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Cate Blanchett and the Three Amigos
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Cate Blanchett is playing conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly who defeated the Equal Rights Amendment in a miniseries entitled “Mrs. America” on Hulu, with Tracey Ullman as Betty Friedan, who courageously tried to resist the lesbian takeover of feminism until finally capitulating to what she had long presciently denounced as the “lavender menace” in 1977. (Of course, the poor lesbians are now largely defeated by autogynephilic he-men claiming to be women, so what goes around comes around.)

The problem for Cate is that many of her former fans are angry at her at bringing her considerable skills to playing The Enemy. So she has penned an op-ed in the NYT to remind them she doesn’t actually oppose the Equal Rights Amendment like her character did:

Cate Blanchett: I’m Not ‘Mrs. America.’ That’s the Point.

Link now fixed.

Art allows us to investigate, illuminate and hopefully understand the apparent gap between us.

By Cate Blanchett
Ms. Blanchett is a producer and actor.

Actually, Ms. Blanchett is, first and foremost, an actress.

May 21, 2020, 5:00 a.m. ET

It’s pretty sad when a great actress has to explain to her progressive, graduate-degreed fans that she isn’t the same as the character she plays on TV.

From another perspective, it was pretty funny when the villagers of Santa Poco in 1916 didn’t realize the actors who played the Three Amigos weren’t actually the same as the characters they portrayed in the moving pictures:

and it’s pretty funny in 2020 when New York Times subscribers make a similar mistake about Cate Blanchett.

 
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  1. Mike Tre says:

    “It’s pretty sad when a great actress has to explain to her progressive, graduate-degreed fans that she isn’t the same as the character she plays on TV.”

    Especially when the portrayal of Schlafly will likely be dishonest and mocking, to suit how a leftist would see her anyway.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
  2. It’s not like me to care what Kate Blanchett’s views are to begin with, much more know who she even is. I just see people in movies and shows, and if they are realistic and/or funny (for a comedy) than that’s good – doing your job right is good. It’s just a freaking job.

    My question to you is, have you seen any of this show, Steve, and is it at least somewhat fair, to where I wouldn’t mind borrowing DVDs of it from the library once they open up again?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Pat Boyle
  3. The fact that some people cannot distinguish between actors and the parts they play on stage, screen, or video is a pretty depressing thought for democracy.

    Supposing someone played the part of a savvy business tycoon on TV, and people actually thought he (or she) was capable of running the government of a major democracy, and he was elected to high office, and then wanted to put Anthony Hopkins on trial for what he did to that nice lesbian girl with blue eyes in Silence of the Lambs.

    • Troll: Manfred Arcane
    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
  4. bomag says:

    Looks like plenty of politically correct cringy-ness. The Progressives, as usual, are complaining here that the show would allow any portrayal of sympathy for the other side.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  5. Who will play Trump in the blockbuster biopic of 2032?

  6. Anon[175] • Disclaimer says:

    A n even more similar thing happened to Peter Brady when he had to play Benedict Arnold in the school play. At the time it seemed farfetched even for the Brady Bunch.

  7. SFG says:

    Oh, it gets sillier. Apparently Chris Pratt got some blowback after Avengers: Infinity War for screwing up the Avengers’ plan and getting half of the universe killed…

    I wonder if the decline in real-world social interaction is increasing the number of people who can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality? Or at least starting to think reality reflects fantasy worlds in subtle ways? I mean, I know my wisdom and charisma have suffered…

  8. The director’s critical mistake in this miniseries was not having Blanchett wear a moustache she could twirl cartoonishly as she said evil things.

  9. Urr..N.Y. Times or L.A. Times?

    SJW viewers aren’t confusing the actor with the character. They would just prefer Blanchett boldly and loudly reject that role, or at least accept it to mock their villain.

    • Agree: Father Coughlin
  10. Ray P says:

    These leftists know full well that the actress isn’t the character she plays. They are Stalinists objecting to any depiction of the enemy (excepting the crudest propaganda caricatures). It is like making a fair-minded biopic of Trotsky in 1937 Soviet Union.

  11. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:

    Blanchett wants to make it clear she’s nothing like Schlafly, a principled and godly woman who graduated Phi Beta Kappa from an elite Midwest university, got a law degree from that same elite university, a master’s from Harvard/Radcliffe, worked as a ballistics gunner and technician during WWII, and loved America and Americans.

    Phyllis Schlafly was a great woman and pleasing to God.

    • Thanks: Pop Warner
    • Replies: @Ray P
    , @obwandiyag
  12. I think that this problem has always existed. James Thurber wrote a short book called Soapland, an analysis of/attack on the American radio soap operas of the 1930s, and describes several instances of radio listeners believing that the shows were real–including a story about an actor who played a husband in two different series and received an angry letter from a woman who accused him of bigamy.

    • LOL: fish
    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
  13. Sean says:

    Does Tracey Ullman play Betty Friedan as the battered wife constantly plastering herself with makeup to hide a bruised face that she claimed to have been during her marriage? The better the actor the less they are like the characters they play, and the less able they are to put up a persona as front to the public offscreen, no? Henry Fonda was married five times. Used to get her stepmother to tell Jane she was fat.

    PR pic for Walk On The Wide Side, in which Jane co starred with Lawrence Harvey. Now there was someone who could not be bothered to act off screen (increasingly on it too) and did not care to conceal his opinions. Result: absolutely everyone hated Lawrence Harvey.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @J1234
  14. Bugg says:

    The brilliant woke subscribers of the progressive New York Times cannot grasp actors in very role are making believe they are somebody else. Porn must blow their minds.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  15. I’m just surprised it took this long for TPTB to get around to a well funded, celebrity-backed smear job against the (deceased) woman who kicked their ass forty years ago.

    If it makes any money, that’s just a bonus for them.

    • Agree: Old and Grumpy, Getaclue
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  16. For me, a more important issue is: where did maternal instinct go? I suppose it did exist: little girls playing with dolls, naturally.

    And now, the percentage of childless women in child-bearing age is 20% in Western societies & well over 40%, perhaps even 50% in Japan, with China following. You can blame ideology (but- there is no much feminism in east Asia), work routines, social policy…. but the net result remains always: you cannot raise birth-rates by any social engineering imaginable.

    So, Schlafly’s & Friedan’s “struggles”, as different as they may have been, ultimately could turn out to be insignificant. Modernization means childlessness – period. The net result will be either inundation by fecund & dumb races (which will then mostly die out because they’re too dumb to sustain modern life, supported by intricate technologies) or takeover by nascent AI, or some sci fi hybridization of humans & machines.

    But, frankly, I don’t see a possibility of return to normal family, which has been the norm until 50-70 years ago.

    They say childless women are unhappy. Many, even most of them. I don’t know, one never can tell. Just- things don’t seem to change over time to anything resembling normal family & happy mothers. And I don’t believe that feminism & lesbians have caused it.

    • Replies: @Carol
    , @Rob McX
    , @gate666
  17. George says:

    I have a vague memory of bourgeois feminism vs working class feminism being a topic of the early Marxists, like 1900s + or -.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  18. Amazing. It is the Twenty First Century and people still have to be reminded that actors and actresses are playing a role. And often we will be treated to the image of a actor or actress sitting before a rapt panel of Congressmen and Congresswomen expounding their views on some subject they know shit about. America, what a great country.

  19. I don’t have any sort of well worked out theory, but i think i a good bit of the current crisis–the real one, not the Xi Jingping Flu–stems from the ability to project seemingly “real”/visual stories out to people.

    Because they “see it”, it is propaganda that manages to short circuit the “screening” circuits that people historically evolve to deal with crap people tell them. And it is simply more highly impactful than propaganda could be before.

    And it has let other people replace your people’s traditional stories, tales, legends, history, with the stories they want to tell you.

    It has been thoroughgoing disaster for Western civilization.

    • Replies: @anon
  20. MEH 0910 says:
    @SFG

    I wonder if the decline in real-world social interaction is increasing the number of people who can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality?

    Harlan Ellison writing in the introduction to his 1978 short story collection Strange Wine:

    http://www.baen.com/Chapters/ERBAEN0078/ERBAEN0078.htm

    I used to know Dan Blocker, who played Hoss Cartwright on Bonanza. He was a wise and a kind man, and there are tens of dozens of people I would much rather see dead than Dan. One time, around lunch-break at Paramount, when I was goofing off on writing a treatment for a Joe Levine film that never got made, and Dan was resting his ass from some dumb horsey number he’d been reshooting all morning, we sat on the steps of the weathered saloon that probably in no way resembled any saloon that had ever existed in Virginia City, Nevada, and we talked about reality versus fantasy. The reality of getting up at five in the morning to get to the studio in time for makeup call and the reality of how bloody much FICA tax they took out of our paychecks and the reality of one of his kids being down with something or other . . . and the fantasy of not being Dan Blocker, but of being Hoss Cartwright.

    And he told me a scary story. He laughed about it, but it was the laugh of butchers in a slaughterhouse who have to swing the mauls that brain the beeves; who then go home to wash the stink out of their hair from the spattering.

    He told me–and he said this happened all the time, not just in isolated cases–that he had been approached by a little old woman during one of his personal appearances at a rodeo, and the woman had said to him, dead seriously, “Now listen to me, Hoss: when you go home tonight, I want you to tell your daddy, Ben, to get rid of that Chinee fella who cooks for you all. What you need is to get yourself a good woman in there can cook up some decent food for you and your family.”

    So Dan said to her, very politely (because he was one of the most courteous people I’ve ever met), “Excuse me, ma’am, but my name is Dan Blocker. Hoss is just the character I play. When I go home I’ll be going to my house in Los Angeles and my wife and children will be waiting.”

    And she went right on, just a bit affronted because she knew all that, what was the matter with him, did he think she was simple or something, “Yes, I know . . . but when you go back to the Ponderosa, you just tell your daddy Ben that I said . . . ”

    For her, fantasy and reality were one and the same.

    There was a woman who had the part of a home-wrecker on a daytime soap opera. One day as she was coming out of Lord & Taylor in New York, a viewer began bashing her with an umbrella, calling her filthy names and insisting she should leave that nice man and his wife alone!

    One time during a college lecture, I idly mentioned that I had actually thought up all the words Leonard Nimoy had spoken as Mr. Spock on the sole Star Trek segment I had written; and a young man leaped up in the audience, in tears, and began screaming that I was a liar. He actually thought the actors were living those roles as they came across the tube.

    Harlan Ellison had previously related the Dan Blocker story in a piece in the Los Angeles Free Press back in 1973:

    https://voices.revealdigital.org/?a=d&d=BGJFHJH19730406.1.9&e=——-en-20–1–txt-txIN—————1

  21. Anonymous[216] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    I wonder if the decline in real-world social interaction is increasing the number of people who can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality? Or at least starting to think reality reflects fantasy worlds in subtle ways? I mean, I know my wisdom and charisma have suffered…

    As a mischlinge you probably have some buffs in charisma and intelligence to make up for it, at the expense of constitution.

    • Replies: @SFG
  22. But remember the very important codicil to Ms. Blanchett’s defense of acting: white people can never play black people. There can be no “acting” there!

    It’s like what Steve said about “who is getting paid?”

    • Replies: @TheMassageIsTheMedium
  23. Bill H says:

    Well, given that what we watch on the television and movie screen makes more sense than what we see going on in the world around us (“Russia elected Donald Trump”) I can understand why people are so confused. Alice would have a hard time knowing which side of the looking glass she was on.

  24. theMann says:

    I wonder how many people went to Raymond Burr for legal advice?

    • Replies: @Barnard
  25. Dan Smith says:

    Galaxy Quest. Great Sci-Fi parody in which aliens from another galaxy construct technology based on a Star Trek -like TV series.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  26. I don’t understand the continued push for the ERA at this point. They lost the show fight in the democratic process, but it was just read into the Constitution piecemeal by SCOTUS anyway.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  27. kihowi says:

    What Hollywood bigwigs understand, is that nobody can distinguish between reality and movie fantasy. Even intelligent people who are aware of what’s happening, their brains get tattooed with the imagines that they see. Whenever they need to deal with a situation that has been “dealt with” in the movies, those images will be halfway across their mind before their intellect has time to get its boots on. You need an extraordinary amount of discipline to escape from that mechanism.

    There is really one story of the 20th century and onward, and that is that a microscopic number of people controlled how everybody else interpreted basically everything.

  28. Zpaladin says:
    @MEH 0910

    This is why people are persuaded when actors make commercials telling them to vote or work against climate change or other causes. It works especially well when the actors play doctors or other authority figures.

  29. Karlin’s piece on National IQ may need revision.

  30. Maybe this phenomenon explains the diversity-insistence that actors in films, advertisements, etc. must “look like” their audience in race and ethnicity — the audience thinks what they are seeing is real, and they want their “share” of it.

    The Guy Debord/Jean Baudrillard idea that the spectacle becomes more real than that which it depicts has come to pass.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  31. Gordo says:

    with Tracey Ullman as Betty Friedan

    I’m sure they have rules as to which ethnic group can play which ethnic groups.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  32. I opposed the Equal Rights amendment back in the day. In retrospect maybe I was wrong. Can you imagine the fun some bright lawyer would have with affirmative action for women. Its definitely not equal. Imagine if the women soccer players were paid using the formula of the male players? Gee all the gals might have to follow Julie Ertz method, and land a good looking, white NFL player. Good luck with that ladies given the recent NFL draft’s racial makeup. Anyway I haven’t watched Mrs America given Phyllis Schafley is my personal heroine. However Kate Blanchett is a brilliant actress. Isn’t she an Aussie? Why would she even care about a debunk amendment in the first place?
    Feminism has become a Zombie like, brain eating disorder.

  33. fish says:
    @MEH 0910

    One time during a college lecture, I idly mentioned that I had actually thought up all the words Leonard Nimoy had spoken as Mr. Spock on the sole Star Trek segment I had written; and a young man leaped up in the audience, in tears, and began screaming that I was a liar. He actually thought the actors were living those roles as they came across the tube.

    ….as a matter of fact I mentioned just this very thing to Jim Kirk at a bar just the other day! Apparently he was just getting ready to ship out on an extended tour….five years I think he mentioned and wanted to grab a couple of Tequila shots at his favorite old haunt before leaving orbit!

    • Replies: @Kylie
  34. Clyde says:

    The Three Amigos is one of those comedies that actually gives you some laughs. Probably too racist to be made today.

    • Replies: @fish
  35. J.Ross says:

    It’s not funny or the exact mistake claimed, it’s the takeover of society by cultic thinking along Bolshevik lines (Blanchett’s error is not in “being” the wrong person but in a personal failure of revolutionary consciousness), against which Republicans have no more of a defense than they do against vote fraud or immigration. Insofar as any serious attention is paid to this sort of thing, this huge and successful Bolshevik effort is tolerated, and every last effort at right-wing ideological work is attacked or examined or something to apologize for.

  36. J.Ross says:
    @MEH 0910

    Ellison is the same fabulist whose reaction to Kent State depended on outright lying.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    , @anonymous
  37. This posting defines “10” on the Snark-o-meter.

  38. Anon7 says:

    I didn’t think Cate Blanchett was Bob Dylan in I’m Not There, an odd and original biopic in which a half-dozen different actors (acting persons) played different aspects of Dylan’s persona. She was fascinating to watch.

    Oddly, the New York Times didn’t feel like they needed to clarify.

    I’m also reminded of the character that Steven Colbert played in The Colbert Report. He’s funny and talented, and his conservative talk show host character Colbert (pronounced col-bair) often took dead aim at Democrat foibles. Apparently, there were a lot of people who watched the show because they thought the character was a real conservative who cleverly figured out a way to say exactly what conservatives wanted to say, but couldn’t because of Political Correctness.

    In the Sixties hit All in the Family, Carroll O’Connor played conservative everyman Archie Bunker so skillfully that the show’s creator Norman Lear and O’Connor himself fretted that many people who watched the show laughed appreciatively whenever Archie Bunker spoke, not realizing that it was intended as satire.

    • Replies: @David
  39. jim jones says:

    I assumed that this movie was another example of Steven Spielberg”s obsession with Nazis:

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  40. Jack Benny used to get a few hundred letters a week about the way he treated Rochester.

    Navy recruiters in the 1960s used to get a regular stream of guys walking into their office saying they wanted to join that fun outfit with Commander McHale and the PT 107. (I mean these guys were totally serious, according to the recruiters.)

  41. Nodwink says:

    Blanchett is not the first Aussie to cop it over a role. John Jarratt received death threats after playing a sadistic killer in Wolf Creek. The late Rod Taylor got strange and fearful looks at Cannes for his role as the demented hillbilly cult leader “Daddy-O” in Welcome to Woop Woop.

    I’m guessing that Blanchett’s fans believe that she is successful enough to be highly selective of what roles she accepts, and thus would simply say, ‘Oh no, she’s HORRIBLE!’ and reject the offer. Blanchett, though, is a thorough professional, and is likely to have seen this as a challenge.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
  42. @MEH 0910

    Lots of nutty women in the USA. My favorite story on this is the Herman Raucher one, where various women claim to be the Jennifer O’Neill (“Dorothy”) character in Summer of ’42.

    After the movie came out, several women claiming to be Dorothy wrote to Raucher, but only one was deemed by Herman to be the real Dorothy by her handwriting and a mention of things only she could have known. The letter arrived with a Canton, Ohio, postmark but no return address.

    “She wrote that she had remarried and had become a grandmother,” Raucher said, “but most of her letter was about her hope that I had not been scarred or traumatized by our meeting.

    “She closed by writing something to the effect, ‘Ghosts of that night 30 years ago are better left undisturbed.’ ”

    With no home address to go by, Raucher had no way to respond. He never heard from her again.

    https://yesterdaysisland.com/herman-raucher/

    That’s why whenever I hear “Women are to be believed!” I take that with a grain of salt.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    , @Ray P
  43. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:

    Oddly enough, the Brits seem far more susceptible to this kind of delusion than we Anglophones on the other side of the Atlantic. There are several instances of actors who played heavies or cads on their favorite soap operas like CORONATION STREET or EASTENDERS who have been targeted and beaten up in pubs or in the street, some quite severely, for their characters’ sins.

    John Cleese has noted this several times about FAWLTY TOWERS: It was popular on both sides of the Atlantic, but he said Americans who encountered him always understood Basil Fawlty was just a character. But he managed to capture so perfectly a type of the British Lower-Middle Class that most Brits assumed that that was who he was in person–and treated him with the rudeness and dislike they have for such a type.

  44. @MEH 0910

    Leonard Nimoy wrote an autobiography in the mid 70’s called “I am not Spock”, in which he recounted tales of people, usially women, coming up to him and asking him to use his extraterrestrial powers (the Vulcan Mind Meld) to help their loved ones and that he had to explain that he was only acting and had no special abilities. He recounted how one woman had gotten quite upset with him, as she didn’t believe him.

    I think the basic problem is that our brains are not evolved to deal with today’s level of simulation of reality, video and movies primarily, with video games and VR coming up fast. For all of mankind’s prior existence, plays were about the most advanced form of virtual reality there was. Magicians could show the impossible.
    When peope watch horror movies, their autonomic nervous system responds as if they’re experiencing reality. Remember the hordes of women weeping as they left “Love Story”? The erections men get while watching pornos?
    Heck, when James Dean died, dozens of teenage girls killed themselves, as the women of an earlier generation did over Rudoloph Valentino, because they had created a complete fantasy scenario of a non-existent personal relationship.
    Some people believed that Obama was going to stop the oceans from rising, because they confused him and his teleprompter.
    Yeah, let women vote. What could possibly go wrong?

  45. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @MEH 0910

    Story goes Kubrick wanted Dan Blocker to play Major Kong in Dr Strangelove. Blocker’s agent read the script and got back to them: “way too pink for Dan.”

  46. Most actors should have known this as an occupational hazard since the 60s, when the producers of Gilligan’s Island would get loads of angry letters from viewers demanding that more must be done to rescue those seven stranded castaways.

  47. Poirot says:

    Funny scene from Extras (2006. Ricky Gervais) where Sir Ian McKellen tells Ricky that he’s not really a wizard. https://facebook.com/BBCOne/videos/10156862172751778

    • Replies: @dcthrowback
  48. Art is dead. Everything’s about propaganda now. ZOG is no softie for art.
    Any humanizing of the enemy is an act of political betrayal in the climate we are in. Art humanizes by its very essence.

    So, yeah, I dont think too many of these NYT readers are actually confused. I think they are suspicious that Ms. Blanchett could play an Evil Person rather sympathetically… and lending her beauty to the character of Schlafly.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  49. ganderson says:

    Baldrick:
    You look smart, Mr Blackadder. Going somewhere nice?

    Blackadder:
    No. I’m off to the theatre.

    Baldrick:
    Don’t you like it then?

    Blackadder:
    No I don’t. A lot of stupid actors strutting around shouting, with their chests thrust out so far you’d think their nipples were attached to a pair of charging elephants. And the worst thing about it is having to go with Prince Mini-Brain!

    Baldrick:
    What, doesn’t he like it either?

    Blackadder:
    Oh, no. He loves it. The problem is he doesn’t realise it’s made up.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  50. Anon[241] • Disclaimer says:

    Post-Grad women can’t tell the difference between a character & the actress.

    #63863 reason we should abolish female suffrage

  51. G. Poulin says:

    I know people who think they know everything about race relations in the South, because they watched To Kill a Mockingbird when they were teenagers. The inability to distinguish images from reality is very widespread.

    • Agree: S. Anonyia
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  52. Anon[521] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Are haircuts a thing of the past for you?

    I was thinking today about when I would feel comfortable getting a haircut again. The risk is probably low if they just cut your hair quickly and shut up. But still, I fall in the old, fat, asthmatic risk group, and no risk is better than low risk.

    But then it occured to me that figuring out the risk of a haircut is the wrong way to think about. A haircut is a perishable service. If you think you need a haircut after lockdown, you are committing to a lifetime of haircuts, not just the one. If not, then you might as well skip the one right after lockdown.

    So the right way to think about it is what is the discounted net present risk of haircuts? The risk of the next haircut taking away the rest of your life, plus the risk of the haircut after that taking away a shorter rest of your life … down to the risk of the last haircut before you die of something other than haircut-induced-Covid.

    Thinking about it that way, I decided I will try never to get another haircut. Which isn’t easy. Unless I go for a shaved head or a buzz cut, I have to figure out how to give myself a cruddy haircut. I work from home, am not in the dating market, don’t meet customers, and so on, so I can look a little shabby, but not that shabby. But my attempts so far at trimming my own hair have not gone well, and YouTube videos are not that helpful.

  53. @Almost Missouri

    Is it a smear job? I haven’t seen the show, but I think the whole problem (for lefties) is that Schafley comes across as such an impressive person.

    I didn’t know anything about the real Schafley until I saw her speak on some panel later in her life. (In my mind I think I had her confused with Anita Bryant). She was talking about political organizing. But, man, she was impressive. She just radiated authority and fluency with facts and experience.

    One of the (many) problems feminists have is that they think they celebrate “strong, independent women.” But they actually demand that women be group thinking ewes.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
    • Thanks: Father Coughlin
  54. Abe says:

    with Tracey Ullman as Betty Friedan, who courageously tried to resist the lesbian takeover of feminism until finally capitulating to what she had long presciently denounced as the “lavender menace” in 1977.

    From Steve’s essay this week-

    It’s reminiscent of how Janet Napolitano was rewarded with becoming Secretary of the Interior and head of the University of California for saying, “Show me a 50-foot [border] wall, and I’ll show you a 51-foot ladder.” (If you are trying to picture exactly how an illegal alien would manipulate a 51-foot ladder, well, note that Ms. Napolitano majored in political science, not mechanical engineering.)

    Ms. Napolitano, identified on Wikipedia as a childless, never-married basketball fan and softball player, is following in the intrepid footsteps of Donn Shalala, another totally not gay sack-of-potatoes-in-pantsuit cipher who parlayed a short political career into a nice sinecure in the world of public college administration. To be fair, the totally not gay Napolitano’s quip about 51 foot ladders would have been the wittiest/most quotable thing said in the history of the world by a lesbian, so it’s a shame her total-not-gayness prevents her from grabbing that particular laurel.

    (I’m sure when the future Edward Gib-Huang writes his history of the decline and fall of the American empire, the role of crypto-dykes in it like Napolitano, Shalala, Janet Reno, Hillary and Condi Rice will finally get the treatment it deserves)

  55. Anon[521] • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t know whether I think Cate Blanchett is a great actress (or as she says “actor”) or not. She is wildly entertaining to watch, but she is doing Cate Blanchett no matter who she plays. She has the Cate Blanchett thing down pat, the eyes, the mouth, the elocution (no matter what the accent), and it’s really great fun.

    • Replies: @Joseph A.
  56. anon[169] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    Take a basic example: folk tales and fairy tales. These stories used to be told and then read to all children, giving them a basic grounding in knowledge of human nature. Children got their images from these stories – wicked witch, mean old troll, big bad wolf. The stories themselves weren’t real – they were stories – but the human psychology they presented was tried and true knowledge from many generations of the culture.
    I read these to my son when he was small, but I don’t think his peers know these stories. The stream of garbage on TV and Internet has replaced them.

    • Agree: AnotherDad, Dtbb
  57. I loved her in Blue Jasmine, I’m glad that got made before Woody Allen got permanently ejected from having a career.

  58. @HammerJack

    Hammer, one of the Baldwins, I get confused because there are so many of them.

  59. @Anonymous

    Oddly enough, the Brits seem far more susceptible to this kind of delusion than we Anglophones on the other side of the Atlantic. There are several instances of actors who played heavies or cads on their favorite soap operas like CORONATION STREET or EASTENDERS who have been targeted and beaten up in pubs or in the street, some quite severely, for their characters’ sins.

    John Cleese has noted this several times about FAWLTY TOWERS: It was popular on both sides of the Atlantic, but he said Americans who encountered him always understood Basil Fawlty was just a character. But he managed to capture so perfectly a type of the British Lower-Middle Class that most Brits assumed that that was who he was in person–and treated him with the rudeness and dislike they have for such a type.

    Perhaps, but I’d wager that Americans just generally believe that anyone with a British accent is acting.

  60. @HammerJack

    Who will play Trump in the blockbuster biopic of 2032?

    My pick would be Michael Madsen.

    He’ll be roughly the correct age by then.

  61. @Gilbert Ratchet

    It’s kind of amazing that Robert Downey Jr. got an Oscar nomination for his meta, tongue in cheek portrayal of a white actor in blackface for Tropic Thunder and no one really batted an eye. That was only 12 years ago. It’s like we underwent a cultural revolution since.

  62. Actually, Ms. Blanchett is, first and foremost, an actress.

    Oh please. I dated a girl who was a theater graduate student in Boulder in the 1980s. She and all her friends, female, male, straight or gay, called themselves actors, and I understood.

    Who cares.

    None of this shit is new.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
  63. Art Deco says:
    @Abe

    If I’m not mistaken, Shalala was a college administrator before she had a government job. She went back to her earlier employments.

    What I liked about Shalala was that she refused a security detail when she was in the Clintoon cabinet. Supposedly, she was one of just three Clintoon cabinet members who did.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  64. Mr. Anon says:
    @SFG

    I wonder if the decline in real-world social interaction is increasing the number of people who can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality?

    If so, then the “New Normal” of social distancing and minimized human interaction is only going to exacerbate that.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  65. “It’s pretty sad when a great actress has to explain to her progressive, graduate-degreed fans that she isn’t the same as the character she plays on TV.”

    It’s called the artist’s fear of being typecast. Schlafly today, Anita Bryant tomorrow, and a pro-life Christian activist next week. Turn around and she’ll be doing traditional family roles on the Hallmark Channel.

    Once is an accident, but twice is a trend. So they want to nip that in the bud before a trend begins. And of course their fans are astute enough to see that she’s going down some dangerous paths and want to warn her before things get too out of hand.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  66. Mild Mike says:

    America is the great workhorse of the Occident, and its people grind more at the proverbial coal-face than others leaving very little time for playing, or any insight into the nature of play.

    One cannot imitate, self-deprecate, use nuanced voice in the telling of a story or anecdote with many Americans because they will think your minor conversational theatrics–meant only to stimulate conversation–are in fact stemming from a single-source; namely, you, and unironically you.

    So while Americans put a high premium on something called “integrity”, that what you say is what you mean, and your word is your bond, etc, this has a corollary effect of leaving Americans without the ability to develop social personas and therefore something like the craft of acting is still very much a mystery to them. “Why would you behave like something different when you should just be you.” translates into their inability to differentiate between the person they see onscreen and the person they visualize in real life.

    Also probably why Self-Help and Self-Actualization books and courses are such a big thing Stateside–the least playful and nuanced creations in existence. And also why many of the big stars in American movies are in fact Aussies, Canadians, Brits–peoples who punch above their weight with regards to being able to play much more effectively than sober, serious Yanks.

  67. @Gordo

    I’m sure they have rules as to which ethnic group can play which ethnic groups.

    Ullman isn’t Jewish. The tragedy of the Fatman, another beautiful theory slain by an ugly fact.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Father Coughlin
  68. Mr. Anon says:

    It’s pretty sad when a great actress has to explain to her progressive, graduate-degreed fans that she isn’t the same as the character she plays on TV.

    Perhaps this is why actors think we should care about their political opinions. Because they think we think they really are Jason Bourne, or Captain America, or whatever.

  69. @Anonymous

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deirdre_Barlow

    “Free the Weatherfield One” campaign[edit]
    When the story of Deirdre Rachid being jailed for fraud was aired in 1998, a public campaign developed in the UK. Despite Rachid being a fictional character, politicians expressed their opinions on the story as if she had been imprisoned in real life.[17][18][19] Prime Minister Tony Blair said that he would be commanding his Home Secretary, Jack Straw, to investigate the issue.[18][20] William Hague, the then leader of the Conservative Party, announced that his party was also concerned about Rachid’s treatment, stating that “The whole nation is deeply concerned about Deirdre, Conservatives as much as everyone else”.[17][19][20]

    The “Free Deirdre Rachid” campaign was likened to the “Free George Jackson” campaign in 1984 after Brookside character George Jackson was falsely imprisoned for a warehouse robbery. In the story for Brookside, George served his sentence

  70. @Abe

    To be fair, the totally not gay Napolitano’s quip about 51 foot ladders would have been the wittiest/most quotable thing said in the history of the world by a lesbian, so it’s a shame her total-not-gayness prevents her from grabbing that particular laurel.

    Spoken like someone who has never read Camille Paglia or Florence King.

  71. MEH 0910 says:
    @J.Ross

    https://www.highdefdigest.com/blog/harlan-ellison-obit/

    Ellison once described his writing career as being a “professional liar,” which no doubt came into play when he told stories about himself and his life. While some of the stories were true (yes, Harlan did indeed mail a dead gopher to a book publisher), almost all of them were certainly embellished to some degree. Stories from others added to his legend. (No, he did not throw a fan down an elevator shaft.)

  72. @Hypnotoad666

    “Is it a smear job?”

    Don’t take my word for it. Watch the trailer. Blanchett plays Schlafly as sinister, smarmy, manipulative and privileged. The “antagonist” (actually protagonist) characters are all salt-of-the-earth women-of-the-people (and women of color of the people of color), vibrant and likable, coalescing in a rainbow coalition of the fringes to oppose Schlafly’s evil white oppression.

    Anyhow, with creator Dahvi Waller and executive producer Stacey Sher, where did you think this thing was going? C’mon man, were ya born yesterday?

    P.S. Ann Coulter shares and expands your impression of Schlafly:

    https://anncoulter.com/2016/09/05/phyllis-stewart-schlafly-1924-2016/

  73. @Hypnotoad666

    “Is it a smear job?”

    Don’t take my word for it. Watch the trailer. Blanchett plays Schlafly as sinister, smarmy, manipulative and privileged. The “antagonist” (actually protagonist) characters are all salt-of-the-earth women-of-the-people (and women of color of the people of color), vibrant and likable, coalescing in a rainbow coalition of the fringes to oppose Schlafly’s evil white oppression.

    Anyhow, with creator Dahvi Waller and executive producer Stacey Sher, where did you think this thing was going? C’mon man, were ya born yesterday?

    P.S. Ann Coulter shares and expands your impression of Schlafly:

    https://anncoulter.com/2016/09/05/phyllis-stewart-schlafly-1924-2016/

    • Replies: @Poirot
  74. Of course her op-ed was necessary. In light of an entertainment industrial complex which slavishly applies its view of a perfect socially just reality to fiction, there is a need to explain to the intellectual morons who consume their propaganda that portraying reality as it was does not necessarily signal agreement. I also harbor no illusions this film will accurately or fairly portray the life and ideas of a woman whose accomplishments put to shame those who will defame her until the cows come home.

  75. @Anon

    Female friends. You don’t have to be flirting or anything. I’ve had impoverished male friends my whole life who depended upon me occasionally cutting their hair for free. One guy showed up with hair down to the middle of his back. “Tim, you can come over more often than once a year.”

    My husband and sons reap the benefits of the free service now. I got to practice on a lot of guys who really didn’t care if I messed up a little.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  76. fish says:
    @Clyde

    The Three Amigos is one of those comedies that actually gives you some laughs. Probably too racist to be made today.

    “Blazing Saddles”…….we’d have another Civil War!

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  77. @Bugg

    This actually partially explains why hardcore porn is so dangerous. As a former teacher, the easy access to increasingly degenerate forms of porn has screwed up the minds of most males (and some females) under the age of 25 or so. There are lots of reports of girls/women being injured to the extent they are hospitalized because of their attempts to replicate porn acts with their boyfriends. It’s sick.

  78. @Sean

    I thought Lawrence Harvey was cool because he always acted like he -really- didn’t give a damn.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @James O'Meara
  79. @Anon

    That’s funny. I will respond below because it is irresistible but off topic:

    [MORE]

    First of all, our time is the best in a long while for a man to wear his hair any way he wants. Thank God. I’ve lived though decades of short, long, styled, coiffed, moussed, buzzed, and I can tell you that recent years have been the best time I remember for us to do whatever we want with our hair. We now have the same luxury as women.

    Over that past two months or whatever, I’ve let mine grow from a buzz to whatever it is now, but I ordered a buzzer “Mangroomer” tool so I can buzz it back down or my wife can. I actually haven’t yet because I’m having too much fun. There was a time or two when I had a gorgeous head of hair down to my shoulders — as a much younger man.

    Second, look back at great men in history who lived in times when a man’s hair could be grown out, or even covered by a powdered wig of long hair itself. The great founders of my country had such hair. Today many ignorant Americans would think Ben Franklin was some kind of old hippy.

    My neighbor is an architect who pretty much looks like old Ben, complete with all the hair. Architects are required by architect law to be eccentric, you know.

    Third, whatever you want to do, you don’t need to live in fear. Do not believe that you should live the rest of your life afraid to sit in a chair and let a service provider do his job for you. That is ridiculous. However, considering how you described your physical self, I understand your concern. That kind of sucks.

    Best of luck to you, you old hippy you. 🙂

  80. Dtbb says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Equal rights would be a step down for women and deep down they realize it.

  81. anon[118] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Shave. Cheap and easy. Have done so for many years. Not a political or fashion statement.
    Just got tired of black women wanting to touch my hair all the time.

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
  82. @G. Poulin

    We had to watch To Kill a Mockingbird in social studies class and, even as a youngun in the 60s, I thought it blew dead dogs. Same goes for a Raisin in the Sun and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.

  83. Carol says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Second wave feminists were just accommodating changes already underway. Men were bitter and disillusioned about marriage and kids in the 50s. It was all over the culture, Friedan pointed some of it out. Time to become self-reliant!

    E.g., I found my mother’s letters to her mother ca 1941 and as it turns out my father had wanted all three of us aborted. A married guy with a good job and car. She finally succumbed with #4. Men were amazingly hardhearted.

    They weren’t nearly so sentimental as they act now. Something to do with WWII, I hear.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  84. @bomag

    Let’s see, black maid- check, confederate flag- check, scene in a Christian church- check, and holding a gun- check. Along with the Free Space, I’ve got BINGO!

  85. Cortes says:

    One of the brave inhabitants of Santo Poco (“We can sew!!!”) seems to have moved to Scotland. A shop selling embroidery materials which I pass regularly has been open for the past ten days or so in defiance of El Guapo and his minions.

  86. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Buzz Mohawk

    You miss the point, which is only that she’s engaged in acting. It has nothing to do with “actress” versus “actor”.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  87. Thomm says:

    It is a well-known fact that women are far less capable of separating television/films from reality than men are. Hence, most of the people who think actors are really the characters are women.

    This is because women tend to let emotion control what they see as reality or not. This is also why women are unreliable witnesses to a crime, since what their emotions want to believe to be true is what they will truly believe is true (i.e. in their mind, they have erased the facts with the new version of fact).

    This is also why most women who make false accusations of rape or sexual assault have truly convinced themselves it has happened, and don’t think they are lying. Their memory has been overwritten by emotion.

  88. anonymous[204] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    He also bought the New York Times’ bullshit story about the Kitty Genovese murder hook, line and sinker (numerous people witnessing the murder and not even bothering to call the police) , and excoriated her neighbors in print. Perhaps his story “The Whimper of Whipped Dogs” was based on this.
    He was also wildly talented and one of the finest science fiction/horror writers of his era. Maybe Keith Richards was right in his opinion that it may not be a good thing to meet your idols.

    • Replies: @anon
  89. Abe says:
    @kaganovitch

    Spoken like someone who has never read Camille Paglia

    Hey, I’m a big fan- I think SEXUAL PERSONAE is on-par with the best of Nietzsche as a big-picture, art historical- philosophical-phenomenological tour-de-force. However, not one inch of it is funny or witty (at lest in the containing any trace of levity sense).

    Paglia’s crowing about how she and Madonna routed the forces of anti-sex feminism proved sadly unprescient too, what with METOO…

  90. She comes from a land down under,
    where women crow and men chunder.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  91. Thoughts says:

    There is a rape scene between Cate and the On-Screen husband that is disparaging to Phyllis on a deeply insulting level

    As far as I’m concerned…

    Let the Left Rip Cate to Shreds

    Cate, as most white liberals, has made her bed with the wrong side and all the ill that comes to her is well-deserved

    And honestly…the op-ed is probably fake and meant to promote the series

    I ain’t watchin’ it

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  92. Rob McX says:
    @kihowi

    True. More important than the fantasists that other commenters have referred to, the ones who believe soap characters are real people, there’s a large body of people whose worldview is shaped by films and TV. When they see endlessly repeated positive depictions of non-whites in films and TV shows, they don’t believe it’s real but they do believe it’s realistic.

  93. @Abe

    Hey, I’m a big fan- I think SEXUAL PERSONAE is on-par with the best of Nietzsche

    You can’t be serious.

    • Disagree: Abe
  94. @Joe Stalin

    Summer of ’42 is a very good coming-of-age film. Just, I think you got it wrong here: Herman identified this letter as written by real “Dorothy”. It was not a fantasy projection. Check the wiki page.

  95. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, Mexico’s answer to “3 Amigo’s” provide entertainment at Home Depot…

  96. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @kaganovitch

    Or Hannay Gadsby!

    Just kidding, your point is definitely unsound. And I have a dyke here who says it isn’t funny. But then nothing is funny to her.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @kaganovitch
  97. Ray P says:
    @Anonymous

    She could have manned a B-29 with tail-gunner Joe?

  98. Muggles says:
    @Giant Duck

    >>Maybe this phenomenon explains the diversity-insistence that actors in films, advertisements, etc. must “look like” their audience in race and ethnicity — the audience thinks what they are seeing is real, and they want their “share” of it.

    The Guy Debord/Jean Baudrillard idea that the spectacle becomes more real than that which it depicts has come to pass<<

    Yes, sometimes those 60's French Situationists had a valid point.

    This is now seen in the "social media" sphere particularly in apps like Instagram where carefully staged photos, or TikTok, videos, and other similar ones, manufacture false reality.

    Entertainers, celebrities and politicians used to have the monopoly on this, since they were the only ones, other than rich socialites, who could afford to "manage" their public photos, appearances and articles to wide audiences. Now anyone with a computer and digital camera can do it.

    The real problem here is that one one really cares. If you are busy turning your own little life into some kind of performance, who has time/interest in watching that? Even your supposed friends, real or virtual, are busy making their own virtual realities. The more they are into that, the less they care about yours. Plus, as everyone with sense knows, you can't live your own life based on the opinions of others. Especially the billions of Internet morons. "False consciousness" and so on.

    Do that and you are doomed to failure. Studies show that the more the kids are hooked to their cell phone "realities" the less happy they become. Most post false "happiness" and success. That isn't reality most of the time. That's also why rich celebrities kill themselves with drugs and booze. It's not what it's cracked up to be.

    • Replies: @Cortes
  99. Rob McX says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Whatever you ascribe it to, the cause has to be social/political. Otherwise it’s hard to explain why there are pockets of people (e.g. Amish) who have remained impervious to these changes.

  100. @jim jones

    Absurdistan. Yahweh was, in this film, a sort of canned occult force. I guess old Hebrews somehow lured him into the Ark & sealed him.

    Yet, despite of that morose destiny,Yahweh seemed to have remained fond of Jews- he spectacularly burned all those Nazis, as well as their hangers-on. Just, in years to follow, he let 4-6 million of his followers to be killed, without lifting a finger (or a flame).

    So, in the end, you can never trust those gods….

    • Agree: jim jones
  101. anon[267] • Disclaimer says:
    @kaganovitch

    You keep on insisting she isn’t whenever anyone brings it up.
    What’s the big deal, isn’t it okay to be a Jew?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  102. Ray P says:
    @Joe Stalin

    That’s why whenever I hear “Women are to be believed!” I take that with a grain of salt.

    So, if some women tell us that you are a fantastic lover, we can safely discount it?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  103. David says:
    @Anon7

    Not only was Dylan a woman in his prime in that movie, but he was also black as a child, which would be another Steve Martin parallel.

    Blanchett was the only good thing about “I’m Not There.”

  104. Barnard says:
    @theMann

    I would hope none considering Burr was a pathologically lying lunatic. He made up stories about serving in the Navy and being wounded at Okinawa, a completely fictitious account about a wife who died in a plane crash and a son who died of leukemia. Who knows what he would have said to someone who actually thought he was a lawyer.

  105. @HammerJack

    Who will play Trump in the blockbuster biopic of 2032?

    What makes you think any mention of the Trump Presidency will even be allowed in 2032?

  106. huisache says:

    this is not limited to lefties; a whole generation of Americans thought John Wayne was the ultimate in patriotic virile manhood. I used to tell my dad that he was a chain smoking bald overweight rich guy who avoided military service in WW II and not the guy in the films. That commie pacifist George McGovern was flying scores of combat missions while the Duke was playing heroes for Republic Pictures and a hero of WW II forever after. Dad would not buy it.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Coemgen
  107. AKAHorace says:
    @MEH 0910

    I wonder if the decline in real-world social interaction is increasing the number of people who can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality?

    There may always have been people who confuse actors with the roles that they play, what is new about the last 60 or so years is the amount of acting that people watch compared to the amount of real life that they see or history that they hear about. Common tropes that are used over and over again in tv and film may seem more real than common patterns in everyday life or history.

  108. @kaganovitch

    If i had to lay money on Jewish blood or no Jewish blood, I’d lay it on the former. Recent Jewish blood.
    1-Name Ullman is Jewish 95% of the time. Father listed only as “Polish” … no religion known.
    2-Not too many nice Catholic teenage girls in the 70s would wake up and decide to be stand-up comediennes
    3-She got help from Jewish nepotism by being signed to Stiff Records (Andrew Jakeman) even though she wasnt much of a singer, had to sing other people’s songs, and had to rely on Phil Spectorish overdubs of Kirsty MacColl’s voice.
    4-Is political (had a video that featured the British Labour Party politician Neil Kinnock, at the time the Leader of the Opposition)
    5-Last but not least she looks Jewish (Jewish-looking enough to play Betty Friedan ffs)

  109. @Abe

    From Steve’s essay this week-

    It’s reminiscent of how Janet Napolitano was rewarded with becoming Secretary of the Interior and head of the University of California for saying, “Show me a 50-foot [border] wall, and I’ll show you a 51-foot ladder.” (If you are trying to picture exactly how an illegal alien would manipulate a 51-foot ladder, well, note that Ms. Napolitano majored in political science, not mechanical engineering.)

    This reminds me of a video some smug left wing idiot was posting on twitter showing a Jeep Cherokee with a custom fabricated folding apparatus on the roof which allowed the vehicle to ride over a section of border fence. The object of the exercise was apparently to demonstrate that your average Mexican or Central American illegal migrant has access to a Jeep, a fabrication shop, thousands of dollars in materials, and the engineering know-how to build such a machine in order to cross the border.

    I assume that Lesbians have a better grasp of physics and so forth than heterosexual women based upon common Lesbian hobbies and pursuits, but does Napolitano really believe that extension ladders really come in ever increasing lengths through infinity feet long? Does she not understand that the ladder constitutes the longest side of any square triangle to be formed by resting the ladder against a wall, so a 51 foot ladder is not likely to achieve the object for which she intends it?

    I was able to find a special order 60 foot aluminum extension ladder with a web search – it’s $1,500.00, and 180lbs. Which Mexican He-Man pulls the 180 lb. ladder up and lowers it down the other side of the 51 foot wall?

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @martin_2
  110. Joseph A. says:
    @Anon

    She is fabulous. Not just entertaining, but a superb actress . . . one of the best still working, I think. She likes to work on all kinds of projects, like Streep (not a genre snob), and she has ability to take on any persona (like Dench) — even men. She’s a pearl. SS knows all these bizarre things about Hollywood and IQ. Is there a reputable list of high IQ movie-industry folks? CB has to be one of the brighter actresses — up there with Foster, I’d say.

    Also, Ullman is brilliant. I’m tempted to find a way to watch the series.

  111. @Art Deco

    Art, I read that Illinois Gov. Pritzker has a security detail for his wife and daughter even when they are off of state. I suppose I could look it up, but have the families of major politicians, such as big city mayors, governors, congressmen and senators ever been attacked?

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  112. Blubb says:

    Can’t watch Cate Blanchett any more. She injects baby penis under her skin as a beauty treatment.

  113. SafeNow says:

    News item from 1985:

    “Jessica Lange, Sissy Spacek and Jane Fonda are scheduled to testify Monday before the Democratic Party’s House farm task force on the emotional toll of the financial stress experienced by farm families, something akin to their roles in the movies ″Country,″ ″The River″ and ″The Dollmaker,″ respectively.”

    So it’s not just morons who conflate roll with reality; semi-morons (Congressmen) do it too. And, at Harvards everywhere, faculty and supervisors pretend that playing the roll of proficient students and workers is the same as actually being one…or at least tolerably close.

  114. @Reg Cæsar

    Playing Mrs. America is yet another job that Americans just won’t do.

  115. @Anon

    Unless you’ve got a barbershop you actually enjoy hanging out at, i can’t see any reason not to cut the haircut from your budget.

    Personally, i’ve never found giving myself a trim being a big problem, though letting your wife or girlfriend do it is fine too. (I’ve been to the barbershop once in my life.)

    ~~

    None of my business, but i’d skip worrying about your hair and tackle the weight thing.

    — Cut back the carbs and eat more paleo. (Carbs are what’s fattening up America. We didn’t evolve a whole new carb metabolism with the neolithic, and now most of us–me included–simply don’t do the physical work.)

    — Limiting eating any given day to about an 8 hour window, so that during the other 16 your body
    goes into fat burning ketosis.

    — Exercise. Ideally, lift. (I’m bad at this too.)

    — Stretching everyday for us old guys everyday is goodness too. All those connective tissues want to stiffen up and you lose flexibility and are more prone to injury.

    Random:
    — I fast one day a month. (It was this past Sunday for May.) One day adds little in terms of total ketosis, but it’s about reminding myself that *I* am in charge not my appetites.

    My two cents. I know i’m on the hard downslope, but i want to enjoy the whole grandparent thing–when it comes–as best as i’m able.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @anon
  116. @Dennis Dale

    Well, the sex was good. (We were sometimes stoned on weed or partaking of hallucinogenic substances, and it was great.)

    She runs a theater company now, in a very nice, coastal place BTW. I have seen her on TV interviews.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
  117. I mean, how many of us have been taken in by a good acting performance?

    I recall Anthony Hopkins appearing on a talk show years after Silence of the Lambs came out (but before the sequel). He was an avuncular guest, but then the host asked him about Hannibal Lecter and if he ever had the opportunity to get back into that character. Hopkins paused and on camera began the mental change into Lecter, and then began speaking in his voice and mannerisms.

    The audience flipped out in fear and creeped-outness, goosed by the talk show host playing into it (“Oh man I’m terrified!”).

    Great acting registers with people emotionally, not intellectually.

    And how many of these “sophisticated” types still believe NWA really were hardcore gangsters, and not music geeks with record company PR machine behind them?

    What you need is someone in your life who is either cynical or a natural contrarian or just plain different from you. Someone who can laugh and say, “Yeah, I’m sure that’s real.” That requires your being around people different than you, with different personalities and views of the world. Not someone like CNN or the NY Times re-emphasizing that belief unquestionably.

    I am not surprised by this inability to distinguish between reality and fiction on the Left these days. Now in an echo chamber, they have no one in their world who can tell them to cool it, its all a show. Their echo chamber is the opposite, heightening their paranoia and fear. They attack anyone breaking their bubble as a “Russian bot” or a “Nazi.” These people are the slaves in Plato’s Parable of the Caves.

  118. SFG says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    It’s a metaphor–‘whatever barrier you come up with, people will find a way around it.’

    There’s some truth to it. The major value of the wall was always symbolic anyway. E-verify would have been a lot more useful, but that’s exactly why the donors made sure it never happened.

    I had a whole paragraph about how the lack of a populist-right intellectual apparatus means you have nobody to staff the Deputy Assistant Undersecretary of Immigration Enforcement jobs that actually get stuff done in a bureaucracy, but that’s for another day.

  119. SFG says:
    @Anonymous

    Using words like that means you failed your charisma check, but given that I’m arguing about politics on the Internet I can’t complain too much about getting my feefees hurt. Goes with the territory. 😉

    The irony is the D&D model actually explains HBD pretty well–there’s a bell curve, and it’s shifted to the right or left depending on the group averages, so most people are average in every group but at the tails of the curve the group differences really come out.

    Someone much nastier than me can come up with ‘real-life’ racial adjustments. 😉

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  120. Kronos says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    From the reviews, it looks like a hit piece. Next, they’ll do drive-by bios on Jerry Falwell and other 1980s figures that disdained the 1960s counterculture.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    , @Reg Cæsar
  121. @Dennis Dale

    Nah. Steve is drawing attention to a grammatical argument that was already going in when I had a girlfriend in the mid-1980s who was “an actor.” My point is that none of the social issues we spend so much time discussing here are new. They are in fact very old now, at least from where I come.

  122. pirelli says:

    For all those asking about the show, I’ve seen the first several episodes, and here’s my take. Schlafly is portrayed as both ambitious and intelligent (much more so than her husband, who is mostly shown as a pompous ass that Phyllis fools into thinking he wears the pants in the relationship) and, moreover, sincere in her beliefs. This latter aspect is presented as a paradox. She has to navigate rooms full of arrogant blowhards (men) who assume her intellectual inferiority, and she skillfully manipulates them into doing what she wants. Why then, we’re supposed to wonder, wouldn’t she want to change things? Well… maybe because she’s already able to get what she wants!

    The feminists are not shown in a uniformly positive light. Friedan is an obnoxious narcissist whose thin-skinned ego causes problems for “the movement.” Steinem is the Cool Girl, sexy and stylish (although Rose Byrne uses a god-awful nasal, whiny voice in portraying her — is that really what she sounded like?) but somewhat lacking in conviction and intensity. Oh, and there’s a black one who thinks the beckys are all blind to racial concerns (but you already assumed that, I’m sure).

    It’s not a bad show, and Blanchett is quite good, but there are much better things to watch on TV.

  123. @Kronos

    For crying out loud, its a pro-baby killing, pro-manhating series. What’s there to ponder? It’s not like any Hollywood studio would make a pro-life, anti-feminist movie. So its communist propaganda mixed with some soap opera women-cat-fighting crap that women love to watch; you can see that from the freaking trailers. Heck, you could see that on reading a synopsis on Wikipedia.

    Hard pass. And laugh at anyone who likes it.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @Kronos
  124. pirelli says:

    For all those asking about the show, I’ve seen the first several episodes, and here’s my take. Schlafly is portrayed as both ambitious and intelligent (much more so than her husband, who is mostly shown as a pompous ass that Phyllis fools into thinking he wears the pants in the relationship) and, moreover, sincere in her beliefs. This latter aspect is presented as a paradox. She has to navigate rooms full of arrogant blowhards (men) who assume her intellectual inferiority, and she skillfully manipulates them into doing what she wants. Why then, we’re supposed to wonder, wouldn’t she want to change things? Well… maybe because she’s already able to get what she wants!

    The feminists are not shown in a uniformly positive light. Friedan is an obnoxious narcissist whose thin-skinned ego causes problems for “the movement.” Steinem is the Cool Girl, sexy and stylish (although Rose Byrne uses a god-awful nasal, whiny voice in portraying her — is that really what she sounded like?) but somewhat lacking in conviction and intensity. Oh, and there’s a black one who thinks the beckys are all blind to racial concerns (but you already assumed that, I’m sure).

    It’s not a bad show, and Blanchett is quite good, but there are much better things to watch on TV. I’d give it a solid B.

  125. @SFG

    It’s a metaphor–‘whatever barrier you come up with, people will find a way around it.’

    Well, it’s a silly metaphor because as the formidability of the barrier increases, the fewer and fewer the number of people who will be able to successfully negotiate it. That’s the nature of barriers – if you’re a Medieval King you don’t throw up your hands and decide not to build walls for your castle since someone, somewhere who is really well motivated could possibly build a siege engine sufficient to defeat the castle wall. Hell, you might even supplement the barrier with redundant barriers or other means to turn back whoever is trying to breach it. That is to say if your intent and purpose was to prohibit people from breaching the barrier rather than waive them on over.

  126. @Ray P

    So, if some women tell us that you are a fantastic lover, we can safely discount it?

  127. @George

    I have a vague memory of bourgeois feminism vs working class feminism being a topic of the early Marxists, like 1900s + or -.

    I bet you’re the only supercentennarian who posts here.

    I’ve been keeping a 1916 death watch the past year. Kirk Douglas was crossed off in February, but I just learned theater critic Eric Bentley is still with us, as are Olivia de Havilland and Beverly Cleary.

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @Rob McX
  128. Mike Tre says:
    @Nodwink

    IIRC Willen Dafoe and James Caviezel and received death threats for their depictions of Jesus.

  129. @Abe

    I recall her being funny in interviews,but surely you agree that Flo at least, was funny?

  130. @Dennis Dale

    Or Hannay Gadsby!

    That may well be a rule- No lesbian comediennes are funny.

  131. Coemgen says:
    @huisache

    That commie pacifist George McGovern was flying scores of combat missions while the Duke was playing heroes for Republic Pictures and a hero of WW II forever after.

    Physical courage and moral courage are clearly two different species.

  132. Marty says:

    Not really OT, here’s a director talking about a biopic in development:

    Living and teaching in Memphis for the past four years has given me an intimate look at the injustice people of color face every day. Brian’s inspiring story is not only emblematic of that injustice, but a clarion call against a judicial system in urgent need of reform. It’s a story I had to tell.”

    The injustice in question? Being falsely charged with rape by a black girl.

  133. @anon

    You keep on insisting she isn’t whenever anyone brings it up.
    What’s the big deal, isn’t it okay to be a Jew?

    Nah, it’s perfectly okay. I was pointing out that Gordo’s allegation that there are “rules” in the entertainment industry that only Jews can play Jews is false.

  134. with Tracey Ullman as Betty Friedan…

    Because Ernest Borgnine is no longer available.

    Betty was from Peoria and Phyllis from St Louis. They are 10,000 miles apart– oops, wait… DistanceCalculator.net gave me Saint-Louis, Réunion Island. For St Louis, it’s only 146 miles.

    However, Cate’s Ivanhoe, Victoria is more than 10,500 miles from Tracey’s Slough. That’s farther apart than Peoria and Réunion.

    Paris-Réunion is the longest nonstop domestic flight in the world. (It’s four miles shorter from Orly than from CDG; keep that in mind if you’re racking up points.) Paris-Papeete is even longer, but there’s a stop at the halfway point– LAX.

    http://weekendblitz.com/top-10-longest-domestic-flights-in-the-world/

    Back to the topic– Liv Ullmann, isn’t Jewish, either, though her grandfather was sent to Dachau for helping those who were.

    As for Mrs Schlafly, everyone concentrates on her ERA fight, ignoring her equally (if not more) influential suupport for Barry Goldwater the previous decade. Yes, he and McGovern both got creamed, but Washington has been dominated by veterans of both campaigns ever since.

  135. Rob McX says:
    @Thoughts

    And honestly…the op-ed is probably fake and meant to promote the series.

    Yes, that’s the most probable reason that she (or her publicist) wrote it. Wouldn’t anyone with a TV series to promote die for a chance to boost it in an NYT op-ed?

  136. MEH 0910 says:
    @Father Coughlin

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracey_Ullman#Early_life

    Tracey Ullman was born Trace Ullman in Slough,[6] Buckinghamshire,[7] the younger of two daughters,[8] to Doreen (born Cleaver) and Antony John Ullman. Her mother was British, with Roma ancestry,[9] and her father was a Roman Catholic Pole.[10]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_Don%27t_Know_(Kirsty_MacColl_song)#Tracey_Ullman_version

    In October 1983 Tracey Ullman reached number two on the UK Singles Chart with her recording of “They Don’t Know” for Stiff Records: the track would be included on Ullman’s debut album You Broke My Heart in 17 Places.

    Well known in the UK as an actress/comedienne, Ullman had had a surprise Top Ten hit with her debut single “Breakaway”: Pete Waterman, whose Loose End Productions had recently provided Stiff with the Belle Stars hit singles, suggested to his friend Kirsty MacColl that she pitch her composition “They Don’t Know” for Ullman to record as her second single.[10]

    The production of Ullman’s “They Don’t Know” was credited to Peter Collins, Waterman’s Loose Ends partner. Waterman himself would hone the track, including having MacColl and Rosemary Robinson (the wife of Stiff Records president Dave Robinson) “add Shangri-La-type backing vocals”, in Waterman’s words, and having MacColl reprise her original “bay-ay-be-ee” to intro the third verse (as Ullman had a limited high-end range).[11]

    Tracey Ullman – They Don’t Know

    [MORE]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_Don%27t_Know_(Kirsty_MacColl_song)#Comparison_with_Kirsty_MacColl_original_version

    Although it has been alleged that Ullman’s version of “They Don’t Know” utilizes the backing track of the Kirsty MacColl original version, Ullman’s recording – produced by Peter Collins – was in fact brand-new in all respects, noticeably differing from MacColl’s recording by being in a different key, and featuring a slightly faster tempo, a distinctly different arrangement and a guitar solo that differs substantially from the one played on MacColl’s version, which was produced by Liam Sternberg. The confusion may stem from the fact that Ullman did use a previously-existing MacColl backing track when recording her own version of MacColl’s “Terry” in 1984. (Both versions of “Terry” were co-produced by MacColl.)

  137. Rob McX says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    And don’t forget Vera Lynn.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  138. @Rob McX

    And don’t forget Vera Lynn.

    I’ll let you keep the 1917 watch.

  139. @Father Coughlin

    I don’t know about this woman (and don’t care about her ethnicity). But- the whole business of collecting data on other people’s lives seems to me superficial…actually, of little worth. I happen to agree with John Updike, when he criticized Graham Greene’s biography.

    ….

    The trouble with literary biographies, perhaps, is that they mainly testify to the long worldly corruption of a life, as documented deeds and days and disappointments pile up, and cannot convey the unearthly human innocence that attends, in the perpetual present tense of living, the self that seems the real one.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  140. Pat Boyle says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Acting ability – that is the ability to to pretend to be someone else – is not actually highly regarded by the critics and even the paying audience. Almost every extroverted high school student has acted in the school play. So acting isn’t some rare ability that only shows up when the moon is blue. I played in our outlaw school parody of the teachers. I was a big hit. I delivered the performance that, they the other students, wanted and admired. I did it by pushing my lower jaw forward which made me look stupid. Dustin Hoffman did something similar in “Rainman”. He was probably better than I was, but he had a better script. Trust me, even without a single acting lesson, I can play stupid.

    People go to the movies to see crazy action, or crazy drama, or crazy comedy. They won’t buy a ticket to see actors act like real people in real situations. Movie stars – those with star quality – are not the inconspicuous actors who fade into the background. Think Arnold Schwarzenegger or Jim Carey.

    The other way to achieve fame and regard in acting is association with certain hit roles or being English. All English men seem to be natural actors. Perhaps it’s because jobs are available in the theater and movies but few elsewhere. When the town factory closes the laid off workers open a Bed and Breakfast and form and art colony. In any case Lawrence Olivier or Anthony Hopkins by dint of their Englishness became the “Greatest Actor in The World” in their respective eras.

    The other way is to play gangsters. For several decades now Pacino and De Niro have enjoyed gaudy acting reputations in spite of the fact that they are seldom very good in anything but a mobster movie. They are not really actors. Rather they are Gangster Actors (a subspecies). In earlier days Bogart, Cagney, and Robinson also achieved fame as gangsters. But they could do other parts as well.

    The best American movie actors in the traditional sense of versatile character performers would be Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, Kurt Russel and Kevin Kline. Russel can play monsters and goofy comics. But he does not get lauded for his acting. Probably because he once worked for Disney. All of these guys can do drama, tragedy, action, farce, and romance. Pacino can portray an aging dwarf mobster.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  141. Anonymous[216] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    You are one of my favorite commenters SFG but I saw a joke to be made, and maybe you were making it yourself but not obviously. No offense meant.

    My thought process was that Jews would have advanced Charisma, Intelligence, though as a people I think the chutzpah often outweighs the Wisdom. (Not in your case though.) Buffs at the expense of what? Dext? There have been some Jewish boxers, there is the whole jewelry making thing, not sure about that. Strength maybe. Consitution, there are a few IQ related diseases that are pretty much tradeoffs in that regard, I’ll go with that.

    I was about to joke about infravision as it related to half elves but thought meh.

    • Replies: @SFG
  142. J.Ross says:

    Turkey, which for months has been committing acts of war on the Greek border, in an effort to dump its entire “refugee” reservoir into Europe (during a declared pandemic), after having accepted a billion dollars from the EU to pretty much not do that, has now seized Greek territory.
    Time to find out if the EU governments (which have, against character, started supporting Greece) are serious about anything but taxes.
    https://voiceofeurope.com/2020/05/greece-turkish-armed-forces-seize-pocket-of-greek-territory/

  143. @Poirot

    lots of funny scenes in that show, sir. bowie’s cameo an all-timer.

  144. Pat Boyle says:
    @Manfred Arcane

    Acting ability – that is the ability to to pretend to be someone else – is not actually highly regarded by the critics and even the paying audience. Almost every extroverted high school student has acted in the school play. So acting isn’t some rare ability that only shows up when the moon is blue. I played in our outlaw school parody of the teachers. I was a big hit. I delivered the performance that, they the other students, wanted and admired. I did it by pushing my lower jaw forward which made me look stupid. Dustin Hoffman did something similar in “Rainman”. He was probably better than I was, but he had a better script. Trust me, even without a single acting lesson, I can play stupid.

    People go to the movies to see crazy action, or crazy drama, or crazy comedy. They won’t buy a ticket to see actors act like real people in real situations. Movie stars – those with star quality – are not the inconspicuous actors who fade into the background. Think Arnold Schwarzenegger or Jim Carey.

    The other way to achieve fame and regard in acting is association with certain hit roles or being English. All English men seem to be natural actors. Perhaps it’s because jobs are available in the theater and movies but few elsewhere. When the town factory closes the laid off workers open a Bed and Breakfast and form and art colony. In any case Lawrence Olivier or Anthony Hopkins by dint of their Englishness became the “Greatest Actor in The World” in their respective eras.

    The other way is to play gangsters. For several decades now Pacino and De Niro have enjoyed gaudy acting reputations in spite of the fact that they are seldom very good in anything but a mobster movie. They are not really actors. Rather they are Gangster Actors (a subspecies). In earlier days Bogart, Cagney, and Robinson also achieved fame as gangsters. But they could do other parts as well.

    The best American movie actors in the traditional sense of versatile character performers would be Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, Kurt Russel and Kevin Kline. Russel can play monsters and goofy comics. But he does not get lauded for his acting. Probably because he once worked for Disney. All of these guys can do drama, tragedy, action, farce, and romance. Pacino can portray an aging dwarf mobster.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    , @kaganovitch
  145. Sean says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Yes, it is different for actresses though. Jane (mother committed suicide) said:

    “When I was growing up we were told when that when women get older we’d have to choose between our ass and our face”.

    She had a young Sasha Gray (who appeared in a Steven Soderbergh film) rump. So Jane got two chances at being cast for the role: going in to the office and then when she was leaving!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  146. Anonymous[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Smith

    GQ worked great if you either loved or hated Star Trek. But someone with no experience with the show would probably have just found it weird and baffling.

  147. @stillCARealist

    Still, A very attractive woman approached me as I left the grocery store yesterday. Getting a little too close she pulled down her mask and said…”I’ll do anything you want for fifty bucks.” I blurted out…”Can you give me a haircut?”

  148. @fish

    fish, you are probably right and that is because they couldn’t see past one word and realize the black sheriff is the hero in the movie.

  149. donut says:

    This comment thread is full preposterous second or third hand stories about people approaching actors and attacking them for the behavior of their characters in a TV show or a movie . I have heard these idiotic anecdotes since my Grandmother told me one in the 60’s . I never believed any of them until now . If Steves’s commenters are dumb enough to believe that shit then maybe there are people out there that stupid . BTW I never swallowed that BS about Orson Wells “War of the Worlds” broadcast either .

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  150. Dennis Dale says: • Website

    All English men seem to be natural actors.

    Maybe. Maybe they just have the longest and most venerable theater tradition in the West (world?). I’ve heard there was this Shakespeare guy…

    The best American movie actors in the traditional sense of versatile character performers would be Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, Kurt Russel and Kevin Kline.

    Versatility is the last thing I’d associate with the first two. Kline certainly qualifies, but there are better and he’s a nonentity on screen no matter the role. They can all be funny, but that doesn’t make one a character actor. Philip Hoffman was a character actor (Dustin Hoffman is the grand old man of character actors). Joaquin Phoenix is a character actor.

    One thing I think happens is British actors have to work on voice if they want to work in Hollywood or New York; they have to at least have a host of American accents. American actors can be lazy. You still get awful accents out of great actors. I watched “The Illusionist” finally. Edward Norton is playing a Viennese with a sort of soft English accent. Cringe. There’s another great character actor you forgot about.

  151. @Thomm

    Thomm, right you are and look at the cover stories on the mags at the super market check out counter. They believe that shit.

  152. @Buffalo Joe

    A couple of years ago, at WLS-AM (890), the late Don Wade and his wife Roma were being visited by the Gov. of Indiana. They were astounded when the only people to show up were the Gov. and his aide, NO security entourage.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  153. J1234 says:

    Making biopics of the enemy means the left gets to define it’s enemy, and (in its own mind) own history. And with the base of the left being dumber than it’s ever been before, owning history by making movies is more doable than it’s ever been before. The left just has to portray its enemy in a way that appears even-handed to its base (which has a really low standard for even-handedness, despite living in this mythology that asserts it’s very even-handed.) And you do this by portraying your enemies, like the essentially evil Phyllis Schlafly, as also possessing some relatively minor positive qualities, as well.

    • Agree: Father Coughlin
  154. Whiskey says: • Website

    So, real life Nurse Betty? Zellwegger was great in that.

  155. Poirot says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Michelle Malkin wrote a small piece on Schlafly about a month ago: “Phyllis Schlafly: Godmother of America First” https://www.amren.com/commentary/2020/04/phyllis-schlafly-godmother-of-america-first/

  156. @Jim Don Bob

    No, no, you’re confusing Harvey with Steve McQueen, who really didn’t give a damn:

    https://www.counter-currents.com/2016/04/st-steven-of-le-mans/

    Harvey was simply a supercilious prick, who always played himself; thus, his best performances were as unlikable pricks, as in The Manchurian Candidate or A Dandy in Aspic.

    https://www.counter-currents.com/2016/12/passing-the-buck-spy-dandy-ubermensch/

  157. @Anon

    Thinking about it that way, I decided I will try never to get another haircut.

    Let your freak flag fly, Brother.

    And don’t let them take your power.

    • Agree: Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  158. Lot says:
    @Father Coughlin

    Her live Top of the Pops performance was excellent.

  159. @Anon

    I had a professor in college, a wacky guru type, who had his hair cut once a year. (He also wore plaid lumberjack shirts — this was the 70s, long before grunge, green work pants from Sears (like Homer Simpson) and brown oxfords. Every day. He dressed that way in grad school ’cause it was cheap, and never saw a reason to change).

    Anyway, students were greatly amused when he came in for the final exam in April, since his head was closely trimmed, more than a crew cut, not quite shaved entirely; that was a little treat before the grueling exam. Then he let his hair grow for the next 12 months. It was sort of like Bozo, but white, and in fact he looked exactly like the pictures of old Schopenhauer, even facially (ironic, because he was a dogmatic Hegelian). Hence, their amazement at the transformation on exam day.

    You should listen to AnotherDad about exercise and diet. This guy didn’t drink or drug, but he chainsmoked 3 packs of Pall Malls a day (he could light up with one hand while lecturing, cigs in one shirt pocket, matches in the other), drank gallons of lousy cafeteria coffee (instant from a machine), never exercised (he was the only one to use the old 30s elevator to go up one floor), ate whatever crap he wanted, and dropped dead of a heart attack at 59. He had fun, though.

  160. J.Ross says:
    @donut

    This: why is there tertiary propagation of almost-certainly-false stories about Dumb Middle Americans and not talking-up of stories about highly educated elites conned into supporting terrorist revolutionists and self-defeating economic policy disasters? Which idiot type (assuming both exist) is more dangerous? This thread is so goofy its voice of reason is donut.

    • Replies: @donut
  161. anon[185] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    He was also wildly talented and one of the finest science fiction/horror writers of his era.

    Eh, not really. I found a copy of “Dangerous Visions” in a used bookstore. Maybe it was great stuff back 50 years ago but it’s kind of so-what mainstream now. In my opinion a direct line can be drawn from the stories of Ellison and some other “new wave” writers to the modern pink SF. Really, it’s not that far from “I have no mouth” or “Repent, harlequin!” to “If you were a dinosaur, my love” which was given some prestige award.

    If Harlan Ellison had written “Space Raptor Butt Invasion” the character development might have been better, but the basic plot would remain the same. He was overrated.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    , @SFG
    , @anonymous
  162. anon[185] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    It’s a metaphor–‘whatever barrier you come up with, people will find a way around it.’

    It’s sophistry. Because every open borders bonehead lives in a dwelling with a front door that can be closed and locked. I’ve never, ever encountered any open borders libtard, liberteeny, GOPe “muh eeCONomee” etc. fan who failed to close and lock the door to their apartment / house / mobile home / whatever before bed. If they really believed their own bullshit they’d remove the front door and replace it with clear plastic sheet, or just leave the aperture open to anyone passing by.

    But they do not, and would never, do that.

    They talk “no walls” but act as if walls can actually keep people out, when it’s their own stuff and own skin on the line. Lying hypocrites, quite ready to risk other people’s lives and children, just not their own.

  163. Kronos says:
    @R.G. Camara

    I agree, but sometimes the obvious needs to be stated again and again. This wasn’t produced by a tiny Christian/family friendly studio. The US has been receiving this from Hollywood for a very long long time now…

  164. @kaganovitch

    Honestly would not put Paglia and Florence King in the same sentence. Florence King was a better writer about ordinary events and people. She could relate to people much better, perhaps because she came from the South and didn’t have things easily handed to her like Paglia has.

    Why isn’t there ever a single major criticism, a responsible criticism vs Camile Paglia? Who died and made her the be all and end all of popular culture pseudo-intellectualism? She’s a scholar for the most part, about popular culture. Not like she’s an expert on Greco-Roman, Medieval, or even the Industrial Revolution. Seems like ever since Rush Limbaugh endorsed her because they got along quite famously back in the early ’90’s, the Right has totally embraced her. Why? Because of her early fan girl crush, of never ending fascination with the likes of “artists” such as Madonna? Because of her writings on Hollywood, particularly ca. mid. century? She is a professor, nothing less, and certainly nothing more. It’s not like she’s among the top ten professors in the US that have directly contributed to American knowledge. Surprised that she hasn’t made a fetish out of Kim Kardashian, and attempted to convince the US that Kim is really a higher calling, not an object of lust and desire, but a greatness, found only in a few mortals every other generation.

    If anything, there won’t be any major film made about the likes of Camille Paglia when she kicks. Phyllis Schlafly had far greater achievements, from working in a WW2 factory, putting herself through college to earn a law degree, having a happy marriage of nearly a half century and raising 7 children, to writing various policy based books and heading a national magazine for over 40 yrs. Not to mention she single handedly prevented a major policy agenda from becoming part of the Constitution.

    Sooner would put the word “hack” upon Paglia than Schlafly. “Hack” both in a figurative and literal definition of the term.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  165. @Jim Don Bob

    My wife is pretty conservative and realistic and yet still loves Mockingbird and worships the ground Harper Lee walks upon. She teaches this twaddle at school and the kids love it too. Fortunately her other literary fetish is Shakespeare, which I can deal with. She also adores films like Hidden Figures, and she knows she’s going alone to those.

    • Replies: @anon
  166. @Dennis Dale

    The English guy who played House was very good. He sounded much more authentic as an American than he did in his true voice.
    Tracey Ullman sounds fake as an American,at least in her old show.
    BTW I saw Schlafly debate Freidan at the U of I in the 70s. Schlafly won,but the audience of college girl

  167. Art Deco says:
    @Carol

    Men were bitter and disillusioned about marriage and kids in the 50s. I

    A social fiction promoted by Barbara Ehrenreich. (Who blows dead dogs).

  168. @Dennis Dale

    Hold up now. For decades it was cringeworthy to watch Brit actors attempting an American accent. They simply couldn’t get it right. Even respected Brit actresses such as classically trained Claire Bloom, when attempting a Cockney accent, couldn’t get it right. There are limitations for actors, even the great ones.

    If anything, MTV and the total domination over last 40 yrs of US Pop Culture has helped improve British actors with their attempts at American accents. Some of them go for the high end Canadian way, where there’s no discernible accent at all, and English is simply spoken as plainly as possible without any indication that the person is from anywhere in particular. Brits have learned to clip their accents, but they haven’t really learned to develop an American regional accent that’s convincingly credible. Think Canadian actors such as Raymond Burr or Walter Pidgeon. They didn’t speak English with a noticeable trace of any accent at all. They could in theory be “American”, but not really from any one locale. The closest to a Canadian accent would be the Northwestern area, Portland, OR or Seattle, WA. There is no discernible accent that suggests that they’re from anywhere, much less from historically settled American regions, such as the South, the Midwest, or the Northeast. And of course, the US Northwest shares a border with British Columbia, Canada.

  169. Art Deco says:
    @Thomm

    No, they no perfectly well they’re lying.

    Women find fictional narratives more engaging. They don’t think they’re real.

    • Troll: R.G. Camara
  170. George says:

    At 0:20 a black domestic worker. This is 1970 America, I wonder what race she would be today.

  171. @anon

    Ellison does go down in TV history for penning one of the best Outer Limits and one of the best Star Treks. (Demon With a Glass Hand and City on the Edge of Forever, respectively).

    I’d award a similar exacta to the lesser known Jerome Bixby, who wrote Star Trek’s wildly popular Mirror! Mirror! (with the bearded alternate-universe Spock) and did Twilight Zone’s truly scary It’s a Good Life (with horrible little Billy Mumy) from his own original short story.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  172. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    You’re overreacting. Paglia is a well educated public intellectual, i.e. intellectualized entertainer. She is not a “pseudo-intellectual”; she’s a real deal. Just, that’s what intellectuals are supposed to be.

    And of course, she’s not a scholar.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  173. SFG says:
    @anon

    Sure, Moorcock and the like. You could even count Heinlein in there with his polyamory, though they’d undoubtedly call him a flaming sexist. (He was actually on the feminist side–his women were unrealistically competent, much like his men.)

    SF was never Christian, though, contra Vox Day. You had atheist-rationalist types like Asimov and Clarke, but SF was always about science. It’s only now that the SJWs took over that it’s getting taken over by identity politics and the like. But remember the identity politics people and the scientific atheists were on the same side in that era–they only tossed out the Sam Harris/Richard Dawkins types recently.

    Now *fantasy* has a long Christian tradition, dating from Tolkien and Lewis. (Even Rowling has said there are Christian themes, albeit liberal ones, in Harry Potter.)

    • Replies: @Manfred Arcane
    , @anon
  174. SFG says:
    @Anonymous

    No serious offense taken. Like I said, it’s the Internet. I’ll live. 😉

    Honestly, we’re talking about group traits, so I’d say high Intelligence, low Wisdom. Constitution penalty? Sure, I’ll buy that, what with the indoor occupations. Charisma isn’t finely grained enough in D&D–given that you’re dealing with a pushy personality that nonetheless gets what it wants, I’d call it a wash. I’d actually go first-ed White Wolf and say penalties to Charisma (and Appearance), bonuses to *Manipulation*, but (a) they use a point-buy system and (b) once you’re mixing RPG systems the joke isn’t funny anymore except on RPG.net, which is so SJW it reads like a parody of blue-haired protesters. (Seriously, go there and look at their list of bans. A guy just got banned for saying ‘See, the normals are right, we don’t have a sense of humor’ on a thread about gaming jokes.)

    The joke was that people were watching so much fantasy it was affecting their views of reality, and then I pulled out a D&D metaphor, showing I had been affected too.

    Anyway, like I said, if you’re going to go arguing about stuff on the Internet you can’t get too worked up. Go in peace, and vote for Trump, he may be a conman but what do you think President Stacy Abrams is going to do after Biden resigns one month in?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  175. Anon[139] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    On the weight thing, I made the mistake of reading a few too many genetics books, as extra credit for iSteve. For instance, Plomin in his book a couple of years ago uses “body weight” as his go-to example — trying to avoid things like race and IQ for career preservation purposes, I presume. It turns out that body weight in adulthood has a heritability of 0.8, one of the most heritable traits, equal to height (and BMI is derived from the two). For comparison, the heritability of IQ is only 0.5, male homosexuality (“Born That Way”?) only about 0.2 (meaning that gay conversion therapy may not be completely crazy, although its practitioners seem to be).

    When you throw into the mix that everything is a trait (including motivations and self control) and everything is heritable (Turkheimer’s First Law) … it starts to become clear why 2/3s of Americans are overweight or obese, none of them like that condition, and almost none keep lost weight off for five years if they ever manage to lose any.

    A time machine back to 1980 would help with the environmental component: only 1/3 were fat back then.

  176. @Pat Boyle

    Much of my fascination with 60s/70s TV centers not around the stars but on the guest villains — the actors cast as tyrants, mobsters, murderers and evil geniuses. Playing the killer of the week on Columbo, for example, was a unique chance for a guest star to shine.

    But it was particularly fascinating to see an actor generally known as a good guy turning around and being smartly cast against type as a smug, sociopathic villain — Shatner or Robert Vaughn when their own series had run out, or former cuddly sitcom dads like Robert Reid, Carl Betz, William Windom or William Schallert. Mission Impossible effectively cast Robert Goulet as a gangster. Comic impressionist Frank Gorshin was uncanny on Batman and Star Trek.

    So if you like Cate Blanchett but revile Phyllis Schlafly, you should relish her sinking her teeth into this role. But these people have just lost it.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  177. @SFG

    Lewis worked in sci-fi, as well–although your point about lefty domination of sci-fi still mostly holds, since he wrote his Space Trilogy in part as an answer to the atheist-socialist sci-fi writings of H.G. Wells and Olaf Stapledon, who were more representative of the genre at that time. Jules Verne is the only other Christian I can think of among the early generations of sci-fi writers.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
  178. Jack D says:

    From the NY Times, I gathered that Blanchett did too good a job. She is such a talented actress that she made her character seem fully human and not the usual Hollywood cardboard cutout of an EEEVIL right wing person. They would have preferred if she hadn’t tried so hard so that we could have seen Schlafly as just pure unalloyed EEVIL like Trump.

    Of course they can do this because Schlafly is safely dead. Maybe in a couple of decades when Trump is also dead it will be ok to portray him as a fully rounded human but for so long as he occupies the White House he may only be portrayed as a monster or a buffoon.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  179. @Jack D

    Doubtful. The Left’s characterization of the Right these days boils down to one or more of the following:

    1. Nazi.
    2. Homobophic but secretly gay.
    3. Stupid inbred.
    4. Machiavellian weaselly schemer.
    5. Stepford wife.
    6. Petty tyrant happy to be a tool of the establishment.
    7. Had serious abuse when younger, and current evil stance is them acting out instead of going to therapy.
    8. Homophobic but not secretly gay.
    9. Psycho Christian.
    10. Power hungry greedy autocrat.
    11. Did I mention Nazi?

    In other words, 2-dimensional depictions all, and all really just projections of the Left’s personal issues.

    Very likely Schafly’s depiction will be a combo of 1, 6, 7, 8, and 9. I’ll bet Blanchett drops some racist lines and anti-gay lines, be depicted going to church and obeying her husband, and show her gleeful in making others miserable.

    N.B.: Although I’ve not watched either The Handmaid’s Tale (as has no one who isn’t a manhater), the Left has tried to make a character named “Aunt” something or another on that into a meme. Aunt something or another apparently is a woman who is quite happy to police and enforce the draconian oppressive laws against women in the show. I’ll bet Blanchett’s character is going to be like that, and deliberately so.

    Sad!

    • Replies: @Father Coughlin
  180. anon[184] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    SF was always about science. It’s only now that the SJWs took over that it’s getting taken over by identity politics and the like

    Only now? Two examples.

    David Gerrold – Chtorr features his protagonist having sex with preteen boys in I think the second book. But hardly a surprise.

    Samuel R. Delany

    Pick just about anything, but I dare you to read all of Dhalgren, every. single. page. Look at the publishing date. The first number isn’t “2”, it’s like 35 or 40 years old.

    Identity politics and pedosex have been building up in SF for decades. It’s just become pretty much the only game in town in recent years thanks to certain figures in the SF publishing ghetto. But the “new wave” writers pushed identity politics and sexual “adventures” very hard.

    PS: Harlan Ellison was an overrated, whiny little bitch.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @MEH 0910
  181. @Thomm

    There is a reason in many cultures that one male witness was worth two female witnesses in legal proceedings.

  182. Neoconned says:
    @SFG

    People seriously have Pratt crap for what happened in that mediocre movie?

  183. martin_2 says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Even putting a ladder of that size up against a wall is very demanding and requires at least two strong men, since they’re on the ground and it is difficult to gain leverage. You have to inch it up.

    It would be totally impossible to then lift it up from the ground and pull it over on the other side. It is totally typical that a female politician would talk in this ignorant way, having never been in the least involved in any manual work and having no clue of the difficulties involved.

  184. @anon

    Censorship kept a lot of sci-fi authors’ weird sex interests out of sci-fi for a long time. Heinlein supposedly started working on “Stranger in a Strange Land” in 1949, the same year Nabokov started working on “Lolita” in the expectation that censorship was eventually going to crack up. I read a book of letters by P.G. Wodehouse and one letter from 1949 to a friend was about young Norman Mailer’s WWII novel “The Naked and the Dead.” Wodehouse figured that books like that were just the beginning of a long trend toward more explicit material in fiction. I think Wodehouse said he was too old to catch the new wave, but younger writers should keep in mind the direction history was going on this point.

    In 1955 Nabokov published “Lolita” anonymously in English in Paris. Then in 1958 it was published under his own name in UK and US and was a vast bestseller, selling 15 million copies. Heinlein kept a close eye on Nabokov’s career so he went ahead with publishing “Stranger” in 1961. Heinlein had bad cerebral problems from 1966-69, but when he came out of the fog, he was rich and famous because “Stranger” had taken off with hippies, so he wrote a lot of self-indulgent novels in his old age. But his best stuff is mostly his juveniles from the 1950s in which society’s strict rules holding back his various fetishes helped his self-discipline.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  185. @Known Fact

    Harlan Ellison was a big deal in L.A. in the 1970s. He was constantly getting into feuds with other locals and hashing them out in the newspapers and local magazines at great length. He kind of reminds me of Trump in personality.

  186. @Father Coughlin

    1-Name Ullman is Jewish 95% of the time. Father listed only as “Polish” … no religion known.

    Name Ullman is not Jewish 95% of the time. Of notable Ullmans listed by Wiki around Half are Jewish. Of the first ten random Ullman obits I checked only half were Jewish.

    3-She got help from Jewish nepotism by being signed to Stiff Records (Andrew Jakeman) even though she wasnt much of a singer, had to sing other people’s songs, and had to rely on Phil Spectorish overdubs of Kirsty MacColl’s voice.

    Does that make Milli Vanilli Jewish too?

    4-Is political (had a video that featured the British Labour Party politician Neil Kinnock, at the time the Leader of the Opposition)

    Surely you know the overwhelming majority of the Arts world leans left? This is just an exercise in solipsism.

    You bring to mind an old joke.. A man goes to a psychiatrist. To start things off, the psychiatrist suggests they start with a Rorschach Test. He holds up the first picture and asks the man what he sees.
    “A man and a woman making love in a park,” the man replies.

    He holds up the second picture and asks the man what he sees.

    “A man and a woman making love in a boat.”

    He holds up the third picture.

    “A man and a woman making love at the beach.”

    This goes on for the entire set of inkblots; the man says he sees a man and a woman making love in every one of them. At the end of the test, the psychiatrist looks at the patient and says, “I think it’s safe to say, you have a preoccupation with sex.”

    And the man replies, “Me!? You’re the one showing the dirty pictures!”

    • Agree: AKAHorace
  187. @Dennis Dale

    Well this is sort of Lesbian comedy but not by a lesbian..

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  188. @kaganovitch

    Big effort-post there Kaganovitch. You even went for a Naxalt. And ignored most of my points which were obviously cumulative.

    The big question is why the effort post?

    Are you putting your hard earned dollars on her not being of any Jewish extraction? No, of course not.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @kaganovitch
  189. @R.G. Camara

    “Aunt” something or another on that into a meme. Aunt something or another apparently is a woman who is quite happy to police and enforce the draconian oppressive laws against women in the show. I’ll bet Blanchett’s character is going to be like that, and deliberately so.

    Like Uncle Tom? I get it. The J-Left is nothing if not predictable.

  190. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    Harlan Ellison was a big deal in L.A. in the 1970s. He was constantly getting into feuds with other locals and hashing them out in the newspapers and local magazines at great length. He kind of reminds me of Trump in personality.

    A big difference between the two is Trump has a big ego, and likes to be liked. Ellison had a big ego, and HAD to be liked. He took a perverse angle at fulfilling his prime directive, which was receiving love by constantly proving how smart/creative he could appear. His ego pushed him to the point of being a boor, on many occasions, and he would sometimes be appalled with himself later.

    Trump likes to be liked, but he doesn’t HAVE to be liked. If he were to become aware of his boorishness, he’d just brush it off. “Eh. One of those days…”

    That’s a key factor in a great leader. He likes to be liked, but he doesn’t have to be liked. Ellison… didn’t enjoy that psychological feature. He was a needy little guy.

    I guess a good president has at least one overriding trait a good parent has. A good parent isn’t your friend. He/she’s your parent. Trump isn’t your friend. He’s Donald Trump.

    You better get your shit together.

  191. @Pat Boyle

    For several decades now Pacino and De Niro have enjoyed gaudy acting reputations in spite of the fact that they are seldom very good in anything but a mobster movie. They are not really actors. Rather they are Gangster Actors (a subspecies).

    DeNiro was magnificent in Raging Bull as boxer Jake LaMotta. Also very good in Taxi Driver as Travis Bickle. Neither of those are gangster roles.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  192. anon[390] • Disclaimer says:
    @Known Fact

    My wife is pretty conservative and realistic and yet still loves Mockingbird and worships the ground Harper Lee walks upon.

    Harper Lee is dead. So is the author of Mockingbird.

    She teaches this twaddle at school and the kids love it too.

    No one wants to be the first to stop clapping. Especially in high school, for a grade. It might go on one’s Permanent Record.

    She also adores films like Hidden Figures, and she knows she’s going alone to those.

    She may be “conservative and realistic” but the Hidden Figures are women. Ingroup preference detected. You have my sympathy.

  193. Anon[103] • Disclaimer says:

    Wait, wasn’t Schlafly Catholic?

    So this Hollywood movie is basically revenge rewriting of history, with nice-on-the-right-side-of-history jewish Friedan as the good guy? How the Jews must love their present power of shaping culture!

    I’d love to see EM Jones review.

  194. anon[390] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Brits have learned to clip their accents, but they haven’t really learned to develop an American regional accent that’s convincingly credible.

    It’s not even close to Christmas, but whatever, meet Clay. Bill Clay. As American as anyone else…

    PS: John McClane is NSFW – Never Safe For Work.

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
  195. Anon[103] • Disclaimer says:
    @Father Coughlin

    Tend to agree w you. Either jewish (Trace is a Catholic first name??) or rootless white. The other option is she fell for a Jew, à la Simone de Beauvoir. Women assimilate to their lovers, and some become useful idiots.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  196. @Jim Don Bob

    There is something so after school special about even the best of Left-wing propaganda.

    For my money, Inherit the Wind is the most enraging piece of leftist, anti-Christian propaganda lies. Growing up I thought it was all true, and then I looked up the history of the Scopes monkey fake trial. Man, what a joke. This was a left-wing stacked deck and a show trial all mixed together.

    Clarence Darrow was an abomination on the legal system.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  197. JMcG says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    That’s beautifully put.

  198. @kaganovitch

    De Niro and Streep started out in similar heavy drama movies, like The Deer Hunter, then successfully moved into comedy. But Streep kept going and going because of her remarkable range and mimicry skills, while De Niro is mostly great at playing De Niro. In retrospect, De Niro is more like an old time movie star like Clark Gable or John Wayne who mostly played Clark Gable or John Wayne, while Streep is representative of the greater technical skills of more recent actors.

    De Niro delayed that recognition by doing a lot of body-morphing early in his career — skinny for Taxi Driver, muscular and then fat for Raging Bull. But he’s still basically some version of De Niro.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  199. @kaganovitch

    Tracey Ullman wrote about a visit she and her daughter made to a genealogist in her 1998 book “Tracey Takes On:”

    “What is your maiden name, Madam?”

    “Ullman,” I told him.

    “Ah!” he said. “Is that Scandinavian?”

    “No, Austrian, as far as I know, but that doesn’t stop people thinking I’m Liv’s daughter and sending me invitations to the Helsinki Poetry Festival.”

    “Well, would it be a name of Hebrew origin?” he ventured.

    “No, I’m not Jewish, but don’t tell anyone in show business that! Once the Eltham Jewish Pensioners asked me to their bing night, saying, “Tracey, darling, we’re not sure if you’re Jewish, but you’re so clever you must be.” And then a cousin in Kracow told e that my Polish grandmother was rumored to have converted to Catholicism in the 30s, so I might turn out to be a secret Jew, like the the American secretary of state Madeleine Albright, wouldn’t that be great?” …

    “My mum’s mum was a Penfold,” I told him. “And her family were Romany Gypsies who ran a traveling fairground.”

    “Any leads on your grandfather’s side?” he asked wearily.

    “Oh, yeah, the sailor Harry Hagstrum, or it might have been Hogstrume, we’re not really sure. … Well, when he found out that my gran was up the duff, he went back to his native Norway (or it might have been Sweden) rather sharpish.”

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  200. Hibernian says:

    It’s pretty sad when a great actress has to explain to her progressive, graduate-degreed fans that she isn’t the same as the character she plays on TV.

    LOL

  201. @Bardon Kaldian

    I’m actually on the mark. Again proving my point no one seems willing to criticize one who seems to have a reputation for no apparent reason. So well educated but yet can’t be much bothered to teach a generation of students to become better informed about classical civilization (unless it revolves around a “relevant” topic like Madonna, BDSM, etc).

    Her forte is in pop culture, historical pop culture (mid to late 20th century) but still pop culture. Which is pseudo work. It is crap, period, and not worthy of an educator to spend time teaching. That’s what she’s usually taught for most of her career: Nor Greco-Roman art, literature, drama, history, not the great classics of Western Civilization, but C-R-A-P. All about pop culture. How exactly does that help raise the awareness, much less the ability of students to learn from the past and become better informed? A true educator raises the awareness of difficult subjects, thereby making their students better informed who then go on to raise up generations of better informed people. The hack just embraces pop culture and attempts to raise the likes of 2nd rate kitsch up to the level of art.

    Similar to those who thought that Andy Warhol was a creative 2nd coming of DaVinci. Warhol was a fraud, but a brilliant marketer (and also a very excellent illustrator, graphic arts for commercials). He found his niche or his “calling” in marketing a something no one had seen before: convincing the masses that soup cans were “art”, or skillful arranging of photo negatives of Elvis were to be ranked up there with the likes of the Sistine Chapel. He was basically a fraud. He earned his bread and butter later on by painting rich celebrities. So if one basically verbal fellatios the likes of Madonna, Elizabeth Taylor, and other 20th century pop culture icons, it’s time to call fraud, fake, and foul upon the likes of one in academia.

    At best, perhaps it could be said that Paglia reminds one of Richard Burton. When he began his career, he was considered to be a tremendous talent on the stage, was easily the direct challenge to Olivier in Shakespeare, hands down. And then as alcoholism got the better of him, and through various career mishaps, he became more and more involved in 2nd and 3rd rate movies until he became something in later years resembling a hack.

    When it comes to raising awareness to better society as a whole, if one’s not part of the solution, then they are part of the problem. On that score I’ll take Florence King hands down over that.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  202. Rob McX says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Clarence Darrow was an abomination on the legal system.

    I think he mounted the original “Twinkie defence” back in 1924, in his successful effort to save the lives of Leopold and Loeb. He wore down the judge using an army of doctors and psychiatrists spouting psychobabble about what led them to murder.

  203. @Known Fact

    “or former cuddly sitcom dads like Robert Reid, Carl Betz, William Windom or William Schallert. ”

    Or Bill Cosby.

  204. @Steve Sailer

    And now she and her daughter can collect their saliva for the DNA test and end all the stories. She sounds as creative as Yul Brynner was with endless legends and fictions about his origins.

  205. Lurker says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Guess Who’s Jogging to Dinner.

    • LOL: Rob McX
  206. Historically, Hollywood has cast great beauties in roles based on real but ordinary-looking people. In Mrs. America, the usual situation is reversed.

  207. anon[282] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    One more thing to get you ready for old age:
    Practice rolls and falls. I practice back falls, side falls, and forward rolls on astroturf. It toughens your bones, gets you used to a little pain, and prepares you to instinctively land well when you fall accidently.
    All old people fall, and it is frequently the death of them.

  208. @Kronos

    Next, they’ll do drive-by bios on Jerry Falwell and other 1980s figures that disdained the 1960s counterculture.

    Or Jerry Falwell, Jr.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-education-of-jerry-falwell-jr-11589824107

    • Replies: @Kronos
  209. Cortes says:
    @Muggles

    I agree entirely. Thanks.

    The world is wide and wonderful enough that seeing people glued to their little gadgets is depressing. Philip Dick had it spot on with the creation of “Perky Pat.”

  210. AKAHorace says:
    @Manfred Arcane

    Lewis worked in sci-fi, as well–although your point about lefty domination of sci-fi still mostly holds, since he wrote his Space Trilogy in part as an answer to the atheist-socialist sci-fi writings of H.G. Wells

    I would recommend “That Hideous Strength” to anyone who reads Steve Sailer. It is the sort of Science Fiction that will confirm the prejudices of those think that wearing face masks is the first step towards scientific fascism and womens suffrage. Also very well written.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  211. MEH 0910 says:
    @Anon

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracey_Ullman#Early_life

    On the subject of the spelling of her name: “My real name is Trace Ullman, but I added the ‘y.’ My mother said it was spelled the American way, but I don’t think she can spell! I always wanted a middle name. My mum used to tell me it was Mary but I never believed her. I looked on my birth certificate and I didn’t have one, just Trace Ullman.”[11]

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  212. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.heinleinsociety.org/rah/biographies.html

    In January 1970, I Will Fear No Evil was in the initial stages of cutting when Heinlein developed a perforated diverticulum. By the time it was discovered, seventeen days later (Mrs. Heinlein indicated that Heinlein had an extraordinarily high threshhold of pain), peritonitis had set in, and he very nearly died. All the business affairs, including getting the new book ready for publication, fell on Ginny’s shoulders, with only the barest minimum of feedback from a man sometimes too weak to manage more than a nod or a word or two in response to questions. Recuperating from major illnesses was always a full-time job for Heinlein, and this one took the better part of two years. During this period, Heinlein gave a few a few interviews, but it was not until 1972 that he was back to strength for writing.

    Heinlein’s near-brush with death kept him busy just surviving for nearly two years. There were few projects. By 1972 he felt well enough to write and started Time Enough for Love.

    He was awarded the first SFWA Grand Master Nebula Award in 1975. The years of 1976 and 1977 were spent organizing blood drives, tied in with his appearance as Guest of Honor for the third time at a World Science Fiction Convention, “MidAmeriCon,” in Kansas City, Missouri, over the Labor Day weekend of 1976. Heinlein continued to write during these years, but for one reason or another, he decided not to publish the work.

    At the end of 1977, exhausted by the ongoing effort of the blood drives, Robert and Ginny took a vacation to the South Pacific. Early in 1978, they were walking on a beach at Moorea, Tahiti, when he had a Transient Ischemic Attack, a brief blockage of blood to his brain that can be a precursor to a cerebral stroke. A CAT scan ruled out a brain tumor, but the flow of blood to his brain continued to decrease. Only two months into a six month regime of medication he was “dull-normal, slipping toward ‘human vegetable,’” sleeping 16 hours a day and barely functional the rest of the time. A heart catheterization for angiogram revealed that his left internal carotid artery was completely blocked, too high for surgery. A carotid bypass operation restored oxygen flow to his brain.

    As soon as he was able to work, Heinlein started writing The Number of the Beast. An abridgement was published in Omni Magazine, and the advance paid by Fawcett/Columbine was a record-breaking $500,000.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  213. MEH 0910 says:
    @anon

    Pick just about anything, but I dare you to read all of Dhalgren, every. single. page. Look at the publishing date. The first number isn’t “2”, it’s like 35 or 40 years old.

    Dhalgren was published in 1975. It’s 45 years old.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  214. Anonymous[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sean

    So, Chrissie Hynde chose her ass and Debbie Harry her face. That actually makes some sense when you think of it.

  215. gate666 says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    childless women outearn men.

  216. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Too long post. Just, you seem to insist that public intellectuals should be serious thinkers & that their work should be scholarly, erudite.

    But- that’s not who they are.

    They’re intellectual entertainers, and their work is basically about dissemination of ideas on…everything. Their precursors are Greek Sophists. Some of them can be really creative or scholarly in their chosen fields, but most of them are not. And, most of the time, they are wrong (Sartre & Chomsky on politics, Paul Krugman on Trump & economy).

    Paglia is essentially an intellectualized commentator on popular culture & social trends. Hers are not serious scholarly sociological, political, philosophical, … analyses. In this respect, she is not much different from the likes of Slavoj Žižek & comp. Umberto Eco was a mixed bag- an erudite literary philosopher & writer who achieved popularity, but whose ideas were not such a big deal.

    That’s who they are.

    True, there are serious thinkers who are also public intellectuals (Raymond Aron, Ralf Dahrendorf, Mircea Eliade,..), but they’re in the minority.

    • Replies: @Abe
  217. sb says:
    @Dennis Dale

    Brits and especially Australians learn and practise accents as part of the curriculum if they do any acting school – it’s seen as part of the craft and important for employability . Or so I’m told .
    Americans are notoriously bad at accents of the other English speaking countries but then it is rarely an important skill for them to master .
    A number of Brits can do the Australian accent well – Kate Winslet especially comes to mind – whereas I’ve never heard an American who would score a pass mark

  218. anonymous[204] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    ” Maybe it was great stuff back 50 years ago but it’s kind of so-what mainstream now.”

    Well yeah. Happens a lot. Ellison’s work was dark, edgy, creative and not mainstream (at the time). It is mainstream because others have since imitated it.
    Neither science fiction nor rock’n’roll enchants this aging Boomer as it once did his 14-year old self. I gave up reading SF many years ago, not too long after childhood’s end (heh). To me , that does not detract from the achievements of people like Ellison or Philip Jose Farmer, who I am sure I would find unreadable now.

  219. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    English actors usually stink when they try to do Southern accents. Daniel Craig in Knives Out is terrible at his accent.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
  220. @kaganovitch

    A Bit of Frye and Laurie is not quite as good as Jeeves and Wooster, but it is still entertaining if you like these guys.

  221. MEH 0910 says:

    OT:

  222. @Joe Stalin

    Joe, Cuomo travels the state in his $13,000,000 helicopter and then boards one of those “black op” SUVs and arrives with a detail of uniformed and plain clothes troopers.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  223. anonymous[117] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    He took that helicopter to make a speech at Utica when there was a mass shooting a few years ago…wanted to get there before the blood dried.

    Albany to Utica…about 100 miles. Our tax dollars at work.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  224. @Father Coughlin

    Big effort-post there Kaganovitch. You even went for a Naxalt. And ignored most of my points which were obviously cumulative.

    On the contrary, I did not ignore most of your points as I dealt with 3 out of five which is most. That is not a Naxalt btw. It would be a Naxalt if it were established that A)Ullman was Jewish and B) nepotism was implicated here. Neither of these things was established, hence what you are left with is the fact that (according to you that is) Ullman is not talented enough to win a music contract and the only possible explanation is Jewish nepotism. For this a single counter example suffices. In the event it appears that Jakeman’s judgement was vindicated as Ullman had two UK top 5 hits.

    As regards your other 2 points
    2-Not too many nice Catholic teenage girls in the 70s would wake up and decide to be stand-up comediennes

    Not many Jewish girls in the 70’s became comedians either. Little can be deduced from samples of 1.

    5-Last but not least she looks Jewish (Jewish-looking enough to play Betty Friedan ffs)

    This is nonsensical, Ullman is one of the most gifted mimic/impersonators of the last few decades, she doesn’t need to look any more than remotely plausible to play Friedan.

  225. anon[300] • Disclaimer says:

    More infotainment from FOX: 15 men compete to win the right to knock up a woman.
    She’s 41, and finally ready to be a mother…

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/tv/tv-news/controversial-show-sees-15-men-22068468

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  226. Kronos says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Perhaps later, but not yet. The liberal/cult Marx Boomers are heading into their golden years. You’ll see more historical dramas on figures they adored and despised. Especially of those who told boomers they couldn’t boom. Essentially most culture wars was/is a subliminal “fuck you” to how mom and dad lived in the 1950s.

  227. Rob McX says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Daniel Craig in Knives Out is terrible at his accent.

    That’s what I thought too. For some reason his southern accent seems better in Logan Lucky, which was made two years earlier.

  228. Abe says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Paglia is essentially an intellectualized commentator on popular culture & social trends.

    Yes, Paglia got lazy and has for decades now basically coasted off her breakthrough work, making her somewhat of a progenitor of today’s ‘intellectuals’ who copy her fixation with pop culture dreck, without having even bothered to grow up and at least upgrade it to adult pop culture dreck (all that verbiage wasted on Harry Potter, comic books, Game of Thrones, etc.)

    That does not mean SEXUAL PERSONAE is not a revelation and on-par with Nietzsche- my only hesitation in piling on the accolades is wondering how much of it is original, but after many years I have yet to come across anything that would make me think most of it is not sui generis. Read it for nothing else than the art history lesson. Paglia (well before the web and Wikipedia) notices and points out things to the micron- for example, the obvious homoerotic playfulness in Donatello’s DAVID, down to the feather from Goliath’s helmet riding up David’s inner thigh to sensually caress him in a naughty place.

  229. @anon

    I recall seeing on one of infotainment news shows where some woman went after an Asian-looking sperm donor for child support even though he had a signed agreement with the lady. It was California and had they used an in-vitro process for fertilisation, he literally wouldn’t gotten shafted. Her mother apparently instigated the child support process.

    So, all men beware and find a LAWYER before indulging in such CONTRACTS.

  230. I member when Terry Gross informed somebody involved in the movie that, according to her listeners, disgust with the rape scene in Deliverance was homophobia.

    And then there’s when she informed Wendell Berry that her listeners objected to the sexism of having his wife type up his manuscripts.

    “She likes typing up my manuscripts. You’re making my wife out to be some hapless victim tool. That’s sexist if you ask me.”

  231. @Anonymous

    I used to go a plague on both their houses. Self-promoting idiots arguing over nothing for no other purpose than self-promotion.

  232. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, the sex was good.

    Are you sure? You were dating an actress, after all. (kidding!)

    What’s the difference between a female “actor” and an “actress”?

    Actresses don’t fake orgasms. Actors don’t have them.

  233. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @anon

    No no no. Rickman’s accent as “Bill Clay” was supposed to be inept. He was playing a guy playing a guy. Not bad accent. Good acting.
    In the sequel they bring back the Kraut bad guys and you’ll notice they too don’t quite have the accents down perfect. At one point a bad guy playing a cop, making small talk, says something about it “raining dogs and cats”.

  234. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Maybe. I’ve seen this joke more than once in old British comedy: A brit has to conjure up an American accent, and instantly goes into a comic, broad Texas accent.

  235. @AKAHorace

    Agreed, although one should read the entire trilogy, of which THS is the final volume. They would make glorious films, but their message is far too traditional and godly for that.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
  236. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @Jonathan Mason

    a pretty depressing thought for democracy

    Do people still talk like this? You’re adorable. “Democracy” is just one deck chair on the Titanic.

    I saw a RAMZPaul (is this how we’re supposed to write it? can’t he just use his Christian name ffs?) doing a video against the lockdown.
    He said something like “come on guys, our forefathers fought for these freedoms…” and I couldn’t explain to myself why I found the language so ridiculous and inept, almost enraging–I agree with it after all. Those “freedoms” are effectively gone and to be fighting for them while the Democrats are moving on to the next stage, something like President Stacey Abrams, is to be a world-class schmuck.
    But mostly the “freedoms” are nothing. “We” are everything. To be talking about “freedoms” while you are being slated for extinction–note how those “freedoms” not only haven’t protected us from the predations of the elite, they have been used to justify their whole project–is a moral failure.

    Don’t talk to me about “freedoms” if you’re within arm’s reach.

  237. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @sb

    I think I assumed Winslet to be Australian for years after the film “Heavenly Creatures”.

  238. @anonymous

    And then he closes the Thru Way when a few flakes fall.

  239. Anonymous[329] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pat Boyle

    I would guess that the residual puritan objection to the acting profession is still stronger in the U.S. than Britain. The people who were pulling down theaters in England in the 1650s had mostly relocated to America a generation later.

    • Replies: @Father Coughlin
  240. @kaganovitch

    Interesting that you’re so touchy about a conjecture that an actress is of the ethnic extraction of the subject she is supposed to play.

    I’m radioing Houston on this one.

  241. @Anonymous

    That is quite plausible. Modern Drama arose out of Early Modern confraternities. Once the reformation hit, they were largely suppressed in areas where puritans and their fellow-travelers controlled.

  242. J1234 says:
    @Sean

    Does Tracey Ullman play Betty Friedan….

    That has to be the ultimate compliment for an actress: We want you to play Betty Friedan in a movie!”

  243. @kaganovitch

    Tracey Ullman really looks like Jeremy Corbyn.

  244. @MEH 0910

    A lot of sci-fi writers took a lot of drugs in the 1960s-70s.

  245. @MEH 0910

    Heinlein was in bad health for much of his life, from the time he was mustered out of the Navy in 1934 because they figured he’d soon be dead of TB.

    He got a lot of work done, though.

  246. @MEH 0910

    Her mother is half-Gypsy and thus bad at spelling?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  247. Kylie says:
    @fish

    “.as a matter of fact I mentioned just this very thing to Jim Kirk at a bar just the other day! Apparently he was just getting ready to ship out on an extended tour….five years I think he mentioned and wanted to grab a couple of Tequila shots at his favorite old haunt before leaving orbit!”

    Total b.s. Edith Keeler told me she persuaded Jim to take the Temperance Pledge way back in 1930 and he’s been a teetotaler ever since.

  248. AKAHorace says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    The first and the third of the trilogy, I found Voyage to Venus unreadable. The last (that Hideous Strength) is the best of the three and would probably easiest to film.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  249. @sb

    Meryl Streep got high marks from Aussies for her portrayal of that woman who had her baby grabbed by a dingo.

    • Replies: @sb
  250. sb says:
    @Hamlet's Ghost

    I have never heard any Australian say that . Rather the contrary in fact .( Unlike Kate Winslet )

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
  251. Anonymous[413] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    lol, that’s true. I find that I spend most days absorbing information at such a rapid rate that my brain kind of hurts. Is this normal?

    I think I have made D&D jokes like that maybe 10 years ago or so. I played Baldur’s Gate and Ultima 6 as a kid, and have some D&D playing friends who I played miniatures with (which was also years ago I think – damn, I’m getting old). I tend to be a power gamer at anything I play, just by nature, which probably makes me unfun to play with anyway.

    And now I have kids and they don’t, it seems like such a crazy investment of time. I’m reminded of a friend who once read several series of David Eddings fantasy, which he liked, but he said that after a while each story was just a quest to get an object (McGuffin, as we know them today, the search for which is usually a Hero’s Journey). And it got boring for him at that point. Yes, he has kids too, now.

  252. @sb

    I have. And from actors no less.

    • Replies: @sb
  253. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    That sounds reasonable to me.

  254. sb says:
    @Hamlet's Ghost

    May I suggest you google ” Meryl Streep’s Australian accent ” for various opinions on this matter

  255. @AKAHorace

    But what is “unreadable” is by no means necessarily unfilmable.

    Perelandra (I prefer the original title) is my favourite of the three, and I believe it could be made into the most beautiful and profound fantasy film of all time. Its depiction of the sour heart of evil is unforgettable.

    That Hideous Strength is much more straightforward and thus would be easier to film. The climactic scene would be a humdinger though, wouldn’t it?

  256. Anon87 says:

    It feels like young Hollywood just stumbled onto Phyllis, and are agast she existed. There is this hit job, as well as undue slander in the awful Mrs. Maisel. I swore I noticed another slam recently, but I’m blanking. It feels oddly coordinated.

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