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Brooks: "House Republican Caucus Is Close to Ungovernable"
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With awareness of Paul Ryan’s Wisconsinan naivete about immigration policy * suddenly threatening his ascent to Speaker of the House, David Brooks complains in the NYT:

The House Republican caucus is close to ungovernable these days.

Personally, I was under the vague impression that in a Constitutional republic, we elect members of the House of Representatives to govern, not to be governed.

Of course, a text search does not find the string “immigra” in Brooks’ column.

* In the early 1990s I visited the Milwaukee fairgrounds on the lakefront a couple of times for various festivals. I recall being struck by how African Americans made up a large percentage of the partiers at the festivals, but a small percentage of the workers. Most of the work seemed to be getting done by Mexicans.

A continuing theme here at iSteve is that Milwaukee and Madison have, on average, close to the worst blacks in the country. Most Northern cities’ blacks are the descendants of people who left the South in the 1940s and 1950s for jobs in the North. But Wisconsin’s blacks tend to be the descendants of people who left Mississippi in the 1960s and 1970s for welfare in social democratic Wisconsin.

It’s only natural for Wisconsin whites like Paul Ryan to see Mexicans as better than blacks and thus want more of them in order to demographically swamp the African-Americans who have made life miserable for Wisconsin whites. But it’s also natural for Republicans further from the Canadian Border to be less naive about the poorly thought-through social engineering emotions of Wisconsin politicians.

 
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  1. I don’t think Paul Ryan wants to be Speaker. He has young children to think of and he’s have to spend much more time in Washington. Plus he still wants to be President, and being Speaker would complicate that.

  2. Mexicans do all the work in Chicago too. I am under the impression that some blacks Chicago left for higher welfare benefits in Madison. Ryan had a black girlfriend in college so he can’t dislike them too much.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Flip

    "Ryan had a black girlfriend in college so he can’t dislike them too much."

    Interracial sex/relationship much? Every hear of one tribe raiding its neighbor, killing all the males and taking their women?

    Duh...

    That isn't to say what Ryan's particular feelings are, but to assert that one could date/screw a young black lady while in college means one is, decades later, a friend of blacks or even not just antithetical to blacks is just nonsensical.

    But there is a lot of nonsense being purveyed and accepted as gospel these days, including ideas like that.

  3. Mike Zwick [AKA "Dahinda"] says:

    I worked on several of my cousins’ dairy farms in Central Wisconsin in the late 70’s and early 80’s. Back then it was mostly families with 50 to 80 cows milking them and tending to other farm work together, parents, kids, and maybe a few hired hands from the area. The last time I visited the area most of the farms were replaced by huge operations that had thousands of head of cattle being milked in shifts. Most of the work was being done by Mexicans. Many of the little towns up there now have Mexican groceries and taquerias. Many of the young people raised up there move from the area now to places like Chicago and many of the farmers that were farming the land are retired. There seems to be a lot of population replacement.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @Mike Zwick

    Chinese-owned land trusts are also moving into the Midwest, buying up farms. Their white lawyer/agent frontmen approach experienced farmers to manage large tracts. There isn't much talk about it in forums like the Farm Journal.

    Replies: @res, @yaqub the mad scientist

    , @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    @Mike Zwick

    The Germans have a great word for what you describe happening in some of these remote places.

    Überfremdung: (noun) literally "overforeigned" or foreign infiltration / domination
    http://www.dict.cc/?s=%C3%9Cberfremdung

  4. The Chamber Pot of Commerce is evidently behind Paul Ryan becoming Speaker, they are assembling a big daddy warbucks war chest to take out any Republican who doesn’t support him.

    As for this “ungovernable” business, these are just the consequences of trying to to cram two different political parties into one.

    • Replies: @Glaivester
    @countenance

    The only problem is, Eric Cantor outspent Dave Brat 20-to-1 and still lost. And Ryan's amnesty support is getting pointed out to the voters by Hannity, etc.

    I doubt people are worrying about getting taken out by the Chamber of Commerce war chest when they realize that the voters are waking up to the scheme.

    In fact, hopefully some of the amnesty-ites will get taken out this cycle.

    Let the Chamber assemble their war chest to take out those who oppose Ryan and try to use it to threaten them into supporting him. The Congressmen see how much good all that money is doing Bush. I don't think they'll go for it.

  5. From Politico: ” Sheldon Adelson warms to Marco Rubio: An endorsement could come as early as the end of this month, sources close to the casino magnate say.”

    I guess pairing up with Schumer to push the amnesty deal really paid off! Adelson’s no fool, he knows when a politician is available at a good price. I’m confident Trump will use this.

    • Replies: @fish
    @Harry Baldwin


    From Politico: ” Sheldon Adelson warms to Marco Rubio: An endorsement could come as early as the end of this month, sources close to the casino magnate say.”

    I guess pairing up with Schumer to push the amnesty deal really paid off! Adelson’s no fool, he knows when a politician is available at a good price. I’m confident Trump wi
    ll use this.
     
    Available? Hasn't Marco been Sheldons political "Rent Boy" since the very beginning of his career.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist

  6. @Mike Zwick
    I worked on several of my cousins' dairy farms in Central Wisconsin in the late 70's and early 80's. Back then it was mostly families with 50 to 80 cows milking them and tending to other farm work together, parents, kids, and maybe a few hired hands from the area. The last time I visited the area most of the farms were replaced by huge operations that had thousands of head of cattle being milked in shifts. Most of the work was being done by Mexicans. Many of the little towns up there now have Mexican groceries and taquerias. Many of the young people raised up there move from the area now to places like Chicago and many of the farmers that were farming the land are retired. There seems to be a lot of population replacement.

    Replies: @Big Bill, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta

    Chinese-owned land trusts are also moving into the Midwest, buying up farms. Their white lawyer/agent frontmen approach experienced farmers to manage large tracts. There isn’t much talk about it in forums like the Farm Journal.

    • Replies: @res
    @Big Bill


    Chinese-owned land trusts are also moving into the Midwest, buying up farms. Their white lawyer/agent frontmen approach experienced farmers to manage large tracts. There isn’t much talk about it in forums like the Farm Journal.
     
    Interesting. Can you recommend any resources to learn more about this? For example, it would be interesting to estimate the portion of the farmland market affected by this over the years. I have seen the Economist mention phenomena like this in Africa, but nothing about the US.

    Replies: @Anonym

    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    @Big Bill

    Yes, please send some links.

  7. The Grand Old Pyromaniacs have been burning down the country for decades in plain daylight, with you and a large section of the media preaching an air of legitimacy about the right-wing political insane asylum that has been waving a Confederate banner of not just incompetence, but incoherence, cultured stupidity, cognitive dissonance, disinformation, domestic gun violence, international war violence, and the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.

    The modern-day Republican is a full-blown political arsonist, gleeful to burn the Republic for the sole satisfaction of ‘free-dumb’ and 0.1% insatiable, psychopathic greed.

    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.

    It’s hard to come up with a modern example since the GOP abandoned reason when Nixon was removed from office and the GOP descended into a 40-year ideological and propaganda campaign against reality and the average American citizen.

    • Replies: @fish
    @Tiny Duck

    Way to work in all the DNC talking points Gerry.

    , @ic1000
    @Tiny Duck

    That's a rockin' and rollin' bucketful of anti-Republican animus that Gerry has to share! If it were me, the tone might be a bit less over-the-top, and I'd quibble with a couple of the particulars. But that's mostly a matter of style.

    In a different universe, Democrats would be offering better alternatives. For middle-class Americans, tonight's debate ought to be good for some rueful laughs, on that point. As ParaPundit often notes, the U.S. is poorly served by its elites.

    After pressing "Publish Comment", Mr. Fist may have looked in the mirror and seen an SJW hero staring back. But there is that recurring iSteve theme, Not Getting The Joke.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Tiny Duck


    …the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.
     
    At least you agree with us about immigration.

    Which the Robber Barons championed against the wishes of the common folk. In case you didn't know…
    , @iSteveFan
    @Tiny Duck


    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.
     
    If by Republicans you mean the GOP leadership, then I agree with you. More wars, more immigration and more free trade pacts, or as Steve likes to say "invade-the-world-invite-the-world-in-hock-to-the-world" is insane. But then again doesn't your Democrat party essentially trumpet the same?
    , @Jeeves
    @Tiny Duck

    Mr. Fist's comment might frighten even David Brooks.

    Reihan Salam also notes that Brooks fails to mention immigration. Could be a Fox and Hedgehog problem, with the latter having the advantage of being right (and Right).
    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/425495/immigration-policy-establishment-conservative-divide

  8. Why should the blacks work. They are getting more in entitlements than the Mexican laborers are getting in pay.

    Just listen to Lucy…

    Lucy: “Well, I only pay $50 a month for rent. It’s supposed to be $600 something, so there’s $550 right there. I get $425 a month for food stamps. I get $150 month to pay my electric bill. I get a cell phone and then I get $100 a month paid towards for water.”
    Host: “Do you have any kids, Lucy?”
    Lucy: “I have three kids.”
    Host: “Does your husband work?”
    Lucy: “He’ll work every now and then. Part time. But he doesn’t work very much. He doesn’t feel the need for it.”
    Host: “Does he get benefits as well?”
    Lucy: “Yeah. Those are family benefits.”

    Lucy: “I just want to say while workers out there are people like you that are preaching morality at people like me living on welfare, can you really blame us? I mean, I get to sit home, I get to go visit my friends all day, I even get to smoke weed.”

    Lucy: “But you know, if somebody offered you a million dollars, no strings attached, would you walk away from it?”

    Look at the deal these Cubans (who never even worked or lived in the US ) are getting in Florida..

    http://www.sun-sentinel.com/us-cuba-welfare-benefits/sfl-us-cuba-welfare-benefits-part-2-htmlstory.html

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Jill

    People respond to incentives. Who's surprised that people happily accept money for which there are no strings attached.

  9. @Harry Baldwin
    From Politico: " Sheldon Adelson warms to Marco Rubio: An endorsement could come as early as the end of this month, sources close to the casino magnate say."

    I guess pairing up with Schumer to push the amnesty deal really paid off! Adelson's no fool, he knows when a politician is available at a good price. I'm confident Trump will use this.

    Replies: @fish

    From Politico: ” Sheldon Adelson warms to Marco Rubio: An endorsement could come as early as the end of this month, sources close to the casino magnate say.”

    I guess pairing up with Schumer to push the amnesty deal really paid off! Adelson’s no fool, he knows when a politician is available at a good price. I’m confident Trump will use this.

    Available? Hasn’t Marco been Sheldons political “Rent Boy” since the very beginning of his career.

    • Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist
    @fish


    Available? Hasn’t Marco been Sheldons political “Rent Boy” since the very beginning of his career.
     
    Funny thought!!!

    From the very first time I saw Marco Rubio being touted by the Cuckservatives as the future of the Republican party, the thing that popped into my mind was how much the boyish Rubio resembled his doppelganger America's most notorious "Rent Boy", the gay spree killer psychopath, Andrew Cunanan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Cunanan

    The only thing I can add is that Cunanan was way smarter, 147 IQ, and probably more loyal to his fellow Americans. While Rubio is a far more a dangerous threat to his country.
  10. @Tiny Duck
    The Grand Old Pyromaniacs have been burning down the country for decades in plain daylight, with you and a large section of the media preaching an air of legitimacy about the right-wing political insane asylum that has been waving a Confederate banner of not just incompetence, but incoherence, cultured stupidity, cognitive dissonance, disinformation, domestic gun violence, international war violence, and the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.

    The modern-day Republican is a full-blown political arsonist, gleeful to burn the Republic for the sole satisfaction of 'free-dumb' and 0.1% insatiable, psychopathic greed.

    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.

    It's hard to come up with a modern example since the GOP abandoned reason when Nixon was removed from office and the GOP descended into a 40-year ideological and propaganda campaign against reality and the average American citizen.

    Replies: @fish, @ic1000, @Reg Cæsar, @iSteveFan, @Jeeves

    Way to work in all the DNC talking points Gerry.

    • Agree: International Jew
  11. “The House Republican caucus is close to ungovernable these days.”

    This meme is so strange. The whole point of a shift in leadership is to vote on a new leader. If the members of the group have deep disagreements, they will take a while to pick that new leader. That is the essence of what voting is.

    So Boehner is going. The membership can’t immediately agree on a replacement. They debate and vote until a replacement is determined. Since there is disagreement, that debate will take a while. Once its completed, statis will reoccur.

    This isn’t even vaguely like ‘ungovernable.’ In fact, its the natural process involved in ‘voting.’

    joeyjoejoe

    • Replies: @Patrick in SC
    @joeyjoejoe

    Good observations, but it's not so strange when you consider that one of the unpardonable sins of the Democratic Party and its acolytes in the liberal media is being "divisive," as if elections which entail a choice between A and B do not by definition involve division, as in "dividing the House" at the Oxford Union. Of course, they really mean "disagreeing with liberals."

  12. Most of the work seemed to be getting done by Mexicans.

    In my younger days, I lived for a short time in a “company town” dominated by a large chemical facility.

    Back then, the workers were mostly “bubbas” … uneducated white guys, most of whom grew up in the town and went to work for the plant right after high school. But they made a great living and the town was nice, clean and orderly.

    I went back for a visit a couple of years ago, and everywhere we went, all we saw were Mexicans. I reckon it’s the same at the plant, too. Where did all the bubbas go?

  13. @fish
    @Harry Baldwin


    From Politico: ” Sheldon Adelson warms to Marco Rubio: An endorsement could come as early as the end of this month, sources close to the casino magnate say.”

    I guess pairing up with Schumer to push the amnesty deal really paid off! Adelson’s no fool, he knows when a politician is available at a good price. I’m confident Trump wi
    ll use this.
     
    Available? Hasn't Marco been Sheldons political "Rent Boy" since the very beginning of his career.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist

    Available? Hasn’t Marco been Sheldons political “Rent Boy” since the very beginning of his career.

    Funny thought!!!

    From the very first time I saw Marco Rubio being touted by the Cuckservatives as the future of the Republican party, the thing that popped into my mind was how much the boyish Rubio resembled his doppelganger America’s most notorious “Rent Boy”, the gay spree killer psychopath, Andrew Cunanan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Cunanan

    The only thing I can add is that Cunanan was way smarter, 147 IQ, and probably more loyal to his fellow Americans. While Rubio is a far more a dangerous threat to his country.

  14. @Big Bill
    @Mike Zwick

    Chinese-owned land trusts are also moving into the Midwest, buying up farms. Their white lawyer/agent frontmen approach experienced farmers to manage large tracts. There isn't much talk about it in forums like the Farm Journal.

    Replies: @res, @yaqub the mad scientist

    Chinese-owned land trusts are also moving into the Midwest, buying up farms. Their white lawyer/agent frontmen approach experienced farmers to manage large tracts. There isn’t much talk about it in forums like the Farm Journal.

    Interesting. Can you recommend any resources to learn more about this? For example, it would be interesting to estimate the portion of the farmland market affected by this over the years. I have seen the Economist mention phenomena like this in Africa, but nothing about the US.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @res

    This is interesting, and something that has occurred in Australia and New Zealand as well. My guess it is occurring everywhere where this is not prohibited. And perhaps in some places where it is prohibited but not enforced well.

  15. This finally got me to email my congressman. I hate to say where I live, because here we still have white anglo labor. It’s a paradise. All the roofing, construction, hospitality still done by young whites. Except for the Mexican restaurants. Their labor goes back and forth between Mex and anglo, I think, with vicissitudes in immigration.

    There was a crew of Mexicans resurfacing the floor at Walmart, but I think they were transient. Then I saw three painters, still in mufti covered with paint drippings, in the same place but I think they were working on the new Chipotle. Whenever I visit Socal I see how the road crews and other workers are all Mexican or Guatemalans or whatever.

    See I look at these crews all the time – but I wonder if others don’t even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don’t see these things?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @carol


    See I look at these crews all the time – but I wonder if others don’t even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don’t see these things?
     
    Hired help, workers, blue collar types are invisible to the eyes of the SWPL types. Even standing in plain sight those chichi folks can't see them; they're mentally blocked out.
    , @International Jew
    @carol

    "Gradually, and then suddenly"

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @carol


    I look at these crews all the time – but I wonder if others don’t even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don’t see these things?

     

    Just so. For the SWPL/SJW savior narrative to hold together, manual and low-level service workers, in addition to those on welfare, can't really be contemplated as possessing agency and personal responsibility. They serve simply as 'The Other', i.e. as undifferentiated, idealized masses whom the powerful, righteous, fully-human SJWs can rescue from oppression.

    Actual flesh-and-blood manual laborers are icky, and play only fleeting and inconsequential roles in SJWs' lives, so they're safely ignored.

  16. @joeyjoejoe
    "The House Republican caucus is close to ungovernable these days."

    This meme is so strange. The whole point of a shift in leadership is to vote on a new leader. If the members of the group have deep disagreements, they will take a while to pick that new leader. That is the essence of what voting is.

    So Boehner is going. The membership can't immediately agree on a replacement. They debate and vote until a replacement is determined. Since there is disagreement, that debate will take a while. Once its completed, statis will reoccur.

    This isn't even vaguely like 'ungovernable.' In fact, its the natural process involved in 'voting.'

    joeyjoejoe

    Replies: @Patrick in SC

    Good observations, but it’s not so strange when you consider that one of the unpardonable sins of the Democratic Party and its acolytes in the liberal media is being “divisive,” as if elections which entail a choice between A and B do not by definition involve division, as in “dividing the House” at the Oxford Union. Of course, they really mean “disagreeing with liberals.”

  17. Steve, you’re giving Ryan too much credit if you think he actually noticed the distinction within the iSteve theme i.e. Wisconsin. I don’t think the guy is too deep a thinker or intellectual. I think he’s honestly just a shill for the highest bidder and looking foremost to advance “Paul Ryan.” You should research how his wealth has increased through the only job he’s really ever had(congressman), as well as his very opportune marriage. He won a contest in High School as biggest brown noser for a reason. Kissing establishment GOP interests like the Chamber of Commerce fits that theme…

  18. From the article:

    Countrymen with different views are regarded as aliens. Political identity became a sort of ethnic identity, and any compromise was regarded as a blood betrayal.

    What about ‘countrymen’ who volunteer to serve in foreign armies instead of their own? I suppose they’re staying loyal to ethnic identity and blood.

    • Replies: @WJ
    @Lugash

    Good point. Mr. Brooks apparently doesn't think this country is worth his pride and joy defending ,but for Israel he would sacrifice all.

  19. @Tiny Duck
    The Grand Old Pyromaniacs have been burning down the country for decades in plain daylight, with you and a large section of the media preaching an air of legitimacy about the right-wing political insane asylum that has been waving a Confederate banner of not just incompetence, but incoherence, cultured stupidity, cognitive dissonance, disinformation, domestic gun violence, international war violence, and the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.

    The modern-day Republican is a full-blown political arsonist, gleeful to burn the Republic for the sole satisfaction of 'free-dumb' and 0.1% insatiable, psychopathic greed.

    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.

    It's hard to come up with a modern example since the GOP abandoned reason when Nixon was removed from office and the GOP descended into a 40-year ideological and propaganda campaign against reality and the average American citizen.

    Replies: @fish, @ic1000, @Reg Cæsar, @iSteveFan, @Jeeves

    That’s a rockin’ and rollin’ bucketful of anti-Republican animus that Gerry has to share! If it were me, the tone might be a bit less over-the-top, and I’d quibble with a couple of the particulars. But that’s mostly a matter of style.

    In a different universe, Democrats would be offering better alternatives. For middle-class Americans, tonight’s debate ought to be good for some rueful laughs, on that point. As ParaPundit often notes, the U.S. is poorly served by its elites.

    After pressing “Publish Comment”, Mr. Fist may have looked in the mirror and seen an SJW hero staring back. But there is that recurring iSteve theme, Not Getting The Joke.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ic1000


    After pressing “Publish Comment”, Mr. Fist may have…
     
    …introduced Fisting to the Stevosphere.
  20. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    A resident of a mentioned city here… It’s true, a lot of the blacks that have arrived here over the past 20 years are primarily from Chicago’s south side. Sometimes I have to drive through certain neighborhoods. It’s common to see Illinois license plates in these neighborhoods. I’m wondering if some of these people are collecting welfare from WI and IL?

    signed,

    evil racist in a primarily swpl city

    • Replies: @Zed, Lord of the Brutals
    @Anonymous

    A lot of that is "dey baby daddy's" and jockers coming to visit their mealticket. A lot of the males are felons or otherwise unable to collect welfare, so they're still "staying" with family members in Chicago or the warzone southern suburbs. The females are the ones collecting all the gibsmedat loot.

    The ISP was extremely busy along I-94 and the local police along Rt 41 busting all these losers as they commuted to make their "conjugal visits." The ISP has rolled way back, probably because they are pointlessly trying to stem the slaughter in Chicago and/or it was discovered that enforcing the law along I94 was racist.

  21. Personally, I was under the vague impression that in a Constitutional republic, we elect members of the House of Representatives to govern, not to be governed.

    Ha, well said, Steve. George Will loves to speak of the Framers expectation that the “people’s house” would be such, a rock ’em, sock ’em place for debate, a place where consensus was incredibly hard to forge, for good reason….because enacting law after law after law was thought anathema to freedom, the old, “the government that governs least, governs best” aphorism.

    Of course, George loves to say this, but when the people actually DO what the Framers intended, he gets pretty ticked.

    I will say, though, that the other day Will expressed my feelings about Ryan–he’s a policy wonk and he’s useful in that position. Ryan tried early on to debate Obama on ObamaCare, but the press saw to it, as they did all things Obama, that his arguments got little play because they made too much sense. His softness on immigration eliminates him in my mind from the Speakership, but he’s not by temperament or talent suited to it anyway. At least on the point of Ryan as Speaker, Will was right.

  22. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @carol
    This finally got me to email my congressman. I hate to say where I live, because here we still have white anglo labor. It's a paradise. All the roofing, construction, hospitality still done by young whites. Except for the Mexican restaurants. Their labor goes back and forth between Mex and anglo, I think, with vicissitudes in immigration.

    There was a crew of Mexicans resurfacing the floor at Walmart, but I think they were transient. Then I saw three painters, still in mufti covered with paint drippings, in the same place but I think they were working on the new Chipotle. Whenever I visit Socal I see how the road crews and other workers are all Mexican or Guatemalans or whatever.

    See I look at these crews all the time - but I wonder if others don't even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don't see these things?

    Replies: @anonymous, @International Jew, @The Last Real Calvinist

    See I look at these crews all the time – but I wonder if others don’t even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don’t see these things?

    Hired help, workers, blue collar types are invisible to the eyes of the SWPL types. Even standing in plain sight those chichi folks can’t see them; they’re mentally blocked out.

  23. @Tiny Duck
    The Grand Old Pyromaniacs have been burning down the country for decades in plain daylight, with you and a large section of the media preaching an air of legitimacy about the right-wing political insane asylum that has been waving a Confederate banner of not just incompetence, but incoherence, cultured stupidity, cognitive dissonance, disinformation, domestic gun violence, international war violence, and the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.

    The modern-day Republican is a full-blown political arsonist, gleeful to burn the Republic for the sole satisfaction of 'free-dumb' and 0.1% insatiable, psychopathic greed.

    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.

    It's hard to come up with a modern example since the GOP abandoned reason when Nixon was removed from office and the GOP descended into a 40-year ideological and propaganda campaign against reality and the average American citizen.

    Replies: @fish, @ic1000, @Reg Cæsar, @iSteveFan, @Jeeves

    …the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.

    At least you agree with us about immigration.

    Which the Robber Barons championed against the wishes of the common folk. In case you didn’t know…

  24. @ic1000
    @Tiny Duck

    That's a rockin' and rollin' bucketful of anti-Republican animus that Gerry has to share! If it were me, the tone might be a bit less over-the-top, and I'd quibble with a couple of the particulars. But that's mostly a matter of style.

    In a different universe, Democrats would be offering better alternatives. For middle-class Americans, tonight's debate ought to be good for some rueful laughs, on that point. As ParaPundit often notes, the U.S. is poorly served by its elites.

    After pressing "Publish Comment", Mr. Fist may have looked in the mirror and seen an SJW hero staring back. But there is that recurring iSteve theme, Not Getting The Joke.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    After pressing “Publish Comment”, Mr. Fist may have…

    …introduced Fisting to the Stevosphere.

  25. With awareness of Paul Ryan’s Wisconsinan naivete…

    Unfortunately, the demonym is Wisconsinite, which sounds like a common ore. I prefer Badger for my in-laws. The Hoosiers got it right; nobody says Indianan.

    • Replies: @Seamus Padraig
    @Reg Cæsar


    Unfortunately, the demonym is Wisconsinite, which sounds like a common ore. I prefer Badger for my in-laws.
     
    How about cheese-heads?
  26. Election season is around the corner, so Congressional Republicans are making a lot of noise. But they will go back to Establishment positions once the election is over.

  27. @Big Bill
    @Mike Zwick

    Chinese-owned land trusts are also moving into the Midwest, buying up farms. Their white lawyer/agent frontmen approach experienced farmers to manage large tracts. There isn't much talk about it in forums like the Farm Journal.

    Replies: @res, @yaqub the mad scientist

    Yes, please send some links.

  28. I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin’s attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You’re certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude. Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations. It’s still a hierarchical society and Hispanics will never be challenging the status quo other than to displace blacks in low-skilled work. That has its advantages culturally and economically.

    I was juts in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north. He’s far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    @The Z Blog

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn't much anti-open borders sentiment in the South. I just don't see people making much of an issue of it here. Barbour's been pretty brazen in his statements about the need for cheap farm labor.

    Replies: @Glaivester, @ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar

    , @rod1963
    @The Z Blog

    The Roman nobility thought the same way as those arrogant Texans of yours did when they imported the barbarians only to realize later the barbarians owned them. If they're lucky the Mexicans will keep some of the snobby Texans around as clowns the same way the elite Romans provided entertainment to their barbarian overlords.

    Demographics is destiny.

    , @Curle
    @The Z Blog


    I was juts in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north.
     
    Which is why he keeps having to move his rallies to ever larger venues while in the South? http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/gop-primaries/253389-no-tickets-left-for-trumps-dallas-rally
    , @meh
    @The Z Blog


    I was juts in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north. He’s far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.
     
    That's funny; I "was juts in Texas" and the place is overbrimming with Trump fever. Maybe you need to get out more.

    I don't believe for a second that you have any clue what sounds silly to most Texans, or "most Sotherners", either.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @The Z Blog

    I was just in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north. He’s far too rude for most Southerners anyway

    I don't think they'll find Hillary any less rude or abrasive. I'm listening to the Democratic debate and I don't think Hillary plans to break through the glass ceiling, but to cut through it with her voice.

    , @ben tillman
    @The Z Blog


    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin’s attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You’re certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude.
     
    No, it's not, unless you mean that Southerners are more strongly opposed to immigration. Southerners in Congress were the opponents of the 1965 immigration act, and Southerners today remain overwhelmingly opposed to immigration.

    Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations.
     
    No, it hasn't. It was unheard of 25 years ago in most of the South.


    I was juts in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north. He’s far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.
     
    No, it doesn't. Most Texans support a wall to keep Mexicans out.
  29. Failed, immigration pandering, racial pandering VPs are always a bad lot.

    My God Jack Kemp was Bob Dole’s VP.

  30. I can’t help but think a lack of sunlight must contribute. Dark skinned people are at much higher risk for vitamin D deficiency, along with its assorted mental impairments, in northern latitudes. Dark eyed people are at much higher risk for seasonal affective disorder.

  31. Basically, the pro-open borders America haters have stacked the deck: remove one open-borders nutjob, and another is right behind him.

    If they remove Ryan from contention, and the next one is still a nutjob, the other nutjobs will cry out that ,”c’mon, you jerks, just vote for him, its not that important, we look like fools.”

    Which is how they got Tax Cheat Timmy Geithner through the Senate.

    “Just go along to get along” shouldn’t be a winning argument, but amongst rabbits it is.

    • Agree: Mike Sylwester
  32. @carol
    This finally got me to email my congressman. I hate to say where I live, because here we still have white anglo labor. It's a paradise. All the roofing, construction, hospitality still done by young whites. Except for the Mexican restaurants. Their labor goes back and forth between Mex and anglo, I think, with vicissitudes in immigration.

    There was a crew of Mexicans resurfacing the floor at Walmart, but I think they were transient. Then I saw three painters, still in mufti covered with paint drippings, in the same place but I think they were working on the new Chipotle. Whenever I visit Socal I see how the road crews and other workers are all Mexican or Guatemalans or whatever.

    See I look at these crews all the time - but I wonder if others don't even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don't see these things?

    Replies: @anonymous, @International Jew, @The Last Real Calvinist

    “Gradually, and then suddenly”

  33. iSteveFan says:
    @Tiny Duck
    The Grand Old Pyromaniacs have been burning down the country for decades in plain daylight, with you and a large section of the media preaching an air of legitimacy about the right-wing political insane asylum that has been waving a Confederate banner of not just incompetence, but incoherence, cultured stupidity, cognitive dissonance, disinformation, domestic gun violence, international war violence, and the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.

    The modern-day Republican is a full-blown political arsonist, gleeful to burn the Republic for the sole satisfaction of 'free-dumb' and 0.1% insatiable, psychopathic greed.

    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.

    It's hard to come up with a modern example since the GOP abandoned reason when Nixon was removed from office and the GOP descended into a 40-year ideological and propaganda campaign against reality and the average American citizen.

    Replies: @fish, @ic1000, @Reg Cæsar, @iSteveFan, @Jeeves

    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.

    If by Republicans you mean the GOP leadership, then I agree with you. More wars, more immigration and more free trade pacts, or as Steve likes to say “invade-the-world-invite-the-world-in-hock-to-the-world” is insane. But then again doesn’t your Democrat party essentially trumpet the same?

  34. @Mike Zwick
    I worked on several of my cousins' dairy farms in Central Wisconsin in the late 70's and early 80's. Back then it was mostly families with 50 to 80 cows milking them and tending to other farm work together, parents, kids, and maybe a few hired hands from the area. The last time I visited the area most of the farms were replaced by huge operations that had thousands of head of cattle being milked in shifts. Most of the work was being done by Mexicans. Many of the little towns up there now have Mexican groceries and taquerias. Many of the young people raised up there move from the area now to places like Chicago and many of the farmers that were farming the land are retired. There seems to be a lot of population replacement.

    Replies: @Big Bill, @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta

    The Germans have a great word for what you describe happening in some of these remote places.

    Überfremdung: (noun) literally “overforeigned” or foreign infiltration / domination
    http://www.dict.cc/?s=%C3%9Cberfremdung

  35. Let Brooks complain, he’s one the biggest cuckservatives and Neo-Con warmonger types around.

    I don’t trust a single word that that guy writes or speaks. He’s fundamentally a political hack for sale to the highest bidder.

    Ryan is radioactive for a reason, most rank and file Conservatives are well aware of the threat immigration poses and to keep those who support it away from the levers of power. As long as they can keep the most dangerous ones(who are also the most popular with the establishment) out of the speakership, we’ll do fine.

  36. @Reg Cæsar

    With awareness of Paul Ryan’s Wisconsinan naivete…
     
    Unfortunately, the demonym is Wisconsinite, which sounds like a common ore. I prefer Badger for my in-laws. The Hoosiers got it right; nobody says Indianan.

    Replies: @Seamus Padraig

    Unfortunately, the demonym is Wisconsinite, which sounds like a common ore. I prefer Badger for my in-laws.

    How about cheese-heads?

  37. anon • Disclaimer says:

    I am a “Sconnie” (Wisconsinite) myself. I was talking to a Black friend of mine from the South about my state, and he told me that within the Black community itself, it is well known that Blacks from Wisconsin and Chicago are particularly “hood”. There is a large Black middle class in places like Atlanta, but much less so in Chicago and Milwaukee.

    Since the Northern cities are so White, Blacks feel uncomfortable venturing out of narrow geographic areas. Thus, ghetto norms tend to be reinforced, and are not challenged by wider experience with the outside world. At least that was his explanation.

  38. @Lugash
    From the article:

    Countrymen with different views are regarded as aliens. Political identity became a sort of ethnic identity, and any compromise was regarded as a blood betrayal.
     
    What about 'countrymen' who volunteer to serve in foreign armies instead of their own? I suppose they're staying loyal to ethnic identity and blood.

    Replies: @WJ

    Good point. Mr. Brooks apparently doesn’t think this country is worth his pride and joy defending ,but for Israel he would sacrifice all.

  39. @Jill
    Why should the blacks work. They are getting more in entitlements than the Mexican laborers are getting in pay.

    Just listen to Lucy...

    Lucy: “Well, I only pay $50 a month for rent. It’s supposed to be $600 something, so there’s $550 right there. I get $425 a month for food stamps. I get $150 month to pay my electric bill. I get a cell phone and then I get $100 a month paid towards for water.”
    Host: “Do you have any kids, Lucy?”
    Lucy: “I have three kids.”
    Host: “Does your husband work?”
    Lucy: “He’ll work every now and then. Part time. But he doesn’t work very much. He doesn’t feel the need for it.”
    Host: “Does he get benefits as well?”
    Lucy: “Yeah. Those are family benefits.”

    Lucy: “I just want to say while workers out there are people like you that are preaching morality at people like me living on welfare, can you really blame us? I mean, I get to sit home, I get to go visit my friends all day, I even get to smoke weed.”

    Lucy: “But you know, if somebody offered you a million dollars, no strings attached, would you walk away from it?”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ltp9gROW49I

    Look at the deal these Cubans (who never even worked or lived in the US ) are getting in Florida..

    http://www.sun-sentinel.com/us-cuba-welfare-benefits/sfl-us-cuba-welfare-benefits-part-2-htmlstory.html

    Replies: @AndrewR

    People respond to incentives. Who’s surprised that people happily accept money for which there are no strings attached.

  40. @Tiny Duck
    The Grand Old Pyromaniacs have been burning down the country for decades in plain daylight, with you and a large section of the media preaching an air of legitimacy about the right-wing political insane asylum that has been waving a Confederate banner of not just incompetence, but incoherence, cultured stupidity, cognitive dissonance, disinformation, domestic gun violence, international war violence, and the greatest economic war on the poor and middle class since the Robber Baron Era.

    The modern-day Republican is a full-blown political arsonist, gleeful to burn the Republic for the sole satisfaction of 'free-dumb' and 0.1% insatiable, psychopathic greed.

    Nothing Republicans say or propose makes intellectual sense.

    It's hard to come up with a modern example since the GOP abandoned reason when Nixon was removed from office and the GOP descended into a 40-year ideological and propaganda campaign against reality and the average American citizen.

    Replies: @fish, @ic1000, @Reg Cæsar, @iSteveFan, @Jeeves

    Mr. Fist’s comment might frighten even David Brooks.

    Reihan Salam also notes that Brooks fails to mention immigration. Could be a Fox and Hedgehog problem, with the latter having the advantage of being right (and Right).
    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/425495/immigration-policy-establishment-conservative-divide

  41. @res
    @Big Bill


    Chinese-owned land trusts are also moving into the Midwest, buying up farms. Their white lawyer/agent frontmen approach experienced farmers to manage large tracts. There isn’t much talk about it in forums like the Farm Journal.
     
    Interesting. Can you recommend any resources to learn more about this? For example, it would be interesting to estimate the portion of the farmland market affected by this over the years. I have seen the Economist mention phenomena like this in Africa, but nothing about the US.

    Replies: @Anonym

    This is interesting, and something that has occurred in Australia and New Zealand as well. My guess it is occurring everywhere where this is not prohibited. And perhaps in some places where it is prohibited but not enforced well.

  42. OT: How Tories win immigrant votes using anti-immigrant messages

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/tories-gain-from-anti-immigrant-messaging-among-immigrants-what-gives/article26749675/

    It shows that, as of Wednesday, non-immigrant Canadians have a predicted likelihood of voting Conservative of 27 per cent, while foreign-born Canadians have a likelihood of 34 per cent – a statistically significant 7-point difference recorded well after the Tories’ tilt toward ugly ethno-politics.

    More significantly, Dr. Loewen told me, “there is no evidence that immigrants are becoming less likely to vote Tory as the campaign goes on. In fact, if anything, the opposite appears true.”

    By turning sharply toward anti-immigrant messaging, the Conservatives didn’t lose, and might even have gained, support among immigrants. What gives?

    Anti-niqab ad from the Bloc Quebecois:

    Translation: A drop too many.

  43. @The Z Blog
    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin's attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You're certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude. Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations. It's still a hierarchical society and Hispanics will never be challenging the status quo other than to displace blacks in low-skilled work. That has its advantages culturally and economically.

    I was juts in Texas and there's none of the Trump fever seen up north. He's far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @rod1963, @Curle, @meh, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn’t much anti-open borders sentiment in the South. I just don’t see people making much of an issue of it here. Barbour’s been pretty brazen in his statements about the need for cheap farm labor.

    • Replies: @Glaivester
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn’t much anti-open borders sentiment in the South.

    Jeff Sessions. Ran unopposed in 2014.

    , @ben tillman
    @yaqub the mad scientist


    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn’t much anti-open borders sentiment in the South.
     
    He's one man out of millions. And you couldn't be more wrong.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @yaqub the mad scientist


    . Barbour’s been pretty brazen in his statements about the need for cheap farm labor.
     
    As was Alexander Stephens, 150 years ago. It's tradition down there.
  44. @The Z Blog
    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin's attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You're certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude. Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations. It's still a hierarchical society and Hispanics will never be challenging the status quo other than to displace blacks in low-skilled work. That has its advantages culturally and economically.

    I was juts in Texas and there's none of the Trump fever seen up north. He's far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @rod1963, @Curle, @meh, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman

    The Roman nobility thought the same way as those arrogant Texans of yours did when they imported the barbarians only to realize later the barbarians owned them. If they’re lucky the Mexicans will keep some of the snobby Texans around as clowns the same way the elite Romans provided entertainment to their barbarian overlords.

    Demographics is destiny.

  45. @carol
    This finally got me to email my congressman. I hate to say where I live, because here we still have white anglo labor. It's a paradise. All the roofing, construction, hospitality still done by young whites. Except for the Mexican restaurants. Their labor goes back and forth between Mex and anglo, I think, with vicissitudes in immigration.

    There was a crew of Mexicans resurfacing the floor at Walmart, but I think they were transient. Then I saw three painters, still in mufti covered with paint drippings, in the same place but I think they were working on the new Chipotle. Whenever I visit Socal I see how the road crews and other workers are all Mexican or Guatemalans or whatever.

    See I look at these crews all the time - but I wonder if others don't even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don't see these things?

    Replies: @anonymous, @International Jew, @The Last Real Calvinist

    I look at these crews all the time – but I wonder if others don’t even notice them. Maybe my fellow SWPLs just don’t see these things?

    Just so. For the SWPL/SJW savior narrative to hold together, manual and low-level service workers, in addition to those on welfare, can’t really be contemplated as possessing agency and personal responsibility. They serve simply as ‘The Other’, i.e. as undifferentiated, idealized masses whom the powerful, righteous, fully-human SJWs can rescue from oppression.

    Actual flesh-and-blood manual laborers are icky, and play only fleeting and inconsequential roles in SJWs’ lives, so they’re safely ignored.

  46. David Brooks son is serving in the IDF, Brooks represents quite well the thnking of the NYC Neocon Elites.

  47. @The Z Blog
    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin's attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You're certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude. Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations. It's still a hierarchical society and Hispanics will never be challenging the status quo other than to displace blacks in low-skilled work. That has its advantages culturally and economically.

    I was juts in Texas and there's none of the Trump fever seen up north. He's far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @rod1963, @Curle, @meh, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman

    I was juts in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north.

    Which is why he keeps having to move his rallies to ever larger venues while in the South? http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/gop-primaries/253389-no-tickets-left-for-trumps-dallas-rally

  48. The House Republican caucus is close to ungovernable these days.

    “A government is a body of people usually – notably – ungoverned.” (Shepard Book, quoting Malcolm Reynolds, “Firefly”. )

    David Brooks and the New York Times are just upset that the House Republican caucus is not, for the nonce, content to be governed by the usual suspects. David Brooks and the New York Times are perfectly happy for the current occupants of the White House to remain ungovernable, however.

    • Agree: Mike Sylwester
  49. @The Z Blog
    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin's attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You're certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude. Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations. It's still a hierarchical society and Hispanics will never be challenging the status quo other than to displace blacks in low-skilled work. That has its advantages culturally and economically.

    I was juts in Texas and there's none of the Trump fever seen up north. He's far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @rod1963, @Curle, @meh, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman

    I was juts in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north. He’s far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    That’s funny; I “was juts in Texas” and the place is overbrimming with Trump fever. Maybe you need to get out more.

    I don’t believe for a second that you have any clue what sounds silly to most Texans, or “most Sotherners”, either.

  50. @The Z Blog
    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin's attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You're certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude. Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations. It's still a hierarchical society and Hispanics will never be challenging the status quo other than to displace blacks in low-skilled work. That has its advantages culturally and economically.

    I was juts in Texas and there's none of the Trump fever seen up north. He's far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @rod1963, @Curle, @meh, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman

    I was just in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north. He’s far too rude for most Southerners anyway

    I don’t think they’ll find Hillary any less rude or abrasive. I’m listening to the Democratic debate and I don’t think Hillary plans to break through the glass ceiling, but to cut through it with her voice.

  51. @countenance
    The Chamber Pot of Commerce is evidently behind Paul Ryan becoming Speaker, they are assembling a big daddy warbucks war chest to take out any Republican who doesn't support him.

    As for this "ungovernable" business, these are just the consequences of trying to to cram two different political parties into one.

    Replies: @Glaivester

    The only problem is, Eric Cantor outspent Dave Brat 20-to-1 and still lost. And Ryan’s amnesty support is getting pointed out to the voters by Hannity, etc.

    I doubt people are worrying about getting taken out by the Chamber of Commerce war chest when they realize that the voters are waking up to the scheme.

    In fact, hopefully some of the amnesty-ites will get taken out this cycle.

    Let the Chamber assemble their war chest to take out those who oppose Ryan and try to use it to threaten them into supporting him. The Congressmen see how much good all that money is doing Bush. I don’t think they’ll go for it.

  52. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @The Z Blog

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn't much anti-open borders sentiment in the South. I just don't see people making much of an issue of it here. Barbour's been pretty brazen in his statements about the need for cheap farm labor.

    Replies: @Glaivester, @ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn’t much anti-open borders sentiment in the South.

    Jeff Sessions. Ran unopposed in 2014.

  53. @The Z Blog
    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin's attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You're certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude. Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations. It's still a hierarchical society and Hispanics will never be challenging the status quo other than to displace blacks in low-skilled work. That has its advantages culturally and economically.

    I was juts in Texas and there's none of the Trump fever seen up north. He's far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @rod1963, @Curle, @meh, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman

    I think Steve is quite wrong about this. Paul Ryan is not emblematic of Wisconsin’s attitude toward immigration. My bet is most of the locals are strongly against immigration. You’re certainly seeing this in New England, where the leaders favor flooding the South with immigrants, but the rank and file Yankee is anti-immigration.

    In the South it is a very different attitude.

    No, it’s not, unless you mean that Southerners are more strongly opposed to immigration. Southerners in Congress were the opponents of the 1965 immigration act, and Southerners today remain overwhelmingly opposed to immigration.

    Migrant labor has been a part of the culture for generations.

    No, it hasn’t. It was unheard of 25 years ago in most of the South.

    I was juts in Texas and there’s none of the Trump fever seen up north. He’s far too rude for most Sotherners anyway, but the wall building stuff sounds silly to most Texans.

    No, it doesn’t. Most Texans support a wall to keep Mexicans out.

  54. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @The Z Blog

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn't much anti-open borders sentiment in the South. I just don't see people making much of an issue of it here. Barbour's been pretty brazen in his statements about the need for cheap farm labor.

    Replies: @Glaivester, @ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn’t much anti-open borders sentiment in the South.

    He’s one man out of millions. And you couldn’t be more wrong.

  55. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @The Z Blog

    When ex Mississippi Governor and ex-RNC chairman Haley Barbour is shilling for Mark Zuckerberg, you know that there isn't much anti-open borders sentiment in the South. I just don't see people making much of an issue of it here. Barbour's been pretty brazen in his statements about the need for cheap farm labor.

    Replies: @Glaivester, @ben tillman, @Reg Cæsar

    . Barbour’s been pretty brazen in his statements about the need for cheap farm labor.

    As was Alexander Stephens, 150 years ago. It’s tradition down there.

  56. @Anonymous
    A resident of a mentioned city here... It's true, a lot of the blacks that have arrived here over the past 20 years are primarily from Chicago's south side. Sometimes I have to drive through certain neighborhoods. It's common to see Illinois license plates in these neighborhoods. I'm wondering if some of these people are collecting welfare from WI and IL?

    signed,

    evil racist in a primarily swpl city

    Replies: @Zed, Lord of the Brutals

    A lot of that is “dey baby daddy’s” and jockers coming to visit their mealticket. A lot of the males are felons or otherwise unable to collect welfare, so they’re still “staying” with family members in Chicago or the warzone southern suburbs. The females are the ones collecting all the gibsmedat loot.

    The ISP was extremely busy along I-94 and the local police along Rt 41 busting all these losers as they commuted to make their “conjugal visits.” The ISP has rolled way back, probably because they are pointlessly trying to stem the slaughter in Chicago and/or it was discovered that enforcing the law along I94 was racist.

  57. From Brooks: “conservatism stands for intellectual humility, … a respect for hierarchy,…Among people too ill educated to understand the different spheres…These insurgents are incompetent at governing and unwilling to be governed.” Conservative, Caucasian, Christians, neo-con Jewish Brooks has his “Eye of Sauron” on you!

  58. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Flip
    Mexicans do all the work in Chicago too. I am under the impression that some blacks Chicago left for higher welfare benefits in Madison. Ryan had a black girlfriend in college so he can't dislike them too much.

    Replies: @anon

    “Ryan had a black girlfriend in college so he can’t dislike them too much.”

    Interracial sex/relationship much? Every hear of one tribe raiding its neighbor, killing all the males and taking their women?

    Duh…

    That isn’t to say what Ryan’s particular feelings are, but to assert that one could date/screw a young black lady while in college means one is, decades later, a friend of blacks or even not just antithetical to blacks is just nonsensical.

    But there is a lot of nonsense being purveyed and accepted as gospel these days, including ideas like that.

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