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Buttigieg: American Indians Sure Get Run Over a Lot
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American Indians, who didn’t evolve with alcohol until the last dozen or so generations, have a high rate of death while trying to walk home drunk from bars and liquor stores. From the Journal of the American Medical Association:

Pedestrian and hypothermia deaths among Native Americans in New Mexico. Between bar and home

M M Gallaher 1, D W Fleming, L R Berger, C M Sewell

JAMA. 1992 Mar 11;267(10):1345-8.

Objective: To determine the nature of excess injury mortality among Native Americans in New Mexico.

Design: Retrospective review of death certificates for deaths from unintentional injuries.

Setting: The state of New Mexico.

Subjects: New Mexico residents who died of unintentional injuries between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 1989.

Main outcome measure: Cause-specific mortality rates.

Results: Over half of the excess mortality from all unintentional injuries among Native Americans resulted from hypothermia and from pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes. New Mexico Native Americans were nearly eight times more likely to die in pedestrian–motor vehicle crashes and were 30 times more likely to die of hypothermia compared with other New Mexico residents. At death, 90% of those Native Americans tested were highly intoxicated (median blood alcohol concentrations of 0.24 and 0.18 g/dL [corrected] for pedestrian and hypothermia deaths, respectively). Despite the fact that most Native Americans in New Mexico live on reservations, most deaths occurred at off-reservation sites in border towns and on roads leading back to the reservation.

Conclusions: The possession and sale of alcohol is illegal on many Native American reservations. This policy forces Native Americans who want to drink to travel long distances to obtain alcohol. These data suggest that this policy is also the likely explanation for the markedly increased risk of death from hypothermia and pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes in this population.

As I’ve been saying, if our leadership’s new macroeconomic strategy is Money Printer Go Brrrrrrrr, spending money on pedestrian safety infrastructure seems like a better use than most. But I’m not sure if that would do much for Indians.

By the way, here’s a graph of total pedestrian deaths from 2010 (a year with low miles driven due to the economic crash of 2008) to 2019:

Sure looks like the homicide graph in which the Ferguson Effect added 22.9% more murders from 2014 to 2016. We see 23.8% more pedestrians killed by vehicles in 2016 than 2014: probably a similar main cause: the cops retreated to the donut shop during the First BLM Era.

 
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  1. PC Gag orders are so damaging

    I suppose Indian self determination wisely decided not to sell alcoholic drinks in the reservations. White supremacists would never be allowed to vote for restriction on Indian liberties inside reservations (or outside)

    In a unbiased wold we could determine to treat Indians as children, as far as alcohol is concerned. For their own good, for the good of our insurances, taxes, and health system.

    A maiority of Indians would probably consent.

    If there is is no research on Indian physiological and psychological problems with alcohol, it easily could be Done. If it were allowed to research individual and race differences.

    Political correctness causes Indian deaths. Freedom of speech and freedom of “Racist” true speech can save lives. More in our site…..

  2. Anon[285] • Disclaimer says:

    Why are blacks high risk?

    — Harder to see in the dark?

    — Like to wear black clothes?

    — Just like they don’t like to be arrested just because YT cop says to, they also don’t like to be forced to move off the road by oncoming cars, probably driven by YT? And turning to look makes them look weak and subservient, so they don’t do that?

    — They walk mostly in neighborhoods where drivers are in competent or drunk?

    — They walk in white neighborhoods where they are deliberated mowed down?

    — They are not really injured all that badly, but the racist emergency medical system manages to kill them by putting all the MCAT < 24 black doctors in emergency rooms where whites cannot turn around and look for another doctor?

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    @Anon

    Since IQ correlates with accidents in all sorts of jobs, I’m sure it also has an effect on avoiding getting hit by a car.

  3. The obvious solution is to run over more wypipos.

    I’m surprised Mayor Pete didn’t suggest this.

  4. I don’t know about Indians, but that black statistic could be cut in half if they they didn’t regard crosswalks and Walk/Don’t Walk lights as examples of systemic racism that must be opposed by direct action.

    • Replies: @Marty
    @Sollipsist

    I don’t see this at all. The attitude of the black pedestrians I see seems to be, “OK, I ignore every other rule, but I can afford to wait for this light.”

    Replies: @Sollipsist

  5. It’s pretty easy to see that Trump is responsible for this, ‘The Buck Stops Here’, and all that.

    On a serious note, this seems to be an example of do-gooder white folk causing more harm than good.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Nodwink


    It’s pretty easy to see that Trump is responsible for this, ‘The Buck Stops Here’, and all that.
     
    The Buck needs to stop on the reservation.
  6. So, the moral of the story is that when black men die, you should invest in donut shops…

  7. Peter Hitchens was on one recently about pedestrian deaths. Reckoned some report from the 90’s said that pedestrian deaths had declined (in UK) over decades due to declining number of pedestrians due to… fear of being a pedestrian death.

    Are there more pedestrians in US since 2010? Urbanisation, Brooklyn hipsterisation; also recession-induced car sales…

    (Btw I think declining child pedestrians in UK over that period in part due to parental fears of child abduction, which ramped up from 70’s thru 90’s. Probably same in America. Have there been any high-profile child abductions since 2010? Perhaps another reason for no. of pedestrians to rise.)

  8. Is the pictogram a gay male with a hard-on?
    Or a transvestite with the dress blown by wind coming from the right?

    And how do you “invest in equitable streets”?

  9. Indians also do a lot of drunk driving, including parking on the highway and going to sleep behind the wheel. Also, pedestrians will just curl up and go to sleep in places like parking lots. If you’re driving in Indian country, watch out for what’s over the next hill.

    • Replies: @Sick 'n Tired
    @Another Canadian

    A friend of mine who grew up near an Indian reservation in Wyoming told me their town had a huge issue with Indians getting drunk and passing out in winter, and freezing to death.

    An Australian friend of mine said they have a similar problem with Aborigines in Australia getting drunk and sleeping on rural roads and getting run over by cars & 18 wheelers. They call them speed bumps down there, so it's not just an America issue.

    Replies: @vhrm

  10. That graphic in Buttegieg’s tweet is a case study in how not to present data.

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @International Jew

    Today Tufte would get weeded out in 2nd grade.

    WAAYYY too judgy

    , @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @International Jew

    I.J., You write, "That graphic in Buttegieg’s tweet is a case study in how not to present data."

    Yes. Care to elaborate? There is no link to explain the orange and red colors, the numbers in the heads, what "At population 63.3" means, or why the figures are half-skirted and have a right arm that is longer than their left arm (or are we viewing them from behind?).

    Replies: @International Jew

  11. Buttigieg doesn’t get out much, does he, at least around the country? Indians don’t walk on streets. They walk on roads, meaning two-lane rural roads in which speed limits are probably 45 – 65, with drivers going faster than that, even at night, some of them being drunk Indians themselves. How can the numbers for spread out Indian lands in New Mexico be compared to people on the streets of South Bend, Indiana, or elsewhere?

    Solution: provide headdresses at the tribal council meeting with embedded red LEDs and strobes. For the hypothermia problem, how about even stronger alcohol to depress the blood’s freezing point… side affects may include black-outs and death…

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Buttigieg doesn’t get out much, does he, at least around the country?
     
    We're unruled by shut-ins.
    , @Paperback Writer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    On a lot of tribal websites there are warnings to wear reflective clothing at night so as to be more visible.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, I knew lots of whooWhoo Indians. Worked with them and occasionally drank with them. But I never met one who could 'hold' their liquor. One beer and they were slurring their words, two and they were wobbly, three and passed out. The Indians know they have a problem with alcohol, that's why they don't sell it on the res. but that doesn't mean they don't drink it on the res. Reservation roads around here are roads, not streets, usually no lines and flanked by trees or swales. Never are they lighted. Don't know what mayor pete is up to, NA have no political clout. Maybe tap the casino money for the dems? Around here candidates in tribal elections are allowed to pay for votes. And as to the hypothermia, we used to trade them blankets for furs. Dems can propose that as a reparation and give the blacks their damn mules.

  12. It would have been February 1990, a few weeks after I moved to Los Alamos, that I was driving home from Santa Fe. I had never been in New Mexico before 1990. I had spent the evening in Santa Fe and started for home at maybe 11 o’clock. A light snow had started falling, and there by the highway climbing north out of Santa Fe was a hitchhiker. Feeling for anyone out in those conditions, I picked him up. He was an Indian and he was drunk, and he was headed to San Ildefonso Pueblo 20 miles from there.

    I might have dropped him off at his house, but he started making passes at me. “Do you have a girlfriend?” “You’re good looking.” “Have you ever done it with a guy?” He was big and he was drunk, and I was concerned that extricating myself might get violent. So I dropped him off at the San I. turnoff with four miles left to walk in the snow at midnight. It was an interesting introduction to the territory. I picked up hitchhikers other times after that, but was ready with a cover story about a made-up girlfriend.

  13. American Indians, who didn’t evolve with alcohol until the last dozen or so generations, have a high rate of death while trying to walk home drunk from bars and liquor stores.

    Didn’t the guys who wrote Freakonomics have this covered? Just let them drive.

    Another thought is to have bars stock these big rolly-bouncy plastic bubbles, and wrap those who insist on leaving drunk so that they can be bounced along down the road.

    • LOL: Sam Malone
  14. Obviously, a dozen different factors jump out for the different rates in different locales. Notably, there was one fatality during the first 6 months in Vermont in 2019 and 2020. Warm weather states, where people aren’t confined to their homes for 4 or more months, have more deaths. Less crowded states have less. States with more blacks, hispanics, and drunk driving immigrants have more. If people would put their phones down and cross at the crosswalks this would not be much of a problem, but good luck with that.

    For New Mexico, a bad year has about 80 pedestrian deaths. It you want to reduce them cheaply, local government can pay for uber rides. Unlike drunk driving, where you have to leave your car behind, people actually use these. Or convince the richest man in the world, who grew up there, to use Amazon delivery slaves to drop off Indians at the reservations. Would this increase alcohol deaths? Alcoholics don’t typically let distance, or anything else, get in the way of their drinking, so it seems doubtful. Maybe try it out.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @william munny


    Warm weather states, where people aren’t confined to their homes for 4 or more months, have more deaths.
     
    "Confined to their homes"?

    https://www.pineandlakes.com/incoming/6782652-lgux3i-120220.PEJ.IceFishingExtravaganzaFILE.JPG/alternates/BASE_LANDSCAPE/120220.PEJ.IceFishingExtravaganzaFILE.JPG

    You must mean "shanties":

    https://www.takemefishing.org/getmedia/4d5b0856-2005-40ef-b3a8-37c7924be18d/Shanty-Town-photo-by-relaxshacks-com_-300x194.jpg

  15. Median BAL of .24 is pretty drunk. That half were above that is shocking. That is falling down stupid drunk. If you are staggering around in that condition in Alaska, the Dakotas etc in winter you are in real trouble. The tribal leaders might want to buy a van and collect their drunks from the local firewater hole ( how many can there be in areas that rural?) to get them home safely.

    • Replies: @Boy the way Glenn Miller played
    @unit472


    The tribal leaders might want to buy a van and collect their drunks from the local firewater hole ( how many can there be in areas that rural?) to get them home safely.
     
    Use some of that casino money.
  16. A friend that grew up adjacent to a Rez would tell stories of how some of these fatalities were really nurses. Get someone who you wanted rid of passed out drunk, place them on a road past the crest of a hill, wait for a car to come by and run him over.

  17. Anon[827] • Disclaimer says:

    Race, race, race. It’s all we hear from the MSM and academia, 24/7. It has become the dominant frame and narrative of everything in this country. But all of it is designed to foster solidarity in non-White races, demonize American Whites, and prevent solidarity in American. What are they up to?

    Try these on for size:

    The Burden Is Not Shared Equally
    —Relative combat deaths, by race and ethnicity

    Narrator: These disparities are awful, but we know how to fix them. It’s time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and…

    The Burden Is Not Shared Equally
    —Relative suicide risk by race and ethnicity

    Narrator: These disparities are awful, but we know how to fix them. It’s time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and invest in pro-White education

    The Burden Is Not Shared Equally
    —Relative victimhood from interracial violence, by race and ethnicity

    Narrator: These disparities are awful, but we know how to fix them. It’s time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and…

    The Burden Is Not Shared Equally
    —Relative lifespans, by gender

    Narrator: These disparities are awful, but we know how to fix them. It’s time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and…

    The Burden Is Not Shared Equally
    —Relative danger of job-related death, by gender

    Narrator: These disparities are awful, but we know how to fix them. It’s time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and…

  18. I’ve heard of driving while black, but not (jay)walking while black.

  19. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve noticed so few police cars lately (not complaining) , seems a certain demographic is capable of policing themselves. In northern New York a lot of Amish have bought up the cheap farmland, the weather is often gray and gloomy, the Amish buggies are Black and traveling slowly. It’s gray on black crime.

  20. Helmets mandatory for pedestrians.

  21. We visited a relative who was an Indian Agent for an Arizona Reservation. His complaint about their drinking was the bars right at the boundary of the reservation. Sure enough, we drove by one late at night. It was packed. And not another building for miles.

  22. I wonder if the legalization of pot has anything to do with the increase. The timing would be about right. It’d be interesting to see a graph of pedestrian deaths in states where pot was legalized (and nearby states) versus states where it wasn’t legalized.

  23. Was Crazy Horse a homophobe?

  24. About 10-15% of Americans believe in equity (which they now call systemic racism) and to them everything is going to be a problem like this. The rest of us just don’t get what they are complaining about because don’t believe in equity. It will be interesting to see if everyone can be made to believe in equity with intensive universalistic moral training from childhood, I.E., a new “Soviet Man” can be created.

  25. Putting Booty Gig in charge of crosswalks in the desert seems like as a good a way as any to bury his political career.
    “There’s a lot of sand out there. Why don’t you go pound some, Mayor Pete.”

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  26. Blacks aren’t a big fan of rules, jaywalking or otherwise.

    Remember, Michael Brown and Dorian Johnson were flagged down by a cop for blatantly walking in the street. This is what kicked off the whole incident. Well, that and the assault of an Asian shop owner.

  27. Rural and urban pedestrian deaths are two entirely different things.

    Rural deaths are, as others have pointed out here, mostly drunks walking home at night (otherwise there aren’t that many pedestrians to begin with).

    Urban deaths fall in two categories: First, black people who walk out into the street without looking. The black view is that drivers are responsible for looking out for them. As Proud Black Men and Former Kangs, they are free to walk in the street or anywhere they fancy (if you recall, the Ferguson incident started with a cop stopping Michael Brown as he walked down the middle of the street even though there was a sidewalk).

    Second are (mostly white) elderly people who get taken out when ghetto cab drivers and such in a rush to get somewhere come speeding around a corner, go thru red lights, etc.

    The common factor in most of these interactions is that there is a Person of Color in there somewhere, either as the pedestrian or as the (often unlicensed and uninsured) driver or both. Like so many things in America, vibrancy serves to enrich us (or at least personal injury lawyers and hospitals) and in periods of greater vibrancy such as after the killing of some Gentle Giant we are more enriched than usual.

    But neither Buttie nor the MSM are really allowed to mention any of this except to the extent that it fits the approved template “Minorities are hardest hit by X”.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jack D


    are really allowed
     
    Slave mentality
    , @anonymous
    @Jack D


    Urban deaths fall in two categories: First, black people who walk out into the street without looking. The black view is that drivers are responsible for looking out for them.
     
    What is the difference in culpability between a driver who hits a black who has walked into the street, and a police officer who has a suspect die of a heart attack while being arrested (such as what happened with George Floyd)?
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    As Proud Black Men and Former Kangs...

     

    ...or early-20th-century white men...

    they are free to walk in the street or anywhere they fancy
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1d/Busy_commercial_district_in_New_Orleans_La._c._1901.jpg

    Replies: @Jack D

  28. @International Jew
    That graphic in Buttegieg's tweet is a case study in how not to present data.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    Today Tufte would get weeded out in 2nd grade.

    WAAYYY too judgy

  29. @Jack D
    Rural and urban pedestrian deaths are two entirely different things.

    Rural deaths are, as others have pointed out here, mostly drunks walking home at night (otherwise there aren't that many pedestrians to begin with).

    Urban deaths fall in two categories: First, black people who walk out into the street without looking. The black view is that drivers are responsible for looking out for them. As Proud Black Men and Former Kangs, they are free to walk in the street or anywhere they fancy (if you recall, the Ferguson incident started with a cop stopping Michael Brown as he walked down the middle of the street even though there was a sidewalk).

    Second are (mostly white) elderly people who get taken out when ghetto cab drivers and such in a rush to get somewhere come speeding around a corner, go thru red lights, etc.

    The common factor in most of these interactions is that there is a Person of Color in there somewhere, either as the pedestrian or as the (often unlicensed and uninsured) driver or both. Like so many things in America, vibrancy serves to enrich us (or at least personal injury lawyers and hospitals) and in periods of greater vibrancy such as after the killing of some Gentle Giant we are more enriched than usual.

    But neither Buttie nor the MSM are really allowed to mention any of this except to the extent that it fits the approved template "Minorities are hardest hit by X".

    Replies: @Desiderius, @anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    are really allowed

    Slave mentality

  30. @Achmed E. Newman
    Buttigieg doesn't get out much, does he, at least around the country? Indians don't walk on streets. They walk on roads, meaning two-lane rural roads in which speed limits are probably 45 - 65, with drivers going faster than that, even at night, some of them being drunk Indians themselves. How can the numbers for spread out Indian lands in New Mexico be compared to people on the streets of South Bend, Indiana, or elsewhere?

    Solution: provide headdresses at the tribal council meeting with embedded red LEDs and strobes. For the hypothermia problem, how about even stronger alcohol to depress the blood's freezing point... side affects may include black-outs and death...

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Paperback Writer, @Buffalo Joe

    Buttigieg doesn’t get out much, does he, at least around the country?

    We’re unruled by shut-ins.

  31. How many of these drunken stumbles are actually suicides? What’s the federal money quick fix for despair?

  32. anonymous[718] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    Rural and urban pedestrian deaths are two entirely different things.

    Rural deaths are, as others have pointed out here, mostly drunks walking home at night (otherwise there aren't that many pedestrians to begin with).

    Urban deaths fall in two categories: First, black people who walk out into the street without looking. The black view is that drivers are responsible for looking out for them. As Proud Black Men and Former Kangs, they are free to walk in the street or anywhere they fancy (if you recall, the Ferguson incident started with a cop stopping Michael Brown as he walked down the middle of the street even though there was a sidewalk).

    Second are (mostly white) elderly people who get taken out when ghetto cab drivers and such in a rush to get somewhere come speeding around a corner, go thru red lights, etc.

    The common factor in most of these interactions is that there is a Person of Color in there somewhere, either as the pedestrian or as the (often unlicensed and uninsured) driver or both. Like so many things in America, vibrancy serves to enrich us (or at least personal injury lawyers and hospitals) and in periods of greater vibrancy such as after the killing of some Gentle Giant we are more enriched than usual.

    But neither Buttie nor the MSM are really allowed to mention any of this except to the extent that it fits the approved template "Minorities are hardest hit by X".

    Replies: @Desiderius, @anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    Urban deaths fall in two categories: First, black people who walk out into the street without looking. The black view is that drivers are responsible for looking out for them.

    What is the difference in culpability between a driver who hits a black who has walked into the street, and a police officer who has a suspect die of a heart attack while being arrested (such as what happened with George Floyd)?

  33. @International Jew
    That graphic in Buttegieg's tweet is a case study in how not to present data.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    I.J., You write, “That graphic in Buttegieg’s tweet is a case study in how not to present data.”

    Yes. Care to elaborate? There is no link to explain the orange and red colors, the numbers in the heads, what “At population 63.3” means, or why the figures are half-skirted and have a right arm that is longer than their left arm (or are we viewing them from behind?).

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    My problem with that graphic is that it presents one-dimensional data in a way that suggests there's more going on, thus wasting the reader's time. The thermometer-like filling of those figures suggests the data are fractions of some whole (i.e. percentages between 0 and 100). The asymmetric figures are another distraction; they distracted you, and they distracted me too until I realized they were not some kind of Chernoff face.

    To be fair, spurious graphics are common in business communications. Bar graphs with a gratuitous third dimension are the most common example. Of course you get used to this after brief exposure to it. But it still looks dumb.

  34. Geronimo himself died from drunk driving, or rather drunk riding, though I notice Wikipedia has tidied up that fact. (Increasingly, we have to refer to accounts written before the current century to get the interesting details.) According to Towana Spivey, curator of Fort Sill Museum collections, “Geronimo used to go into town to drink, and one rainy night when he was returning, he fell off his horse. He lay in a field, drunk, all night. As a result he developed pneumonia. He died at Fort Sill’s Indian hospital.”

    While hitchhiking across New Mexico in my youth, I got a ride in a pickup from an Indian who continually refreshed himself with beers from a cooler between us. He told me that one night, when he was heading home from the bar with his wife, he passed out, went off the road, and rolled his truck. That woke him up. The engine was still running, but the roof was caved in. Hunching to see the road between the hood and the now-lowered roof, he made it home, carried his still unconscious wife into the house, and went to bed. The next morning he awoke to a blood-curdling shriek as his wife went outside and saw what had happened to the truck.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @Harry Baldwin

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmrSOfoz0UY

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Harry Baldwin

    I forgot to mention that his wife had slept through the whole thing. Not sure if that was clear.

    , @anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    The next morning he awoke to a blood-curdling shriek as his wife went outside and saw what had happened to the truck.

    Well, yeah. It was her truck, I am sure.

    , @JMcG
    @Harry Baldwin

    I came on a horrible car wreck last summer. A tree had fallen across the road around six feet above grade level. A van had hit it and peeled the roof back like a sardine can.
    I was first on the scene, so I stopped to see if I could help.
    With some apprehension, I approached the van, only to find it empty. I looked around, and there were three Mexicans stumbling around in shock on an adjoining lawn.
    They told me there was no one else in the van, so I drove down the road a half mile to get a cell signal.
    When I got back to the wreck the State cops were already there. The Mexicans were nowhere to be found. That was about five minutes later. The van was full of beer cans, open and closed. This happened about 6 am.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  35. Old guy repeating a story alert:

    Minneapolis had (has?) a large population of unban Indians. I’m too lazy to check, but I think at one time there were more Indians than Blacks within the city limits. Cedar Avenue, which cognoscenti of the cheese-filled hamburger refer to as “Juicy Lucy Boulevard”*, is a major N-S thoroughfare in south Minneapolis.

    Back in the ‘70s, there was a large public housing project, the “Little Earth of United Tribes” that straddled both sides of Cedar, with a pedestrian bridge connecting the two halves. Unfortunately, one had to climb stairs to access the bridge, so as a result there were many people, particularly on weekend nights, hit by cars crossing Cedar. The city’s solution was a traffic light, the expenditure for which irritated most of the frugal Northern Europeans who then made up a large majority of the Mill City’s population. No word on whether the semaphore cut down pedestrian deaths/injuries. A friend of mine, who at the time was a case worker for the Hennepin County welfare department suggested that building liquor stores on each side of Cedar was a better solution.

    * No one actually calls Cedar Avenue “Juicy Lucy Blvd”, I just made that up. Juicy Lucys are quite delicious though; supposedly first served at Matt’s Bar on 35th and Cedar. Fans of the 5/8ths Club, 23 blocks south of Matt’s, will tell you that that establishment was the first to serve this delicious treat.

    • Replies: @turtle
    @Ganderson

    Where I grew up, Albuquerque in the 1960s,"Juicy Lucy" was a derogatory term for fat, ugly, and stupid Spanish-American females.
    The word "Chicana" hadn't been invented yet.

    And, yes, there were lovely young women of Spanish-American ancestry, who were most definitely not "Juicy Lucys." Some of them were really awesome. :)

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Ganderson


    Back in the ‘70s, there was a large public housing project, the “Little Earth of United Tribes”
     
    A.k.a. "Teepeetown".

    Replies: @Ganderson

  36. The article cited is from JAMA 1992.
    More recent data shows the following:
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22994193/#&gid=article-figures&pid=figure-1-uid-0

    Please note the following:
    1. It gets cold in New Mexico during winter months.
    2. It is a long way from Gallup to Toadlena, and a fair distance from Farmington to Shiprock.
    https://toadlenatradingpost.com/Toadlena_Trading_Post/Map_Location_Hours/index.html
    3. If you ride a long distance in the back of an open pickup truck, whether drunk or sober, during extremely cold weather, you may freeze to death. Unfortunately, these incidents happen in New Mexico, typically among Navajo trying to get home from off-Res destinations.
    4. No one is “forcing” anyone to do anything. Those who choose to consume alcohol will find it. The Volstead Act, for example, was a resounding failure.
    5. The authors of the article are, or were, affiliated with:
    Office of Epidemiology, New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe 87502.
    6. The Navajo Nation is ruled by the Navajo Tribal Council, not by white men in Santa Fe.

    Also note:
    The lead author, M M Gallaher, is a co-author of this article:
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7941530/
    Which states:

    Handguns were generally owned for self-protection, and rifles were owned for hunting. Of households with firearms, 24% stored them unsafely (unlocked and loaded or unloaded but with ammunition nearby).

    Draw your own conclusions.

    For those who have not been to Gallup, NM on a Fri or Sat evening, I will say it is a very sad sight to see (mostly) Native American men staggering, falling-down drunk. As most people are aware, Native Americans, in common with the Asians of today, have a lower tolerance for alcohol than those of us of European, and especially northern European, heritage.

    However, this is a public health problem, as is the high rate of tuberculosis among Navajo, and has absolutely nothing to do with “safer streets.” In my opinion, Buttgig is a horse’s ass, and should STFU on topics about which he knows absolutely nothing.

    What does “more equitable” mean, anyway. Does Buttgig propose to knock a few white men unconscious, throw them in the streets, and pay the police to run them over, in order to “share the burden?” Or what?

  37. @Harry Baldwin
    Geronimo himself died from drunk driving, or rather drunk riding, though I notice Wikipedia has tidied up that fact. (Increasingly, we have to refer to accounts written before the current century to get the interesting details.) According to Towana Spivey, curator of Fort Sill Museum collections, "Geronimo used to go into town to drink, and one rainy night when he was returning, he fell off his horse. He lay in a field, drunk, all night. As a result he developed pneumonia. He died at Fort Sill's Indian hospital."

    While hitchhiking across New Mexico in my youth, I got a ride in a pickup from an Indian who continually refreshed himself with beers from a cooler between us. He told me that one night, when he was heading home from the bar with his wife, he passed out, went off the road, and rolled his truck. That woke him up. The engine was still running, but the roof was caved in. Hunching to see the road between the hood and the now-lowered roof, he made it home, carried his still unconscious wife into the house, and went to bed. The next morning he awoke to a blood-curdling shriek as his wife went outside and saw what had happened to the truck.

    Replies: @turtle, @Harry Baldwin, @anon, @JMcG

  38. These disparities are awful, but we know how to fix them. It’s time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and invest in safer, equitable streets.

    So, a racial disparity in road deaths is a pattern of exclusion resulting from unsafe and inequitable streets – a problem that can be fixed by “investment”, i.e. by increased spending.

    Is Buttigieg so “woke” that he actually believes this cant? Is anyone?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @James N. Kennett


    Is Buttigieg so “woke” that he actually believes this cant? Is anyone?
     
    He'll believe anything he is required to believe in order to climb the greasy pole of power.

    Replies: @VivaLaMigra

  39. First thing that came to my mind was Ira Hayes. Johnny Cash had a hit song about him when I was a kid. He was a Pima Indian Marine who was in the iconic photo of the Marines raising the flag on Iwo Jima. He died drunk in a ditch.

    Then Ira started drinking hard
    Jail was often his home
    They let him raise the flag and lower it
    Like you’d throw a dog a bone
    He died drunk early one morning
    Alone in the land he fought to save
    Two inches of water and a lonely ditch
    Was a grave for Ira Hayes

    Call him drunken Ira Hayes
    He won’t answer anymore
    Not the whiskey drinking Indian
    Or the marine that went to war

  40. @Harry Baldwin
    Geronimo himself died from drunk driving, or rather drunk riding, though I notice Wikipedia has tidied up that fact. (Increasingly, we have to refer to accounts written before the current century to get the interesting details.) According to Towana Spivey, curator of Fort Sill Museum collections, "Geronimo used to go into town to drink, and one rainy night when he was returning, he fell off his horse. He lay in a field, drunk, all night. As a result he developed pneumonia. He died at Fort Sill's Indian hospital."

    While hitchhiking across New Mexico in my youth, I got a ride in a pickup from an Indian who continually refreshed himself with beers from a cooler between us. He told me that one night, when he was heading home from the bar with his wife, he passed out, went off the road, and rolled his truck. That woke him up. The engine was still running, but the roof was caved in. Hunching to see the road between the hood and the now-lowered roof, he made it home, carried his still unconscious wife into the house, and went to bed. The next morning he awoke to a blood-curdling shriek as his wife went outside and saw what had happened to the truck.

    Replies: @turtle, @Harry Baldwin, @anon, @JMcG

    I forgot to mention that his wife had slept through the whole thing. Not sure if that was clear.

    • LOL: Sick 'n Tired
  41. Having a higher IQ, even drunk, means your judgment of situations is better. Whites are smarter than Indians.

  42. Yeah, pedestrian death is being being “noticed”, even by our elites.

    A new book by Angie Schmitt called “Right of Way: Race, class and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Death in America” probably hits all the ‘approved’ talking points. I didn’t read the stupid thing, but a glance at the summary and table of contents is enough to lose one’s breakfast. The author describes herself as “one of the nation’s leading voices and thought leaders in transportation equity”. Chapter titles include “Killer Cars” and “Blaming the Victim”.

    I’d wager a paycheck that Ms Schmitt does zero analysis of those accident-involved drivers’ histories. Here in the 716, we have a major national auto insurer center. A sane salary-drone there confided that the bottom 5% of their long term drivers are:
    1) a known menace to life and limb
    2) almost always from vibrant areas
    3) uninsurable at any price if not for state mandated ‘risk’ pooling.

    Yes, newer vehicles have awful driver visibility – Thank you NHTSA for roll-over safety!

    Yes, cell phones distract both drivers and pedestrians.

    But combine all that with the new authorities who, especially in woke areas, will not prohibit awful drivers from driving, and you get more pedestrian death. Expect it to get worse.

  43. So? Tail Gunner Pete endures a pedestrian
    rear-ending every night.

    • LOL: Kolya Krassotkin
  44. spending money on pedestrian safety infrastructure seems like a better use than most.

    Please no. The main “improvement” the current crop of “pedestrian safety” activists have is reducing speed limits, increasing traffic and otherwise making driving suck. Often they use euphemisms like “traffic calming” and their “infrastructure” is reducing lanes of traffic and installing speedbumps and other hinderances to driving.

    If you click through to the organization he’s pushing (https://smartgrowthamerica.org/dangerous-by-design/) they’re up front about it too when they criticize the status quo:

    Why is this happening?
    In a word, because state and local transportation agencies place a higher value on speed (and avoiding delay) than they do on safety. It’s simply not possible to prioritize both. When faced with decisions that would elevate and prioritize safety for people walking but increase delay for vehicles, the decision-makers’ true priorities are laid bare.

    And if you look at their proposed solution graphic a bit further down note they reduce the speed limit from 45 to 25.

    Another thing they don’t mention is that the majority of pedestrian fatalities (some studies have it as high as 90% but none lower than 50% ) are the pedestrian’s fault.

    Note also their banner:
    Why is that guy in the middle of the street? There is a sidewalk on that street and if he is trying to cross he’s less than 100 yards form an intersection. Should we change our laws and infrastructure to optimize our streets for that guy? No thanks!

    I fully agree that many places could benefit from overpasses and sidewalks and sometimes signals, but the current groups proposing this stuff are just anti-car activists trying to use “pedestrian deaths” as a cudgel against cars and car use.

  45. Anonymous[321] • Disclaimer says:

    It used to be illegal to sell alcohol to American Indians because everybody, including the Indians, knew it was a very bad thing to do. But, of course, that was racist. Now the characters who wrote this study want to allow Indians to be able to buy rot gut right on the rez even though the Indians themselves don’t want that.
    When our government existed to actually help us with our lives, it was a crime to sell booze to braves and it was well known than only unscrupulous white men did so. I guess all the unscrupulous white men are now our overlords of the left.

    A photo taken in Montana during the FDR administration:

    • Thanks: turtle
  46. @Harry Baldwin
    Geronimo himself died from drunk driving, or rather drunk riding, though I notice Wikipedia has tidied up that fact. (Increasingly, we have to refer to accounts written before the current century to get the interesting details.) According to Towana Spivey, curator of Fort Sill Museum collections, "Geronimo used to go into town to drink, and one rainy night when he was returning, he fell off his horse. He lay in a field, drunk, all night. As a result he developed pneumonia. He died at Fort Sill's Indian hospital."

    While hitchhiking across New Mexico in my youth, I got a ride in a pickup from an Indian who continually refreshed himself with beers from a cooler between us. He told me that one night, when he was heading home from the bar with his wife, he passed out, went off the road, and rolled his truck. That woke him up. The engine was still running, but the roof was caved in. Hunching to see the road between the hood and the now-lowered roof, he made it home, carried his still unconscious wife into the house, and went to bed. The next morning he awoke to a blood-curdling shriek as his wife went outside and saw what had happened to the truck.

    Replies: @turtle, @Harry Baldwin, @anon, @JMcG

    The next morning he awoke to a blood-curdling shriek as his wife went outside and saw what had happened to the truck.

    Well, yeah. It was her truck, I am sure.

  47. I guess there aren’t many Indians in Buttigieg’s South Bend IN.

    Other points to note:

    Due to idiot female NM governor, that state had one of the harshest lockdowns in the country.

    NM is infamous for “drunk driving” police roadblocks (i.e. “safety checks”) so probably a lot of Indians just walk back from the bars anyway, out in rural areas (as has been noted).

    In many if not all cases Indian Pueblos and reservations do not permit selling alcohol on their property. But of course these bars and stores cluster just outside of their limits. Walking distance.

    I guess Indian Uber hasn’t been invented yet.

  48. Having grown up in Northern AZ last mid-century, i think this is a flippin stoopid question he should have asked in private first. Real smart guy, that one.

    Because they are drunk. The worst were the ones who passed out on the Santa Fe tracks in Flagstaff
    Not much left to bury. They climbef onto the road or tracks because it was warmer.

    Coue more generations and they should have grown used to booze.

    Buttigieg is a little, uninformed, REMF of a man. A real shame.

  49. I often drive through a small majority black city. It was in the top ten for murders for years.

    I ‘ve observed that black pedestrians there are incredibly insouciant about walking in traffic, even with small children

  50. @Achmed E. Newman
    Buttigieg doesn't get out much, does he, at least around the country? Indians don't walk on streets. They walk on roads, meaning two-lane rural roads in which speed limits are probably 45 - 65, with drivers going faster than that, even at night, some of them being drunk Indians themselves. How can the numbers for spread out Indian lands in New Mexico be compared to people on the streets of South Bend, Indiana, or elsewhere?

    Solution: provide headdresses at the tribal council meeting with embedded red LEDs and strobes. For the hypothermia problem, how about even stronger alcohol to depress the blood's freezing point... side affects may include black-outs and death...

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Paperback Writer, @Buffalo Joe

    On a lot of tribal websites there are warnings to wear reflective clothing at night so as to be more visible.

  51. @Harry Baldwin
    Geronimo himself died from drunk driving, or rather drunk riding, though I notice Wikipedia has tidied up that fact. (Increasingly, we have to refer to accounts written before the current century to get the interesting details.) According to Towana Spivey, curator of Fort Sill Museum collections, "Geronimo used to go into town to drink, and one rainy night when he was returning, he fell off his horse. He lay in a field, drunk, all night. As a result he developed pneumonia. He died at Fort Sill's Indian hospital."

    While hitchhiking across New Mexico in my youth, I got a ride in a pickup from an Indian who continually refreshed himself with beers from a cooler between us. He told me that one night, when he was heading home from the bar with his wife, he passed out, went off the road, and rolled his truck. That woke him up. The engine was still running, but the roof was caved in. Hunching to see the road between the hood and the now-lowered roof, he made it home, carried his still unconscious wife into the house, and went to bed. The next morning he awoke to a blood-curdling shriek as his wife went outside and saw what had happened to the truck.

    Replies: @turtle, @Harry Baldwin, @anon, @JMcG

    I came on a horrible car wreck last summer. A tree had fallen across the road around six feet above grade level. A van had hit it and peeled the roof back like a sardine can.
    I was first on the scene, so I stopped to see if I could help.
    With some apprehension, I approached the van, only to find it empty. I looked around, and there were three Mexicans stumbling around in shock on an adjoining lawn.
    They told me there was no one else in the van, so I drove down the road a half mile to get a cell signal.
    When I got back to the wreck the State cops were already there. The Mexicans were nowhere to be found. That was about five minutes later. The van was full of beer cans, open and closed. This happened about 6 am.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @JMcG


    I came on a horrible car wreck last summer.
     
    Yuck. I think you mean upon.



    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f9/57/b0/f957b0addcfdfc78ee93150379e96729.jpg

    Replies: @JMcG

  52. @Achmed E. Newman
    Buttigieg doesn't get out much, does he, at least around the country? Indians don't walk on streets. They walk on roads, meaning two-lane rural roads in which speed limits are probably 45 - 65, with drivers going faster than that, even at night, some of them being drunk Indians themselves. How can the numbers for spread out Indian lands in New Mexico be compared to people on the streets of South Bend, Indiana, or elsewhere?

    Solution: provide headdresses at the tribal council meeting with embedded red LEDs and strobes. For the hypothermia problem, how about even stronger alcohol to depress the blood's freezing point... side affects may include black-outs and death...

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Paperback Writer, @Buffalo Joe

    Ach, I knew lots of whooWhoo Indians. Worked with them and occasionally drank with them. But I never met one who could ‘hold’ their liquor. One beer and they were slurring their words, two and they were wobbly, three and passed out. The Indians know they have a problem with alcohol, that’s why they don’t sell it on the res. but that doesn’t mean they don’t drink it on the res. Reservation roads around here are roads, not streets, usually no lines and flanked by trees or swales. Never are they lighted. Don’t know what mayor pete is up to, NA have no political clout. Maybe tap the casino money for the dems? Around here candidates in tribal elections are allowed to pay for votes. And as to the hypothermia, we used to trade them blankets for furs. Dems can propose that as a reparation and give the blacks their damn mules.

  53. It’s time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and invest in safer, equitable streets.

    — Secretary Pete Buttigieg

    Equitable streets! Because, in America, the streets themselves are racist. They are paved with white supremacy.

  54. @william munny
    Obviously, a dozen different factors jump out for the different rates in different locales. Notably, there was one fatality during the first 6 months in Vermont in 2019 and 2020. Warm weather states, where people aren't confined to their homes for 4 or more months, have more deaths. Less crowded states have less. States with more blacks, hispanics, and drunk driving immigrants have more. If people would put their phones down and cross at the crosswalks this would not be much of a problem, but good luck with that.

    For New Mexico, a bad year has about 80 pedestrian deaths. It you want to reduce them cheaply, local government can pay for uber rides. Unlike drunk driving, where you have to leave your car behind, people actually use these. Or convince the richest man in the world, who grew up there, to use Amazon delivery slaves to drop off Indians at the reservations. Would this increase alcohol deaths? Alcoholics don't typically let distance, or anything else, get in the way of their drinking, so it seems doubtful. Maybe try it out.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Warm weather states, where people aren’t confined to their homes for 4 or more months, have more deaths.

    “Confined to their homes”?

    You must mean “shanties”:

  55. @James N. Kennett

    These disparities are awful, but we know how to fix them. It's time to reverse these patterns of exclusion and invest in safer, equitable streets.
     
    So, a racial disparity in road deaths is a pattern of exclusion resulting from unsafe and inequitable streets - a problem that can be fixed by "investment", i.e. by increased spending.

    Is Buttigieg so "woke" that he actually believes this cant? Is anyone?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Is Buttigieg so “woke” that he actually believes this cant? Is anyone?

    He’ll believe anything he is required to believe in order to climb the greasy pole of power.

    • Replies: @VivaLaMigra
    @Mr. Anon

    Um, "climbing" isn't what Booty Giggle does on a "greasy pole!"

  56. @JMcG
    @Harry Baldwin

    I came on a horrible car wreck last summer. A tree had fallen across the road around six feet above grade level. A van had hit it and peeled the roof back like a sardine can.
    I was first on the scene, so I stopped to see if I could help.
    With some apprehension, I approached the van, only to find it empty. I looked around, and there were three Mexicans stumbling around in shock on an adjoining lawn.
    They told me there was no one else in the van, so I drove down the road a half mile to get a cell signal.
    When I got back to the wreck the State cops were already there. The Mexicans were nowhere to be found. That was about five minutes later. The van was full of beer cans, open and closed. This happened about 6 am.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I came on a horrible car wreck last summer.

    Yuck. I think you mean upon.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Reg Cæsar

    You’re correct of course. Sister Evangelist would hang her head in shame.

  57. The loss of privacy, the push for self-driving cars, and the charging per mile are all interrelated to an earlier event that most Whites are utterly ignorant about:

    https://www.lifewire.com/finding-turning-off-cars-black-box-534841

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/komando/2014/12/26/keep-your-car-black-box-private/20609035/

    If you have a post 2010 car, you are essentially a passenger in your ‘own’ vehicle. Newest vehicles can be remotely disabled, remotely auditorily surveilled, etc. Buy and plan accordingly. Better yet, find a rural mechanic you can trust and have him rebuild/restore an older one for you. You can still have electronic windows and door locks and air conditioning, but without the federal control and surveillance.

  58. @Reg Cæsar
    @JMcG


    I came on a horrible car wreck last summer.
     
    Yuck. I think you mean upon.



    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/f9/57/b0/f957b0addcfdfc78ee93150379e96729.jpg

    Replies: @JMcG

    You’re correct of course. Sister Evangelist would hang her head in shame.

  59. @Jack D
    Rural and urban pedestrian deaths are two entirely different things.

    Rural deaths are, as others have pointed out here, mostly drunks walking home at night (otherwise there aren't that many pedestrians to begin with).

    Urban deaths fall in two categories: First, black people who walk out into the street without looking. The black view is that drivers are responsible for looking out for them. As Proud Black Men and Former Kangs, they are free to walk in the street or anywhere they fancy (if you recall, the Ferguson incident started with a cop stopping Michael Brown as he walked down the middle of the street even though there was a sidewalk).

    Second are (mostly white) elderly people who get taken out when ghetto cab drivers and such in a rush to get somewhere come speeding around a corner, go thru red lights, etc.

    The common factor in most of these interactions is that there is a Person of Color in there somewhere, either as the pedestrian or as the (often unlicensed and uninsured) driver or both. Like so many things in America, vibrancy serves to enrich us (or at least personal injury lawyers and hospitals) and in periods of greater vibrancy such as after the killing of some Gentle Giant we are more enriched than usual.

    But neither Buttie nor the MSM are really allowed to mention any of this except to the extent that it fits the approved template "Minorities are hardest hit by X".

    Replies: @Desiderius, @anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    As Proud Black Men and Former Kangs…

    …or early-20th-century white men…

    they are free to walk in the street or anywhere they fancy

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Or like this:

    https://youtu.be/aohXOpKtns0?t=110

    The automobile really changed things, at least for white people. Driving thru W. Philly, it really looks like this film - people just walk out into the street everywhere.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @The Alarmist

  60. While on vacation in the 4 Corners area years ago we stopped at a Sonic fast food on a reservation—it was the only place for miles on a lonely 4 lane road that seemed to have little traffic–there was a gigantic pedestrian over pass in the middle of nowhere—to prevent drunken Indians from getting run over at night

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Possumman

    The Navajo make good money off owning Monument Valley, which is a National Park-quality site that they own, so good for them for building an overpass to keep drunken Navajo from getting killed.

  61. The story is that Mayor Pete’s Dept of Trans is looking at a “per-mile” tax.

    We know that the GOPs will loudly oppose it (“No new taxes!”). But what will GOPs do about existing, federal taxes on fuel? Nothing, of course.

    Old taxes good.

    [MORE]

    It was so predictable that GOPs, who voted dozens of times to repeal Obamacare, couldn’t deliver a repeal to Trump.

    Don’t even register to vote.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Abolish_public_education

    The per mile tax is a substitute for Gas taxes on electric cars (plus a useful top up on IC cars).
    They're just prepping the way.

    I've been calling the righteous Prius drivers tax dodgers for years.

  62. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    As Proud Black Men and Former Kangs...

     

    ...or early-20th-century white men...

    they are free to walk in the street or anywhere they fancy
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1d/Busy_commercial_district_in_New_Orleans_La._c._1901.jpg

    Replies: @Jack D

    Or like this:

    The automobile really changed things, at least for white people. Driving thru W. Philly, it really looks like this film – people just walk out into the street everywhere.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    That soundtrack-- any soundtrack-- is suspicious.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @The Alarmist
    @Jack D

    Changed things in some places ....

    https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/b/masiphumelele-township-cape-town-south-africa-june-busy-street-scene-people-taxis-31949759.jpg

  63. @Ganderson
    Old guy repeating a story alert:

    Minneapolis had (has?) a large population of unban Indians. I’m too lazy to check, but I think at one time there were more Indians than Blacks within the city limits. Cedar Avenue, which cognoscenti of the cheese-filled hamburger refer to as “Juicy Lucy Boulevard”*, is a major N-S thoroughfare in south Minneapolis.

    Back in the ‘70s, there was a large public housing project, the “Little Earth of United Tribes” that straddled both sides of Cedar, with a pedestrian bridge connecting the two halves. Unfortunately, one had to climb stairs to access the bridge, so as a result there were many people, particularly on weekend nights, hit by cars crossing Cedar. The city’s solution was a traffic light, the expenditure for which irritated most of the frugal Northern Europeans who then made up a large majority of the Mill City’s population. No word on whether the semaphore cut down pedestrian deaths/injuries. A friend of mine, who at the time was a case worker for the Hennepin County welfare department suggested that building liquor stores on each side of Cedar was a better solution.

    * No one actually calls Cedar Avenue “Juicy Lucy Blvd”, I just made that up. Juicy Lucys are quite delicious though; supposedly first served at Matt’s Bar on 35th and Cedar. Fans of the 5/8ths Club, 23 blocks south of Matt’s, will tell you that that establishment was the first to serve this delicious treat.

    Replies: @turtle, @Reg Cæsar

    Where I grew up, Albuquerque in the 1960s,”Juicy Lucy” was a derogatory term for fat, ugly, and stupid Spanish-American females.
    The word “Chicana” hadn’t been invented yet.

    And, yes, there were lovely young women of Spanish-American ancestry, who were most definitely not “Juicy Lucys.” Some of them were really awesome. 🙂

  64. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Or like this:

    https://youtu.be/aohXOpKtns0?t=110

    The automobile really changed things, at least for white people. Driving thru W. Philly, it really looks like this film - people just walk out into the street everywhere.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @The Alarmist

    That soundtrack– any soundtrack– is suspicious.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes the soundtrack is added. But what is cool is that they speed corrected the film so it looks like the people are walking smoothly and at a normal pace. Many early motion picture cameras recorded at a slower frame rate than the current standard so everyone seems to be walking too fast when you play the film back on a modern projector.

    They've been able to do a lot with digital techniques to get more information out of old film and make it appear much clearer. There is tremendous redundancy between any two frames of a motion picture so if you interpolate data from the previous frame and the next frame to the current frame you can create more detail and clarity than is present in just that frame.

    The movie "They Shall Not Grow Old" is a technical tour de force. We are used to seeing the people of 1917 as jerky faded flickers from some impossibly distant past but after restoring this film, it really brings home that they were people just like us.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrabKK9Bhds

    Replies: @JMcG, @David In TN, @Anonymous

  65. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Or like this:

    https://youtu.be/aohXOpKtns0?t=110

    The automobile really changed things, at least for white people. Driving thru W. Philly, it really looks like this film - people just walk out into the street everywhere.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @The Alarmist

    Changed things in some places ….

  66. Stephen Levitt in Superfreakonomics pointed out that drinking and walking is way more dangerous than drinking and driving.

    In other news, courtesy of the movie Wind River (spoiler alert), the epidemic of missing and murdered Indian women is due to roving posses of homicidal white oil rig workers.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Paleoconn


    Stephen Levitt in Superfreakonomics pointed out that drinking and walking is way more dangerous than drinking and driving.

     

    To oneself. Not to others.


    I knew a 300-lb. Indian who was smart enough to keep his financial affairs squared away while sober, allowing him to drink freely at the boardwalk bar without worry. One night he passed out on the boards. His colleagues borrowed a forklift from their employer to cart him home.
  67. @Another Canadian
    Indians also do a lot of drunk driving, including parking on the highway and going to sleep behind the wheel. Also, pedestrians will just curl up and go to sleep in places like parking lots. If you're driving in Indian country, watch out for what's over the next hill.

    Replies: @Sick 'n Tired

    A friend of mine who grew up near an Indian reservation in Wyoming told me their town had a huge issue with Indians getting drunk and passing out in winter, and freezing to death.

    An Australian friend of mine said they have a similar problem with Aborigines in Australia getting drunk and sleeping on rural roads and getting run over by cars & 18 wheelers. They call them speed bumps down there, so it’s not just an America issue.

    • Replies: @vhrm
    @Sick 'n Tired

    Not a bad way to go from a subjective point of view. Better than most probably.

  68. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D

    That soundtrack-- any soundtrack-- is suspicious.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Yes the soundtrack is added. But what is cool is that they speed corrected the film so it looks like the people are walking smoothly and at a normal pace. Many early motion picture cameras recorded at a slower frame rate than the current standard so everyone seems to be walking too fast when you play the film back on a modern projector.

    They’ve been able to do a lot with digital techniques to get more information out of old film and make it appear much clearer. There is tremendous redundancy between any two frames of a motion picture so if you interpolate data from the previous frame and the next frame to the current frame you can create more detail and clarity than is present in just that frame.

    The movie “They Shall Not Grow Old” is a technical tour de force. We are used to seeing the people of 1917 as jerky faded flickers from some impossibly distant past but after restoring this film, it really brings home that they were people just like us.

    • Thanks: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Jack D

    Agreed, I took my son to see that during its extremely short theatrical release. It was stunning.

    , @David In TN
    @Jack D

    I saw "They Shall Not Grow Old" in a theater and it "really brings home that they were people just like us."

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    They should have left it in black and white. The color still looks unrealistic.

  69. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes the soundtrack is added. But what is cool is that they speed corrected the film so it looks like the people are walking smoothly and at a normal pace. Many early motion picture cameras recorded at a slower frame rate than the current standard so everyone seems to be walking too fast when you play the film back on a modern projector.

    They've been able to do a lot with digital techniques to get more information out of old film and make it appear much clearer. There is tremendous redundancy between any two frames of a motion picture so if you interpolate data from the previous frame and the next frame to the current frame you can create more detail and clarity than is present in just that frame.

    The movie "They Shall Not Grow Old" is a technical tour de force. We are used to seeing the people of 1917 as jerky faded flickers from some impossibly distant past but after restoring this film, it really brings home that they were people just like us.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrabKK9Bhds

    Replies: @JMcG, @David In TN, @Anonymous

    Agreed, I took my son to see that during its extremely short theatrical release. It was stunning.

  70. @Possumman
    While on vacation in the 4 Corners area years ago we stopped at a Sonic fast food on a reservation---it was the only place for miles on a lonely 4 lane road that seemed to have little traffic--there was a gigantic pedestrian over pass in the middle of nowhere---to prevent drunken Indians from getting run over at night

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Navajo make good money off owning Monument Valley, which is a National Park-quality site that they own, so good for them for building an overpass to keep drunken Navajo from getting killed.

  71. This policy forces Native Americans who want to drink to travel long distances to obtain alcohol. These data suggest that this policy is also the likely explanation for the markedly increased risk of death from hypothermia and pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes in this population.

    Once again it’s all the fault of the paleface.

    Reparations now!

  72. @Nodwink
    It's pretty easy to see that Trump is responsible for this, 'The Buck Stops Here', and all that.

    On a serious note, this seems to be an example of do-gooder white folk causing more harm than good.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    It’s pretty easy to see that Trump is responsible for this, ‘The Buck Stops Here’, and all that.

    The Buck needs to stop on the reservation.

  73. Of course these ‘scientists’ endorse selling alcohol on reservations. White people will never stop being the death of Indians.

    This would be hilarious if it weren’t so sad.

    • Agree: turtle
  74. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes the soundtrack is added. But what is cool is that they speed corrected the film so it looks like the people are walking smoothly and at a normal pace. Many early motion picture cameras recorded at a slower frame rate than the current standard so everyone seems to be walking too fast when you play the film back on a modern projector.

    They've been able to do a lot with digital techniques to get more information out of old film and make it appear much clearer. There is tremendous redundancy between any two frames of a motion picture so if you interpolate data from the previous frame and the next frame to the current frame you can create more detail and clarity than is present in just that frame.

    The movie "They Shall Not Grow Old" is a technical tour de force. We are used to seeing the people of 1917 as jerky faded flickers from some impossibly distant past but after restoring this film, it really brings home that they were people just like us.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrabKK9Bhds

    Replies: @JMcG, @David In TN, @Anonymous

    I saw “They Shall Not Grow Old” in a theater and it “really brings home that they were people just like us.”

  75. @Abolish_public_education
    The story is that Mayor Pete’s Dept of Trans is looking at a “per-mile” tax.

    We know that the GOPs will loudly oppose it (“No new taxes!”). But what will GOPs do about existing, federal taxes on fuel? Nothing, of course.

    Old taxes good.

    It was so predictable that GOPs, who voted dozens of times to repeal Obamacare, couldn’t deliver a repeal to Trump.

    Don’t even register to vote.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    The per mile tax is a substitute for Gas taxes on electric cars (plus a useful top up on IC cars).
    They’re just prepping the way.

    I’ve been calling the righteous Prius drivers tax dodgers for years.

  76. @Sollipsist
    I don't know about Indians, but that black statistic could be cut in half if they they didn't regard crosswalks and Walk/Don't Walk lights as examples of systemic racism that must be opposed by direct action.

    Replies: @Marty

    I don’t see this at all. The attitude of the black pedestrians I see seems to be, “OK, I ignore every other rule, but I can afford to wait for this light.”

    • Replies: @Sollipsist
    @Marty

    Maybe it's a regional thing. My commute takes me through some of the least affluent areas of a major city largely populated by Southern California transplants. I may be seeing more people who stand to gain one way or another by being an injured pedestrian.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  77. Elizabeth Warren must have a recipe for this.

  78. My experience with both black and Indian pedestrians is that they both love to play “chicken” with drivers waiting for them to clear out of the way. I’ve even seen one squawlette take a half-step backward as I slowly approach her and her mama just to linger in my road space just a little bit longer.

    One thing I notice about Indians is that they are not particularly fast in reaction, unlike blacks whose reflexes doubtless save them in the last split-second to avoid getting flattened by oncoming traffic. Even trying to walk past Indians is an eye-rolling experience as they leave no room to pass them on the sidewalk or in the aisle at Wal-mart, what with their swarms of kids darting about.

    Alcohol, of course, makes it all worse

  79. @Anon
    Why are blacks high risk?

    -- Harder to see in the dark?

    -- Like to wear black clothes?

    -- Just like they don't like to be arrested just because YT cop says to, they also don't like to be forced to move off the road by oncoming cars, probably driven by YT? And turning to look makes them look weak and subservient, so they don't do that?

    -- They walk mostly in neighborhoods where drivers are in competent or drunk?

    -- They walk in white neighborhoods where they are deliberated mowed down?

    -- They are not really injured all that badly, but the racist emergency medical system manages to kill them by putting all the MCAT < 24 black doctors in emergency rooms where whites cannot turn around and look for another doctor?

    Replies: @Anonymous Jew

    Since IQ correlates with accidents in all sorts of jobs, I’m sure it also has an effect on avoiding getting hit by a car.

  80. @Ganderson
    Old guy repeating a story alert:

    Minneapolis had (has?) a large population of unban Indians. I’m too lazy to check, but I think at one time there were more Indians than Blacks within the city limits. Cedar Avenue, which cognoscenti of the cheese-filled hamburger refer to as “Juicy Lucy Boulevard”*, is a major N-S thoroughfare in south Minneapolis.

    Back in the ‘70s, there was a large public housing project, the “Little Earth of United Tribes” that straddled both sides of Cedar, with a pedestrian bridge connecting the two halves. Unfortunately, one had to climb stairs to access the bridge, so as a result there were many people, particularly on weekend nights, hit by cars crossing Cedar. The city’s solution was a traffic light, the expenditure for which irritated most of the frugal Northern Europeans who then made up a large majority of the Mill City’s population. No word on whether the semaphore cut down pedestrian deaths/injuries. A friend of mine, who at the time was a case worker for the Hennepin County welfare department suggested that building liquor stores on each side of Cedar was a better solution.

    * No one actually calls Cedar Avenue “Juicy Lucy Blvd”, I just made that up. Juicy Lucys are quite delicious though; supposedly first served at Matt’s Bar on 35th and Cedar. Fans of the 5/8ths Club, 23 blocks south of Matt’s, will tell you that that establishment was the first to serve this delicious treat.

    Replies: @turtle, @Reg Cæsar

    Back in the ‘70s, there was a large public housing project, the “Little Earth of United Tribes”

    A.k.a. “Teepeetown”.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    I’d forgotten that.. Is it still there? I thought about driving up Cedar when I did my “Lake Street Gawkers’ Tour” last July, but I wanted to get to the remains of the Precinct house...

    I know Russell Means is dead, but are the Bellecourt brothers still around? Dennis Banks?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  81. @Paleoconn
    Stephen Levitt in Superfreakonomics pointed out that drinking and walking is way more dangerous than drinking and driving.

    In other news, courtesy of the movie Wind River (spoiler alert), the epidemic of missing and murdered Indian women is due to roving posses of homicidal white oil rig workers.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Stephen Levitt in Superfreakonomics pointed out that drinking and walking is way more dangerous than drinking and driving.

    To oneself. Not to others.

    I knew a 300-lb. Indian who was smart enough to keep his financial affairs squared away while sober, allowing him to drink freely at the boardwalk bar without worry. One night he passed out on the boards. His colleagues borrowed a forklift from their employer to cart him home.

  82. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @International Jew

    I.J., You write, "That graphic in Buttegieg’s tweet is a case study in how not to present data."

    Yes. Care to elaborate? There is no link to explain the orange and red colors, the numbers in the heads, what "At population 63.3" means, or why the figures are half-skirted and have a right arm that is longer than their left arm (or are we viewing them from behind?).

    Replies: @International Jew

    My problem with that graphic is that it presents one-dimensional data in a way that suggests there’s more going on, thus wasting the reader’s time. The thermometer-like filling of those figures suggests the data are fractions of some whole (i.e. percentages between 0 and 100). The asymmetric figures are another distraction; they distracted you, and they distracted me too until I realized they were not some kind of Chernoff face.

    To be fair, spurious graphics are common in business communications. Bar graphs with a gratuitous third dimension are the most common example. Of course you get used to this after brief exposure to it. But it still looks dumb.

  83. Anonymous[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes the soundtrack is added. But what is cool is that they speed corrected the film so it looks like the people are walking smoothly and at a normal pace. Many early motion picture cameras recorded at a slower frame rate than the current standard so everyone seems to be walking too fast when you play the film back on a modern projector.

    They've been able to do a lot with digital techniques to get more information out of old film and make it appear much clearer. There is tremendous redundancy between any two frames of a motion picture so if you interpolate data from the previous frame and the next frame to the current frame you can create more detail and clarity than is present in just that frame.

    The movie "They Shall Not Grow Old" is a technical tour de force. We are used to seeing the people of 1917 as jerky faded flickers from some impossibly distant past but after restoring this film, it really brings home that they were people just like us.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrabKK9Bhds

    Replies: @JMcG, @David In TN, @Anonymous

    They should have left it in black and white. The color still looks unrealistic.

  84. anonymous[125] • Disclaimer says:

    As Steve has pointed out, it is strange how rarely people think of Indians.

    I was driving across the country and found myself in rez terrirtory in Arizona around midnight when I needed a bathroom break. I saw that a McDonald’s was open so I stopped and to my surprise–this was the middle of nowhere–it was PACKED with drunk Indians. When I walked in one of them looked at me like I was insane and pulled me aside and said, “you need to get the fuck out of here.” I mean he did it in a friendly, helpful way–he wasn’t threatening me, he was warning me I was in the wrong place at the wrong time as a white man.

    It’s funny because I would have known not to pull off on MLK drive in Cleveland or whatever at midnight on Friday if I needed to use the bathroom on a road trip, but it didn’t occur to me I could be walking into a tinderbox in the middle of the desert.

  85. @unit472
    Median BAL of .24 is pretty drunk. That half were above that is shocking. That is falling down stupid drunk. If you are staggering around in that condition in Alaska, the Dakotas etc in winter you are in real trouble. The tribal leaders might want to buy a van and collect their drunks from the local firewater hole ( how many can there be in areas that rural?) to get them home safely.

    Replies: @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    The tribal leaders might want to buy a van and collect their drunks from the local firewater hole ( how many can there be in areas that rural?) to get them home safely.

    Use some of that casino money.

  86. @Sick 'n Tired
    @Another Canadian

    A friend of mine who grew up near an Indian reservation in Wyoming told me their town had a huge issue with Indians getting drunk and passing out in winter, and freezing to death.

    An Australian friend of mine said they have a similar problem with Aborigines in Australia getting drunk and sleeping on rural roads and getting run over by cars & 18 wheelers. They call them speed bumps down there, so it's not just an America issue.

    Replies: @vhrm

    Not a bad way to go from a subjective point of view. Better than most probably.

  87. @Reg Cæsar
    @Ganderson


    Back in the ‘70s, there was a large public housing project, the “Little Earth of United Tribes”
     
    A.k.a. "Teepeetown".

    Replies: @Ganderson

    I’d forgotten that.. Is it still there? I thought about driving up Cedar when I did my “Lake Street Gawkers’ Tour” last July, but I wanted to get to the remains of the Precinct house…

    I know Russell Means is dead, but are the Bellecourt brothers still around? Dennis Banks?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ganderson


    I know Russell Means is dead, but are the Bellecourt brothers still around? Dennis Banks?
     
    A "civil rights activist", one of the more soft-spoken ones, named Earle something-or-other, was murdered by a teenage Hispanic male prostitute he'd picked up in downtown Minneapolis. A couple of weeks later, a local newscast did a story on some boring community council meeting, IIRC, in the Phillips neighborhood.

    They obviously had to use stock footage of an earlier meeting, for sitting there, near one of the Bellecourt brothers, was Earle himself, still alive.


    Vernon (a.k.a. WaBun Inini) died in 2007; Clyde is still alive. As for Earle, I can't find his last name. Google keeps giving me Earle Brown instead, who was definitely not a civil rights activist, at least in the way most use the term. Brown's name may be stripped from his memorials now that his Klan "connections" have come to light:


    Brooklyn Center may remove Earle Brown’s name from landmarks, festival

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Mark Grainger

  88. @Marty
    @Sollipsist

    I don’t see this at all. The attitude of the black pedestrians I see seems to be, “OK, I ignore every other rule, but I can afford to wait for this light.”

    Replies: @Sollipsist

    Maybe it’s a regional thing. My commute takes me through some of the least affluent areas of a major city largely populated by Southern California transplants. I may be seeing more people who stand to gain one way or another by being an injured pedestrian.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Sollipsist


    I may be seeing more people who stand to gain one way or another by being an injured pedestrian.
     
    https://i.etsystatic.com/13023569/r/il/1f3697/1780118373/il_570xN.1780118373_4az7.jpg
  89. @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    I’d forgotten that.. Is it still there? I thought about driving up Cedar when I did my “Lake Street Gawkers’ Tour” last July, but I wanted to get to the remains of the Precinct house...

    I know Russell Means is dead, but are the Bellecourt brothers still around? Dennis Banks?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I know Russell Means is dead, but are the Bellecourt brothers still around? Dennis Banks?

    A “civil rights activist”, one of the more soft-spoken ones, named Earle something-or-other, was murdered by a teenage Hispanic male prostitute he’d picked up in downtown Minneapolis. A couple of weeks later, a local newscast did a story on some boring community council meeting, IIRC, in the Phillips neighborhood.

    They obviously had to use stock footage of an earlier meeting, for sitting there, near one of the Bellecourt brothers, was Earle himself, still alive.

    Vernon (a.k.a. WaBun Inini) died in 2007; Clyde is still alive. As for Earle, I can’t find his last name. Google keeps giving me Earle Brown instead, who was definitely not a civil rights activist, at least in the way most use the term. Brown’s name may be stripped from his memorials now that his Klan “connections” have come to light:

    Brooklyn Center may remove Earle Brown’s name from landmarks, festival

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @Reg Cæsar

    There’s an Earle Brown Drive in Garrison, too.

    When I ran for student body president at the ‘U’ back in the 70’s (dead last in the primary) one of my opponents was a guy named Harold Iron Shield. Good guy. Wonder where he is these days.

    Russell Means had an amusing turn on “Curb Your Enthusiasm”

    Were you living in the TCs when those Minneapolis cops got into trouble for throwing an obstreperous, drunken Indian in the trunk of their cruiser on a below zero night? Could you imagine the ruckus if that happened today? Or does no one really care about Indians these days?

    , @Mark Grainger
    @Reg Cæsar

    Earl Livermore?


    https://www.worldliteraturetoday.org/2019/autumn/alcatraz-not-island-dean-chavers

  90. @Sollipsist
    @Marty

    Maybe it's a regional thing. My commute takes me through some of the least affluent areas of a major city largely populated by Southern California transplants. I may be seeing more people who stand to gain one way or another by being an injured pedestrian.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I may be seeing more people who stand to gain one way or another by being an injured pedestrian.

  91. @Mr. Anon
    @James N. Kennett


    Is Buttigieg so “woke” that he actually believes this cant? Is anyone?
     
    He'll believe anything he is required to believe in order to climb the greasy pole of power.

    Replies: @VivaLaMigra

    Um, “climbing” isn’t what Booty Giggle does on a “greasy pole!”

  92. @Reg Cæsar
    @Ganderson


    I know Russell Means is dead, but are the Bellecourt brothers still around? Dennis Banks?
     
    A "civil rights activist", one of the more soft-spoken ones, named Earle something-or-other, was murdered by a teenage Hispanic male prostitute he'd picked up in downtown Minneapolis. A couple of weeks later, a local newscast did a story on some boring community council meeting, IIRC, in the Phillips neighborhood.

    They obviously had to use stock footage of an earlier meeting, for sitting there, near one of the Bellecourt brothers, was Earle himself, still alive.


    Vernon (a.k.a. WaBun Inini) died in 2007; Clyde is still alive. As for Earle, I can't find his last name. Google keeps giving me Earle Brown instead, who was definitely not a civil rights activist, at least in the way most use the term. Brown's name may be stripped from his memorials now that his Klan "connections" have come to light:


    Brooklyn Center may remove Earle Brown’s name from landmarks, festival

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Mark Grainger

    There’s an Earle Brown Drive in Garrison, too.

    When I ran for student body president at the ‘U’ back in the 70’s (dead last in the primary) one of my opponents was a guy named Harold Iron Shield. Good guy. Wonder where he is these days.

    Russell Means had an amusing turn on “Curb Your Enthusiasm”

    Were you living in the TCs when those Minneapolis cops got into trouble for throwing an obstreperous, drunken Indian in the trunk of their cruiser on a below zero night? Could you imagine the ruckus if that happened today? Or does no one really care about Indians these days?

  93. @Reg Cæsar
    @Ganderson


    I know Russell Means is dead, but are the Bellecourt brothers still around? Dennis Banks?
     
    A "civil rights activist", one of the more soft-spoken ones, named Earle something-or-other, was murdered by a teenage Hispanic male prostitute he'd picked up in downtown Minneapolis. A couple of weeks later, a local newscast did a story on some boring community council meeting, IIRC, in the Phillips neighborhood.

    They obviously had to use stock footage of an earlier meeting, for sitting there, near one of the Bellecourt brothers, was Earle himself, still alive.


    Vernon (a.k.a. WaBun Inini) died in 2007; Clyde is still alive. As for Earle, I can't find his last name. Google keeps giving me Earle Brown instead, who was definitely not a civil rights activist, at least in the way most use the term. Brown's name may be stripped from his memorials now that his Klan "connections" have come to light:


    Brooklyn Center may remove Earle Brown’s name from landmarks, festival

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Mark Grainger

  94. Momentarily trending on Twitter:
    https://twitter.com/search?q=%22Robert%20Moses%22&src=trend_click&vertical=trends

  95. Why South Africa is still so segregated

    How centuries of division built one of the most unequal countries on earth.

    For decades, South Africa was under apartheid: a series of laws that divided people by race. Then, in the 1990s, those laws were dismantled. But many of the barriers they created continue to divide South Africans by skin color – which in turn determines their quality of life, access to jobs, and wealth. Racial division was built into the fabric of cities throughout South Africa, and it still hasn’t been uprooted.

    That’s partly because, while apartheid was the culmination of South Africa’s racial divisions, it wasn’t the beginning of them. That story starts closer to the 1800s, when the British built a network of railroads that transformed the region’s economy into one that excluded most Black people — and then made that exclusion the law.

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