina Karen has already been doxed by keyboard warriors, and will likely lose her job at Carl’s Jr.

  10. Overpass/bridge giant banner idea:

    Murderer Lives Matter (to their victims)

    Rapist Lives Matter (to their victims)

    Black Lives Matter (to their victims)

    13/52 . . . Awww sheeit, who knew?

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  11. Anon[351] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s OK to be lowercase.

    • LOL: Chrisnonymous
  12. vhrm says:
    @Vernon Hoees

    Maybe you shouldn’t have done dlavery

    You’re absolutely right.

    Sitting here today there is no doubt that bringing/allowing Black slaves in the New World was the worst idea ever.

    • Replies: @anonymous.
  13. Will they capitalize the “B” if the suspect in a crime is described as a “Black male?”

    Oh wait, going forward they won’t even report those crimes, or at least won’t mention what the guy we are supposed to be on the lookout for looked like.

    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
  14. fish says:
    @Vernon Hoees

    You’ be write Tinys……dlavery be horrible…dat be why we be doin DiGiorno now.

  15. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, in Torrance…

    Torrance police called a press conference asking for the public’s help in finding Racist Latina Karen!

    https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=701036234012802

    • Replies: @Just another serf
  16. Anonymous[129] • Disclaimer says:

    I thought that was the whole point of using “African American”? To use a proper noun rather than a more generic term like “black”.

    Originally “colored” and “people of color” were used as more polite terms than “Negro”. It only referred to blacks; other non-white groups were called “Latins”, “Orientals”, “Hindoos”, etc.

    Then at some point “colored” and “people of color” became considered declasse and offensive, and “Afro-American” and “black” were the new acceptable terms.

    Then “Afro-American” became considered offensive, and you were supposed to use “African-American”.

    More recently, “people of color” has come back as being acceptable, although “colored” apparently hasn’t. However, “people of color” is now supposed to also refer to non-whites in general, though it does seem to imply black dominance and blacks being the “real” “people of color”, with other non-whites as an afterthought or subordinate position.

    I wonder how much of this is driven by blacks’ short attention spans and fickleness. Blacks seem to pay lots of attention to and get aroused by quick, frequent changes in superficialities and appearances. Having the newest sneakers, using the latest lingo, listening to the latest black music hit, etc. are big deals among blacks.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Dumbo
    , @anon
  17. @bomag

    When will you people stop smoking crack? These people have almost no influence in America.

  18. Anon[301] • Disclaimer says:

    This has been brewing for a while, and is the outcome of affirmative action admissions of students who never learned formal written grammar, usage, style, punctuation, or spelling. Generally speaking minority students are aware of, at some level, and embarassed by their deficiencies, and they eagerly adopt any excuse that their studies professors offer.

    Picasso could draw a proper portrait but ultimately chose not to; black grad students couldn’t write in proper English if their lives depended on it and they find it humiliating to accept any help.

    From Heather Mac Donald’s The Diversity Delusion regarding the sad cancellation of Professor Val Rust:

    Other debates centered on the political implications of punctuation. Rust had changed a student’s capitalization of the word “indigenous” in her dissertation proposal to the lowercase, thus allegedly showing disrespect for the student’s ideological point of view.

    According to the Day of Action Statement, “the barrage of questions by white colleagues and the grammar ‘lessons’ by the professor have contributed to a hostile class climate.”

    Rust is hardly the first professor to be called a bigot for correcting students’ grammar and spelling. “Asking for better grammar is inflammatory in the school,” said an occasional TA. “You have to give an A or you’re a racist.”

    Of course, capitalization has nothing to do with respect, any more than italics imply that the italicized person is “unbalanced.” You have someone who is caught making a mistake and then rationalizing it to maintain self respect.

    You get this a lot with STEM-centric white people who somehow never heard of the rule that periods and commas go inside the quotes or you only have one space after periods. If you get taught stuff in middle school or high school you take it in. If you make it into college not having learned it, you fight it.

  19. @Anonymous

    Non-Asian women have a notorious sadistic resentment of Asian women, who are confirmed by multiple studies as the most attractive race of female on Earth. Many such videos exist from all over the world. Asian women are a source of enormous grief for the harsher, more “caucasoid” looking women.

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Paul
    , @Wilkey
    , @Ron Mexico
  20. MEH 0910 says:

    Perhaps the metaphor of blacks as our Sacred Cow should be modified to blacks as our Golden Calf?

    Black Cow

    [MORE]

    Classic Albums: Steely Dan’s Aja – Black Cow & Home at Last

    Steely Dan discuss the production behind “Black Cow” and “Home at Last” from “Aja.”

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  21. The so-called “war lord” leader of Seattle’s Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ) has made some weird rap videos.

    I don’t even know what is real anymore.

  22. @Anonymous

    Beautiful park. Oye MexiKareñ.

  23. Olorin says:

    Woah woah woah wait. I thought we were supposed to call them “African Americans”?

  24. @Yancey Ward

    I have started capitalizing it.

    • Thanks: BenKenobi
  25. Anon55uu says:

    Yesterday I realised that the PRIDE flag is slowly being updated to add black and brown stripes across the top. Seems to have started around 2019 but corporate flag users eg zillow are now using that version.

    Not too concerned with this in that there will now be a more obvious distinction between the rainbows little kids like and the acceptable left political version.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    , @anon
    , @Neuday
  26. Olorin says:
    @Anon

    If you get taught stuff in middle school or high school you take it in. If you make it into college not having learned it, you fight it.

    In other words, the longer a person’s ignorance and failure to conform to norms endures, the more they define themselves by their deficits and demand you define them by those deficits as well.

    And this, ladles and genderspoons, is where we’re at. The soft bigotry of low expectations peddled by the left/Dems becomes the very mechanism by which Jogger-Americans define, limit, cripple, and destroy themselves. And in so doing accrue privilege to their masters while reviling those pointing to the door of the cave.

    The white scapegoat is just a distracting reality TV series.

  27. @Yancey Ward

    Is the “w” in white capitalized, too? Do I even need to ask?

    Not in anything worth reading.

    • Thanks: Joseph Doaks
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anon
  28. In case you didn’t think it could get more insane

    Penny Lane signs defaced in Liverpool over slavery claims

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-merseyside-52992669

    Now if it turns out there was a Mr. Strawberry who was a slave owner, I’m totally giving up!

  29. @Jane Plain

    What is it, every 10-15 years there’s a change? The race formerly known as…

  30. Anonymous[166] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yancey Ward

    No, see the nbc news link below. Black capitalized but white lower case. It’s beyond absurd.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/crime-courts/minnesota-pardons-black-man-century-old-lynching-case-n1230876

  31. Why not capitalize the whole word? BLACK people deserve this recognition. Better yet, bold print – BLACK and proud!

    Further, we could capitalize the first letter of their pronouns, as we would for a deity. George Floyd may have died an ignoble death, but His death shall not be in vain. May He rest in peace.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  32. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    I suggest we call them Black Gold people.

    Also, not just ‘Black’ but BLACK.

    No, B-L-A-C-K.

  33. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    From PAVED WITH GOOD INTENTIONS to CAVED TO BAD INTENTIONS.

  34. So do we capitalize yellow?

  35. Harold says:
    @Joe Magarac

    Interesting.

    It seems to be in The American Language, Supplement I which doesn’t seem to be available freely online. It can be borrowed at Archive.org

    I did find this by Mencken
    Designations for Colored Folk

    “WHEN THE New York Times announced in an editorial on March 7, 1930, that it would capitalize the word Negro thereafter, there were loud hosannahs from the Aframerican intelligentsia, for (with an exception to be noted) they seemed to be convinced that lifting the word out of lower case would also give a leg up to its bearers. The decision of the Times was inspired, according to its own account, by Major Robert Russa Moton, then principal of Tuskegee Institute, but he was by no means the originator of the movement, nor was the Times the first American news- paper to yield. ”

    https://sci-hub.tw/10.2307/487288

    and this
    Some Notes on the Capital “N”Author(s): Donald L. Grant and Mildred Bricker Grant
    https://sci-hub.tw/10.2307/274643

    • Thanks: Joe Magarac
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  36. Anon[202] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Stoddard’s The Rising Tide of Color Against White World-Supremacy is a masterpiece. For additional reading, I recommend Stoddard’s Lonely America and Charles Lee Magne’s The Negro and the World Crisis.

  37. fish says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Nobody with production values this bad has any business Warlording an Autonomous Zone!

  38. @Dan Hayes

    Yeah, but the “H” is capitalized, so I think it’s pretty fair.

    [MORE]

    Hu-white, per the Jared Taylor style book.

  39. @Anonymous

    I think “Afro-American” IS pretty offensive, honestly.

    I mean, we don’t call Oriental people straight-black-American, or Swedish girls blond-full-bodied-American, the Irish Carrot-top-American, right? Am I missing something?

  40. @JimDandy

    Jim, Yes, but not “you people.” And my new Crayola 64 crayon set has a GeorgeFloyd where the black crayon used to be, sorry, I meant Black crayon.

  41. BenKenobi says:
    @Anon

    the rule that periods and commas go inside the quotes

    I’m aware of this but ending a sentence with a period inside the quotes triggers my autism for some reason.

    • Replies: @Anon
  42. @unobserved observer

    Now that’s thinking. And in return for all of this preposterous linguistic kowtowing they’re giving up violent crime, right? I mean, that’s the deal, right? Because I’m on board with that. Small price to pay.

    Need help finding a REALTOR®? Browse thousands of local REALTORS®

  43. “Perhaps the metaphor of blacks as our Sacred Cow should be modified to blacks as our Golden Calf?”

    You forgot to capitalize the b word (or is it the B word), Steve. Perhaps it was an oversight during the noticing. Of course, one loophole is that you used the plural form of the B word, so perhaps if its pluralized, it doesn’t have to be capitalized.

  44. @Change that Matters

    What, are you racist or something?

  45. @Yancey Ward

    Here’s a dot org which capitalizes both Black and White, and their reasons why:

    Recognizing Race in Language: Why We Capitalize “Black” and “White”

    In addition to capitalizing Black, CSSP has also made the decision to capitalize White. We will do this when referring to people who are racialized as White in the United States, including those who identify with ethnicities and nationalities that can be traced back to Europe. To not name “White” as a race is, in fact, an anti-Black act which frames Whiteness as both neutral and the standard. In sociologist Robin D’Angelo’s White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism, she writes, “White people get to be ‘just people,’” without having their race named, whereas people of color are often described with their race.

    We believe that it is important to call attention to White as a race as a way to understand and give voice to how Whiteness functions in our social and political institutions and our communities. Moreover, the detachment of “White” as a proper noun allows White people to sit out of conversations about race and removes accountability from White people’s and White institutions’ involvement in racism. We are also reckoning with the threatening implications of capitalizing “W” in “White,” often used by White supremacists, to establish White racial dominance. The violence of capitalizing White in this context makes us grapple with the history of how Whiteness has functioned and thrived in the United States; acknowledging that, yes, White people have had power and still hold power in this country. While we condemn those who capitalize “W” for the sake of evoking violence, we intentionally capitalize “White” in part to invite people, and ourselves, to think deeply about the ways Whiteness survives—and is supported both explicitly and implicitly.

    OTOH, The Seattle Times explains why they capitalize B but not w:

    Capital-B ‘Black’ becomes standard usage at The Seattle Times

    Here’s the updated passage in the style guide, crafted by members of the Times’ Diversity & Inclusion task force in partnership with the news copy desk:

    Black (adj.): Belonging to people who are part of the African diaspora. Capitalize Black because it is a reflection of shared cultures and experiences (foods, languages, music, religious traditions, etc.). Do not use as a singular or plural noun. When ethnicity is relevant to the story, ask the source which ethnic identifier they use. Black is not necessarily synonymous with African American; some argue the term Black is more inclusive of the collective experiences of the U.S. population, which encompasses recent immigrants.

    white (adj.): Belonging to people with light-colored skin, especially those of European descent. Unlike Black, it is lowercase, as its use is a physical description of people whose backgrounds may spring from many different cultures. Capitalized white is often used by the white nationalist/white supremacist movement. Do not use as a singular or plural noun. When ethnicity is relevant to the story, ask the source which personal ethnic identifier they use.

    Uh oh! Someone tell the “Times’ Diversity & Inclusion task force” that by not capitalizing White, The Seattle Times is, according to the CSSP, engaging in an “an anti-Black act which frames Whiteness as both neutral and the standard”. Steve, perhaps you could point out this racist oversight on the Times’ Twitter feed.

    • Replies: @kihowi
    , @Anonymous
  46. @Anon

    Think of it this way: once we’re all speaking and writing Mandarin anyway, capitalization issues will be moot.

  47. @Not Only Wrathful

    I’m watching the third of the Nolan Batman films. At least Bane, also with a capital “B”, was worthy of his role.

    Yeah, he was great right up until the part where he admitted to being a beta lovelorn cuck for Talia Al’Ghul.

  48. @Joe Magarac

    Negro shouldn’t be capitalized because it’s a Spanish word and Spanish doesn’t capitalize any adjectives, even the names of nationalities. For example, “Esteban Marinero es un americano.”

  49. @Anonymous

    Yeah, this fit yellow pearl is welcome to shelter in place over here from all the racists as long as she wants…

  50. @Clifford Brown

    Based on these videos one can only conclude that Raz is a Jewish homosexual?!

  51. @JimDandy

    I think using Black with a capital B is great. It should be a proper name, because it’s a race and RACE is real. We just need to do the same with White.

    Just like with Asian.

  52. Both White and Black should have been made uppercase long ago.

  53. @Morris Applebaum IV

    Well, at least blacks haven’t gone the Prince route and changed their nomenclature to some unpronounceable symbol.

    However, the century is young, give them time.

  54. @Anon

    …. somehow never heard of the rule that periods and commas go inside the quotes or you only have one space after periods.

    Both of these rules are incorrect.

  55. Anon[351] • Disclaimer says:
    @BenKenobi

    In the UK it’s the “opposite”.

    In the end, standardized rules of written English are there to make the writing transparent and let the pure meaning come through unimpeded. Be a rebel with your clearly expressed ideas, not your capitalization.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  56. Paul says:
    @JohnPlywood

    LOL. That is why flat-chested Asian women try to look as White as possible. By the way, who can tell them apart?

  57. Paul says:

    What these “news” outlets are up to is, of course, the groveling thing.

  58. This nonsense actually started with „Beijing“, continued through „Myanymar“, „Kyiv“, and „Mumbai“, and then „Ukraine“, instead of „The Ukraine“. Anglo culture is always ready to bend over and accomodate outsiders‘ demands.

  59. Paul says:

    Those on the Left have given up on class struggle. They have switched to racial and ethnic struggle. Affluent people, especially, prefer it that way. They see it as less threatening to themselves personally and yet are still able to do the moral preening thing.

  60. Pericles says:

    Los Angeles Times, BuzzFeed News, NBC News, and MSNBC

    should properly be “Buzzfeed news, nBc news and msnBc”. But what about Los Angeles Times?

    Los Angeles Times journalist Erin B. Logan

    Ah. We at least get “erin B. logan”.

    They can only envy the BBc.

  61. Wilkey says:
    @JohnPlywood

    Non-Asian women have a notorious sadistic resentment of Asian women, who are confirmed by multiple studies as the most attractive race of female on Earth.

    Sure, if you say so. I don’t think white women will have any shortage of admirers anytime soon. But you follow your heart’s desire.

    The particular Asian woman in this particular video is most definitely NOT attractive. Feel free to visit her Twitter page.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
  62. Olorin says:
    @Anon55uu

    If memory serves that was a 4chan/pol/operation. Getting the Philadelphia LGBTQWERTY+++ group to add black and brown to the rainbow with an organic and well designed program of local hacktivism.

    (I.e., yes, adding no color and dirt color to the natural phenomenon of daylight passed through a prism. STEM is racist!)

    Others then picked it up. Now global corporations. Those kids have a helluva reach.

  63. Wilkey says:
    @Anonymous

    The Asian woman being harassed in the video is a leftist hag who strikes me as a potential troll, trying to incite people to harass her – like that black guy in Central Park. She has a Twitter page with one leftwing rant after another. She also refers to this Hispanic woman as a “white lady.”

    Of course she wants her to be a white lady – she knows how the game is played, and who the media will get woked up over.

    What’s clear is that she’s some crazy lady about town who is easily incited to anger. Every town has at least one. Most have several.

    • Agree: Cloudbuster
  64. Dumbo says:
    @Anonymous

    Blacks are pretty good at slang and creating new words and expressions. “Woke” and stuff like that. Or new types of handshakes. So I suppose they would get easily tired of being called the same way for more than 15 years. Also, racism.

    But more seriously, I think it’s more that you can’t change their behaviour, so after a while the word ends up having a bad connotation and has to be changed. But, a rose by any other name still has the same smell.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  65. @Dumbo

    Whites are good at inventing new words for new things, such as technology. Blacks are good at inventing new words for old things, such as sex.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer, kihowi
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  66. CJ says:
    @Jane Plain

    Seems to be. It was pushed heavily just a few years ago, and was clearly mandatory on the alphabet TV networks.

    Progression of the approved term during my lifetime:

    Colored > Negro > Afro-American > black > people of color > African-American > black. There has been some overlap and some debate about capitaization, but anyone behind the times has always been considered an embarrassing paleosaur.

  67. So, in Mexico it would be spelled with a capital ‘N’.

  68. @Achmed E. Newman

    Yet we do call SpaghettiOs Franco-American.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  69. anon[916] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon55uu

    Yesterday I realised that the PRIDE flag is slowly being updated to add black and brown stripes across the top. Seems to have started around 2019 but corporate flag users eg zillow are now using that version.

    How long before the rainbow stripes are squished to a narrow band at the bottom by increasingly large black and brown stripes?

  70. @Harold

    “When the New York Times announced in an editorial on March 7, 1930, that it would capitalize the word Negro thereafter, there were loud hosannahs from the Aframerican intelligentsia, for (with an exception to be noted) they seemed to be convinced that lifting the word out of lower case would also give a leg up to its bearers. The decision of the Times was inspired, according to its own account, by Major Robert Russa Moton, then principal of Tuskegee Institute, but he was by no means the originator of the movement, nor was the Times the first American news- paper to yield. ”

    The more things change, the more they remain the same. I’ve been trying to convince my kids, whose UK school “history” lessons included Rosa Parks and lynching but not Watts or Detroit, that “the only thing different, the only thing new” is that all of education and all of Big Capital is (in theory) on the rioters side, which should worry them as white people – but that the gaps in performance/achievement/income between the races are not going to change, apart from slightly narrowing as intelligent white women have fewer babies.

    We’ve literally seen riots followed by “something must be done” for 50 years now.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  71. @YetAnotherAnon

    55 years since the Watts Riots.

  72. @Anonymous

    will likely lose her job at Carl’s Jr.

    Yeah, demolishing the life of a fast food worker is sure speaking truth to power!

  73. @Jane Plain

    African-American is a lot harder to spell or fit on a banner or graffiti

  74. @Change that Matters

    I’ve never really gotten why

    Black, White, Brown: Acceptable
    Yellow, Red: Racist

  75. @JohnPlywood

    These Asian women, does that include the hotties in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Yemen?

  76. @Peter Akuleyev

    Good point, Peter. It’s not all of us, though. They are still Peking, Burma, and Bombay to me, and that’s the way I’ll keep saying them. Don’t forget old Canton. (I don’t care much about Kiev or the Ukraine – no reason to say them at all unless I’m playing Risk(TM) – the game of world domination)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzLtF_PxbYw

  77. IHTG says:
    @bomag

    That’s Wesley Yang’s “wokeness as unfinished business” thesis:

  78. @Peter Akuleyev

    Dropping “the” from in front of “Ukraine” makes sense because it went from being a region to being its own country. It’s a corrupt, dysfunctional and divided country but it is one now.

    I agree with your broader point on place names though.

  79. @Yancey Ward

    Up the ante in this game. Change the spelling and capitalize: Huwhite.

  80. @the one they call Desanex

    I thought Commie-killer Franco was a name we now dare not utter.

  81. @Achmed E. Newman

    … or Swedish girls blond-full-bodied-American….

    There you go stereotyping again … they’re not all blonde.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  82. This is the kind of childish thing that 5th graders get worked up over: let’s spell black with a capital “B” and white with a small “w!”

    The aggression against dignity that it indicates is no mere childish thing to be concerned about. An observation that’s been given to me through participation in a competitive sport (triathlon) is that the best athletes (with high self-regard) are most apt to be supportive of their fellows at all levels within the sport. In contrast with elitism, this is a quality of those that are not merely ambitious climbers but are genuinely elite.

  83. Mike Tre says:

    Should we start capitalizing the word negro?

  84. @bomag

    I agree that this is behind the present BlackMania. They know their time as Precious Pets is running out. The coming Mestizo/Asian majority will not give a s&&& about black issues. So they need to manipulate the white liberal ruling class all they can, while they can.

  85. @Patrick in SC

    Black crime will be decriminalized, so, problem avoided.

  86. Anon[289] • Disclaimer says:

    This is almost as sad as the marines insisting on having their name capitalized despite all other service members going by the same generic names they have used (without capitalization) in every other society since the beginning of war. The marines think it makes them look prestigious but I’ve never seen anything scream “insecure” more loudly.

  87. anon[493] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    What you are describing is the euphemism treadmill.
    When the outhouse was brought indoors it was called the water closet.
    Since we crap in the water closet, and crap has negative connotations, “water closet” starts to sound nasty.
    We change the name to toilet.
    Since we crap in the toilet, and crap has negative connotations, “toilet” starts to sound nasty.
    We change the name to bath room.
    We change the name to rest room.
    We’ll keep changing the name as long as crap has negative connotations.

    For the same reason we have to keep changing the name for black people.

  88. @Achmed E. Newman

    I mean, we don’t call Swedish girls blond-full-bodied-American, right? Am I missing something?

    Hey Achmed, aren’t Swedish girls, um, Swedish or something?

    I think “Afro-American” IS pretty offensive, honestly.


    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  89. kihowi says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Wait I thought Africans were so much more diverse than us boring mayos. We don’t even have culture. And now we’re too diverse. Man, we suck.

  90. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    The so-called “war lord” leader of Seattle’s Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ) has made some weird rap videos.

    I’d like to see him make a video explaining how it is he can secede from the US, yet simultaneously offer free health care, citizenship for illegals, free food, etc.

    He’d have my full attention for that one.

  91. black is Black?
    I want my country back

  92. Neuday says:
    @JimDandy

    Does this mean I have to start using a capital “N”?

  93. Neuday says:
    @Anon55uu

    Yesterday I realised that the PRIDE flag is slowly being updated to add black and brown stripes across the top

    I just wish the White flag wasn’t that of surrender.

  94. @Morris Applebaum IV

    Larry Auster, who is enjoying a resurgence due to circumstances, had a theory about that. He said that every 10-15 years a new name for blacks had to be cooked up because the old one accumulated too many bad associations.

    The guy was a genius.

  95. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Here’s the updated passage in the style guide, crafted by members

    Am I the only one infuriated at seeing the word “written” suddenly being replaced by the word “crafted”? What was wrong with the word “written”?

    Produced with a pen or keyboard = written

    Produced with ice pop sticks and glue = crafted

    Is this too subtle a distinction for 21st century minds?

  96. @Jane Plain

    But I take my coffee African-American.

  97. Muggles says:

    Just as slang quickly dates anything heard (say TV dialogue or lyrics) so spelling and words referencing certain things does also.

    As others note, every few years we have a new PC word/term for a Negro/black/Black/African American, etc.

    After “Black” will come “Blak”, (the “c” is so Caucasian, another white trick!).

    I guess “Caucasian” is properly capitalized since it refers to an actual geographical area, like “Asian.”

    However almost no one uses that word and it is something of a debatable stretch to trace the DNA ancestry of “whites” to that specific area. Though it did seem to be something of an ancient homeland for non Africans.

    Today many academic pseudo programs are full of foolish over educated people preoccupied with making up new words and concepts to get their papers published. “Inter-sectional oppression” and all.

    It is an undeniable fact, though odd, that in the future this era will be also known for Negroes/blacks/Blacks/AA’s referring to themselves as “niXXXers” in conversations among themselves but not when taking to others. Usually that is the case. Even in texting, though when written sometimes ending with “ra” instead of “er.” Very odd, like a secret linguistic handshake we aren’t supposed to know about. This usage is sometimes denied (as embarrassing) but usually just rationalized as a “black thing” which whites should not hear and thus ignore.

    I don’t think even in English speaking Africa actual black Africans use that word to describe one another. However, in 20 years it may just be another trendy name for black Americans.

  98. Corvinus says:

    Of course, i-Steve neglects to provide historical context. He is simply paying homage to how the NYT purposely omits certain important information.

    Now, this “update” from black to Black has been a discussion piece for the past decade.

    http://dcentric.wamu.org/2011/10/when-to-capatalize-black-and-white/index.html

    From the comments section (Troy Johnson)

    Funny, this comes up a lot. I’ve adopted the same convention on my website
    http://aalbc.com. I freely admit however that my logic for adopting this convention is flawed. Black and white are adjectives (even though no one on this earth is actually the color black or white) and should not be capitalized.

    The definition of “Black” is so nebulous, in 2011, that it is a virtually useless term, as the subject of Touré’s book seems to imply. In any event, the two sloppy terms should be treated the same. Generally Black is capitalized to elevate “Blackness” to demote “whiteness” a subtle dig.

    From June 2015 https://www.cjr.org/analysis/language_corner_1.php

    As the excellent Grammarphobia blog noted, The American Heritage Dictionary is conflicted on whether to capitalize “Black” but not “White.” “Orthographic evenhandedness would seem to require the use of uppercase White, but this form might be taken to imply that whites constitute a single ethnic group, an issue that is certainly debatable,” the dictionary says.

    But using “lowercase white in the same context as uppercase Black will obviously raise questions as to how and why the writer has distinguished between the two groups,” the usage note says.

    “There is no entirely happy solution to this problem,” American Heritage concludes. “In all likelihood, uncertainty as to the mode of styling of white has dissuaded many publications from adopting the capitalized form Black.”

    From October 1, 2019 https://medium.com/@InsightCCED/spell-it-with-a-capital-b-9eab112d759a

    Last week, in a step to modernize and commit to greater inclusion, The Brookings Institution, a well-established Washington D.C. think tank, announced that it would update its writing style guide to capitalize “Black” when referencing Black or African American people. For Brookings, this is not merely a typographical change but, rather, an intentional effort to recognize how people’s experiences are represented.

    While there’s no standard rule on whether references to race should be lowercase or capitalized, most media outlets and publications that rely on the AP Stylebook refer to Black people in the lowercase. The APA style calls for capitalized Black and White, and The Chicago Manual of Style allows the authors to capitalize Black based on their preference. Major news outlets like The New York Times and the Associated Press both use lowercase black and white.

    The question of how to properly refer to Black people in print has deep historical roots. In an 1878 editorial entitled “Spell it with a Capital,” Ferdinand Lee Barnett, husband of Ida B. Wells and founder of a Black weekly newspaper, asserted that the failure of white people to capitalize Negro was to show disrespect to, stigmatize, and “fasten a badge of inferiority” on Black people. In 1898, sociologist, historian, and civil rights activist W.E.B. DuBois proclaimed, “I believe that eight million Americans deserve a capital letter.”

    Speaking of historical roots…

    Source –> “Racial Etiquette: Customs And Rules Of Behavior In Jim Crow America”, Dr. Ronald L.F. Lewis, California State University-Northridge

    Most southern white Americans who grew up prior to the 1960’s expected black Americans to conduct themselves according to well-understood rituals of behavior. This racial etiquette governed the actions, manners, attitudes, and words of all black people when in the presence of whites. To violate this racial etiquette placed one’s very life, and the lives of one’s family, at risk.

    Blacks were expected to refer to white males in positions of authority as “Boss” or “Cap’n”–a title of respect that replaced “Master” or “Marster” used in slave times. If a white person was well known, a black servant or hired hand or tenant might speak in somewhat intimate terms, addressing the white person as “Mr. John” or “Miss Mary.”

    Whites much preferred to give blacks honorary titles, such as Doctor, or Professor, or Reverend, in order to avoid calling them Mister. While “n—–” was universally used, some whites were uncomfortable with it because they knew it was offensive. As a substitute, the word “niggra” or “colored person” often appeared in polite society.

    All black men, on the other hand, were called by their first names or were referred to as “Boy”, “Uncle”, and “Old Man”–regardless of their age. In legal cases and the press, blacks were often referred to by the word “Negro” with a first name attached, such as “Negro Sam.” Black women were addressed as “Auntie” or “girl.” Under no circumstances would the title “Miss.” or “Mrs.” be applied. A holdover from slavery days was the term “Wench,” a term that showed up in legal writings and depositions in the Jim Crow era.

    This practice of addressing blacks by words that denoted disrespect or inferiority reduced the black person to a non-person, especially in newspaper accounts. In reporting incidents involving blacks, the southern press usually adopted the gender-neutral term “Negro,” thus designating blacks as lifeless and unknown persons. For example, an accident report might read like this: “Rescuers discovered that two women, three men, four children, and five Negroes were killed by the explosion.”

  99. Corvinus says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It’s not as if the name “white people” was invented…

    https://aeon.co/ideas/how-white-people-were-invented-by-a-playwright-in-1613

    [Scholar Kim] Hall explains that the ‘significance of blackness as a troping of race far exceeds the actual presence’ of Africans within England at the time. Before Middleton’s play, there were a host of imagined ‘black’ characters, such as in Ben Jonson’s The Masque of Blackness (1605), which featured Queen Anne performing in blackface, as well as Shakespeare’s ‘noble Moor’ in Othello, staged a couple of years before Middleton’s play. Understandings of race were malleable: in early modern writing, exoticised characters can be described as ‘dusky’, ‘dun’, ‘dark’, ‘sable’ or ‘black.’ Depictions of an exoticised Other weren’t only of Africans, but also Italians, Spaniards, Arabs, Indians, and even the Irish. Middleton’s play indicates the coalescing of another racial pole in contrast to blackness, and that’s whiteness – but which groups belonged to which pole was often in flux.

    As an aside, when the first Africans arrived in Virginia in 1619, there were no “white” people, nor, according to colonial records, would there be for another sixty years. Hmmm…

    And it’s not as if white people, chiefly (heh) the English, created words with foreign origins…

    https://cudoo.com/blog/something-borrowed-english-words-with-foreign-origins

    And it’s not as if Europeans have words borrowed from indigenous languages of the Americas…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_from_indigenous_languages_of_the_Americas

    And then there is (gasp) a sample of the English loanwords in Arabic…

    https://www.iasj.net/iasj?func=fulltext&aId=95290

    Words travel from one language into another as a result of language contact stimulated by a number of linguistic and extra linguistic motivations. Environmental, sociopolitical, and economical motive like war invasion, intermarriage, immigration, trading and financial bargaining, beside other instances of linguistic motivations behind contact among communities like the need for lexical gap filling, the need for new words, the tendency to use more prestigious variety, etc. are all factors that might lead to borrowing. Borrowing is the phenomenon which undertakes the word transmission process from one variety into another among the connected communities. The language that lends is the donor or the borrower language, and the language that borrows is known as the receptor or the borrowing language. The borrowed word is not transmitted to the target language merely as a rigid linguistic form but as a flexible culture concept usually associated with historical background
    and cultural values of a donor language.

  100. @vhrm

    American blacks are just American Jews’ pitbull. If the Jews had not been allowed in, the blacks would have been forced out.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  101. @Anonymous

    That was hilarious. The huge poster sized picture of Latina Karen’s face on the tripod was fantastic. Imagine the cost of that nutty demonstration of dumbness. Poor America. It’s a sad end to a once strong people.

  102. @Adam Smith

    Wow!

    On the 2nd picture, see, that’s the confusion. He’s an Afro-American, but not an African American.

    One time I had to tell someone on the phone that this one load of freight was going to be late 1/2 hour or so. The pilot (this was an airplane) was a white guy from S. Africa. Well, you gotta figure I told the lady “yeah, he’ll be there. Look for an African American guy.” I was hoping hilarity ensued.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Adam Smith
  103. S says:

    One of these days, when the powers that be are finished using them and don’t need them any more , they will once again deliberately rile up Blacks about something stupid, as much of it has been in the past.

    This time it will be different though.

    Unlike in the past fifty-sixty years when the Blacks rioted and looted, and the police stood down initially, the police/national guard will this time, unannounced, act very quickly and forcibly against them.

    And just to make the sure Blacks get the message, they’ll deliberately rile them up again once more about something stupid, and again act against them quickly with main force.

    And the powers that be will get off on this just as they got off on all the rioting, looting, and violence in the past.

  104. anon[225] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    NASA publicity: The Rocketman who took us to moon in the sixties was a German-American (von Braun). The Rocketman who may take us to Mars may be an African-American (Musk).

  105. @Achmed E. Newman

    Here in my little mountain town I have one African American friend.
    He’s a white guy from South Africa.

  106. @Wilkey

    I’m afraid white women already have a shortage of admirers, and have for decades. Year after year we get scientific studies showing how white women lose out to Asian women on dating apps, and how large scientific samples of men universally prefer the Asian female face over the European. Asian womem are objectively more attractive than white women.

  107. anonymous[374] • Disclaimer says:
    @Vernon Hoees

    That’s curious, I know for a fact there’s a word that instantly makes black people lose their minds. Talking about fragile.

  108. @anonymous.

    American blacks are just American Jews’ pitbull. If the Jews had not been allowed in, the blacks would have been forced out.

    So should we be expecting the 1654 Project by Anonymous anytime soon?

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