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Boris Johnson, for One, Welcomes Our New Top Global University Overlords
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From City A.M.:

New visa planned for graduates of ‘top global universities’
Edward Thicknesse

Individuals who have attended a “top global university” will be eligible to move to the UK without a job offer under a new scheme unveiled today.

A new “High Potential Individual” route will be introduced, the government has announced as part of its new innovation strategy.

The government said that the scheme would make it “as simple as possible for internationally mobile individuals who demonstrate high potential to come to the UK”.

“Eligibility will be open to individuals who have graduated from a top global university”, it added in a statement.

“The UK government will explore the scope to expand eligibility to other characteristics of high potential”. …

Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng said: “The countries that secure leadership in transformational technologies will lead the world – it’s our job to ensure the UK keeps pace with the global innovation race.”

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson strikes even me as a bit of an IQ fetishist:

 
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  1. Is there anything worse than conservative virtue signaling. I prefer the legitimately woke sjws.

    • Agree: Daniel H
  2. Arizona State U grad here. Do I qualify? I want to meet Paul McCartney

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  3. What about college dropouts like Steven Jobs, Bill Gates, Larry Ellison and Mark Zuckerburg? Aren’t they who Boris really wants?

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  4. And then suddenly it turns out in the course of events that DurgaSoft Seminar is verymuch a government-recognized top global university. Are you doing the needful, sir?

  5. So, does this mean grads from HBCUs ? Who’s going to tell them no? How about Jesuit colleges and universities or does this just mean Ivy league?

  6. I actually think it’s a smart initiative. The new global upper class are the highly-educated, rootless, cosmopolitan elite and the ticket into the club are globally elite universities. A Frenchman attending HEC, South Korean attending Seoul National University, and American attending Harvard are all competing for the same global upper crust jobs. These are the winners in today’s world, and you want more winners on your team. Or at least you’d rather have high-impact winners than 10 dullard net-loss immigrants.

    The only things that Britain exports these days are for the rootless elites: their world-famous boarding schools and higher education & their global financial industry. London is not an English city, it’s a world city.

    • Agree: Houston 1992, epebble
    • Replies: @Getaclue
    @BRK

    At the same time he's all for flooding the country with "migrants"....He's a fake "konservative" -- his father is straight from the Rockefellers and he is carrying out the Globalist Great Reset Agenda

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    , @Some Guy
    @BRK


    These are the winners in today’s world, and you want more winners on your team.
     
    But are they automatically on your team just because they live in the same country(often temporarily)?

    Replies: @BRK

  7. Tucker Carlson gets confronted.

    • Replies: @Redman
    @JohnnyWalker123

    What is this guy saying. Is this about the vaccines? Don’t we all see now that they don’t work as well as we were told?

    At this point it’s a complete joke. The world has been thrown into a frenzy over something that’s far less of a threat than AIDS was to heterosexual men.

    Was Ron Unz correct that it was intentional? I don’t know. But we do know at this point that it’s not the plague. Why are we going through the same shit all over again?

  8. As a proud graduate of the School of Applied Diplomacy at Patrice Lumumba University, I welcome this enlightened policy and I assume Great British will welcome me.

  9. The best use of IQ is to figure out what’s what, to formulate and implement a plan, and to keep it to yourself.

    • Agree: Thoughts
  10. I guess this is one way of letting in people from the European community who would otherwise be banned by Brexit.

    But what is a global University?

  11. Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng…. yeah he’s just as “British” as Tom Baker.

    • Replies: @Fredrik
    @anon215

    Just like Priti Patel, Sajid Javid and probably other ministers in the UK conservative government.

    Brexit was never about immigration. Johnson and the Tories don't have a problem with immigration. At least not when it's from countries close to the English such as Ghana or India(and Uganda).

  12. So Boris Jobnson throws the borders of Britain, an overcrowded country in decline if they get there was one, wide open to:

    1) Five million residents of Hong Kong.
    2) Every worthless, illiterate African capable of cramming himself on a rubber dinghy.
    3) The privileged leftists currently favored by the “elite” universities of the world.

    We are truly governed by assholes. Revolution cannot come soon enough.

    • Agree: 216, AnotherDad, LondonBob, Gordo
    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @Wilkey

    Just looking at Boris Johnson makes me a little bit more OK with Joe Biden. Just a bit. But some.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  13. UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson strikes even me as a bit of an IQ fetishist:

    Poor marginalised immigrants tend not to become force multipliers. High IQ upwardly mobile immigrants tend to have a lot of influence on immigration policy. Refugees too don’t tend to be competitive in the job market, whereas EU immigrants were and did displace and lower wages for native workers.

    A lot of people in the right have a psychological motivation of contempt for people they see as lesser to them and so focus on poor immigrants and refugees as particularly undesirable. (Boris likes immigrants he sees as ‘better’ than working class British people he holds in contempt) But they never pause to think about how they would rather they remain poor and not be rich and influential.

    Inviting high IQ upwardly mobile people is to invite a potentially hostile elite who can more effectively wage ethnic war and influence immigration policies.

    Canada and Australia have had big amounts of high skills immigration policy for 30 years now. Does anyone think that as the children of those Chinese and Indians rise to positions of prominence that immigration policies will get less hostile to their tradition populations?

    As the history of economics shows, it doesn’t matter how stupid an idea is, what matters is who is in charge of making the ideas.

    The internet promised to change that but teenage girls on social media have brought about the most intense era of conformity the West has seen in a long time.

    • Agree: reactionry
    • Replies: @RonaldB
    @Altai

    I used to work at Enron. We had a Russian Jewish immigrant work there for awhile, before someone offered him more money and he switched companies. However, while in my unit, he wrote a program that was extremely valuable and continued to serve us years after he left.

    Switching gears a bit, I remember reading an article making the claim that the Bhopal disaster in India stemmed from the requirement that management and engineering staff be composed of native Indians. The requirement resulted in below-par safety practices and plant management, resulting in one of the worst disasters of all time.

    The Pareto Principle is that given any group of workers, 10% will produce half the value.

    It seems to me there is a case to be made that for certain key positions, it's more important to have the highest quality available than to hire native. So, to prevent employers from simply trying to lower the wage market by importing foreign workers, I propose that the special visas be allocated by companies, and that the companies be required to pay the visa holder a salary at least 5 (five) times the prevailing wage for that type of job. That will allow companies to widen the pool of talent for truly key positions, but will prevent foreign labor to be used where the local workforce can supply the talent.

    You might also have a provision in the law preventing such visa holders from holding any executive or board position.

  14. might have been Cummings that influenced him in this manner (even if he’s gone and sticking the knife in now).

    I for one can’t wait for millions of talented hustlers to squeeze the beleaguered natives out of high-status jobs, out of culturally important positions, out of the top universities, and to use their talents to hustle for more immigration of their kind, etc…

    …but at least they won’t commit much (violent) crime and will pay their taxes and may even be a net gain for muh economy, right??

    • Replies: @Peterike
    @Inselaffen

    “I for one can’t wait for millions of talented hustlers to squeeze the beleaguered natives out of high-status jobs, out of culturally important positions, out of the top universities, and to use their talents to hustle for more immigration of their kind, etc…”

    UK is about 20 years into this phase already.

  15. OT,but its Emmet Tills birthday. Congress thing Bobby went to visit his grave. So sad. Of course,he couldn’t have done that several years ago as Tills corpse was stuck in a box with other bodies in a cemetery storeroom,LOL!

  16. This should appeal to feminist studies gals at Harvard and Princeton, who all want to move to Cuck Island to fulfill a Jane Austen anti-feminist fantasy that lurks deep within their lizard brains. Then they get to Cuck Island and complain online about how there’s no Pam cooking spray.

  17. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    I’d think few grads from first world countries would show interest. Other countries would have a corruption problem, but presumably they have no “top global universities.” I could see this attracting international students at first world universities who can’t get a visa for the U.S.

    You risk getting a lot of grievance studies people if you don’t require a job offer. They should limit it to STEM.

    Japan has a point system that favors grads of good universities. There’s been virtually no interest.

    Another problem that both Canada and Australia have experienced, and the UK certainly would also, is free-ride-medical shopping. Canada, for instance, deported a professor and his family who tried to up to a citizen or citizen path level. They had a kid with Down’s who would require expensive life long care, after the parents’ death even. If you have public medical insurance you need to be a bit heartless about this stuff, or the books don’t balance. Reading between the lines of press accounts, there seems to be a Kabuki where the activists weakly protest the cruelty, the government ignoress it and deports, and after the deportation it gets memory holed and activists never push for any change that would threaten their free health care. I think it’s a fund raising opp for organizations that get media mentions.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @Anon


    I’d think few grads from first world countries would show interest
     
    Whatever you're basing your "thinking" on is wrong. London is brimming with highly-educated professionals from Europe. There are also many elites from around the world and even plenty of Americans from Ivy League backgrounds.
  18. Oh damn. The cucks over here are going to get a hold of this idea and run with it.

    Yeah, but what does Britain produce anymore other than a few good pharmaceuticals, asset managers and financial derivative contracts, and, already, that is with a million or high IQ brights imported over the past 30 years.

  19. What are we going to do when western Europe becomes islamized and the rich dhimmis want to flee? If there were a way to separate the productive ones from the fools who voted to ruin their native lands, I’d say take in the former, but our ruling class would let in the latter.

  20. This sounds like a shortcut for 3rd World elites tired of the inconvenience of existing procedures.

  21. Boris reverts to the globalist that he always was.

    What part of “we have the unalienable right to remain the supermajority in our lands in PERPETUITY” do these people not get?

    Our Self Determination is inviolate.

    • Replies: @David
    @216

    Was.

  22. Anonymous[488] • Disclaimer says:

    New visa planned for graduates of ‘top global universities’
    By Edward Thicknesse

    Individuals who have attended a “top global university” will be eligible to move to the UK without a job offer under a new scheme unveiled today.

    They are just giving away the country, aren’t they?

    Incredible.

    • Agree: S Johnson, LondonBob, Gordo
  23. Good. Let them start with the 15% or so of the Harvard/Princeton/Yale grads that are black.

    • Agree: Rob
  24. Some huge number of profsters/alums, at/from elite US unis, are tax leeches. BJ can have them.

    But he does not deserve to get our burger flippers, baristas, W*M greeters, etc.

  25. Anon[113] • Disclaimer says:

    Last name of this writer is Thicknesse.

    I remember from the harry potter series, main bad guy voldemort put a possessed toady named pious thicknesse in as head of ministry of magic to generally ruin a healthy society and do the bidding of an evil overlord to the detriment of its members.

    Can’t help but think this does lend some credence to scott adams’ otherwise bizarre “we’re in a computer simulation” theory.

  26. @Inselaffen
    might have been Cummings that influenced him in this manner (even if he's gone and sticking the knife in now).

    I for one can't wait for millions of talented hustlers to squeeze the beleaguered natives out of high-status jobs, out of culturally important positions, out of the top universities, and to use their talents to hustle for more immigration of their kind, etc...

    ...but at least they won't commit much (violent) crime and will pay their taxes and may even be a net gain for muh economy, right??

    Replies: @Peterike

    “I for one can’t wait for millions of talented hustlers to squeeze the beleaguered natives out of high-status jobs, out of culturally important positions, out of the top universities, and to use their talents to hustle for more immigration of their kind, etc…”

    UK is about 20 years into this phase already.

  27. @JohnnyWalker123
    Tucker Carlson gets confronted.

    https://twitter.com/OccupyDemocrats/status/1419025362017669122

    Replies: @Redman

    What is this guy saying. Is this about the vaccines? Don’t we all see now that they don’t work as well as we were told?

    At this point it’s a complete joke. The world has been thrown into a frenzy over something that’s far less of a threat than AIDS was to heterosexual men.

    Was Ron Unz correct that it was intentional? I don’t know. But we do know at this point that it’s not the plague. Why are we going through the same shit all over again?

  28. @BRK
    I actually think it’s a smart initiative. The new global upper class are the highly-educated, rootless, cosmopolitan elite and the ticket into the club are globally elite universities. A Frenchman attending HEC, South Korean attending Seoul National University, and American attending Harvard are all competing for the same global upper crust jobs. These are the winners in today’s world, and you want more winners on your team. Or at least you’d rather have high-impact winners than 10 dullard net-loss immigrants.

    The only things that Britain exports these days are for the rootless elites: their world-famous boarding schools and higher education & their global financial industry. London is not an English city, it’s a world city.

    Replies: @Getaclue, @Some Guy

    At the same time he’s all for flooding the country with “migrants”….He’s a fake “konservative” — his father is straight from the Rockefellers and he is carrying out the Globalist Great Reset Agenda

    • Replies: @Supply and Demand
    @Getaclue

    The Great Reset has been working out well for the Chinese. Maybe if you guys dropped the Trump worship and got with the program, life would be better for you.

    Replies: @Getaclue, @fish

  29. I like it. I am an American citizen with a fancy degree. If the USA goes bad, it is nice to have some international options.

    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

    • Agree: S. Anonyia
    • Replies: @Malenfant
    @Roger


    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

     

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I've spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer -- most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding -- but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    ...Importantly, if you're outside London, there's also far less "diversity" -- and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it's safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it's nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you'd be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Western, @Western, @Eric Novak, @black sea, @Excal

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Roger

    United States citizens have many options as to places where they can live overseas. For example several places in the Caribbean offer permanent residency or citizenship for a fee, and there are many places in South America open to immigrants.

    If you are fairly affluent, the United Kingdom is probably a better place to live than most places in the United States, especially if you like rural or small town living.

    Or to put it another way, the United Kingdom has a lot more desirable places to live than does the US provided that hot weather in the summertime is not a prerequisite.

    Prince Harry, however, does not seem to agree and prefers to be in the US away from Royal pageantry and such like. No doubt places like Montecito, California where he is now living can rival or beat most places in England.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Graham

    , @Magic Dirt Resident
    @Roger

    The US has nowhere that can compare with England's smallish cities like York, Chester, Salisbury, Shrewsbury, etc. Basically every cathedral town in England is nicer than America. The only ways America is superior is the cheap land and being able to own guns.

    Actually, America's geographic and climate diversity is pretty cool too. Deserts, mountains, forests, swamps, oceans, we really have it all.

  30. @216
    Boris reverts to the globalist that he always was.

    What part of "we have the unalienable right to remain the supermajority in our lands in PERPETUITY" do these people not get?

    Our Self Determination is inviolate.

    Replies: @David

    Was.

  31. @Wilkey
    So Boris Jobnson throws the borders of Britain, an overcrowded country in decline if they get there was one, wide open to:

    1) Five million residents of Hong Kong.
    2) Every worthless, illiterate African capable of cramming himself on a rubber dinghy.
    3) The privileged leftists currently favored by the “elite” universities of the world.

    We are truly governed by assholes. Revolution cannot come soon enough.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    Just looking at Boris Johnson makes me a little bit more OK with Joe Biden. Just a bit. But some.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @James J O'Meara

    The only time Biden can form a sentence is when he's discussing attacking children. Johnson is simply Bill Clinton with better manners and worse hair.

  32. Rob says:

    I do not know anything about GB’s court system, but if this were the US, some black who went to Podunk U would sue, claiming the law is racist, as most blacks do not wualify. Perhaps she would argue that Africa has x& of the world’s population, but no elite universities.

    In a 5-4 decision, the Supremes would decide that every black who was old enough to have graduated from an elite university would be eligible to immigrate. Jonah Goldberg would hail the decision as a victory for conservatives everywhere. Why? Clearly a great big finger to universities.

    What about Blighty? Will a court just end up ruling that everyone can go to Britain? I mean, Britain has already said what sort of woman she is. Now they are just haggling on price.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  33. Boris Johnson, for One, Welcomes Our New Top Global University Overlords

  34. Speaking of passports and Britain, the UK will grant “Vaccine Passports” to people who recieved placebos in COVID vaccine trials:

    UK to issue ‘vaccine passports’ to people in the PLACEBO group

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2021-07-23/uk-issue-vaccine-passports-people-placebo-group

    Funny, I thought the purpose of the vaccine passport was to verify that you have immunity to an infectious disease.

    Turns out, the purpose of the vaccine passport is to verify that you are obedient to the wishes of the state and the globalist overlords who control it.

    • Agree: Paul Jolliffe
    • LOL: El Dato, J.Ross
  35. Letting in graduates from top global universities without the hassle of getting their papers in order first might have saved Al Johnson’s great-grandfather Ali Kemal from being lynched by Turkish nationalists in 1922. In reality it will just remove any remaining obligation corporations in the U.K. (hardly any of which are British-owned) might feel to the indigenous population.

    • Agree: notsaying
  36. I mean, the elites were already country-hopping at a whim, I don’t see how this changes much.

  37. “We will call for them on the beaches. We will call for them in the racial no-go areas, in the de-industrialized heartlands, in the nontrepreneur “technology parks” and during BLM demonstrations.”

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  38. Need Braainnss, more braaainss to beat Putin:

    When you put the Micks in charge of your society you’ve got to get some brain supplements from somewhere. Sure not coming from the Micks.

  39. Brain-drain, just like bloodletting, is just the ticket for solving Third World Problems.
    I predict a booming market for Wakanda University diplomas.

  40. @Roger
    I like it. I am an American citizen with a fancy degree. If the USA goes bad, it is nice to have some international options.

    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Jonathan Mason, @Magic Dirt Resident

    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I’ve spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer — most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding — but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    …Importantly, if you’re outside London, there’s also far less “diversity” — and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it’s safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it’s nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you’d be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    Much of the countryside in England is exquisite. I've never seen anything to compare to the Cotswolds in the US. It's super green but also mostly deforested so you can see a long way most of the time, whereas in the US it's hard to see the forest for the trees. And there's often a great building in the distance in rural locales.

    And the English have been the best landscape architects for centuries (see Tom Stoppard's "Arcadia"). When I saw Capability Brown's 18th Century landscape design at Blenheim Palace, I realized this kind of place is the inspiration for great American golf courses like Augusta National (but not, oddly enough, for great British golf courses like Royal Sandwich).

    Replies: @LondonBob, @dvorak

    , @Western
    @Malenfant


    "most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today."
     
    Yes, so many of the retail buildings in the US are little more than backyard sheds that could easily be torn down. Tear down an old Mcdonald's in the same strip mall parking lot and build a brand new one. How about an Auto Zone and Burger King set in a large parking lot in front of a Target or Walmart? Although some of these types of buildings are in the UK now too.
    , @Western
    @Malenfant

    The English complain about their weather but their weather isn't bad for day-to-day living. It is not perfect but it is better than the US midwest where it can be bitterly cold in winter and then hot and humid in the summer. Bath has a Jan average of 46-38 and July of 71/58. That is pretty good. London is 48/40 in January.

    , @Eric Novak
    @Malenfant

    No country on Earth has the US beat on natural beauty. England is one geological province. Your comment is ridiculous.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Spect3r

    , @black sea
    @Malenfant

    "Horses for courses," as the Brits say.

    , @Excal
    @Malenfant

    Everybody, don't listen to @Malenfant! The UK is horrible! Rains all the time, bad food, grumpy people, terrifying wildlife (see Fig. 1, below), year-long queues for oncologists! Don't bother! Stay in your own countries! Trust me! Please!

    Fig. 1. Typical UK street scene, 2021

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E7EXPB0WQAc17Ya?format=jpg&name=medium

  41. @Malenfant
    @Roger


    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

     

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I've spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer -- most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding -- but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    ...Importantly, if you're outside London, there's also far less "diversity" -- and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it's safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it's nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you'd be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Western, @Western, @Eric Novak, @black sea, @Excal

    Much of the countryside in England is exquisite. I’ve never seen anything to compare to the Cotswolds in the US. It’s super green but also mostly deforested so you can see a long way most of the time, whereas in the US it’s hard to see the forest for the trees. And there’s often a great building in the distance in rural locales.

    And the English have been the best landscape architects for centuries (see Tom Stoppard’s “Arcadia”). When I saw Capability Brown’s 18th Century landscape design at Blenheim Palace, I realized this kind of place is the inspiration for great American golf courses like Augusta National (but not, oddly enough, for great British golf courses like Royal Sandwich).

    • Agree: Thoughts
    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Steve Sailer

    Only the view from Richmond Hill is protected by an Act of Parliament though. Speaking of which Pete Townshend has put The Wick up for sale.

    https://robbreport.com/shelter/celebrity-homes/pete-townshend-wick-historic-london-mansion-1234622982/

    https://www.primelocation.com/for-sale/details/58955567/

    , @dvorak
    @Steve Sailer


    Much of the countryside in England is exquisite.
     
    Paul Graham and Jessica Livingston, married co-founders of startup factory Y Combinator, were raised in Pittsburgh and Greater Boston respectively. They are currently raising their kids in rural or small-town England. (Graham was born in England, so it wasn't completely out of left field).

    Graham got an early taste of Silicon Valley wokeness about ten years ago when he was accused of sexism and racism, separately. He immediately kicked himself upstairs from the CEO position at YC and soon retired.
  42. Johnson has multiple children from with multiple women, and he has always had money problems anyway, his government has set new records for corruption. The government is highly diverse and not representative of the Conservative electorate let alone the country. The neocons have hijacked Brexit to fling open the borders even more so than usual, certainly not what people voted for, with the corrupt degenerate Johnson a front man for arch neocon Michael Gove, who recently left his beard to shack up with another man, which is strangely unmentioned by the media.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @LondonBob

    Can you provide a link for the Michael Gove claim? I heard him speak several years ago and liked him. Is he really queer? Or is that rumor by his enemies?

    Replies: @LondonBob

  43. This shows a deranged way of thinking.

    Man is a social being, as Aristotle knew, and as we all know. He can’t flourish in any environment & is not adaptable to all human collectives.

    It is true that many creative people would move to some other place if they find it attractive- for them, considering their personal preferences. The man without a comb shows, again & again, his globalist derangement in treating people as interchangeable units.

    Sabine is, as she has demonstrated many times, right on the subject. It is basically- what does “top achiever” in anything mean in the cultural climate of censorship & conformism?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Sabine is too autistic. Sometimes you have to grab deep into the speculative grabbag to pull out a new idea which then can be pared back to useful essentials. You cannot jump a chasm just by putting bricks one next to the other.

    You have to let people dream.

    OTOH, there is people around who think particles are conscious and mRNA vaccines change your DNA (possibly via radio waves), which is just bonkers and pulled out of asses.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    , @Anon
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I've read Avi Loeb's book. The scientist in the video attacks a straw man.

    Avi Loeb does compare his conjecture about the object that entered our solar system to string theory and multiverse theory--but Loeb says his conjecture is more scientific, because it takes into account data, while multiverse theory is more like a priori speculation.

    The scientist in the video says Loeb hold his theory on the same level as multiverse and string theory. He DOES NOT. He says his theory is more empirical.

  44. Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng

    I hope is a full time and not Kwasi secretary.

  45. @Bardon Kaldian
    This shows a deranged way of thinking.

    Man is a social being, as Aristotle knew, and as we all know. He can't flourish in any environment & is not adaptable to all human collectives.

    It is true that many creative people would move to some other place if they find it attractive- for them, considering their personal preferences. The man without a comb shows, again & again, his globalist derangement in treating people as interchangeable units.

    Sabine is, as she has demonstrated many times, right on the subject. It is basically- what does "top achiever" in anything mean in the cultural climate of censorship & conformism?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f23eWOquFQ0

    Replies: @El Dato, @Anon

    Sabine is too autistic. Sometimes you have to grab deep into the speculative grabbag to pull out a new idea which then can be pared back to useful essentials. You cannot jump a chasm just by putting bricks one next to the other.

    You have to let people dream.

    OTOH, there is people around who think particles are conscious and mRNA vaccines change your DNA (possibly via radio waves), which is just bonkers and pulled out of asses.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @El Dato

    She is, in my opinion, too scientistic, not autistic.

    Actually, most theories she's been addressing are not something particularly new; most of them are either spent, or simply cannot be taken seriously anymore. If you promise something & don't deliver it in 50 years- time to move on.

    Dark matter, M theory & multiverses are not better than Ptolemaic epicycles. They're much worse.

    Replies: @El Dato

  46. @BRK
    I actually think it’s a smart initiative. The new global upper class are the highly-educated, rootless, cosmopolitan elite and the ticket into the club are globally elite universities. A Frenchman attending HEC, South Korean attending Seoul National University, and American attending Harvard are all competing for the same global upper crust jobs. These are the winners in today’s world, and you want more winners on your team. Or at least you’d rather have high-impact winners than 10 dullard net-loss immigrants.

    The only things that Britain exports these days are for the rootless elites: their world-famous boarding schools and higher education & their global financial industry. London is not an English city, it’s a world city.

    Replies: @Getaclue, @Some Guy

    These are the winners in today’s world, and you want more winners on your team.

    But are they automatically on your team just because they live in the same country(often temporarily)?

    • Replies: @BRK
    @Some Guy

    Keep them quarantined to London. As other commenters have said, England is remarkably white and lovely outside of London. Very different from the American situation.

    Whether planned or not, I think the balance they’ve struck is one of the better bargains out there. London is hyper-globalized and as nice an international elite playground as you can find anywhere in the world (along with Hong Kong, Singapore, New York, Zurich?), which provides a fair bit of wealth to the treasury, while the rest of England remains English and little troubled by globalism.

  47. @El Dato
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Sabine is too autistic. Sometimes you have to grab deep into the speculative grabbag to pull out a new idea which then can be pared back to useful essentials. You cannot jump a chasm just by putting bricks one next to the other.

    You have to let people dream.

    OTOH, there is people around who think particles are conscious and mRNA vaccines change your DNA (possibly via radio waves), which is just bonkers and pulled out of asses.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    She is, in my opinion, too scientistic, not autistic.

    Actually, most theories she’s been addressing are not something particularly new; most of them are either spent, or simply cannot be taken seriously anymore. If you promise something & don’t deliver it in 50 years- time to move on.

    Dark matter, M theory & multiverses are not better than Ptolemaic epicycles. They’re much worse.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Well, "Dark Matter" is a serious contender as it is based on observational evidence (and no, MOND numerology is not observational evidence). Although likely not WIMPs. It could be stuff that interacts only gravitationally, in which case we are out of luck. OTOH, it could be axions, in which case fun can be had and we have a chance to get to the bottom of this. We will see.

  48. I wonder if the degrees I have from a couple UK Universities would qualify … probably not. But I have a couple from pretty-good American schools, so maybe …

  49. @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    Much of the countryside in England is exquisite. I've never seen anything to compare to the Cotswolds in the US. It's super green but also mostly deforested so you can see a long way most of the time, whereas in the US it's hard to see the forest for the trees. And there's often a great building in the distance in rural locales.

    And the English have been the best landscape architects for centuries (see Tom Stoppard's "Arcadia"). When I saw Capability Brown's 18th Century landscape design at Blenheim Palace, I realized this kind of place is the inspiration for great American golf courses like Augusta National (but not, oddly enough, for great British golf courses like Royal Sandwich).

    Replies: @LondonBob, @dvorak

    Only the view from Richmond Hill is protected by an Act of Parliament though. Speaking of which Pete Townshend has put The Wick up for sale.

    https://robbreport.com/shelter/celebrity-homes/pete-townshend-wick-historic-london-mansion-1234622982/

    https://www.primelocation.com/for-sale/details/58955567/

  50. @Roger
    I like it. I am an American citizen with a fancy degree. If the USA goes bad, it is nice to have some international options.

    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Jonathan Mason, @Magic Dirt Resident

    United States citizens have many options as to places where they can live overseas. For example several places in the Caribbean offer permanent residency or citizenship for a fee, and there are many places in South America open to immigrants.

    If you are fairly affluent, the United Kingdom is probably a better place to live than most places in the United States, especially if you like rural or small town living.

    Or to put it another way, the United Kingdom has a lot more desirable places to live than does the US provided that hot weather in the summertime is not a prerequisite.

    Prince Harry, however, does not seem to agree and prefers to be in the US away from Royal pageantry and such like. No doubt places like Montecito, California where he is now living can rival or beat most places in England.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Jonathan Mason

    Harry (and his dominatrix, Meghan), Andrew, Charles and William are all making me rethink the whole monarchy thing. And ultimately Liz's legacy will be quite unflattering. What they have at least tacitly allowed to be done to the UK will end up destroying the monarchy itself just like the kingdom has been destroyed. Little George might as well learn a trade because I don't think he will ever be king. The country is literally run by people named Kwasi Kwarteng and Priti Patel. I probably don't need to remind anyone here of Boris Johnson's ancestry either.

    , @Graham
    @Jonathan Mason

    The proviso "if you are fairly affluent" is important. I haven't lived in the USA, so please feel free to shoot me down, but my strong impression is that relatively poor Americans get far more for their money than poor British people especially in terms of housing. But yes, as an affluent Englishman I've had a very good life. The greatest change came in the 80s, when I went from being poor in London, living in a shabby area full of violent and stupid people, to being well off in London, living in an attractive area full of interesting and pleasant people, with a lot of green space. Since we left London I've lived in beautiful and quiet country areas. The biggest threat to the countryside is unattractive new housing development eating up fields and woods, driven by population increase consequent on mass immigration.

    Replies: @black sea, @Joe Stalin

  51. @Some Guy
    @BRK


    These are the winners in today’s world, and you want more winners on your team.
     
    But are they automatically on your team just because they live in the same country(often temporarily)?

    Replies: @BRK

    Keep them quarantined to London. As other commenters have said, England is remarkably white and lovely outside of London. Very different from the American situation.

    Whether planned or not, I think the balance they’ve struck is one of the better bargains out there. London is hyper-globalized and as nice an international elite playground as you can find anywhere in the world (along with Hong Kong, Singapore, New York, Zurich?), which provides a fair bit of wealth to the treasury, while the rest of England remains English and little troubled by globalism.

  52. @Jonathan Mason
    @Roger

    United States citizens have many options as to places where they can live overseas. For example several places in the Caribbean offer permanent residency or citizenship for a fee, and there are many places in South America open to immigrants.

    If you are fairly affluent, the United Kingdom is probably a better place to live than most places in the United States, especially if you like rural or small town living.

    Or to put it another way, the United Kingdom has a lot more desirable places to live than does the US provided that hot weather in the summertime is not a prerequisite.

    Prince Harry, however, does not seem to agree and prefers to be in the US away from Royal pageantry and such like. No doubt places like Montecito, California where he is now living can rival or beat most places in England.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Graham

    Harry (and his dominatrix, Meghan), Andrew, Charles and William are all making me rethink the whole monarchy thing. And ultimately Liz’s legacy will be quite unflattering. What they have at least tacitly allowed to be done to the UK will end up destroying the monarchy itself just like the kingdom has been destroyed. Little George might as well learn a trade because I don’t think he will ever be king. The country is literally run by people named Kwasi Kwarteng and Priti Patel. I probably don’t need to remind anyone here of Boris Johnson’s ancestry either.

  53. @Getaclue
    @BRK

    At the same time he's all for flooding the country with "migrants"....He's a fake "konservative" -- his father is straight from the Rockefellers and he is carrying out the Globalist Great Reset Agenda

    Replies: @Supply and Demand

    The Great Reset has been working out well for the Chinese. Maybe if you guys dropped the Trump worship and got with the program, life would be better for you.

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Getaclue
    @Supply and Demand

    You certainly are a one note player type-- "muh TRUMP!" (didn't vote for him, believe he was probably controlled opposition of some sort) -- same old same old every stupid comment -- my life is fine, I didn't need to flee elsewhere to get Professionally employed...-- Commie from rich family goes to China to hang with Commies thinks Globalist creeps are great, no big surprise...whatever -- Under the Great Reset you will have nothing and "be happy" -- also eat bugs, no meat -- all pushed by Klaus Schwab and the WEF and Globalist Satanist "Elites" -- since you think its such a great thing and are so into it hopefully you are leading the way....

    , @fish
    @Supply and Demand

    Does Godfrey have a sockpuppet?

  54. @Roger
    I like it. I am an American citizen with a fancy degree. If the USA goes bad, it is nice to have some international options.

    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Jonathan Mason, @Magic Dirt Resident

    The US has nowhere that can compare with England’s smallish cities like York, Chester, Salisbury, Shrewsbury, etc. Basically every cathedral town in England is nicer than America. The only ways America is superior is the cheap land and being able to own guns.

    Actually, America’s geographic and climate diversity is pretty cool too. Deserts, mountains, forests, swamps, oceans, we really have it all.

  55. @Anon
    I'd think few grads from first world countries would show interest. Other countries would have a corruption problem, but presumably they have no "top global universities." I could see this attracting international students at first world universities who can't get a visa for the U.S.

    You risk getting a lot of grievance studies people if you don't require a job offer. They should limit it to STEM.

    Japan has a point system that favors grads of good universities. There's been virtually no interest.

    Another problem that both Canada and Australia have experienced, and the UK certainly would also, is free-ride-medical shopping. Canada, for instance, deported a professor and his family who tried to up to a citizen or citizen path level. They had a kid with Down's who would require expensive life long care, after the parents' death even. If you have public medical insurance you need to be a bit heartless about this stuff, or the books don't balance. Reading between the lines of press accounts, there seems to be a Kabuki where the activists weakly protest the cruelty, the government ignoress it and deports, and after the deportation it gets memory holed and activists never push for any change that would threaten their free health care. I think it's a fund raising opp for organizations that get media mentions.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa

    I’d think few grads from first world countries would show interest

    Whatever you’re basing your “thinking” on is wrong. London is brimming with highly-educated professionals from Europe. There are also many elites from around the world and even plenty of Americans from Ivy League backgrounds.

  56. Meanwhile, private high schools in non-soviet Russia:

    Move over, Eton! Russia’s exclusive schools are taking on the world’s most elite institutions… if you can afford their price tags

    [MORE]

    Letovo is no ordinary school. It is one of the very few in Russia that offers both a national diploma as well as a certificate from the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IB DP), opening doors to its students for overseas work and study. Elite schools such as this began to spring up following the 2013 –2015 Ukraine and Syria crises, which alienated Moscow from its former partners in the West. With a collapse in oil prices compounded by sanctions, the ruble crashed. In response, Russia’s wealthiest began to search for homegrown alternatives to the likes of Eton and Harrow, which had educated many of a generation of rich Russian children.

    The academy sees itself as a kind of ‘start-up’ educational project. It was founded by the Russian billionaire, entrepreneur, and philanthropist Vadim Moshkovich, who made his fortune in agriculture. In an interview in 2018, the farming mogul stated, “I’m not building a school for children of officials or sanctioned businessmen or oligarchs from Rublyovka,” referring to Moscow’s most coveted and elite district. “Education is the key driver in the modern world and I want Russia to be competitive. This is for soul and country.”

    Such a premium education comes at a premium price, however. Letovo’s base tuition fees are about $20,000 a year. While this is still around only half of what the top British public schools charge, such expenses are far above what the average Russian family can afford. Prospective students undergo a name-blinded exam and are means-tested, meaning that those who can’t afford the fees have a shot at receiving grants and scholarships to supplement the costs.

  57. @Bardon Kaldian
    @El Dato

    She is, in my opinion, too scientistic, not autistic.

    Actually, most theories she's been addressing are not something particularly new; most of them are either spent, or simply cannot be taken seriously anymore. If you promise something & don't deliver it in 50 years- time to move on.

    Dark matter, M theory & multiverses are not better than Ptolemaic epicycles. They're much worse.

    Replies: @El Dato

    Well, “Dark Matter” is a serious contender as it is based on observational evidence (and no, MOND numerology is not observational evidence). Although likely not WIMPs. It could be stuff that interacts only gravitationally, in which case we are out of luck. OTOH, it could be axions, in which case fun can be had and we have a chance to get to the bottom of this. We will see.

  58. @Altai

    UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson strikes even me as a bit of an IQ fetishist:
     
    Poor marginalised immigrants tend not to become force multipliers. High IQ upwardly mobile immigrants tend to have a lot of influence on immigration policy. Refugees too don't tend to be competitive in the job market, whereas EU immigrants were and did displace and lower wages for native workers.

    A lot of people in the right have a psychological motivation of contempt for people they see as lesser to them and so focus on poor immigrants and refugees as particularly undesirable. (Boris likes immigrants he sees as 'better' than working class British people he holds in contempt) But they never pause to think about how they would rather they remain poor and not be rich and influential.

    Inviting high IQ upwardly mobile people is to invite a potentially hostile elite who can more effectively wage ethnic war and influence immigration policies.

    Canada and Australia have had big amounts of high skills immigration policy for 30 years now. Does anyone think that as the children of those Chinese and Indians rise to positions of prominence that immigration policies will get less hostile to their tradition populations?

    As the history of economics shows, it doesn't matter how stupid an idea is, what matters is who is in charge of making the ideas.

    The internet promised to change that but teenage girls on social media have brought about the most intense era of conformity the West has seen in a long time.

    Replies: @RonaldB

    I used to work at Enron. We had a Russian Jewish immigrant work there for awhile, before someone offered him more money and he switched companies. However, while in my unit, he wrote a program that was extremely valuable and continued to serve us years after he left.

    Switching gears a bit, I remember reading an article making the claim that the Bhopal disaster in India stemmed from the requirement that management and engineering staff be composed of native Indians. The requirement resulted in below-par safety practices and plant management, resulting in one of the worst disasters of all time.

    The Pareto Principle is that given any group of workers, 10% will produce half the value.

    It seems to me there is a case to be made that for certain key positions, it’s more important to have the highest quality available than to hire native. So, to prevent employers from simply trying to lower the wage market by importing foreign workers, I propose that the special visas be allocated by companies, and that the companies be required to pay the visa holder a salary at least 5 (five) times the prevailing wage for that type of job. That will allow companies to widen the pool of talent for truly key positions, but will prevent foreign labor to be used where the local workforce can supply the talent.

    You might also have a provision in the law preventing such visa holders from holding any executive or board position.

    • Agree: ziggurat
  59. One step towards the creation of a class of global mandarins, selected from the SAT (or it’s woke equivalent).

  60. I’m reminded of those high-tax, US states who buy (using tax dollars) major market TV ads in other, high tax states, which claim that their (ad buying) states are where employers should relocate or expand.

    If a country has small government / low taxes, it is naturally attractive to capital. Countries like the US, and GB to a lesser extent, are attractive to tax leeches.

  61. Can they bring their debt with them?

  62. anon[124] • Disclaimer says:

    if he were an IQ fetishist his criterion would be SAT, etc. scores for americans, not elite school degree. contrary to popular opinion these are very NOT the same thing in americastan.

    bojo is the same guy who wants a 10% of revenues penalty levied on social media companies for “racist abuse”.

    he’s lower class, low IQ, and a jew-turk. he’s despicable./

  63. He doesn’t look English.

    Ancestors?

    Early Life says:

    Elias Avery Lowe, a palaeographer of Lithuanian Jewish descent

    Ali Kemal Bey, one of the last interior ministers of the Ottoman government

  64. @James J O'Meara
    @Wilkey

    Just looking at Boris Johnson makes me a little bit more OK with Joe Biden. Just a bit. But some.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    The only time Biden can form a sentence is when he’s discussing attacking children. Johnson is simply Bill Clinton with better manners and worse hair.

  65. @Malenfant
    @Roger


    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

     

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I've spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer -- most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding -- but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    ...Importantly, if you're outside London, there's also far less "diversity" -- and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it's safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it's nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you'd be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Western, @Western, @Eric Novak, @black sea, @Excal

    “most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today.”

    Yes, so many of the retail buildings in the US are little more than backyard sheds that could easily be torn down. Tear down an old Mcdonald’s in the same strip mall parking lot and build a brand new one. How about an Auto Zone and Burger King set in a large parking lot in front of a Target or Walmart? Although some of these types of buildings are in the UK now too.

  66. @LondonBob
    Johnson has multiple children from with multiple women, and he has always had money problems anyway, his government has set new records for corruption. The government is highly diverse and not representative of the Conservative electorate let alone the country. The neocons have hijacked Brexit to fling open the borders even more so than usual, certainly not what people voted for, with the corrupt degenerate Johnson a front man for arch neocon Michael Gove, who recently left his beard to shack up with another man, which is strangely unmentioned by the media.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    Can you provide a link for the Michael Gove claim? I heard him speak several years ago and liked him. Is he really queer? Or is that rumor by his enemies?

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @stillCARealist

    There is probably a super injunction out as it is unmentioned in the press but it is an open secret and is discussed on twitter, I always thought he was gay and his wife a beard.

  67. gc says:

    Back in the day I tried to do an Internet IQ test, but after the test questions got harder I started to wonder how these test are scored. You need a really big test group for all that. If you say some 5 year old kid has IQ of 200 that means he/she is as intelligent as an average 10 years old. But what kind of reference you have for adults? If you use SAT scores then everyone will know that this test does not measure just the G-factor or what ever it is called. If you use a test that get’s progressively more difficult scoring that test can be hard. If you use roughly as equally difficult questions, you can do linear interpolation for the scores, but then the quickness of thinking factor is the great explainer and everyone will understand that this measures something else than intelligence. However probably the means will stay the same. I assume Steve Sailer sometimes says what his buddies in science are saying, but sometimes he says something like this IQ fetish things. Being from a Top Level university is more than a proof that you have an high IQ.

  68. Anon[272] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    This shows a deranged way of thinking.

    Man is a social being, as Aristotle knew, and as we all know. He can't flourish in any environment & is not adaptable to all human collectives.

    It is true that many creative people would move to some other place if they find it attractive- for them, considering their personal preferences. The man without a comb shows, again & again, his globalist derangement in treating people as interchangeable units.

    Sabine is, as she has demonstrated many times, right on the subject. It is basically- what does "top achiever" in anything mean in the cultural climate of censorship & conformism?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f23eWOquFQ0

    Replies: @El Dato, @Anon

    I’ve read Avi Loeb’s book. The scientist in the video attacks a straw man.

    Avi Loeb does compare his conjecture about the object that entered our solar system to string theory and multiverse theory–but Loeb says his conjecture is more scientific, because it takes into account data, while multiverse theory is more like a priori speculation.

    The scientist in the video says Loeb hold his theory on the same level as multiverse and string theory. He DOES NOT. He says his theory is more empirical.

  69. bojo is anthony blanche but (supposedly) heterosexual.

    sad.

  70. @Supply and Demand
    @Getaclue

    The Great Reset has been working out well for the Chinese. Maybe if you guys dropped the Trump worship and got with the program, life would be better for you.

    Replies: @Getaclue, @fish

    You certainly are a one note player type– “muh TRUMP!” (didn’t vote for him, believe he was probably controlled opposition of some sort) — same old same old every stupid comment — my life is fine, I didn’t need to flee elsewhere to get Professionally employed…– Commie from rich family goes to China to hang with Commies thinks Globalist creeps are great, no big surprise…whatever — Under the Great Reset you will have nothing and “be happy” — also eat bugs, no meat — all pushed by Klaus Schwab and the WEF and Globalist Satanist “Elites” — since you think its such a great thing and are so into it hopefully you are leading the way….

  71. Either you allow competition to work it’s magic (and terror) or you use brute force in a futile attempt to stop it. The cream rises.

  72. @Malenfant
    @Roger


    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

     

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I've spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer -- most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding -- but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    ...Importantly, if you're outside London, there's also far less "diversity" -- and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it's safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it's nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you'd be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Western, @Western, @Eric Novak, @black sea, @Excal

    The English complain about their weather but their weather isn’t bad for day-to-day living. It is not perfect but it is better than the US midwest where it can be bitterly cold in winter and then hot and humid in the summer. Bath has a Jan average of 46-38 and July of 71/58. That is pretty good. London is 48/40 in January.

  73. @Malenfant
    @Roger


    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

     

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I've spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer -- most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding -- but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    ...Importantly, if you're outside London, there's also far less "diversity" -- and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it's safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it's nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you'd be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Western, @Western, @Eric Novak, @black sea, @Excal

    No country on Earth has the US beat on natural beauty. England is one geological province. Your comment is ridiculous.

    • Replies: @Malenfant
    @Eric Novak

    Spoken like somebody who has never been there. I think you'd be surprised at how well the UK, though much smaller, compares to the USA on that front.

    National parks aside, I think that England is far prettier than the USA, overall. An average spot in the UK -- selected at random -- will, generally, be much more aesthetically pleasing than your average randomly-selected spot in the USA.

    And there are few places on Earth that compare to the Scottish highlands. (Scotland in general is extremely beautiful.)

    The UK's forests are better than American forests for another reason: No poison ivy, no poison oak, and no poison sumac. There are fewer ticks, as well, and those ticks are far less likely to harbor or transmit Lyme disease. (The US has a >10x higher incidence of Lyme disease, on a population-adjusted basis.)
    ...So if you actually like going into the wilderness, rather than just looking at it in pictures, the UK is much more pleasant and less seemingly hostile.

    The weather is more temperate, as well.

    It really is quite a lovely place. When I'm there, I can't escape the feeling that I evolved to live there. The climate, the landscapes, the weight of its history which is so evident everywhere you turn... it strikes a real, and almost primal, chord.

    The day-to-day of life in the USA is really quite dull and dismal in comparison. Seriously.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @Spect3r
    @Eric Novak

    Norway and New Zealand would like to have a word with you.

    Replies: @Eric Novak

  74. @Malenfant
    @Roger


    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

     

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I've spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer -- most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding -- but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    ...Importantly, if you're outside London, there's also far less "diversity" -- and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it's safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it's nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you'd be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Western, @Western, @Eric Novak, @black sea, @Excal

    “Horses for courses,” as the Brits say.

  75. @Eric Novak
    @Malenfant

    No country on Earth has the US beat on natural beauty. England is one geological province. Your comment is ridiculous.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Spect3r

    Spoken like somebody who has never been there. I think you’d be surprised at how well the UK, though much smaller, compares to the USA on that front.

    National parks aside, I think that England is far prettier than the USA, overall. An average spot in the UK — selected at random — will, generally, be much more aesthetically pleasing than your average randomly-selected spot in the USA.

    And there are few places on Earth that compare to the Scottish highlands. (Scotland in general is extremely beautiful.)

    The UK’s forests are better than American forests for another reason: No poison ivy, no poison oak, and no poison sumac. There are fewer ticks, as well, and those ticks are far less likely to harbor or transmit Lyme disease. (The US has a >10x higher incidence of Lyme disease, on a population-adjusted basis.)
    …So if you actually like going into the wilderness, rather than just looking at it in pictures, the UK is much more pleasant and less seemingly hostile.

    The weather is more temperate, as well.

    It really is quite a lovely place. When I’m there, I can’t escape the feeling that I evolved to live there. The climate, the landscapes, the weight of its history which is so evident everywhere you turn… it strikes a real, and almost primal, chord.

    The day-to-day of life in the USA is really quite dull and dismal in comparison. Seriously.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    Summer in Britain is pretty great. There are good reasons why rich people love flying in for Wimbledon, Henley, the Derby, the Open etc, Tom Stoppard's birthday party, etc etc etc etc.

    Of course, it's not summer year round.

    Replies: @black sea, @Malenfant

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Malenfant

    "the UK is much more pleasant and less seemingly hostile.

    The weather is more temperate, as well.

    It really is quite a lovely place. "


    So, hey everybody, I've got a GREAT idea!!

    Let's hand the whole thing over to Africans and Pakistanis. For no reason whatsoever!! Wouldn't THAT be a pip?

  76. @Malenfant
    @Eric Novak

    Spoken like somebody who has never been there. I think you'd be surprised at how well the UK, though much smaller, compares to the USA on that front.

    National parks aside, I think that England is far prettier than the USA, overall. An average spot in the UK -- selected at random -- will, generally, be much more aesthetically pleasing than your average randomly-selected spot in the USA.

    And there are few places on Earth that compare to the Scottish highlands. (Scotland in general is extremely beautiful.)

    The UK's forests are better than American forests for another reason: No poison ivy, no poison oak, and no poison sumac. There are fewer ticks, as well, and those ticks are far less likely to harbor or transmit Lyme disease. (The US has a >10x higher incidence of Lyme disease, on a population-adjusted basis.)
    ...So if you actually like going into the wilderness, rather than just looking at it in pictures, the UK is much more pleasant and less seemingly hostile.

    The weather is more temperate, as well.

    It really is quite a lovely place. When I'm there, I can't escape the feeling that I evolved to live there. The climate, the landscapes, the weight of its history which is so evident everywhere you turn... it strikes a real, and almost primal, chord.

    The day-to-day of life in the USA is really quite dull and dismal in comparison. Seriously.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Summer in Britain is pretty great. There are good reasons why rich people love flying in for Wimbledon, Henley, the Derby, the Open etc, Tom Stoppard’s birthday party, etc etc etc etc.

    Of course, it’s not summer year round.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Steve Sailer

    The canal system in the UK, built before the advent of the railroads, is rather serenely beautiful, and quite extensive. I would love to spend a week or two cruising those canals on a narrowboat. Some people make a life of it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwOs0m_0Ons

    , @Malenfant
    @Steve Sailer

    England isn't terrible in the winter. The average winter temperature between Hastings and York is about 40°F. It's chilly, and the days are short -- but it's not truly cold and snowstorms are exceptionally rare. What little snowfall there is usually melts quite quickly.

    England's climate is temperate in every sense of the word. It's like San Francisco, with more seasonal variation.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  77. @anon215
    Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng.... yeah he's just as "British" as Tom Baker.

    Replies: @Fredrik

    Just like Priti Patel, Sajid Javid and probably other ministers in the UK conservative government.

    Brexit was never about immigration. Johnson and the Tories don’t have a problem with immigration. At least not when it’s from countries close to the English such as Ghana or India(and Uganda).

  78. @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    Summer in Britain is pretty great. There are good reasons why rich people love flying in for Wimbledon, Henley, the Derby, the Open etc, Tom Stoppard's birthday party, etc etc etc etc.

    Of course, it's not summer year round.

    Replies: @black sea, @Malenfant

    The canal system in the UK, built before the advent of the railroads, is rather serenely beautiful, and quite extensive. I would love to spend a week or two cruising those canals on a narrowboat. Some people make a life of it.

  79. @Malenfant
    @Roger


    I do not see much chance that living in the UK will ever be preferable to living in the USA, but it is nice to have the option anyway.

     

    Have you ever been to the UK?

    I've spent ample time in both the UK and the US, and the UK is really a much nicer place to live. Although the US may, on paper, be richer, the UK feels richer -- most of the towns and villages are old, and were built to a higher standard than things are built to today. The cathedrals, such as the one at Ely, are astounding -- but many of the public works and town squares are hardly less impressive. And in terms of natural beauty, England and Scotland have most of the USA beat, and no country has more pleasant parks than the UK.

    ...Importantly, if you're outside London, there's also far less "diversity" -- and the particularly odious American Negro is nowhere to be found. So it's safer. So interactions with strangers are always less tense and hostile. So your wife and children can go for a stroll in town in the evenings, without fear.

    The cost of living in the UK is also lower. And although there are very many rent-seekers who work in annoying and unproductive FIRE industries (and the legal industry,) it's nowhere near as bad as things are in the USA, where most of the economy outside Silicon Valley is parasitical.

    You may have a fancy degree, but you'd be a fool to automatically assume that the UK is a worse place to live than the USA. If anything, I believe that the USA (anywhere) is one of the worst places in the world for a man of means to live, and the UK (particularly York, or anywhere in East Anglia,) is one of the better options.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Western, @Western, @Eric Novak, @black sea, @Excal

    Everybody, don’t listen to ! The UK is horrible! Rains all the time, bad food, grumpy people, terrifying wildlife (see Fig. 1, below), year-long queues for oncologists! Don’t bother! Stay in your own countries! Trust me! Please!

    Fig. 1. Typical UK street scene, 2021

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E7EXPB0WQAc17Ya?format=jpg&name=medium

  80. @Malenfant
    @Eric Novak

    Spoken like somebody who has never been there. I think you'd be surprised at how well the UK, though much smaller, compares to the USA on that front.

    National parks aside, I think that England is far prettier than the USA, overall. An average spot in the UK -- selected at random -- will, generally, be much more aesthetically pleasing than your average randomly-selected spot in the USA.

    And there are few places on Earth that compare to the Scottish highlands. (Scotland in general is extremely beautiful.)

    The UK's forests are better than American forests for another reason: No poison ivy, no poison oak, and no poison sumac. There are fewer ticks, as well, and those ticks are far less likely to harbor or transmit Lyme disease. (The US has a >10x higher incidence of Lyme disease, on a population-adjusted basis.)
    ...So if you actually like going into the wilderness, rather than just looking at it in pictures, the UK is much more pleasant and less seemingly hostile.

    The weather is more temperate, as well.

    It really is quite a lovely place. When I'm there, I can't escape the feeling that I evolved to live there. The climate, the landscapes, the weight of its history which is so evident everywhere you turn... it strikes a real, and almost primal, chord.

    The day-to-day of life in the USA is really quite dull and dismal in comparison. Seriously.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “the UK is much more pleasant and less seemingly hostile.

    The weather is more temperate, as well.

    It really is quite a lovely place. ”

    So, hey everybody, I’ve got a GREAT idea!!

    Let’s hand the whole thing over to Africans and Pakistanis. For no reason whatsoever!! Wouldn’t THAT be a pip?

  81. @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    Summer in Britain is pretty great. There are good reasons why rich people love flying in for Wimbledon, Henley, the Derby, the Open etc, Tom Stoppard's birthday party, etc etc etc etc.

    Of course, it's not summer year round.

    Replies: @black sea, @Malenfant

    England isn’t terrible in the winter. The average winter temperature between Hastings and York is about 40°F. It’s chilly, and the days are short — but it’s not truly cold and snowstorms are exceptionally rare. What little snowfall there is usually melts quite quickly.

    England’s climate is temperate in every sense of the word. It’s like San Francisco, with more seasonal variation.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    The main problem with England is that it's so far north that winter days are extremely short, which is depressing.

    On the other hand, summer days are extremely long in England, which is great. I can recall driving through the Cotswolds on July 4, 1987 from 7 to 9:30 pm during a balloon race with hot air balloons dropping out of the sky all around us. That's about as good as it gets.

    Henry James wrote, “Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  82. @stillCARealist
    @LondonBob

    Can you provide a link for the Michael Gove claim? I heard him speak several years ago and liked him. Is he really queer? Or is that rumor by his enemies?

    Replies: @LondonBob

    There is probably a super injunction out as it is unmentioned in the press but it is an open secret and is discussed on twitter, I always thought he was gay and his wife a beard.

  83. @Jonathan Mason
    @Roger

    United States citizens have many options as to places where they can live overseas. For example several places in the Caribbean offer permanent residency or citizenship for a fee, and there are many places in South America open to immigrants.

    If you are fairly affluent, the United Kingdom is probably a better place to live than most places in the United States, especially if you like rural or small town living.

    Or to put it another way, the United Kingdom has a lot more desirable places to live than does the US provided that hot weather in the summertime is not a prerequisite.

    Prince Harry, however, does not seem to agree and prefers to be in the US away from Royal pageantry and such like. No doubt places like Montecito, California where he is now living can rival or beat most places in England.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Graham

    The proviso “if you are fairly affluent” is important. I haven’t lived in the USA, so please feel free to shoot me down, but my strong impression is that relatively poor Americans get far more for their money than poor British people especially in terms of housing. But yes, as an affluent Englishman I’ve had a very good life. The greatest change came in the 80s, when I went from being poor in London, living in a shabby area full of violent and stupid people, to being well off in London, living in an attractive area full of interesting and pleasant people, with a lot of green space. Since we left London I’ve lived in beautiful and quiet country areas. The biggest threat to the countryside is unattractive new housing development eating up fields and woods, driven by population increase consequent on mass immigration.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @black sea
    @Graham

    If you don't mind my asking, where in London did you live when you were poor and where did you move to once your circumstances had improved?

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Graham


    I haven’t lived in the USA, so please feel free to shoot me down, but my strong impression is that relatively poor Americans get far more for their money than poor British people especially in terms of housing.
     
    For just the EBT LINK card alone in Illinois (aka "food stamps") a single person gets up to $204/ month.

    https://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=33412

  84. @Graham
    @Jonathan Mason

    The proviso "if you are fairly affluent" is important. I haven't lived in the USA, so please feel free to shoot me down, but my strong impression is that relatively poor Americans get far more for their money than poor British people especially in terms of housing. But yes, as an affluent Englishman I've had a very good life. The greatest change came in the 80s, when I went from being poor in London, living in a shabby area full of violent and stupid people, to being well off in London, living in an attractive area full of interesting and pleasant people, with a lot of green space. Since we left London I've lived in beautiful and quiet country areas. The biggest threat to the countryside is unattractive new housing development eating up fields and woods, driven by population increase consequent on mass immigration.

    Replies: @black sea, @Joe Stalin

    If you don’t mind my asking, where in London did you live when you were poor and where did you move to once your circumstances had improved?

  85. @Malenfant
    @Steve Sailer

    England isn't terrible in the winter. The average winter temperature between Hastings and York is about 40°F. It's chilly, and the days are short -- but it's not truly cold and snowstorms are exceptionally rare. What little snowfall there is usually melts quite quickly.

    England's climate is temperate in every sense of the word. It's like San Francisco, with more seasonal variation.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The main problem with England is that it’s so far north that winter days are extremely short, which is depressing.

    On the other hand, summer days are extremely long in England, which is great. I can recall driving through the Cotswolds on July 4, 1987 from 7 to 9:30 pm during a balloon race with hot air balloons dropping out of the sky all around us. That’s about as good as it gets.

    Henry James wrote, “Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_MqfF0WBsU

    Nuff said.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Steve Sailer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_MqfF0WBsU

  86. @Eric Novak
    @Malenfant

    No country on Earth has the US beat on natural beauty. England is one geological province. Your comment is ridiculous.

    Replies: @Malenfant, @Spect3r

    Norway and New Zealand would like to have a word with you.

    • Replies: @Eric Novak
    @Spect3r

    Colorado alone has 53 peaks at or above 14,000 ft. Norway, which is smaller than Texas and California. No European country can compare with America in variety of natural features, which is why Europeans settled it to begin with. America comprises more than 1/3 of the land area of the North American continent.

    Replies: @Spect3r

  87. Steve,

    Tangentially related to Global Universities, I see the flagship university in my old home state is opening a recruiting office in (checks notes) New Delhi and Bangalore, India!

    https://apnews.com/article/business-india-illinois-a24a9a90f161b6c2c01124fa7fc19ea7

    Apparently having Chinese students who pay full tuition yet work as spies for the CCP and steal research is a bad thing now, or we need even MORE foreign students paying the bloated salaries for DIE administrators as people with children and college age students flee Silly-nois.

    It’ll be interesting to see if the Indians have the cashola the Chinese have to pay full freight.

    Ah, I remember the good ol’ days where the flagship state school was for the, get this, citizens of the state where it resided.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @mmack

    Bureaucracies always work for their own interests.

  88. anon[418] • Disclaimer says:

    Yes, please, take all our Ivy League grads!

    What kind of people go to the Ivy League?
    – Leftist Jews
    – Money and power hungry neocon Jews
    – Progressive idiot children of WASP elites who worship and/or fear Jews
    – Mindless easily brainwashed greedy ambitious Asian and Hispanic opportunist followers
    – LGBTQ and BLM activists (admitted for their “leadership quality”)

    Boris can have them all. America will be much better off without these pompous elitist hypocritical assholes who think they are born to lead for having attended the Traitorous Eight. They have done nothing but led the country down the drain for the past century.

  89. @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    The main problem with England is that it's so far north that winter days are extremely short, which is depressing.

    On the other hand, summer days are extremely long in England, which is great. I can recall driving through the Cotswolds on July 4, 1987 from 7 to 9:30 pm during a balloon race with hot air balloons dropping out of the sky all around us. That's about as good as it gets.

    Henry James wrote, “Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Nuff said.

  90. @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    The main problem with England is that it's so far north that winter days are extremely short, which is depressing.

    On the other hand, summer days are extremely long in England, which is great. I can recall driving through the Cotswolds on July 4, 1987 from 7 to 9:30 pm during a balloon race with hot air balloons dropping out of the sky all around us. That's about as good as it gets.

    Henry James wrote, “Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.”

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  91. anon[418] • Disclaimer says:

    In the mid 2000’s, The Economist published an article about the recipe for success for the UK and all other countries not named USA, which is to establish its own Silicon Valley, and the secret sauce to such a recipe is to anchor it with a world class STEM oriented university, i.e. their own Stanford, which for the UK would be Cambridge.

    A decade later, TE lamented that the experiment has failed. Despite all its efforts, a British Silicon Valley did not spring up around Cambridge, as it proved to be no Stanford. TE’s conclusion was that the Brits just aren’t ambitious enough, like the Americans. They make 20m pounds and are happy to sell or maintain, whereas Americans aren’t happy until they make $20 billion.

    Be careful what you wish for.

    SV should serve as a cautionary tale to the world, not one to emulate. Big Tech has gone passed the point of good, they have now arrived at pure evil. Google, Facebook and Microsoft track us like cattle for exploitation. Twitter does nothing but fan the flames of hatred. Apple bankrupts us with their expensive iPhones. Netflix has become the new purveyor of soft porn and other cultural garbage. Palantir knows everything there is to know about each of us. Amazon has destroyed tens of thousands of retail businesses, and the internet basically is a giant deep dark jungle where hackers roam free and the (((media’s))) stomping ground for disseminating fake news of both left and right.

    Yet I suppose these are the “best and brightest” that Boris wants to attract and bring to Britain. I say let him have it. Silicon Valley has destroyed the world, not improved it. Back in its early days it may have been developed by hippies like Steve Jobs and Wozniak who want to change the world for the better, but thanks to Bill Gates and company it has been transformed into a greed-is-good Wall Street offshoot. These days tech is all about money and tracking people. The only thing the techies care about is to develop yet another useless app to sell to Big Tech and make billions, ethics be damned. Wall Street/Private equity big money has tainted and destroyed technology. Boris Johnson can have these rapacious soulless vampire squids disguised as “engineers”. America will be better off without them.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @anon

    The problem with that plan is that the world only needs so many Silicon Valleys. It's like trying to create multiple Wall Streets all over the world. Yes, people engage in finance in ever medium-sized town, but they don,'t --for better or worse -- create new and sometimes destructive financial products everywhere. Those with a particular talent for that sort of thing, coupled with enormous greed/ambition, continue to gravitate to Wall Street. Same thing with Silicon Valley.

  92. @Graham
    @Jonathan Mason

    The proviso "if you are fairly affluent" is important. I haven't lived in the USA, so please feel free to shoot me down, but my strong impression is that relatively poor Americans get far more for their money than poor British people especially in terms of housing. But yes, as an affluent Englishman I've had a very good life. The greatest change came in the 80s, when I went from being poor in London, living in a shabby area full of violent and stupid people, to being well off in London, living in an attractive area full of interesting and pleasant people, with a lot of green space. Since we left London I've lived in beautiful and quiet country areas. The biggest threat to the countryside is unattractive new housing development eating up fields and woods, driven by population increase consequent on mass immigration.

    Replies: @black sea, @Joe Stalin

    I haven’t lived in the USA, so please feel free to shoot me down, but my strong impression is that relatively poor Americans get far more for their money than poor British people especially in terms of housing.

    For just the EBT LINK card alone in Illinois (aka “food stamps”) a single person gets up to $204/ month.

    https://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=33412

  93. I doubt this is about IQ even though he once called Africans “piccaninnies” and the like.

    Boris Kemal Bey is pro-immigration because of alien origins. Beguiled Brits think he is English.

    His brother Jo, the former universities minister, has been pushing this idea under the guise of “building a fairer immigration system.”

  94. @Spect3r
    @Eric Novak

    Norway and New Zealand would like to have a word with you.

    Replies: @Eric Novak

    Colorado alone has 53 peaks at or above 14,000 ft. Norway, which is smaller than Texas and California. No European country can compare with America in variety of natural features, which is why Europeans settled it to begin with. America comprises more than 1/3 of the land area of the North American continent.

    • Replies: @Spect3r
    @Eric Novak

    You said no country can rival USA in Natural beauty, and that is clearly not true.
    Do you have a lot of variety? You do, but so do other countries.
    For example, Norway has everything you guys have, farms, fields, mountains, beaches, etc and have Fjords, so...
    Also, size means nothing in this conversation.

    Replies: @Western

  95. anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Define “Top global universities”. Which ones make the cut, top 20? 50? 100? And according to which ranking — QS, Times Higher Ed or Shanghai? Depending on which ranking you use, you could end up with quite a different list of universities. For example, UCLA is ranked #13 in Shanghai, #15 in THE, but #40 in QS. University of WA is #16 in Shanghai, #29 in THE, and #85 in QS.

    I once looked this up — the vast majority of China’s billionaire tech founders are graduates of unheralded universities in that country – ranked in the 300’s and 400’s on QS.

    Also, it’s hilarious that he doesn’t think the major makes a difference, as he’s probably unfamiliar with holistic admission (Oxbridge doesn’t practice such a farce). There is at least a 50 IQ point spread between a physics/mechanical/electrical engineering major and an ethnic/gender studies major in every elite college in America.

  96. @mmack
    Steve,

    Tangentially related to Global Universities, I see the flagship university in my old home state is opening a recruiting office in (checks notes) New Delhi and Bangalore, India!

    https://apnews.com/article/business-india-illinois-a24a9a90f161b6c2c01124fa7fc19ea7

    Apparently having Chinese students who pay full tuition yet work as spies for the CCP and steal research is a bad thing now, or we need even MORE foreign students paying the bloated salaries for DIE administrators as people with children and college age students flee Silly-nois.

    It'll be interesting to see if the Indians have the cashola the Chinese have to pay full freight.

    Ah, I remember the good ol' days where the flagship state school was for the, get this, citizens of the state where it resided.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    Bureaucracies always work for their own interests.

  97. @Steve Sailer
    @Malenfant

    Much of the countryside in England is exquisite. I've never seen anything to compare to the Cotswolds in the US. It's super green but also mostly deforested so you can see a long way most of the time, whereas in the US it's hard to see the forest for the trees. And there's often a great building in the distance in rural locales.

    And the English have been the best landscape architects for centuries (see Tom Stoppard's "Arcadia"). When I saw Capability Brown's 18th Century landscape design at Blenheim Palace, I realized this kind of place is the inspiration for great American golf courses like Augusta National (but not, oddly enough, for great British golf courses like Royal Sandwich).

    Replies: @LondonBob, @dvorak

    Much of the countryside in England is exquisite.

    Paul Graham and Jessica Livingston, married co-founders of startup factory Y Combinator, were raised in Pittsburgh and Greater Boston respectively. They are currently raising their kids in rural or small-town England. (Graham was born in England, so it wasn’t completely out of left field).

    Graham got an early taste of Silicon Valley wokeness about ten years ago when he was accused of sexism and racism, separately. He immediately kicked himself upstairs from the CEO position at YC and soon retired.

  98. @Supply and Demand
    @Getaclue

    The Great Reset has been working out well for the Chinese. Maybe if you guys dropped the Trump worship and got with the program, life would be better for you.

    Replies: @Getaclue, @fish

    Does Godfrey have a sockpuppet?

  99. @anon
    In the mid 2000's, The Economist published an article about the recipe for success for the UK and all other countries not named USA, which is to establish its own Silicon Valley, and the secret sauce to such a recipe is to anchor it with a world class STEM oriented university, i.e. their own Stanford, which for the UK would be Cambridge.

    A decade later, TE lamented that the experiment has failed. Despite all its efforts, a British Silicon Valley did not spring up around Cambridge, as it proved to be no Stanford. TE's conclusion was that the Brits just aren't ambitious enough, like the Americans. They make 20m pounds and are happy to sell or maintain, whereas Americans aren't happy until they make $20 billion.

    Be careful what you wish for.

    SV should serve as a cautionary tale to the world, not one to emulate. Big Tech has gone passed the point of good, they have now arrived at pure evil. Google, Facebook and Microsoft track us like cattle for exploitation. Twitter does nothing but fan the flames of hatred. Apple bankrupts us with their expensive iPhones. Netflix has become the new purveyor of soft porn and other cultural garbage. Palantir knows everything there is to know about each of us. Amazon has destroyed tens of thousands of retail businesses, and the internet basically is a giant deep dark jungle where hackers roam free and the (((media's))) stomping ground for disseminating fake news of both left and right.

    Yet I suppose these are the "best and brightest" that Boris wants to attract and bring to Britain. I say let him have it. Silicon Valley has destroyed the world, not improved it. Back in its early days it may have been developed by hippies like Steve Jobs and Wozniak who want to change the world for the better, but thanks to Bill Gates and company it has been transformed into a greed-is-good Wall Street offshoot. These days tech is all about money and tracking people. The only thing the techies care about is to develop yet another useless app to sell to Big Tech and make billions, ethics be damned. Wall Street/Private equity big money has tainted and destroyed technology. Boris Johnson can have these rapacious soulless vampire squids disguised as "engineers". America will be better off without them.

    Replies: @black sea

    The problem with that plan is that the world only needs so many Silicon Valleys. It’s like trying to create multiple Wall Streets all over the world. Yes, people engage in finance in ever medium-sized town, but they don,’t –for better or worse — create new and sometimes destructive financial products everywhere. Those with a particular talent for that sort of thing, coupled with enormous greed/ambition, continue to gravitate to Wall Street. Same thing with Silicon Valley.

  100. @Eric Novak
    @Spect3r

    Colorado alone has 53 peaks at or above 14,000 ft. Norway, which is smaller than Texas and California. No European country can compare with America in variety of natural features, which is why Europeans settled it to begin with. America comprises more than 1/3 of the land area of the North American continent.

    Replies: @Spect3r

    You said no country can rival USA in Natural beauty, and that is clearly not true.
    Do you have a lot of variety? You do, but so do other countries.
    For example, Norway has everything you guys have, farms, fields, mountains, beaches, etc and have Fjords, so…
    Also, size means nothing in this conversation.

    • Replies: @Western
    @Spect3r

    Norway doesn't have great deserts or warm weather beaches of the south like Florida or Hawaii. Norway has nothing like Death Valley, Joshua Tree, Arizona, Nevada, or the Meditteranean climate of the coast of California.

  101. @Spect3r
    @Eric Novak

    You said no country can rival USA in Natural beauty, and that is clearly not true.
    Do you have a lot of variety? You do, but so do other countries.
    For example, Norway has everything you guys have, farms, fields, mountains, beaches, etc and have Fjords, so...
    Also, size means nothing in this conversation.

    Replies: @Western

    Norway doesn’t have great deserts or warm weather beaches of the south like Florida or Hawaii. Norway has nothing like Death Valley, Joshua Tree, Arizona, Nevada, or the Meditteranean climate of the coast of California.

  102. We weren’t discussing climate, so all of that Mediterranean, California coast, etc is irrelevant to the conversation.

    I agree that they do not have Deserts, nor canyons… I have no idea what is Joshua tree.

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