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California Refugees Wait in Long Lines for Food
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Homesick California refugees continue to spread their indigenous culture across America, such as lining up for In-N-Out Burgers in Colorado and rooting for the LA Dodgers at the recent World Series held in Dallas-Fort Worth.

By the way, In-N-Out Burgers are fine, but don’t wait 12 hours in line for them. They’re just hamburgers.

 
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  1. • If a wannabe fed can line-up for 12 hours (and I don’t care how gourmet the burger might be),

    • If a wannabe Jewish can get a circumcision,

    • If a wannabe left-alone kid can be drafted into in-person, brick-&-mortar school attendance,

    Then expecting a wannabe voter to show up at his legal polling station, on the day of an election, would not be so unreasonable.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @guest007
  2. That people exist in the US that are stupid enough to wait in line 12 hours for a burger is embarrassing.

  3. Nathan says:

    Colorado used to have its own indigenous burger joints. It also used to have its own political culture, from left-libertarian Democrats to Christian social conservatives. Then four people with a lot of money figured out that what Colorado really needed was Chicago-style machine politics. Once machine politics are established, it’s hard to reverse the process. Colorado has permanent mail in voting and the Republican party exists more or less only where there are no major urban centers.

    Look for the same thing to happen to Georgia.

    • Agree: Pop Warner, Neoconned
    • Replies: @Cato
    , @John Johnson
    , @Anonymous
  4. Jmaie says:

    Hmm, comment did not take the first time.

    They’re just hamburgers.

    You’re showing your (west) coastal elitism there Steve ;<) For those of us in the hinterlands, yah, I can get a better burger at some restaurants and I can make better at home. In the realm of drive up fast food burgers? They are certainly not.

    (I would not wait 12 hours for one, I'll give you that. Probably. I visit Cali from time to time and can get my fix. Otherwise, I might.)

    • Disagree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
  5. Hun says:

    These people live empty, pointless lives.

  6. peterike says:

    They’re just hamburgers.

    Exactly. A totally non-exceptional example of the genre.

    Though Californians mooning over them is less officiously sickening than people from Austin constantly going on about how they have “the best Mexican food” and mocking the Mexican food in [insert your town].

    As if that slop cuisine that anyone can make successfully were some kind of achievement.

    And actually, I’ve had plenty of it, and most of it is about what you’d get at a Chipotle.

  7. Anonymous[101] • Disclaimer says:

    After I moved away from California I took a class about mapping/GIS which inter alia used In-N-Out for an exercise. Apparently that firm’s policy is to not open any location has to be within 500mi from the cows (so presumably these are all chain-owned, not franchises)? I don’t remember if this analysis suggests more or fewer Texas/Oklahoma, but it really is just a hamburger. It would be nice if, when the U.S. economy tanks next year, it wiped out all the fast-food chains too. An immigration moratorium would do the same but hey, we have an obligation to only discuss proposals that are physically possible in reality, right? Like making Silicon Valley employment 51% female (or higher)

    • Replies: @Whiskey
  8. Not Raul says:

    In-N-Out is good; but it’s overrated.

    Nation’s is better.

    https://www.nationsrestaurants.com/

    • Replies: @Kronos
  9. Still, I’ll take the Cali refugees over the crowd lining up outside Popeye’s Chicken.

    • Agree: Icy Blast, Bubba
    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @John Johnson
  10. Millennials get really excited about new opportunities to be separated from their money. Your average Millennial male is probably about as bad as a Gex X female. It’s distasteful to observe in-person, how gleeful so many of them get about some new corporate schlock. I like In-N-Out burger, but come the Hell on. It ain’t that great.

    • LOL: Old and Grumpy
  11. Aurora is a sprawling suburb of Denver. It has some pretty rough areas: when one watches the evening news in Colorado, chances are the robbery or shooting headline is coming out of Aurora. But I think it’s large enough that there are some swank spots too, and Californians find real estate to be cheap anywhere else in the country that isn’t Seattle, Boston, or New York. Colorado real estate seems overvalued to me, but the market is whatever one will pay for it, so Californians can set the price.

    Also noteworthy is that the increasing bluing of America occurs when elite whites, those who believe they’re too enlightened to be burdened by whiteness, join with their brown and black brothers to overthrow the Deplorables. Colorado was once purple red, but now it’s pretty blue. Californians are a part of that story.

    • Thanks: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @WJ
    , @Thomas
    , @SaneClownPosse
  12. JimB says:

    By the way, In-N-Out Burgers are fine, but don’t wait 12 hours in line for them. They’re just hamburgers.

    You can make a gourmet burger on your own stove top, the put it in an old In-n-Out wrapper.

  13. I only go to the In N Out Burger on Radcliffe.

  14. Anon7 says:

    OT: I’ll start calling Kamala Harris the Vice President-elect if she’ll resign her senate seat right now. Deal?

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
  15. Jake says:

    California refugees flee fro what has gone wrong in CA and try to remake where they are into CA, which spreads the contagion.

  16. since maudslay made the perfect screw autism has been selected for.

  17. since maudslay made the perfect screw autism has been selected for.

    these people waiting 12 h could replace mexican farm workers.

  18. In-n-out represents Christianity, the Eisenhower era and the American dream from Baldwin Park. But Aurora went overwhelmingly for Biden. Such a disconnect from reality. They deserve to wait 12 hours.

    • Agree: clyde
  19. Homesick California refugees continue to spread their indigenous culture across…

  20. Yeah, but do they have In-and Out B urge r bumper stickers, Steve? If not, they are not real native Californians anyway, so let them eat Coney Island!

    • Replies: @JimB
    , @Ron Mexico
  21. Homesick California refugees continue to spread their indigenous culture across…

  22. Trinity says:

    Oh my gawd, Colorado and Texas, don’t make the mistake of Florida and other Southeastern states, stop this shit dead in its tracks before your state turns into Commiefornia East. The East Coast snowbirds already ruined much of Florida, North Carolina, and now have their hooks set into South Carolina, North Ga, and Nashville, Tn. You might have some right thinking Californians, but many will probably flaunt their superiority. Be ready to hear, “well this is how we used to do it back in California,” ” so and so was better in California,” and most importantly remember, that those of us not on the East Coast or Left Coast are inbred hicks and hillbillies. hehe.

    • Replies: @3g4me
  23. AndrewR says:

    Colorado would be better off [redacted]ing everyone in that line, but that’s not my business… [sips tea]

    • Agree: Cloudbuster
  24. Mr. Anon says:

    OT – Trump considers executive order to ban birthright citizenship:

    https://bigleaguepolitics.com/bombshell-president-trump-may-sign-executive-order-to-end-birthright-citizenship-before-term-ends/

    Wow! What a great idea. If only he had thought of this – oh, I don’t know – three years and ten months ago.

    • Agree: Ben tillman, By-tor
    • Replies: @Old and Grumpy
  25. Thomas says:

    Last trip to the Oregon coast this year, we drove a couple hours out of our way to Keizer to hit up the furthest north In-N-Out. Got to disagree with you on this one, Steve. It’s worth it.

    My go-to order: Double-double, Animal-style, ketchup and mustard instead of spread, raw chopped onions instead of grilled, add chiles, fries well-done.

    Supposedly, In-N-Out has been slow to spread too far from California because it doesn’t want to transport its meat far enough to require freezing. They buy their beef from the massive Harris Ranch feedlot in Coalinga, California (aka, “Cowschwitz”) that anybody who has traveled along I-5 through the Central Valley has smelled.

  26. This has nothing to do with California but where I live the cars wrap around the Chick-fil-A drive-thru 3 times. There’s always like 50 cars in line at any time!

    I went there once because someone gave me a gift certificate. I went inside and waited in line behind about 30 people. On reaching the counter I asked the woman there what the event was and she told me it is that way from open to close every day they’re open!

  27. jon says:

    SoCal natives are the only people I have met that can rival New Yorkers in their provincialism.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
  28. AndrewR says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    What have we wrought upon the world? [cries tears of pure despair]

  29. El Dato says:

    This confirms my suspicion that burger ingredients have a dependency-creating effect. A massive boost of salt, sugar, fat, protein and mystery additives: Too much for the hindbrain to resist.

    Also, obligatory:

  30. Trinity says:

    Sorry, but I am not at the point of starvation or desperation yet to sit in a fast food line for 12 hours. Never been out West, never had these hamburgers, but really, how good can they really be? A fast food hamburger chain that a lot of people rave about is called, “Five Guys.” SORRY, but I wasn’t impressed with the overpriced and small portions served at “Five Guys.” Honestly, “Burger King” is tops in the fast food hamburger choices as far as I am concerned.

  31. El Dato says:

    OT: The hate is palpable.

    AOC as usual with a firm grasp of the basic logic of the real world: “Imagine if someone did something different, then it would be different. This is a scandal!”

    Does anyone believe Rittenhouse would be released if he were Muslim & did the same thing in a diff context?

    Imagine if Kyle Rittenhouse was a Muslim…

    There would probably be Muslim threats of beheading Antifa goons?

  32. Homesick California refugees continue to spread their indigenous culture

    Something as generic as a fast food hamburger is what passes for culture.

    • Agree: epebble
    • Replies: @Drew
  33. National Hamburger Festival is held annually , but not this summer, in Akron, Ohio. There are dozens of restaurants that have great burgers. In-n-Out doesn’t participate, but to me any hand formed burger cooked on a greasy griddle, not a grill, has a good start on enjoyable. A great roll makes a big difference too. Over rated in my opinion, “Five Guys.”

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    , @Bill P
    , @Rud
  34. @Thomas

    I ate at one in Utah and the patty wasn’t cooked enough, and the sauce tasted like ordinary orange “fry sauce.” Pretty disappointing considering I was all hyped up to try it. Marginally better than Whataburger (also overrated).

    • Replies: @Bubba
  35. Similar lines formed when Pollo Campero opened its first restaurant in Northern Virginia around 15 years ago. Immigrants from Central America waited hours for a piece of fried chicken.

    Before 9/11, they would line up at the arrival gate of any flight from Guatemala, and buy the chicken from returning passengers as they got off the plane. It was said every overhead bin was stuffed with greasy bags and the plane reeked of pollo frito.

    (I’m not a fried chicken fan, but it’s way better than KFC or Popey’s)

  36. JimB says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, but do they have In-and Out B urge r bumper stickers, Steve? If not, they are not real native Californians anyway, so let them eat Coney Island!

    Don’t you mean let them eat Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs?

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  37. J.Ross says:

    One of the most repellant characteristics of soy life is worshipful consumerism and the gourmetization of trash. I love the double double with dirty fries and would never wait in line for it. But how many of these same soulless megacorp drones also waited in line for Apple Box #427 or Movie Franchise Sequel #35?

  38. Anonymous[422] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomas

    Last trip to the Oregon coast this year, we drove a couple hours out of our way to Keizer to hit up the furthest north In-N-Out. Got to disagree with you on this one, Steve. It’s worth it.

    My go-to order: Double-double, Animal-style, ketchup and mustard instead of spread, raw chopped onions instead of grilled, add chiles, fries well-done.

    In a fraction of that waiting time, you could go to a local butcher, procure a ridiculously superior quality grind of meat, then make your double-double Fag-style idiot burger at home. Not that you’d recognize the higher quality meat compared to a fricking cheap-assed saturated fat-laden In-n-Out burger, you lazy, time-squandering, wall-scrawling ape-woman.

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Jmaie
  39. Thoughts says:

    Jollibee is similar

    It’s true…what people won’t give for a little taste of home…even if it is crap (Jollibee is generic Philipino KFC)

    In and Out isn’t crap but it’s not like…that amazing

    In and Out is distinguished in my book as the only American fast food restaurant (well any restaurant really in the USA) that doesn’t give me the shits

    I used to shake with fear when I would drive by a Carl’s…man I wouldn’t last 45 minutes after one of their burgers…worst pains of my life…and I kept going back which was weirder…

  40. @Buffalo Joe

    Over rated in my opinion, “Five Guys.”

    Gotta agree with you on that.

    • Disagree: Drew
    • Replies: @Corn
  41. utu says:

    Colorado has Good Times Burgers & Frozen Custard chain

    • Replies: @Nathan
    , @Bubba
  42. 10 Unhealthy Things Lurking in Your Burger

    https://www.everydayhealth.com/news/unhealthy-things-lurking-in-your-burger/

    The first person I heard describe themself as a CA refugee was Joe Rogan, the new most-trusted-man-in-America. Shirley MacLaine described her relocation motivation from WA to NM, “there are too many Californians in Washington”.

  43. Gamecock says:

    Based on corrupted vote in Arizona, I conclude that California refugees did NOT leave California because of the perverse Leftist ideology. They are economic refugees, fleeing the effect of socialism. But they carry the socialism with them, and are infecting Arizona.

    It’s not, “This is stupid; I’m leaving.” It’s “I can’t afford this, so I’m moving [to someplace that still have free enterprise, and you can make a living – until you get there and start voting].”

  44. Nathan says:
    @utu

    Drifter’s, and its predecessor Classic’s, are Colorado’s own direct In ‘n Out ripoffs.

  45. @Achmed E. Newman

    In-n-Out urge was classic! Some of my first memories of moving to SoCal in 78 were the aforementioned bumper sticker modification and Cal Worthington’s commercials in which I swore the jingle said, “need a car or truck? Pussy cow!” Thanks for taking me back to simpler, happier times.

  46. When will states realize Californians are an invasive species?

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @anon
  47. Anonymous[166] • Disclaimer says:

    Culvers Butter Burgers are good. Originally Wisconsin. Also now in Colorado.

    In-n-Out has been good when I have been to California and St. George Utah. But they may have the worst fries I have ever eaten. Why can’t they fix that?

    • Replies: @Enemy of Earth
    , @utu
    , @Corn
  48. Malenfant says:
    @Thomas

    Got to disagree with you on this one, Steve. It’s worth it.

    Twelve hours for a fast food burger? This is peak “consoom” idiocy. What the hell is wrong with you?

  49. Bill P says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    I cook my own burgers using grass fed beef. It’s only $5/pound at the local Winco. One of my friends is a right wing lady from Singapore married to a local guy who raises those hairy Scottish cows. She told me she didn’t understand why so many of us white guys seem to have a great affection for cattle. I told her we’ve been herding cattle for so long that it’s literally in our blood at this point (I believe that’s true — lactase persistence proves it, but it’s got to have other effects as well). What’s great about this is that if you go anywhere with decent grass and a lot of white guys you’ll always be able to find cheap, excellent beef and quality dairy products.

    Cooking a good burger is as easy as it gets. The most important thing (as always) is quality ingredients. Buy good buns, good beef and good toppings, and if you are a competent cook you can’t go wrong, even with no more than a griddle, hot plate and toaster oven. People still manage to screw them up, but I honestly don’t know why. It’s actually harder to cook good french fries.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
    , @utu
  50. Kronos says:
    @Not Raul

    What about “5 Guys?” They’re really good!

    • Replies: @Drew
    , @Not Raul
  51. Cato says:
    @Nathan

    four people with a lot of money figured out that what Colorado really needed was Chicago-style machine politics

    Who were these four people?

    • Replies: @Nathan
  52. Mark G. says:

    I have an elderly aunt and uncle who left here in Indiana and moved to California. They like In-N-Out burger a lot. When they come back to Indianapolis, though, the first thing they do is go around looking for a local burger chain, White Castle, which I guess doesn’t exist where they live now. They turn into an eighty year old version of “Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle”. White Castle hamburgers are kind of an acquired taste but if you grew up with them you like them and it’s also a nostalgia thing to visit one since they have been around forever. I go a couple times a year. I can imagine former Californians going to a new In-N-Out burger place in another state just like my ex-Hoosier aunt and uncle head to White Castle when they visit Indiana.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  53. Cato says:
    @peterike

    people from Austin constantly going on about how they have “the best Mexican food”

    Austin is the most chauvinistic city in the US.

  54. Muggles says:

    Texans prefer Whataburger, with the big orange triangular metal roofs. Easy to see.

    They by far are favored here over other chains. Though I heard In-and-Out has opened one up not too far from me. Haven’t tried it.

    The Cali import Carls Jr. near me closed a few months ago. Now a taco place. Never tried it.

    Whataburger got bought up by a Chicago hedge fund, when the original family sold. Lots of worry about change and rumors that those big metal orange roofs are not being added to the new locations, presumably elsewhere, not Texas. That’s crazy. With those they don’t need signage though they do take getting used to. Probably Yankee zoning Nazis don’t like them up north.

    Funny how these regionalisms persist with stubborn loyalty from fans. I don’t eat much fast food but when traveling, I do look for Whataburger when in Texas.

    BTW: “Mexican” food is different in different places. TX, NM, AZ and Cali have different takes on it. Also the Mexicans, who wonder where fajitas came from. Tex-Mex, as it is called here, is different. What I’ve had outside of the now former Mexican US territory hasn’t been good. Pretty bad, though Mexicans are now everywhere.

    Real coastal Mexican cuisine with fish, shrimp is very good and very different from “Mexican food” found here. I have found that in Santa Fe, once, and it a few local places here but you have to look. .

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
  55. Cortes says:

    The queue looks like the first McDonalds in Russia.

    Scary.

    On the upside, maybe in 30 years time there’ll be something positive to look at:

    http://johnhelmer.net/in-the-belly-of-the-bourgeoisie-vkusville-is-a-unique-russian-achievement-profitable-too/#more-45477

  56. In N Out burgers are the best and I’ve tried every burger joint in SOCA.

    I wouldn’t wait in line for twelve hours for an In N Out burger…..but they really are great.

    In fact, In N Out is one of the very few things I will miss when I am able to flee CA.

  57. Rob McX says:
    @BaylessHound

    That’s probably why the In-N-Out queue is so slow – no shootouts to thin out the crowd.

  58. Anonymous[210] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    Grass fed beef is terrible. Just like grass fed milk is terrible. Sure, it’s healthier for you, but most people who say they prefer grass fed beef are lying and just say so for the cachet and virtue/prestige signalling.

    The fattier, grain fed beef will always taste better than the gamey, grassy grass fed beef.

    Grass fed butter is better than grain fed butter, though.

    • Agree: JMcG, Stan
    • Replies: @OFWHAP
  59. @Cato

    Austin is the most chauvinistic city in the US.

    Visit Portland first.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  60. prosa123 says:

    Shake Shack is very good too, though it is really isn’t fast food: it usually takes about five minutes to get your food after you order, and there’s no drive-thru. Five Guys is the same.

    • Replies: @Peterike
    , @AP
  61. @Nathan

    Colorado and Oregon were ruined by the same thing.

    Californians and New Yorkers looking for cheaper housing, lower taxes, “good schools” (cough), and rednecks to lecture on how they know everything.

    • Agree: By-tor
  62. How far have we descended.

    Now chain restaurants are considered local, cultural artifacts.

    Woe unto you. Tremble for the fate of the nation.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon, botazefa
  63. @BaylessHound

    Still, I’ll take the Cali refugees over the crowd lining up outside Popeye’s Chicken.

    The Cali refugees have voted and a majority agrees that this comment is racist and that your income needs to be confiscated to promote diversity in your area.

  64. I meant to note that that clickbait-style post title is hilarious, Steve. Also, I really liked your “I fought the rocks, and the rock won.” from the last post, but sometimes I don’t see the whole post early on. I swear that wasn’t there when I first commented.

  65. @Gamecock

    Right. It’s “hey, this isn’t how we did it in California.” It’s the same with Yankees who move to the South. It’s also just food, but where the hell did the Dunkin Donuts come from in the South? They brought that with them. Are you too good for Krispy Kreme? Too healthy for you? GTFO!

    • Replies: @Trinity
    , @Gamecock
  66. Dafuq people saying In-N-Out isn’t that good. It’s the best chain burger there is.

    Of course the Habit in SB is not a chain..

  67. Trelane says:

    Popeyes runs out of chicken

    • Thanks: bruce county
    • LOL: northeast
    • Replies: @northeast
  68. @Anonymous

    Culvers up here in MN has a pretty good burger and their patty melts are also good but I wouldn’t wait twelve hours for a sandwich from any place. I will leave a restaurant if the wait to be seated is more than thirty minutes but that’s just because I don’t like waiting for anything.

  69. Drew says:
    @Kronos

    They’re excellent, for sure. So is Shake Shack and Home Run Burgers. For my money, though, Steak n Shake is the best. All the premium chains are basically just Steak n Shake, but with a twist (larger patties, real malt in shakes, special fry cut, etc.).

    • Agree: Mark G.
  70. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    There’s an In-N-Out right next to a Chick-fil-A in Fort Worth. The happiness and employee politeness and helpfulness threaten to reach critical mass and bring on The Singularity. It’s only the distance of the two shops’ respective drive-through lanes that keeps them at a sufficient distance to avoid this.

    • LOL: botazefa
  71. Drew says:
    @Federalist

    Apparently. It’s actually quite funny when you think about it: Americans emigrate to various European countries for the culture, but not the other way around. The Europeans must be rather jingoistic xenophobes if they can’t find beauty and delight in highly processed, industrially produced over-sugared cuisine, poorly drawn cartoons, and simplistic, out of tune ditties. It’s haute couture!

  72. @peterike

    “As if that slop cuisine that anyone can make successfully were some kind of achievement.”

    Indeed. The doyenne of Mexican cuisine, Diane Kennedy (Anglo, of course) shows how. No immigrants needed. Here’s her guacamole recipe: no immigrants needed; along with the story of how “the best tacos in NYC” are made by a couple New Yorkers who just went to Mexico and learned how to make tacos:

    https://counter-currents.com/2017/05/cooking-with-counter-currents/

  73. Nathan says:
    @Cato

    Pat Stryker, Jared Polis, Tim Gill and Russ Bridges. It is perhaps the biggest but somehow least well understood case study in how the left gained so much political traction in the early 21st century, which is astonishing when you consider that the left has published books and countless articles about how it was done:

    https://www.denverpost.com/2010/04/08/how-the-dems-won-colorado/

    The right is just asleep at the wheel.

    • Replies: @bomag
    , @68W58
    , @Cato
  74. In-N-Out is a solid burger especially at its price point.

    The real appeal of In-N-Out is that its brand embodies the idealized Southern California of the 1950’s. Impeccably clean and bright restaurants that feel both futuristic and retro at the same time. Palm trees, relatively healthy ingredients. A quality product at every man a king pricing. What the Southern California Dream once embodied. That is what people are nostalgic for, the California of three plus decades ago.

    The workers are always busting their hump and serve with a smile. I think this translates to the customers, as I have never seen a fight or the general nastiness you encounter at other fast food establishments.

    Still, few things beat a home cooked cheeseburger.

  75. I felt this way about Shake Shake. Who would wait in line for hours for a hamburger, even if it lived up to the rep? That’s like the organic heirloom tomatoes at Dean and Delucca’s: $5 each. I’m sure they’re great, but $5? C’mon man!

    One day, I found myself up near Columbia U, and being a student area, there was a lull for vacation, and the Shake Shake had no line. I went in, I bought, I consumed. And I realized the secret ingredient that made it so special: salt. I had been restricting my salt intake, and it hit me like a ton of bricks. I guess that’s where the shake comes in.

    It’s all marketing crap to people without souls.

    • Replies: @Anon
  76. @JimB

    I think he means Detroit’s famous Coney Island dogs, and I take exception to this comment. Coney Island dogs are a thing of beauty.

    • Replies: @JimB
  77. @JimB

    I think he means Detroit’s famous Coney Island dogs, and I take exception to this comment. Coney Island dogs are a thing of beauty.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  78. @Paul Mendez

    I cried when Pollos Hermanos closed.

  79. @Morton's toes

    “there are too many Californians”.

    That’s my new line, replacing “too many Canadians” or “too many Democrats” to describe a business establishment filled with a certain ethnic group.

  80. @Clifford Brown

    In-N-Out is a solid burger especially at its price point.

    I think price and consistency are both underrated points in In-N-Out’s favor. I haven’t made a close comparison between fast food joints, but in my limited experience one spends less at In-N-Out than any burger place other than perhaps McDonald’s.

    Consistency in food quality is another area in which it excels. I’ve had far fewer badly cooked burgers at In-N-Out than anywhere else I’ve tried. I once had a great burger at Wendy’s, but a few months later when I tried it again it was not nearly as good. And both times it cost a lot more than a similar meal cost at In-N-Out.

    I also agree with your other points. I’ve read that In-N-Out pays its employees much better than most burger joints and so it tends to attract a higher quality employee. You don’t get those pimply-faced, apathetic boys behind the counter whose appearance often causes me to lose my appetite.

    • Replies: @M_Young
  81. @Cato

    people from Austin constantly going on about how they have “the best Mexican food”

    Austin is the most chauvinistic city in the US.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • LOL: Desiderius
  82. danand says:
    @Thomas

    “My go-to order: Double-double, Animal-style, ketchup and mustard instead of spread, raw chopped onions instead of grilled, add chiles, fries well-done.”

    I always order double grilled onions at In-N-Out. The In-N-Out’s around here have become even more popular since the “pandemic” began. People are of the mind that they, along with Chick-fil-A, are the “safest” of the fast food venues. Perhaps it’s the hyphenated names, or that they are owed/run by Mormons, don’t know?

    Have lunch there with my teen daughter ~2X weekly, gives me the chance to have her attention for a few minutes as we crawl the line. At the couple of local joints the parking lots have been re-routed into snake formations to handle the long drive thru queues; added order takers walking car to car to speed the process.

    Side note is that a cousin happens to live in Aurora, resided there her entire life. After seeing this thread, I sent a message inquiring how long she had been waiting in line…LOL.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  83. @Clifford Brown

    Still, few things beat a home cooked cheeseburger.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @OilcanFloyd
  84. @Gamecock

    They are economic refugees, fleeing the effect of socialism. But they carry the socialism with them, and are infecting…

    • Replies: @rebel yell
    , @AnotherDad
  85. Mike Tre says:

    Want a great burger while in Southern California? It ain’t at In and Out (the world’s most overrated hamburger). Go to Tommy’s or Fatburger.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  86. Anonymous[279] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    Many people don’t like genuine grass-fed beef because it tastes a lot like wild game — “gamey,” as they say. If it doesn’t, it’s almost certainly not truly grass-fed.
    I say “genuine grass-fed” because a lot that claims to be grass-fed really isn’t.
    We raise grass-fed beef and it’s an expensive, time-consuming process. Our beef is certified by American Grassfed Association inspection (we are a Certified Producer) to have been raised on an American-owned family ranch without growth promotants (hormones), without sub-therapeutic antibiotics and to be 100 percent grass fed on open pasture (not confined) and — most importantly — grass finished: Most so-called grass-fed beef is feed-lot finished on corn to fatten the animals up before they are slaughtered.
    Real wholly grass-fed beef cattle are small and lean. When alive, they also smell fresh and clean and don’t reek of the foul smell of the feed lot.
    We are a member of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition as well as the AGA. Membership requires annual fees as well as per-head fees. The cattle take about a year longer than grain-fed to reach slaughter size and don’t produce as much meat, so it is more expensive. Locally sold, our beef sells for several dollars a pound more than supermarket feed-lot beef. Our biggest customers are local restaurants and butcher shops as well as co-ops and locally-owned groceries.
    You should make sure that the grass-fed beef you buy is at least labeled USDA Process Verified by the Food Safety Inspection Service, even though this is not a sure guarantee that it actually is for various reasons. It’s much better to also have the AGA or similar association logo.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Bill P
  87. Peterike says:
    @Thomas

    “ raw chopped onions instead of grilled, add chiles”

    You could eat hot dog shit on a bun and it would taste roughly the same with those toppings.

    Adding chiles to anything means you don’t actually care about what the thing tastes like.

  88. utu says:
    @Anonymous

    “But they may have the worst fries I have ever eaten. Why can’t they fix that?” – Because they are not frozen and not preprocessed. Most fresh cut fries are not that good.

    • Replies: @Jmaie
  89. Trinity says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Krispy Kreme >> Dunkin Donuts. No contest.

  90. Trinity says:
    @Paul Mendez

    Best fast food fried chicken is Maryland Fried Chicken. I have only seen a few of these restaurants and they were in Georgia and Florida, have no idea if they are in other states. Easily beats the others.

  91. utu says:
    @Bill P

    “I told her we’ve been herding cattle for so long” – True but we were not eating them until they were very old. Beef eating became a thing after British agricultural revolution (1800) when production of beef became affordable.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  92. Peterike says:
    @prosa123

    “ Shake Shack is very good too, though it is really isn’t fast food: it usually takes about five minutes to get your food after you order”

    Try the one in JFK airport with the 100% black staff. Takes forever and the food is greasy trash.

  93. In-N-Out.

    Overhyped. Overrated.

    • Replies: @3g4me
  94. Whiskey says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Fast Food places will be just about the last restaurants to close.

    First, they are mostly chain owned. Meaning vast corporate access to capital and bailouts not available to small, individual owned restaurants.

    Secondly, fast food is the most resilient to home delivery. Nobody orders mid tier restaurants like Olive Garden and Red Lobster for delivery. Its cheap chinese and KFC and burger joints. Delivery is not free so the cost of that eats into the food, and stuff from say Olive Garden won’t travel as well as a pizza or burger.

    Third, fast food can use low wage, low skills workers where a decent restaurant cannot. Chipotle keeps poisoning people because their emphasis on fresh food prepared daily does not match their workforce labor base and cost and revenue. Thomas Keller at French Laundry charges almost $600 a person for his meals. But that gives him a revenue stream to pay people to clean his restaurants (in theory — he actually was fined several years ago for health code violations) several times a day completely like Gordon Ramsay’s places are, Bobby Flay’s etc.

    The reason the fast food is so dreadful is the cheap labor force. Corporate operations spends considerable time engineering things so that there is the least chance of poisoning someone because the meat and things touching it was not kept separate from lettuce, etc. Go to a Subway and you will see things like meat and cheese in individual wraps for this reason, having low skills and poorly motivated (low pay) workers means reverting to the lowest common denominator.

    I’ve had In and Out. Their burgers are ok, nothing special, as others noted its the ambience and nostalgia of decent service that is the draw. A good burger made at home over mesquite coals beats anything I’ve had out, and with in-season Hatch chiles home-roasted is absolutely delicious with cheese and grilled onions.

    People are not going to like the collapse of the economy Biden plans for the Great Reset. Nor the unrest. At a minimum, all the mid-tier stuff like In and Out that depends on workers above the absolute minimum will go away making life absolutely miserable even for the Managerial Class. Who lack even the most basic skills. I think it was Matt Yglesias who said he doesn’t even want a kitchen as all he does is order out, and the co-author of “The MVP Machine” Ben something or other said on his baseball podcast that he doesn’t know how to drive and has no interest living in NYC.

  95. JohnnyD says:

    “Those are good burgers.”
    “Shut the f*** up, Donny!”

  96. Rud says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    Over rated in my opinion, “Five Guys.”

    The ones that you get these days since they’ve franchised all over the country aren’t very good at all. The burgers and fries they used to make at their original first couple of shops in the D.C. area were insanely good. I used to go to the one in Alexandria. Just a tiny hole in the wall, but they were great.

    They don’t taste the same at all these days.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  97. Bubba says:
    @utu

    Colorado has Good Times Burgers

    With a name like that it sounds like they got weed in them…

  98. @Thomas

    My go-to order: Double-double, Animal-style, ketchup and mustard instead of spread, raw chopped onions instead of grilled, add chiles, fries well-done.

    Another thing I hate about In-N-Out, their stupid “secret” insider menu.

    Over.

    Rated.

  99. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @Nathan

    We sent a Republican to the senate as recently as 2014. So don’t let anyone tell you it’s a solid blue state. The problem is that we’re simply not a prole state. We had some labor violence in the late 1800s, coal mine rebellions and the like, but for us that’s ancient history. Very different from Appalachia and the Midwest where it has a lot of emotional valence, where people encourage others to remember the fact that Grandpa got fired on by the Pinkertons. There’s no Boston Brahmins here, the zeitgeist is that we came here relatively recently, from the Eastern parts of the country, and we all want to make money, and most of us all “temporarily embarrassed millionaires.” So we’re just plain repelled by Trump’s low-class behavior. There’s no part of us thinking “yay, stick it to the man.”

    And that’s what this election was about, class. Don’t let anyone tell you it was about whites and blacks, whites and non-whites, whites and Jews. Trump never made any explicit appeals to whites. In fact he went out of his way to say how he was gonna help every group other than white men. He ran an identity politics campaign, but it was identity politics for low-class white people. It repelled the high-class white people but failed in the midwest to appeal to the low/working class, because he didn’t deliver on his agenda.

    • Agree: Ed
    • Disagree: Ben tillman, Ron Mexico
    • LOL: S. Anonyia
  100. @Reg Cæsar

    Wow, that map change from 1928 to 1932 is dramatic and says a lot.
    It’s a watershed period when Mayflower America lost the country it founded and was replaced by Immigrant America. When an 18th century liberal Republic finally turned into a modern social state. When pioneering rural America was replaced by factory America.
    I think the old guard blew it. If you want minimal government, fine, but you can’t have a Great Depression. People will not pay that price. If minimal government means periodic depressions, then the answer is no.

  101. In n out is a good double entendre for what California progs are doing to Colorado.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  102. i’m about 1 hour away from this new In-N-Out .

    i think the number was really 4 hours. some people waited overnight for opening day, and that’s where the 12 hours thing comes from. people who got in line after it opened reported waiting a less insane number than that. but it’s still retarded to wait even 1 hour for In-N-Out burgers.

    and yes, there are literally a million people from California here. they flood in by the thousands. the number i read was that Colorado absorbs 90,000 of them per year.

    these days Colorado is to scum Californians as Florida is to scum New Yorkers.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
  103. Bubba says:
    @S. Anonyia

    In-N-Out seemed cleaner to me than Whataburger (see video below), but I only go to Chick-fil-A these days because the kids seem friendly and nice, not like the crazy looking tattooed thugs working at other fast food places who seem as if they just got out of prison and need a job for their parole.

    And I prefer my food without being spit on or worse.

  104. The NY area experienced its own burger hysteria a few years ago when Shake Shack opened and began proliferating. Then every place started grinding its own “signature” blend. To me burgers in general and at any pricepoint are overhyped and overanalyzed — I’d rather have a nice piece of meatloaf, and my wife is an ace

  105. AP says:
    @prosa123

    Having lived in both areas and not being a native of either (so I am not clouded by hometown loyalty) – In n Out beats Shake Shack and Five Guys. It really is the best fast food.

    That having been said, I wouldn’t wait 30 minutes for any fast food, much less 12 hours.

  106. @Reg Cæsar

    The things one stumbles into on a cross country drive.

    Still have the T-shirt.

  107. @RoatanBill

    I wouldn’t wait like that either, but it’s more than a hamburger that they’re waiting for. They’re looking for a shared experience and what passes for authentic culture . There are probably people talking to each other in line, maybe sharing memories. They’re outdoors talking to their neighbors instead of at home on their phone or watching tv, and it’s not political. They could be doing worse things.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @bomag
    , @guest007
  108. @Reg Cæsar

    I particularly hate the reversed colors when looking at old maps.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  109. Not Raul says:
    @Kronos

    Thanks for the recommendation.

    I haven’t tried it yet; but I will.

  110. Anonymous[265] • Disclaimer says:
    @utu

    Yes, the cheese, milk, and butter were the main protein/fat sources, not the beef itself, which was a luxury. The traditional English “ploughman’s meal”:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploughman%27s_lunch#History

    Pierce the Ploughman’s Crede (c. 1394) mentions the traditional ploughman’s meal of bread, cheese, and beer. Bread and cheese formed the basis of the diet of English rural labourers for centuries: skimmed-milk cheese, supplemented with a little lard and butter, was their main source of fats and protein.[5] In the absence of access to expensive seasonings, onions were the “favoured condiment”,[6] as well as providing a valuable source of Vitamin C.[7]

    Part of the Indian beef taboo is probably related to Indians’ dependence on milk and butter (ghee) and on cattle for ploughing.

    In England, even chicken was a relative luxury until fairly recently for many people and eaten at Sunday dinners and the like. Chicken became affordable in the ’50s when intensive factory farming methods from the US were introduced:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antony_Fisher#Career

    In 1952, he undertook a study trip to the United States, where he visited the new Foundation for Economic Education (FEE). F. A. Harper of the FEE introduced Fisher to former colleagues from the Agriculture Department of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, who showed him intensive chicken farming techniques. Fisher was very impressed and returned to start England’s first battery cage chicken farm, Buxted Chickens, which eventually made him a millionaire.

    • Agree: utu
  111. Not Raul says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I just found out that there’s an even worse Austin than the one in Texas.

  112. Neoconned says:
    @RoatanBill

    Hey brah In & Out is amazing.

  113. Dan Hayes says:
    @Mark G.

    White Castle “hamburgers” are not hamburgers! But whatever they are, they are delicious!!

  114. duncsbaby says:
    @danand

    Here’s the Chick-fil-a CEO getting down on his knees for the his new God:

    “Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy says one way for white people to do penance for racism in the U.S. is to find random black people and shine their shoes.

    Cathy made the comment during a panel discussion with Pastor Louie Giglio and rapper Lecrae at Passion City Church in Atlanta, Georgia. The panel’s purpose was to have what the church called “an open and honest conversation around how racism has plagued our city for generations, and the steps we can all take to confront it head-on in our church, our neighborhoods, and our hearts.”

  115. Dube says:

    In-N-Out Burgers are not fine, and they are not hamburgers. More like color printed xeroxes. The meat is no longer meat. The fries are not great but not so bad. Lots of kids milling around back there in their white hats, but it’s been hard to discern an organized process. Good to see them making a few bucks, though. Praises for the chain hosting its devoted clients at low prices, but the visit makes me sad. I’ve gone only a few times, thinking that it will be okay, but not. OTOH I had a burger named after me on the menu of an independent local shop, written up in Sunset Magazine!, with a half pound patty medium rare, a thick slab of onion, thick slice of good tomato, lettuce, and a tongue of sliced pickle hanging out the side of a good quality bun. Juice pouring into the red and white paper wrap. When I put my face into it, everyone knew not to bother trying to engage me in conversation. The owners retired, and part of my sadness is from no longer hearing people happily call my name.

  116. There’s a pretty good hamburger place in Dorris, California.

  117. @Reg Cæsar

    “Street food” is one of the more annoying SWPL affectations these days. We have it at entirely upscale sit-down restaurants now. But is that really ‘street food’ or is that just marketing?

    People want their authentically fake experiences, come hell or high water.

    Anyone who’s actually sampled third-world street food knows that you end up with three choices of venue afterward, and it’s luck of the draw which one you get: the toilet, the infirmary, or the morgue.

    The one in your photos is likely safe, meaning inauthentic.

    • Replies: @Bill
    , @anon
  118. M_Young says:
    @peterike

    Yeah. I was overseas for quite a while and of course missed Mexican food (growing up in SoCal). But when I got back and had a few meals I realized that it was basically a mediocre cuisine at best.

  119. M_Young says:
    @Pincher Martin

    “I also agree with your other points. I’ve read that In-N-Out pays its employees much better than most burger joints and so it tends to attract a higher quality employee. You don’t get those pimply-faced, apathetic boys behind the counter whose appearance often causes me to lose my appetite.”

    Always clean cut, most of the ‘traditional’ age for a fast food worker, teens and early twenties. They will speak, for the most part, unaccented English and reflect the ethnic demographic of the area. IOW, not staffed by 35 year old Mexican women. In fact, I remember eating at one in Escondido where the staff was mostly Anglo and the clientel mostly Latino.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  120. @Malenfant

    Oops, I think he said “two hours” — even so, though.

  121. Dumbo says:

    I think this explains a lot about American life, society and even politics. If someone can wait for 12 hours in a line for a stupid burger (which is not even great, I tried it), then they can be convinced to wear a mask even indoors, to vote for Biden, to believe in diversity, to accept gay marriage, anything.

    American fast food is popular because it’s like food for a child – greasy, or salty, or very sweet (fries, potato chips, donuts, burgers, etc.) and most people are increasingly like children in their tastes.

  122. @RoatanBill

    Who are the four people, and what happened?

  123. @Reg Cæsar

    OMG, they are in France, advertising as a special point of pride that they use real cheese.

  124. @M_Young

    In-N-Out is similar to Chick-Fil-A, another quality evangelist-run fast food chain.

  125. @Bragadocious

    As people noted who in 1982 altered the bumpersticker

    In-N-Out
    Burger

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  126. Anonymous[383] • Disclaimer says:

    I hesitate to link anything NYT, but on the topic of fast food, this is a genuinely interesting video on how fish & chips was popularised in the US before being displaced by fried chicken.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/20/opinion/haddon-salt.html

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  127. @peterike

    I remember when I visited friends in California one of them, with great elan, took me to In-n-Out promising me a real treat. I didn’t have the heart to tell him that I found the burger quite unexceptional. It was somewhat better than McDonalds but that’s a very low bar to hurdle. I’ve been puzzled by their reputation ever since.

    I’ve had good Mexican food but only when made by a chef in a proper restaurant, not chain stuff.

  128. @M_Young

    I read a book on the restaurant called In-N-Out: A Behind-The-Counter Look at the Fast-Food Chain That Breaks All the Rules. One of the points made in the book was that they pay their employees well. Managers at the time earned over $70,000 a year, had health insurance, and got other perks. Teen workers made better than the minimum wage customary at other fast food restaurants.

  129. Rob McX says:

    Best fast food video ever, IMO.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @El Dato
  130. Nathan says:
    @Anonymous

    No. No no no no no.

    There’s “proles” a plenty in Colorado, and there always has been. Pueblo is a steel town straight out of Pennsylvania that’s been plopped down on the front range. There are tens of thousands of blue collar types working at places like Schlage Lock in Colorado Springs and the rail yards in Denver. In fact, “prole” politics is what kept Pete Coors out of the Senate back in ’04. Between Coors’ union busting in the 70s and the Focus on the Family Baptists, he lost to lefty Ken Salazar, who represented neither of those group’s interests. But all that went down before the Gang of Four’s machine bought the state.

    Look into a book called The Blue Print or just Google Pat Stryker and gang of four. They’ve explained their whole playbook. Talking about what supposed demographics Trump did or didn’t appeal too is just a lot of just-so-stories. It’s all lies pollsters and pundits sell to cable news and none of it has anything to do with the pipeline between non-profits, the Democrats, and election canvassers that determine who governs you.

  131. It’s like going to Five Guys in London.

  132. black sea says:

    I’ve tried to think of a restaurant meal of any kind that I would wait 12 hours for. I’m drawing a blank. Is there any restaurant meal I’d wait one hour for? Well, if I could put my name down for a reservation, wander around for 50 minutes, then come back, and if the food had a stellar reputation, then maybe, but maybe not.

    Fast food is fast food. If you have to wait an hour for it — forget about 12 hours — it’s no longer fast food. I just can’t see it making that much difference to me, though I guess it provides some kind of bonding for people who long for a collective experience to latch onto.

    Eating hamburgers is probably a let down in this regard, though everyone will tell themselves that it was delicious.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @JMcG
  133. El Dato says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    American inventiveness is best

  134. danand says:
    @duncsbaby

    “Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy says one way for white people to do penance for racism in the U.S. is to find random black people and shine their shoes.”

    Was unaware that Nike sneakers required polishing, perhaps I’m just ignorant. Maybe Mr. Cathy figures it better to shine their shoes than hire them to work in his restaurants?

    Looks like a mutual love fest of “holy rollers” there:

    Lecrae’s sixth studio album, Gravity, has been called the most important album in Christian hip hop history by Rapzilla and Atlanta Daily World. The album debuted as the best-selling album overall in the iTunes Store, #3 on the Billboard 200, and won the Grammy Award for Best Gospel Album at the 2013 Grammy Awards; marking the first time that a hip hop artist received this award.

  135. @El Dato

    Had he been a Muslim his picture would have been celebrated on the cover of Rolling Stone and the Squad would be praising his attack on the establishment. Had he been a Muslim defending himself from Caucasian attackers, he would have no charges at all.

  136. anonymous[103] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’m only aware of three entrepreneur driven fast food chains founded post-1980 that have reached 2,000+ stores.

    1. Papa John’s
    2. Panda Express
    3. Jimmy Johns

    None of the founders appear to be overly Christian. All three including Panda Express founder have Midwest backgrounds.

    • Replies: @prosa123
  137. Ed says:
    @Anonymous

    Agreed and Trump’s appeal to the working class evidently appealed to Hispanics ranging from Mexican Americans on the Rio Grande to Puerto Ricans in Philly and Dominicans in the Bronx.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/11/21/culture-wars-latinos-trump-438932

  138. bomag says:
    @Lockean Proviso

    They could be doing worse things.

    Okay, but they could be doing better things.

    Or is that their best option?

  139. They’re just hamburgers.

    The fries aren’t the best either.

  140. bomag says:
    @Nathan

    Thanks for the link.

    The right is just asleep at the wheel.

    There is criticism of the Republicans not keeping up with the Democrats in ballot harvesting and rigging the count in key districts, but this is akin to complaining that the Republicans are not using performance enhancing drugs in their track and field athletes; not letting their trans boys cover the girl’s events. Some people believe things should play out in a more natural way, and we should work against the hacking of our institutions; and resist an arms race of more dodgy election practices.

    I think there was a Heinlein novel where a planet was trying out democracy, and it soon devolved into one side killing voters on the other side to rig elections.

    • Replies: @Nathan
  141. 68W58 says:
    @Nathan

    One of those books is “the Blueprint”, is it not? About how the Dems turned Colorado from a Republican stronghold to almost completely dominated by the Democrats. It does seem they have a plan for one party control, but the Pubbies seem to not know how to react.

  142. @RoatanBill

    They’re having fun, unlike you, who’s sitting in his office condescending to other people.

    Just curious, what do you think of people who camp out waiting to see the latest Star Wars movie, or folks who pay thousands to see a famous Broadway show?

    • Disagree: Buffalo Joe
  143. anonymous[282] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Has the whole “soy” concept been overextended when applied to people consuming literal beef hamburgers?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Anonymous
  144. @petit bourgeois

    Thank you. They have Bible verse references printed on their cups and pictures of vintage cars on the walls. Americans instinctively love stuff like that, but they don’t know why, and they don’t know how to preserve it.

    Also, their prices are insanely low. Without the huge volume of customers, they don’t make money. When I worked for a restaurant, years ago, the manager told me, “If the line’s not out the door, we’re not making money.”

  145. @Steve Sailer

    Every Christian teen in my area has applied to, or worked at, one of those joints. I’m never surprised when I take my young son to In N Out and I recognize a worker who used to be in our homeschool group.

  146. JimB says:
    @James O'Meara

    I think he means Detroit’s famous Coney Island dogs, and I take exception to this comment. Coney Island dogs are a thing of beauty.

    I’m surprised any eatery selling Coney Island dogs wouldn’t have burned down and blown away during the Detroit riots.

  147. @James O'Meara

    What kind of sausage/frankfurter is inside? Not a fan of those frankfurters that taste and look as if they’ve been extruded from a high speed blend of mechanically recovered pork, glutamate, white breadcrumbs salt and ‘flavourings’.

    British cuisine isn’t exactly world renowned, but we do have some tremendous pork sausages and hard cheeses. Caerphilly, Lancashire and Wensleydale are great with granary bread and butter (and beer).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumberland_sausage

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British_cheeses#Hard_cheeses

  148. El Dato says:

    Meanwhile in Germany:

    WATCH clashes break out in Germany after rally against Covid-19 lockdown canceled last minute

    Mysteriously, Antifa degenerates/maskequetaires are fighting anti-lockdown protestors.

    Nobody likes authority like anti-authoritarians.

    Also, Trump fans not welcome:

    • Replies: @Bill
  149. @Mr. Anon

    The Trump pattern is whatever he tweets won’t be done. Guess it is 4d chess and part of his master plan that we must trust.

  150. I’m confuse will it be good for the almighty Texan GDP if with those people buying a burger meal, or is it bad they are doing nothing but standing for 12 hours ?

  151. @Trinity

    A fast food burger is a fast food burger. I’ve never been to In-and-Out, but I imagine it to be something like Five Guys or Backyard Burgers, which is nothing special.

    And Chic-fil-a is starting to resemble fast food in quality and service lately. Truett Cathey’s children must be hanging out with the Wal-Mart heirs. It was predictable.

  152. @Anonymous

    Trump was definitely trying to appeal to whites when he spoke about repealing birthright citizenship and “sending them back.” Unfortunately, he wasn’t serious and started backtracking immediately during his first campaign. I think MAGA was also a thinly-veiled attempt to appeal to whites by admitting that the new version of America is inferior and not authentic.

  153. El Dato says:
    @Rob McX

    Pavlovian programming is best! Now I’m hungry!

    Jamie Oliver wants to disgust kids with Chicken Nuggets, fails abysmally:

    • Thanks: Rob McX
    • LOL: bruce county
  154. @jon

    Technically, it’s parochialism, not provincialism, but you are right.

  155. Bill P says:
    @Anonymous

    The latest ground beef I bought says it’s certified by USDA and “Oregon Tilth” as grass fed, organic, no antibiotics, hormones, etc. Cost me $5.98 for one pound. Usually I don’t bother with the organic (it’s more expensive), but they were out of the non-organic grass fed. It’s pretty good. It does look different from usual ground beef. It’s not pink, but rather a deeper, almost burgundy color, and the fat is darker, too. Doesn’t taste “gamey” to me, but I like the taste of wild venison and I buy ground bison to make lasagna (adds richness to the sauce) when it’s on sale.

  156. AP says:
    @black sea

    Is there any restaurant meal I’d wait one hour for?

    So you don’t go to any restaurants with waiters during busy times? You find in intolerable to chat with friends/wife/etc. at a table for an hour before your meal arrives? Everyone has their quirks, I do not mean to offend of course.

    • Replies: @black sea
  157. Peterike says:
    @Anonymous

    “ So we’re just plain repelled by Trump’s low-class behavior. There’s no part of us thinking “yay, stick it to the man.”

    Aka you’re a bunch of useless faggots.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  158. J.Ross says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    Every decision in the lockdown was clearly political and not medical, and if we do not punish the people who did this to us, they’ll do it again.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  159. Jmaie says:
    @Trinity

    Never been out West, never had these hamburgers, but…“Burger King” is tops in the fast food hamburger choices as far as I am concerned.

    So your position is, “I’ve never tried In-n-Out but Burger King is better?”

    As to Five Guys “small portion” I’m curious – does BK sell a quadruple Whopper? ‘Cause that’s what you’d need to get a burger bigger than 5G’s standard double patty…

  160. @Anonymous

    we came here relatively recently, from the Eastern parts of the country, and we all want to make money, and most of us all “temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”

    IOW, you’re rootless, soulless, cosmopolitans. Consumers, not builders. Immigrants, not settlers.

    • Agree: AnotherDad, Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    , @Marty
    , @Anonymous
  161. Jmaie says:
    @Anonymous

    Not that you’d recognize the higher quality meat compared to a fricking cheap-assed saturated fat-laden In-n-Out burger

    I am curious what superior grind of meat you suggest that isn’t “saturated fat-laden?” Kinds comes with the territory…

    By the way, In-n-Out uses 100% ground chuck.

    • Replies: @bomag
  162. @Morton's toes

    “Opt for lean turkey meat over beef”? Well, fuck that shit.

  163. guest007 says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    The states that make it hard to vote absentee (by mail) had some of the lowest turnouts in 2020. The Governor of Mississippi is bragging about having a smoothly run election but Mississippi only had 60% registered voter turnout unlike the 76% turnout is Colorado that does vote by mail.

    It seems that what Republicans are most scared of is that if voting is easier that more people who vote for Democrats will turn out to vote. Three of the six highest turnout states are vote by mail states.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1184621/presidential-election-voter-turnout-rate-state/

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
  164. guest007 says:
    @Lockean Proviso

    People want to feel normal during a pandemic standing in line for a hamburger that they remember are great fits that need. Just like the commerical that has two men watching football where one asks the other “who’s playing?” and the response is ” Does it matter?”

  165. Jmaie says:
    @utu

    “But they may have the worst fries I have ever eaten. Why can’t they fix that?” – Because they are not frozen and not preprocessed. Most fresh cut fries are not that good

    The one failing of the “everything fresh” mantra. Fresh cut potatoes have too much water content, moisture is still being exuded when they’re hot and so they can’t crisp up. Freezing dries them out enough to fix that. Or you can do what the Brits do and fry them twice.

    • Replies: @utu
  166. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:
    @James O'Meara

    Salt is magical, and not just in burgers. I’ve only recently gotten to where I can salt food correctly. I’ve read about it in professional cookbooks forever, but one or two incidents of overeating left me salt-shy.

    As you add more salt food becomes saltier, up until the point where you have the right amount of salt, at which point the salt flavor disappears and you only taste the food, which is delicious. Then if you continue and add too much, the salt flavor returns and it’s not good. So there’s a fairly narrow band of correct salting.

    For burgers lots of pepper and fat are also critical. Acidic pickles are also good, and maybe onions. I avoid cheese, bacon, and cloying sauces, which take over the burger. I get plenty of cheese elsewhere in my diet. The best burger is a super fatty patty, not too thick (eat two or three if you’re hungry), heavily salted and prepared, on a bun. Period.

    By the way, hypertension is mostly genetic, and even the most radical low salt diets like the DASH diet don’t do much. Go to your doctor and get the meds and eat properly salted food.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
  167. @Muggles

    You can get real Mexican in Dallas at Javier’s. It can be a fantastic dining experience. I recommend table 94.

    • Thanks: Muggles
  168. Muse says:

    I had a friend that worked at Kraft Foods. Her quote was: making great food is easy, making money while making great food is hard.

    If yous guys want the best burger possible without taking on airs, and without a 12 hour wait… take a risk on 95th, and head on down to Topnotch Beefburger on the Southside of Chicago in the Beverly neighborhood. The beef is ground fresh that day on premises. The fries are sliced there too. The shakes are made with real ice cream in a mixer – you get the stainless mixing cup at the table.

    Go during lunch when it is perfectly safe as the place is full of police getting lunch. It is the place I miss most from the neighborhood. My kids beg to go back to eat there.

    Here is what our ubermenschen have to say about it:

    https://checkplease.wttw.com/restaurants/top-notch-beefburgers

  169. prosa123 says:
    @Trinity

    Five Guys does not serve “small portions” by any stretch of the imagination. Even their single-patty burgers are larger than at any of the true fast-food restaurants and a regular order of fries is enough for two people.

  170. @El Dato

    El, a looney tune world because libs have been arguing against bail big time, hammering away that bail is racist. Hell, according to them most crimes shouldn’t be crimes, most offenses shouldn’t carry charges. In Berkeley, according to Berkeleyside, a woman who set fire to an occupied tent in a homeless encampment got bail set at ‘two cents.’ AOC, if you don’t like the law, change the law. That’s what reps are supposed to do, not spend every waking moment virtue signalling. Thank you for posting this. Stay safe.

  171. Trinity says:

    Well, I have eaten at 2 different locations over the years, only once in each one, which was enuff for me to say, oh hell no, not again. I ate at one in Gainesville, Ga and one in Brandon, Florida. Sorry, but in both locations I was served a pitiful order of fries and the burger wasn’t nothing to write home about. And the prices? Oh hell, no, that food was just a notch above slop. I will concede that the restaurants in N. Georgia ARE TERRIBLE, worst region that I have ever lived in for food, doesn’t even compare to South Ga., Florida, New York, Maryland, or South Carolina ( great food in the Palmetto state, at least where I lived.) Food in N. Georgia is tasteless, cheap, and is a total scam. It could be that the owner of this particular “Five Guys” was yet another cheap sum bitch who was pushing out old burgers and fries, and giving smaller portions. Some local yahoo in this region tried charging for Xtra condiments through a drive thru at Mickey D’s. haha. That one didn’t last. Don’t visit any restaurants in this entire area. Brandon, Fl.? Full of great restaurants, but “Five Guys” isn’t one of them, not even for a fast food restaurants. I rate “Five Guys” only slightly above McDonald’s and I consider Mickey D’s the worst of the worst when it comes to fast food burgers.

  172. Cato says:
    @Nathan

    Thank you. Looks interesting. I found the book on Library Genesis: https://b-ok.org/book/2210258/51e644

  173. @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, thanks for the videos. Makes me hungry. When I worked the National Hamburger festival the best burgers were hand formed, not patties, on a crusty bakery roll with a doughy center. BakeryRollsMatter. And when I checked on the participating restaurants the ones using a griddle, not a grill, had the longest lines. BurgerFatMatters. When the fat drips through a grill a lot of flavor goes too. At my house hand formed, 80%20% beef, cooked rare on a stove top cast iron griddle, then covered in bleu cheese crumbles and served on Buffalo’s best slightly toasted Costanzo’s roll. Stop by, open 24/7. Bring your own beer and one to share. Oh, and use fresh beef, never freeze it, don’t buy more than you need. Stay safe.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    , @clyde
  174. Bill says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    People want their authentically fake experiences, come hell or high water.

    Can we start hiding the #&@!ng HVAC ducts again soon? And the pipes for the sprinklers? I mean, we all know it isn’t a loft. It isn’t a converted factory/warehouse space. It’s a in a #&@!ng strip mall.

    • Replies: @danand
  175. @Reg Cæsar

    By the time you buy good meat, bacon, cheese, rolls and pickles, it’s cheaper to buy a ribeye.

    • LOL: sayless
  176. Neuday says:
    @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    Hyman lemmings

    Guilty as charged, I’ve done a helluvalot more than wait 12 hours for one of those.

  177. @Trinity

    Burger King gives you the best bang for the buck, especially if you use the app.

    For $5 you can get two Crossain’wich combos (with two orders of hash browns and two cups of coffee) or two Whopper Jr. combos (with two orders of fries and two medium drinks). Highly recommended for insatiable gluttons.

    If I’m going to be eating shitty fast food made from frozen cow parts, I might as well get it cheap.

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @Trinity
  178. Neuday says:
    @Thomas

    My go-to order: Double-double, Animal-style, ketchup and mustard instead of spread, raw chopped onions instead of grilled, add chiles, fries well-done.

    How very Californian of you to be self-obsessed enough to think anyone else has the slighted interest in what burger & fries you order.

  179. @William Badwhite

    Insecure social climbers with more money than brains.

    “Trump’s a loud-mouthed buffoon, so I’ll go ahead and vote for the dementia patient with bleeding eyeballs. That will show everyone how classy I am!”

    It’s always the Middle (and especially the Upper Middle) types who go all-in on the foolish virtue signaling. The High and the Low don’t care.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  180. Marty says:
    @William Badwhite

    Yeah, I don’t get his point. What if Warren Buffett had said to his circle, “Hey, you classy new millionaires, you realize your daughter could be the next Tessa Majors, right?” Would he have been more receptive?

  181. Trinity says:
    @Stan Adams

    Well said. I only eat fast food once in a blue moon and by coincidence I went to Wendy’s this morning only because I had 2 dollars off coupons for 2 breakfast meals. I had the baconator breakfast sandwich combo and it cost me 8 bucks and some change for two combos vs. 12 dollars on the regular. The usual breakfast is oatmeal, about 3-4 boiled eggs, and coffee. haha. Doesn’t get any more bland than that one so on the weekends I eat the junk.

    Eating at those fast food burger places once in awhile is fine, but not on a regular basis. Sitting in line for 12 hours for any meal, ( unless you haven’t eaten in 30 days) is moronic.

  182. @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    Mexican cuisine is disgusting.

    The way an adult expresses this sentiment is “I don’t care for Mexican cuisine”.

    ~~

    Strikes me the Mexicans have actually done a credible job of making a palatable, sometimes tasty, cuisine built up from the corn and beans staples available in their geographic endowment.

    • Replies: @Bill P
  183. OFWHAP says:
    @Anonymous

    Finally someone speaks the truth! While I think the difference between grass/grain-fed ground beef is less noticeable I find that grass-fed steaks are much tougher. I am sure many feel buyer’s remorse once they pay the massive upcharge and then overcook their beef. (Grass-fed beef should only be cooked for about 70% as long as grain-fed beef).

  184. WJ says:
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Most of the Front Range is now a dung hole. Zillions of Home Depots, strip centers and huge traffic jams to get in the mountains on I 70 or to get out of the mountains on Sunday. Urban sprawl to the east halfway to Limon. My time is almost up here and I’m moving on so I’ll have to pass on the in and out.

  185. black sea says:
    @AP

    I do sometimes go to restaurants with waiters. Probably not so much at busy times. I don’t remember having to wait an hour to be seated, but maybe I’ve done it at some point in my life. For the record, I meant at such an establishment waiting an hour while standing around, not waiting at a table or at a bar, which I have done, though not in many years. And I probably wouldn’t do that now.

    I guess I’m just not that much of a gourmand. If there were other restaurants nearby, I’d just look into going to a less crowded place.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    , @AP
  186. Smash Burger????? Anyone??

    • Agree: Neuday
  187. 3g4me says:
    @Trinity

    @23 Trinity: You’re rather late to the party. Austin has a chosen mayor and plenty of antifa. You’d be hard pressed to find a native Texan in the DFW area. San Antonio is almost entirely Mestizo. Houston is a more sprawling version of New York, stuffed to the gills with immigrants. Texas might as well be blue – its repukes keep re-electing Cornyn, who never met a White he wouldn’t hurry to replace with diversity. And wheelchair gov is busy placating the Karen vote with mask mandates while telling all the Californians and New Yorkers to come on down. Add in all the Han and pajeet and everyone else, and the Texas of my youthful, liberal imagination is nowhere to be found. Cannot wait to move out for the true rural hinterland.

  188. Bill P says:
    @AnotherDad

    Mexican agriculture revolutionized global cuisine. In a sense, we’re all “eating Mexican” whenever we eat tomatoes, corn, chilis, turkey, prickly pear (common throughout India, North Africa and the Middle East), sweet potatoes and beans.

    Imagine how much would be missing from global cuisine if we didn’t have those ingredients. What a bonanza the Spaniards found there.

    • Agree: Muggles
    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
  189. 3g4me says:
    @Single and Ready to Drop Red Pills

    @54 Single and Ready to Drop Pills: “Mexican Cuisine is Disgusting”

    Calling it Mexican cuisine is an oxymoron.

  190. 3g4me says:
    @Charles St. Charles

    @99 Charles St. Charles: Just like California and Californians in general. Just like what passes for ‘murrican cultue. It’s all overhyped and overrated. And plastic. And made in China.

  191. Californians used to buy Coors in Colorado and take it back home with them, before it was available on the coast. It was kept refrigerated from the brewery in Golden and thus was only sold in a limited region. People who couldn’t buy it in their state thought it was special.

  192. Thomas says:
    @Thomas

    Heh. Of anything I’ve commented here in awhile, this one set off the most autistic screeching for some reason. And it was about a burger.

  193. @Bill P

    I like Mexican food, but I’m not that fond of chilis or tomatoes. I probably like TexMex more than what would be called common Mexican food. From what I can tell, the more refined Mexican cuisine is more like Spanish or French cuisine made with local ingredients.

    In the absence of wheat, sugar, cheese, beef, pork, coffee, etc., I’m not sure how the food of the region would have looked or tasted before the arrival of Columbus.

    • Replies: @Bill P
  194. Thomas says:
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Colorado was once purple red, but now it’s pretty blue. Californians are a part of that story.

    The bigger part of that story is the fact that the Denver area is the second-largest administrative center of the federal government after the Washington, DC area. What happened to Colorado is the same thing that happened to Virginia: a burgeoning federal workforce flipped the state.

    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
  195. @duncsbaby

    I was pretty much down to Chick-Fil-A
    as my only fast food choice – good quality, friendly service, and they didn’t knuckle under to the queers. Then I saw this feeble old white man licking some jogger’s feet and they are dead to me now.

    Did he think he was going to gain some new basketball-American customers with this move? I’ve been in Chick-Fil-A hundreds of times and I’m not seeing J’Quantré and his crew around, ordering the grilled chicken club. Dindus are never going to be customers of CFA for a number of reasons, including:

    1. Low serving size to price ratio – at Popeye’s or Church’s you can load up on greasy yardbird for a few dollars. CFA sells human-sized servings at a relatively high price.

    2. Not enough density of Duskies to get a good riot going if you don’t get enough ketchup packets.

    3. CFA only serves white(!) meat, skinless, boneless chicken – not the preference of the Sambos and Sambettes, besides, half the fun of eating chicken is carelessly discarding the bones along sidewalks and front yards and in buses and subway cars, right L’máns?

    I’m sure there are other reasons…

    Anyway, [email protected] you, Truett Cathy.

  196. prosa123 says:
    @anonymous

    In-n-Out is less religiously oriented than Chik-fil-A because its restaurants are open on Sundays.

  197. prosa123 says:
    @black sea

    There was a restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut called The Captain’s Galley that would not take reservations even though it attracted enormous crowds. Waits of 2+ hours were common even on weekdays. That was bad enough, but to make matters worse people had to check in with the hostess every 30 or so minutes while waiting, otherwise their names would be crossed off the list. Why such a policy? It forced customers to hang around the restaurant while waiting, rather than going elsewhere and returning in two hours, and a fair percentage of them would get drinks at the bar while waiting. People put up with this absurd policy not because the food was anything special, but because the restaurant served comically gargantuan portions of meat and seafood. Thankfully, this schtick lasted for only so long, and the restaurant gave up the ghost in 2010.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Steve Sailer
  198. @Thomas

    I wouldn’t stand in line for 12 hours for the finest French or Italian cuisine on the planet, much less a goddamn hamburger.

    Seek counseling ASAP.

    • Agree: bruce county
    • Replies: @Muggles
  199. Nathan says:
    @bomag

    It’s more a matter of the game isn’t being played the way people think it is. If we keep playing by the Marquess of Queensberry rules when the other side is juicing and showing up with baseball bats, it’s no surprise we keep getting slaughtered.

  200. @J.Ross

    J, you are so right and my Thanksgiving dinner will be short family memebers who listen to cuomo. I hope he chokes on a turkey bone. And now that useless fuck is getting an Emmy, but in reality as useless award.

    • Agree: JMcG
  201. utu says:
    @Jmaie

    ” I don’t think most people realize that any decent French fry needs to be twice fried. The first frying is done at a lower temperature, which softens the potato and prepares the starchy surface for the second frying’s crispification”

    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/219634/chef-johns-french-fries/

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
  202. @prosa123

    prosa, years ago my wife and I ate at Gladstones for Seafood on the shore in LA. Same shitty res system with a space cadet for a hostess but the food was good. I recommended it to my son when he was in LA with his rugby team. They got tired of waiting and just sat down with random strangers who were being seated ahead of them. Actually worked out as you make new acquaintances. not like they hopped into bed with strangers. By the way, cruise ships do this, seat you with strangers.

  203. danand says:
    @Bill

    “Can we start hiding the #&@!ng HVAC ducts again soon? And the pipes for the sprinklers?”

    Bill, aesthetically might agree. But I’m all for giving rats, and other vermin, one less place to hide and make a home in restaurants. Especially one that is are over my plate.

  204. @Buzz Mohawk

    Coors doesn’t pasteurize it’s beer, which in the 1970’s was unique but made it “illegal” in many states, mostly states east of the Mississippi. It was the backstory of the movie “Smoky and the Bandit” it was Coors that they were smuggling. It was common for out of state college students attending CU, CSU etc., who drove home for the holidays or summer break would pack as much Coors in there car as possible as the could charge a significant mark up for resale. Of course back then the state was Red and even the Dem’s (Governor Dick Lamb) wanted to stop illegal immigration. More fun from that era

  205. J.Ross says:
    @anonymous

    GMO soy is a poison which affects you long-term and I am not aware of a vegan equivalent of exclusive soy preferrers — pseudo-gourmet fast food, especially when paired with a microbrew and proudly announced on DorseyWeb, is (and has, from the beginning, been) the very image of soy. I’m not even going to say “Wil.” The product soylent was not a vegetarian thing, it was a SXSW thing. Your argument is internally logical and very arithmetic but depends on not knowing what “soy” means.

  206. anon[237] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    People want their authentically fake experiences, come hell or high water

    Dude that is totally memeworthy. Lemme do it for you.

  207. @John Milton’s Ghost

    Aurora, chosen location for a mass shooting event, is home to an Air Force Base and nearby Centennial is home to major defense contractors.
    Spooky area.

  208. @AnotherDad

    I particularly hate the reversed colors when looking at old maps.

    https://uselectionatlas.org

  209. Gamecock says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    “It’s the same with Yankees who move to the South.”

    I am completely sincere in saying that Californians moving here has dissolved my dislike of Yankees. It’s more than “Yankees are better than Californians.” It’s Yankees are okay, after all.

    Californians have accomplished the impossible.

  210. Muggles says:
    @GeneralRipper

    I wouldn’t stand in line for 12 hours for the finest French or Italian cuisine on the planet, much less a goddamn hamburger.

    But in Paris you might well wait two hours before your waiter/server brings you the check. You can ask, but for some unfathomable reason they ignore your repeated requests.

    Of course one reason is that tips are built into the bill, not much usually added, if any. So no incentive.

    Still I wonder why even modest bistros don’t want to turn tables faster. Once when flying in from Texas, starved and tired, we had to wait > two hours after eating to finally get the bill. We almost walked the check.

    This is “normal” though, since in another very nice place, somewhat famous historically, we had to wait and wait. I noticed a very well dressed man (dark suit, etc.) on Sunday with his chic blonde wife and well dressed young son also wait > an hour for his bill. He’d gotten deserts, coffee, etc. but still sat there while languid well-dressed waiters just swanned around doing nothing.

    I asked a server once in Nice why that seemed to be the case in Paris. He had no idea.

    They do eat much later there and even modest places want you to have a reservation. Nearly demand it, even when you can see they are sitting empty. But that is the local culture there and like it or not, you aren’t going to change it. The food is usually very good, fresh, well prepared. But menu selections in most places, unless “specialty ethnic food” are nearly all the same. Some variation but you see the same offerings over and over. The food is always otherwise, French, not other European dishes. None.

    America, the land of many choices for mediocre to poor food. Sometimes not too bad and you might discover something good in an odd place.

  211. @Rud

    The burgers and fries they used to make at their original first couple of shops in the D.C. area were insanely good.

    I ordered a Five Gays burger back in 05 or so in Gainsville, Virginia, just outside Manassas when the craze started. They won’t make a medium rare burger. So I told em nice and loud where everyone would hear it within earshot, “If YOU don’t trust your hamburger meat to make it medium rare, why on earth should *I* trust it to eat it well done?”. If your meat is rotten, your meat is rotten. What, rotten meat is really safer well done? Come to find out they use 95/5 hamuburger to save disposal costs of fat from cooking, then ladle 1 teaspoon of canola vegetable oil over the patty once on the roll, pretend-juicy. It’s a hideous burger, could not be MORE unhealthy. They opened a couple up here in Massachusetts awhile back, but they folded pretty quickly. Chains don’t do that well up here anyway, but no one seems to like them around here.

  212. @Anonymous

    Colorado is NOT a state for classy people or people who want to make money. Every yahoo millennial slacker from my high school graduating class (from a Southern suburb) moved there with their parents’ money after college. I guess their mentality is if you’re going to be underemployed why not be underemployed in beautiful surroundings? Which has a certain logic to it, but it doesn’t mean they are classy people, except perhaps in their imaginations. More like downwardly mobile.

    It is a beautiful state aside from the annoying transplants. Love visiting, though the food is bad.

  213. @Buffalo Joe

    Sounds good man. I’m coming over for dinner tomorrow night.

  214. @Peterike

    Adding chiles to anything means you don’t actually care about what the thing tastes like.

    That’s one lesson that I’ve learned with time.

  215. JMcG says:
    @black sea

    The more I eat out, the better I like eating at home. I’m sure both my wife and I have improved as cooks over the years, but my impression is that restaurant food has gotten worse at all price points.

  216. Bill says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Chick-Fil-A is like In-N-Out in that it is overrated and the employees are white and young. But In-N-Out employees come across as humans rather than malfunctioning Disney animatrons. Or maybe Chick-Fil-A employees are more like malfunctioning _Westworld_ animatrons (the one with Yule Brynner: I don’t know about the HBO product).

    • Replies: @black sea
  217. Anonymous[279] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike Tre

    Testify!

  218. Bill says:
    @El Dato

    Nobody likes authority like anti-authoritarians.

    Once upon a time, I was shocked to learn that “anarchist” Noam Chomsky was pro gun control.

  219. prosa123 says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Californians used to buy Coors in Colorado and take it back home with them, before it was available on the coast. It was kept refrigerated from the brewery in Golden and thus was only sold in a limited region. People who couldn’t buy it in their state thought it was special.

    1977’s hit movie Smokey and the Bandit was about smuggling Coors out of its legal sales area.

  220. @Thomas

    Unionized fed fucks voting for their gravy train always getting better, and no genuine oversight.

    Thanks, JFK.

  221. Neoconned says:
    @Paul Mendez

    Ive never heard of Pollo Campero til now…..gonna have to try them out….

  222. Anon[429] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peterike

    You could eat hot dog shit on a bun and it would taste roughly the same with those toppings.

    Adding chiles to anything means you don’t actually care about what the thing tastes like.

    It’s a burger with toppings. Not a steak or even a hamburger steak. If you really want to taste beef, you have a steak.

    Chicago hot dog variations with all their toppings and peppers and chilies taste nothing like an In-N-Out burger with those toppings.

    Ketchup is a standard topping and its sweetness and tangy flavor tends to dominate the most.

  223. Bill P says:
    @OilcanFloyd

    Apparently it was low in fat and protein, hence the cannibalism. Chocolate was a high status drink, and people drank a lot of cactus beer. Deer were hunted to local extinction. Eurasian domesticated stock animals increased quality of life significantly for Indian peasants.

    During the colonial era Spaniards prohibited olive farming in Mexico to protect Spanish farmers. You’d think Mexicans would have planted olive orchards immediately after gaining independence, but until very recently they never bothered. Mexican cuisine would be pretty different today without some of these colonial era policies. It would be somewhat less indigenous and significantly more Mediterranean, and Spanish cuisine would likely have more Mexican influence.

    I’m not a full Mexiphile like Fred Reed, but I do think the world owes a lot to the humble Mexican farmer. It’s not for nothing that American farmers have been addicted to their labor for the last century. Goes to show what an evil, exploitative piece of legislation NAFTA was.

    • Replies: @Peterike
  224. @Buzz Mohawk

    Californians used to buy Coors in Colorado and take it back home with them, before it was available on the coast. It was kept refrigerated from the brewery in Golden and thus was only sold in a limited region. People who couldn’t buy it in their state thought it was special.

    Q: WHERE CAN I GET YOUR BEER AT [sic]?

    https://newglarusbrewing.com/beers/Distribution

  225. @utu

    You have to use the right potato, too. After cutting, wash the starch off, freeze and double fry. They usually turn out fine. I like to throw some thin sliced onions in late in the fry.

  226. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peterike

    Useless for what? What’s the end-goal? Look, Peterike, I can’t force myself to find Trump’s personality appealing any more than I can force myself to be aroused by some unshaven feminist. It seems to me like the unstated goal of this project is a country where I, because I’m insufficiently low-class, am not welcome. I’m not gonna work toward that. I can ask only that you stop trying to appeal to me as a “fellow white.”

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  227. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams

    Yes, that’s the case, becuase that’s what this election was all about. You can say immigration, immigration, immigration all you want, but for most people, they don’t think about issues unless they are current. Immigration wasn’t. And that’s on Trump, who for whatever reason decided not to bring up the issue.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  228. Anonymous[312] • Disclaimer says:
    @William Badwhite

    We built this state, it was teepees and buffalo before we got here. We’re not rootless, we’re Americans, and I think it’s a good thing that we left many of the class hatreds behind in the East.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  229. clyde says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    I have never eaten a hamburger with blue cheese on but your doing it this way sounds like a great idea. I could care less about any fast food hamburger. Once a month I get a hamburger craving, I buy organic hamburger meat at Aldi usually. Shape half a pound into a patty with some cayenne and salt and fry it. Don’t stuff all kinds of lettuce and tomatoes under the bun, you get an unholy mess. Put your proffered herbages on the side and eat as you progress with the hamburger. Raw spinach is very good!

    I am sucha purist I do not squirt ketchup or mustard on it or in it. Instead I dip my hamburger + half a bun into xxx sauces as I go along. Big slice of raw onion on the side needed. I am getting hungry already.

  230. I lived in Colorado in the ’70s, before it was infested with Californians and it was a fantastic place. I wish they’d all go back.

  231. @Jmaie

    All burgers are just burgers.

  232. @guest007

    There’s nothing particularly good about high voter turn-out. A modest level of difficulty weeds out the biggest morons and ne’er-do-wells.

    • Replies: @guest007
  233. Peterike says:
    @Bill P

    “ It’s not for nothing that American farmers have been addicted to their labor for the last century”

    Yeah and just think, without it all the stoop labor would be done by machines now.

  234. AP says:
    @black sea

    You mentioned waiting for the meal, so I assumed this included sitting at the table (or at the bar until the table is ready) waiting to order and then for the meal, not actually just standing around for an hour. I suppose I wouldn’t do that, either.

  235. Anonymous[182] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Has the whole “soy” concept been overextended when applied to people consuming literal beef hamburgers?

    Not only that, but the guys who use that term imagine themselves to be Jeremiah Johnson but in reality are internet addict dweebs. In other words, they’re “soy” themselves and really no different from those they call that term.

  236. @prosa123

    A line of people on the sidewalk is great advertising. I think it was more common to have people line up outside in the past. I can remember driving past in December 1976 in Westwood in L.A. an immense line of people waiting to get into the midnight showing of a new movie called “Rocky” and thinking that must be a good movie.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  237. black sea says:
    @Bill

    Chick-Fil-A used to have, and maybe still has, some sort of college scholarship program for its employees. This was of course good PR, but it also attracted a better quality of employee.

    • Replies: @Bill
  238. @Steve Sailer

    A line of people on the sidewalk is great advertising.

    In certain circumstances, yes. A line of people on a sidewalk waiting to get issued this month’s ration of bread and milk from the collective “store”, as in Communist Russia et al, is poor advertising.

  239. bomag says:
    @Jmaie

    Chuck is generally the lower quality meat from a carcass.

    Lee Iacocca relates that Henry Ford II ordered hamburgers everywhere he went, and noted that no place made burgers like the cafeteria at the Ford plant. Out of curiosity, Lee approached the cooks at Ford headquarters and inquired what made their burgers so good. The cook reached into storage, pulled out a New York Strip steak, tossed it in the meat grinder, and said, “that’s how.”

    • Replies: @Jmaie
  240. @Anonymous

    Insecure, conformist social climbers are more vulgar than Trump.

  241. guest007 says:
    @Cloudbuster

    Most countries in the world would disagree. Most countires have higher turnout than the U.S. 100% voter turnout would leave no doubt on the wishes of the voters versus sampling some subgroup of voters.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @Cloudbuster
  242. Znzn says:

    I thought California turned blue because of all those defence related leaving in the early 90s after the end of the Cold War, so any immigration from California from that time is likely to tilt a state red not blue.

  243. Corn says:
    @Pincher Martin

    I like Five Guys burgers but the sauce they pile on make them so damn messy. I feel like I need a bib when I eat one.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  244. Corn says:
    @Anonymous

    Amen! I like In-N-Out burgers but their fries are terrible.

  245. FozzieT says:

    250 comments and no mention of Freddy’s Steakburgers? They combine the best of In-N-Out’s retro theme and fast, friendly service with Steak-N-Shake’s style of burger and matchstick fries.

  246. Corn says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I’ve been to the SPAM Museum. It’s actually pretty interesting

  247. @Thomas

    I used drive by that lot twice a week traveling between the Bay Area and LA. I remember wondering what the turnover was like there and if the cows notice and what they think in the sort of unfunny Far Side cartoon in my head. But you’re right about that smell. It’s almost worth going the extra 30 minutes to get to the 99.

  248. @Anonymous

    Who said anything about immigration?

    What is your position on BLM and Antifa? On reparations? On crime? On quotas?

    You are a white man, correct? A millionaire? How do you stand to benefit from Democratic policies? Do you believe the Democrats are lying when they say they want to confiscate your assets to fund their various wealth-transfer schemes?

    Do you have kids? If so, do you support affirmative-action policies that will make it harder for them to get into a good college and harder for them to find a good job when they graduate?

    The Democrats chose Biden as their impotent figurehead because they figured that they could con gullible whites into voting for an explicitly anti-white agenda. Evidently their plan worked.

    Enjoy being a former millionaire when you get taxed through the wazoo to pay for reparations and bailouts. Good luck selling your house after your new Section 8 neighbors move in. Hope your kids don’t get screwed too badly when they lose out in the admissions lottery to DaShawn and LaShonda.

    And if you do end up getting the short end of the stick, then you can console yourself with the thought that you deserve it, because your evil ancestors built a racist country atop a foundation of colonialism, slavery, and discrimination.

    Seriously, you are one delusional fool.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  249. Jmaie says:
    @bomag

    Chuck the lowest quality meat on the carcass? You are obviously not a butcher. And that has nothing to do with the amount of saturated fat, chuck has a bit less of that compared to strip steak.

    So, a gourmet restaurant using $30 a pound meat makes a better burger than a drive athrough fast food restaurant. That’s your point?”

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  250. @Anonymous

    We built this state, it was teepees and buffalo before we got here

    In your last post, you said you arrived “relatively recently” – assuming you’re the same “anonymous” as before. So no, you didn’t build anything. You glom onto something someone else built. Your type of people hid back East while men dealt with the natives, then people like you move out and criticize the settlers.

    and I think it’s a good thing that we left many of the class hatreds behind in the East.

    You were the one inserting class into things, making the difference between lower-class whites and “high-class whites”, by which you meant middlebrow.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  251. @Corn

    Their burgers are pretty unwieldy, but if they were as good as some say I would bring my own bib.

    It’s still a burger and so I’m partial to them, but unlike In-N-Out I just don’t see what the fuss is about.

  252. @Jmaie

    So, a gourmet restaurant using $30 a pound meat makes a better burger than a drive athrough fast food restaurant.

    Having eaten many so-called gourmet burgers, I’m surprised by how often this is NOT true.

  253. northeast says:
    @Trelane

    You can’t make those reactions up.

  254. @Clifford Brown

    No negros were harmed during the filming of this outdoor show.

  255. black sea says:
    @Clifford Brown

    I have never seen a fight or the general nastiness you encounter at other fast food establishments.

    California, not sending their best:

    https://nypost.com/2020/11/23/long-lines-at-new-colorado-in-n-out-spark-wild-pantless-fight/

    • Replies: @anon
  256. Mycale says:

    I lived a block away from one in college and I make sure I get at least one meal at In and Out there any time I travel to a city with one, which is thankfully more common than it used to be. I got a meal in Austin even, which, to be fair, is pretty much California Transplant Destination #1.

    So, just a hamburger? yes, and no. I had Five Guys and Shake Shack on back to back days (not my best back to back days, to be fair) recently and the difference in quality was staggering – and In and Out is better than Shake Shack by a decent margin IMO.

  257. Anonymous[259] • Disclaimer says:
    @William Badwhite

    Yes, the 1800s, to be exact. You remind me of the reservation bums who go on about the glory of their Injun ancestors. What have you done recently? What have you built?

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  258. Anonymous[308] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams

    Do you have kids? If so, do you support affirmative-action policies that will make it harder for them to get into a good college and harder for them to find a good job when they graduate?

    Of course I don’t support affirmative action, why do you think I’m commenting here? I just don’t believe Trump’s gonna do anything about it. Tell me, where is he speaking out against it? The Democrats are using the coronavirus as an excuse to make major “reforms” to university admissions, where is he speaking out against it? I don’t think he is even aware of it.

    What’s delusional is thinking this election was about all these issues when it wasn’t. You read my comment as meaning I voted for Biden. All I was saying was why my state voted for Biden, I voted for the Prohibition Party.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  259. @guest007

    Most countries in the world would disagree. Most countires have higher turnout than the U.S. 100% voter turnout would leave no doubt on the wishes of the voters versus sampling some subgroup of voters.

    Most countries in the world don’t have a two party system where both sides live in denial of human biology and where the education system teaches that Whites held back everyone else (but Asians) through their bad juju spirits.

    The “get out the vote” drives are based on statistics that have been cold calculated by the left. The entire purpose is to elect Democrats.

    For those of us that don’t want either party to get a supermajority we cringe at the idea of 100% voting.

  260. anon[827] • Disclaimer says:
    @black sea

    No fights at the other Front Range In-n-Out, in Colorado Springs.

    Couldn’t be demographics. Must be the dirt.

  261. @Anonymous

    Of course I don’t support affirmative action, why do you think I’m commenting here? I just don’t believe Trump’s gonna do anything about it. Tell me, where is he speaking out against it? The Democrats are using the coronavirus as an excuse to make major “reforms” to university admissions, where is he speaking out against it? I don’t think he is even aware of it.

    Even if Trump did absolutely nothing, he would be infinitely preferable to Biden or (God help us) Harris. The Democrats will only accelerate the pace of the decline.

    Don’t you understand that Trump’s defeat has emboldened the left? They’ve got their green light to go full woketard.

    (Remember, boys and girls, good ol’ moderate Joltin’ Joe is just a figurehead. He’ll sign whatever papers they thrust in front of him.)

    For those of you pinning your hopes on a Republican victory in 2024, keep in mind that an awful lot can happen in four years.

    All I was saying was why my state voted for Biden, I voted for the Prohibition Party.

    Congratulations on wasting your vote.

    Your choice was ironic, given that Trump is an avowed teetotaler.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  262. @Anonymous

    Fried fish is not unknown in America.

    Denny’s offers a fish-and-chips platter with two sides and bread for about $10. It’s not great food, but it is a good value:

    (Ever the cheapskate, I always use a 20%-off coupon scanned from my phone. Senior citizens get a 15% discount through AARP.)

    My local Denny’s does a decent job most of the time. The seasonal turkey-and-stuffing dinner with two sides, cranberry sauce, and “Texas toast” isn’t half-bad*. Add a slice of pumpkin pie and you’ve got a sizable meal.

    The nearest IHOP, on the other hand, serves up terrible food, including the worst pancakes known to man. They taste like stale Wonder Bread.

    *Compared to the swill that my aunt churned out last year, the Denny’s turkey is downright delicious. Fortunately for my stomach, my aunt’s not doing Thanksgiving this year because of her COVID paranoia. My mother isn’t a bad cook, but she’s not up to making a big meal. So the two of us will probably end up going out on Thursday.

    • Replies: @Jmaie
  263. Bill says:
    @black sea

    It’s the corporate culture, not the employees, which is the problem.

  264. @Anonymous

    Yes, the 1800s, to be exact.

    Lol ok. Now you’re just making things up.

    You remind me of the reservation bums who go on about the glory of their Injun ancestors.

    I didn’t say anything at all about my ancestors. I was ridiculing your “we high-class whites” (by which you meant middlebrow) gayness.

    What have you done recently? What have you built?

    I personally built most of Pascagoula, MS. I also invented the helicopter.

  265. By the way, In-N-Out Burgers are fine, but don’t wait 12 hours in line for them. They’re just hamburgers.

    Says the guy who can help himself any time that he wants. And I suppose Del Taco is just a taco?

  266. @John Johnson

    Austin is the most chauvinistic city in the US.

    Visit Portland first.

    Ann Arbor – it has absolutely nothing going on except for sanctimony.

  267. Anon[196] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peterike

    Adding chiles to anything means you don’t actually care about what the thing tastes like.

    I feel the same way about cheese on burgers. It coats your tongue and keeps anything but cheese flavor was being detected.

  268. Anon[367] • Disclaimer says:

    Eccentric east coaster fast food reviewer YouTuber flies to L.A. for a television appearance and on the way home stops by an In-N-Out near LAX to review the double-double.

    • Replies: @danand
  269. Anonymous[126] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams

    Don’t you understand that Trump’s defeat has emboldened the left? They’ve got their green light to go full woketard.

    “Our enemies are emboldened by their symbolic victory,” well, why do you think that is? “We have to fight this symbolic war because if we don’t they’ll win this symbolic war,” is base circular reasoning.

    Congratulations on wasting your vote.

    I’ve been hearing that from GOPe people for years. It wasn’t convincing then and it isn’t convincing now. I didn’t waste my vote. There are two reasons politicians implement policies: because they believe in them and because their voters will dump them if they don’t implement them. That implied threat was what ultimately sank the schumer rubio immigration bill. They had the votes to pass it comfortably, but did not act because they knew they’d get killed in the next elections. If they could count on everyone having your mentality, we’d have 3 million immigrants a year and would be told it’s good we’re not getting the Democrats’ proposal of 5 million a year.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  270. anon[230] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peterike

    Adding chiles to anything means you don’t actually care about what the thing tastes like.

    Mole’ poblano must have chile or it won’t taste right.

  271. Jmaie says:
    @Stan Adams

    The nearest IHOP, on the other hand, serves up terrible food, including the worst pancakes known to man. They taste like stale Wonder Bread

    .

    And absurdly overpriced as well. Wife and I dropped in after many years’ absence, two breakfasts cost us $35 with tip. Mediocre at that. Never again.

    • Replies: @black sea
  272. danand says:

    A rumble at that In-N-Out line in Aurora. Probably originated in a hungry stomach and broke out from there.

  273. danand says:
    @Anon

    #367 that “Eccentric East coast fast food reviewer” appropriately ordered the vanilla shake to go with this meal.

    BTW his income from producing these relatively modest fast food reviews is North of $200K annually. Perhaps not the best use of his time, but certainly not the worst:

    nazzzzz

  274. @Anonymous

    What do you know of my mentality?

    There were two candidates for the presidency: Trump and Biden. It was, quite literally, a binary choice.

    Do you honestly believe that we’ll be better off under Biden than we’ve been under Trump? And do you honestly believe that the Republican candidate in 2024 will be better than Trump in 2020?

    Your underlying assumption is that, with Icky Orange Man is out of the way, a “real” leader will take up the banner of Trumpism and lead us all to the promised land.

    There’s a persistent delusion on the right that some smooth-talking professional politician will emerge who will run on Trump’s 2016 platform, win the presidency, and implement the changes that Trump was unable to bring about. Good luck finding such a man, good luck getting him to run (knowing in advance that the media will do everything in their power to destroy his reputation), and good luck getting him elected.

    Establishment Republicans are already interpreting Trump’s defeat as a repudiation of Trumpism itself. They’re saying that Trump didn’t do *enough* to appeal to minorities, that he still leaned too heavily on the white vote. They’re dismissing his victory in 2016 as a fluke. They’re writing off his supporters as a bunch of rednecks.

    “Trump didn’t really win,” someone told me the other day. “Hillary lost. If Biden had run in 2016, he would have won resoundingly. Trumpism is dead. You’re never going to see another major-party candidate run on a platform of immigration restrictionism. It’s a lost cause.”

    That is the message you sent. At least, that’s the message that the political establishment is hearing.

  275. black sea says:
    @Jmaie

    At Waffle House the All Star Special is $7.50.

    • Replies: @anon
  276. anon[587] • Disclaimer says:
    @black sea

    Plus at Waffle House you can actually watch your food being cooked.

  277. @Anonymous

    The end-goal is life, and you’re shooting in the wrong direction. Trump is vulgar. Voting for Trump is intelligent and the mark of a free man. Voting for Trump is high-class.

  278. @guest007

    I am not interested in the wishes of voters who can’t be bothered to show up and vote without prodding.

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