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Can San Diego Resist the Undertow? Can Seattle?
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San Diego has gotten increasingly utopian looking over the decades, and may have the strength to hold out against dystopian political trends in the Golden State. From City Journal:

Strength in San Diego

The city’s triumvirate of police chief, district attorney, and mayor has not given in to disorder.

Thomas Hogan

Homicides are up, radical prosecutors are taking office, and politicians are hobbling the police. Is any large urban area managing to maintain order in this tumult? Yes—and believe it or not, it’s in California, that hotbed of progressive disorder.

The eighth-largest city in the United States, with 1.4 million residents, San Diego has been called the safest big city in America as it keeps crime down while maintaining sensible law enforcement policies. Even with a large metropolitan area, the city’s violent- and property-crime rates remain low. As the rest of the country saw violence explode in 2020, the number of homicides in San Diego rose only slightly, from 50 to 55 murders. (Philadelphia, a city of roughly the same size as San Diego, saw homicides rise from 356 in 2019 to 499 murders in 2020.)

… The final piece of the trio is the mayor. From 2014 through the end of 2020, Republican Kevin Faulconer held that office, compiling a fiscally conservative, socially moderate record. On law enforcement, he mostly stayed out of the way and allowed the district attorney and police chief—the experts in public safety—to do their jobs. San Diego recently elected a new mayor, Democrat Todd Gloria, a third-generation San Diegan who ran on a progressive platform but so far has left the police and prosecutors alone. It may be enough for a mayor not to interfere with law enforcement to keep a city safe, as long as a strong prosecutor and police chief are on the job.

New York City’s murder rate continued to fall during Bill DiBlasio’s first half dozen years, in part because he put Giuliani’s old police chief Bill Bratton in charge of the cops.

Meanwhile in Seattle … From the Seattle Times:

‘Two truths’ to downtown Seattle living: Vibrant, diverse atmosphere butts up against drug use, street crime
Sep. 4, 2021 at 6:00 am Updated Sep. 5, 2021 at 11:55 am

Captions: Police on bikes are seen on Third Avenue. Downtown residents say the landscape of addiction, homelessness and crime in their neighborhood has gotten worse in the last two years. (Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times)

Ted and Priscilla Tanase, seen on the rooftop deck of their downtown Seattle high-rise, are looking at at renting a place on the Eastside for a year to get away from the open-air drug use and crime on the streets downtown. (Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times)

… Cynthia Marin, foreground, walks along Third Avenue, a street she has been avoiding because of the now-common drug use, crime and other safety issues, there. (Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times)

A man passes a boarded up building on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle. (Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times)

Leslie Buker says she has learned to block out the nightly screams she can hear from inside her condo, but she still will call 911 if people she encounters outside don’t move after being shaken.(Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times)

No mention of the political events of 2020, such as CHAZ …

 
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  1. When does San Diego succeed from California?

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Redneck farmer

    Nothing secedes like secession.

  2. San Diego should secede from California and join the United States.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Bernie, @Dutch Boy, @Mike Tre, @Sick of Orcs, @John Johnson

    , @SteveRogers42
    @Reg Cæsar

    And bring the Pacific Fleet with it.

  3. @Reg Cæsar
    San Diego should secede from California and join the United States.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @SteveRogers42

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    • Replies: @IHTG
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Besides demographic change, many of the sorts of people who used to GOP in Southern California are no longer part of the Republican coalition. See also: Vermont.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Bernie
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Whites in Cal. vote 50-50 GOP/Dem. Whites in Texas vote 70% for GOP.

    This is changing as more whites from outside Texas move to places like Austin.

    , @Dutch Boy
    @JohnnyWalker123

    San Diego only looks good in comparison to LA and SF. The downtown area has become a vast homeless encampment. Faulconer is likely the last Republican mayor; his successor, Todd Gloria, is a part Filipino homosexual. The city council is down to one Republican. The forces that turned other large cities into chaotic garbage dumps are also at work in SD, it's just taking a bit longer because the area retained a larger percentage of whites than the other big metro areas. The only newspaper in town is owned by a South African born Chinese billionaire and is PC to the limit.

    Replies: @Reverend Goody

    , @Mike Tre
    @JohnnyWalker123

    National City, the gateway to el Estodos Unitos.

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists
     
    TX may not stay red for much longer, with biden's impeachment-worthy invasion of illegals. Gov. Wheelie of TX is too chickenpoop to seal the border.
    , @John Johnson
    @JohnnyWalker123

    California Republicans have always been weak and poor at strategy.

    They never cared about gun rights or education and roll over for just about anything but taxes.

    Their strategy depends entirely on voters that are sick of Democrats. Well what if voters don't mind the Democrat? (Crickets).

    But their worst characteristic is continually cozying up to the wealthy. They like to run wealthy out of touch candidates that have only been to LA and San Diego.

    Too many Republicans already left the state out of disgust. The remaining ones are clueless.

  4. Interestingly, San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.

    Obviously, that’s not the difference.

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    @Colin Wright

    Maybe a lot of San Diego's blacks are military or veterans?

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    , @Twinkie
    @Colin Wright


    San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.
     
    San Diego and Seattle differences are due to policy differences.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Corvinus

  5. On Seattle, this came out a couple years back:

    Made a ripple at the time, but what is depicted is, of course, now the new normal.

    • Agree: Twinkie, nebulafox
  6. San Diego is 6.7% Black. Philadelphia is 44% Black.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Roger


    San Diego is 6.7% Black. Philadelphia is 44% Black.
     
    San Diego-Philly differences are due to demographic differences.
  7. Deeper dive into sensible and sanitary San Diego:

    As deep a dive as you can can safely stomach into the sulfuric cesspool of Seattle:

  8. This is a new challenge for Soros. There’s nothing the right kind of DA can’t fix.

  9. @Colin Wright
    Interestingly, San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.

    Obviously, that's not the difference.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Twinkie

    Maybe a lot of San Diego’s blacks are military or veterans?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @jimmyriddle

    'Maybe a lot of San Diego’s blacks are military or veterans?'

    That's a distinct possibility. I was thinking more that the San Diego police have probably been able to continue enforcing the law, but you could be right as well.

  10. I know San Diego pretty well. There are nine military bases, so there’s a heavy gun culture. You don’t want to mess around with those devil dogs: last Friday at the Recruiting Depot down by the airport some guy came through the gate carrying a knife, and they shot and killed him. Besides that, there’s the cowboy thing. I lived someplace with a mayor literally called Buck Howdy. You’re laughing, but not for long if you get him talking about 2A stuff. That’s why San Diego is a nice, polite place. You never know who is strapped, and if they are, chances are they’re a trained marks-ist.

  11. “… vibrant, diverse atmosphere …” Yep, it’s the atmosphere.

  12. @Colin Wright
    Interestingly, San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.

    Obviously, that's not the difference.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Twinkie

    San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.

    San Diego and Seattle differences are due to policy differences.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    Seattle is different from San Diego due to people differences. There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne - the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.

    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else "TECH" workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American. In addition they either don't know any better or are anti-White for spite, so they vote for the ctrl-left like crazy.

    I guess the ex-navy presence and more normal Americans in San Diego make the big difference. However, as Rob McX wrote, get a few insidious Soros-sent D/A's in there, maybe change the school boards, and then that must-have black Police Chief, and it can all change for the worse.

    .

    * China has sent in the additional immigration influx of the corrupt rich, anchor children and others in Seattle to enjoy what was a pristine environment (will it stay that way?) and to get the money the hell out of China before some other corrupt mofo gets his hands on it.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @JMcG

    , @Anon
    @Twinkie

    Our big U.S. cities changed from voting moderate--to pick a point in time as an example, around 1950 or so--to hard liberal today, because they lost their industrial base of workers that used to vote conservative. Instead they are now hives of middle- to upper-middle class people who work in the service industries.

    Until the 1970s, Seattle got its population like most regional large cities did, from other areas of the same state. Smaller town moderates and conservatives moved there looking for a wide variety of jobs.

    However, since the 1980s, it's had workers come in from big liberal U.S. cities to work solely in the tech industry, and their numbers are large enough they have changed the voting trends of the place.

    When you move 200,000 etoiolated aspys from big city liberal enclaves to a place instead of guys who could do repair work on their father's tractor, you will change the voting trends of a place.

    I don't see how our big cities could change back, frankly. The service industry isn't going away, and the industrial segment isn't coming back, either. We do need more industrial jobs in this country, because that's the only segment of the job market blacks are smart enough to find work in.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @John Johnson

    , @Corvinus
    @Twinkie

    Yes. So leave it to Mr. Sailer to take a page from the Noo Yawk Times in burying the lede.

    —Stephan does not maintain that police should be abolished, that systemic racism has infected the criminal-justice system, or that violent criminals should be released. (For these reasons, the Racial Justice Coalition of San Diego has called for her resignation.) But she’s also demonstrated a capacity for nuance, initiating diversion programs for juvenile cases and mental-health issues, creating model programs to protect victims, and tussling with local police organizations to charge an officer with filing a false report. Stephan is a balanced and modern prosecutor—pursuing justice while navigating the difficult waters of reform and safety.

    Stephan has a strong partner in San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit, who hails from a law-enforcement family: his father was a cop, and his son is a cop, too. Nisleit worked his way up from patrol to specialized units, including robbery, gangs, and homicides; sex crimes; internal affairs; homeless outreach; and SWAT. Nisleit supports a diverse and qualified police force, but he does not call his officers corrupt or racist. Nisleit calls out gangs for inflicting violence rather than labeling them misunderstood youths. The San Diego police department maintains a homeless-outreach team to procure services for the homeless, but it does not permit them to harass citizens. In September, the city removed a homeless encampment; homelessness, though still a problem, is far less common here than in other major California cities.—

    Replies: @Alfa158

  13. @Roger
    San Diego is 6.7% Black. Philadelphia is 44% Black.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    San Diego is 6.7% Black. Philadelphia is 44% Black.

    San Diego-Philly differences are due to demographic differences.

  14. @Twinkie
    @Colin Wright


    San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.
     
    San Diego and Seattle differences are due to policy differences.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Corvinus

    Seattle is different from San Diego due to people differences. There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne – the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.

    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else “TECH” workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American. In addition they either don’t know any better or are anti-White for spite, so they vote for the ctrl-left like crazy.

    I guess the ex-navy presence and more normal Americans in San Diego make the big difference. However, as Rob McX wrote, get a few insidious Soros-sent D/A’s in there, maybe change the school boards, and then that must-have black Police Chief, and it can all change for the worse.

    .

    * China has sent in the additional immigration influx of the corrupt rich, anchor children and others in Seattle to enjoy what was a pristine environment (will it stay that way?) and to get the money the hell out of China before some other corrupt mofo gets his hands on it.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne – the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.
     
    Queen Anne, Magnolia, Ballard, Green Lake, and even Fremont were already under heavy gentrification/IT-ization ten years ago and weren’t working class neighborhoods.

    By then, blue collar workers were already exiled to the northern (Shoreline, Lynnwood) and southern (Tukwila, SeaTac, Renton) edges of the city.


    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else “TECH” workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American.
     
    During that time, foreign tech workers flooded to the Eastside, not Seattle proper. The latter actually became whiter for a while, even as Bellevue and Redmond on the Eastside turned into Little Bengalore.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Curle

    , @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I visited Seattle on a climbing trip in 1987. We arrived, by car, during the night and were shown to our rooms in a friend’s house. He was a manager for an outdoors shop, EMS, I think.
    When I awoke to a beautiful sunny day, Mt. Rainier was perfectly framed in the gable-end window in my room. It was stunning; and then sobering when I realized that it was over eighty miles away and still appeared so large.
    That house must have been in one of those neighborhoods you are speaking of. I briefly thought about moving there, but thankfully did not.

  15. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    Seattle is different from San Diego due to people differences. There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne - the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.

    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else "TECH" workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American. In addition they either don't know any better or are anti-White for spite, so they vote for the ctrl-left like crazy.

    I guess the ex-navy presence and more normal Americans in San Diego make the big difference. However, as Rob McX wrote, get a few insidious Soros-sent D/A's in there, maybe change the school boards, and then that must-have black Police Chief, and it can all change for the worse.

    .

    * China has sent in the additional immigration influx of the corrupt rich, anchor children and others in Seattle to enjoy what was a pristine environment (will it stay that way?) and to get the money the hell out of China before some other corrupt mofo gets his hands on it.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @JMcG

    There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne – the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.

    Queen Anne, Magnolia, Ballard, Green Lake, and even Fremont were already under heavy gentrification/IT-ization ten years ago and weren’t working class neighborhoods.

    By then, blue collar workers were already exiled to the northern (Shoreline, Lynnwood) and southern (Tukwila, SeaTac, Renton) edges of the city.

    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else “TECH” workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American.

    During that time, foreign tech workers flooded to the Eastside, not Seattle proper. The latter actually became whiter for a while, even as Bellevue and Redmond on the Eastside turned into Little Bengalore.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    Yes, they were being gentrified, but plenty of working class people still lived there. I know. Perhaps you don't.

    The regular H-1B foreign "TECH" workers may have been living predominantly on the east side, but many of the big-money (via stock options) types, and there are lots of them, have bid up all the property in the really nice neighborhoods - Q/A, Magnolia, Ballard, Green Lake, etc. Many of them are foreigners. (Fremont was for weirdos and Capitol Hill was for weirdos and gays.) Belltown, north of, but basically part of, downtown was being gentrified a long time back too.

    It's the property taxes that come with huge yearly increases in RE valuation and even just the high prices in fancy stores that the well-off don't even care about (mostly the former) that drive regular people out. No, I don't say that many working-class people could have BOUGHT houses in those nice neighborhoods 10, even 15 years back, but many still lived there.


    Tukwila and SeaTac are just dumps - #NeighborhoodTooBlack

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Curle
    @Twinkie

    This is all interesting. Starting about thirty years ago I made a point of avoiding at all costs anything north of West Seattle. At that time Seattle proper was starting to become annoying running into all the pompous Californians and East Coasters moving in. Every time I’m forced go there I feel like a stranger in a strange land.

  16. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Bernie, @Dutch Boy, @Mike Tre, @Sick of Orcs, @John Johnson

    Besides demographic change, many of the sorts of people who used to GOP in Southern California are no longer part of the Republican coalition. See also: Vermont.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @IHTG


    See also: Vermont.
     
    Vermont was swamped, and is dominated by the pod people now.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @nebulafox

  17. “New York City’s murder rate continued to fall during Bill DiBlasio’s first half dozen years, in part because he put Giuliani’s old police chief Bill Bratton in charge of the cops.”

    To a large extent NYC bought labor and ethnic peace with government jobs. Early retirement and lifetime healthcare benefits are starting to weigh down on the ability to do things like police the city, jail criminals, ect.

    From 2015: Retirees Outnumber Active Employees In Public Pension Plans
    https://insurancenewsnet.com/innarticle/retirees-outnumber-active-employees-in-public-pension-plans

    In the 1990s NYC had paid off enough of the debt and obligations that caused the financial crisis that it was possible to aggressively police the city.

  18. @Twinkie
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne – the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.
     
    Queen Anne, Magnolia, Ballard, Green Lake, and even Fremont were already under heavy gentrification/IT-ization ten years ago and weren’t working class neighborhoods.

    By then, blue collar workers were already exiled to the northern (Shoreline, Lynnwood) and southern (Tukwila, SeaTac, Renton) edges of the city.


    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else “TECH” workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American.
     
    During that time, foreign tech workers flooded to the Eastside, not Seattle proper. The latter actually became whiter for a while, even as Bellevue and Redmond on the Eastside turned into Little Bengalore.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Curle

    Yes, they were being gentrified, but plenty of working class people still lived there. I know. Perhaps you don’t.

    The regular H-1B foreign “TECH” workers may have been living predominantly on the east side, but many of the big-money (via stock options) types, and there are lots of them, have bid up all the property in the really nice neighborhoods – Q/A, Magnolia, Ballard, Green Lake, etc. Many of them are foreigners. (Fremont was for weirdos and Capitol Hill was for weirdos and gays.) Belltown, north of, but basically part of, downtown was being gentrified a long time back too.

    It’s the property taxes that come with huge yearly increases in RE valuation and even just the high prices in fancy stores that the well-off don’t even care about (mostly the former) that drive regular people out. No, I don’t say that many working-class people could have BOUGHT houses in those nice neighborhoods 10, even 15 years back, but many still lived there.

    Tukwila and SeaTac are just dumps – #NeighborhoodTooBlack

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Yes, they were being gentrified, but plenty of working class people still lived there. I know. Perhaps you don’t.
     
    I lived in PacNW/Western WA state 20 years ago and know the area like the back of my hand.

    #NeighborhoodTooBlack
     
    This has all the clear maps that show where the races have been concentrated in Seattle between 1940-2020. Look at the white, 2020 map.

    https://depts.washington.edu/civilr/segregation_maps.htm

    https://depts.washington.edu/labhist/maps-race-seattle.shtml

    Seattle proper is still pretty white (many 85%+ areas). South of the city and Eastside much less so.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  19. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    Yes, they were being gentrified, but plenty of working class people still lived there. I know. Perhaps you don't.

    The regular H-1B foreign "TECH" workers may have been living predominantly on the east side, but many of the big-money (via stock options) types, and there are lots of them, have bid up all the property in the really nice neighborhoods - Q/A, Magnolia, Ballard, Green Lake, etc. Many of them are foreigners. (Fremont was for weirdos and Capitol Hill was for weirdos and gays.) Belltown, north of, but basically part of, downtown was being gentrified a long time back too.

    It's the property taxes that come with huge yearly increases in RE valuation and even just the high prices in fancy stores that the well-off don't even care about (mostly the former) that drive regular people out. No, I don't say that many working-class people could have BOUGHT houses in those nice neighborhoods 10, even 15 years back, but many still lived there.


    Tukwila and SeaTac are just dumps - #NeighborhoodTooBlack

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Yes, they were being gentrified, but plenty of working class people still lived there. I know. Perhaps you don’t.

    I lived in PacNW/Western WA state 20 years ago and know the area like the back of my hand.

    #NeighborhoodTooBlack

    This has all the clear maps that show where the races have been concentrated in Seattle between 1940-2020. Look at the white, 2020 map.

    https://depts.washington.edu/civilr/segregation_maps.htm

    https://depts.washington.edu/labhist/maps-race-seattle.shtml

    Seattle proper is still pretty white (many 85%+ areas). South of the city and Eastside much less so.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    I know the area too, my friend. I knew working-class people that lived in some of the nicest neighborhoods. That was ending around 10 years back..

    Yes, the city is pretty non-black, put it that way. As I wrote, the really nice areas have lots of big-money "TECH" people, and they are not all White.

    I thank you for the interactive maps - LUV that stuff! Note that in '20 the nice areas are not all White or close. Magnolia, West Seattle, and the areas on the west side of Lake Washington south of the 520 are the best - still 75% to over 80%, top of Q/A hill is 75%, on the north slope, near Seattle Pacific, it's 65%, north of the ship canal is high 60s to high 70's %. Now take a look at the 2000 numbers - they are near 90% and higher almost all over the place. The trend is NOT your friend, in this case.

    Politically, the State has gone down a long, terrible slide since the 40 year-ago Governess-ship of Dixie Lee Ray. Hell, you can't even be named that now and NOT be the Governor!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Bernie

  20. I visited San Diego recently and was struck by the sheer number of “homeless” encampments in nice areas like Balboa Park, the aggressive panhandling, and the open air drug use. Giuliani era New York it ain’t.

    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
    @James Braxton

    A few years ago I stayed 2 nights in a hotel in the Gaslamp district, and walked around. Vagrants everywhere.

  21. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    Seattle is different from San Diego due to people differences. There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne - the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.

    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else "TECH" workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American. In addition they either don't know any better or are anti-White for spite, so they vote for the ctrl-left like crazy.

    I guess the ex-navy presence and more normal Americans in San Diego make the big difference. However, as Rob McX wrote, get a few insidious Soros-sent D/A's in there, maybe change the school boards, and then that must-have black Police Chief, and it can all change for the worse.

    .

    * China has sent in the additional immigration influx of the corrupt rich, anchor children and others in Seattle to enjoy what was a pristine environment (will it stay that way?) and to get the money the hell out of China before some other corrupt mofo gets his hands on it.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @JMcG

    I visited Seattle on a climbing trip in 1987. We arrived, by car, during the night and were shown to our rooms in a friend’s house. He was a manager for an outdoors shop, EMS, I think.
    When I awoke to a beautiful sunny day, Mt. Rainier was perfectly framed in the gable-end window in my room. It was stunning; and then sobering when I realized that it was over eighty miles away and still appeared so large.
    That house must have been in one of those neighborhoods you are speaking of. I briefly thought about moving there, but thankfully did not.

  22. @Redneck farmer
    When does San Diego succeed from California?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Nothing secedes like secession.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • LOL: James Forrestal
  23. @Twinkie
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Yes, they were being gentrified, but plenty of working class people still lived there. I know. Perhaps you don’t.
     
    I lived in PacNW/Western WA state 20 years ago and know the area like the back of my hand.

    #NeighborhoodTooBlack
     
    This has all the clear maps that show where the races have been concentrated in Seattle between 1940-2020. Look at the white, 2020 map.

    https://depts.washington.edu/civilr/segregation_maps.htm

    https://depts.washington.edu/labhist/maps-race-seattle.shtml

    Seattle proper is still pretty white (many 85%+ areas). South of the city and Eastside much less so.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I know the area too, my friend. I knew working-class people that lived in some of the nicest neighborhoods. That was ending around 10 years back..

    Yes, the city is pretty non-black, put it that way. As I wrote, the really nice areas have lots of big-money “TECH” people, and they are not all White.

    I thank you for the interactive maps – LUV that stuff! Note that in ’20 the nice areas are not all White or close. Magnolia, West Seattle, and the areas on the west side of Lake Washington south of the 520 are the best – still 75% to over 80%, top of Q/A hill is 75%, on the north slope, near Seattle Pacific, it’s 65%, north of the ship canal is high 60s to high 70’s %. Now take a look at the 2000 numbers – they are near 90% and higher almost all over the place. The trend is NOT your friend, in this case.

    Politically, the State has gone down a long, terrible slide since the 40 year-ago Governess-ship of Dixie Lee Ray. Hell, you can’t even be named that now and NOT be the Governor!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Oops, that's Dixy Lee Ray, "y" instead of "ie". She legally changed from Marguerite to the Dixy Ray at 16 y/o, and the Lee was in reference to a family connection to Robert E. Lee. What an amazing lady. Oh, of all things, she was a DEMOCRAT (at least officially, in 1976).

    Replies: @Curle

    , @Bernie
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I just saw the movie "Singles" again for the first time in almost 30 years. It came out at the height of grunge in 1992 and is about single white 20-somethings in Seattle living single white kid lives (music, jobs, parties, sex, relationships, etc.).

    It makes (or made) Seattle look like a place where a young white kid would like to go and live.

    I spent some time in Puyallup over 20 years ago. Was "quaint" if a bit downscale for the area. Anyone know if Puyallup has been overtaken by diversity?

    Replies: @Curle, @SteveRogers42

  24. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    I know the area too, my friend. I knew working-class people that lived in some of the nicest neighborhoods. That was ending around 10 years back..

    Yes, the city is pretty non-black, put it that way. As I wrote, the really nice areas have lots of big-money "TECH" people, and they are not all White.

    I thank you for the interactive maps - LUV that stuff! Note that in '20 the nice areas are not all White or close. Magnolia, West Seattle, and the areas on the west side of Lake Washington south of the 520 are the best - still 75% to over 80%, top of Q/A hill is 75%, on the north slope, near Seattle Pacific, it's 65%, north of the ship canal is high 60s to high 70's %. Now take a look at the 2000 numbers - they are near 90% and higher almost all over the place. The trend is NOT your friend, in this case.

    Politically, the State has gone down a long, terrible slide since the 40 year-ago Governess-ship of Dixie Lee Ray. Hell, you can't even be named that now and NOT be the Governor!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Bernie

    Oops, that’s Dixy Lee Ray, “y” instead of “ie”. She legally changed from Marguerite to the Dixy Ray at 16 y/o, and the Lee was in reference to a family connection to Robert E. Lee. What an amazing lady. Oh, of all things, she was a DEMOCRAT (at least officially, in 1976).

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Was pro atomic energy and raised pigs. Named one after her least favorite reporter.

  25. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Bernie, @Dutch Boy, @Mike Tre, @Sick of Orcs, @John Johnson

    Whites in Cal. vote 50-50 GOP/Dem. Whites in Texas vote 70% for GOP.

    This is changing as more whites from outside Texas move to places like Austin.

  26. I think of this letter to the editor in the September 1987 issue of Instauration a lot:

    “I live in a suburb of San Diego, 25 freeway minutes from the city center. Huge supermarkets are open until midnight. You can find anything anytime. I love it . . . and perhaps the single thing I love the most about it and I’m not at all ashamed to proclaim from whatever rooftop may be at hand is the fact that there is not a black person living within probably five miles of where I live, maybe ten miles. After being forced to live with them in prison and for nine months in their neighborhoods out here, I can easily say that it is because of their absence that the stores stay open late and are not battened down with bars, that the laundromats are clean and the machines not rifled, that the public phones all work and the walls of buildings are not smeared with their offal, that police are practically never seen, that neighborhoods are quiet, civilized places where people do not live in fear of theft or assault either upon their persons or their senses, all of which contributes to a general feeling of friendliness and trust which, of course, is the exact opposite of what I’ve experienced within “their” environs. The reasons for this contrast, whatever they may be, are completely irrelevant to me. I am simply so glad to never see them or be subjected to their “culture” that I could, and occasionally do, shout with joy. It is as if a tremendous weight has been lifted from my consciousness . . . as if extra energy has been given me simply through not having to put up with them or deal with them in any way.”

    (“Life Without Blacks,” Instauration, September 1987, p. 15.)

    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Bernie

    Bernie says:

    It is as if a tremendous weight has been lifted from my consciousness . . . as if extra energy has been given me simply through not having to put up with them or deal with them in any way.”

    (“Life Without Blacks,” Instauration, September 1987, p. 15.)

    I respond:

    I loved Instauration and had a subscription for ~ 7 years in the early 1990s.

    Do you have access to Installation online?

    I've been looking for one article for a very long time - it describes a Sikh soldier commenting on the bravery of blue eyed White English soldiers fighting Sikh Indians in India, he's shooting cannons at them and they only fight with bayonets and keep reforming after getting pounded by cannon fire.

    It's brilliant.

    Do you know of this article should be ~ 1992-93.

    Let me know if you have it.

    jackryanod (at) protonmail (dot) com

    Replies: @Bernie

  27. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Twinkie

    I know the area too, my friend. I knew working-class people that lived in some of the nicest neighborhoods. That was ending around 10 years back..

    Yes, the city is pretty non-black, put it that way. As I wrote, the really nice areas have lots of big-money "TECH" people, and they are not all White.

    I thank you for the interactive maps - LUV that stuff! Note that in '20 the nice areas are not all White or close. Magnolia, West Seattle, and the areas on the west side of Lake Washington south of the 520 are the best - still 75% to over 80%, top of Q/A hill is 75%, on the north slope, near Seattle Pacific, it's 65%, north of the ship canal is high 60s to high 70's %. Now take a look at the 2000 numbers - they are near 90% and higher almost all over the place. The trend is NOT your friend, in this case.

    Politically, the State has gone down a long, terrible slide since the 40 year-ago Governess-ship of Dixie Lee Ray. Hell, you can't even be named that now and NOT be the Governor!

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Bernie

    I just saw the movie “Singles” again for the first time in almost 30 years. It came out at the height of grunge in 1992 and is about single white 20-somethings in Seattle living single white kid lives (music, jobs, parties, sex, relationships, etc.).

    It makes (or made) Seattle look like a place where a young white kid would like to go and live.

    I spent some time in Puyallup over 20 years ago. Was “quaint” if a bit downscale for the area. Anyone know if Puyallup has been overtaken by diversity?

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Bernie

    “ Anyone know if Puyallup has been overtaken by diversity?”

    No. It hasn’t.

    , @SteveRogers42
    @Bernie

    There are probably a dozen black kids attending Emerald Ridge High School at any given time, but there IS a two-story-tall Soviet Realist mural of MLK scowling down from a wall in the Common room.

  28. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    I lived in San Diego CA for ~ 8 years in the mid 2000s.

    It’s a very safe, civilized place – very white Anglo, but with others coming down from LA.

    The US Navy base gives the city a very Midwestern anglo Conservative identity. People used to complain that San Diego didn’t have a lot of “culture” and shut down early.

    If you want “excitement” and crime, violence you can go to LA or TJ.

    I had experienced a lot of rough things in my Chicago, NYC life, but I never experienced a huge Southern California brush fire – like a nuclear bomb.

    This was after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, when I was evacuated, I packed my valuables in my car with loaded guns.

    I spent one night in the Salk medical parking lot (got roused by security in the morning), then spent a night with tens of thousands of others in the San Diego Chargers Qualcomm Field parking lot.

    Not only was there no rioting and looting like in Hurricane Katrina New Orleans. Everybody went to bed and was quiet ~ 10 pm.

    Very civilized place.

    J Ryan
    The Political Cesspool

  29. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bernie
    I think of this letter to the editor in the September 1987 issue of Instauration a lot:

    "I live in a suburb of San Diego, 25 freeway minutes from the city center. Huge supermarkets are open until midnight. You can find anything anytime. I love it . . . and perhaps the single thing I love the most about it and I’m not at all ashamed to proclaim from whatever rooftop may be at hand is the fact that there is not a black person living within probably five miles of where I live, maybe ten miles. After being forced to live with them in prison and for nine months in their neighborhoods out here, I can easily say that it is because of their absence that the stores stay open late and are not battened down with bars, that the laundromats are clean and the machines not rifled, that the public phones all work and the walls of buildings are not smeared with their offal, that police are practically never seen, that neighborhoods are quiet, civilized places where people do not live in fear of theft or assault either upon their persons or their senses, all of which contributes to a general feeling of friendliness and trust which, of course, is the exact opposite of what I’ve experienced within “their” environs. The reasons for this contrast, whatever they may be, are completely irrelevant to me. I am simply so glad to never see them or be subjected to their “culture” that I could, and occasionally do, shout with joy. It is as if a tremendous weight has been lifted from my consciousness . . . as if extra energy has been given me simply through not having to put up with them or deal with them in any way."

    (“Life Without Blacks,” Instauration, September 1987, p. 15.)

    Replies: @anonymous

    Bernie says:

    It is as if a tremendous weight has been lifted from my consciousness . . . as if extra energy has been given me simply through not having to put up with them or deal with them in any way.”

    (“Life Without Blacks,” Instauration, September 1987, p. 15.)

    I respond:

    I loved Instauration and had a subscription for ~ 7 years in the early 1990s.

    Do you have access to Installation online?

    I’ve been looking for one article for a very long time – it describes a Sikh soldier commenting on the bravery of blue eyed White English soldiers fighting Sikh Indians in India, he’s shooting cannons at them and they only fight with bayonets and keep reforming after getting pounded by cannon fire.

    It’s brilliant.

    Do you know of this article should be ~ 1992-93.

    Let me know if you have it.

    jackryanod (at) protonmail (dot) com

    • Replies: @Bernie
    @anonymous

    You can find the back issues here:

    https://www.big-lies.org/instauration/instauration-pdf-file-list.html

    Replies: @res

  30. @Twinkie
    @Achmed E. Newman


    There are really nice neighborhoods (say Queen Anne – the top of the hill looks down on the city and up to that big ice-cream cone volcano to the SE, the Olympics to the West, and the Cascades to the East) that still had working class Americans even just a decade ago.
     
    Queen Anne, Magnolia, Ballard, Green Lake, and even Fremont were already under heavy gentrification/IT-ization ten years ago and weren’t working class neighborhoods.

    By then, blue collar workers were already exiled to the northern (Shoreline, Lynnwood) and southern (Tukwila, SeaTac, Renton) edges of the city.


    The nice areas of Seattle have been bought out by the rich .com 2.0. Amazon and whoever else “TECH” workers. Many of them are from all sorts of foreign lands, say India and China*, and they turn the neighborhoods into something that are non-American.
     
    During that time, foreign tech workers flooded to the Eastside, not Seattle proper. The latter actually became whiter for a while, even as Bellevue and Redmond on the Eastside turned into Little Bengalore.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Curle

    This is all interesting. Starting about thirty years ago I made a point of avoiding at all costs anything north of West Seattle. At that time Seattle proper was starting to become annoying running into all the pompous Californians and East Coasters moving in. Every time I’m forced go there I feel like a stranger in a strange land.

  31. @Bernie
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I just saw the movie "Singles" again for the first time in almost 30 years. It came out at the height of grunge in 1992 and is about single white 20-somethings in Seattle living single white kid lives (music, jobs, parties, sex, relationships, etc.).

    It makes (or made) Seattle look like a place where a young white kid would like to go and live.

    I spent some time in Puyallup over 20 years ago. Was "quaint" if a bit downscale for the area. Anyone know if Puyallup has been overtaken by diversity?

    Replies: @Curle, @SteveRogers42

    “ Anyone know if Puyallup has been overtaken by diversity?”

    No. It hasn’t.

    • Thanks: Bernie
  32. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Oops, that's Dixy Lee Ray, "y" instead of "ie". She legally changed from Marguerite to the Dixy Ray at 16 y/o, and the Lee was in reference to a family connection to Robert E. Lee. What an amazing lady. Oh, of all things, she was a DEMOCRAT (at least officially, in 1976).

    Replies: @Curle

    Was pro atomic energy and raised pigs. Named one after her least favorite reporter.

  33. @IHTG
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Besides demographic change, many of the sorts of people who used to GOP in Southern California are no longer part of the Republican coalition. See also: Vermont.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    See also: Vermont.

    Vermont was swamped, and is dominated by the pod people now.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    Vermont was swamped, and is dominated by the pod people now.
     
    Whenever I am in northern New England, I am struck by how different the vibes are in Vermont and New Hampshire (and Maine too).

    Reminds me a little bit of the different feel between Iowa and Missouri.
    , @nebulafox
    @Reg Cæsar

    Texas is interesting because you have an influx of outof-state professionals (mostly white or East/South Asian, obviously) on the one hand, and local non-whites who have grown rather alienated from the Democrats who were counting on their support. It turns out that embracing and visibly gaslighting about riots alienate a lot of people, by no means all white, and the "turn Texas blue" strategy is in danger because of that.

    Now, this does not vindicate the Karl Rove "Give Hispanics an open border and pro-life rhetoric, and they'll embrace the Chamber of Commerce and vote Republican" idiocy of the 2000s that cost the GOP so dearly. But you had whole counties in South Texas who haven't voted Republican since the late 1800s drifting red in 2020. This does indicate that if the Republicans are smart enough to ditch their more vote losing traditions, above all the suicidal embrace of oligarch-fetishization in practice on economics, and reorient right-wing politics to what it is going to have to be to win power (and for an old-school civNat type like me, what is right, anyway), there is an opening here as the Democrats grow more insane.

    As I've repeatedly said: the more the Democrats become the party of bien-pensants, tech CEOs, and underclass blacks (as the BLM leadership moves to ritzy white neighborhoods, of course: grifters gonna grift), the more that the Republicans can attract everybody else.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie

  34. @anonymous
    @Bernie

    Bernie says:

    It is as if a tremendous weight has been lifted from my consciousness . . . as if extra energy has been given me simply through not having to put up with them or deal with them in any way.”

    (“Life Without Blacks,” Instauration, September 1987, p. 15.)

    I respond:

    I loved Instauration and had a subscription for ~ 7 years in the early 1990s.

    Do you have access to Installation online?

    I've been looking for one article for a very long time - it describes a Sikh soldier commenting on the bravery of blue eyed White English soldiers fighting Sikh Indians in India, he's shooting cannons at them and they only fight with bayonets and keep reforming after getting pounded by cannon fire.

    It's brilliant.

    Do you know of this article should be ~ 1992-93.

    Let me know if you have it.

    jackryanod (at) protonmail (dot) com

    Replies: @Bernie

    • Replies: @res
    @Bernie

    Thanks. They also have a web site at
    http://instaurationonline.com/

    It is pretty badly broken -- new.instaurationonline.com is a DNS failure for me -- but if you remove the new in links by hand you can get to files like this (your letter is on page 15).
    http://www.instaurationonline.com/pdf-files/Instauration-1987-09-September.pdf

    P.S. Including this because sites disappear and it is good to have multiple alternatives.

  35. Anon[386] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie
    @Colin Wright


    San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.
     
    San Diego and Seattle differences are due to policy differences.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Corvinus

    Our big U.S. cities changed from voting moderate–to pick a point in time as an example, around 1950 or so–to hard liberal today, because they lost their industrial base of workers that used to vote conservative. Instead they are now hives of middle- to upper-middle class people who work in the service industries.

    Until the 1970s, Seattle got its population like most regional large cities did, from other areas of the same state. Smaller town moderates and conservatives moved there looking for a wide variety of jobs.

    However, since the 1980s, it’s had workers come in from big liberal U.S. cities to work solely in the tech industry, and their numbers are large enough they have changed the voting trends of the place.

    When you move 200,000 etoiolated aspys from big city liberal enclaves to a place instead of guys who could do repair work on their father’s tractor, you will change the voting trends of a place.

    I don’t see how our big cities could change back, frankly. The service industry isn’t going away, and the industrial segment isn’t coming back, either. We do need more industrial jobs in this country, because that’s the only segment of the job market blacks are smart enough to find work in.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Anon


    Our big U.S. cities changed from voting moderate–to pick a point in time as an example, around 1950 or so–to hard liberal today, because they lost their industrial base of workers that used to vote conservative. Instead they are now hives of middle- to upper-middle class people who work in the service industries.

    Until the 1970s, Seattle got its population like most regional large cities did, from other areas of the same state. Smaller town moderates and conservatives moved there looking for a wide variety of jobs.
     

    Yup. Seattle used to be a city built on coal, mining (goldrush), logging/lumber, and later aircraft building and shipping. There is a reason why Filson started there.

    https://content.artofmanliness.com/uploads/2014/06/filson.jpg

    It was a very blue collar city. That said, such blue collar voters were actually not "conservative" in today's sense. Unionism was rife and they were often economically left-of-center. They were, however, culturally very rightist.

    People today don't know or forget, but Seattle actually went through very bad times in the late post-war period (60's-70's):

    https://www.historylink.org/Content/Media/Photos/Large/will-the-last-person-leaving-seattle-turn-out-the-lights-billboard-april-1971.jpg


    We do need more industrial jobs in this country, because that’s the only segment of the job market blacks are smart enough to find work in.
     
    And not just for blacks. But I don't see how this will be possible in light of increasing automation. It is possible to have blue collar jobs in automation, but that will require reforming the secondary education system in the U.S. along the German lines.
    , @John Johnson
    @Anon

    When you move 200,000 etoiolated aspys from big city liberal enclaves to a place instead of guys who could do repair work on their father’s tractor, you will change the voting trends of a place.

    That is only part of the story. Washington and Oregon went Democrat in presidential elections well before the tech boom.

    Nordic cities have long been Democrat enclaves. Washington and Oregon have Nordic urban areas from their days as logging states. You can go to cities like Ballard and see the architectural influence. They have buildings with sharply sloped roofs even though they will never get that kind of snow.

    Public school indoctrination + Nords = liberal domination.

    Not that I think voting Republican will solve our problems. I just hate zombie level liberalism which is the common variety unfortunately.

  36. @Reg Cæsar
    @IHTG


    See also: Vermont.
     
    Vermont was swamped, and is dominated by the pod people now.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @nebulafox

    Vermont was swamped, and is dominated by the pod people now.

    Whenever I am in northern New England, I am struck by how different the vibes are in Vermont and New Hampshire (and Maine too).

    Reminds me a little bit of the different feel between Iowa and Missouri.

  37. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Bernie, @Dutch Boy, @Mike Tre, @Sick of Orcs, @John Johnson

    San Diego only looks good in comparison to LA and SF. The downtown area has become a vast homeless encampment. Faulconer is likely the last Republican mayor; his successor, Todd Gloria, is a part Filipino homosexual. The city council is down to one Republican. The forces that turned other large cities into chaotic garbage dumps are also at work in SD, it’s just taking a bit longer because the area retained a larger percentage of whites than the other big metro areas. The only newspaper in town is owned by a South African born Chinese billionaire and is PC to the limit.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Reverend Goody
    @Dutch Boy

    The newspaper publisher has ruined both the Union Tribune and the LA Times. Weird stance on every issue. I no longer get the Times.

  38. My north Seattle neighborhood is a mix. It was a working class neighborhood when we bought in years ago but all the recent arrivals are doctors and tech people building re-modeled McMansions. Houses that cost \$150K in the 90’s are now worth \$1M-j\$1.5M.
    Meanwhile this increasingly upper-class neighborhood also has increasing bums, tent camps, garbage, and crime. The neighbors have BLM signs in their yards, want someone to do something “to help the homeless”, but are also starting to complain about the crime and garbage. They don’t get the connection.
    Seattleites are virtue-signaling bleeding heart liberals, but when it comes to their home equity and 401Ks they know how to count their money. They voted for the moderately far left candidate in the last mayoral election instead of the far far left candidate. The threat to their home equity will become more immediate as time goes on.
    Racially the neighborhood is still white, with increasing south Asians. The dot Indians are all stereotypical liberal democrats.

  39. As the rest of the country saw violence explode in 2020, the number of homicides in San Diego rose only slightly, from 50 to 55 murders. (Philadelphia, a city of roughly the same size as San Diego, saw homicides rise from 356 in 2019 to 499 murders in 2020.)

    This is not a fair comparison:

    Philadelphia : 44.1% black
    San Diego: 6.39% black

    7x as many blacks, AT LEAST 7x as many murders. It’s that simple. And BLM turned up the blackness premium – instead of being 7x as violent, they became 10x as violent. Turn San Diego into a 44% black city and they would have the same crime problem as Philly. It has nothing to do with who the mayor, police chief and prosecutor are (other than being 44% black would ensure the election of Democrats). Want to get away from crime? Choose a city with few black people. This article (like many other discussions in our country today) ignores the elephant in the room. I could explain most of the crime rate in virtually any city in America solely with reference to the % of black population.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke, Alden, Rich
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Jack D

    '...Want to get away from crime? Choose a city with few black people...'

    Indeed. The town I've moved to in Oregon is decidedly down on its heels; the biggest employer must be the hospital. Along with the dreary employment prospects goes a flourishing drug problem, vagrancy, etc.

    But crime? For an area with about sixty thousand people, I checked the numbers for the year before my arrival. As I recall, no murders, no rapes, no armed robberies, and eight burglaries. Numerous cases of petty theft and what I took to be bar fights and domestic disputes, but that was it.

    All this in an area whose police forces added up to roughly half of those the much wealthier but decidedly 'diverse' California city I had fled.

    But then, this town's only 0.3 % black, you see.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Jack D

    Agreed. My small town in flyover country has about 6 blacks. We have an extra helping of white trash, but very little crime. Everybody is very friendly (even the cops wave to you) and heavily armed.

    The last murder was 18 months ago. It was, wait for it, a black guy shot by another black guy at a club over respect, or something. The club has been closed ever since.

  40. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Bernie, @Dutch Boy, @Mike Tre, @Sick of Orcs, @John Johnson

    National City, the gateway to el Estodos Unitos.

  41. The mayor-elect of Seattle, Bruce Harrell, beat his defund-the-police opponent by 17%. Many residents of Seattle have had it with violence.
    I have a number of very liberal, white friends who now avoid Seattle, period. It isn’t just Covid. I live in a white area with a l.5 hr. commute to Seattle depending on ferries. There are lots of blacks but many are military. They behave themselves.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Marie H

    Port Orchard is beautiful, as is Vashon, Bainbridge Island, Pt. Townsend, Sequim, and Pt. Angeles. And, Marie, how quaint and pretty is that little town on the route to the Hood Canal bridge, Port Gamble! (I had to go to bing maps and look it up.) It's the trees and the fresh cool air that I like, I guess, and one can put up with that gloomy, wet, but not that cold other 8 months.

    Replies: @TWS

  42. @jimmyriddle
    @Colin Wright

    Maybe a lot of San Diego's blacks are military or veterans?

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘Maybe a lot of San Diego’s blacks are military or veterans?’

    That’s a distinct possibility. I was thinking more that the San Diego police have probably been able to continue enforcing the law, but you could be right as well.

  43. @Jack D

    As the rest of the country saw violence explode in 2020, the number of homicides in San Diego rose only slightly, from 50 to 55 murders. (Philadelphia, a city of roughly the same size as San Diego, saw homicides rise from 356 in 2019 to 499 murders in 2020.)
     
    This is not a fair comparison:

    Philadelphia : 44.1% black
    San Diego: 6.39% black

    7x as many blacks, AT LEAST 7x as many murders. It's that simple. And BLM turned up the blackness premium - instead of being 7x as violent, they became 10x as violent. Turn San Diego into a 44% black city and they would have the same crime problem as Philly. It has nothing to do with who the mayor, police chief and prosecutor are (other than being 44% black would ensure the election of Democrats). Want to get away from crime? Choose a city with few black people. This article (like many other discussions in our country today) ignores the elephant in the room. I could explain most of the crime rate in virtually any city in America solely with reference to the % of black population.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Jim Don Bob

    ‘…Want to get away from crime? Choose a city with few black people…’

    Indeed. The town I’ve moved to in Oregon is decidedly down on its heels; the biggest employer must be the hospital. Along with the dreary employment prospects goes a flourishing drug problem, vagrancy, etc.

    But crime? For an area with about sixty thousand people, I checked the numbers for the year before my arrival. As I recall, no murders, no rapes, no armed robberies, and eight burglaries. Numerous cases of petty theft and what I took to be bar fights and domestic disputes, but that was it.

    All this in an area whose police forces added up to roughly half of those the much wealthier but decidedly ‘diverse’ California city I had fled.

    But then, this town’s only 0.3 % black, you see.

  44. I worked with law enforcement in San Diego from about 1994 to about 2008. San Diego’s situation is unique, hemmed in by ocean to the west, mountains to the east, Mexico to the south and military reservation to the north (Oceanside and Camp Pendleton); the law enforcement there has a very distinct and relatively small area in which to work. There are LOTS of federal agencies camped out in San Diego due to San Ysidro, one of the largest land crossings between two contiguous countries, and many of those agencies are well over-represented due to that fact. There are tons of FBI, DEA, HSI – ICE, Coast Guard and CBP (very large Border Patrol presence) wandering about the border and locales north. There are few blacks and the San Diego PD is not loathe to employ deadly force. Seal Team III is located on the Silver Strand (just down from Coronado Island) and there are tons of young marines all over the place. Illegal aliens don’t stop in San Diego after they jump – too close to the border fence (as there’re too many LEOs ready to scoop them up) so they head east and north to LA and beyond. The Latino gangs are nowhere near as prevalent as in LA. Sure there are some homeless and psychotics, but no where near the percentage of a place like San Francisco or Chicago for the size of the population.

    It was just a great city to live in. I’m sure it’s changed somewhat since I’ve been there, but the geography just lends itself to a tight patrol space and the community benefits from that fact.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Rob Lee

    When I went to Sierra Vista, AZ to visit the border in 2003, the maids in my motel were white and black. Illegal aliens don't hang around in the border corridor where the Border Patrol is all over the place.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Dutch Boy
    @Rob Lee

    One thing you'd notice if you haven't been to SD since 2008 is the growth of homelessness and homeless camps in the downtown area. A few years ago there was an attempt to sanitize the area because of an outbreak of hepatitis among the homeless that caused a few fatalities (the authorities started collecting some of the worst garbage heaps and spraying dilute bleach solutions on the sidewalk shit). My impression is that they are not willing to do anything but talk about the problem since there are now so many people camped out.

  45. @Reg Cæsar
    San Diego should secede from California and join the United States.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @SteveRogers42

    And bring the Pacific Fleet with it.

  46. @Bernie
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I just saw the movie "Singles" again for the first time in almost 30 years. It came out at the height of grunge in 1992 and is about single white 20-somethings in Seattle living single white kid lives (music, jobs, parties, sex, relationships, etc.).

    It makes (or made) Seattle look like a place where a young white kid would like to go and live.

    I spent some time in Puyallup over 20 years ago. Was "quaint" if a bit downscale for the area. Anyone know if Puyallup has been overtaken by diversity?

    Replies: @Curle, @SteveRogers42

    There are probably a dozen black kids attending Emerald Ridge High School at any given time, but there IS a two-story-tall Soviet Realist mural of MLK scowling down from a wall in the Common room.

  47. Republican [empty suit] held that office, compiling a fiscally conservative .. record

    There go the idiot reporters, again. In fact, ex-Mayor ES is just another big government conservative (i.e. a RINO); but they all are.

    In Nov ‘19, SD voters approved Measure YY: a \$\$3.5B bond for the totally crappy, San Diego USD. The local GOP officially came out against it for the practical reason that not-long previously approved billions were mismanaged, but there’s no specific, i’net information about mayor’s feelings on the measure. However, the guy was a big proponent of building a new stadium for the [taxpayer-] Chargers, and a whole slew of other, tax-&-spend projects.

    (In contrast, one prominent, local GOP came out strongly against the bond, as well as the statewide, disgusting, gas tax question.)

  48. The real cause is the low number of blacks.

  49. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Bernie, @Dutch Boy, @Mike Tre, @Sick of Orcs, @John Johnson

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists

    TX may not stay red for much longer, with biden’s impeachment-worthy invasion of illegals. Gov. Wheelie of TX is too chickenpoop to seal the border.

  50. @Anon
    @Twinkie

    Our big U.S. cities changed from voting moderate--to pick a point in time as an example, around 1950 or so--to hard liberal today, because they lost their industrial base of workers that used to vote conservative. Instead they are now hives of middle- to upper-middle class people who work in the service industries.

    Until the 1970s, Seattle got its population like most regional large cities did, from other areas of the same state. Smaller town moderates and conservatives moved there looking for a wide variety of jobs.

    However, since the 1980s, it's had workers come in from big liberal U.S. cities to work solely in the tech industry, and their numbers are large enough they have changed the voting trends of the place.

    When you move 200,000 etoiolated aspys from big city liberal enclaves to a place instead of guys who could do repair work on their father's tractor, you will change the voting trends of a place.

    I don't see how our big cities could change back, frankly. The service industry isn't going away, and the industrial segment isn't coming back, either. We do need more industrial jobs in this country, because that's the only segment of the job market blacks are smart enough to find work in.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @John Johnson

    Our big U.S. cities changed from voting moderate–to pick a point in time as an example, around 1950 or so–to hard liberal today, because they lost their industrial base of workers that used to vote conservative. Instead they are now hives of middle- to upper-middle class people who work in the service industries.

    Until the 1970s, Seattle got its population like most regional large cities did, from other areas of the same state. Smaller town moderates and conservatives moved there looking for a wide variety of jobs.

    Yup. Seattle used to be a city built on coal, mining (goldrush), logging/lumber, and later aircraft building and shipping. There is a reason why Filson started there.

    It was a very blue collar city. That said, such blue collar voters were actually not “conservative” in today’s sense. Unionism was rife and they were often economically left-of-center. They were, however, culturally very rightist.

    People today don’t know or forget, but Seattle actually went through very bad times in the late post-war period (60’s-70’s):

    We do need more industrial jobs in this country, because that’s the only segment of the job market blacks are smart enough to find work in.

    And not just for blacks. But I don’t see how this will be possible in light of increasing automation. It is possible to have blue collar jobs in automation, but that will require reforming the secondary education system in the U.S. along the German lines.

  51. @Twinkie
    @Colin Wright


    San Diego is 6.7% black, while Seattle is 7% black.
     
    San Diego and Seattle differences are due to policy differences.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anon, @Corvinus

    Yes. So leave it to Mr. Sailer to take a page from the Noo Yawk Times in burying the lede.

    —Stephan does not maintain that police should be abolished, that systemic racism has infected the criminal-justice system, or that violent criminals should be released. (For these reasons, the Racial Justice Coalition of San Diego has called for her resignation.) But she’s also demonstrated a capacity for nuance, initiating diversion programs for juvenile cases and mental-health issues, creating model programs to protect victims, and tussling with local police organizations to charge an officer with filing a false report. Stephan is a balanced and modern prosecutor—pursuing justice while navigating the difficult waters of reform and safety.

    Stephan has a strong partner in San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit, who hails from a law-enforcement family: his father was a cop, and his son is a cop, too. Nisleit worked his way up from patrol to specialized units, including robbery, gangs, and homicides; sex crimes; internal affairs; homeless outreach; and SWAT. Nisleit supports a diverse and qualified police force, but he does not call his officers corrupt or racist. Nisleit calls out gangs for inflicting violence rather than labeling them misunderstood youths. The San Diego police department maintains a homeless-outreach team to procure services for the homeless, but it does not permit them to harass citizens. In September, the city removed a homeless encampment; homelessness, though still a problem, is far less common here than in other major California cities.—

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon, TWS
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Corvinus

    How is Steve burying the lede? He is quoting a story making your points. That San Diego is safer because the leadership isn’t insane. This is what’s in the story he is quoting.
    “ keeps crime down while maintaining sensible law enforcement policies.
    “ San Diego recently elected a new mayor, Democrat Todd Gloria, a third-generation San Diegan who ran on a progressive platform but so far has left the police and prosecutors alone. It may be enough for a mayor not to interfere with law enforcement to keep a city safe, as long as a strong prosecutor and police chief are on the job.”
    Etc.
    He put the lede right there in black and white in his post.

  52. @Corvinus
    @Twinkie

    Yes. So leave it to Mr. Sailer to take a page from the Noo Yawk Times in burying the lede.

    —Stephan does not maintain that police should be abolished, that systemic racism has infected the criminal-justice system, or that violent criminals should be released. (For these reasons, the Racial Justice Coalition of San Diego has called for her resignation.) But she’s also demonstrated a capacity for nuance, initiating diversion programs for juvenile cases and mental-health issues, creating model programs to protect victims, and tussling with local police organizations to charge an officer with filing a false report. Stephan is a balanced and modern prosecutor—pursuing justice while navigating the difficult waters of reform and safety.

    Stephan has a strong partner in San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit, who hails from a law-enforcement family: his father was a cop, and his son is a cop, too. Nisleit worked his way up from patrol to specialized units, including robbery, gangs, and homicides; sex crimes; internal affairs; homeless outreach; and SWAT. Nisleit supports a diverse and qualified police force, but he does not call his officers corrupt or racist. Nisleit calls out gangs for inflicting violence rather than labeling them misunderstood youths. The San Diego police department maintains a homeless-outreach team to procure services for the homeless, but it does not permit them to harass citizens. In September, the city removed a homeless encampment; homelessness, though still a problem, is far less common here than in other major California cities.—

    Replies: @Alfa158

    How is Steve burying the lede? He is quoting a story making your points. That San Diego is safer because the leadership isn’t insane. This is what’s in the story he is quoting.
    “ keeps crime down while maintaining sensible law enforcement policies.
    “ San Diego recently elected a new mayor, Democrat Todd Gloria, a third-generation San Diegan who ran on a progressive platform but so far has left the police and prosecutors alone. It may be enough for a mayor not to interfere with law enforcement to keep a city safe, as long as a strong prosecutor and police chief are on the job.”
    Etc.
    He put the lede right there in black and white in his post.

  53. As the rest of the country saw violence explode in 2020, the number of homicides in San Diego rose only slightly, from 50 to 55 murders. (Philadelphia, a city of roughly the same size as San Diego, saw homicides rise from 356 in 2019 to 499 murders in 2020.)

    Just looked up some numbers – obviously “size” here refers to population in the city proper, but comparing East Coast cities to other American cities is probably apples-to-oranges. Philadelphia’s 1.6 million population is squeezed into 143 square miles, whereas San Diego’s 1.4 million are on 372 square miles, so Philadelphia is way more densely populated.

    This actually probably makes Philadelphia much worse, because if you superimposed San Diego’s square mileage over the Philadelphia metropolitan area you’re probably including additional high crime cities ringing Philadelphia such as Camden, NJ, Trenton NJ, Wilmington, DE, Chester, PA and probably Reading PA as well. It’s just the fact that there were long-standing existing political boundaries that obscure the actual nature of the problem. San Diego doesn’t seem to be ringed by a bunch of smaller, higher crime cities in the same way.

  54. @Reg Cæsar
    @IHTG


    See also: Vermont.
     
    Vermont was swamped, and is dominated by the pod people now.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @nebulafox

    Texas is interesting because you have an influx of outof-state professionals (mostly white or East/South Asian, obviously) on the one hand, and local non-whites who have grown rather alienated from the Democrats who were counting on their support. It turns out that embracing and visibly gaslighting about riots alienate a lot of people, by no means all white, and the “turn Texas blue” strategy is in danger because of that.

    Now, this does not vindicate the Karl Rove “Give Hispanics an open border and pro-life rhetoric, and they’ll embrace the Chamber of Commerce and vote Republican” idiocy of the 2000s that cost the GOP so dearly. But you had whole counties in South Texas who haven’t voted Republican since the late 1800s drifting red in 2020. This does indicate that if the Republicans are smart enough to ditch their more vote losing traditions, above all the suicidal embrace of oligarch-fetishization in practice on economics, and reorient right-wing politics to what it is going to have to be to win power (and for an old-school civNat type like me, what is right, anyway), there is an opening here as the Democrats grow more insane.

    As I’ve repeatedly said: the more the Democrats become the party of bien-pensants, tech CEOs, and underclass blacks (as the BLM leadership moves to ritzy white neighborhoods, of course: grifters gonna grift), the more that the Republicans can attract everybody else.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    @nebulafox

    Oh, yeah, Republicans ruling. That would be great. And make a big, big change.

    Because the Democrats are bad and the Republicans are good.

    The Democrats oppress everybody and the Republicans free them.

    The Democrats are crooks but the Republicans are honest.

    Give me a break.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @nebulafox


    above all the suicidal embrace of oligarch-fetishization in practice on economics
     
    If the GOP doesn't for tax cuts, nobody will.

    We don't need Soros's money, we need people like him deported. Or in prison.

    , @Twinkie
    @nebulafox

    This everyday and twice on Sunday.

  55. @Bernie
    @anonymous

    You can find the back issues here:

    https://www.big-lies.org/instauration/instauration-pdf-file-list.html

    Replies: @res

    Thanks. They also have a web site at
    http://instaurationonline.com/

    It is pretty badly broken — new.instaurationonline.com is a DNS failure for me — but if you remove the new in links by hand you can get to files like this (your letter is on page 15).
    http://www.instaurationonline.com/pdf-files/Instauration-1987-09-September.pdf

    P.S. Including this because sites disappear and it is good to have multiple alternatives.

  56. @Rob Lee
    I worked with law enforcement in San Diego from about 1994 to about 2008. San Diego's situation is unique, hemmed in by ocean to the west, mountains to the east, Mexico to the south and military reservation to the north (Oceanside and Camp Pendleton); the law enforcement there has a very distinct and relatively small area in which to work. There are LOTS of federal agencies camped out in San Diego due to San Ysidro, one of the largest land crossings between two contiguous countries, and many of those agencies are well over-represented due to that fact. There are tons of FBI, DEA, HSI - ICE, Coast Guard and CBP (very large Border Patrol presence) wandering about the border and locales north. There are few blacks and the San Diego PD is not loathe to employ deadly force. Seal Team III is located on the Silver Strand (just down from Coronado Island) and there are tons of young marines all over the place. Illegal aliens don't stop in San Diego after they jump - too close to the border fence (as there're too many LEOs ready to scoop them up) so they head east and north to LA and beyond. The Latino gangs are nowhere near as prevalent as in LA. Sure there are some homeless and psychotics, but no where near the percentage of a place like San Francisco or Chicago for the size of the population.

    It was just a great city to live in. I'm sure it's changed somewhat since I've been there, but the geography just lends itself to a tight patrol space and the community benefits from that fact.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dutch Boy

    When I went to Sierra Vista, AZ to visit the border in 2003, the maids in my motel were white and black. Illegal aliens don’t hang around in the border corridor where the Border Patrol is all over the place.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Some people make a big deal about the border areas with high Hispanic population being extremely low crime - they rarely, if ever, factor in the fact that these areas are often highly militarized and are subject to an enormous amount of federal law enforcement presence.

    Even so, how do you think absolutely an enormous amount of drugs makes it across this border?

    This is what I overheard while I was training with a group of local LEOs once.

    Young cop: Man, you guys all look at me like I am the scum of the earth, because I work prison.

    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @JMcG, @Rob Lee

  57. The homeless situation in central San Diego is not good – as others have commented, Balboa Park at night is full of the homeless, and within a couple of blocks of the expensive downtown baseball stadium, you’ll find tent encampments, boarded up storefronts, drunken homeless men eyeing you to see if you can be intimidated into giving them money, etc.

    But, it’s a lot better than equivalent parts of LA. And overall, San Diego has a lot less of this nonsense than the rest of coastal SoCal. The relatively conservative city and county governments undoubtedly have something to do with it, but Democrats are making inroads in both, so it will be, uh, interesting to see what the next decade holds…

  58. @nebulafox
    @Reg Cæsar

    Texas is interesting because you have an influx of outof-state professionals (mostly white or East/South Asian, obviously) on the one hand, and local non-whites who have grown rather alienated from the Democrats who were counting on their support. It turns out that embracing and visibly gaslighting about riots alienate a lot of people, by no means all white, and the "turn Texas blue" strategy is in danger because of that.

    Now, this does not vindicate the Karl Rove "Give Hispanics an open border and pro-life rhetoric, and they'll embrace the Chamber of Commerce and vote Republican" idiocy of the 2000s that cost the GOP so dearly. But you had whole counties in South Texas who haven't voted Republican since the late 1800s drifting red in 2020. This does indicate that if the Republicans are smart enough to ditch their more vote losing traditions, above all the suicidal embrace of oligarch-fetishization in practice on economics, and reorient right-wing politics to what it is going to have to be to win power (and for an old-school civNat type like me, what is right, anyway), there is an opening here as the Democrats grow more insane.

    As I've repeatedly said: the more the Democrats become the party of bien-pensants, tech CEOs, and underclass blacks (as the BLM leadership moves to ritzy white neighborhoods, of course: grifters gonna grift), the more that the Republicans can attract everybody else.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie

    Oh, yeah, Republicans ruling. That would be great. And make a big, big change.

    Because the Democrats are bad and the Republicans are good.

    The Democrats oppress everybody and the Republicans free them.

    The Democrats are crooks but the Republicans are honest.

    Give me a break.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @obwandiyag

    Both parties are both stupid and evil, but one is dumber and more immoral than the other. No prizes for guessing which one.

  59. @nebulafox
    @Reg Cæsar

    Texas is interesting because you have an influx of outof-state professionals (mostly white or East/South Asian, obviously) on the one hand, and local non-whites who have grown rather alienated from the Democrats who were counting on their support. It turns out that embracing and visibly gaslighting about riots alienate a lot of people, by no means all white, and the "turn Texas blue" strategy is in danger because of that.

    Now, this does not vindicate the Karl Rove "Give Hispanics an open border and pro-life rhetoric, and they'll embrace the Chamber of Commerce and vote Republican" idiocy of the 2000s that cost the GOP so dearly. But you had whole counties in South Texas who haven't voted Republican since the late 1800s drifting red in 2020. This does indicate that if the Republicans are smart enough to ditch their more vote losing traditions, above all the suicidal embrace of oligarch-fetishization in practice on economics, and reorient right-wing politics to what it is going to have to be to win power (and for an old-school civNat type like me, what is right, anyway), there is an opening here as the Democrats grow more insane.

    As I've repeatedly said: the more the Democrats become the party of bien-pensants, tech CEOs, and underclass blacks (as the BLM leadership moves to ritzy white neighborhoods, of course: grifters gonna grift), the more that the Republicans can attract everybody else.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie

    above all the suicidal embrace of oligarch-fetishization in practice on economics

    If the GOP doesn’t for tax cuts, nobody will.

    We don’t need Soros’s money, we need people like him deported. Or in prison.

  60. @James Braxton
    I visited San Diego recently and was struck by the sheer number of "homeless" encampments in nice areas like Balboa Park, the aggressive panhandling, and the open air drug use. Giuliani era New York it ain't.

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

    A few years ago I stayed 2 nights in a hotel in the Gaslamp district, and walked around. Vagrants everywhere.

  61. @nebulafox
    @Reg Cæsar

    Texas is interesting because you have an influx of outof-state professionals (mostly white or East/South Asian, obviously) on the one hand, and local non-whites who have grown rather alienated from the Democrats who were counting on their support. It turns out that embracing and visibly gaslighting about riots alienate a lot of people, by no means all white, and the "turn Texas blue" strategy is in danger because of that.

    Now, this does not vindicate the Karl Rove "Give Hispanics an open border and pro-life rhetoric, and they'll embrace the Chamber of Commerce and vote Republican" idiocy of the 2000s that cost the GOP so dearly. But you had whole counties in South Texas who haven't voted Republican since the late 1800s drifting red in 2020. This does indicate that if the Republicans are smart enough to ditch their more vote losing traditions, above all the suicidal embrace of oligarch-fetishization in practice on economics, and reorient right-wing politics to what it is going to have to be to win power (and for an old-school civNat type like me, what is right, anyway), there is an opening here as the Democrats grow more insane.

    As I've repeatedly said: the more the Democrats become the party of bien-pensants, tech CEOs, and underclass blacks (as the BLM leadership moves to ritzy white neighborhoods, of course: grifters gonna grift), the more that the Republicans can attract everybody else.

    Replies: @obwandiyag, @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie

    This everyday and twice on Sunday.

  62. @Steve Sailer
    @Rob Lee

    When I went to Sierra Vista, AZ to visit the border in 2003, the maids in my motel were white and black. Illegal aliens don't hang around in the border corridor where the Border Patrol is all over the place.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Some people make a big deal about the border areas with high Hispanic population being extremely low crime – they rarely, if ever, factor in the fact that these areas are often highly militarized and are subject to an enormous amount of federal law enforcement presence.

    Even so, how do you think absolutely an enormous amount of drugs makes it across this border?

    This is what I overheard while I was training with a group of local LEOs once.

    Young cop: Man, you guys all look at me like I am the scum of the earth, because I work prison.

    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Twinkie

    Some people make a big deal about the border areas with high Hispanic population being extremely low crime – they rarely, if ever, factor in the fact that these areas are often highly militarized and are subject to an enormous amount of federal law enforcement presence.

    It really depends on the area. Laredo is definitely not low crime. Neither is Tucson. Phoenix isn't that close to the border but has some very dangerous areas.

    As a White person though you are still much better off in those areas than say Baltimore. But I've never heard anyone say that border areas are extremely low crime.

    Even so, how do you think absolutely an enormous amount of drugs makes it across this border?

    The main problem is that there is just too much traffic between the two countries. We can't crack open every box of avocados that comes across.

    , @JMcG
    @Twinkie

    I’ve only known two prison guards, one became a local cop after his stint working in the county prison. Neither was a decent human being. I don’t know whether the job harmed them or if they were attracted to the job. It is a job that needs doing though.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Rob Lee
    @Twinkie


    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.
     
    Which is par for the course in today's upside down times, as the United States Border Patrol are by far and away the most patriotic representatives of federal law enforcement, if not of local and state as well. Most other agencies - local, state and federal - focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol's primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT. Any US citizen caught up in their day-to-day is basically up to no good.

    You'd think that aspect of their work would be more appreciated by a grateful citizenry. That they're underfunded, undermanned, outgunned and set upon by aggressive ethnocentrics is not at all their fault. It's especially ironic given that they've got more very prideful Latino-Americans in their ranks doing more to keep out illegal alien Latinos than most other 'stock' Americans.

    Their primary mission is to keep America American. I know that's not popular these days...

    Replies: @Twinkie, @William Badwhite, @Johann Ricke

  63. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Southern California used to be the epicenter of the Republican party.

    Interesting how that changed.

    Even in Orange County, the Democrats have become dominant.

    Yet in Texas, Republicans continue to win elections. I wonder why this difference exists.

    Replies: @IHTG, @Bernie, @Dutch Boy, @Mike Tre, @Sick of Orcs, @John Johnson

    California Republicans have always been weak and poor at strategy.

    They never cared about gun rights or education and roll over for just about anything but taxes.

    Their strategy depends entirely on voters that are sick of Democrats. Well what if voters don’t mind the Democrat? (Crickets).

    But their worst characteristic is continually cozying up to the wealthy. They like to run wealthy out of touch candidates that have only been to LA and San Diego.

    Too many Republicans already left the state out of disgust. The remaining ones are clueless.

  64. @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Some people make a big deal about the border areas with high Hispanic population being extremely low crime - they rarely, if ever, factor in the fact that these areas are often highly militarized and are subject to an enormous amount of federal law enforcement presence.

    Even so, how do you think absolutely an enormous amount of drugs makes it across this border?

    This is what I overheard while I was training with a group of local LEOs once.

    Young cop: Man, you guys all look at me like I am the scum of the earth, because I work prison.

    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @JMcG, @Rob Lee

    Some people make a big deal about the border areas with high Hispanic population being extremely low crime – they rarely, if ever, factor in the fact that these areas are often highly militarized and are subject to an enormous amount of federal law enforcement presence.

    It really depends on the area. Laredo is definitely not low crime. Neither is Tucson. Phoenix isn’t that close to the border but has some very dangerous areas.

    As a White person though you are still much better off in those areas than say Baltimore. But I’ve never heard anyone say that border areas are extremely low crime.

    Even so, how do you think absolutely an enormous amount of drugs makes it across this border?

    The main problem is that there is just too much traffic between the two countries. We can’t crack open every box of avocados that comes across.

  65. @Anon
    @Twinkie

    Our big U.S. cities changed from voting moderate--to pick a point in time as an example, around 1950 or so--to hard liberal today, because they lost their industrial base of workers that used to vote conservative. Instead they are now hives of middle- to upper-middle class people who work in the service industries.

    Until the 1970s, Seattle got its population like most regional large cities did, from other areas of the same state. Smaller town moderates and conservatives moved there looking for a wide variety of jobs.

    However, since the 1980s, it's had workers come in from big liberal U.S. cities to work solely in the tech industry, and their numbers are large enough they have changed the voting trends of the place.

    When you move 200,000 etoiolated aspys from big city liberal enclaves to a place instead of guys who could do repair work on their father's tractor, you will change the voting trends of a place.

    I don't see how our big cities could change back, frankly. The service industry isn't going away, and the industrial segment isn't coming back, either. We do need more industrial jobs in this country, because that's the only segment of the job market blacks are smart enough to find work in.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @John Johnson

    When you move 200,000 etoiolated aspys from big city liberal enclaves to a place instead of guys who could do repair work on their father’s tractor, you will change the voting trends of a place.

    That is only part of the story. Washington and Oregon went Democrat in presidential elections well before the tech boom.

    Nordic cities have long been Democrat enclaves. Washington and Oregon have Nordic urban areas from their days as logging states. You can go to cities like Ballard and see the architectural influence. They have buildings with sharply sloped roofs even though they will never get that kind of snow.

    Public school indoctrination + Nords = liberal domination.

    Not that I think voting Republican will solve our problems. I just hate zombie level liberalism which is the common variety unfortunately.

  66. @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Some people make a big deal about the border areas with high Hispanic population being extremely low crime - they rarely, if ever, factor in the fact that these areas are often highly militarized and are subject to an enormous amount of federal law enforcement presence.

    Even so, how do you think absolutely an enormous amount of drugs makes it across this border?

    This is what I overheard while I was training with a group of local LEOs once.

    Young cop: Man, you guys all look at me like I am the scum of the earth, because I work prison.

    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @JMcG, @Rob Lee

    I’ve only known two prison guards, one became a local cop after his stint working in the county prison. Neither was a decent human being. I don’t know whether the job harmed them or if they were attracted to the job. It is a job that needs doing though.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @JMcG


    Neither was a decent human being.
     
    This young prison guard was a bit on the off side. He wasn’t a bad guy, just unwise in his judgment. I observed that during training.

    He repeatedly applied to the local PD and failed to secure a spot. He probably could get a spot now, given the mass defections from that city PD.

    So, I found this amusing: there was a local PD narcotics officer as well in the group. I looked at the old cop (we became friends of sorts) and said, “What about him? Nothing bad to say about him?” He snorted, “Are you kidding? That guy is narcotics and he’s probably on three different kinds of PEDs. I’m not saying jack about him.” The narcotics guy seemed to be a good guy from what I could tell, but he did have biceps that were as big as my thighs (and I’m not exactly a small guy). He was a solid ball of muscles on top of muscles.

    All the local cops shit on the federal LE in the group.
  67. “Ted and Priscilla Tanase”
    Gag on it and die, traitors.

  68. @Marie H
    The mayor-elect of Seattle, Bruce Harrell, beat his defund-the-police opponent by 17%. Many residents of Seattle have had it with violence.
    I have a number of very liberal, white friends who now avoid Seattle, period. It isn't just Covid. I live in a white area with a l.5 hr. commute to Seattle depending on ferries. There are lots of blacks but many are military. They behave themselves.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Port Orchard is beautiful, as is Vashon, Bainbridge Island, Pt. Townsend, Sequim, and Pt. Angeles. And, Marie, how quaint and pretty is that little town on the route to the Hood Canal bridge, Port Gamble! (I had to go to bing maps and look it up.) It’s the trees and the fresh cool air that I like, I guess, and one can put up with that gloomy, wet, but not that cold other 8 months.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It all is meth and trash with the added bonus of crime. Best just to stay away from the Peninsula all together.

  69. @Twinkie
    @Steve Sailer

    Some people make a big deal about the border areas with high Hispanic population being extremely low crime - they rarely, if ever, factor in the fact that these areas are often highly militarized and are subject to an enormous amount of federal law enforcement presence.

    Even so, how do you think absolutely an enormous amount of drugs makes it across this border?

    This is what I overheard while I was training with a group of local LEOs once.

    Young cop: Man, you guys all look at me like I am the scum of the earth, because I work prison.

    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @JMcG, @Rob Lee

    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.

    Which is par for the course in today’s upside down times, as the United States Border Patrol are by far and away the most patriotic representatives of federal law enforcement, if not of local and state as well. Most other agencies – local, state and federal – focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol’s primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT. Any US citizen caught up in their day-to-day is basically up to no good.

    You’d think that aspect of their work would be more appreciated by a grateful citizenry. That they’re underfunded, undermanned, outgunned and set upon by aggressive ethnocentrics is not at all their fault. It’s especially ironic given that they’ve got more very prideful Latino-Americans in their ranks doing more to keep out illegal alien Latinos than most other ‘stock’ Americans.

    Their primary mission is to keep America American. I know that’s not popular these days…

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Rob Lee


    I know that’s not popular these days…
     
    I think the old cop was talking about human quality/corruption, not the nature of the respective LE work.

    You get no argument from me on how vital Border Patrol is and how crucial manning and maintaining the sovereign border is.

    BTW, these were local LEOs in the PacNW, so the old cop was on about the guys who work the Canadian border.
    , @William Badwhite
    @Rob Lee


    Most other agencies – local, state and federal – focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol’s primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT.
     
    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @James Forrestal

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Rob Lee


    Which is par for the course in today’s upside down times, as the United States Border Patrol are by far and away the most patriotic representatives of federal law enforcement, if not of local and state as well.
     
    And that is why when Dubya only commuted rather than pardoned the officers at the center of that border incident with the illegal, I started thinking less of him, to the point that I now believe it would be better for the country had he never been born.
  70. @Jack D

    As the rest of the country saw violence explode in 2020, the number of homicides in San Diego rose only slightly, from 50 to 55 murders. (Philadelphia, a city of roughly the same size as San Diego, saw homicides rise from 356 in 2019 to 499 murders in 2020.)
     
    This is not a fair comparison:

    Philadelphia : 44.1% black
    San Diego: 6.39% black

    7x as many blacks, AT LEAST 7x as many murders. It's that simple. And BLM turned up the blackness premium - instead of being 7x as violent, they became 10x as violent. Turn San Diego into a 44% black city and they would have the same crime problem as Philly. It has nothing to do with who the mayor, police chief and prosecutor are (other than being 44% black would ensure the election of Democrats). Want to get away from crime? Choose a city with few black people. This article (like many other discussions in our country today) ignores the elephant in the room. I could explain most of the crime rate in virtually any city in America solely with reference to the % of black population.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Jim Don Bob

    Agreed. My small town in flyover country has about 6 blacks. We have an extra helping of white trash, but very little crime. Everybody is very friendly (even the cops wave to you) and heavily armed.

    The last murder was 18 months ago. It was, wait for it, a black guy shot by another black guy at a club over respect, or something. The club has been closed ever since.

  71. @Rob Lee
    @Twinkie


    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.
     
    Which is par for the course in today's upside down times, as the United States Border Patrol are by far and away the most patriotic representatives of federal law enforcement, if not of local and state as well. Most other agencies - local, state and federal - focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol's primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT. Any US citizen caught up in their day-to-day is basically up to no good.

    You'd think that aspect of their work would be more appreciated by a grateful citizenry. That they're underfunded, undermanned, outgunned and set upon by aggressive ethnocentrics is not at all their fault. It's especially ironic given that they've got more very prideful Latino-Americans in their ranks doing more to keep out illegal alien Latinos than most other 'stock' Americans.

    Their primary mission is to keep America American. I know that's not popular these days...

    Replies: @Twinkie, @William Badwhite, @Johann Ricke

    I know that’s not popular these days…

    I think the old cop was talking about human quality/corruption, not the nature of the respective LE work.

    You get no argument from me on how vital Border Patrol is and how crucial manning and maintaining the sovereign border is.

    BTW, these were local LEOs in the PacNW, so the old cop was on about the guys who work the Canadian border.

  72. @JMcG
    @Twinkie

    I’ve only known two prison guards, one became a local cop after his stint working in the county prison. Neither was a decent human being. I don’t know whether the job harmed them or if they were attracted to the job. It is a job that needs doing though.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Neither was a decent human being.

    This young prison guard was a bit on the off side. He wasn’t a bad guy, just unwise in his judgment. I observed that during training.

    He repeatedly applied to the local PD and failed to secure a spot. He probably could get a spot now, given the mass defections from that city PD.

    So, I found this amusing: there was a local PD narcotics officer as well in the group. I looked at the old cop (we became friends of sorts) and said, “What about him? Nothing bad to say about him?” He snorted, “Are you kidding? That guy is narcotics and he’s probably on three different kinds of PEDs. I’m not saying jack about him.” The narcotics guy seemed to be a good guy from what I could tell, but he did have biceps that were as big as my thighs (and I’m not exactly a small guy). He was a solid ball of muscles on top of muscles.

    All the local cops shit on the federal LE in the group.

    • LOL: JMcG
  73. @Dutch Boy
    @JohnnyWalker123

    San Diego only looks good in comparison to LA and SF. The downtown area has become a vast homeless encampment. Faulconer is likely the last Republican mayor; his successor, Todd Gloria, is a part Filipino homosexual. The city council is down to one Republican. The forces that turned other large cities into chaotic garbage dumps are also at work in SD, it's just taking a bit longer because the area retained a larger percentage of whites than the other big metro areas. The only newspaper in town is owned by a South African born Chinese billionaire and is PC to the limit.

    Replies: @Reverend Goody

    The newspaper publisher has ruined both the Union Tribune and the LA Times. Weird stance on every issue. I no longer get the Times.

  74. @Rob Lee
    @Twinkie


    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.
     
    Which is par for the course in today's upside down times, as the United States Border Patrol are by far and away the most patriotic representatives of federal law enforcement, if not of local and state as well. Most other agencies - local, state and federal - focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol's primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT. Any US citizen caught up in their day-to-day is basically up to no good.

    You'd think that aspect of their work would be more appreciated by a grateful citizenry. That they're underfunded, undermanned, outgunned and set upon by aggressive ethnocentrics is not at all their fault. It's especially ironic given that they've got more very prideful Latino-Americans in their ranks doing more to keep out illegal alien Latinos than most other 'stock' Americans.

    Their primary mission is to keep America American. I know that's not popular these days...

    Replies: @Twinkie, @William Badwhite, @Johann Ricke

    Most other agencies – local, state and federal – focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol’s primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT.

    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @William Badwhite


    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.
     
    A buddy of mine is former Coast Guard officer who did lots of drug interdictions and such. When he did dive training with the SOCOM ninjas, they all shit on him massively for being Coast Guard.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @James Forrestal
    @William Badwhite


    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.
     
    Hey, come on now -- the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force have killed a whole lot more Iraqis than the Coast Guard! Sure, none of them are gonna haul your ass out of the water in the middle of a storm... but why would you care about that?
  75. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Marie H

    Port Orchard is beautiful, as is Vashon, Bainbridge Island, Pt. Townsend, Sequim, and Pt. Angeles. And, Marie, how quaint and pretty is that little town on the route to the Hood Canal bridge, Port Gamble! (I had to go to bing maps and look it up.) It's the trees and the fresh cool air that I like, I guess, and one can put up with that gloomy, wet, but not that cold other 8 months.

    Replies: @TWS

    It all is meth and trash with the added bonus of crime. Best just to stay away from the Peninsula all together.

  76. @Rob Lee
    I worked with law enforcement in San Diego from about 1994 to about 2008. San Diego's situation is unique, hemmed in by ocean to the west, mountains to the east, Mexico to the south and military reservation to the north (Oceanside and Camp Pendleton); the law enforcement there has a very distinct and relatively small area in which to work. There are LOTS of federal agencies camped out in San Diego due to San Ysidro, one of the largest land crossings between two contiguous countries, and many of those agencies are well over-represented due to that fact. There are tons of FBI, DEA, HSI - ICE, Coast Guard and CBP (very large Border Patrol presence) wandering about the border and locales north. There are few blacks and the San Diego PD is not loathe to employ deadly force. Seal Team III is located on the Silver Strand (just down from Coronado Island) and there are tons of young marines all over the place. Illegal aliens don't stop in San Diego after they jump - too close to the border fence (as there're too many LEOs ready to scoop them up) so they head east and north to LA and beyond. The Latino gangs are nowhere near as prevalent as in LA. Sure there are some homeless and psychotics, but no where near the percentage of a place like San Francisco or Chicago for the size of the population.

    It was just a great city to live in. I'm sure it's changed somewhat since I've been there, but the geography just lends itself to a tight patrol space and the community benefits from that fact.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dutch Boy

    One thing you’d notice if you haven’t been to SD since 2008 is the growth of homelessness and homeless camps in the downtown area. A few years ago there was an attempt to sanitize the area because of an outbreak of hepatitis among the homeless that caused a few fatalities (the authorities started collecting some of the worst garbage heaps and spraying dilute bleach solutions on the sidewalk shit). My impression is that they are not willing to do anything but talk about the problem since there are now so many people camped out.

  77. @William Badwhite
    @Rob Lee


    Most other agencies – local, state and federal – focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol’s primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT.
     
    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @James Forrestal

    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.

    A buddy of mine is former Coast Guard officer who did lots of drug interdictions and such. When he did dive training with the SOCOM ninjas, they all shit on him massively for being Coast Guard.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNPW3blR0tg

  78. @obwandiyag
    @nebulafox

    Oh, yeah, Republicans ruling. That would be great. And make a big, big change.

    Because the Democrats are bad and the Republicans are good.

    The Democrats oppress everybody and the Republicans free them.

    The Democrats are crooks but the Republicans are honest.

    Give me a break.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Both parties are both stupid and evil, but one is dumber and more immoral than the other. No prizes for guessing which one.

  79. @Rob Lee
    @Twinkie


    Old cop: Nah, brother, you are not the scum of the earth. That’d be Border Patrol. You are on top of them.
     
    Which is par for the course in today's upside down times, as the United States Border Patrol are by far and away the most patriotic representatives of federal law enforcement, if not of local and state as well. Most other agencies - local, state and federal - focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol's primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT. Any US citizen caught up in their day-to-day is basically up to no good.

    You'd think that aspect of their work would be more appreciated by a grateful citizenry. That they're underfunded, undermanned, outgunned and set upon by aggressive ethnocentrics is not at all their fault. It's especially ironic given that they've got more very prideful Latino-Americans in their ranks doing more to keep out illegal alien Latinos than most other 'stock' Americans.

    Their primary mission is to keep America American. I know that's not popular these days...

    Replies: @Twinkie, @William Badwhite, @Johann Ricke

    Which is par for the course in today’s upside down times, as the United States Border Patrol are by far and away the most patriotic representatives of federal law enforcement, if not of local and state as well.

    And that is why when Dubya only commuted rather than pardoned the officers at the center of that border incident with the illegal, I started thinking less of him, to the point that I now believe it would be better for the country had he never been born.

  80. Anyone who thinks one party one iota better or more moral than the other is a blithering moron.

  81. @Twinkie
    @William Badwhite


    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.
     
    A buddy of mine is former Coast Guard officer who did lots of drug interdictions and such. When he did dive training with the SOCOM ninjas, they all shit on him massively for being Coast Guard.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  82. @William Badwhite
    @Rob Lee


    Most other agencies – local, state and federal – focus their efforts on US citizens, while the US Border Patrol’s primary mission is to keep foreigners OUT.
     
    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @James Forrestal

    This is similar to how the only US armed service that does anything for America or Americans in a given year is the Coast Guard.

    Hey, come on now — the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force have killed a whole lot more Iraqis than the Coast Guard! Sure, none of them are gonna haul your ass out of the water in the middle of a storm… but why would you care about that?

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