The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Bono's Voice Goes Out in Berlin
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

In iSteve’s continuing coverage of all things Bono … From the BBC:

U2 tour: Berlin show cancelled due to Bono voice issues
1 September 2018

U2 fans were left disappointed when their Berlin show was cancelled after Bono lost his voice.

The Irish band had played a handful of songs when the singer apologised to the crowd, saying: “I think we can’t go on. It’s not right for you.” …

Some fans said Bono had announced that smoke machines had affected his voice. …

Bono had been singing Red Flag Day when he lost his voice, according to those at the concert.

I thought U2 was going to the wave the Blue Flag of the E.U. as a “transgressive” gesture.

Maybe it was having dinner with E.U. supremo Jean-Claude Juncker before the show and letting J-C pick the wine list that took its toll on Bono?

US actress Ashley Judd was at the concert and said “the crowd so felt for him” as he was “powerless and vulnerable”.

Ashley went on: “Powerless and vulnerable,” that’s just how I felt the first time my agent sent me a screenplay for a family drama about a 19-year-old girl, and I joked about how I had to lose five pounds to play a teenager, and then he said, “No, we’ve got Jennifer Lawrence for the lead, everybody thinks you’d be perfect for her mom.” That’s when I realized “It’s all Trump’s fault,” which I must say was awfully insightful of me considering it was 2010.

 
Hide 109 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. But does Bono play golf, ride a bicycle or star in My Beautiful Laundrette?

    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    I always confuse him with Sonny Bono but then I remember that they were different people. I can remember some of Sonny's songs (he couldn't sing at all). I don't think I've ever heard this one sing anything. Doesn't he sing with some group?

    Of course this guy is mostly famous nowadays for his politics. But toward the end so was Sonny - different directions of course.

    Another famous song writer Irving Berlin wasn't much of a singer but what little voice he had was pleasant. With the possible exception of Louis Armstrong or Bellafonte after his third vocal nodule operation, Sonny Bono had the worst voice in pop music history.

    Sonny delegated most of the singing to his wife Cher. She performed in a unique dialect/accent never heard before. She spoke normally and then sang in some accent she must have learned on Mars. She also had defective politics.
  2. Ashley Judd–another dry shrivelled womb trying to inflict her psychosis on the rest of us normal humans.

    • Replies: @Flip
    Her ex-husband remarried a younger woman and has a two year old daughter. I wonder why they didn't have children together.
  3. @AnotherDad
    Ashley Judd--another dry shrivelled womb trying to inflict her psychosis on the rest of us normal humans.

    Her ex-husband remarried a younger woman and has a two year old daughter. I wonder why they didn’t have children together.

    • Replies: @Luke
    Dario Franchitti, Scottish 4 time indycar champion
    , @Kylie
    "Her ex-husband remarried a younger woman and has a two year old daughter. I wonder why they didn’t have children together."

    I wonder if you wonder.
  4. Wouldn’t it be “transgressive” to wave the old national flags?

  5. The Trump Curse is not suffering a replication crisis.

  6. Is this the best place to go schadenfreude on someone’s possibly age-related problems? I don’t believe in karma but I could change my mind especially with such a target-rich environment.

    Born December 20, 1958 did you say?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I didn't say that.

    Here's what Twitter says:

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer

    , @Reg Cæsar

    Born December 20, 1958 did you say?
     
    Got him out of draft registration. Smart move, I'd say.

    Men born from March 29, 1957 through December 31, 1959, were not required to register with the Selective Service System because the registration program was suspended when they would have reached age 18. The requirement to register with Selective Service was reinstated in 1980, but only for men born January 1, 1960, or later.

    https://www.sss.gov/Registration/Men-Born-Before-1960
     
    , @Pericles
    "I don’t believe in karma but I could change my mind"

    Nobody cares.

    , @adreadline
    https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/731/145/0fa.jpg

    Bono will be fine.

    Saturday Bloody Saturdaaaay
    Saturday Bloody Saturdaaaay

  7. McCain had 5 funerals in 3 cities this week.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Seemed like more.
    , @36 ulster
    ...and played second fiddle to Trump at each and every one.
  8. That’s not Jean Clodd, that’s van Rompuy “former President of the European Council in office from November 2009 to November 2014.”:

    Biography of Herman Van Rompuy

    “The European Council, charged with defining the European Union’s (EU) overall political direction and priorities, is the institution of the EU that comprises the heads of state or government of the member states, along with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission.”

    Jean Claude is the current President of The Commission:

    Jean-Claude Juncker

    The European Commission (EC) is an institution of the European Union, responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.

    This is as complex as politicial organization in a George Lucas latter day production.

    It is rumored that Jean Claude is partial to Fernet Branca rather than wine:

    Fernet-Branca [ferˈnɛt ˈbraŋka] is a brand of amaro, or bitter herbal liqueur. Bernardino Branca invented the Fernet-Branca bitter in Milan, Italy, in 1845. The brand soon thereafter gained popularity, leading to the founding of the Fratelli Branca Distillery.

    On the sides:

    Jean Claude has just announced that Daylight Saving Time, one of the most stupidest ideas ever (AFAIK a Brit idea) shall finally be discontinued and European Time be fixed to Summertime for good. Thought it is unclear when that will happen (think of the billions of dollar that went into buggy DST implementations for decades …. the horror … the horror).

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    Perhaps the EU needs an Alt-Right Sith Lord.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iu3qoIsGzUM
    , @Cortes
    Every person from the south of England (where opposition to daylight saving is concentrated in the UK) does a volte-face on the subject after a couple of weeks of autumn at 55N and beyond. In my experience. Try it out yourself and get back to us.

    NB - The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.

  9. @JohnnyWalker123
    McCain had 5 funerals in 3 cities this week.

    Seemed like more.

    • Replies: @36 ulster
    You may be right, IJ. And yet he was upstaged in every one by The Uninvited One.
  10. I’ve seen U2 over 20 times and Bozo’s voice has never gone out.
    Flag Karma

  11. @El Dato
    That's not Jean Clodd, that's van Rompuy "former President of the European Council in office from November 2009 to November 2014.":

    Biography of Herman Van Rompuy


    "The European Council, charged with defining the European Union's (EU) overall political direction and priorities, is the institution of the EU that comprises the heads of state or government of the member states, along with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission."
     
    Jean Claude is the current President of The Commission:

    Jean-Claude Juncker


    The European Commission (EC) is an institution of the European Union, responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.
     
    This is as complex as politicial organization in a George Lucas latter day production.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPJy0HTRD4s

    It is rumored that Jean Claude is partial to Fernet Branca rather than wine:


    Fernet-Branca [ferˈnɛt ˈbraŋka] is a brand of amaro, or bitter herbal liqueur. Bernardino Branca invented the Fernet-Branca bitter in Milan, Italy, in 1845. The brand soon thereafter gained popularity, leading to the founding of the Fratelli Branca Distillery.
     
    On the sides:

    Jean Claude has just announced that Daylight Saving Time, one of the most stupidest ideas ever (AFAIK a Brit idea) shall finally be discontinued and European Time be fixed to Summertime for good. Thought it is unclear when that will happen (think of the billions of dollar that went into buggy DST implementations for decades .... the horror ... the horror).

    Perhaps the EU needs an Alt-Right Sith Lord.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Hi.
  12. • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Johnny, if I was an editorial cartoonist, I would sketch Obama standing on McCain's coffin and title it "Obama's new soap box."
  13. @El Dato
    That's not Jean Clodd, that's van Rompuy "former President of the European Council in office from November 2009 to November 2014.":

    Biography of Herman Van Rompuy


    "The European Council, charged with defining the European Union's (EU) overall political direction and priorities, is the institution of the EU that comprises the heads of state or government of the member states, along with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission."
     
    Jean Claude is the current President of The Commission:

    Jean-Claude Juncker


    The European Commission (EC) is an institution of the European Union, responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.
     
    This is as complex as politicial organization in a George Lucas latter day production.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPJy0HTRD4s

    It is rumored that Jean Claude is partial to Fernet Branca rather than wine:


    Fernet-Branca [ferˈnɛt ˈbraŋka] is a brand of amaro, or bitter herbal liqueur. Bernardino Branca invented the Fernet-Branca bitter in Milan, Italy, in 1845. The brand soon thereafter gained popularity, leading to the founding of the Fratelli Branca Distillery.
     
    On the sides:

    Jean Claude has just announced that Daylight Saving Time, one of the most stupidest ideas ever (AFAIK a Brit idea) shall finally be discontinued and European Time be fixed to Summertime for good. Thought it is unclear when that will happen (think of the billions of dollar that went into buggy DST implementations for decades .... the horror ... the horror).

    Every person from the south of England (where opposition to daylight saving is concentrated in the UK) does a volte-face on the subject after a couple of weeks of autumn at 55N and beyond. In my experience. Try it out yourself and get back to us.

    NB – The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Basically, the authorities have pretty much worked out all the kinks in Daylight Savings Time in recent years, so nobody is trying to make it better anymore, so the complainers have the upper hand at present.
    , @moshe
    Nope, Daylight Savings Time is for farmers and sick f*cks who do dumb things like have children or work 9-5 M-F.

    The best time to awaken is about an hour after sun rise and with DSF sunrise can be at 5am instead of at a more reasonable 8am.

    Likewise, you want approximately 4 hours of Wake Time before you go to sleep. With DSF you can be going to sleep at 7:30 instead of the more pleasant and reasonable 2am.

    Ugh. It's bad enough winter is cold, does it have to be dark too?

    To stay relevant, let me add that I love the fact that antisems' white utopias are planned for Idaho and Norway.

    Dumb goyim.

    Jews know that California is the place to be. after partaking of the tree of knowledge of Good and Evil we left Eden for the farther-most western point we could find. As the Bible says, our forefathers wisely held to "eat and drink for tomorrow we die". (God disagreed which is why we killed Him.)

    Daylight savings time is an evil the workingman morlock, lover of the dark, seeks to impose upon his eloi superiors who frolick in the light.

    The better to hunt and eat us I suppose.
    , @AnotherDad

    The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.
     
    No way on the 10:15.

    It's true this is an extraordinarily bad idea for Spain. Spain is essentially under England and belongs in UTC. So Europe time (UTC+1)--more or less the right time for Germany--is already "daylight savings". Then locking in the daylight savings version of that--UTC+2--puts Spain in a time zone meant for Western Russia--say St.Petersburg--or Kiev. Still that's only two hour. So at the equinox your sunrise would be around 8:00 am.

    On top of that you have the seasonal swing. But even here in Seattle--47 degrees--we only lose about 3-1/2 hours of daylight; 1-1/2-2hrs on each side. Even at the winter solstice sunrise is before 8:00am. Barcelona is down near 40 degrees--a bit north of Madrid, so call it 41. That's like New York. You'll lose less than 3 hours of daylight. So no more than 1-1/2 in the morning. That puts your latest sunrise no later than 9:30, and it should be less than that, 9:15ish.

    But still that's ridiculous--Spain isn't Norway, the sun shouldn't be rising after 9.

    If Europe insists on this idiocy Spain should just quit Europe time and roll it's own, "Spanish Time". That could be what you have now--UTC+1 in the winter, UTC+2 in the summer. Or throw in with the Brits--UTC+1 in the summer, UTC in the winter.
    , @Pericles
    Last year, the sun rose at 08:45 in Stockholm on 22 December and set again at 14:48. (DST included.) So 10:15 would roughly be the post-DST situation in Stockholm, not Barcelona.

    In Kiruna on 10 December, the sun rose at 11:18 and set at 11:44. It didn't rise again until 2 January.
  14. Bo no and u2, gas bags over full.

    So many concerts with too-full inflatables the team members had to emulate.

    then copying the beatles by making noise in traffic.

    Best they go away or play vegas and what’s in vegas stays there.

  15. @Cortes
    Every person from the south of England (where opposition to daylight saving is concentrated in the UK) does a volte-face on the subject after a couple of weeks of autumn at 55N and beyond. In my experience. Try it out yourself and get back to us.

    NB - The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.

    Basically, the authorities have pretty much worked out all the kinks in Daylight Savings Time in recent years, so nobody is trying to make it better anymore, so the complainers have the upper hand at present.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    I spent a few years in Oxford and London and in those places, as I recall, in the bleak midwinter there was light until about 1800 and that since around 0700. Contrast with (on the occasional clear sky day at 55N or 409 miles NW of London) 0830 until 1600- in ideal conditions. The promoters of permanent clocktime are blinkered morons.

    To provide a little more context, parents with small kids at our latitudes invest in blackout curtains for the lighter months so that they get a decent sleep.. I remember hanging them* at the start of May.

    * Curtains, though I could’ve hanged the kids high at times...

    , @dr kill
    We (FL) apparently are waiting for Congress to approve the Permanent DST law passed last winter. Stay tuned.
  16. @Flip
    Her ex-husband remarried a younger woman and has a two year old daughter. I wonder why they didn't have children together.

    Dario Franchitti, Scottish 4 time indycar champion

  17. @Steve Sailer
    Basically, the authorities have pretty much worked out all the kinks in Daylight Savings Time in recent years, so nobody is trying to make it better anymore, so the complainers have the upper hand at present.

    I spent a few years in Oxford and London and in those places, as I recall, in the bleak midwinter there was light until about 1800 and that since around 0700. Contrast with (on the occasional clear sky day at 55N or 409 miles NW of London) 0830 until 1600- in ideal conditions. The promoters of permanent clocktime are blinkered morons.

    To provide a little more context, parents with small kids at our latitudes invest in blackout curtains for the lighter months so that they get a decent sleep.. I remember hanging them* at the start of May.

    * Curtains, though I could’ve hanged the kids high at times…

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    Huh. I remember Oxford as being pretty dark at like 4:30 PM in the winter, but perhaps I'm not remembering correctly: It's been about 25 years. Anyway, I certainly started getting up in time for sunrise during those months so as not to sink into a suicidal depression.
    , @NickG

    I spent a few years in Oxford and London and in those places, as I recall, in the bleak midwinter there was light until about 1800 and that since around 0700
     
    Your memory is off. Sunset time in Oxford at the Winter solstice is 16:47, it's properly dark around 16:15.
  18. @Cortes
    Every person from the south of England (where opposition to daylight saving is concentrated in the UK) does a volte-face on the subject after a couple of weeks of autumn at 55N and beyond. In my experience. Try it out yourself and get back to us.

    NB - The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.

    Nope, Daylight Savings Time is for farmers and sick f*cks who do dumb things like have children or work 9-5 M-F.

    The best time to awaken is about an hour after sun rise and with DSF sunrise can be at 5am instead of at a more reasonable 8am.

    Likewise, you want approximately 4 hours of Wake Time before you go to sleep. With DSF you can be going to sleep at 7:30 instead of the more pleasant and reasonable 2am.

    Ugh. It’s bad enough winter is cold, does it have to be dark too?

    To stay relevant, let me add that I love the fact that antisems’ white utopias are planned for Idaho and Norway.

    Dumb goyim.

    Jews know that California is the place to be. after partaking of the tree of knowledge of Good and Evil we left Eden for the farther-most western point we could find. As the Bible says, our forefathers wisely held to “eat and drink for tomorrow we die”. (God disagreed which is why we killed Him.)

    Daylight savings time is an evil the workingman morlock, lover of the dark, seeks to impose upon his eloi superiors who frolick in the light.

    The better to hunt and eat us I suppose.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    I'm delighted to infer that you don't have children.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    You're better at your schtick than TD is at his. Not good enough for the Poconos or Catskills but not bad either. keep the humor coming.
    , @Intelligent Dasein

    As the Bible says, our forefathers wisely held to “eat and drink for tomorrow we die”. (God disagreed which is why we....)
     
    That was a tremendously blasphemous, horrible thing to say.
  19. I would worry for Steve if U2 had performed at McCain’s funeral. The blog might have exploded right off the screen at me.

    Also – if you could only take 8 U2 songs into space, which ones would they be?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I like "Where the Streets Have No Name," but in general I don't really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2's sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren't that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like "Stand" or "It's the End of the World As We Know It" that come as a surprise.

    , @flyingtiger
    "She moves in mysterious ways"
    I heard this song so many times in strip clubs. Every time I hear it I think of Shayla, Randi, Cherise, Fiona, Christina, Ariel and others.
    The song that brings about fond memories. Not like that preachy "In the name of love," about that pool hustler, Michael King.
  20. Used to be a lot of Irish bands that had singing talent to go around. For instance, in the heyday of the Dubliners, they had Luke Kelly AND Ronnie Drew – two really excellent, first-rate voices, though I believe the others could also sing.

  21. @MikeatMikedotMike
    I would worry for Steve if U2 had performed at McCain's funeral. The blog might have exploded right off the screen at me.

    Also - if you could only take 8 U2 songs into space, which ones would they be?

    I like “Where the Streets Have No Name,” but in general I don’t really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2’s sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren’t that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like “Stand” or “It’s the End of the World As We Know It” that come as a surprise.

    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    So is WtSHNN the equivalent of militant black medical student or 60 year old Jewish professor?
    , @Jim Christian
    The music of all of them are so ingrained in my mind, I'm sick of all of them. Three chords and some kind of hook and you can't get them off three plays a day on every FM station 50 years later. Popular music blows.

    Ah, Bach! Great symphony orchestras, they used to take us to the Kennedy Center as kids, my Fairfax High had a great director for public schools, a Matt Hines, he built concert bands. I found symphony to be a far more moving experience live than any rock I ever saw live and I saw all the 60s and 70s greats. But the complexity and rich sounds from a fine orchestra always touched me more. I listened to rock, I got laid with rock, but I never LOVED rock. It was there, to be tolerated, base and course and by any comparison to great symphony, talentless. Sorry Led and Stones and Paul.

    Little Feat, no one liked them. But for awhile, it was supposedly cool to SAY you liked them. No one really did. Remember them? No? Shocking. And who will remember the Beatles, Bono, the Stones 100 years hence, 50 years from today? Terrestrial radio will be dead by then, and so, no one. They were a gimmick with a hook. They'll be in some internet backwater, 400 pages deep in a Google search.

    , @CrunchybutRealistCon
    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90. The fame must have gone to Bono's head in a way that Paul McCartney. Elton John & Mick Jagger were able to compartmentalize & put in context.
    FFS Bono (& Sting), you are just entertainers.

    Seeing Bono stumble this way gives hope to opponents of Bugmen.
    , @kihowi
    I've always categorized U2 together with acts like Bob Dylan or Lady Gaga that are much better at the spiel than the music. When I was young and interested in pop music it seemed like every week there was a new salivating piece in the music press about how U2 was re-inventing themselves again or brining out a new gimmick. Remember when they performed under giant McDonalds-like golden arches? How ironic and post-modern and clever!

    Then when you listen to the music it sort of drones on.
    , @Ganderson
    REM was the back up band on Warren Zevon’s wonderful version of “Raspberry Beret”.
    , @WowJustWow
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8dZwXnMrRU
  22. @Cortes
    I spent a few years in Oxford and London and in those places, as I recall, in the bleak midwinter there was light until about 1800 and that since around 0700. Contrast with (on the occasional clear sky day at 55N or 409 miles NW of London) 0830 until 1600- in ideal conditions. The promoters of permanent clocktime are blinkered morons.

    To provide a little more context, parents with small kids at our latitudes invest in blackout curtains for the lighter months so that they get a decent sleep.. I remember hanging them* at the start of May.

    * Curtains, though I could’ve hanged the kids high at times...

    Huh. I remember Oxford as being pretty dark at like 4:30 PM in the winter, but perhaps I’m not remembering correctly: It’s been about 25 years. Anyway, I certainly started getting up in time for sunrise during those months so as not to sink into a suicidal depression.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    Pretty dark sounds right.

    But absence of light? I’m going back to the early 1980s for Oxford and the evening light didn’t look too different from London late 80s/early 90s. Then, I’m old.
    , @Intelligent Dasein

    Huh. I remember Oxford as being pretty dark at like 4:30 PM in the winter, but perhaps I’m not remembering correctly:
     
    You don't have to remember. The website timeanddate.com has a plethora of astronomical calendars and calculators, including the completely interactive sun calculator which will tell you the exact times of sunrise and sunset, for any day of the year, for any location on Earth. Here is the sun calculator for Oxford, UK, which tells you that in the dead of winter, on December 21st (the solstice typically falls on or about this day), Oxford will experience "daylight" (i.e. some portion of the visible disk of the sun above the horizon) from 8:09 am to 3:56 pm, for a total of 7 hours and 47 minutes, although the various types of twilight may extend the hours that are subjectively experienced as daytime.

    There is a whole bunch of useful information on this site and it's fun to play around with the calculators. I highly recommend it.

  23. @moshe
    Nope, Daylight Savings Time is for farmers and sick f*cks who do dumb things like have children or work 9-5 M-F.

    The best time to awaken is about an hour after sun rise and with DSF sunrise can be at 5am instead of at a more reasonable 8am.

    Likewise, you want approximately 4 hours of Wake Time before you go to sleep. With DSF you can be going to sleep at 7:30 instead of the more pleasant and reasonable 2am.

    Ugh. It's bad enough winter is cold, does it have to be dark too?

    To stay relevant, let me add that I love the fact that antisems' white utopias are planned for Idaho and Norway.

    Dumb goyim.

    Jews know that California is the place to be. after partaking of the tree of knowledge of Good and Evil we left Eden for the farther-most western point we could find. As the Bible says, our forefathers wisely held to "eat and drink for tomorrow we die". (God disagreed which is why we killed Him.)

    Daylight savings time is an evil the workingman morlock, lover of the dark, seeks to impose upon his eloi superiors who frolick in the light.

    The better to hunt and eat us I suppose.

    I’m delighted to infer that you don’t have children.

    • Replies: @moshe
    Don't be so delighted.

    I skipped-country on 3 different girlfriends after they missed their period for a while and haven't spoken with any of em since.

    One is a saudi muslim chick with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth. One a Jewess whom you have seen on tv if your wife has made you watch one of the most watched inane reality shows. And one - here's the good news for you - believe it or not, half genetically Japanese and half genetically German (the latter of which were in Hawaii before WW2).

    Not to mention some interesting 1 night stands.

    So I can't promise ya my genes aren't safeguarded in some secure zones.

  24. @Flip
    Her ex-husband remarried a younger woman and has a two year old daughter. I wonder why they didn't have children together.

    “Her ex-husband remarried a younger woman and has a two year old daughter. I wonder why they didn’t have children together.”

    I wonder if you wonder.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    Nothing to wonder. He divorced her, he wanted kids. That's Part 1. Part 2 is, the morning of the pussy march, it was a big deal in DC that Judd was going to speak at the thing. That very morning, Washington Post ran a full-length article about Judd, Dario, their divorce, complete with pictures of the new 25 year-old beautiful blonde wife, handsome Dario and his two beautiful kids. Positively picturesque. Great article, but it's archived, can't find it for now.

    And so I have this theory, that Judd was fueled in her rage by the article that morning. Pissed that Dario got what he wanted and she's on the outside looking in, her hatred trebled and fueled by unused eggs. Chicks are vengeful as fuck. Here's her speech, check the rage, man. This chick lives a life as fine as money and a chick's beauty can make it. And yet: rage. Here, you tell me:
    https://youtu.be/VNXMOxBbt6g

  25. On daylight savings time, the number of hours of daylight in a day is a function of the latitude and the time of the year, not the clock. Changing the clock does absolutely nothing. If employers want their employees to report to work and/ or leave work closer to/ urther from sunrise/ sunset, they are always free to change their standard working hours. The idea was always snake oil.

    • Agree: Corn
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    DST was first used by the Germans in WWI in an effort to save energy. The savings have never been demonstrated.
    , @Corn
    I tend to agree. Supposedly an American Indian once said that DST was like “cutting one end off your blanket to sew to the other end.”

    Getting back to your suggestion, the late blogger John Reilly once suggested the same. Rather than set the clock back, businesses should keep Summer Hours and Winter Hours.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I would hope (and am pretty sure) everyone on this page would know that you don't gain any daylight or lose any daylight. I haven't followed all the comments on this but do want to add one thing about time zones. China has one time zone. The country is not really as wide East-West as you might imagine from the maps, as most everyone is in the eastern 60% - the rest is Tibet and Xinjiang(?), which is just desolate mountains and high desert.

    My point is that China is not doing anything magical or smart by keeping the one time zone. It may work well for airline schedules and the like. As far as daily life though, if you live in Chengdu, fairly far west, you're not gonna start work at 8A when the sun doesn't come up until 9:30. People and business will make the hours fit the human body. That means people still have to keep track of different hours of people in places that are far apart in longitude when doing business.

    There's not perfect way on this. That's why we have our retard phones to tell us what time it is along with when our facebook friends had their last bowel movements.
  26. @anony-mouse
    Is this the best place to go schadenfreude on someone's possibly age-related problems? I don't believe in karma but I could change my mind especially with such a target-rich environment.

    Born December 20, 1958 did you say?

    I didn’t say that.

    Here’s what Twitter says:

  27. @slumber_j
    Huh. I remember Oxford as being pretty dark at like 4:30 PM in the winter, but perhaps I'm not remembering correctly: It's been about 25 years. Anyway, I certainly started getting up in time for sunrise during those months so as not to sink into a suicidal depression.

    Pretty dark sounds right.

    But absence of light? I’m going back to the early 1980s for Oxford and the evening light didn’t look too different from London late 80s/early 90s. Then, I’m old.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    No, you're probably right: not total darkness at that hour. Just dark enough to sadden me.
  28. @Steve Sailer
    I like "Where the Streets Have No Name," but in general I don't really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2's sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren't that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like "Stand" or "It's the End of the World As We Know It" that come as a surprise.

    So is WtSHNN the equivalent of militant black medical student or 60 year old Jewish professor?

  29. @slumber_j
    Huh. I remember Oxford as being pretty dark at like 4:30 PM in the winter, but perhaps I'm not remembering correctly: It's been about 25 years. Anyway, I certainly started getting up in time for sunrise during those months so as not to sink into a suicidal depression.

    Huh. I remember Oxford as being pretty dark at like 4:30 PM in the winter, but perhaps I’m not remembering correctly:

    You don’t have to remember. The website timeanddate.com has a plethora of astronomical calendars and calculators, including the completely interactive sun calculator which will tell you the exact times of sunrise and sunset, for any day of the year, for any location on Earth. Here is the sun calculator for Oxford, UK, which tells you that in the dead of winter, on December 21st (the solstice typically falls on or about this day), Oxford will experience “daylight” (i.e. some portion of the visible disk of the sun above the horizon) from 8:09 am to 3:56 pm, for a total of 7 hours and 47 minutes, although the various types of twilight may extend the hours that are subjectively experienced as daytime.

    There is a whole bunch of useful information on this site and it’s fun to play around with the calculators. I highly recommend it.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    Thanks. I supposed there were ways to check but was too lazy to do so.

    3:56 sounds about right for sunset: it's a miracle I survived.
  30. @moshe
    Nope, Daylight Savings Time is for farmers and sick f*cks who do dumb things like have children or work 9-5 M-F.

    The best time to awaken is about an hour after sun rise and with DSF sunrise can be at 5am instead of at a more reasonable 8am.

    Likewise, you want approximately 4 hours of Wake Time before you go to sleep. With DSF you can be going to sleep at 7:30 instead of the more pleasant and reasonable 2am.

    Ugh. It's bad enough winter is cold, does it have to be dark too?

    To stay relevant, let me add that I love the fact that antisems' white utopias are planned for Idaho and Norway.

    Dumb goyim.

    Jews know that California is the place to be. after partaking of the tree of knowledge of Good and Evil we left Eden for the farther-most western point we could find. As the Bible says, our forefathers wisely held to "eat and drink for tomorrow we die". (God disagreed which is why we killed Him.)

    Daylight savings time is an evil the workingman morlock, lover of the dark, seeks to impose upon his eloi superiors who frolick in the light.

    The better to hunt and eat us I suppose.

    You’re better at your schtick than TD is at his. Not good enough for the Poconos or Catskills but not bad either. keep the humor coming.

  31. @Cortes
    Pretty dark sounds right.

    But absence of light? I’m going back to the early 1980s for Oxford and the evening light didn’t look too different from London late 80s/early 90s. Then, I’m old.

    No, you’re probably right: not total darkness at that hour. Just dark enough to sadden me.

  32. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/AbbyMartin/status/891191056770809856

    Johnny, if I was an editorial cartoonist, I would sketch Obama standing on McCain’s coffin and title it “Obama’s new soap box.”

  33. @Kylie
    "Her ex-husband remarried a younger woman and has a two year old daughter. I wonder why they didn’t have children together."

    I wonder if you wonder.

    Nothing to wonder. He divorced her, he wanted kids. That’s Part 1. Part 2 is, the morning of the pussy march, it was a big deal in DC that Judd was going to speak at the thing. That very morning, Washington Post ran a full-length article about Judd, Dario, their divorce, complete with pictures of the new 25 year-old beautiful blonde wife, handsome Dario and his two beautiful kids. Positively picturesque. Great article, but it’s archived, can’t find it for now.

    And so I have this theory, that Judd was fueled in her rage by the article that morning. Pissed that Dario got what he wanted and she’s on the outside looking in, her hatred trebled and fueled by unused eggs. Chicks are vengeful as fuck. Here’s her speech, check the rage, man. This chick lives a life as fine as money and a chick’s beauty can make it. And yet: rage. Here, you tell me:

    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
    Ashley:
    "I am unafraid to be nasty because..."

    ...because I bash Christians, Muslims, & Sikhs -- BUT NOT JEWS...

    ...and because I bash White males as rapists -- BUT NOT BLACKS!

    FIFY

    , @backup
    I read a transcript and the speech is an incoherent mess. I think the "rage" isn't real, the "rage" being a compensation for the fact that being a feminist in the 21st century west is pointless. Women have the same rights as men. There is nothing to fight for anymore. The fight is over. The latest feminist wave is simply a live action role-play.
    , @Olorin

    Chicks are vengeful as fuck.
     
    And men never are, of course. Which is why we never routinely sacrifice our sons to brother wars or our children to demographic replacement by Muslims and Africans. Say to get even with, I dunno, Germans.
  34. @Intelligent Dasein

    Huh. I remember Oxford as being pretty dark at like 4:30 PM in the winter, but perhaps I’m not remembering correctly:
     
    You don't have to remember. The website timeanddate.com has a plethora of astronomical calendars and calculators, including the completely interactive sun calculator which will tell you the exact times of sunrise and sunset, for any day of the year, for any location on Earth. Here is the sun calculator for Oxford, UK, which tells you that in the dead of winter, on December 21st (the solstice typically falls on or about this day), Oxford will experience "daylight" (i.e. some portion of the visible disk of the sun above the horizon) from 8:09 am to 3:56 pm, for a total of 7 hours and 47 minutes, although the various types of twilight may extend the hours that are subjectively experienced as daytime.

    There is a whole bunch of useful information on this site and it's fun to play around with the calculators. I highly recommend it.

    Thanks. I supposed there were ways to check but was too lazy to do so.

    3:56 sounds about right for sunset: it’s a miracle I survived.

  35. @Cortes
    Every person from the south of England (where opposition to daylight saving is concentrated in the UK) does a volte-face on the subject after a couple of weeks of autumn at 55N and beyond. In my experience. Try it out yourself and get back to us.

    NB - The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.

    The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.

    No way on the 10:15.

    It’s true this is an extraordinarily bad idea for Spain. Spain is essentially under England and belongs in UTC. So Europe time (UTC+1)–more or less the right time for Germany–is already “daylight savings”. Then locking in the daylight savings version of that–UTC+2–puts Spain in a time zone meant for Western Russia–say St.Petersburg–or Kiev. Still that’s only two hour. So at the equinox your sunrise would be around 8:00 am.

    On top of that you have the seasonal swing. But even here in Seattle–47 degrees–we only lose about 3-1/2 hours of daylight; 1-1/2-2hrs on each side. Even at the winter solstice sunrise is before 8:00am. Barcelona is down near 40 degrees–a bit north of Madrid, so call it 41. That’s like New York. You’ll lose less than 3 hours of daylight. So no more than 1-1/2 in the morning. That puts your latest sunrise no later than 9:30, and it should be less than that, 9:15ish.

    But still that’s ridiculous–Spain isn’t Norway, the sun shouldn’t be rising after 9.

    If Europe insists on this idiocy Spain should just quit Europe time and roll it’s own, “Spanish Time”. That could be what you have now–UTC+1 in the winter, UTC+2 in the summer. Or throw in with the Brits–UTC+1 in the summer, UTC in the winter.

    • Replies: @David
    Sunrise in Barcelona at the winter solstice would be about 8:15 without dst so 9:15 with it, I agree. But at 44 degrees north, Burlington's longest day is about 6.5 hours longer than its shortest so Seattle's difference is obviously more than 3.5 hours.
    , @Cortes
    The article is now headlined 0915

    https://www.elperiodico.com/es/ciencia/20180831/salida-sol-cambio-hora-verano-invierno-7011474

    but I’m fairly sure it read 1015 a couple of days ago. Or I was just plain wrong. No intention of misleading.
  36. @Steve Sailer
    I like "Where the Streets Have No Name," but in general I don't really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2's sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren't that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like "Stand" or "It's the End of the World As We Know It" that come as a surprise.

    The music of all of them are so ingrained in my mind, I’m sick of all of them. Three chords and some kind of hook and you can’t get them off three plays a day on every FM station 50 years later. Popular music blows.

    Ah, Bach! Great symphony orchestras, they used to take us to the Kennedy Center as kids, my Fairfax High had a great director for public schools, a Matt Hines, he built concert bands. I found symphony to be a far more moving experience live than any rock I ever saw live and I saw all the 60s and 70s greats. But the complexity and rich sounds from a fine orchestra always touched me more. I listened to rock, I got laid with rock, but I never LOVED rock. It was there, to be tolerated, base and course and by any comparison to great symphony, talentless. Sorry Led and Stones and Paul.

    Little Feat, no one liked them. But for awhile, it was supposedly cool to SAY you liked them. No one really did. Remember them? No? Shocking. And who will remember the Beatles, Bono, the Stones 100 years hence, 50 years from today? Terrestrial radio will be dead by then, and so, no one. They were a gimmick with a hook. They’ll be in some internet backwater, 400 pages deep in a Google search.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Little Feat, no one liked them.
     
    AEN begs to differ, sir:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTz8g8yh8GY

    Maybe it's that honky-tonk piano that I like so much. See also Dixie Chicken.
  37. @Steve Sailer
    I like "Where the Streets Have No Name," but in general I don't really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2's sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren't that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like "Stand" or "It's the End of the World As We Know It" that come as a surprise.

    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90. The fame must have gone to Bono’s head in a way that Paul McCartney. Elton John & Mick Jagger were able to compartmentalize & put in context.
    FFS Bono (& Sting), you are just entertainers.

    Seeing Bono stumble this way gives hope to opponents of Bugmen.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90.

    Eh ... they were a sensation in front of a fashionable crowd of 3,000 in Santa Monica in 1981 and then equally successful in front of a mainstream arena rock crowd opening for J. Geils in San Francisco in early 1982. That they'd be the biggest band in the world by 1987 was not particularly surprising to me.

    They were also really young when they first got to America: Bono was 21 in 1981 and The Edge only 20. Bands used to be really young during the British Invasion, but less so than in the past. Joe Strummer turned 25 in 1977, Chrissie Hynde was 27 when her first album came out, as was Sting with "Roxanne." So if you figure rock stars peak about the same later 20s age as baseball players, then U2 was good enough young enough that they had a half dozen years as a Transatlantic touring band under their belts before they conquered the world with "The Joshua Tree" in 1987.

    One thing that slowed them down was that Bono's notebook of lyrics he was writing down on tour for their second album got stolen, so their October album wasn't as good as it could have been when they had to put their new songs back together on the fly.

  38. US actress Ashley Judd was at the concert and said “the crowd so felt for him” as he was “powerless and vulnerable”.

    Isn’t feeling for the powerless and vulnerable sexual harassment? Keep your hands to yourself!

  39. @anony-mouse
    Is this the best place to go schadenfreude on someone's possibly age-related problems? I don't believe in karma but I could change my mind especially with such a target-rich environment.

    Born December 20, 1958 did you say?

    Born December 20, 1958 did you say?

    Got him out of draft registration. Smart move, I’d say.

    Men born from March 29, 1957 through December 31, 1959, were not required to register with the Selective Service System because the registration program was suspended when they would have reached age 18. The requirement to register with Selective Service was reinstated in 1980, but only for men born January 1, 1960, or later.

    https://www.sss.gov/Registration/Men-Born-Before-1960

  40. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90. The fame must have gone to Bono's head in a way that Paul McCartney. Elton John & Mick Jagger were able to compartmentalize & put in context.
    FFS Bono (& Sting), you are just entertainers.

    Seeing Bono stumble this way gives hope to opponents of Bugmen.

    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90.

    Eh … they were a sensation in front of a fashionable crowd of 3,000 in Santa Monica in 1981 and then equally successful in front of a mainstream arena rock crowd opening for J. Geils in San Francisco in early 1982. That they’d be the biggest band in the world by 1987 was not particularly surprising to me.

    They were also really young when they first got to America: Bono was 21 in 1981 and The Edge only 20. Bands used to be really young during the British Invasion, but less so than in the past. Joe Strummer turned 25 in 1977, Chrissie Hynde was 27 when her first album came out, as was Sting with “Roxanne.” So if you figure rock stars peak about the same later 20s age as baseball players, then U2 was good enough young enough that they had a half dozen years as a Transatlantic touring band under their belts before they conquered the world with “The Joshua Tree” in 1987.

    One thing that slowed them down was that Bono’s notebook of lyrics he was writing down on tour for their second album got stolen, so their October album wasn’t as good as it could have been when they had to put their new songs back together on the fly.

    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    That's interesting about their 2nd album lyrics being nicked. Their first album is alright, but October sure is a clunker.
    They'd have continued decent success (Simple Minds, Pretenders, Kinks) had they stayed on the vein of #3's "War". but it always seemed that it was the injection of ambient moodscape vibes of (Vangelis-Philip Glass style) that made their next two albums so addictive. It probably helped that their late 80s competition was vapid Hair Metal & saccharine top 40 like Starship.
    , @Peter Akuleyev

    One thing that slowed them down was that Bono’s notebook of lyrics he was writing down on tour for their second album got stolen
     
    Losing the lyrics should have helped. U2's lyrics are generally vapid cliche ridden sentiment, probably the band's weakest element. They tend to be very abstract ,vague and about "me" and "you" and "love", but usually with a catchy phrase for the chorus "It's a beautiful day", "Where the streets have no name", "two hearts (beating as one)", etc. Maybe that's their appeal - simple, not challenging but memorable, kind of like a Hallmark card. Michael Stipe is a far better lyricist.

    Shane MacGowan was writing brilliant lyrics around the same time - "Sickbed of Cuchullain", "Fairytale of New York", "Dark Streets of London". That 's what Irish rock should be.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    It really would be a shame to lose all that writing, but the truth is that lyrics hardly matter. This band had (or has, but I wouldn't know) a great sound, and whoever writes the melody does a great job. That's what matters, the melody and the sound, and, as Peak Stupidity tried to explain back during it's beginnings, the lyrics are of far less importance.

    That may be less so for folk music, but I'm talking about rock&roll. David Byrne said on some interview that Burning Down the House was originally going to be Foam Rubber, USA (no I can't find that 1980's interview). It didn't matter wha the said, that song has a great beat (not that good a melody though). Take Louie, Lou-eye, please! Nobody knows what the guy's singing.

    I appreciate your plug for REM, Steve. It turns out that they are a perfect example of my point here. They had some great melodies and a great sound, especially on Murmer, which is appropriately titled. I think the rest of the band admitted that they didn't know what Michael Stipe was singing. Stipe probably didn't reall know either. Who cares, when you've got Radio Free Europe turned up to 11:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eK1xD8RClbM
  41. Anonymous[332] • Disclaimer says:

    Even if they weren’t engaged in all that preening, self-congratulating activism, U2’s music would still be horrible. U2 sounds like an HR department feels.

    Their sound is similar to INXS, but the latter managed to come across as authentic, original and charismatic until Michael Hutchence’s death. U2 is sterile, repetitive, hollow and derivative.

    What kind of person even goes to a U2 concert in 2018 (besides Wacky Judd?) Sad!

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    What kind of person even goes to a U2 concert in 2018 (besides Wacky Judd?) Sad!

    In my experience lots of professional types in their 40s and 50s. I know every time they come through Boston the partners at management consulting firms, investment bankers and commercial bank directors all get very excited. They are a band for aging white fraternity brothers, which is kind of ironic.
  42. @Steve Sailer
    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90.

    Eh ... they were a sensation in front of a fashionable crowd of 3,000 in Santa Monica in 1981 and then equally successful in front of a mainstream arena rock crowd opening for J. Geils in San Francisco in early 1982. That they'd be the biggest band in the world by 1987 was not particularly surprising to me.

    They were also really young when they first got to America: Bono was 21 in 1981 and The Edge only 20. Bands used to be really young during the British Invasion, but less so than in the past. Joe Strummer turned 25 in 1977, Chrissie Hynde was 27 when her first album came out, as was Sting with "Roxanne." So if you figure rock stars peak about the same later 20s age as baseball players, then U2 was good enough young enough that they had a half dozen years as a Transatlantic touring band under their belts before they conquered the world with "The Joshua Tree" in 1987.

    One thing that slowed them down was that Bono's notebook of lyrics he was writing down on tour for their second album got stolen, so their October album wasn't as good as it could have been when they had to put their new songs back together on the fly.

    That’s interesting about their 2nd album lyrics being nicked. Their first album is alright, but October sure is a clunker.
    They’d have continued decent success (Simple Minds, Pretenders, Kinks) had they stayed on the vein of #3’s “War”. but it always seemed that it was the injection of ambient moodscape vibes of (Vangelis-Philip Glass style) that made their next two albums so addictive. It probably helped that their late 80s competition was vapid Hair Metal & saccharine top 40 like Starship.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Right, "Joshua Tree" takes their album music up to a new level due to the production:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FsrPEUt2Dg

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    I wonder if any of that slightly portentious, bombastic wall-of-noise arena rock was influenced by Scottish contemporaries Simple Minds? They changed a lot between 'Boy' (pretty "rocky") and Unforgettable Fire. Stuff like Bad and especially Pride In The Name Of Love always seemed Simple-Mindsy, though with guitar doing a lot of the synthesiser stuff.

    SM were YUGE in 1983/4, then Jim Kerr went and married Chrissie Hynde, which unsurprisingly seems to have taken his eye off the ball.

    (blimey, and there you go - "When creating their 1984 album The Unforgettable Fire, the Irish rock band U2 saw New Gold Dream as an influence."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYFIIuubklU

  43. Frog in the throat? Let’s hope it’s Marine Le Pen using his uvula as a punchbag.

    • Replies: @36 ulster
    I like the image of that; I'd hope that Marion would join in.
  44. @anony-mouse
    Is this the best place to go schadenfreude on someone's possibly age-related problems? I don't believe in karma but I could change my mind especially with such a target-rich environment.

    Born December 20, 1958 did you say?

    “I don’t believe in karma but I could change my mind”

    Nobody cares.

  45. @Cortes
    Every person from the south of England (where opposition to daylight saving is concentrated in the UK) does a volte-face on the subject after a couple of weeks of autumn at 55N and beyond. In my experience. Try it out yourself and get back to us.

    NB - The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.

    Last year, the sun rose at 08:45 in Stockholm on 22 December and set again at 14:48. (DST included.) So 10:15 would roughly be the post-DST situation in Stockholm, not Barcelona.

    In Kiruna on 10 December, the sun rose at 11:18 and set at 11:44. It didn’t rise again until 2 January.

  46. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    That's interesting about their 2nd album lyrics being nicked. Their first album is alright, but October sure is a clunker.
    They'd have continued decent success (Simple Minds, Pretenders, Kinks) had they stayed on the vein of #3's "War". but it always seemed that it was the injection of ambient moodscape vibes of (Vangelis-Philip Glass style) that made their next two albums so addictive. It probably helped that their late 80s competition was vapid Hair Metal & saccharine top 40 like Starship.

    Right, “Joshua Tree” takes their album music up to a new level due to the production:

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    My immediate reaction at the time to "Joshua Tree" was that U2 had sold out. Back in the 1980s selling out was still a thing. "War" was still stripped down and punk enough that the bombast didn't seem overbearing. The "Joshua Tree" sound made them pretentious and overbearing.

    I find it interesting that my kids and their peers - now in their late teens - love all sorts of 1960s-80s rock music, but have never warmed to U2. At this point, bizarrely, bands I detested at the time like Toto and Journey seem likely to have more enduring staying power than U2 will. Probably Bono is not helping his cause with the youth of today by still trundling around, bleating slogans and being aggressively uncool.

    My question - what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Almost every song on The Joshua Tree was damn good. I originally thought of Bullet the Blue Sky as the only worthless filler song, as I knew even then that it was the band's attempt to get political - to the left, OF COURSE. However, I really like it more now, partly due to the fact that I happen to agree with this view from the 1980's. The tune was weird for its time, but it grew on me.

    Imagine if Bono stuck with this theme: America, get out of the world's business. He'd at least be on-board with 1/2 of our criticism of Invade the World, Invite the World. He ain't worry about the "In Hock" part as, per comments here, he's a citizen of the lowest-tax haven in the world.
  47. @slumber_j
    I'm delighted to infer that you don't have children.

    Don’t be so delighted.

    I skipped-country on 3 different girlfriends after they missed their period for a while and haven’t spoken with any of em since.

    One is a saudi muslim chick with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth. One a Jewess whom you have seen on tv if your wife has made you watch one of the most watched inane reality shows. And one – here’s the good news for you – believe it or not, half genetically Japanese and half genetically German (the latter of which were in Hawaii before WW2).

    Not to mention some interesting 1 night stands.

    So I can’t promise ya my genes aren’t safeguarded in some secure zones.

    • Replies: @JSM
    You skipped out on your kids? You truly are vile.
    , @The Wild Geese Howard

    I skipped-country on 3 different girlfriends after they missed their period for a while and haven’t spoken with any of em since
     
    Clearly living the dream!
    , @PhonyCommentContentDetector
    A "saudi muslim with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth..Jewess whom you have seen...reality shows...half Japanese...half German... interesting 1 night stands... can't promise ya my genes aren't safeguarded..." etc.

    Dude, seriously, even with the anonymity afforded by this site, you are embarrassing yourself.

    Even a clutch of credulous adolescent males would be rolling their eyes at your cringe-worthy b.s.
  48. Bono’s net worth 700 million. Imagine what he could actually do with that money if he were serious about it.

    http://www.buybrazilland.com/rainforest-property-for-sale/

  49. @Jim Christian
    Nothing to wonder. He divorced her, he wanted kids. That's Part 1. Part 2 is, the morning of the pussy march, it was a big deal in DC that Judd was going to speak at the thing. That very morning, Washington Post ran a full-length article about Judd, Dario, their divorce, complete with pictures of the new 25 year-old beautiful blonde wife, handsome Dario and his two beautiful kids. Positively picturesque. Great article, but it's archived, can't find it for now.

    And so I have this theory, that Judd was fueled in her rage by the article that morning. Pissed that Dario got what he wanted and she's on the outside looking in, her hatred trebled and fueled by unused eggs. Chicks are vengeful as fuck. Here's her speech, check the rage, man. This chick lives a life as fine as money and a chick's beauty can make it. And yet: rage. Here, you tell me:
    https://youtu.be/VNXMOxBbt6g

    Ashley:
    “I am unafraid to be nasty because…”

    …because I bash Christians, Muslims, & Sikhs — BUT NOT JEWS…

    …and because I bash White males as rapists — BUT NOT BLACKS!

    FIFY

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …because I bash Christians, Muslims, & Sikhs — BUT NOT JEWS…

     

    What's wrong with bashing Mohammedans? It's a centuries-old tradition.

    You must be too young to remember when the Crusaders were the good guys.
  50. @Steve Sailer
    I like "Where the Streets Have No Name," but in general I don't really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2's sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren't that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like "Stand" or "It's the End of the World As We Know It" that come as a surprise.

    I’ve always categorized U2 together with acts like Bob Dylan or Lady Gaga that are much better at the spiel than the music. When I was young and interested in pop music it seemed like every week there was a new salivating piece in the music press about how U2 was re-inventing themselves again or brining out a new gimmick. Remember when they performed under giant McDonalds-like golden arches? How ironic and post-modern and clever!

    Then when you listen to the music it sort of drones on.

    • Replies: @It's All Ball Bearings
    Have to disagree. The Zoo tv and Pop Mart concerts I attended in the Pontiac Silverdome were a blast. Fully entertaining to the senses, completely physically exhausting. Well worth the $25-$35 cost back in the 90s. Bono understands how to work football stadiums, arenas, clubs and tv studios. If you have something to sell he can sell it.
    , @Pat Kittle
    Dylan categorized with Gaga?

    Like, gag me with a spoon.

    Even if I like the music, pop gimmicks are boring -- plastic costumes, bashing & burning instruments, big floating pigs, pyrotechnics, whatever, I'm not a moron, you don't have to do that.
  51. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    That's interesting about their 2nd album lyrics being nicked. Their first album is alright, but October sure is a clunker.
    They'd have continued decent success (Simple Minds, Pretenders, Kinks) had they stayed on the vein of #3's "War". but it always seemed that it was the injection of ambient moodscape vibes of (Vangelis-Philip Glass style) that made their next two albums so addictive. It probably helped that their late 80s competition was vapid Hair Metal & saccharine top 40 like Starship.

    I wonder if any of that slightly portentious, bombastic wall-of-noise arena rock was influenced by Scottish contemporaries Simple Minds? They changed a lot between ‘Boy’ (pretty “rocky”) and Unforgettable Fire. Stuff like Bad and especially Pride In The Name Of Love always seemed Simple-Mindsy, though with guitar doing a lot of the synthesiser stuff.

    SM were YUGE in 1983/4, then Jim Kerr went and married Chrissie Hynde, which unsurprisingly seems to have taken his eye off the ball.

    (blimey, and there you go“When creating their 1984 album The Unforgettable Fire, the Irish rock band U2 saw New Gold Dream as an influence.”

    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Yeah, much of U2's breakout sound was established on Unforgettable Fire. "Bad" seems very much the seed for Streets have no Name, and much credit goes to the The Edge for the unique sound. His "shimmering effect" for guitar (feed into a footpedal for reverb synth) is half of the trick to the U2 ascent from mere stars to Top of the World-
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPyhYczii8I
    [Hooooo Hoooooo, Hoooo, Hoooo, Not Faaade Awaaaeeaayy.....Just let it goooooo......]
    Per Simple Minds, yeah, they were onto something in the 81-83 frame with those songs driven by Derek Forbes Bass guitar & synth. "Glittering Prize" being a key example.
  52. Why does the MSM think the stae of Boner’s voice is of the remotest interest to anyone? This was in the headline news on BBC World Service, btw.

  53. @Jim Christian
    Nothing to wonder. He divorced her, he wanted kids. That's Part 1. Part 2 is, the morning of the pussy march, it was a big deal in DC that Judd was going to speak at the thing. That very morning, Washington Post ran a full-length article about Judd, Dario, their divorce, complete with pictures of the new 25 year-old beautiful blonde wife, handsome Dario and his two beautiful kids. Positively picturesque. Great article, but it's archived, can't find it for now.

    And so I have this theory, that Judd was fueled in her rage by the article that morning. Pissed that Dario got what he wanted and she's on the outside looking in, her hatred trebled and fueled by unused eggs. Chicks are vengeful as fuck. Here's her speech, check the rage, man. This chick lives a life as fine as money and a chick's beauty can make it. And yet: rage. Here, you tell me:
    https://youtu.be/VNXMOxBbt6g

    I read a transcript and the speech is an incoherent mess. I think the “rage” isn’t real, the “rage” being a compensation for the fact that being a feminist in the 21st century west is pointless. Women have the same rights as men. There is nothing to fight for anymore. The fight is over. The latest feminist wave is simply a live action role-play.

  54. @anony-mouse
    Is this the best place to go schadenfreude on someone's possibly age-related problems? I don't believe in karma but I could change my mind especially with such a target-rich environment.

    Born December 20, 1958 did you say?


    Bono will be fine.

    Saturday Bloody Saturdaaaay
    Saturday Bloody Saturdaaaay

  55. puppets talk about fear…but when “the man comes around,” puppets will feel fear..and the man WILL come around…

    • Agree: jim jones
  56. @Steve Sailer
    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90.

    Eh ... they were a sensation in front of a fashionable crowd of 3,000 in Santa Monica in 1981 and then equally successful in front of a mainstream arena rock crowd opening for J. Geils in San Francisco in early 1982. That they'd be the biggest band in the world by 1987 was not particularly surprising to me.

    They were also really young when they first got to America: Bono was 21 in 1981 and The Edge only 20. Bands used to be really young during the British Invasion, but less so than in the past. Joe Strummer turned 25 in 1977, Chrissie Hynde was 27 when her first album came out, as was Sting with "Roxanne." So if you figure rock stars peak about the same later 20s age as baseball players, then U2 was good enough young enough that they had a half dozen years as a Transatlantic touring band under their belts before they conquered the world with "The Joshua Tree" in 1987.

    One thing that slowed them down was that Bono's notebook of lyrics he was writing down on tour for their second album got stolen, so their October album wasn't as good as it could have been when they had to put their new songs back together on the fly.

    One thing that slowed them down was that Bono’s notebook of lyrics he was writing down on tour for their second album got stolen

    Losing the lyrics should have helped. U2’s lyrics are generally vapid cliche ridden sentiment, probably the band’s weakest element. They tend to be very abstract ,vague and about “me” and “you” and “love”, but usually with a catchy phrase for the chorus “It’s a beautiful day”, “Where the streets have no name”, “two hearts (beating as one)”, etc. Maybe that’s their appeal – simple, not challenging but memorable, kind of like a Hallmark card. Michael Stipe is a far better lyricist.

    Shane MacGowan was writing brilliant lyrics around the same time – “Sickbed of Cuchullain”, “Fairytale of New York”, “Dark Streets of London”. That ‘s what Irish rock should be.

  57. @Steve Sailer
    Right, "Joshua Tree" takes their album music up to a new level due to the production:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FsrPEUt2Dg

    My immediate reaction at the time to “Joshua Tree” was that U2 had sold out. Back in the 1980s selling out was still a thing. “War” was still stripped down and punk enough that the bombast didn’t seem overbearing. The “Joshua Tree” sound made them pretentious and overbearing.

    I find it interesting that my kids and their peers – now in their late teens – love all sorts of 1960s-80s rock music, but have never warmed to U2. At this point, bizarrely, bands I detested at the time like Toto and Journey seem likely to have more enduring staying power than U2 will. Probably Bono is not helping his cause with the youth of today by still trundling around, bleating slogans and being aggressively uncool.

    My question – what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    "My question – what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?"

    Because despite the superb talent of the band members, most of their (popular) music is childish, and bland. It sounds like the guitar plays that same funk chord on the 1 and 3 count in every song.
    50 year-olds don't really want to sing along to "A doo doo doo, a dah dah dah, is all I want to say to you". It's embarrassing even when nobody is around to hear you. 18 year olds definitely don't want to sing along to that stuff.
    They had some good deep track stuff, but it wasn't powerful enough by rock standards to endure.
    It doesn't help that Sting is a pretentious ass.
    , @Intelligent Dasein

    At this point, bizarrely, bands I detested at the time like Toto and Journey
     
    I've never heard of anybody detesting Journey or Toto before, especially Toto. The members of that superband have collectively performed on hundreds if not thousands of songs and scores that comprise the musical tapestry of modern America. If you excised Toto from the timeline, you would pretty much eviscerate the history of rock. And Journey is always welcome mood music.

    I don't praise rock musicians and I refuse to give the industry any of my money, because I think that rock music in the aggregate is destructive and subversive; therefore it's complicated for me to say that I really "like" anyone involved with it. But just going off of certain very general factors such as the emotional appeal of the music sans the politics and personalities involved, I'm not sure how anyone could not like Toto or Journey. What music do you like?
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    Sting has one imperishable (well... relatively) contribution - the bass line on The Bed's Too Big Without You - covered note for note by Robbie Shakespeare on the Sheila Hylton reggae version and also on Julie Roberts' reggae version. There's a neat version by Galaxy too, not sure if it's the UK soul band or a Nigerian band.
  58. @Anonymous
    Even if they weren't engaged in all that preening, self-congratulating activism, U2's music would still be horrible. U2 sounds like an HR department feels.

    Their sound is similar to INXS, but the latter managed to come across as authentic, original and charismatic until Michael Hutchence's death. U2 is sterile, repetitive, hollow and derivative.

    What kind of person even goes to a U2 concert in 2018 (besides Wacky Judd?) Sad!

    What kind of person even goes to a U2 concert in 2018 (besides Wacky Judd?) Sad!

    In my experience lots of professional types in their 40s and 50s. I know every time they come through Boston the partners at management consulting firms, investment bankers and commercial bank directors all get very excited. They are a band for aging white fraternity brothers, which is kind of ironic.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    They are a band for aging white fraternity brothers, which is kind of ironic
     
    The same phenomenon has been noted on the current Guns N' Roses tour.
  59. @eD
    On daylight savings time, the number of hours of daylight in a day is a function of the latitude and the time of the year, not the clock. Changing the clock does absolutely nothing. If employers want their employees to report to work and/ or leave work closer to/ urther from sunrise/ sunset, they are always free to change their standard working hours. The idea was always snake oil.

    DST was first used by the Germans in WWI in an effort to save energy. The savings have never been demonstrated.

  60. @AnotherDad

    The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.
     
    No way on the 10:15.

    It's true this is an extraordinarily bad idea for Spain. Spain is essentially under England and belongs in UTC. So Europe time (UTC+1)--more or less the right time for Germany--is already "daylight savings". Then locking in the daylight savings version of that--UTC+2--puts Spain in a time zone meant for Western Russia--say St.Petersburg--or Kiev. Still that's only two hour. So at the equinox your sunrise would be around 8:00 am.

    On top of that you have the seasonal swing. But even here in Seattle--47 degrees--we only lose about 3-1/2 hours of daylight; 1-1/2-2hrs on each side. Even at the winter solstice sunrise is before 8:00am. Barcelona is down near 40 degrees--a bit north of Madrid, so call it 41. That's like New York. You'll lose less than 3 hours of daylight. So no more than 1-1/2 in the morning. That puts your latest sunrise no later than 9:30, and it should be less than that, 9:15ish.

    But still that's ridiculous--Spain isn't Norway, the sun shouldn't be rising after 9.

    If Europe insists on this idiocy Spain should just quit Europe time and roll it's own, "Spanish Time". That could be what you have now--UTC+1 in the winter, UTC+2 in the summer. Or throw in with the Brits--UTC+1 in the summer, UTC in the winter.

    Sunrise in Barcelona at the winter solstice would be about 8:15 without dst so 9:15 with it, I agree. But at 44 degrees north, Burlington’s longest day is about 6.5 hours longer than its shortest so Seattle’s difference is obviously more than 3.5 hours.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    But at 44 degrees north, Burlington’s longest day is about 6.5 hours longer than its shortest so Seattle’s difference is obviously more than 3.5 hours.
     
    Yes--i meant 3.5 hours off of the 12 hour equinox day. That's the easy back-of-the-envelope calculation since everyone on the planet gets those 12 hour days.

    You're right our total swing--solstice to solstice--here is roughly 7 hours. From really long pleasant summer evenings … to sunrise a bit before 8, and sundown at 4:20 before you even get out of the office. Of course since it's usually generally a gray muddle around then, you can't really tell, you do is swill your caffeine and dream of next summer.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Seattle is home to the three northernmost ballparks used in major league baseball (Montreal had #4 and #5, Minnesota #6-9), as well as the first US-based Stanley Cup champion. It's our northernmost big city by far.

    If Seattle ain't dark in the winter, no place in the lower 48 is.
  61. @Steve Sailer
    U2 got very lucky to partner up with Brian Eno & Daniel Lanois for their 3 breakout albums 1985-90.

    Eh ... they were a sensation in front of a fashionable crowd of 3,000 in Santa Monica in 1981 and then equally successful in front of a mainstream arena rock crowd opening for J. Geils in San Francisco in early 1982. That they'd be the biggest band in the world by 1987 was not particularly surprising to me.

    They were also really young when they first got to America: Bono was 21 in 1981 and The Edge only 20. Bands used to be really young during the British Invasion, but less so than in the past. Joe Strummer turned 25 in 1977, Chrissie Hynde was 27 when her first album came out, as was Sting with "Roxanne." So if you figure rock stars peak about the same later 20s age as baseball players, then U2 was good enough young enough that they had a half dozen years as a Transatlantic touring band under their belts before they conquered the world with "The Joshua Tree" in 1987.

    One thing that slowed them down was that Bono's notebook of lyrics he was writing down on tour for their second album got stolen, so their October album wasn't as good as it could have been when they had to put their new songs back together on the fly.

    It really would be a shame to lose all that writing, but the truth is that lyrics hardly matter. This band had (or has, but I wouldn’t know) a great sound, and whoever writes the melody does a great job. That’s what matters, the melody and the sound, and, as Peak Stupidity tried to explain back during it’s beginnings, the lyrics are of far less importance.

    That may be less so for folk music, but I’m talking about rock&roll. David Byrne said on some interview that Burning Down the House was originally going to be Foam Rubber, USA (no I can’t find that 1980’s interview). It didn’t matter wha the said, that song has a great beat (not that good a melody though). Take Louie, Lou-eye, please! Nobody knows what the guy’s singing.

    I appreciate your plug for REM, Steve. It turns out that they are a perfect example of my point here. They had some great melodies and a great sound, especially on Murmer, which is appropriately titled. I think the rest of the band admitted that they didn’t know what Michael Stipe was singing. Stipe probably didn’t reall know either. Who cares, when you’ve got Radio Free Europe turned up to 11:

  62. @Steve Sailer
    I like "Where the Streets Have No Name," but in general I don't really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2's sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren't that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like "Stand" or "It's the End of the World As We Know It" that come as a surprise.

    REM was the back up band on Warren Zevon’s wonderful version of “Raspberry Beret”.

  63. @Cortes
    I spent a few years in Oxford and London and in those places, as I recall, in the bleak midwinter there was light until about 1800 and that since around 0700. Contrast with (on the occasional clear sky day at 55N or 409 miles NW of London) 0830 until 1600- in ideal conditions. The promoters of permanent clocktime are blinkered morons.

    To provide a little more context, parents with small kids at our latitudes invest in blackout curtains for the lighter months so that they get a decent sleep.. I remember hanging them* at the start of May.

    * Curtains, though I could’ve hanged the kids high at times...

    I spent a few years in Oxford and London and in those places, as I recall, in the bleak midwinter there was light until about 1800 and that since around 0700

    Your memory is off. Sunset time in Oxford at the Winter solstice is 16:47, it’s properly dark around 16:15.

  64. @Steve Sailer
    Right, "Joshua Tree" takes their album music up to a new level due to the production:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FsrPEUt2Dg

    Almost every song on The Joshua Tree was damn good. I originally thought of Bullet the Blue Sky as the only worthless filler song, as I knew even then that it was the band’s attempt to get political – to the left, OF COURSE. However, I really like it more now, partly due to the fact that I happen to agree with this view from the 1980’s. The tune was weird for its time, but it grew on me.

    Imagine if Bono stuck with this theme: America, get out of the world’s business. He’d at least be on-board with 1/2 of our criticism of Invade the World, Invite the World. He ain’t worry about the “In Hock” part as, per comments here, he’s a citizen of the lowest-tax haven in the world.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  65. @Jim Christian
    The music of all of them are so ingrained in my mind, I'm sick of all of them. Three chords and some kind of hook and you can't get them off three plays a day on every FM station 50 years later. Popular music blows.

    Ah, Bach! Great symphony orchestras, they used to take us to the Kennedy Center as kids, my Fairfax High had a great director for public schools, a Matt Hines, he built concert bands. I found symphony to be a far more moving experience live than any rock I ever saw live and I saw all the 60s and 70s greats. But the complexity and rich sounds from a fine orchestra always touched me more. I listened to rock, I got laid with rock, but I never LOVED rock. It was there, to be tolerated, base and course and by any comparison to great symphony, talentless. Sorry Led and Stones and Paul.

    Little Feat, no one liked them. But for awhile, it was supposedly cool to SAY you liked them. No one really did. Remember them? No? Shocking. And who will remember the Beatles, Bono, the Stones 100 years hence, 50 years from today? Terrestrial radio will be dead by then, and so, no one. They were a gimmick with a hook. They'll be in some internet backwater, 400 pages deep in a Google search.

    Little Feat, no one liked them.

    AEN begs to differ, sir:

    Maybe it’s that honky-tonk piano that I like so much. See also Dixie Chicken.

    • Replies: @Ragno
    5000+ albums and yet I've managed to avoid U2 entirely. (Which actually surprises me, as I eventually broke down and bought a few Springsteen records.)

    It might be the combination of the monolithic media adoration they dogpaddled in for so long alomng with the air of hip sanctimony they cultivated. But I think it was something palpable in their music: I remember listening to one of their midperiod records (Zooropa? Pop?) at a friend's house and realizing to my horror that every single song was a textbook-perfect tv-commercial soundtrack.
    , @WowJustWow
    There was a time when even woke progressives in music geek circles could enjoy heavily country-tinged rock; now they can tolerate a few Creedence songs at best. And the deliberately atrocious album art made sure nobody would ever pick up a Little Feat record on a whim.

    But holy hell, were they great at their instruments. Even in their more masturbatory meanderings they kept the whole band sounding more cohesive than the prog rock acts of the day.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mw9l_ztwT3E

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzNeFYcIIc4
    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Couldn't have made a better post myself. I saw them w/ Tower of Power horn section live about 6 mos. B-4 L.G.'s passing.

    An' all deh boys deh at de bar began to sing along . . .
  66. @moshe
    Nope, Daylight Savings Time is for farmers and sick f*cks who do dumb things like have children or work 9-5 M-F.

    The best time to awaken is about an hour after sun rise and with DSF sunrise can be at 5am instead of at a more reasonable 8am.

    Likewise, you want approximately 4 hours of Wake Time before you go to sleep. With DSF you can be going to sleep at 7:30 instead of the more pleasant and reasonable 2am.

    Ugh. It's bad enough winter is cold, does it have to be dark too?

    To stay relevant, let me add that I love the fact that antisems' white utopias are planned for Idaho and Norway.

    Dumb goyim.

    Jews know that California is the place to be. after partaking of the tree of knowledge of Good and Evil we left Eden for the farther-most western point we could find. As the Bible says, our forefathers wisely held to "eat and drink for tomorrow we die". (God disagreed which is why we killed Him.)

    Daylight savings time is an evil the workingman morlock, lover of the dark, seeks to impose upon his eloi superiors who frolick in the light.

    The better to hunt and eat us I suppose.

    As the Bible says, our forefathers wisely held to “eat and drink for tomorrow we die”. (God disagreed which is why we….)

    That was a tremendously blasphemous, horrible thing to say.

  67. @International Jew
    Seemed like more.

    You may be right, IJ. And yet he was upstaged in every one by The Uninvited One.

  68. @Henry's Cat
    Frog in the throat? Let's hope it's Marine Le Pen using his uvula as a punchbag.

    I like the image of that; I’d hope that Marion would join in.

  69. @eD
    On daylight savings time, the number of hours of daylight in a day is a function of the latitude and the time of the year, not the clock. Changing the clock does absolutely nothing. If employers want their employees to report to work and/ or leave work closer to/ urther from sunrise/ sunset, they are always free to change their standard working hours. The idea was always snake oil.

    I tend to agree. Supposedly an American Indian once said that DST was like “cutting one end off your blanket to sew to the other end.”

    Getting back to your suggestion, the late blogger John Reilly once suggested the same. Rather than set the clock back, businesses should keep Summer Hours and Winter Hours.

  70. @JohnnyWalker123
    McCain had 5 funerals in 3 cities this week.

    …and played second fiddle to Trump at each and every one.

  71. @moshe
    Don't be so delighted.

    I skipped-country on 3 different girlfriends after they missed their period for a while and haven't spoken with any of em since.

    One is a saudi muslim chick with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth. One a Jewess whom you have seen on tv if your wife has made you watch one of the most watched inane reality shows. And one - here's the good news for you - believe it or not, half genetically Japanese and half genetically German (the latter of which were in Hawaii before WW2).

    Not to mention some interesting 1 night stands.

    So I can't promise ya my genes aren't safeguarded in some secure zones.

    You skipped out on your kids? You truly are vile.

  72. @Peter Akuleyev
    My immediate reaction at the time to "Joshua Tree" was that U2 had sold out. Back in the 1980s selling out was still a thing. "War" was still stripped down and punk enough that the bombast didn't seem overbearing. The "Joshua Tree" sound made them pretentious and overbearing.

    I find it interesting that my kids and their peers - now in their late teens - love all sorts of 1960s-80s rock music, but have never warmed to U2. At this point, bizarrely, bands I detested at the time like Toto and Journey seem likely to have more enduring staying power than U2 will. Probably Bono is not helping his cause with the youth of today by still trundling around, bleating slogans and being aggressively uncool.

    My question - what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?

    “My question – what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?”

    Because despite the superb talent of the band members, most of their (popular) music is childish, and bland. It sounds like the guitar plays that same funk chord on the 1 and 3 count in every song.
    50 year-olds don’t really want to sing along to “A doo doo doo, a dah dah dah, is all I want to say to you”. It’s embarrassing even when nobody is around to hear you. 18 year olds definitely don’t want to sing along to that stuff.
    They had some good deep track stuff, but it wasn’t powerful enough by rock standards to endure.
    It doesn’t help that Sting is a pretentious ass.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    The other issue with the Police is that their most famous single has lyrics which are easily interpreted as the story of a stalker on the hunt.
  73. @Steve Sailer
    Basically, the authorities have pretty much worked out all the kinks in Daylight Savings Time in recent years, so nobody is trying to make it better anymore, so the complainers have the upper hand at present.

    We (FL) apparently are waiting for Congress to approve the Permanent DST law passed last winter. Stay tuned.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    We (FL) apparently are waiting for Congress to approve the Permanent DST law passed last winter. Stay tuned.
     
    Thanks for the info doc. I'd thought it was a done deal. Didn't realize it required Congressional approval.

    I didn't really see a big point to it, but it was going to make it way easier for me to get up for sunrise beach walks with the wife. (I figure my schedule clock-wise would stay about the same,) Right now only the latest ones--7:15 in early Jan--do i have any shot at if i get motivated (rare).
  74. @JohnnyWalker123
    Perhaps the EU needs an Alt-Right Sith Lord.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iu3qoIsGzUM

    Hi.

  75. @moshe
    Don't be so delighted.

    I skipped-country on 3 different girlfriends after they missed their period for a while and haven't spoken with any of em since.

    One is a saudi muslim chick with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth. One a Jewess whom you have seen on tv if your wife has made you watch one of the most watched inane reality shows. And one - here's the good news for you - believe it or not, half genetically Japanese and half genetically German (the latter of which were in Hawaii before WW2).

    Not to mention some interesting 1 night stands.

    So I can't promise ya my genes aren't safeguarded in some secure zones.

    I skipped-country on 3 different girlfriends after they missed their period for a while and haven’t spoken with any of em since

    Clearly living the dream!

  76. U2 were great for a few years, and very good for a much longer span.

    I found them listenable while they were making the music they wanted to make. Pop was their final album made in that spirit.

    They passed their musical sell-by date when they caved to fan demand for another Joshua Tree.

    I would also note that I find U2 far less enjoyable in light of current political and demographic realities. Bono should move to a Boer farm to see his numinous pets in action.

  77. @Peter Akuleyev
    What kind of person even goes to a U2 concert in 2018 (besides Wacky Judd?) Sad!

    In my experience lots of professional types in their 40s and 50s. I know every time they come through Boston the partners at management consulting firms, investment bankers and commercial bank directors all get very excited. They are a band for aging white fraternity brothers, which is kind of ironic.

    They are a band for aging white fraternity brothers, which is kind of ironic

    The same phenomenon has been noted on the current Guns N’ Roses tour.

  78. @MikeatMikedotMike
    "My question – what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?"

    Because despite the superb talent of the band members, most of their (popular) music is childish, and bland. It sounds like the guitar plays that same funk chord on the 1 and 3 count in every song.
    50 year-olds don't really want to sing along to "A doo doo doo, a dah dah dah, is all I want to say to you". It's embarrassing even when nobody is around to hear you. 18 year olds definitely don't want to sing along to that stuff.
    They had some good deep track stuff, but it wasn't powerful enough by rock standards to endure.
    It doesn't help that Sting is a pretentious ass.

    The other issue with the Police is that their most famous single has lyrics which are easily interpreted as the story of a stalker on the hunt.

  79. @David
    Sunrise in Barcelona at the winter solstice would be about 8:15 without dst so 9:15 with it, I agree. But at 44 degrees north, Burlington's longest day is about 6.5 hours longer than its shortest so Seattle's difference is obviously more than 3.5 hours.

    But at 44 degrees north, Burlington’s longest day is about 6.5 hours longer than its shortest so Seattle’s difference is obviously more than 3.5 hours.

    Yes–i meant 3.5 hours off of the 12 hour equinox day. That’s the easy back-of-the-envelope calculation since everyone on the planet gets those 12 hour days.

    You’re right our total swing–solstice to solstice–here is roughly 7 hours. From really long pleasant summer evenings … to sunrise a bit before 8, and sundown at 4:20 before you even get out of the office. Of course since it’s usually generally a gray muddle around then, you can’t really tell, you do is swill your caffeine and dream of next summer.

  80. @Pat Kittle
    Ashley:
    "I am unafraid to be nasty because..."

    ...because I bash Christians, Muslims, & Sikhs -- BUT NOT JEWS...

    ...and because I bash White males as rapists -- BUT NOT BLACKS!

    FIFY

    …because I bash Christians, Muslims, & Sikhs — BUT NOT JEWS…

    What’s wrong with bashing Mohammedans? It’s a centuries-old tradition.

    You must be too young to remember when the Crusaders were the good guys.

  81. @David
    Sunrise in Barcelona at the winter solstice would be about 8:15 without dst so 9:15 with it, I agree. But at 44 degrees north, Burlington's longest day is about 6.5 hours longer than its shortest so Seattle's difference is obviously more than 3.5 hours.

    Seattle is home to the three northernmost ballparks used in major league baseball (Montreal had #4 and #5, Minnesota #6-9), as well as the first US-based Stanley Cup champion. It’s our northernmost big city by far.

    If Seattle ain’t dark in the winter, no place in the lower 48 is.

  82. @dr kill
    We (FL) apparently are waiting for Congress to approve the Permanent DST law passed last winter. Stay tuned.

    We (FL) apparently are waiting for Congress to approve the Permanent DST law passed last winter. Stay tuned.

    Thanks for the info doc. I’d thought it was a done deal. Didn’t realize it required Congressional approval.

    I didn’t really see a big point to it, but it was going to make it way easier for me to get up for sunrise beach walks with the wife. (I figure my schedule clock-wise would stay about the same,) Right now only the latest ones–7:15 in early Jan–do i have any shot at if i get motivated (rare).

  83. @Peter Akuleyev
    My immediate reaction at the time to "Joshua Tree" was that U2 had sold out. Back in the 1980s selling out was still a thing. "War" was still stripped down and punk enough that the bombast didn't seem overbearing. The "Joshua Tree" sound made them pretentious and overbearing.

    I find it interesting that my kids and their peers - now in their late teens - love all sorts of 1960s-80s rock music, but have never warmed to U2. At this point, bizarrely, bands I detested at the time like Toto and Journey seem likely to have more enduring staying power than U2 will. Probably Bono is not helping his cause with the youth of today by still trundling around, bleating slogans and being aggressively uncool.

    My question - what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?

    At this point, bizarrely, bands I detested at the time like Toto and Journey

    I’ve never heard of anybody detesting Journey or Toto before, especially Toto. The members of that superband have collectively performed on hundreds if not thousands of songs and scores that comprise the musical tapestry of modern America. If you excised Toto from the timeline, you would pretty much eviscerate the history of rock. And Journey is always welcome mood music.

    I don’t praise rock musicians and I refuse to give the industry any of my money, because I think that rock music in the aggregate is destructive and subversive; therefore it’s complicated for me to say that I really “like” anyone involved with it. But just going off of certain very general factors such as the emotional appeal of the music sans the politics and personalities involved, I’m not sure how anyone could not like Toto or Journey. What music do you like?

  84. @kihowi
    I've always categorized U2 together with acts like Bob Dylan or Lady Gaga that are much better at the spiel than the music. When I was young and interested in pop music it seemed like every week there was a new salivating piece in the music press about how U2 was re-inventing themselves again or brining out a new gimmick. Remember when they performed under giant McDonalds-like golden arches? How ironic and post-modern and clever!

    Then when you listen to the music it sort of drones on.

    Have to disagree. The Zoo tv and Pop Mart concerts I attended in the Pontiac Silverdome were a blast. Fully entertaining to the senses, completely physically exhausting. Well worth the $25-$35 cost back in the 90s. Bono understands how to work football stadiums, arenas, clubs and tv studios. If you have something to sell he can sell it.

  85. @eD
    On daylight savings time, the number of hours of daylight in a day is a function of the latitude and the time of the year, not the clock. Changing the clock does absolutely nothing. If employers want their employees to report to work and/ or leave work closer to/ urther from sunrise/ sunset, they are always free to change their standard working hours. The idea was always snake oil.

    I would hope (and am pretty sure) everyone on this page would know that you don’t gain any daylight or lose any daylight. I haven’t followed all the comments on this but do want to add one thing about time zones. China has one time zone. The country is not really as wide East-West as you might imagine from the maps, as most everyone is in the eastern 60% – the rest is Tibet and Xinjiang(?), which is just desolate mountains and high desert.

    My point is that China is not doing anything magical or smart by keeping the one time zone. It may work well for airline schedules and the like. As far as daily life though, if you live in Chengdu, fairly far west, you’re not gonna start work at 8A when the sun doesn’t come up until 9:30. People and business will make the hours fit the human body. That means people still have to keep track of different hours of people in places that are far apart in longitude when doing business.

    There’s not perfect way on this. That’s why we have our retard phones to tell us what time it is along with when our facebook friends had their last bowel movements.

  86. @Achmed E. Newman

    Little Feat, no one liked them.
     
    AEN begs to differ, sir:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTz8g8yh8GY

    Maybe it's that honky-tonk piano that I like so much. See also Dixie Chicken.

    5000+ albums and yet I’ve managed to avoid U2 entirely. (Which actually surprises me, as I eventually broke down and bought a few Springsteen records.)

    It might be the combination of the monolithic media adoration they dogpaddled in for so long alomng with the air of hip sanctimony they cultivated. But I think it was something palpable in their music: I remember listening to one of their midperiod records (Zooropa? Pop?) at a friend’s house and realizing to my horror that every single song was a textbook-perfect tv-commercial soundtrack.

    • Replies: @Carbon blob
    "I remember listening to one of their midperiod records (Zooropa? Pop?) at a friend’s house and realizing to my horror that every single song was a textbook-perfect tv-commercial soundtrack."

    lol. Your head probably would have exploded had your friend dragged you to one of their shows from the ZooTV tour:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfL-UAHcJME
  87. @kihowi
    I've always categorized U2 together with acts like Bob Dylan or Lady Gaga that are much better at the spiel than the music. When I was young and interested in pop music it seemed like every week there was a new salivating piece in the music press about how U2 was re-inventing themselves again or brining out a new gimmick. Remember when they performed under giant McDonalds-like golden arches? How ironic and post-modern and clever!

    Then when you listen to the music it sort of drones on.

    Dylan categorized with Gaga?

    Like, gag me with a spoon.

    Even if I like the music, pop gimmicks are boring — plastic costumes, bashing & burning instruments, big floating pigs, pyrotechnics, whatever, I’m not a moron, you don’t have to do that.

  88. @Steve Sailer
    I like "Where the Streets Have No Name," but in general I don't really think that highly of U2 as a songwriting group. I could name several songs by REM, a fairly comparable group, that I like more than any songs by U2, even though I am quite impressed by U2 overall.

    35+ years ago I liked U2's sound as the fulfillment of the post-punk sound sketched out by Public Image in 1978. But the downside over their sound being so dominant that most U2 songs sound like U2 songs and thus aren't that surprising. In contrast, REM can come up with novelty songs that are joyful goofs like "Stand" or "It's the End of the World As We Know It" that come as a surprise.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    That is very, very funny.
  89. @Jim Christian
    Nothing to wonder. He divorced her, he wanted kids. That's Part 1. Part 2 is, the morning of the pussy march, it was a big deal in DC that Judd was going to speak at the thing. That very morning, Washington Post ran a full-length article about Judd, Dario, their divorce, complete with pictures of the new 25 year-old beautiful blonde wife, handsome Dario and his two beautiful kids. Positively picturesque. Great article, but it's archived, can't find it for now.

    And so I have this theory, that Judd was fueled in her rage by the article that morning. Pissed that Dario got what he wanted and she's on the outside looking in, her hatred trebled and fueled by unused eggs. Chicks are vengeful as fuck. Here's her speech, check the rage, man. This chick lives a life as fine as money and a chick's beauty can make it. And yet: rage. Here, you tell me:
    https://youtu.be/VNXMOxBbt6g

    Chicks are vengeful as fuck.

    And men never are, of course. Which is why we never routinely sacrifice our sons to brother wars or our children to demographic replacement by Muslims and Africans. Say to get even with, I dunno, Germans.

    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
    Vengence against Germans?

    The ((("conscience of the world"))) had this to say about that:

    "Every Jew, somewhere in his being, should set apart a zone of hate -- healthy, virile hate -- for what the German personifies and for what persists in the German. To do otherwise would be a betrayal of the dead."
    -- [ https://forum.codoh.com/viewtopic.php?t=7168 ]

  90. @Achmed E. Newman

    Little Feat, no one liked them.
     
    AEN begs to differ, sir:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTz8g8yh8GY

    Maybe it's that honky-tonk piano that I like so much. See also Dixie Chicken.

    There was a time when even woke progressives in music geek circles could enjoy heavily country-tinged rock; now they can tolerate a few Creedence songs at best. And the deliberately atrocious album art made sure nobody would ever pick up a Little Feat record on a whim.

    But holy hell, were they great at their instruments. Even in their more masturbatory meanderings they kept the whole band sounding more cohesive than the prog rock acts of the day.

    • Replies: @captflee
    @WowJustWoW

    They were something, weren't they, particularly when Lowell was among the living ?

    On more than one occasion, though apparently only on swampy tropical nights, your humble narrator has, whilst stretching his legs after a long voyage, walked up on celebrations from which rang forth the rather distinctive sounds of the Feats, followed hard thereafter by invites to come in/up and join the festivities. Not Beatles, not Clapton, not Stones, always Little Feat. Now, I was a dashing young junior mate then, so this was ages ago, and the lunacy of the PC/cultmarx SJW culture was not yet really rolling, at least among the middle+ classes of the third world, whether Rio, Bangkok, or New Orleans. A young man far from home could pass an entire evening without having to navigate many political minefields, something rather less likely to occur of late. More's the pity there.

    In any event, while probably not statistically valid, I will take an appreciation of LF's music by someone else as a promising indicator, so perhaps our proggy friends are doing us a favor by putting the band outside the pale.

  91. So Bono ended up waving a white flag. Hmmm.

    It’s a beautiful day, the sky falls
    And you feel like it’s a beautiful day
    Don’t let it get away

  92. @Olorin

    Chicks are vengeful as fuck.
     
    And men never are, of course. Which is why we never routinely sacrifice our sons to brother wars or our children to demographic replacement by Muslims and Africans. Say to get even with, I dunno, Germans.

    Vengence against Germans?

    The (((“conscience of the world”))) had this to say about that:

    “Every Jew, somewhere in his being, should set apart a zone of hate — healthy, virile hate — for what the German personifies and for what persists in the German. To do otherwise would be a betrayal of the dead.”
    — (https://forum.codoh.com/viewtopic.php?t=7168 ]

  93. @Peter Akuleyev
    My immediate reaction at the time to "Joshua Tree" was that U2 had sold out. Back in the 1980s selling out was still a thing. "War" was still stripped down and punk enough that the bombast didn't seem overbearing. The "Joshua Tree" sound made them pretentious and overbearing.

    I find it interesting that my kids and their peers - now in their late teens - love all sorts of 1960s-80s rock music, but have never warmed to U2. At this point, bizarrely, bands I detested at the time like Toto and Journey seem likely to have more enduring staying power than U2 will. Probably Bono is not helping his cause with the youth of today by still trundling around, bleating slogans and being aggressively uncool.

    My question - what happened to the Police? Why do they seem to be forgotten?

    Sting has one imperishable (well… relatively) contribution – the bass line on The Bed’s Too Big Without You – covered note for note by Robbie Shakespeare on the Sheila Hylton reggae version and also on Julie Roberts’ reggae version. There’s a neat version by Galaxy too, not sure if it’s the UK soul band or a Nigerian band.

  94. There is a certain vocal problem that effects singers when they play empty stadiums. They are forced to cancel shows.Maybe the dust from the empty seats effect them. I forgot what it is called.

  95. @moshe
    Don't be so delighted.

    I skipped-country on 3 different girlfriends after they missed their period for a while and haven't spoken with any of em since.

    One is a saudi muslim chick with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth. One a Jewess whom you have seen on tv if your wife has made you watch one of the most watched inane reality shows. And one - here's the good news for you - believe it or not, half genetically Japanese and half genetically German (the latter of which were in Hawaii before WW2).

    Not to mention some interesting 1 night stands.

    So I can't promise ya my genes aren't safeguarded in some secure zones.

    A “saudi muslim with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth..Jewess whom you have seen…reality shows…half Japanese…half German… interesting 1 night stands… can’t promise ya my genes aren’t safeguarded…” etc.

    Dude, seriously, even with the anonymity afforded by this site, you are embarrassing yourself.

    Even a clutch of credulous adolescent males would be rolling their eyes at your cringe-worthy b.s.

    • Replies: @moshe
    You're funny :)

    It's all true bro. Your superhero name is a tad cringeworthy considering how bad you are at your chosen appellation.
  96. @Ragno
    5000+ albums and yet I've managed to avoid U2 entirely. (Which actually surprises me, as I eventually broke down and bought a few Springsteen records.)

    It might be the combination of the monolithic media adoration they dogpaddled in for so long alomng with the air of hip sanctimony they cultivated. But I think it was something palpable in their music: I remember listening to one of their midperiod records (Zooropa? Pop?) at a friend's house and realizing to my horror that every single song was a textbook-perfect tv-commercial soundtrack.

    “I remember listening to one of their midperiod records (Zooropa? Pop?) at a friend’s house and realizing to my horror that every single song was a textbook-perfect tv-commercial soundtrack.”

    lol. Your head probably would have exploded had your friend dragged you to one of their shows from the ZooTV tour:

  97. @Achmed E. Newman

    Little Feat, no one liked them.
     
    AEN begs to differ, sir:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTz8g8yh8GY

    Maybe it's that honky-tonk piano that I like so much. See also Dixie Chicken.

    Couldn’t have made a better post myself. I saw them w/ Tower of Power horn section live about 6 mos. B-4 L.G.’s passing.

    An’ all deh boys deh at de bar began to sing along . . .

  98. @WowJustWow
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8dZwXnMrRU

    That is very, very funny.

  99. @AnotherDad

    The wonderful idea will lead to sunrise at 10:15 am at the winter solstice in Barcelona, according to El Periódico, the paper I get online.
     
    No way on the 10:15.

    It's true this is an extraordinarily bad idea for Spain. Spain is essentially under England and belongs in UTC. So Europe time (UTC+1)--more or less the right time for Germany--is already "daylight savings". Then locking in the daylight savings version of that--UTC+2--puts Spain in a time zone meant for Western Russia--say St.Petersburg--or Kiev. Still that's only two hour. So at the equinox your sunrise would be around 8:00 am.

    On top of that you have the seasonal swing. But even here in Seattle--47 degrees--we only lose about 3-1/2 hours of daylight; 1-1/2-2hrs on each side. Even at the winter solstice sunrise is before 8:00am. Barcelona is down near 40 degrees--a bit north of Madrid, so call it 41. That's like New York. You'll lose less than 3 hours of daylight. So no more than 1-1/2 in the morning. That puts your latest sunrise no later than 9:30, and it should be less than that, 9:15ish.

    But still that's ridiculous--Spain isn't Norway, the sun shouldn't be rising after 9.

    If Europe insists on this idiocy Spain should just quit Europe time and roll it's own, "Spanish Time". That could be what you have now--UTC+1 in the winter, UTC+2 in the summer. Or throw in with the Brits--UTC+1 in the summer, UTC in the winter.

    The article is now headlined 0915

    https://www.elperiodico.com/es/ciencia/20180831/salida-sol-cambio-hora-verano-invierno-7011474

    but I’m fairly sure it read 1015 a couple of days ago. Or I was just plain wrong. No intention of misleading.

  100. @YetAnotherAnon
    I wonder if any of that slightly portentious, bombastic wall-of-noise arena rock was influenced by Scottish contemporaries Simple Minds? They changed a lot between 'Boy' (pretty "rocky") and Unforgettable Fire. Stuff like Bad and especially Pride In The Name Of Love always seemed Simple-Mindsy, though with guitar doing a lot of the synthesiser stuff.

    SM were YUGE in 1983/4, then Jim Kerr went and married Chrissie Hynde, which unsurprisingly seems to have taken his eye off the ball.

    (blimey, and there you go - "When creating their 1984 album The Unforgettable Fire, the Irish rock band U2 saw New Gold Dream as an influence."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYFIIuubklU

    Yeah, much of U2’s breakout sound was established on Unforgettable Fire. “Bad” seems very much the seed for Streets have no Name, and much credit goes to the The Edge for the unique sound. His “shimmering effect” for guitar (feed into a footpedal for reverb synth) is half of the trick to the U2 ascent from mere stars to Top of the World-

    [Hooooo Hoooooo, Hoooo, Hoooo, Not Faaade Awaaaeeaayy…..Just let it goooooo……]
    Per Simple Minds, yeah, they were onto something in the 81-83 frame with those songs driven by Derek Forbes Bass guitar & synth. “Glittering Prize” being a key example.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I really liked their "Live at Red Rocks" live album from the mid-1980s.

    The general trend of the second half of the 1970s and first half of the 1980s in rock, from the first Ramones album onward, was to make guitar parts less bluesy (black) and more "linear" (white). Keith Levene of PIL briefly figured out how to make the linear playing of the era less aggro sounding, and instead more exalted sounding, and The Edge built on that. I think.

    I paid a lot of attention to U2 from 1981-1987, but little since then, so it's weird to me to realize that 5/6ths of their career has been since 1987.

  101. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Yeah, much of U2's breakout sound was established on Unforgettable Fire. "Bad" seems very much the seed for Streets have no Name, and much credit goes to the The Edge for the unique sound. His "shimmering effect" for guitar (feed into a footpedal for reverb synth) is half of the trick to the U2 ascent from mere stars to Top of the World-
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPyhYczii8I
    [Hooooo Hoooooo, Hoooo, Hoooo, Not Faaade Awaaaeeaayy.....Just let it goooooo......]
    Per Simple Minds, yeah, they were onto something in the 81-83 frame with those songs driven by Derek Forbes Bass guitar & synth. "Glittering Prize" being a key example.

    I really liked their “Live at Red Rocks” live album from the mid-1980s.

    The general trend of the second half of the 1970s and first half of the 1980s in rock, from the first Ramones album onward, was to make guitar parts less bluesy (black) and more “linear” (white). Keith Levene of PIL briefly figured out how to make the linear playing of the era less aggro sounding, and instead more exalted sounding, and The Edge built on that. I think.

    I paid a lot of attention to U2 from 1981-1987, but little since then, so it’s weird to me to realize that 5/6ths of their career has been since 1987.

  102. @PhonyCommentContentDetector
    A "saudi muslim with excellent inherited genes and unimaginable inherited wealth..Jewess whom you have seen...reality shows...half Japanese...half German... interesting 1 night stands... can't promise ya my genes aren't safeguarded..." etc.

    Dude, seriously, even with the anonymity afforded by this site, you are embarrassing yourself.

    Even a clutch of credulous adolescent males would be rolling their eyes at your cringe-worthy b.s.

    You’re funny 🙂

    It’s all true bro. Your superhero name is a tad cringeworthy considering how bad you are at your chosen appellation.

  103. The Trump Effect strikes another down another bloviating detractor at a critically symbolic moment.

  104. @MikeatMikedotMike
    I would worry for Steve if U2 had performed at McCain's funeral. The blog might have exploded right off the screen at me.

    Also - if you could only take 8 U2 songs into space, which ones would they be?

    “She moves in mysterious ways”
    I heard this song so many times in strip clubs. Every time I hear it I think of Shayla, Randi, Cherise, Fiona, Christina, Ariel and others.
    The song that brings about fond memories. Not like that preachy “In the name of love,” about that pool hustler, Michael King.

  105. @snorlax
    But does Bono play golf, ride a bicycle or star in My Beautiful Laundrette?

    I always confuse him with Sonny Bono but then I remember that they were different people. I can remember some of Sonny’s songs (he couldn’t sing at all). I don’t think I’ve ever heard this one sing anything. Doesn’t he sing with some group?

    Of course this guy is mostly famous nowadays for his politics. But toward the end so was Sonny – different directions of course.

    Another famous song writer Irving Berlin wasn’t much of a singer but what little voice he had was pleasant. With the possible exception of Louis Armstrong or Bellafonte after his third vocal nodule operation, Sonny Bono had the worst voice in pop music history.

    Sonny delegated most of the singing to his wife Cher. She performed in a unique dialect/accent never heard before. She spoke normally and then sang in some accent she must have learned on Mars. She also had defective politics.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Lee Hazlewood was probably as bad as Sonny. His records with Nancy Sinatra worked very well despite both their limitations.

    Mark Knopfler’s most successful record in a long time was with Emmylou Harris. And Chrissie Hynde did an album with her toy boy du jour, who sounded like a dead monitor lizard getting run over by a 6x6 military truck on nondirectional tires. It wasn’ t that bad overall though.

    There is a pattern here.
  106. Anonymous[291] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pat Boyle
    I always confuse him with Sonny Bono but then I remember that they were different people. I can remember some of Sonny's songs (he couldn't sing at all). I don't think I've ever heard this one sing anything. Doesn't he sing with some group?

    Of course this guy is mostly famous nowadays for his politics. But toward the end so was Sonny - different directions of course.

    Another famous song writer Irving Berlin wasn't much of a singer but what little voice he had was pleasant. With the possible exception of Louis Armstrong or Bellafonte after his third vocal nodule operation, Sonny Bono had the worst voice in pop music history.

    Sonny delegated most of the singing to his wife Cher. She performed in a unique dialect/accent never heard before. She spoke normally and then sang in some accent she must have learned on Mars. She also had defective politics.

    Lee Hazlewood was probably as bad as Sonny. His records with Nancy Sinatra worked very well despite both their limitations.

    Mark Knopfler’s most successful record in a long time was with Emmylou Harris. And Chrissie Hynde did an album with her toy boy du jour, who sounded like a dead monitor lizard getting run over by a 6×6 military truck on nondirectional tires. It wasn’ t that bad overall though.

    There is a pattern here.

  107. @WowJustWow
    There was a time when even woke progressives in music geek circles could enjoy heavily country-tinged rock; now they can tolerate a few Creedence songs at best. And the deliberately atrocious album art made sure nobody would ever pick up a Little Feat record on a whim.

    But holy hell, were they great at their instruments. Even in their more masturbatory meanderings they kept the whole band sounding more cohesive than the prog rock acts of the day.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mw9l_ztwT3E

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzNeFYcIIc4

    @WowJustWoW

    They were something, weren’t they, particularly when Lowell was among the living ?

    On more than one occasion, though apparently only on swampy tropical nights, your humble narrator has, whilst stretching his legs after a long voyage, walked up on celebrations from which rang forth the rather distinctive sounds of the Feats, followed hard thereafter by invites to come in/up and join the festivities. Not Beatles, not Clapton, not Stones, always Little Feat. Now, I was a dashing young junior mate then, so this was ages ago, and the lunacy of the PC/cultmarx SJW culture was not yet really rolling, at least among the middle+ classes of the third world, whether Rio, Bangkok, or New Orleans. A young man far from home could pass an entire evening without having to navigate many political minefields, something rather less likely to occur of late. More’s the pity there.

    In any event, while probably not statistically valid, I will take an appreciation of LF’s music by someone else as a promising indicator, so perhaps our proggy friends are doing us a favor by putting the band outside the pale.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
How a Young Syndicate Lawyer from Chicago Earned a Fortune Looting the Property of the Japanese-Americans, then Lived...
Becker update V1.3.2