The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Boehner Plans Easing of Penal Code, Which Might Keep Speaker's New Son-In-Law Out of the Pen
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the New York Times:

Push to Scale Back Sentencing Laws Gains Momentum
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER JULY 28, 2015

The House speaker, John A. Boehner, has endorsed a House bill that would change the criminal justice system. Credit Zach Gibson/The New York Times

WASHINGTON — For several years, a handful of lawmakers in Congress have tried to scale back tough sentencing laws that have bloated federal prisons and the cost of running them. But broad-based political will to change those laws remained elusive.

The Speaker’s son-in-law

Now, with a push from President Obama, and perhaps even more significantly a nod from Speaker John A. Boehner, Congress seems poised to revise four decades of federal policy that greatly expanded the number of Americans — to roughly 750 per 100,000 — now incarcerated, by far the highest of any Western nation.

It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation.

Perhaps somebody could point out what they have learned from their last epochal mistake so we have some reason to assume they aren’t just going to do it all over again.

 
Hide 151 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Another great title.

    This blog is the only thing that will get me through the election year. Please don’t quit your day job.

    Perhaps somebody could point out what they have learned from their last epochal mistake so we have some reason to assume they aren’t just going to do it all over again.

    No, they’re just going to do it all over again. Like with the housing bubble. Because racism.

    • Agree: EriK
  2. I find this topic depressing. I don’t dispute your analysis, but well you know.

    What really bugs me is that my take is that draconian laws and sentences don’t really do anything in one sense. There is no deterrent factor; only a preemptive one. There is just not enough of a future time orientation there for things like “Hey if I do this I could go to prison” to have any effect. They are just going with the flow, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

    The cynic in me thinks you could run a kind of “draft lottery” with people of the right age group and demographic to stick in prison, and get the same kind of reduction in crime.

    I guess that is too dark. I mean self-selection has to count for something right?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Sunbeam

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist, @Kylie, @blair, @North Carolina Resident

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Sunbeam

    "The cynic in me thinks you could run a kind of “draft lottery” with people of the right age group and demographic to stick in prison, and get the same kind of reduction in crime."

    I suspect that's not quite true, but I can't really say that I blame you, for thinking it might be. It seems plausible.

    , @TWS
    @Sunbeam

    Wrong. The easing of sentencing laws led to an estimated 300,000 people murdered from the sixties to the eighties when they tightened up again. The effects were seen nearly immediately and are well documented.

    Ease up again and see what happens.

    Every year, every Department of Corrections in every state works very hard to lower the security classification and thus shorten the sentences of some very, very dangerous criminals. That is simply for budget reasons. Housing these human predators is tough, expensive, dangerous work. I bet you've never worked a job where you are shown a 'how to survive a rape and torture session' before you've ever worked a day.

    Now add politics into this. Every year or so there are a series of articles in local papers about how they let somebody out who should have been kept in. They never mention that the reason we let them out is because more and more dangerous guys keep coming in and you simply have to let some of them out. Even if sentences were never taken into consideration you would have to let some out simply for space for the guys who (and I've met them) have to be fed through a metal slot and strapped into chains that would hold a wild tiger before being let out for their hour a day of rec time, alone, because they would murder someone with them and eat their eyeballs. Those are some nice guys. They were worse before they came into the system. Think about that. And think about this, most of them will get out some day and you will be sharing a space in the checkout line with them or maybe a fenceline.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Sunbeam


    There is just not enough of a future time orientation there for things like “Hey if I do this I could go to prison” to have any effect.
     
    I agree, but that doesn't necessarily preclude a deterrent effect. The death penalty in particular puts miscreants on notice that the authorities take their actions seriously. He's facing tough, no-nonsense people. He doesn't need future time orientation to pick up on that. It's like distinguishing a rattler from a garden snake.
  3. “unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation”

    But no one knew what caused that, it was social forces beyond anyone’s ken or control, just as it was sheer coincidence that crime started falling when more bad boys were locked up!

    In the UK the same thing happened 10 years later, in the 1990s, and crime has fallen, though to nowhere near 50s levels.

    So the Cameron administration has cut police budgets dramatically, and appointed as Chief Inspector of Police a commercial lawyer and privatisation expert with no criminal law experience. He’s hated by the rank and file.

    “Firstly, your Honour, just look at him”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Winsor

    http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/may/17/police-warn-big-budget-cuts-will-lead-to-paramilitary-force

  4. Who is that man labeled “the Speaker’s son-in-law”, and how is he relevant to this article? Our heart goes out to anyone with such a tragically distended cranium. (Or maybe it’s just a funny hat.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    , @Blobby5
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    I think it might be where he stores his Jiffy Pop.

  5. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Who is that man labeled "the Speaker's son-in-law", and how is he relevant to this article? Our heart goes out to anyone with such a tragically distended cranium. (Or maybe it's just a funny hat.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Blobby5

    • Replies: @soren
    @Steve Sailer

    You may want to link to that directly in the blog post lest people just say you're typecasting.

    , @rod1963
    @Steve Sailer

    What would posses a upper class white woman to marry such a filthy, moronic, dried up black?

    OTOH Boehner absolutely deserves this parasitical bum as a son-in-law.

    , @Realist
    @Steve Sailer

    I did not know this. This tells me volumes about Boner.

    , @Alec
    @Steve Sailer

    @4 "Who is that man labeled “the Speaker’s son-in-law”?"

    @5 "He’s the Speaker’s son-in-law."

    Never doubt content from iSteve.

    , @Power Child
    @Steve Sailer

    There's a lot of South-Asian Indians in the Caribbean area. From the looks of it, I'd say Mr. Lakhan is at least partly of that stock. Which makes me think he might be more of a Cheech-N-Chong type criminal than a Dr. Dre-type criminal. If only this distinction was made by the laws Lakhan's father-in-law is in support of loosening.

    , @Stumpy Pepys
    @Steve Sailer

    Ha! So that's why he's always crying. Makes total sense now.

    , @Thomas O. Meehan
    @Steve Sailer

    Maybe this is why the Speaker is crying all the time?

    , @carol
    @Steve Sailer

    She must be high all the time, to not be embarrassed about it all by now.

  6. That’s the guy from the “Rude!” song, right? I never realised that was about asking John Boehner for his daughter’s hand in marriage, but it kind of makes sense. Although, with Boehner, I’d expect there to be a part where breaks into tears.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Greg Pandatshang

    "That’s the guy from the “Rude!” song, right? I never realised that was about asking John Boehner for his daughter’s hand in marriage, but it kind of makes sense. Although, with Boehner, I’d expect there to be a part where breaks into tears."

    The guy from "Rude" who you say looks like John Boehner's son in law is Palestinian, although he does look like he has partial Negroid ancestry in his family tree. I notice that some Palestinians look like Pardos in phenotype. I have seen some Palestinians with very nappy hair, which should not be surprising since Palestine shares a border with Egypt.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  7. Somewhat on-topic:

    An interesting essay from John McWhorter:

    Antiracism, Our Flawed New Religion
    Opposition to racism used to be a political stance. Now it has every marking of a religion, with both good and deleterious effects on American society.

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/07/27/antiracism-our-flawed-new-religion.html

    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:

    JOHN H. MCWHORTER
    The Reparations Racket
    America has already made amends for slavery.

    http://www.city-journal.org/html/eon_3_29_02jm.html

    • Agree: Luke Lea
    • Replies: @Kylie
    @syonredux


    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:
     
    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    Replies: @syonredux, @SPMoore8, @Thomas O. Meehan, @Massimo Heitor

  8. SFG says:

    “It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation.”

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people…back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently…

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @SFG


    “It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation.”

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people…back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently…
     
    During the 1950s-early '60s (a low crime era),the US criminal justice system stressed rehabilitation over incarceration:

    In the 1950s, the United States experienced a panic over youth crime. Both the political rhetoric and cultural fears of the period would appear to lead directly to the “get tough” approach popular today. But they did not. Instead, the government's response focused on policies of prevention and rehabilitation. What accounts for this? The answer lies in a set of institutions that framed the issue and biased it in favor of progressive solutions. These institutions—the Children's Bureau, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency—provided friendly venues for progressive ideas while preventing other ideas from being considered.
     
    http://www.palgrave-journals.com/polity/journal/v38/n3/full/2300057a.html

    Things started to shift in the 1960s as the murder rate soared*.Cf, for example, Nixon's call for "Law and Order," etc.Actual changes to sentencing policies took a while, though:

    When the crime rate began to climb in the mid-1960s, conservatives urged a "get tough" policy that emphasized swift, severe punishment. Demands for swifter trials and sentencing were defeated by the "due process" clause of the Constitution. If anything, justice moves even slower today than it did twenty years ago. Conservative demands for more severe punishment did eventually have an effect, however.
     

    After 1975, the expected cost of violence began to rise. First, while the police continued to make arrests for about half the violent offenses they recorded, arrests rose considerably faster than victimization rates. Thus, if victimization rates are our best indicator of the underlying trend in violence, the percentage of violent offenders getting arrested must have risen. At the same time, those who went to prison were staying longer. The net effect of these changes was that violent offenders could expect to spend more time in prison. Judging by murder and victimization rates, the violent crime rate was about 10 percent lower in 1988 than in 1975. Yet the fraction of adults in state and federal prisons more than doubled during this period. In part, this was because we were locking up more people for drug-related offenses. But those who committed violent crimes could also expect to spend considerably more time in prison in 1988 than in 1975.
     
    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing


    *

    An American's chance of being murdered was relatively low in the 1950s and early 1960s. It doubled between 1964 and 1974,
     
    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist

    , @AnAnon
    @SFG

    That was the beginnings of the goodwhite strategy of appealing to the outside group to win out over the badwhites. Sure, they had to ultimately abandon Detroit, but cavanagh did get elected.

    , @Anonymous
    @SFG

    Here are some films to give you an idea of the vibe of the late 60s to mid-70s...

    Dirty Harry (1971)
    The French Connection (1971)
    Super Fly (1972)
    Magnum Force (1973)
    Serpico (1973)
    Death Wish (1974)
    The Enforcer (1976)
    Taxi Driver (1976)

    Learn from the past. Think twice. Make fewer mistakes.

    , @International Jew
    @SFG


    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?
     
    I don't think so. What did happen is that the police and courts became more tolerant of bad behavior, which emboldened the criminals.

    Replies: @peterike, @TWS, @NOTA

    , @TWS
    @SFG

    Yeah they cut the security and discipline in the prisons first. Mostly due to 'progressive' new theories on psychology and criminology. Then the riots occurred. You'd almost think there was a connection.

    I'm sure the civil rights movement was involved tangentially at least.

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @SFG



    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?

     

    They had the anti-death penalty movement and a reduction in number of executions numbers.

    year -- Forcible rape rate relative to 1960 rate -- executions for rape

    1945 -- ------ -- 22
    1946 -- ------ -- 20
    1947 -- ------ -- 24
    1948 -- ------ -- 23
    1949 -- ------ -- 11
    1950 -- ------ -- 11
    1951 -- ------ -- 17
    1952 -- ------ -- 12
    1953 -- ------ -- 7
    1954 -- ------ -- 9
    1955 -- ------ -- 5
    1956 -- ------ -- 11
    1957 -- ------ -- 9
    1958 -- ------ -- 7
    1959 -- ------ -- 7
    1960 -- 1.0x -- 8
    1961 -- 1.0x -- 9
    1962 -- 1.0x -- 4
    1963 -- 1.0x -- 2
    1964 -- 1.2x -- 5 -- last execution for rape
    1965 -- 1.3x
    1966 -- 1.4x
    1967 -- 1.5x
    1968 -- 1.7x
    1969 -- 1.9x
    1970 -- 1.9x
    1971 -- 2.1x
    1972 -- 2.3x
    1973 -- 2.6x
    1974 -- 2.7x
    1975 -- 2.7x
    1976 -- 2.8x
    1977 -- 3.1x
    1978 -- 3.2x
    1979 -- 3.6x
    1980 -- 3.8x

    Estimated crime in United States-Total
    http://deathpenaltyusa.org

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Hippopotamusdrome

  9. Boner’s daughter must be as indifferent to reality and common sense as her mother’s inseminator. Marrying a Rasta man is not a wise lifestyle choice.

    The standard “progressive” rant on current incarceration rates is, “Crime is down. Why do we keep so many criminals in prison?” “Progressives” seem bewildered by the idea that when criminals are in prison their criminal activities are reduced. I’ve concluded that “progressivism” is a mental defect involving the same sorts of confusion as autogynephilia.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Sort of like Jeb marrying that Mexican peasant woman. This is called "Breeding Your IQ Back Down to Mean," or "How Republicans do Wealth Redistribution."

    Boehner's daughter probably married the freak just to have easy access to drugs. If you want to live the life of a druggie, you risk arrest every time you wander the streets trying to find who's selling the stuff. Marry the supplier, and you've got easy, free, and safer access to drugs if you're female. I once heard a cop say it was the main reason why white women marry black men, although they sure as hell don't ever risk telling their daddies that.

  10. @Sunbeam
    I find this topic depressing. I don't dispute your analysis, but well you know.

    What really bugs me is that my take is that draconian laws and sentences don't really do anything in one sense. There is no deterrent factor; only a preemptive one. There is just not enough of a future time orientation there for things like "Hey if I do this I could go to prison" to have any effect. They are just going with the flow, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

    The cynic in me thinks you could run a kind of "draft lottery" with people of the right age group and demographic to stick in prison, and get the same kind of reduction in crime.

    I guess that is too dark. I mean self-selection has to count for something right?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kevin O'Keeffe, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    • Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.
     
    Absolutely!!!!

    I believe it was the National Geographic or American History Channel hand had a 12 plus episode series on the Sicilian mafia.

    At the end the question was what ultimately caused the Sicilian mob to go rapidly into decline by the second and third generations.

    The head FBI analyst of the mafia stated that while law enforcement and tough anti-racketeering laws played a big part. One can not over look that the Sicilian mob's own rules tending towards hypergamous marriage patterns and against out of wedlock children caused them to breed sociopathic and psychopathic tendencies out of the future generations of the crime families.

    When I heard this I about dropped out of my chair. Imagine if he used such a heredity based explanation to characterize the increase in black crime and incarceration rates!!!!

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist

    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It all boils down to is: we pay bad people to breed.
     
    Paul Kersey reported a case of a 17-18 year old "youth" who put an old white man into a coma or killed him playing the knock out game, I am not sure which.

    Seems the kid had been punching out his teachers since age 13.

    At his trial his ACLU/NLG lawyers were arguing that the judge should not be too hard on him so that he could remain a father to his child and the one on the way.

    Like I keep saying, RISUG/VASALGEL, early and often, would do wonders to clean up the gene pool.
    , @Kylie
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.
     
    Yes, the "You breed them, we'll feed them" policy has been disastrous.

    Replies: @TWS

    , @blair
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

     

    This is absolutely correct. If selection in biology is to have any meaning at all, this is its meaning. Are they fit enough to survive in their environment? If the environment is the state they were living in among themselves in Africa, the answer is no, not many. But if the environment is one of never ending food and housing and medicine supplied by a totally different group, then yes.
    , @North Carolina Resident
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Speaking of paying bad people to breed...

    A buddy of mine invests in run-down commercial real estate in high crime areas. He has two tenants from Yemen operating convenience stores.
    One is 33 yo, has two wives in Yemen and a girlfriend in the US. 12 kids total
    The other is 52 yo, has three wives in Yemen and one in the US. 20 kids total

    Both (allegedly) are involved in all sorts of scams and illegal activities: food stamp fraud, selling stolen merchandise, smuggling cigarettes from low tax NC to high tax NYC and Chicago, selling synthetic marijuana, etc.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  11. @syonredux
    Somewhat on-topic:


    An interesting essay from John McWhorter:

    Antiracism, Our Flawed New Religion
    Opposition to racism used to be a political stance. Now it has every marking of a religion, with both good and deleterious effects on American society.
     
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/07/27/antiracism-our-flawed-new-religion.html

    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a "Black Intellectual."Here's an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:


    JOHN H. MCWHORTER
    The Reparations Racket
    America has already made amends for slavery.


    http://www.city-journal.org/html/eon_3_29_02jm.html

    Replies: @Kylie

    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:

    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    • Agree: Percy Gryce
    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Kylie


    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:

    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!
     
    Damning with faint praise, I know.

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.
     
    Has he? I hadn't noticed.
    , @SPMoore8
    @Kylie

    I read both McWhorter articles and I don't really see the leftward turn, what I do think is that he is being careful not to blaspheme against St. Ta Nehisi. Not to disparage McWhorter, but I do get the sense that he might be a bit envious of Ta Nehisi's current oracular status.

    I think he makes an excellent point about "anti-racism" being a kind of religion. But he should add, it's a church that no one is obliged to attend. The entire "Shut up and listen" vibe coming from that camp is such that personally I don't want to deal with them anymore, and that's after spending years listening and trying to see it from their POV. Basically, all they are doing is engaging in public mutual stroking, and it's meaningless.

    Replies: @TB2

    , @Thomas O. Meehan
    @Kylie

    Mc Whorter couldn't resist the temptation to endorse candidate Obama. Like Colin Powell, race trumpeted intellect and loyalty.

    , @Massimo Heitor
    @Kylie


    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.
     
    McWhorter is great in that he expresses some far right view points on race that typically no public intellectual can express.

    McWhorter also has some hard left viewpoints, and that's not new, that's always been him. Read his articles on Trayvon Martin, they are standard hard left. McWhorter sounds like the stereotypical angry black nationalist white hater that has zero logic or reasoning. This isn't new. McWhorter also claims that Mumia Abu-Jamal was absolutely unquestionably innocent from the 1982 murder accusation. I've not researched that incident that deeply, but McWhorter seems hard left, and very anti-white on that issue.

    His recent article criticizing American antiracism as blind religion is what I would classify as a far right viewpoint. I've made the exact same point, and many other fringe right wing types has, be he is a mainstream public intellectual expressing what is widely considered thought crime.

    Among black race commenters, I like Sowell the best. McWhorter also has some great points, and he is of a younger generation and more accessible to many, but occasionally he swings far left and will outrage people on either side.

    Replies: @syonredux

  12. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    You may want to link to that directly in the blog post lest people just say you’re typecasting.

  13. @SFG
    "It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation."

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people...back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently...

    Replies: @syonredux, @AnAnon, @Anonymous, @International Jew, @TWS, @Hippopotamusdrome

    “It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation.”

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people…back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently…

    During the 1950s-early ’60s (a low crime era),the US criminal justice system stressed rehabilitation over incarceration:

    In the 1950s, the United States experienced a panic over youth crime. Both the political rhetoric and cultural fears of the period would appear to lead directly to the “get tough” approach popular today. But they did not. Instead, the government’s response focused on policies of prevention and rehabilitation. What accounts for this? The answer lies in a set of institutions that framed the issue and biased it in favor of progressive solutions. These institutions—the Children’s Bureau, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency—provided friendly venues for progressive ideas while preventing other ideas from being considered.

    http://www.palgrave-journals.com/polity/journal/v38/n3/full/2300057a.html

    Things started to shift in the 1960s as the murder rate soared*.Cf, for example, Nixon’s call for “Law and Order,” etc.Actual changes to sentencing policies took a while, though:

    When the crime rate began to climb in the mid-1960s, conservatives urged a “get tough” policy that emphasized swift, severe punishment. Demands for swifter trials and sentencing were defeated by the “due process” clause of the Constitution. If anything, justice moves even slower today than it did twenty years ago. Conservative demands for more severe punishment did eventually have an effect, however.

    After 1975, the expected cost of violence began to rise. First, while the police continued to make arrests for about half the violent offenses they recorded, arrests rose considerably faster than victimization rates. Thus, if victimization rates are our best indicator of the underlying trend in violence, the percentage of violent offenders getting arrested must have risen. At the same time, those who went to prison were staying longer. The net effect of these changes was that violent offenders could expect to spend more time in prison. Judging by murder and victimization rates, the violent crime rate was about 10 percent lower in 1988 than in 1975. Yet the fraction of adults in state and federal prisons more than doubled during this period. In part, this was because we were locking up more people for drug-related offenses. But those who committed violent crimes could also expect to spend considerably more time in prison in 1988 than in 1975.

    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing

    *

    An American’s chance of being murdered was relatively low in the 1950s and early 1960s. It doubled between 1964 and 1974,

    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing

    • Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist
    @syonredux

    How much of the decrease in crime has been really do to "White Flight", improved security systems and gun ownership for self defense???

    Of course Obama and his Justice Dept is hard at work to fix this.

    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    @syonredux


    During the 1950s-early ’60s (a low crime era),the US criminal justice system stressed rehabilitation over incarceration:
     
    Ah yes!!!

    The golden era of its was society's fault. Willie Sutton robbed banks not because he was a born sociopath but because as Sutton allegedly said "that was where the money was". At bit of subtle political satire that was actually believed as true because it so perfectly captured the leftist zeitgeist of the time.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  14. I find this topic depressing. I don’t dispute your analysis, but well you know.

    What really bugs me is that my take is that draconian laws and sentences don’t really do anything in one sense. There is no deterrent factor; only a preemptive one.

    Public caning would be a far better deterrent than incarceration. Far cheaper, too. Dindus & co. would have a collective coronary.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Svigor

    I'm afraid Americans wore out their rights to public beating/whippings/canings following the Civil Rights Act. Now it'd be too much of a "trigger."

  15. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    ROTFL

    http://www.city-journal.org/2015/25_3_snd-bias.html

    “Attendees at the seminar were subjected to an “interactive theater scenario” called “Ready to Vote?” that showed white male computer-science professors on a fictional hiring committee belittling females and failing to “value diversity.” The author of the scenario, a professor of performance studies and ethnic studies at the University of California, San Diego, seems never to have attended a faculty-hiring committee meeting in her life.”

    YCMTSU

  16. @Kylie
    @syonredux


    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:
     
    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    Replies: @syonredux, @SPMoore8, @Thomas O. Meehan, @Massimo Heitor

    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:

    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!

    Damning with faint praise, I know.

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    Has he? I hadn’t noticed.

  17. As long as the released criminals are sent to Fergusons across America, the urban Libs don’t care.

  18. talk of crime will become taboo just like immigration ,race, bruce,
    et.al.

  19. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    What would posses a upper class white woman to marry such a filthy, moronic, dried up black?

    OTOH Boehner absolutely deserves this parasitical bum as a son-in-law.

  20. RJA says:

    Here is a fairly rare example where I must diverge from Sailerian thinking. Emptying our prisons of marijuana convicts is a no-brainer. Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I’d also argue is immoral.

    What’s more, and I know I’m going to get lambasted for this, this might be a situation where “disparate impact” is actually real. Blacks use drugs only at slightly higher rates than Whites, but account for waaaaay more minor drug convictions. (Guess it’s related to the fact that they really do commit other crimes at much higher rates, and are thus policed more heavily, so more marijuana is found. Also, less private space.)

    Chapelle got this one right:

    That said, Boehner’s daughter must really hate daddy.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @RJA

    The reason many Negro criminals are imprisoned for drug crimes rather than say homicide is often because the police and prosecutors know these criminals are guilty of far more serious crimes but these may be difficult or impossible to prosecute. Rather than leaving a stone-cold killer on the streets police and prosecutors often settle for incapacitating him for a few years. Nailing perps with drugs in their possession is easy. Getting witnesses to murders in Negro neighborhoods to testify about these crimes is next to impossible.

    The "progreessive" argument you present immensely pisses off most of the police and prosecutors I have known. It shows an ignorance of the realities of crime and policing in Negro neighborhoods and how the criminal justice system in this country works.

    For a quick education in these matters I suggest reading the recent book "Ghettoside" by Jill Leovy. The woman is a lib reporter for the LA Times but she accurately reports what she has observed about Negro homicides in Los Angeles over the past decade or so,

    Replies: @RJA, @Avenge Harambe

    , @Boomstick
    @RJA

    I'd be very surprised if there's any significant number of people in prison for simple marijuana possession. Trafficking, yeah, but that would probably be in the hundreds of pounds of weight category, and they're usually engaged in other activities like money laundering.

    , @NOTA
    @RJA

    I'm not sure if your statistic is right--I think it turns on blacks and whites filling out surveys admitting to crimes at the same rate of honesty, which may or may not happen.

    , @TWS
    @RJA

    There are two reason for drug crime incarceration. One, it was plead down from something else. I've seen everything from sexual assault to robbery to assault to serious distribution. Two, you know the guy is guilty but cannot prove it in court for the more serious crime so you go with what you got.

    Got a top of the line rapist and serial sex offender because he had coke in his pocket and the dumbass didn't normally use coke he was just celebrating when he exposed himself to a police officer.

    More often you get called to a disturbance, prowling, domestic etc and the perp is indeed engaged in something shady but the prosecutor is too lazy or will cut a deal down to drug charges (they always have drugs and or paraphernalia don't leave home without it).

    I saw a guy locked up for 24 months for weed now that sounds egregious doesn't it. Except earlier he was locked up 18 months for two attempted murders. If you want to succeed at murder don't knee-cap them first then pump the rest of your rounds into their bodies. Sloppy work that.

    The guys in prison not jail but prison for drugs are distributors, growers, manufacturers and all of them bad news.

    , @Retired
    @RJA

    " Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I’d also argue is immoral."

    Can we release them in your neighborhood?

    Look at the bunch of criminals that Obama pardoned. All are convicted on felonies other than drugs.

    IMO the drug user only offender languishing in prison is a myth. 1.The are mostly dealers, who no one wants on the streets and 2. Ever had a close friend or family member who was an addict. See the litany of crimes they commit? It's often easier to prove the possession bust than the b&e or the robbery, or the assault and battery, so they put them away for possession.

    The benefit is they are locked up so they can't recidivate.

    If you want to lower the prison pop, close the border. That will keep the deported ex-cons from coming back and will cut off the new ones trying to enter.
    Deport all new illegals + anyone who even jaywalks.

  21. @SFG
    "It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation."

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people...back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently...

    Replies: @syonredux, @AnAnon, @Anonymous, @International Jew, @TWS, @Hippopotamusdrome

    That was the beginnings of the goodwhite strategy of appealing to the outside group to win out over the badwhites. Sure, they had to ultimately abandon Detroit, but cavanagh did get elected.

  22. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Sunbeam

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist, @Kylie, @blair, @North Carolina Resident

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Absolutely!!!!

    I believe it was the National Geographic or American History Channel hand had a 12 plus episode series on the Sicilian mafia.

    At the end the question was what ultimately caused the Sicilian mob to go rapidly into decline by the second and third generations.

    The head FBI analyst of the mafia stated that while law enforcement and tough anti-racketeering laws played a big part. One can not over look that the Sicilian mob’s own rules tending towards hypergamous marriage patterns and against out of wedlock children caused them to breed sociopathic and psychopathic tendencies out of the future generations of the crime families.

    When I heard this I about dropped out of my chair. Imagine if he used such a heredity based explanation to characterize the increase in black crime and incarceration rates!!!!

    • Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist
    @anonymous-antimarxist


    American History Channel
     
    I meant the American Heroes Channel, use to be the Military Channel.
  23. MKP says:

    Even by the low standards of the Republican party’s wide cast of cowardly, do-nothing grifter bag-men, Boehner has to stand out as an abysmal failure.

    Despite a majority for 5 years now, which was burnished considerably last year, he has utterly failed to move the needle in any important way on any conservative issue. Aside from stopping an increase in taxes on multi-millionaires, it’s hard to see any bill, issue, or fight where he actually takes a conservative position and fights for it. He gets beaten by Obama up and down (or, more accurately, plays the role) on everything important.

    On top of that, his character and personal life are utter embarrassments.

    Seriously – if conservative American tried to come up with a more useless, shameful leader, could it be done?

  24. @syonredux
    @SFG


    “It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation.”

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people…back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently…
     
    During the 1950s-early '60s (a low crime era),the US criminal justice system stressed rehabilitation over incarceration:

    In the 1950s, the United States experienced a panic over youth crime. Both the political rhetoric and cultural fears of the period would appear to lead directly to the “get tough” approach popular today. But they did not. Instead, the government's response focused on policies of prevention and rehabilitation. What accounts for this? The answer lies in a set of institutions that framed the issue and biased it in favor of progressive solutions. These institutions—the Children's Bureau, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency—provided friendly venues for progressive ideas while preventing other ideas from being considered.
     
    http://www.palgrave-journals.com/polity/journal/v38/n3/full/2300057a.html

    Things started to shift in the 1960s as the murder rate soared*.Cf, for example, Nixon's call for "Law and Order," etc.Actual changes to sentencing policies took a while, though:

    When the crime rate began to climb in the mid-1960s, conservatives urged a "get tough" policy that emphasized swift, severe punishment. Demands for swifter trials and sentencing were defeated by the "due process" clause of the Constitution. If anything, justice moves even slower today than it did twenty years ago. Conservative demands for more severe punishment did eventually have an effect, however.
     

    After 1975, the expected cost of violence began to rise. First, while the police continued to make arrests for about half the violent offenses they recorded, arrests rose considerably faster than victimization rates. Thus, if victimization rates are our best indicator of the underlying trend in violence, the percentage of violent offenders getting arrested must have risen. At the same time, those who went to prison were staying longer. The net effect of these changes was that violent offenders could expect to spend more time in prison. Judging by murder and victimization rates, the violent crime rate was about 10 percent lower in 1988 than in 1975. Yet the fraction of adults in state and federal prisons more than doubled during this period. In part, this was because we were locking up more people for drug-related offenses. But those who committed violent crimes could also expect to spend considerably more time in prison in 1988 than in 1975.
     
    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing


    *

    An American's chance of being murdered was relatively low in the 1950s and early 1960s. It doubled between 1964 and 1974,
     
    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist

    How much of the decrease in crime has been really do to “White Flight”, improved security systems and gun ownership for self defense???

    Of course Obama and his Justice Dept is hard at work to fix this.

  25. @Sunbeam
    I find this topic depressing. I don't dispute your analysis, but well you know.

    What really bugs me is that my take is that draconian laws and sentences don't really do anything in one sense. There is no deterrent factor; only a preemptive one. There is just not enough of a future time orientation there for things like "Hey if I do this I could go to prison" to have any effect. They are just going with the flow, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

    The cynic in me thinks you could run a kind of "draft lottery" with people of the right age group and demographic to stick in prison, and get the same kind of reduction in crime.

    I guess that is too dark. I mean self-selection has to count for something right?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kevin O'Keeffe, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar

    “The cynic in me thinks you could run a kind of “draft lottery” with people of the right age group and demographic to stick in prison, and get the same kind of reduction in crime.”

    I suspect that’s not quite true, but I can’t really say that I blame you, for thinking it might be. It seems plausible.

  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG
    "It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation."

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people...back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently...

    Replies: @syonredux, @AnAnon, @Anonymous, @International Jew, @TWS, @Hippopotamusdrome

    Here are some films to give you an idea of the vibe of the late 60s to mid-70s…

    Dirty Harry (1971)
    The French Connection (1971)
    Super Fly (1972)
    Magnum Force (1973)
    Serpico (1973)
    Death Wish (1974)
    The Enforcer (1976)
    Taxi Driver (1976)

    Learn from the past. Think twice. Make fewer mistakes.

  27. @SFG
    "It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation."

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people...back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently...

    Replies: @syonredux, @AnAnon, @Anonymous, @International Jew, @TWS, @Hippopotamusdrome

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?

    I don’t think so. What did happen is that the police and courts became more tolerant of bad behavior, which emboldened the criminals.

    • Replies: @peterike
    @International Jew


    I don’t think so. What did happen is that the police and courts became more tolerant of bad behavior, which emboldened the criminals.
     
    Yeah, you had the imposition of the Miranda warning in 1966. And, in general, a decline in beat cop policing of the kind where Marty and Seamus might "visit" Leroy (those lovely pre-Shawntavius days) and "remind" him not to cause trouble, or things might not go so well. Cops started to just cruise around in their cars instead of walking the beat.

    I believe judges got soft too, as more and more radicals were elected/appointed. As a kid in the 60s I remember those "soft on crime" and "Liberal judges" discussions of the adults, where it seems more and more the judges were letting the criminals loose. Word of that spreads pretty quickly on the street, I would imagine. You also had the rise of the social activist lawyer, as hordes of freshly minted radicals were graduating the law schools. And the whole explosion in social welfare coddling, decline of discipline in the schools, diminished adult authority in favor of the young, etc. etc. Basically, everything that could be done wrong WAS done wrong.
    , @TWS
    @International Jew

    True story; Miranda was guilty as sin. The rapist that got his name attached to one of the most recognizable pieces of law enforcement procedure was guilty and a repeat offender.

    The liberal courts brought in by liberal judges tied the police's hands entirely. That's also the reason for the over packed court system and the endless plea bargains. Which is evil on its face.

    If you make them take you to trial (innocent or not) and you are found guilty you get anywhere between four and eight times the sentence as if you accepted the plea bargain. They punish you for exercising your rights.

    A huge part of it is that liberal courts and judges essentially decided that it would be harder to find or use evidence of a crime against the criminals. Mission accomplished.

    , @NOTA
    @International Jew

    What caused the big surge in crime is a mystery. My impression is that crime moves in cycles for reasons of its own, which we can probably only affect with great difficulty.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Hibernian

  28. @syonredux
    @SFG


    “It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation.”

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people…back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently…
     
    During the 1950s-early '60s (a low crime era),the US criminal justice system stressed rehabilitation over incarceration:

    In the 1950s, the United States experienced a panic over youth crime. Both the political rhetoric and cultural fears of the period would appear to lead directly to the “get tough” approach popular today. But they did not. Instead, the government's response focused on policies of prevention and rehabilitation. What accounts for this? The answer lies in a set of institutions that framed the issue and biased it in favor of progressive solutions. These institutions—the Children's Bureau, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency—provided friendly venues for progressive ideas while preventing other ideas from being considered.
     
    http://www.palgrave-journals.com/polity/journal/v38/n3/full/2300057a.html

    Things started to shift in the 1960s as the murder rate soared*.Cf, for example, Nixon's call for "Law and Order," etc.Actual changes to sentencing policies took a while, though:

    When the crime rate began to climb in the mid-1960s, conservatives urged a "get tough" policy that emphasized swift, severe punishment. Demands for swifter trials and sentencing were defeated by the "due process" clause of the Constitution. If anything, justice moves even slower today than it did twenty years ago. Conservative demands for more severe punishment did eventually have an effect, however.
     

    After 1975, the expected cost of violence began to rise. First, while the police continued to make arrests for about half the violent offenses they recorded, arrests rose considerably faster than victimization rates. Thus, if victimization rates are our best indicator of the underlying trend in violence, the percentage of violent offenders getting arrested must have risen. At the same time, those who went to prison were staying longer. The net effect of these changes was that violent offenders could expect to spend more time in prison. Judging by murder and victimization rates, the violent crime rate was about 10 percent lower in 1988 than in 1975. Yet the fraction of adults in state and federal prisons more than doubled during this period. In part, this was because we were locking up more people for drug-related offenses. But those who committed violent crimes could also expect to spend considerably more time in prison in 1988 than in 1975.
     
    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing


    *

    An American's chance of being murdered was relatively low in the 1950s and early 1960s. It doubled between 1964 and 1974,
     
    http://prospect.org/article/violent-crime-increasing

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist

    During the 1950s-early ’60s (a low crime era),the US criminal justice system stressed rehabilitation over incarceration:

    Ah yes!!!

    The golden era of its was society’s fault. Willie Sutton robbed banks not because he was a born sociopath but because as Sutton allegedly said “that was where the money was”. At bit of subtle political satire that was actually believed as true because it so perfectly captured the leftist zeitgeist of the time.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @anonymous-antimarxist

    There's the officer Krupke song from West Side Story. Strangely, it seems to show the delinquents taking advantage of the foolish justice system. I wonder when the Bernstein that Tom Wolfe wrote about emerged...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  29. I think what we learned from the 1960s is that A) violent criminals stay behind bars B) cops matter.

    And on the latter point, we really learned that in ’90s in New York and then in other cities.

    Most important, what really gets people, even violent people, to restrain themselves is the certainty of apprehension. It is more effective than severity of punishment, which is something that dumb people don’t think about in advance. People tend to rob you when a cop is not around. They’re not thinking about whether the sentence is 10 years rather than five.

    Cops cut crime much more effectively than do long stays in prison. So the money is better spent on increasing cop numbers than in lengthening sentences. Read William J. Stuntz.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @SEATAF

    True aggressive patrolling combined with getting to know your beat and the neighborhood really pays off. If they know you and see you always swinging through they just won't risk it often enough. Plus if you simply shoot the shit with them once in a while it goes a long way towards good faith and good behavior.

    Had a guy who tried to bash my head in with concrete later apologize along with his family that tried to help him. Saw him ten-twelve years later and he was showing off his newest baby to me and my wife. With many low impulse types they'll regret/forget the behavior later if you give them a chance. Honestly we're talking human beings so not all will but many maybe even most.

  30. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    I did not know this. This tells me volumes about Boner.

  31. OT: ‘I AM CAIT’ Debuts Soft in Ratings…

    I think the more accurate choice of term is “flaccid”…..but hey….I’m a stickler!

  32. Just in time to join their relatives moving into nice white suburbs thanks to Section 8.

  33. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Sunbeam

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist, @Kylie, @blair, @North Carolina Resident

    It all boils down to is: we pay bad people to breed.

    Paul Kersey reported a case of a 17-18 year old “youth” who put an old white man into a coma or killed him playing the knock out game, I am not sure which.

    Seems the kid had been punching out his teachers since age 13.

    At his trial his ACLU/NLG lawyers were arguing that the judge should not be too hard on him so that he could remain a father to his child and the one on the way.

    Like I keep saying, RISUG/VASALGEL, early and often, would do wonders to clean up the gene pool.

  34. The Speaker of the House of the United States of America’s daughter married an unemployed construction worker from Jamaica? I guess when you wait till you’re 35 you can’t be choosy.

  35. Steve has been calling out cuckservatives for years. I’m looking forward to his take on the neologism itself.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Alec

    The neologism has too much porn-addled adolescent association to it. I hope Steve will do a deeper analysis of the phenomenon and give us another intellectual tool to understand the world, instead of just plain name calling.

    Replies: @TWS

  36. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    @4 “Who is that man labeled “the Speaker’s son-in-law”?”

    @5 “He’s the Speaker’s son-in-law.”

    Never doubt content from iSteve.

  37. @anonymous-antimarxist
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.
     
    Absolutely!!!!

    I believe it was the National Geographic or American History Channel hand had a 12 plus episode series on the Sicilian mafia.

    At the end the question was what ultimately caused the Sicilian mob to go rapidly into decline by the second and third generations.

    The head FBI analyst of the mafia stated that while law enforcement and tough anti-racketeering laws played a big part. One can not over look that the Sicilian mob's own rules tending towards hypergamous marriage patterns and against out of wedlock children caused them to breed sociopathic and psychopathic tendencies out of the future generations of the crime families.

    When I heard this I about dropped out of my chair. Imagine if he used such a heredity based explanation to characterize the increase in black crime and incarceration rates!!!!

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist

    American History Channel

    I meant the American Heroes Channel, use to be the Military Channel.

  38. This explains why Boehner is crying all the time.

  39. Our first gay Kenyan president has stuff on Boehner.

  40. @International Jew
    @SFG


    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?
     
    I don't think so. What did happen is that the police and courts became more tolerant of bad behavior, which emboldened the criminals.

    Replies: @peterike, @TWS, @NOTA

    I don’t think so. What did happen is that the police and courts became more tolerant of bad behavior, which emboldened the criminals.

    Yeah, you had the imposition of the Miranda warning in 1966. And, in general, a decline in beat cop policing of the kind where Marty and Seamus might “visit” Leroy (those lovely pre-Shawntavius days) and “remind” him not to cause trouble, or things might not go so well. Cops started to just cruise around in their cars instead of walking the beat.

    I believe judges got soft too, as more and more radicals were elected/appointed. As a kid in the 60s I remember those “soft on crime” and “Liberal judges” discussions of the adults, where it seems more and more the judges were letting the criminals loose. Word of that spreads pretty quickly on the street, I would imagine. You also had the rise of the social activist lawyer, as hordes of freshly minted radicals were graduating the law schools. And the whole explosion in social welfare coddling, decline of discipline in the schools, diminished adult authority in favor of the young, etc. etc. Basically, everything that could be done wrong WAS done wrong.

  41. As you say, it’s all been tried before. I recommend the book, “The Criminal Justice Club,” by former Los Angeles County Deputy DA Walt Lewis, who worked in the office from 1968-2000. In the 1970’s, Lewis often dealt with defendants who had been convicted of murder, paroled, and were back on the street. Usually after 6-7 years.

    You can buy the book here (www.waltlewis.com) or on Amazon. For one of the results of policies Obama, Boehner, Rand Paul, and company wish to bring back, Google “Rodney Alcala.”

    • Replies: @Bad Memories
    @David In TN


    After leaving the Army, Alcala graduated from the UCLA School of Fine Arts and later studied film under Roman Polanski at New York University.

    Well, I think that explains it.
    , @athEIst
    @David In TN

    Somewhere on the Pro-death penalty website is a section called "Once a murderer" which recounts true-life stories of murderers who were convicted and later released and......murdered again. It goes on for pages and pages.

  42. iSteveFan says:

    …that greatly expanded the number of Americans — to roughly 750 per 100,000 — now incarcerated, by far the highest of any Western nation.

    Did they also mention our African population is by far the highest, both numerically and percentage wise, of any Western nation? Our African population is greater than the combined populations of Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Ireland and Greece!

    • Disagree: Reg Cæsar
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @iSteveFan

    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.

    Q1) Do they incarcerate anybody?

    Q2) They have Western legal systems. How are they not Western countries?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Hubbub, @International Jew, @Jefferson

  43. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    There’s a lot of South-Asian Indians in the Caribbean area. From the looks of it, I’d say Mr. Lakhan is at least partly of that stock. Which makes me think he might be more of a Cheech-N-Chong type criminal than a Dr. Dre-type criminal. If only this distinction was made by the laws Lakhan’s father-in-law is in support of loosening.

  44. @Kylie
    @syonredux


    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:
     
    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    Replies: @syonredux, @SPMoore8, @Thomas O. Meehan, @Massimo Heitor

    I read both McWhorter articles and I don’t really see the leftward turn, what I do think is that he is being careful not to blaspheme against St. Ta Nehisi. Not to disparage McWhorter, but I do get the sense that he might be a bit envious of Ta Nehisi’s current oracular status.

    I think he makes an excellent point about “anti-racism” being a kind of religion. But he should add, it’s a church that no one is obliged to attend. The entire “Shut up and listen” vibe coming from that camp is such that personally I don’t want to deal with them anymore, and that’s after spending years listening and trying to see it from their POV. Basically, all they are doing is engaging in public mutual stroking, and it’s meaningless.

    • Replies: @TB2
    @SPMoore8

    You may not be interested in them, but they're interested in you, and they have the power to make that interest felt. Import a million Somalis or move a section 8 next door to you, for example. In a fundamentalist society you're not allowed to be disinterested, it's blasphemy.

  45. This is mostly off topic, but I was wondering if Steve saw this interview with Melinda Gates.

    http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2015/july-august/melinda-gates-high-price-of-faith-action.html

    In an answer to one question, she expresses surprise that they were unable to end homelessness in the Pacific Northwest by giving people free housing. She said, “we cannot build enough transitional housing units.” Big surprise there, Melinda.

  46. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Sunbeam

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist, @Kylie, @blair, @North Carolina Resident

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Yes, the “You breed them, we’ll feed them” policy has been disastrous.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Kylie

    Now we're paying them to be bad. For decades we've given ex cons help with housing and such to ease their way into society. Now PD's all over the country are advertising to felons with gang ties to apply to the police department. Imagine that, a convicted felon might be your neighborhood officer.

  47. Marvelous, I lived through the ’70’s and early ’80’s once… now let’s do it all again ’cause felonious black lives matter..

    Boehner is really cementing his status as head cuckservative.

  48. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    Ha! So that’s why he’s always crying. Makes total sense now.

  49. If I were Boehner, I’d rather keep him in the pen! He must be very proud of his little princess and her Prince Charming.

  50. This is the logical outcome of Black Bloc Voting in Urban Areas. Consider say, Illinois. The rest of the State could vote Republican, but because of strategic Black Bloc voting, the whole state goes Democrat. This has implications for both the Governor’s race and Senate Races, and the Electoral votes in Presidential Elections.

    Boehner, as the conservative wing of the Democratic Party, wants to favor not only his son in law but also like Rand Paul and others, the Black Bloc voters. You see similar stuff in Europe, where the Banlieus and so forth provide the critical mass for politicians like Hollande.

    The Tyranny of the Minority is a result of the voting system, and the larger culture of universal utopianism as a religion by what amounts to the descendants of the Puritans. Western culture throws up this insane stuff over and over again in various forms: the Spartans (a dysfunctional culture aimed at preventing dynastic tyrannies and foreign conquerors), Plato’s Republic based off the Spartans including the ever-present “Noble Lie,” the Gnostics who felt earthly concerns were corrupt and of the devil, the Albigensians (later Gnostics advocating a heaven on earth), the Puritans, the Oneida Community (“smashing Monogamy” — in 1830, funny how that always results in a few big men hogging the teen girls), and so on.

    My take is that Western (and Chinese — see the Taipeng Rebellion killing 25 million where some peasant thought he was Christ’s messenger, and then on second thought, gosh darn it, he WAS Christ) society is so hierarchical and complex and often lacking in intermediary social organizations that Western and Chinese people have a constant longing for “flat” and universal utopian society in the case of Westerners actively denying racial and other differences.

    Your average SWPL of which Boehner is part of; being a DC corruptocrat, has to bow and scrape and perform complex rituals in a society getting ever more complex: for example Myspace->Facebook->Twitter->Instagram. Thus he likely also BELIEVES that heck no, releasing Black criminals is a good thing because they’re just like him.

  51. @SPMoore8
    @Kylie

    I read both McWhorter articles and I don't really see the leftward turn, what I do think is that he is being careful not to blaspheme against St. Ta Nehisi. Not to disparage McWhorter, but I do get the sense that he might be a bit envious of Ta Nehisi's current oracular status.

    I think he makes an excellent point about "anti-racism" being a kind of religion. But he should add, it's a church that no one is obliged to attend. The entire "Shut up and listen" vibe coming from that camp is such that personally I don't want to deal with them anymore, and that's after spending years listening and trying to see it from their POV. Basically, all they are doing is engaging in public mutual stroking, and it's meaningless.

    Replies: @TB2

    You may not be interested in them, but they’re interested in you, and they have the power to make that interest felt. Import a million Somalis or move a section 8 next door to you, for example. In a fundamentalist society you’re not allowed to be disinterested, it’s blasphemy.

  52. TB2 says:

    More blackity, black, blackness from BRA. At times like this I always like to inject a little sanity from Heather MacDonald:

    Is the Criminal-Justice System Racist?

    http://www.city-journal.org/2008/18_2_criminal_justice_system.html

    In the overwhelming majority of cases, whatever the race of the convicted, prison remains what it has always been: a lifetime achievement award for persistence in criminal offending. Absent recidivism or a violent crime, the criminal-justice system will do everything it can to keep you out of the state or federal slammer. It can be disconcerting for the average law-abiding citizen to hear a prosecutor’s typology of the crime universe: most thefts, for example, are considered “nonserious crimes” that do not merit prison sentences, unless they concern a huge amount of money or took place in the victim’s presence. Steal an unoccupied car or burgle an unoccupied home and you’ll probably get probation; hijack a car from a driver or stick up a pedestrian, however, and you’ll probably go to prison.

    Columbia University law professor Dan Richman had a chance to test the “harmless offenders in prison” claim as chair of New York City’s Local Conditional Release Commission. Richman studied the criminal profile of Rikers jail inmates in late 2004. Jails are supposed to be where the most “innocuous” lawbreakers end up—those with misdemeanor convictions or sentences of less than a year. “It struck me how serious the offenders were,” he says. “I’d come from the academy, where there’s persuasive writing about over-incarceration. I had assumed there would be mostly first-time offenders in jail, but it wasn’t true.” About 40 percent of the inmates had prior felony convictions, Richman discovered, and the inmates’ most recent offenses, which had put them in jail this time around, were usually serious. People in for assault would have pleaded down from attempted manslaughter; possession pleaded down from distribution. “These weren’t people who were there by accident,” says Richman.

    ———–

    Another bit of racist madness from white-hating sociopaths of the left. This will raise crime levels, though it won’t cause the sort of crime explosion we saw in the 60-90s. The field trials have already been done by the Baltimore police and the school disciplinary programs. There is no great mass of blacks in jail for trivial crimes, they’ve pleaded down. I’m tempted to say its a myth derived from liberal ideology but in fact liberals don’t really care whether there is or isn’t because, well, disparate impact.

  53. TWS says:
    @Sunbeam
    I find this topic depressing. I don't dispute your analysis, but well you know.

    What really bugs me is that my take is that draconian laws and sentences don't really do anything in one sense. There is no deterrent factor; only a preemptive one. There is just not enough of a future time orientation there for things like "Hey if I do this I could go to prison" to have any effect. They are just going with the flow, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

    The cynic in me thinks you could run a kind of "draft lottery" with people of the right age group and demographic to stick in prison, and get the same kind of reduction in crime.

    I guess that is too dark. I mean self-selection has to count for something right?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kevin O'Keeffe, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar

    Wrong. The easing of sentencing laws led to an estimated 300,000 people murdered from the sixties to the eighties when they tightened up again. The effects were seen nearly immediately and are well documented.

    Ease up again and see what happens.

    Every year, every Department of Corrections in every state works very hard to lower the security classification and thus shorten the sentences of some very, very dangerous criminals. That is simply for budget reasons. Housing these human predators is tough, expensive, dangerous work. I bet you’ve never worked a job where you are shown a ‘how to survive a rape and torture session’ before you’ve ever worked a day.

    Now add politics into this. Every year or so there are a series of articles in local papers about how they let somebody out who should have been kept in. They never mention that the reason we let them out is because more and more dangerous guys keep coming in and you simply have to let some of them out. Even if sentences were never taken into consideration you would have to let some out simply for space for the guys who (and I’ve met them) have to be fed through a metal slot and strapped into chains that would hold a wild tiger before being let out for their hour a day of rec time, alone, because they would murder someone with them and eat their eyeballs. Those are some nice guys. They were worse before they came into the system. Think about that. And think about this, most of them will get out some day and you will be sharing a space in the checkout line with them or maybe a fenceline.

  54. @SFG
    "It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation."

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people...back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently...

    Replies: @syonredux, @AnAnon, @Anonymous, @International Jew, @TWS, @Hippopotamusdrome

    Yeah they cut the security and discipline in the prisons first. Mostly due to ‘progressive’ new theories on psychology and criminology. Then the riots occurred. You’d almost think there was a connection.

    I’m sure the civil rights movement was involved tangentially at least.

  55. OT: There is a follow up to the “open marriage” piece discussed last week. The wife speaks!

    http://nymag.com/thecut/2015/07/youre-a-male-feminist-in-an-open-marriage.html

    • Replies: @manton
    @peterike

    Note that they don't even address, much less attempt to rebut, the many assertions/speculations that this is fake. They don't even address the pseudonym issue. If "Michael Sonmore" is a real person, and a writer no less, in an English-speaking country, he would appear to be the only one whose name gets exactly zero hits from any social media site, database, or other media outlet--except for that one article.

    Fake, fake, fake.

  56. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    Maybe this is why the Speaker is crying all the time?

  57. If sentencing is lessened and crime does not increase that will suggest that the rise and fall of lead and the fall of fetal alcohol syndrome were responsible for the previous rise and fall of crime. Not to say that some ethnicities do not in fact have different genetically related crime rates than others.

  58. Some of this ties into Rand Paul’s “outreach” to the NAM population in general and the Black community in particular. His quaint notion that if we just explain very carefully how all of our common problems can be solved with the twin deus ex machina’s of tax cuts and sentencing reform, why, Black folks and Hispanics will flock to the GOP in such electoral-shattering numbers that it’ll basically amount to another major political realignment, like 1861 or 1933!

    This is, of course, a sweet fairy tale of his and other GOP wishful-thinkers imaginations; and usually politician’s Walter Mitty-delusions do no real harm other than waste a lot of paper and choke the airwaves with lots of pretty words. But the idea that you’re going to let at the very minimum tens of thousands of felons out of Uncle Sammy’s hoosegow because of Rand Paul’s “outreach,” John Boehner’s familial woes, and Bill Clinton’s regrets over his signature crime bill (from the NYT article) is a pretty dicey wager, as you point out.

    I’m sympathetic to the notion that some kid caught with a roach in his glove compartment shouldn’t be sitting in a Federal prison somewhere – but that’s rarely the case. To get the attention of the Feds on non-Diversity related offenses – i.e., “hate crimes” – you usually have had to do a whole lot of prior bad things or some especially bad things as singular incidents. I would be curious to know how many of the drug offenders whose sentences would be affected by these reforms are there after repeated prior bad acts in their communities unrelated to what the Feds sent them to prison over – things like assault & battery, armed robbery, rape, etc. The question would then become: when we release these offenders back into those communities, is it the odds of their recidivism back to drug use/dealings that is going to be the real problem, or the wreaking of general mayhem around them that comes with having a neighborhood full of recently paroled Gentle Giants?

    Or, who knows, maybe I got it all wrong and Boehner, Rand & Co. got it all right: inside the skin of everyone of these convicted felons and potential parolees is a nascent Friedrich Hayek struggling mightily to get out, embrace tax cuts, read NRO daily, and vote Republican for life.

    I guess if Boehner gets his way a number of local neighborhoods across the U.S. will get to put that hypothesis to the test!

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Jason Sylvester

    The whole "jails are full of non-violent drug offenders" is utter crap. You have to work real hard to get sent to prison; nobody is there for possessing a joint.

    What happens is the cops know who the neighborhood bad guys are. But they can't get them for the violent stuff the cops know they have done; snitches get stitches is the rule in the hood. So they get them for some drug offense and get them off the street that way.

    Replies: @anon

  59. TWS says:
    @International Jew
    @SFG


    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?
     
    I don't think so. What did happen is that the police and courts became more tolerant of bad behavior, which emboldened the criminals.

    Replies: @peterike, @TWS, @NOTA

    True story; Miranda was guilty as sin. The rapist that got his name attached to one of the most recognizable pieces of law enforcement procedure was guilty and a repeat offender.

    The liberal courts brought in by liberal judges tied the police’s hands entirely. That’s also the reason for the over packed court system and the endless plea bargains. Which is evil on its face.

    If you make them take you to trial (innocent or not) and you are found guilty you get anywhere between four and eight times the sentence as if you accepted the plea bargain. They punish you for exercising your rights.

    A huge part of it is that liberal courts and judges essentially decided that it would be harder to find or use evidence of a crime against the criminals. Mission accomplished.

  60. Cutting incarceration rates and police budgets sounds like the perfect way to incite a race war: 1) criminals are set free; 2) violent crime rises; 3) the law-abiding respond by arming themselves; 4) Ferguson-style riots when black thugs start getting shot by white people defending themselves.

    I don’t own a firearm. I have never owned a firearm. I can’t even keep track of where my pocket knife is. Nevertheless, I won’t ever become a victim.

    At present, white political consciousness is all but non-existent. What better way to reignite it than to watch violent crime rates soar, even as the government imposes a “fair housing” law that would require more and more of us to live next to thugs?

    John Boehner wants to let people out of jail. Mitch McConnell wants amnesty. Rand Paul and Mike Lee want to give convicted felons the right to vote. They think this is what Republicans voted for? Holy shit. Even the GOP has embraced the Rainbow Reich.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Wilkey

    I don’t own a firearm. I have never owned a firearm. I can’t even keep track of where my pocket knife is. Nevertheless, I won’t ever become a victim.

    For me, the logic train derailed at that last sentence. Please explain.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    , @anon
    @Wilkey


    Cutting incarceration rates and police budgets sounds like the perfect way to incite a race war
     
    It's using crime and criminals as a kind of free secret police that keeps people at home and prevents them organizing against the oligarchs of Wall St: anarcho-tyranny.
  61. @Kylie
    @syonredux


    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:
     
    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    Replies: @syonredux, @SPMoore8, @Thomas O. Meehan, @Massimo Heitor

    Mc Whorter couldn’t resist the temptation to endorse candidate Obama. Like Colin Powell, race trumpeted intellect and loyalty.

  62. TWS says:
    @Kylie
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.
     
    Yes, the "You breed them, we'll feed them" policy has been disastrous.

    Replies: @TWS

    Now we’re paying them to be bad. For decades we’ve given ex cons help with housing and such to ease their way into society. Now PD’s all over the country are advertising to felons with gang ties to apply to the police department. Imagine that, a convicted felon might be your neighborhood officer.

  63. By a large factor, more long sentences are handed out on the state level than on the federal level. This means that the all this talk about loosening mandatory drug sentencing is a dumbshow.

    ThePresident would like to see the states follow suit, but he can’t make it happen.

    This could be a good exercise in Federalism. States wishing to remain part of Western Civilization can keep stiff sentencing, driving out criminals. New York, Illinois and New Jersey can be criminal friendly and suffer the consequences. I like it.

  64. I’ve been hearing much lately about this new term, cuckservative. The pictures used with this blog post really drive it home.

  65. @Wilkey
    Cutting incarceration rates and police budgets sounds like the perfect way to incite a race war: 1) criminals are set free; 2) violent crime rises; 3) the law-abiding respond by arming themselves; 4) Ferguson-style riots when black thugs start getting shot by white people defending themselves.

    I don't own a firearm. I have never owned a firearm. I can't even keep track of where my pocket knife is. Nevertheless, I won't ever become a victim.

    At present, white political consciousness is all but non-existent. What better way to reignite it than to watch violent crime rates soar, even as the government imposes a "fair housing" law that would require more and more of us to live next to thugs?

    John Boehner wants to let people out of jail. Mitch McConnell wants amnesty. Rand Paul and Mike Lee want to give convicted felons the right to vote. They think this is what Republicans voted for? Holy shit. Even the GOP has embraced the Rainbow Reich.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @anon

    I don’t own a firearm. I have never owned a firearm. I can’t even keep track of where my pocket knife is. Nevertheless, I won’t ever become a victim.

    For me, the logic train derailed at that last sentence. Please explain.

    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Harry Baldwin

    It means I don't own a firearm because I live and work in one America's safer cities, in one of the safer parts of the city, and thus have no serious reason, at present, to fear becoming a victim. Under Obama's HD proposals and Boehner's desire to let more cons out of jail, that would change.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

  66. I don’t buy this we are incarcerating people for ‘drug offenses’ B.S. That maybe the charge the criminal is sentenced under as the result of a plea bargain but you don’t do prison time for mere possession of narcotics unless you are trafficking in them and have lots of priors offenses. For example, I am following the case of a dentist’s daughter and her ex con boyfriend. They were both caught in the act of shooting heroin. She’s pregnant and came up dirty on drug test after her release from jail on the underlying narcotics charge. She’s been released again into the custody of a half way house. Here is the ‘boyfriend’ and what got him 3 years 9 months in prison.

    01/30/2007 FEL/DELI W/GUN/CONC WPN/AMMO 04/02/2008 MANATEE 0704386 3Y 0M 0D
    02/02/2008 WILLFUL FLEE/ELUDE LEO 04/02/2008 MANATEE 0800466 3Y 0M 0D
    08/02/2007 TRAFF ILL DRUGS 4-U/14 GRAMS 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 TRAFF COCAINE 28-U/200GR 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 TRAFF ILL DRUGS 4-U/14 GRAMS 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 MARIJUANA-SALE/MANUF/DEL 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 POSS.CONTROL.SUBS/OTHER 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 POSS.CONTROL.SUBS/OTHER 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 POSS.CONTROL.SUBS/OTHER 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 POSS.CONTROL.SUBS/OTHER 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D
    08/02/2007 POSS.CONTROL.SUBS/OTHER 07/23/2008 SARASOTA 0714934 3Y 9M 16D

    Now he’s out and been arrested for shoplifting at a mall and turned a dentist’s daughter into a junkie as well as being caught shooting up behind a convenience store with her. His dad is an ex-con too. My boy here has another wife and kids whom he has abandoned in favor of the younger dentist’s daughter. He’s out awaiting trial now with his conflict counsel seeking a plea deal. The prosecutor ‘consolidated’ the misdemeanor shoplifting and felony possession of heroin charge so it will look like he was sent to prison, if he is, for a first time conviction of possession of heroin rather than as a congenital criminal. BTW they are both white!

  67. @David In TN
    As you say, it's all been tried before. I recommend the book, "The Criminal Justice Club," by former Los Angeles County Deputy DA Walt Lewis, who worked in the office from 1968-2000. In the 1970's, Lewis often dealt with defendants who had been convicted of murder, paroled, and were back on the street. Usually after 6-7 years.

    You can buy the book here (www.waltlewis.com) or on Amazon. For one of the results of policies Obama, Boehner, Rand Paul, and company wish to bring back, Google "Rodney Alcala."

    Replies: @Bad Memories, @athEIst

    After leaving the Army, Alcala graduated from the UCLA School of Fine Arts and later studied film under Roman Polanski at New York University.

    Well, I think that explains it.

  68. @David In TN
    As you say, it's all been tried before. I recommend the book, "The Criminal Justice Club," by former Los Angeles County Deputy DA Walt Lewis, who worked in the office from 1968-2000. In the 1970's, Lewis often dealt with defendants who had been convicted of murder, paroled, and were back on the street. Usually after 6-7 years.

    You can buy the book here (www.waltlewis.com) or on Amazon. For one of the results of policies Obama, Boehner, Rand Paul, and company wish to bring back, Google "Rodney Alcala."

    Replies: @Bad Memories, @athEIst

    Somewhere on the Pro-death penalty website is a section called “Once a murderer” which recounts true-life stories of murderers who were convicted and later released and……murdered again. It goes on for pages and pages.

  69. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Sunbeam

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist, @Kylie, @blair, @North Carolina Resident

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    This is absolutely correct. If selection in biology is to have any meaning at all, this is its meaning. Are they fit enough to survive in their environment? If the environment is the state they were living in among themselves in Africa, the answer is no, not many. But if the environment is one of never ending food and housing and medicine supplied by a totally different group, then yes.

  70. You did what I thought could not be done….you made me feel sorry for John Boehner.

  71. @Kylie
    @syonredux


    For my money, McWhorter easily outdoes TN Coates as a “Black Intellectual.”Here’s an older essay where he discusses the topic of reparations:
     
    Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations!

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    Replies: @syonredux, @SPMoore8, @Thomas O. Meehan, @Massimo Heitor

    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.

    McWhorter is great in that he expresses some far right view points on race that typically no public intellectual can express.

    McWhorter also has some hard left viewpoints, and that’s not new, that’s always been him. Read his articles on Trayvon Martin, they are standard hard left. McWhorter sounds like the stereotypical angry black nationalist white hater that has zero logic or reasoning. This isn’t new. McWhorter also claims that Mumia Abu-Jamal was absolutely unquestionably innocent from the 1982 murder accusation. I’ve not researched that incident that deeply, but McWhorter seems hard left, and very anti-white on that issue.

    His recent article criticizing American antiracism as blind religion is what I would classify as a far right viewpoint. I’ve made the exact same point, and many other fringe right wing types has, be he is a mainstream public intellectual expressing what is widely considered thought crime.

    Among black race commenters, I like Sowell the best. McWhorter also has some great points, and he is of a younger generation and more accessible to many, but occasionally he swings far left and will outrage people on either side.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Massimo Heitor


    Among black race commenters, I like Sowell the best. McWhorter also has some great points, and he is of a younger generation and more accessible to many, but occasionally he swings far left and will outrage people on either side.
     
    Totally agree about Sowell; he's on an entirely separate level.Whenever anyone wants to get a firm grip on the story of immigration to the USA, I always recommend:


    Ethnic America: A History

    http://www.amazon.com/Ethnic-America-History-Thomas-Sowell/dp/0465020755/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8
  72. The vast majority of prisoners are in for drug related offenses which should never have been a crime to begin with. That stupid, mindless, one size fits all Three Strikes has bankrupted California. The 60s crime increase was not related to any large prison releases but to the dominant culture and the Miranda ruling.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Marcy Fleming


    The vast majority of prisoners are in for drug related offenses which should never have been a crime to begin with.
     
    That's actually not factual. Have a look at the pie chart a ways down on this page from an organization which shares your philosophy (if not your facts):

    http://www.prisonpolicy.org/reports/pie.html

    So what you can see is that drug offenders are some 40% of federal prisoners, but just 20% of state prisoners and the state system is six times more populous.

    So while you can still argue that even that's too many, it's not at all the "vast majority".

    Oh what you can learn when you decide to troll a conservative blog!

    Replies: @RJA

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Marcy Fleming

    Any bankrupting of California has been done by Democrats. Given a state with so many advantages, it takes enormous effort to destroy what ought to be a paradise.

    One-party rule in California has demonstrated that the structural inconsistencies of Leftism/Marxism are so powerful that they can undo the accumulated capital of generations of citizens engaged in the hard work of building a well-functioning polity.

    Vote Democrat, so the Democrats can do for America what they have done for Detroit.

  73. @Steve Sailer
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    He's the Speaker's son-in-law.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2314818/Dominic-Lakhan-The-Jamaican-born-fianc-John-Boehners-daughter--arrested-possessing-marijuana.html

    Replies: @soren, @rod1963, @Realist, @Alec, @Power Child, @Stumpy Pepys, @Thomas O. Meehan, @carol

    She must be high all the time, to not be embarrassed about it all by now.

  74. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Sunbeam

    It all boils down to this: we pay bad people to breed.

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist, @anonymous-antimarxist, @Kylie, @blair, @North Carolina Resident

    Speaking of paying bad people to breed…

    A buddy of mine invests in run-down commercial real estate in high crime areas. He has two tenants from Yemen operating convenience stores.
    One is 33 yo, has two wives in Yemen and a girlfriend in the US. 12 kids total
    The other is 52 yo, has three wives in Yemen and one in the US. 20 kids total

    Both (allegedly) are involved in all sorts of scams and illegal activities: food stamp fraud, selling stolen merchandise, smuggling cigarettes from low tax NC to high tax NYC and Chicago, selling synthetic marijuana, etc.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @North Carolina Resident

    Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn't make you a bad person.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

  75. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    Who is that man labeled "the Speaker's son-in-law", and how is he relevant to this article? Our heart goes out to anyone with such a tragically distended cranium. (Or maybe it's just a funny hat.)

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Blobby5

    I think it might be where he stores his Jiffy Pop.

  76. In upstate NY we are living with the legacy costs of Rockefeller’s war on something or other, I see lots of retired 50 year old C.O.’s living off lavish pensions. Prisons seem to be the only growth industry around these parts.

  77. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    What a fitting metaphor.

    http://news.yahoo.com/eurotunnel-says-2-000-migrants-tried-enter-premises-163356082.html

    I think it’s safe to say Europe is finished.

    The news should be AFRICANS SENT BACK TO AFRICA.

    Instead, EU is hand-wringing about what to do about these blacks in France trying to invade UK as well.
    No talk of grabbing them and sending them back.

  78. anon • Disclaimer says:

    You could see cheap credit during the 80s and 90s as an anesthetic to keep people sedated while Wall St. surgically removed the economy.

    You could see the prison building program in the same way as an anesthetic for the high crime rate leading to a populist political reaction. A White minority means Wall St. no longer needs to worry about a populist reaction to high crime levels so they don’t need the prisons any more – as long as they personally have their guarded compounds.

  79. @Sunbeam
    I find this topic depressing. I don't dispute your analysis, but well you know.

    What really bugs me is that my take is that draconian laws and sentences don't really do anything in one sense. There is no deterrent factor; only a preemptive one. There is just not enough of a future time orientation there for things like "Hey if I do this I could go to prison" to have any effect. They are just going with the flow, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

    The cynic in me thinks you could run a kind of "draft lottery" with people of the right age group and demographic to stick in prison, and get the same kind of reduction in crime.

    I guess that is too dark. I mean self-selection has to count for something right?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Kevin O'Keeffe, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar

    There is just not enough of a future time orientation there for things like “Hey if I do this I could go to prison” to have any effect.

    I agree, but that doesn’t necessarily preclude a deterrent effect. The death penalty in particular puts miscreants on notice that the authorities take their actions seriously. He’s facing tough, no-nonsense people. He doesn’t need future time orientation to pick up on that. It’s like distinguishing a rattler from a garden snake.

  80. @Wilkey
    Cutting incarceration rates and police budgets sounds like the perfect way to incite a race war: 1) criminals are set free; 2) violent crime rises; 3) the law-abiding respond by arming themselves; 4) Ferguson-style riots when black thugs start getting shot by white people defending themselves.

    I don't own a firearm. I have never owned a firearm. I can't even keep track of where my pocket knife is. Nevertheless, I won't ever become a victim.

    At present, white political consciousness is all but non-existent. What better way to reignite it than to watch violent crime rates soar, even as the government imposes a "fair housing" law that would require more and more of us to live next to thugs?

    John Boehner wants to let people out of jail. Mitch McConnell wants amnesty. Rand Paul and Mike Lee want to give convicted felons the right to vote. They think this is what Republicans voted for? Holy shit. Even the GOP has embraced the Rainbow Reich.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @anon

    Cutting incarceration rates and police budgets sounds like the perfect way to incite a race war

    It’s using crime and criminals as a kind of free secret police that keeps people at home and prevents them organizing against the oligarchs of Wall St: anarcho-tyranny.

  81. @iSteveFan

    ...that greatly expanded the number of Americans — to roughly 750 per 100,000 — now incarcerated, by far the highest of any Western nation.
     
    Did they also mention our African population is by far the highest, both numerically and percentage wise, of any Western nation? Our African population is greater than the combined populations of Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Ireland and Greece!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.

    Q1) Do they incarcerate anybody?

    Q2) They have Western legal systems. How are they not Western countries?

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @Reg Cæsar


    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.
     
    The tone of my original comment was meant to defend the US from the charge concerning our high incarceration rate. I was just pointing out that we might incarcerate a larger percentage of people than other western nations because of our unique demographic profile that other Western nations, i.e. European, do not share.

    The fact that smaller Brazil, Russia and South Africa have more murders than the US might be testament to the fact that our high incarceration rate is actually paying off.
    , @Hubbub
    @Reg Cæsar

    It should be pointedly noted that the U.S. incarcerates more people because other countries - like Mexico - send their criminals to us to imprison, thus keeping their rates lower. The U.S. should require, nay, demand, reparations from Mexico for their dumping on our soil. Just sayin'.

    , @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    I think the US has that world-record number of prisoners because we're the most violent country that's otherwise high-functioning. There are lots of countries with higher crime rates, but at a certain point a country loses control, no longer has a functioning criminal justice system, and criminals just run free instead of going to prison.

    We saw that during the Baltimore riots. Riots like that in, say, Giuliani's or Bloomberg's NYC, would have resulted in a lot of arrests. In Baltimore, the mayor instructed the police to stand down.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Jefferson
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers."

    Mexico annually also has more murders than the U.S in raw numbers.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate

    Venezuela annually also has more murders than the U.S in raw numbers.

  82. interesting new term I saw on instapundit for trump supporters

    Radical Middle

  83. iSteveFan says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @iSteveFan

    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.

    Q1) Do they incarcerate anybody?

    Q2) They have Western legal systems. How are they not Western countries?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Hubbub, @International Jew, @Jefferson

    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.

    The tone of my original comment was meant to defend the US from the charge concerning our high incarceration rate. I was just pointing out that we might incarcerate a larger percentage of people than other western nations because of our unique demographic profile that other Western nations, i.e. European, do not share.

    The fact that smaller Brazil, Russia and South Africa have more murders than the US might be testament to the fact that our high incarceration rate is actually paying off.

  84. @Harry Baldwin
    @Wilkey

    I don’t own a firearm. I have never owned a firearm. I can’t even keep track of where my pocket knife is. Nevertheless, I won’t ever become a victim.

    For me, the logic train derailed at that last sentence. Please explain.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    It means I don’t own a firearm because I live and work in one America’s safer cities, in one of the safer parts of the city, and thus have no serious reason, at present, to fear becoming a victim. Under Obama’s HD proposals and Boehner’s desire to let more cons out of jail, that would change.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Wilkey

    Firearms are serious business. It takes a long time and lots of practice to gain basic proficiency on a gun range. Learning the knowledge, attitude, and skills needed to use a firearm in a self-defense situation requires much more training and practice. If you have any thought of ever owning a firearm for self-defense, I suggest you obtain a weapon immediately and start learning how to use it. This takes years not days.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  85. @Reg Cæsar
    @iSteveFan

    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.

    Q1) Do they incarcerate anybody?

    Q2) They have Western legal systems. How are they not Western countries?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Hubbub, @International Jew, @Jefferson

    It should be pointedly noted that the U.S. incarcerates more people because other countries – like Mexico – send their criminals to us to imprison, thus keeping their rates lower. The U.S. should require, nay, demand, reparations from Mexico for their dumping on our soil. Just sayin’.

  86. @peterike
    OT: There is a follow up to the "open marriage" piece discussed last week. The wife speaks!

    http://nymag.com/thecut/2015/07/youre-a-male-feminist-in-an-open-marriage.html

    Replies: @manton

    Note that they don’t even address, much less attempt to rebut, the many assertions/speculations that this is fake. They don’t even address the pseudonym issue. If “Michael Sonmore” is a real person, and a writer no less, in an English-speaking country, he would appear to be the only one whose name gets exactly zero hits from any social media site, database, or other media outlet–except for that one article.

    Fake, fake, fake.

  87. When the high military and government officials of China and Russia consider our political leadership – Crying-boy Boehner and his Rasta-pothead son-in-law, porcine Chris Christie, crazy-eyed Nancy Pelosi, Barney Frank and his pimp boyfriend, etc. – they must ask themselves “These are the consuls of the American Empire?” – and laugh.

  88. @Reg Cæsar
    @iSteveFan

    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.

    Q1) Do they incarcerate anybody?

    Q2) They have Western legal systems. How are they not Western countries?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Hubbub, @International Jew, @Jefferson

    I think the US has that world-record number of prisoners because we’re the most violent country that’s otherwise high-functioning. There are lots of countries with higher crime rates, but at a certain point a country loses control, no longer has a functioning criminal justice system, and criminals just run free instead of going to prison.

    We saw that during the Baltimore riots. Riots like that in, say, Giuliani’s or Bloomberg’s NYC, would have resulted in a lot of arrests. In Baltimore, the mayor instructed the police to stand down.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @International Jew

    I seem to recall that St. Petersburg's murder rates are about the same as New Yorks'.

  89. @anonymous-antimarxist
    @syonredux


    During the 1950s-early ’60s (a low crime era),the US criminal justice system stressed rehabilitation over incarceration:
     
    Ah yes!!!

    The golden era of its was society's fault. Willie Sutton robbed banks not because he was a born sociopath but because as Sutton allegedly said "that was where the money was". At bit of subtle political satire that was actually believed as true because it so perfectly captured the leftist zeitgeist of the time.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    There’s the officer Krupke song from West Side Story. Strangely, it seems to show the delinquents taking advantage of the foolish justice system. I wonder when the Bernstein that Tom Wolfe wrote about emerged…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    The lyrics are by Sondheim.

    Replies: @syonredux, @anonymous-antimarxist

  90. @Massimo Heitor
    @Kylie


    IIRC, Mc Whorter has moved noticeably leftward since the 2002 article you cite.
     
    McWhorter is great in that he expresses some far right view points on race that typically no public intellectual can express.

    McWhorter also has some hard left viewpoints, and that's not new, that's always been him. Read his articles on Trayvon Martin, they are standard hard left. McWhorter sounds like the stereotypical angry black nationalist white hater that has zero logic or reasoning. This isn't new. McWhorter also claims that Mumia Abu-Jamal was absolutely unquestionably innocent from the 1982 murder accusation. I've not researched that incident that deeply, but McWhorter seems hard left, and very anti-white on that issue.

    His recent article criticizing American antiracism as blind religion is what I would classify as a far right viewpoint. I've made the exact same point, and many other fringe right wing types has, be he is a mainstream public intellectual expressing what is widely considered thought crime.

    Among black race commenters, I like Sowell the best. McWhorter also has some great points, and he is of a younger generation and more accessible to many, but occasionally he swings far left and will outrage people on either side.

    Replies: @syonredux

    Among black race commenters, I like Sowell the best. McWhorter also has some great points, and he is of a younger generation and more accessible to many, but occasionally he swings far left and will outrage people on either side.

    Totally agree about Sowell; he’s on an entirely separate level.Whenever anyone wants to get a firm grip on the story of immigration to the USA, I always recommend:

    Ethnic America: A History

  91. @Chrisnonymous
    @anonymous-antimarxist

    There's the officer Krupke song from West Side Story. Strangely, it seems to show the delinquents taking advantage of the foolish justice system. I wonder when the Bernstein that Tom Wolfe wrote about emerged...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The lyrics are by Sondheim.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Steve Sailer

    Sondheim's cynical streak serves him well:


    ACTION
    Dear kindly Sergeant Krupke,
    You gotta understand,
    It's just our bringin' up-ke
    That gets us out of hand.
    Our mothers all are junkies,
    Our fathers all are drunks.
    Golly Moses, natcherly we're punks!

    ACTION AND JETS
    Gee, Officer Krupke, we're very upset;
    We never had the love that ev'ry child oughta get.
    We ain't no delinquents,
    We're misunderstood.
    Deep down inside us there is good!

    ACTION
    There is good!

    ALL
    There is good, there is good,
    There is untapped good!
    Like inside, the worst of us is good!

    SNOWBOY: (Spoken) That's a touchin' good story.

    ACTION: (Spoken) Lemme tell it to the world!

    SNOWBOY: Just tell it to the judge.

    ACTION
    Dear kindly Judge, your Honor,
    My parents treat me rough.
    With all their marijuana,
    They won't give me a puff.
    They didn't wanna have me,
    But somehow I was had.
    Leapin' lizards! That's why I'm so bad!

    DIESEL: (As Judge) Right!

    Officer Krupke, you're really a square;
    This boy don't need a judge, he needs an analyst's care!
    It's just his neurosis that oughta be curbed.
    He's psychologic'ly disturbed!

    ACTION
    I'm disturbed!

    JETS
    We're disturbed, we're disturbed,
    We're the most disturbed,
    Like we're psychologic'ly disturbed.


    DIESEL: (Spoken, as Judge) In the opinion on this court, this child is depraved on account he ain't had a normal home.

    ACTION: (Spoken) Hey, I'm depraved on account I'm deprived.

    DIESEL: So take him to a headshrinker.

    ACTION (Sings)
    My father is a bastard,
    My ma's an S.O.B.
    My grandpa's always plastered,
    My grandma pushes tea.
    My sister wears a mustache,
    My brother wears a dress.
    Goodness gracious, that's why I'm a mess!

    A-RAB: (As Psychiatrist) Yes!
    Officer Krupke, you're really a slob.
    This boy don't need a doctor, just a good honest job.
    Society's played him a terrible trick,
    And sociologic'ly he's sick!

    ACTION
    I am sick!

    ALL
    We are sick, we are sick,
    We are sick, sick, sick,
    Like we're sociologically sick!

    A-RAB: In my opinion, this child don't need to have his head shrunk at all. Juvenile delinquency is purely a social disease!

    ACTION: Hey, I got a social disease!

    A-RAB: So take him to a social worker!

    ACTION
    Dear kindly social worker,
    They say go earn a buck.
    Like be a soda jerker,
    Which means like be a schumck.
    It's not I'm anti-social,
    I'm only anti-work.
    Gloryosky! That's why I'm a jerk!

    BABY JOHN: (As Female Social Worker)
    Eek!
    Officer Krupke, you've done it again.
    This boy don't need a job, he needs a year in the pen.
    It ain't just a question of misunderstood;
    Deep down inside him, he's no good!

    ACTION
    I'm no good!

    ALL
    We're no good, we're no good!
    We're no earthly good,
    Like the best of us is no damn good!

    DIESEL (As Judge)
    The trouble is he's crazy.


    A-RAB (As Psychiatrist)
    The trouble is he drinks.

    BABY JOHN (As Female Social Worker)
    The trouble is he's lazy.

    DIESEL
    The trouble is he stinks.

    A-RAB
    The trouble is he's growing.

    BABY JOHN
    The trouble is he's grown.

    ALL
    Krupke, we got troubles of our own!

    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    We're down on our knees,
    'Cause no one wants a fellow with a social disease.
    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    What are we to do?
    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    Krup you!

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist

    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    @Steve Sailer

    Steven Pinker in a speech on his book The Blank Slate had a nice bit on the "Gee, Officer Krupke, I'm depraved 'cause I'm deprived" line calling it a "Krupkeism".

    Pinker really put the wood to the silliness of lefty New York Jewish Marxists.

  92. @Marcy Fleming
    The vast majority of prisoners are in for drug related offenses which should never have been a crime to begin with. That stupid, mindless, one size fits all Three Strikes has bankrupted California. The 60s crime increase was not related to any large prison releases but to the dominant culture and the Miranda ruling.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    The vast majority of prisoners are in for drug related offenses which should never have been a crime to begin with.

    That’s actually not factual. Have a look at the pie chart a ways down on this page from an organization which shares your philosophy (if not your facts):

    http://www.prisonpolicy.org/reports/pie.html

    So what you can see is that drug offenders are some 40% of federal prisoners, but just 20% of state prisoners and the state system is six times more populous.

    So while you can still argue that even that’s too many, it’s not at all the “vast majority”.

    Oh what you can learn when you decide to troll a conservative blog!

    • Replies: @RJA
    @International Jew

    You're arguing over poor semantics. The reality is that 40% (actually 48.6% according to the latest numbers from the direct source[1]) represents by far the largest single category. No matter which way you slice it, that's a lot of people. You don't think any of them are low-level users, minor dealers, or otherwise don't need to be there? None at all?

    [1] http://www.bop.gov/about/statistics/statistics_inmate_offenses.jsp

    Replies: @International Jew

  93. @RJA
    Here is a fairly rare example where I must diverge from Sailerian thinking. Emptying our prisons of marijuana convicts is a no-brainer. Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I'd also argue is immoral.

    What's more, and I know I'm going to get lambasted for this, this might be a situation where "disparate impact" is actually real. Blacks use drugs only at slightly higher rates than Whites, but account for waaaaay more minor drug convictions. (Guess it's related to the fact that they really do commit other crimes at much higher rates, and are thus policed more heavily, so more marijuana is found. Also, less private space.)

    Chapelle got this one right: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaHudA-39xo

    That said, Boehner's daughter must really hate daddy.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Boomstick, @NOTA, @TWS, @Retired

    The reason many Negro criminals are imprisoned for drug crimes rather than say homicide is often because the police and prosecutors know these criminals are guilty of far more serious crimes but these may be difficult or impossible to prosecute. Rather than leaving a stone-cold killer on the streets police and prosecutors often settle for incapacitating him for a few years. Nailing perps with drugs in their possession is easy. Getting witnesses to murders in Negro neighborhoods to testify about these crimes is next to impossible.

    The “progreessive” argument you present immensely pisses off most of the police and prosecutors I have known. It shows an ignorance of the realities of crime and policing in Negro neighborhoods and how the criminal justice system in this country works.

    For a quick education in these matters I suggest reading the recent book “Ghettoside” by Jill Leovy. The woman is a lib reporter for the LA Times but she accurately reports what she has observed about Negro homicides in Los Angeles over the past decade or so,

    • Replies: @RJA
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Yeah, there's probably a lot of truth to this. But I hope you can see how using specifically marijuana as a scapegoat would piss off a huge set of people, a lot of whom would already be naturally inclined to be light on incarceration policy. It just gives them more ammo in the overarching fight.

    There are ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system without using draconian drug laws as sentencing tools. Who knows, maybe in this case the feds are genuinely trying to figure out how... in their own dumb way of course.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Avenge Harambe
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    THIS!!!!!!!!

  94. @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    The lyrics are by Sondheim.

    Replies: @syonredux, @anonymous-antimarxist

    Sondheim’s cynical streak serves him well:

    ACTION
    Dear kindly Sergeant Krupke,
    You gotta understand,
    It’s just our bringin’ up-ke
    That gets us out of hand.
    Our mothers all are junkies,
    Our fathers all are drunks.
    Golly Moses, natcherly we’re punks!

    ACTION AND JETS
    Gee, Officer Krupke, we’re very upset;
    We never had the love that ev’ry child oughta get.
    We ain’t no delinquents,
    We’re misunderstood.
    Deep down inside us there is good!

    ACTION
    There is good!

    ALL
    There is good, there is good,
    There is untapped good!
    Like inside, the worst of us is good!

    SNOWBOY: (Spoken) That’s a touchin’ good story.

    ACTION: (Spoken) Lemme tell it to the world!

    SNOWBOY: Just tell it to the judge.

    ACTION
    Dear kindly Judge, your Honor,
    My parents treat me rough.
    With all their marijuana,
    They won’t give me a puff.
    They didn’t wanna have me,
    But somehow I was had.
    Leapin’ lizards! That’s why I’m so bad!

    DIESEL: (As Judge) Right!

    Officer Krupke, you’re really a square;
    This boy don’t need a judge, he needs an analyst’s care!
    It’s just his neurosis that oughta be curbed.
    He’s psychologic’ly disturbed!

    ACTION
    I’m disturbed!

    JETS
    We’re disturbed, we’re disturbed,
    We’re the most disturbed,
    Like we’re psychologic’ly disturbed.

    DIESEL: (Spoken, as Judge) In the opinion on this court, this child is depraved on account he ain’t had a normal home.

    ACTION: (Spoken) Hey, I’m depraved on account I’m deprived.

    DIESEL: So take him to a headshrinker.

    ACTION (Sings)
    My father is a bastard,
    My ma’s an S.O.B.
    My grandpa’s always plastered,
    My grandma pushes tea.
    My sister wears a mustache,
    My brother wears a dress.
    Goodness gracious, that’s why I’m a mess!

    A-RAB: (As Psychiatrist) Yes!
    Officer Krupke, you’re really a slob.
    This boy don’t need a doctor, just a good honest job.
    Society’s played him a terrible trick,
    And sociologic’ly he’s sick!

    ACTION
    I am sick!

    ALL
    We are sick, we are sick,
    We are sick, sick, sick,
    Like we’re sociologically sick!

    A-RAB: In my opinion, this child don’t need to have his head shrunk at all. Juvenile delinquency is purely a social disease!

    ACTION: Hey, I got a social disease!

    A-RAB: So take him to a social worker!

    ACTION
    Dear kindly social worker,
    They say go earn a buck.
    Like be a soda jerker,
    Which means like be a schumck.
    It’s not I’m anti-social,
    I’m only anti-work.
    Gloryosky! That’s why I’m a jerk!

    BABY JOHN: (As Female Social Worker)
    Eek!
    Officer Krupke, you’ve done it again.
    This boy don’t need a job, he needs a year in the pen.
    It ain’t just a question of misunderstood;
    Deep down inside him, he’s no good!

    ACTION
    I’m no good!

    ALL
    We’re no good, we’re no good!
    We’re no earthly good,
    Like the best of us is no damn good!

    DIESEL (As Judge)
    The trouble is he’s crazy.

    A-RAB (As Psychiatrist)
    The trouble is he drinks.

    BABY JOHN (As Female Social Worker)
    The trouble is he’s lazy.

    DIESEL
    The trouble is he stinks.

    A-RAB
    The trouble is he’s growing.

    BABY JOHN
    The trouble is he’s grown.

    ALL
    Krupke, we got troubles of our own!

    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    We’re down on our knees,
    ‘Cause no one wants a fellow with a social disease.
    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    What are we to do?
    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    Krup you!

    • Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist
    @syonredux

    Syon,

    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?

    Ben Shapiro among others in their analysis of the entertainment industry has written that lots of TV shows, movies and especially Broadway shows prior to their film adaptions start out with very very left wing premises. The problem is it very obvious that mass audiences are never going to buy into the leftist world view.

    If what works on Broadway would work in middle America, "Rock of Ages" would have been a blockbuster.

    Often it is only when first dailies appear that the frantic rewriting, recasting and hiring and firing begins.

    I believe the euphemism is "Finding an Audience".

    I wonder if Steve has an opinion if this phenomena is what made arch conservative John Milius so prized as an ace on the set "script doctor" ?

    The great Stanley Kubrick is another perfect example. He took extremely left-wing screenplays for Spartacus, Dr Strangelove, and Full Metal Jacket and massively reworked them on set.

    For Spartacus Kubrick threw out pages of Dalton Tumbo's Marxist drivel. For Strangelove and FMJ, he worked with Peter Sellers and R Lee Ermey to invent the President Merklin Muffley and Gunny Hardman dialogue and characters on the set.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar

  95. I assume there is a gigantic afro under that hat….either that or a kilo of weed…

    as for Boehner’s family going native, hey, orange is the new black, or so they say….

  96. Gee, Officer Krupke

  97. @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    The lyrics are by Sondheim.

    Replies: @syonredux, @anonymous-antimarxist

    Steven Pinker in a speech on his book The Blank Slate had a nice bit on the “Gee, Officer Krupke, I’m depraved ’cause I’m deprived” line calling it a “Krupkeism”.

    Pinker really put the wood to the silliness of lefty New York Jewish Marxists.

  98. @Wilkey
    @Harry Baldwin

    It means I don't own a firearm because I live and work in one America's safer cities, in one of the safer parts of the city, and thus have no serious reason, at present, to fear becoming a victim. Under Obama's HD proposals and Boehner's desire to let more cons out of jail, that would change.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    Firearms are serious business. It takes a long time and lots of practice to gain basic proficiency on a gun range. Learning the knowledge, attitude, and skills needed to use a firearm in a self-defense situation requires much more training and practice. If you have any thought of ever owning a firearm for self-defense, I suggest you obtain a weapon immediately and start learning how to use it. This takes years not days.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there's a waiting period if you don't have a carrying permit. A lot of liberals in Los Angeles suddenly decided they needed a firearm during the Rodney King riots, but didn't realize you can't pick one up at the drop of a hat. After the chaos settled down, I'll bet most of them decided they no longer needed one and put it out of their mind. In the event of serious prolonged urban unrest I'm sure firearms and ammunition sales will be banned.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous

  99. @RJA
    Here is a fairly rare example where I must diverge from Sailerian thinking. Emptying our prisons of marijuana convicts is a no-brainer. Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I'd also argue is immoral.

    What's more, and I know I'm going to get lambasted for this, this might be a situation where "disparate impact" is actually real. Blacks use drugs only at slightly higher rates than Whites, but account for waaaaay more minor drug convictions. (Guess it's related to the fact that they really do commit other crimes at much higher rates, and are thus policed more heavily, so more marijuana is found. Also, less private space.)

    Chapelle got this one right: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaHudA-39xo

    That said, Boehner's daughter must really hate daddy.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Boomstick, @NOTA, @TWS, @Retired

    I’d be very surprised if there’s any significant number of people in prison for simple marijuana possession. Trafficking, yeah, but that would probably be in the hundreds of pounds of weight category, and they’re usually engaged in other activities like money laundering.

  100. @Svigor

    I find this topic depressing. I don’t dispute your analysis, but well you know.

    What really bugs me is that my take is that draconian laws and sentences don’t really do anything in one sense. There is no deterrent factor; only a preemptive one.
     
    Public caning would be a far better deterrent than incarceration. Far cheaper, too. Dindus & co. would have a collective coronary.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I’m afraid Americans wore out their rights to public beating/whippings/canings following the Civil Rights Act. Now it’d be too much of a “trigger.”

  101. @Greg Pandatshang
    That’s the guy from the “Rude!” song, right? I never realised that was about asking John Boehner for his daughter’s hand in marriage, but it kind of makes sense. Although, with Boehner, I’d expect there to be a part where breaks into tears.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “That’s the guy from the “Rude!” song, right? I never realised that was about asking John Boehner for his daughter’s hand in marriage, but it kind of makes sense. Although, with Boehner, I’d expect there to be a part where breaks into tears.”

    The guy from “Rude” who you say looks like John Boehner’s son in law is Palestinian, although he does look like he has partial Negroid ancestry in his family tree. I notice that some Palestinians look like Pardos in phenotype. I have seen some Palestinians with very nappy hair, which should not be surprising since Palestine shares a border with Egypt.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jefferson

    There are Italians and Ashkenazi Jews who have "very nappy hair" and no recent sub-Saharan ancestry.

  102. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Wilkey

    Firearms are serious business. It takes a long time and lots of practice to gain basic proficiency on a gun range. Learning the knowledge, attitude, and skills needed to use a firearm in a self-defense situation requires much more training and practice. If you have any thought of ever owning a firearm for self-defense, I suggest you obtain a weapon immediately and start learning how to use it. This takes years not days.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there’s a waiting period if you don’t have a carrying permit. A lot of liberals in Los Angeles suddenly decided they needed a firearm during the Rodney King riots, but didn’t realize you can’t pick one up at the drop of a hat. After the chaos settled down, I’ll bet most of them decided they no longer needed one and put it out of their mind. In the event of serious prolonged urban unrest I’m sure firearms and ammunition sales will be banned.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there’s a waiting period if you don’t have a carrying permit."

    That varies by state. A number of states have no waiting period for purchasing a firearm. For the other reasons that you and Jus'Sayin mentioned however, your advice is apt.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @Anonymous
    @Harry Baldwin


    If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there’s a waiting period if you don’t have a carrying permit. A lot of liberals in Los Angeles suddenly decided they needed a firearm during the Rodney King riots, but didn’t realize you can’t pick one up at the drop of a hat. After the chaos settled down, I’ll bet most of them decided they no longer needed one and put it out of their mind. In the event of serious prolonged urban unrest I’m sure firearms and ammunition sales will be banned.
     
    At this time, in this socio-political climate, a gun is a liability. I think this will be true for decades. Though it will cease to be around 3 weeks into a total financial collapse.

    Step one, what you need to do is remove yourself from these NAM urban/suburban areas. Instead of living and thinking like a Blackwater contractor just move out of Fallujah.

    Also, be thankful for relatively large number of progressive-minded whites, who destroy their souls (like an exorcist) trying to make a difference among the NAM population. It not only placates the NAMs for a while but this group is promximate and acts as a buffer. I.e., they are front lines cannon fodder when SHTF.

  103. @syonredux
    @Steve Sailer

    Sondheim's cynical streak serves him well:


    ACTION
    Dear kindly Sergeant Krupke,
    You gotta understand,
    It's just our bringin' up-ke
    That gets us out of hand.
    Our mothers all are junkies,
    Our fathers all are drunks.
    Golly Moses, natcherly we're punks!

    ACTION AND JETS
    Gee, Officer Krupke, we're very upset;
    We never had the love that ev'ry child oughta get.
    We ain't no delinquents,
    We're misunderstood.
    Deep down inside us there is good!

    ACTION
    There is good!

    ALL
    There is good, there is good,
    There is untapped good!
    Like inside, the worst of us is good!

    SNOWBOY: (Spoken) That's a touchin' good story.

    ACTION: (Spoken) Lemme tell it to the world!

    SNOWBOY: Just tell it to the judge.

    ACTION
    Dear kindly Judge, your Honor,
    My parents treat me rough.
    With all their marijuana,
    They won't give me a puff.
    They didn't wanna have me,
    But somehow I was had.
    Leapin' lizards! That's why I'm so bad!

    DIESEL: (As Judge) Right!

    Officer Krupke, you're really a square;
    This boy don't need a judge, he needs an analyst's care!
    It's just his neurosis that oughta be curbed.
    He's psychologic'ly disturbed!

    ACTION
    I'm disturbed!

    JETS
    We're disturbed, we're disturbed,
    We're the most disturbed,
    Like we're psychologic'ly disturbed.


    DIESEL: (Spoken, as Judge) In the opinion on this court, this child is depraved on account he ain't had a normal home.

    ACTION: (Spoken) Hey, I'm depraved on account I'm deprived.

    DIESEL: So take him to a headshrinker.

    ACTION (Sings)
    My father is a bastard,
    My ma's an S.O.B.
    My grandpa's always plastered,
    My grandma pushes tea.
    My sister wears a mustache,
    My brother wears a dress.
    Goodness gracious, that's why I'm a mess!

    A-RAB: (As Psychiatrist) Yes!
    Officer Krupke, you're really a slob.
    This boy don't need a doctor, just a good honest job.
    Society's played him a terrible trick,
    And sociologic'ly he's sick!

    ACTION
    I am sick!

    ALL
    We are sick, we are sick,
    We are sick, sick, sick,
    Like we're sociologically sick!

    A-RAB: In my opinion, this child don't need to have his head shrunk at all. Juvenile delinquency is purely a social disease!

    ACTION: Hey, I got a social disease!

    A-RAB: So take him to a social worker!

    ACTION
    Dear kindly social worker,
    They say go earn a buck.
    Like be a soda jerker,
    Which means like be a schumck.
    It's not I'm anti-social,
    I'm only anti-work.
    Gloryosky! That's why I'm a jerk!

    BABY JOHN: (As Female Social Worker)
    Eek!
    Officer Krupke, you've done it again.
    This boy don't need a job, he needs a year in the pen.
    It ain't just a question of misunderstood;
    Deep down inside him, he's no good!

    ACTION
    I'm no good!

    ALL
    We're no good, we're no good!
    We're no earthly good,
    Like the best of us is no damn good!

    DIESEL (As Judge)
    The trouble is he's crazy.


    A-RAB (As Psychiatrist)
    The trouble is he drinks.

    BABY JOHN (As Female Social Worker)
    The trouble is he's lazy.

    DIESEL
    The trouble is he stinks.

    A-RAB
    The trouble is he's growing.

    BABY JOHN
    The trouble is he's grown.

    ALL
    Krupke, we got troubles of our own!

    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    We're down on our knees,
    'Cause no one wants a fellow with a social disease.
    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    What are we to do?
    Gee, Officer Krupke,
    Krup you!

    Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist

    Syon,

    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?

    Ben Shapiro among others in their analysis of the entertainment industry has written that lots of TV shows, movies and especially Broadway shows prior to their film adaptions start out with very very left wing premises. The problem is it very obvious that mass audiences are never going to buy into the leftist world view.

    If what works on Broadway would work in middle America, “Rock of Ages” would have been a blockbuster.

    Often it is only when first dailies appear that the frantic rewriting, recasting and hiring and firing begins.

    I believe the euphemism is “Finding an Audience”.

    I wonder if Steve has an opinion if this phenomena is what made arch conservative John Milius so prized as an ace on the set “script doctor” ?

    The great Stanley Kubrick is another perfect example. He took extremely left-wing screenplays for Spartacus, Dr Strangelove, and Full Metal Jacket and massively reworked them on set.

    For Spartacus Kubrick threw out pages of Dalton Tumbo’s Marxist drivel. For Strangelove and FMJ, he worked with Peter Sellers and R Lee Ermey to invent the President Merklin Muffley and Gunny Hardman dialogue and characters on the set.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @anonymous-antimarxist


    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?
     
    You mean perhaps he increased the cynicism with each revision?Possibly.I don't really know much about the development of that song.

    I would bear in mind, though, that Sondheim has a biting, caustic, cynical streak.Hence, it's also quite possible that earlier versions were even more cynical and that the lyrics were softened in the revision process.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @anonymous-antimarxist


    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?
     
    If so, nobody does cynicism better. He set these romantic lines for, of all composers, Richard Rodgers:

    Jennifer: What if her brain is dead?

    Eddie: What if he's ineffectual?

    Both: They look delicious,
    They're gonna be all right.

    They both go right to bed
    When they feel intellectual.
    No one's suspicious,
    They're gonna be all right.

    Jennifer: Who's on the skids?
    She goes to night school--

    Eddie: If it's the right school,
    He'll permit her.

    Jennifer: They love the kids,
    They love their friends, too--

    Eddie: Lately, he tends to
    Hit her.

    Jennifer: Sometimes she drinks in bed,

    Eddie: Sometimes he's homosexual.

    Both: But why be vicious?
    They keep it out of sight!
    Good show!
    They're gonna be all right.

     

    Oscar had passed on by then. Perhaps Dick missed Lorenz "faint aroma of performing seals" Hart.
  104. if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation.

    The crime wave is still going on, it didn’t come to a stop stop after a generation.

  105. @North Carolina Resident
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Speaking of paying bad people to breed...

    A buddy of mine invests in run-down commercial real estate in high crime areas. He has two tenants from Yemen operating convenience stores.
    One is 33 yo, has two wives in Yemen and a girlfriend in the US. 12 kids total
    The other is 52 yo, has three wives in Yemen and one in the US. 20 kids total

    Both (allegedly) are involved in all sorts of scams and illegal activities: food stamp fraud, selling stolen merchandise, smuggling cigarettes from low tax NC to high tax NYC and Chicago, selling synthetic marijuana, etc.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn’t make you a bad person.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ScarletNumber


    Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn’t make you a bad person.
     
    Sorry to hear about your boy, Mrs Garner.
    , @Mr. Anon
    @ScarletNumber

    "Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn't make you a bad person."

    It does if they were stolen. And food-stamp fraud and fencing stolen goods makes you a bad person. Bad enough that you ought not be allowed to immigrate.

  106. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Vibrancy and less policing just struck my own area; here in Santa Cruz no freak-show, criminal, addict, or vagrant need fear the police:

    http://kron4.com/2015/07/28/video-family-reacts-to-arrest-of-15yr-old-suspect-in-maddy-middletons-murder

    Of course, the suspect’s identity is being withheld, and under our current sick system, he will likely as not serve perhaps six years’ incarceration if convicted…er…”adjudged delinquent” (we don’t convict “children,” of course, even the murderous ones…). I am seething. Much of the local reaction has been of the maudlin, feminine, “such a shame” variety rather than the manly, righteous “let’s kill the bastard” variety—just another day in California….

  107. RJA says:
    @International Jew
    @Marcy Fleming


    The vast majority of prisoners are in for drug related offenses which should never have been a crime to begin with.
     
    That's actually not factual. Have a look at the pie chart a ways down on this page from an organization which shares your philosophy (if not your facts):

    http://www.prisonpolicy.org/reports/pie.html

    So what you can see is that drug offenders are some 40% of federal prisoners, but just 20% of state prisoners and the state system is six times more populous.

    So while you can still argue that even that's too many, it's not at all the "vast majority".

    Oh what you can learn when you decide to troll a conservative blog!

    Replies: @RJA

    You’re arguing over poor semantics. The reality is that 40% (actually 48.6% according to the latest numbers from the direct source[1]) represents by far the largest single category. No matter which way you slice it, that’s a lot of people. You don’t think any of them are low-level users, minor dealers, or otherwise don’t need to be there? None at all?

    [1] http://www.bop.gov/about/statistics/statistics_inmate_offenses.jsp

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @RJA


    You’re arguing over poor semantics. The reality is that 40% (actually 48.6%
     
    So, you want to talk only about the federal prisons...

    You don’t think any of them are low-level users, minor dealers, or otherwise don’t need to be there? None at all?
     
    You typically wind up in the federal system when your crime goes interstate. So actually I'd expect dealers, large-scale dealers in fact, to be overrepresented among federal prisoners.
  108. RJA says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    @RJA

    The reason many Negro criminals are imprisoned for drug crimes rather than say homicide is often because the police and prosecutors know these criminals are guilty of far more serious crimes but these may be difficult or impossible to prosecute. Rather than leaving a stone-cold killer on the streets police and prosecutors often settle for incapacitating him for a few years. Nailing perps with drugs in their possession is easy. Getting witnesses to murders in Negro neighborhoods to testify about these crimes is next to impossible.

    The "progreessive" argument you present immensely pisses off most of the police and prosecutors I have known. It shows an ignorance of the realities of crime and policing in Negro neighborhoods and how the criminal justice system in this country works.

    For a quick education in these matters I suggest reading the recent book "Ghettoside" by Jill Leovy. The woman is a lib reporter for the LA Times but she accurately reports what she has observed about Negro homicides in Los Angeles over the past decade or so,

    Replies: @RJA, @Avenge Harambe

    Yeah, there’s probably a lot of truth to this. But I hope you can see how using specifically marijuana as a scapegoat would piss off a huge set of people, a lot of whom would already be naturally inclined to be light on incarceration policy. It just gives them more ammo in the overarching fight.

    There are ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system without using draconian drug laws as sentencing tools. Who knows, maybe in this case the feds are genuinely trying to figure out how… in their own dumb way of course.

    • Replies: @anon
    @RJA


    There are ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system without using draconian drug laws as sentencing tools.
     
    There are but not while the media consistently lie about the underlying problems.
  109. I was born in Ohio and that picture explains it all.

  110. @SFG
    "It would be more reassuring if somebody first apologized for cutting imprisonment in the 1960s and unleashing a huge crime wave that went on for a generation."

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s? I thought the initial riots were a response to the civil rights movement, and the lack of response probably emboldened people...back in the 50s they would have just been put down violently...

    Replies: @syonredux, @AnAnon, @Anonymous, @International Jew, @TWS, @Hippopotamusdrome

    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?

    They had the anti-death penalty movement and a reduction in number of executions numbers.

    year — Forcible rape rate relative to 1960 rateexecutions for rape

    1945 — —— — 22
    1946 — —— — 20
    1947 — —— — 24
    1948 — —— — 23
    1949 — —— — 11
    1950 — —— — 11
    1951 — —— — 17
    1952 — —— — 12
    1953 — —— — 7
    1954 — —— — 9
    1955 — —— — 5
    1956 — —— — 11
    1957 — —— — 9
    1958 — —— — 7
    1959 — —— — 7
    1960 — 1.0x — 8
    1961 — 1.0x — 9
    1962 — 1.0x — 4
    1963 — 1.0x — 2
    1964 — 1.2x — 5 — last execution for rape
    1965 — 1.3x
    1966 — 1.4x
    1967 — 1.5x
    1968 — 1.7x
    1969 — 1.9x
    1970 — 1.9x
    1971 — 2.1x
    1972 — 2.3x
    1973 — 2.6x
    1974 — 2.7x
    1975 — 2.7x
    1976 — 2.8x
    1977 — 3.1x
    1978 — 3.2x
    1979 — 3.6x
    1980 — 3.8x

    Estimated crime in United States-Total
    http://deathpenaltyusa.org

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Murder rate and death penality table:

    Year -- Murder rate relative to 1960 rate -- number of executions

    1950 -- ------ -- 83
    1951 -- ------ -- 91
    1952 -- ------ -- 81
    1953 -- ------ -- 63
    1954 -- ------ -- 83
    1955 -- ------ -- 79
    1956 -- ------ -- 65
    1957 -- ------ -- 69 -- Hawaii and Alaska ban capital punishment
    1958 -- ------ -- 50
    1959 -- ------ -- 50
    1960 -- 1.0x -- 56
    1961 -- 0.9x -- 43
    1962 -- 0.9x -- 47
    1963 -- 0.9x -- 21
    1964 -- 1.0x -- 15 -- Oregon bans capital punishment
    1965 -- 1.0x -- 7 -- Iowa, New York, West Virginia, Vermont ban
    1966 -- 1.1x -- 1
    1967 -- 1.2x -- 3
    1968 -- 1.4x -- 0
    1969 -- 1.4x -- 0 -- New Mexico bans capital punishment
    1970 -- 1.5x -- 0
    1971 -- 1.7x -- 0
    1972 -- 1.8x -- 0 -- capital punishment unconstitutional
    1973 -- 1.8x -- 0
    1974 -- 1.9x -- 0
    1975 -- 1.9x -- 0
    1976 -- 1.7x -- 0 -- capital punishment not unconstitutional
    1977 -- 1.7x -- 1
    1978 -- 1.8x -- 0
    1979 -- 1.9x -- 2
    1980 -- 2.0x -- 0

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Murder rate and death penality table:

    Year -- Murder rate relative to 1960 rate --number of executions

    1950 -- ----- -- 83
    1951 -- ----- -- 91
    1952 -- ----- -- 81
    1953 -- ----- -- 63
    1954 -- ----- -- 83
    1955 -- ----- -- 79
    1956 -- ----- -- 65
    1957 -- ----- -- 69 -- Hawaii and Alaska ban capital punishment
    1958 -- ----- -- 50
    1959 -- ----- -- 50
    1960 -- 1.0 -- 56
    1961 -- 0.9 -- 43
    1962 -- 0.9 -- 47
    1963 -- 0.9 -- 21
    1964 -- 1.0 -- 15 -- Oregon bans capital punishment
    1965 -- 1.0 -- 7 -- Iowa, New York, West Virginia, Vermont ban
    1966 -- 1.1 -- 1
    1967 -- 1.2 -- 3
    1968 -- 1.4 -- 0
    1969 -- 1.4 -- 0 -- New Mexico bans capital punishment
    1970 -- 1.5 -- 0
    1971 -- 1.7 -- 0
    1972 -- 1.8 -- 0 -- capital punishment unconstitutional
    1973 -- 1.8 -- 0
    1974 -- 1.9 -- 0
    1975 -- 1.9 -- 0
    1976 -- 1.7 -- 0 -- capital punishment not unconstitutional
    1977 -- 1.7 -- 1
    1978 -- 1.8 -- 0
    1979 -- 1.9 -- 2
    1980 -- 2.0 -- 0

  111. @ScarletNumber
    @North Carolina Resident

    Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn't make you a bad person.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn’t make you a bad person.

    Sorry to hear about your boy, Mrs Garner.

  112. @anonymous-antimarxist
    @syonredux

    Syon,

    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?

    Ben Shapiro among others in their analysis of the entertainment industry has written that lots of TV shows, movies and especially Broadway shows prior to their film adaptions start out with very very left wing premises. The problem is it very obvious that mass audiences are never going to buy into the leftist world view.

    If what works on Broadway would work in middle America, "Rock of Ages" would have been a blockbuster.

    Often it is only when first dailies appear that the frantic rewriting, recasting and hiring and firing begins.

    I believe the euphemism is "Finding an Audience".

    I wonder if Steve has an opinion if this phenomena is what made arch conservative John Milius so prized as an ace on the set "script doctor" ?

    The great Stanley Kubrick is another perfect example. He took extremely left-wing screenplays for Spartacus, Dr Strangelove, and Full Metal Jacket and massively reworked them on set.

    For Spartacus Kubrick threw out pages of Dalton Tumbo's Marxist drivel. For Strangelove and FMJ, he worked with Peter Sellers and R Lee Ermey to invent the President Merklin Muffley and Gunny Hardman dialogue and characters on the set.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar

    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?

    You mean perhaps he increased the cynicism with each revision?Possibly.I don’t really know much about the development of that song.

    I would bear in mind, though, that Sondheim has a biting, caustic, cynical streak.Hence, it’s also quite possible that earlier versions were even more cynical and that the lyrics were softened in the revision process.

  113. @anonymous-antimarxist
    @syonredux

    Syon,

    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?

    Ben Shapiro among others in their analysis of the entertainment industry has written that lots of TV shows, movies and especially Broadway shows prior to their film adaptions start out with very very left wing premises. The problem is it very obvious that mass audiences are never going to buy into the leftist world view.

    If what works on Broadway would work in middle America, "Rock of Ages" would have been a blockbuster.

    Often it is only when first dailies appear that the frantic rewriting, recasting and hiring and firing begins.

    I believe the euphemism is "Finding an Audience".

    I wonder if Steve has an opinion if this phenomena is what made arch conservative John Milius so prized as an ace on the set "script doctor" ?

    The great Stanley Kubrick is another perfect example. He took extremely left-wing screenplays for Spartacus, Dr Strangelove, and Full Metal Jacket and massively reworked them on set.

    For Spartacus Kubrick threw out pages of Dalton Tumbo's Marxist drivel. For Strangelove and FMJ, he worked with Peter Sellers and R Lee Ermey to invent the President Merklin Muffley and Gunny Hardman dialogue and characters on the set.

    Replies: @syonredux, @Reg Cæsar

    I wonder if initially Sondheim wrote the lyrics with such biting cynicism in mind?

    If so, nobody does cynicism better. He set these romantic lines for, of all composers, Richard Rodgers:

    Jennifer: What if her brain is dead?

    Eddie: What if he’s ineffectual?

    Both: They look delicious,
    They’re gonna be all right.

    They both go right to bed
    When they feel intellectual.
    No one’s suspicious,
    They’re gonna be all right.

    Jennifer: Who’s on the skids?
    She goes to night school–

    Eddie: If it’s the right school,
    He’ll permit her.

    Jennifer: They love the kids,
    They love their friends, too–

    Eddie: Lately, he tends to
    Hit her.

    Jennifer: Sometimes she drinks in bed,

    Eddie: Sometimes he’s homosexual.

    Both: But why be vicious?
    They keep it out of sight!
    Good show!
    They’re gonna be all right.

    Oscar had passed on by then. Perhaps Dick missed Lorenz “faint aroma of performing seals” Hart.

  114. @Hippopotamusdrome
    @SFG



    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?

     

    They had the anti-death penalty movement and a reduction in number of executions numbers.

    year -- Forcible rape rate relative to 1960 rate -- executions for rape

    1945 -- ------ -- 22
    1946 -- ------ -- 20
    1947 -- ------ -- 24
    1948 -- ------ -- 23
    1949 -- ------ -- 11
    1950 -- ------ -- 11
    1951 -- ------ -- 17
    1952 -- ------ -- 12
    1953 -- ------ -- 7
    1954 -- ------ -- 9
    1955 -- ------ -- 5
    1956 -- ------ -- 11
    1957 -- ------ -- 9
    1958 -- ------ -- 7
    1959 -- ------ -- 7
    1960 -- 1.0x -- 8
    1961 -- 1.0x -- 9
    1962 -- 1.0x -- 4
    1963 -- 1.0x -- 2
    1964 -- 1.2x -- 5 -- last execution for rape
    1965 -- 1.3x
    1966 -- 1.4x
    1967 -- 1.5x
    1968 -- 1.7x
    1969 -- 1.9x
    1970 -- 1.9x
    1971 -- 2.1x
    1972 -- 2.3x
    1973 -- 2.6x
    1974 -- 2.7x
    1975 -- 2.7x
    1976 -- 2.8x
    1977 -- 3.1x
    1978 -- 3.2x
    1979 -- 3.6x
    1980 -- 3.8x

    Estimated crime in United States-Total
    http://deathpenaltyusa.org

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Hippopotamusdrome

    Murder rate and death penality table:

    Year — Murder rate relative to 1960 ratenumber of executions

    1950 — —— — 83
    1951 — —— — 91
    1952 — —— — 81
    1953 — —— — 63
    1954 — —— — 83
    1955 — —— — 79
    1956 — —— — 65
    1957 — —— — 69 — Hawaii and Alaska ban capital punishment
    1958 — —— — 50
    1959 — —— — 50
    1960 — 1.0x — 56
    1961 — 0.9x — 43
    1962 — 0.9x — 47
    1963 — 0.9x — 21
    1964 — 1.0x — 15 — Oregon bans capital punishment
    1965 — 1.0x — 7 — Iowa, New York, West Virginia, Vermont ban
    1966 — 1.1x — 1
    1967 — 1.2x — 3
    1968 — 1.4x — 0
    1969 — 1.4x — 0 — New Mexico bans capital punishment
    1970 — 1.5x — 0
    1971 — 1.7x — 0
    1972 — 1.8x — 0 — capital punishment unconstitutional
    1973 — 1.8x — 0
    1974 — 1.9x — 0
    1975 — 1.9x — 0
    1976 — 1.7x — 0 — capital punishment not unconstitutional
    1977 — 1.7x — 1
    1978 — 1.8x — 0
    1979 — 1.9x — 2
    1980 — 2.0x — 0

  115. @Hippopotamusdrome
    @SFG



    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?

     

    They had the anti-death penalty movement and a reduction in number of executions numbers.

    year -- Forcible rape rate relative to 1960 rate -- executions for rape

    1945 -- ------ -- 22
    1946 -- ------ -- 20
    1947 -- ------ -- 24
    1948 -- ------ -- 23
    1949 -- ------ -- 11
    1950 -- ------ -- 11
    1951 -- ------ -- 17
    1952 -- ------ -- 12
    1953 -- ------ -- 7
    1954 -- ------ -- 9
    1955 -- ------ -- 5
    1956 -- ------ -- 11
    1957 -- ------ -- 9
    1958 -- ------ -- 7
    1959 -- ------ -- 7
    1960 -- 1.0x -- 8
    1961 -- 1.0x -- 9
    1962 -- 1.0x -- 4
    1963 -- 1.0x -- 2
    1964 -- 1.2x -- 5 -- last execution for rape
    1965 -- 1.3x
    1966 -- 1.4x
    1967 -- 1.5x
    1968 -- 1.7x
    1969 -- 1.9x
    1970 -- 1.9x
    1971 -- 2.1x
    1972 -- 2.3x
    1973 -- 2.6x
    1974 -- 2.7x
    1975 -- 2.7x
    1976 -- 2.8x
    1977 -- 3.1x
    1978 -- 3.2x
    1979 -- 3.6x
    1980 -- 3.8x

    Estimated crime in United States-Total
    http://deathpenaltyusa.org

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Hippopotamusdrome

    Murder rate and death penality table:

    Year — Murder rate relative to 1960 ratenumber of executions

    1950 — —– — 83
    1951 — —– — 91
    1952 — —– — 81
    1953 — —– — 63
    1954 — —– — 83
    1955 — —– — 79
    1956 — —– — 65
    1957 — —– — 69 — Hawaii and Alaska ban capital punishment
    1958 — —– — 50
    1959 — —– — 50
    1960 — 1.0 — 56
    1961 — 0.9 — 43
    1962 — 0.9 — 47
    1963 — 0.9 — 21
    1964 — 1.0 — 15 — Oregon bans capital punishment
    1965 — 1.0 — 7 — Iowa, New York, West Virginia, Vermont ban
    1966 — 1.1 — 1
    1967 — 1.2 — 3
    1968 — 1.4 — 0
    1969 — 1.4 — 0 — New Mexico bans capital punishment
    1970 — 1.5 — 0
    1971 — 1.7 — 0
    1972 — 1.8 — 0 — capital punishment unconstitutional
    1973 — 1.8 — 0
    1974 — 1.9 — 0
    1975 — 1.9 — 0
    1976 — 1.7 — 0 — capital punishment not unconstitutional
    1977 — 1.7 — 1
    1978 — 1.8 — 0
    1979 — 1.9 — 2
    1980 — 2.0 — 0

  116. @Marcy Fleming
    The vast majority of prisoners are in for drug related offenses which should never have been a crime to begin with. That stupid, mindless, one size fits all Three Strikes has bankrupted California. The 60s crime increase was not related to any large prison releases but to the dominant culture and the Miranda ruling.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Any bankrupting of California has been done by Democrats. Given a state with so many advantages, it takes enormous effort to destroy what ought to be a paradise.

    One-party rule in California has demonstrated that the structural inconsistencies of Leftism/Marxism are so powerful that they can undo the accumulated capital of generations of citizens engaged in the hard work of building a well-functioning polity.

    Vote Democrat, so the Democrats can do for America what they have done for Detroit.

  117. @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    I think the US has that world-record number of prisoners because we're the most violent country that's otherwise high-functioning. There are lots of countries with higher crime rates, but at a certain point a country loses control, no longer has a functioning criminal justice system, and criminals just run free instead of going to prison.

    We saw that during the Baltimore riots. Riots like that in, say, Giuliani's or Bloomberg's NYC, would have resulted in a lot of arrests. In Baltimore, the mayor instructed the police to stand down.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I seem to recall that St. Petersburg’s murder rates are about the same as New Yorks’.

  118. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    Boner's daughter must be as indifferent to reality and common sense as her mother's inseminator. Marrying a Rasta man is not a wise lifestyle choice.

    The standard "progressive" rant on current incarceration rates is, "Crime is down. Why do we keep so many criminals in prison?" "Progressives" seem bewildered by the idea that when criminals are in prison their criminal activities are reduced. I've concluded that "progressivism" is a mental defect involving the same sorts of confusion as autogynephilia.

    Replies: @Anon

    Sort of like Jeb marrying that Mexican peasant woman. This is called “Breeding Your IQ Back Down to Mean,” or “How Republicans do Wealth Redistribution.”

    Boehner’s daughter probably married the freak just to have easy access to drugs. If you want to live the life of a druggie, you risk arrest every time you wander the streets trying to find who’s selling the stuff. Marry the supplier, and you’ve got easy, free, and safer access to drugs if you’re female. I once heard a cop say it was the main reason why white women marry black men, although they sure as hell don’t ever risk telling their daddies that.

  119. @Jefferson
    @Greg Pandatshang

    "That’s the guy from the “Rude!” song, right? I never realised that was about asking John Boehner for his daughter’s hand in marriage, but it kind of makes sense. Although, with Boehner, I’d expect there to be a part where breaks into tears."

    The guy from "Rude" who you say looks like John Boehner's son in law is Palestinian, although he does look like he has partial Negroid ancestry in his family tree. I notice that some Palestinians look like Pardos in phenotype. I have seen some Palestinians with very nappy hair, which should not be surprising since Palestine shares a border with Egypt.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    There are Italians and Ashkenazi Jews who have “very nappy hair” and no recent sub-Saharan ancestry.

  120. @ScarletNumber
    @North Carolina Resident

    Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn't make you a bad person.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    “Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn’t make you a bad person.”

    It does if they were stolen. And food-stamp fraud and fencing stolen goods makes you a bad person. Bad enough that you ought not be allowed to immigrate.

  121. @Harry Baldwin
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there's a waiting period if you don't have a carrying permit. A lot of liberals in Los Angeles suddenly decided they needed a firearm during the Rodney King riots, but didn't realize you can't pick one up at the drop of a hat. After the chaos settled down, I'll bet most of them decided they no longer needed one and put it out of their mind. In the event of serious prolonged urban unrest I'm sure firearms and ammunition sales will be banned.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous

    “If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there’s a waiting period if you don’t have a carrying permit.”

    That varies by state. A number of states have no waiting period for purchasing a firearm. For the other reasons that you and Jus’Sayin mentioned however, your advice is apt.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    That varies by state.

    Yeah, I should have checked that. That's just the way it is in my sucky state.

  122. @RJA
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Yeah, there's probably a lot of truth to this. But I hope you can see how using specifically marijuana as a scapegoat would piss off a huge set of people, a lot of whom would already be naturally inclined to be light on incarceration policy. It just gives them more ammo in the overarching fight.

    There are ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system without using draconian drug laws as sentencing tools. Who knows, maybe in this case the feds are genuinely trying to figure out how... in their own dumb way of course.

    Replies: @anon

    There are ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system without using draconian drug laws as sentencing tools.

    There are but not while the media consistently lie about the underlying problems.

  123. anon • Disclaimer says:

    If the explosion in crime in the 1960s was caused by the great migration of very large numbers of young males from the south driving the white population out of the inner cities in the north then there should have been a significant dip in crime in the rural black areas of the south.

    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    @anon

    "If the explosion in crime in the 1960s was caused by the great migration of very large numbers of young males from the south driving the white population out of the inner cities in the north then there should have been a significant dip in crime in the rural black areas of the south."

    A very reasonable idea. I have never seen a study of it though.

  124. @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there’s a waiting period if you don’t have a carrying permit."

    That varies by state. A number of states have no waiting period for purchasing a firearm. For the other reasons that you and Jus'Sayin mentioned however, your advice is apt.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    That varies by state.

    Yeah, I should have checked that. That’s just the way it is in my sucky state.

  125. The US has a lot of crime because it is a free country. People can do lots of stuff without being bothered too much.

    Technology to the rescue. A smart phone is an electronic monitor. I use credit cards for small purchases now. I am always giving up my location for directions to somewhere or another. At least I can easily prove where I wasn’t. I admit, I hate the theory of all this, but basically don’t care much about most aspects of personal privacy. We are pretty close to no one having any.

    Jails and prison populations can be culled by using electronic monitoring. It is already being done, but in a sloppy way. The Vonderrit Myers case would have been Michael Brown on steroids, if he hadn’t shown off his guns on Facebook.

    And if he wasn’t on electronic monitoring for a pending gun charge.

    http://fox2now.com/2014/10/13/vonderrit-myers-jr-showed-off-his-guns-before-shooting/

    Here is a picture of his guns.

    Myers was placed on house arrest on July 7 and not allowed to leave home, with exceptions made for work, school, court appearances, and meetings with attorneys or EMASS.

    The whole thing can be read here: http://circuitattorney.org/docs/Report%20to%20the%20Community2.pdf

    The points being:

    1. He should have been home. WTF is with that?

    2. Picture of the gun. Why not? Didn’t plan on getting caught.

    3. The electronic monitoring/ankle bracelet was good enough to track his location, but not good enough to get the attention of the police.

    4. Security cameras.

    On the face of it… unloading 17 rounds into an 18 year old seems harsh. Plus, he didn’t seem to be doing much of anything before the cop started chasing him.

    On the other hand. The ‘kid’ was out on a gun charge and breaking conditions of release. And there were photos of the kid with the gun. So, the idea the gun was planted falls apart.

    Overall .. the electronic monitoring and the security camera footage are going to work against criminals. Although police have to also be careful about the appearance of their actions. I wouldn’t want that job.

    Plus .. check out the new/emerging field, ‘big data’. I don’t know how it will be possible for the prison populations *not* to grow.

  126. @Alec
    Steve has been calling out cuckservatives for years. I'm looking forward to his take on the neologism itself.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The neologism has too much porn-addled adolescent association to it. I hope Steve will do a deeper analysis of the phenomenon and give us another intellectual tool to understand the world, instead of just plain name calling.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Anonymous

    Well the term applies quite well to our squishy 'leaders' who willingly cooperate with the left screwing us then they keep the left's little monster programs alive so they don't look mean. I hope it continues to tie the left and the squishy right into knots. Name calling? Nope truth in advertising was the term you were looking for.

  127. Ex-prison guard accused of forcing inmates to have sex

    ATLANTA (AP) — A former high-ranking corrections officer at a southeast Georgia women’s prison used his position of power to prey on inmates, targeting their vulnerabilities and forcing them to have sex with him, according to investigators.

    For the moment, we’ll just skip over the sexist, separate but equal segregation of prisoners, who should be housed together in unisex facilities.

  128. What’s more, and I know I’m going to get lambasted for this, this might be a situation where “disparate impact” is actually real. Blacks use drugs only at slightly higher rates than Whites, but account for waaaaay more minor drug convictions. (Guess it’s related to the fact that they really do commit other crimes at much higher rates, and are thus policed more heavily, so more marijuana is found. Also, less private space.)

    Blacks smoke reefer/do drugs on the porch, on the street, on the corner, in the alley, driving the streets in their cars, in the bathroom at the club, etc. That has a lot to do with why they’re busted for it more frequently. Whites tend to have the sense to keep their pot-smoking more on the DL.

    Learn from the past. Think twice. Make fewer mistakes.

    Improvise, adapt, overcome.

    For me, the logic train derailed at that last sentence. Please explain.

    Took the words right out of my mouth. At least carry a good pocket knife. Kershaw Leek is $50.

    You could see cheap credit during the 80s and 90s as an anesthetic to keep people sedated while Wall St. surgically removed the economy.

    You could see the prison building program in the same way as an anesthetic for the high crime rate leading to a populist political reaction. A White minority means Wall St. no longer needs to worry about a populist reaction to high crime levels so they don’t need the prisons any more – as long as they personally have their guarded compounds.

    You could see all of this as a recipe for Anarcho-Fascism.

    Oh what you can learn when you decide to troll a conservative blog!

    Lol, Amen to that.

    Firearms are serious business. It takes a long time and lots of practice to gain basic proficiency on a gun range. Learning the knowledge, attitude, and skills needed to use a firearm in a self-defense situation requires much more training and practice. If you have any thought of ever owning a firearm for self-defense, I suggest you obtain a weapon immediately and start learning how to use it. This takes years not days.

    I don’t buy that. A proper SD handgun is a simple tool, and it isn’t hard to hit a man-sized target at SD ranges. Yes, practice pays off, but SD with a firearm is in no way a necessarily complicated affair. Most SD situations probably involve simply pointing a weapon and giving the impression of willingness to use it. The criminal generally goes in search of easier prey. Not the shootout at the OK Corral.

    A $100 red dot sight makes up for a lot of practice, too.

    Meh, smuggling cigarettes doesn’t make you a bad person.

    Not being a bad person doesn’t make you an immigrant we (should) want.

  129. @anon
    If the explosion in crime in the 1960s was caused by the great migration of very large numbers of young males from the south driving the white population out of the inner cities in the north then there should have been a significant dip in crime in the rural black areas of the south.

    Replies: @Sunbeam

    “If the explosion in crime in the 1960s was caused by the great migration of very large numbers of young males from the south driving the white population out of the inner cities in the north then there should have been a significant dip in crime in the rural black areas of the south.”

    A very reasonable idea. I have never seen a study of it though.

  130. CYNIC, n. A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be. Hence the custom among the Scythians of plucking out a cynic’s eyes to improve his vision.

    Ambrose Bierce, The Devil’s Dictionary

    https://www.gutenberg.org/files/972/972-h/972-h.htm

    • Replies: @iffen
    @syonredux


    Hence the custom among the Scythians of plucking out a cynic’s eyes to improve his vision.
     
    If you are not going to use it then you don't need it!
  131. @RJA
    Here is a fairly rare example where I must diverge from Sailerian thinking. Emptying our prisons of marijuana convicts is a no-brainer. Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I'd also argue is immoral.

    What's more, and I know I'm going to get lambasted for this, this might be a situation where "disparate impact" is actually real. Blacks use drugs only at slightly higher rates than Whites, but account for waaaaay more minor drug convictions. (Guess it's related to the fact that they really do commit other crimes at much higher rates, and are thus policed more heavily, so more marijuana is found. Also, less private space.)

    Chapelle got this one right: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaHudA-39xo

    That said, Boehner's daughter must really hate daddy.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Boomstick, @NOTA, @TWS, @Retired

    I’m not sure if your statistic is right–I think it turns on blacks and whites filling out surveys admitting to crimes at the same rate of honesty, which may or may not happen.

  132. @International Jew
    @SFG


    History question: did they cut imprisonment in the 1960s?
     
    I don't think so. What did happen is that the police and courts became more tolerant of bad behavior, which emboldened the criminals.

    Replies: @peterike, @TWS, @NOTA

    What caused the big surge in crime is a mystery. My impression is that crime moves in cycles for reasons of its own, which we can probably only affect with great difficulty.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @NOTA

    "My impression is that crime moves in cycles for reasons of its own"

    Like sunspots ...

    , @Hibernian
    @NOTA

    That's what liberals want us to believe.

  133. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there's a waiting period if you don't have a carrying permit. A lot of liberals in Los Angeles suddenly decided they needed a firearm during the Rodney King riots, but didn't realize you can't pick one up at the drop of a hat. After the chaos settled down, I'll bet most of them decided they no longer needed one and put it out of their mind. In the event of serious prolonged urban unrest I'm sure firearms and ammunition sales will be banned.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Anonymous

    If you wait until the moment you realize you need a firearm it will be too late to get one. For one thing, there’s a waiting period if you don’t have a carrying permit. A lot of liberals in Los Angeles suddenly decided they needed a firearm during the Rodney King riots, but didn’t realize you can’t pick one up at the drop of a hat. After the chaos settled down, I’ll bet most of them decided they no longer needed one and put it out of their mind. In the event of serious prolonged urban unrest I’m sure firearms and ammunition sales will be banned.

    At this time, in this socio-political climate, a gun is a liability. I think this will be true for decades. Though it will cease to be around 3 weeks into a total financial collapse.

    Step one, what you need to do is remove yourself from these NAM urban/suburban areas. Instead of living and thinking like a Blackwater contractor just move out of Fallujah.

    Also, be thankful for relatively large number of progressive-minded whites, who destroy their souls (like an exorcist) trying to make a difference among the NAM population. It not only placates the NAMs for a while but this group is promximate and acts as a buffer. I.e., they are front lines cannon fodder when SHTF.

  134. TWS says:
    @RJA
    Here is a fairly rare example where I must diverge from Sailerian thinking. Emptying our prisons of marijuana convicts is a no-brainer. Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I'd also argue is immoral.

    What's more, and I know I'm going to get lambasted for this, this might be a situation where "disparate impact" is actually real. Blacks use drugs only at slightly higher rates than Whites, but account for waaaaay more minor drug convictions. (Guess it's related to the fact that they really do commit other crimes at much higher rates, and are thus policed more heavily, so more marijuana is found. Also, less private space.)

    Chapelle got this one right: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaHudA-39xo

    That said, Boehner's daughter must really hate daddy.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Boomstick, @NOTA, @TWS, @Retired

    There are two reason for drug crime incarceration. One, it was plead down from something else. I’ve seen everything from sexual assault to robbery to assault to serious distribution. Two, you know the guy is guilty but cannot prove it in court for the more serious crime so you go with what you got.

    Got a top of the line rapist and serial sex offender because he had coke in his pocket and the dumbass didn’t normally use coke he was just celebrating when he exposed himself to a police officer.

    More often you get called to a disturbance, prowling, domestic etc and the perp is indeed engaged in something shady but the prosecutor is too lazy or will cut a deal down to drug charges (they always have drugs and or paraphernalia don’t leave home without it).

    I saw a guy locked up for 24 months for weed now that sounds egregious doesn’t it. Except earlier he was locked up 18 months for two attempted murders. If you want to succeed at murder don’t knee-cap them first then pump the rest of your rounds into their bodies. Sloppy work that.

    The guys in prison not jail but prison for drugs are distributors, growers, manufacturers and all of them bad news.

  135. TWS says:
    @SEATAF
    I think what we learned from the 1960s is that A) violent criminals stay behind bars B) cops matter.

    And on the latter point, we really learned that in '90s in New York and then in other cities.

    Most important, what really gets people, even violent people, to restrain themselves is the certainty of apprehension. It is more effective than severity of punishment, which is something that dumb people don't think about in advance. People tend to rob you when a cop is not around. They're not thinking about whether the sentence is 10 years rather than five.

    Cops cut crime much more effectively than do long stays in prison. So the money is better spent on increasing cop numbers than in lengthening sentences. Read William J. Stuntz.

    Replies: @TWS

    True aggressive patrolling combined with getting to know your beat and the neighborhood really pays off. If they know you and see you always swinging through they just won’t risk it often enough. Plus if you simply shoot the shit with them once in a while it goes a long way towards good faith and good behavior.

    Had a guy who tried to bash my head in with concrete later apologize along with his family that tried to help him. Saw him ten-twelve years later and he was showing off his newest baby to me and my wife. With many low impulse types they’ll regret/forget the behavior later if you give them a chance. Honestly we’re talking human beings so not all will but many maybe even most.

  136. TWS says:
    @Anonymous
    @Alec

    The neologism has too much porn-addled adolescent association to it. I hope Steve will do a deeper analysis of the phenomenon and give us another intellectual tool to understand the world, instead of just plain name calling.

    Replies: @TWS

    Well the term applies quite well to our squishy ‘leaders’ who willingly cooperate with the left screwing us then they keep the left’s little monster programs alive so they don’t look mean. I hope it continues to tie the left and the squishy right into knots. Name calling? Nope truth in advertising was the term you were looking for.

  137. @Jason Sylvester
    Some of this ties into Rand Paul's "outreach" to the NAM population in general and the Black community in particular. His quaint notion that if we just explain very carefully how all of our common problems can be solved with the twin deus ex machina's of tax cuts and sentencing reform, why, Black folks and Hispanics will flock to the GOP in such electoral-shattering numbers that it'll basically amount to another major political realignment, like 1861 or 1933!

    This is, of course, a sweet fairy tale of his and other GOP wishful-thinkers imaginations; and usually politician's Walter Mitty-delusions do no real harm other than waste a lot of paper and choke the airwaves with lots of pretty words. But the idea that you're going to let at the very minimum tens of thousands of felons out of Uncle Sammy's hoosegow because of Rand Paul's "outreach," John Boehner's familial woes, and Bill Clinton's regrets over his signature crime bill (from the NYT article) is a pretty dicey wager, as you point out.

    I'm sympathetic to the notion that some kid caught with a roach in his glove compartment shouldn't be sitting in a Federal prison somewhere - but that's rarely the case. To get the attention of the Feds on non-Diversity related offenses - i.e., "hate crimes" - you usually have had to do a whole lot of prior bad things or some especially bad things as singular incidents. I would be curious to know how many of the drug offenders whose sentences would be affected by these reforms are there after repeated prior bad acts in their communities unrelated to what the Feds sent them to prison over - things like assault & battery, armed robbery, rape, etc. The question would then become: when we release these offenders back into those communities, is it the odds of their recidivism back to drug use/dealings that is going to be the real problem, or the wreaking of general mayhem around them that comes with having a neighborhood full of recently paroled Gentle Giants?

    Or, who knows, maybe I got it all wrong and Boehner, Rand & Co. got it all right: inside the skin of everyone of these convicted felons and potential parolees is a nascent Friedrich Hayek struggling mightily to get out, embrace tax cuts, read NRO daily, and vote Republican for life.

    I guess if Boehner gets his way a number of local neighborhoods across the U.S. will get to put that hypothesis to the test!

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    The whole “jails are full of non-violent drug offenders” is utter crap. You have to work real hard to get sent to prison; nobody is there for possessing a joint.

    What happens is the cops know who the neighborhood bad guys are. But they can’t get them for the violent stuff the cops know they have done; snitches get stitches is the rule in the hood. So they get them for some drug offense and get them off the street that way.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jim Don Bob


    What happens is the cops know who the neighborhood bad guys are. But they can’t get them for the violent stuff the cops know they have done; snitches get stitches is the rule in the hood. So they get them for some drug offense and get them off the street that way.
     
    I think that was the original (quite good) idea although it may have taken on a life of its own due to stat chasing.

    Even if it is overdone and partly misdirected nowadays due to stat-chasing I'd say it's probably still necessary for the original reason.

    On the other hand the thing I think is currently wrong is not taking account of age - in the opposite direction to how people usually think i.e. young males aged around 14-28 or so who are going through peak testosterone are the prime customer base so for a lot of them I think three strikes and you're out for life is a waste of resources - below a certain age make it three strikes and you're out until age 26 or 28 or 30 or something like that.
  138. @NOTA
    @International Jew

    What caused the big surge in crime is a mystery. My impression is that crime moves in cycles for reasons of its own, which we can probably only affect with great difficulty.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Hibernian

    “My impression is that crime moves in cycles for reasons of its own”

    Like sunspots …

  139. @RJA
    @International Jew

    You're arguing over poor semantics. The reality is that 40% (actually 48.6% according to the latest numbers from the direct source[1]) represents by far the largest single category. No matter which way you slice it, that's a lot of people. You don't think any of them are low-level users, minor dealers, or otherwise don't need to be there? None at all?

    [1] http://www.bop.gov/about/statistics/statistics_inmate_offenses.jsp

    Replies: @International Jew

    You’re arguing over poor semantics. The reality is that 40% (actually 48.6%

    So, you want to talk only about the federal prisons…

    You don’t think any of them are low-level users, minor dealers, or otherwise don’t need to be there? None at all?

    You typically wind up in the federal system when your crime goes interstate. So actually I’d expect dealers, large-scale dealers in fact, to be overrepresented among federal prisoners.

  140. @syonredux
    CYNIC, n. A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be. Hence the custom among the Scythians of plucking out a cynic's eyes to improve his vision.

    Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary


    https://www.gutenberg.org/files/972/972-h/972-h.htm

    Replies: @iffen

    Hence the custom among the Scythians of plucking out a cynic’s eyes to improve his vision.

    If you are not going to use it then you don’t need it!

  141. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @RJA

    The reason many Negro criminals are imprisoned for drug crimes rather than say homicide is often because the police and prosecutors know these criminals are guilty of far more serious crimes but these may be difficult or impossible to prosecute. Rather than leaving a stone-cold killer on the streets police and prosecutors often settle for incapacitating him for a few years. Nailing perps with drugs in their possession is easy. Getting witnesses to murders in Negro neighborhoods to testify about these crimes is next to impossible.

    The "progreessive" argument you present immensely pisses off most of the police and prosecutors I have known. It shows an ignorance of the realities of crime and policing in Negro neighborhoods and how the criminal justice system in this country works.

    For a quick education in these matters I suggest reading the recent book "Ghettoside" by Jill Leovy. The woman is a lib reporter for the LA Times but she accurately reports what she has observed about Negro homicides in Los Angeles over the past decade or so,

    Replies: @RJA, @Avenge Harambe

    THIS!!!!!!!!

  142. @RJA
    Here is a fairly rare example where I must diverge from Sailerian thinking. Emptying our prisons of marijuana convicts is a no-brainer. Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I'd also argue is immoral.

    What's more, and I know I'm going to get lambasted for this, this might be a situation where "disparate impact" is actually real. Blacks use drugs only at slightly higher rates than Whites, but account for waaaaay more minor drug convictions. (Guess it's related to the fact that they really do commit other crimes at much higher rates, and are thus policed more heavily, so more marijuana is found. Also, less private space.)

    Chapelle got this one right: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaHudA-39xo

    That said, Boehner's daughter must really hate daddy.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Boomstick, @NOTA, @TWS, @Retired

    ” Locking up low-level drug offenders is a complete waste of money, provides no benefit to society, and I’d also argue is immoral.”

    Can we release them in your neighborhood?

    Look at the bunch of criminals that Obama pardoned. All are convicted on felonies other than drugs.

    IMO the drug user only offender languishing in prison is a myth. 1.The are mostly dealers, who no one wants on the streets and 2. Ever had a close friend or family member who was an addict. See the litany of crimes they commit? It’s often easier to prove the possession bust than the b&e or the robbery, or the assault and battery, so they put them away for possession.

    The benefit is they are locked up so they can’t recidivate.

    If you want to lower the prison pop, close the border. That will keep the deported ex-cons from coming back and will cut off the new ones trying to enter.
    Deport all new illegals + anyone who even jaywalks.

  143. I’d be crying all the time, too, if my daughter married that.

  144. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    @Jason Sylvester

    The whole "jails are full of non-violent drug offenders" is utter crap. You have to work real hard to get sent to prison; nobody is there for possessing a joint.

    What happens is the cops know who the neighborhood bad guys are. But they can't get them for the violent stuff the cops know they have done; snitches get stitches is the rule in the hood. So they get them for some drug offense and get them off the street that way.

    Replies: @anon

    What happens is the cops know who the neighborhood bad guys are. But they can’t get them for the violent stuff the cops know they have done; snitches get stitches is the rule in the hood. So they get them for some drug offense and get them off the street that way.

    I think that was the original (quite good) idea although it may have taken on a life of its own due to stat chasing.

    Even if it is overdone and partly misdirected nowadays due to stat-chasing I’d say it’s probably still necessary for the original reason.

    On the other hand the thing I think is currently wrong is not taking account of age – in the opposite direction to how people usually think i.e. young males aged around 14-28 or so who are going through peak testosterone are the prime customer base so for a lot of them I think three strikes and you’re out for life is a waste of resources – below a certain age make it three strikes and you’re out until age 26 or 28 or 30 or something like that.

  145. @Reg Cæsar
    @iSteveFan

    Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.

    Q1) Do they incarcerate anybody?

    Q2) They have Western legal systems. How are they not Western countries?

    Replies: @iSteveFan, @Hubbub, @International Jew, @Jefferson

    “Brazil is three-fifths, Russia less than one-half, and South Africa one-sixth the population of the US. yet each of them have more murders annually than we do. In absolute numbers.”

    Mexico annually also has more murders than the U.S in raw numbers.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate

    Venezuela annually also has more murders than the U.S in raw numbers.

  146. @NOTA
    @International Jew

    What caused the big surge in crime is a mystery. My impression is that crime moves in cycles for reasons of its own, which we can probably only affect with great difficulty.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew, @Hibernian

    That’s what liberals want us to believe.

  147. “Box”, not “boz”.

  148. certainly the Federal government should legalize drugs. This would save taxpayers billions, we could eliminate the DEA , the drug gangs would cease to exists, the cartels would go broke, and the government could earn tax revenue from the sale of narcotics, overdose deaths would fall.
    America had the same benefits when we ended prohibition of alcohol, the gangs stopped killing each other over booze, there were less people dying from bad booze, and many Americans were now earning a decent living running bars, liquor stores, etc..and paying taxes.

    Pharmaceutical firms would also benefit and we would spend less money incarcerating drug dealers. With a cheap source of narcotics, a huge segment of the population could maintain their addictions without resorting to criminal activity to support their habit. Maintaining ones narcotic addiction would cost about the same as smokers spend on tobacco products.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Travis

    That's a big load of horseshit. I'm sure there's a pony in there somewhere.

    Drug gangs go broke? How in the hell can legal mj with taxes, regulations, etc compete with illegal weed it can't. The only people who buy legal weed are medical mj and those to lazy or afraid to go to a dealer. Drug cartels cease to exist? I hear organized crime and gangs have gone out of business because we no longer have speakeasys. Numbers no longer run because there's legal betting. Moonshining ran for generations after the repeal of prohibition.

    Now I grant that drug gangs might start insisting that head shops and drug emporiums buy from them rather than distribute themselves. Lots of smoke shops sold mj on the side so they already have a connection. Like many bars now pay protection to the mob. It'll just be more money for the gangs.

    Why in the world would we eliminate the DEA. Illegal drug manufacturing would still exist. Unless of course you mean all drugs are legal and any manufacturing method is okay.

    Druggies would now get regular jobs and quit robbing and stealing to support their dirt cheap (now) meth and heroin habits? Yeah, good luck with that. Meth is cheaper than beer around here how would you make heroine and meth cheaper? Give it away?

    I'll give you that there would be fewer people in jail at the edges. Of course more in rehab but jail's more expensive usually.

  149. TWS says:
    @Travis
    certainly the Federal government should legalize drugs. This would save taxpayers billions, we could eliminate the DEA , the drug gangs would cease to exists, the cartels would go broke, and the government could earn tax revenue from the sale of narcotics, overdose deaths would fall.
    America had the same benefits when we ended prohibition of alcohol, the gangs stopped killing each other over booze, there were less people dying from bad booze, and many Americans were now earning a decent living running bars, liquor stores, etc..and paying taxes.

    Pharmaceutical firms would also benefit and we would spend less money incarcerating drug dealers. With a cheap source of narcotics, a huge segment of the population could maintain their addictions without resorting to criminal activity to support their habit. Maintaining ones narcotic addiction would cost about the same as smokers spend on tobacco products.

    Replies: @TWS

    That’s a big load of horseshit. I’m sure there’s a pony in there somewhere.

    Drug gangs go broke? How in the hell can legal mj with taxes, regulations, etc compete with illegal weed it can’t. The only people who buy legal weed are medical mj and those to lazy or afraid to go to a dealer. Drug cartels cease to exist? I hear organized crime and gangs have gone out of business because we no longer have speakeasys. Numbers no longer run because there’s legal betting. Moonshining ran for generations after the repeal of prohibition.

    Now I grant that drug gangs might start insisting that head shops and drug emporiums buy from them rather than distribute themselves. Lots of smoke shops sold mj on the side so they already have a connection. Like many bars now pay protection to the mob. It’ll just be more money for the gangs.

    Why in the world would we eliminate the DEA. Illegal drug manufacturing would still exist. Unless of course you mean all drugs are legal and any manufacturing method is okay.

    Druggies would now get regular jobs and quit robbing and stealing to support their dirt cheap (now) meth and heroin habits? Yeah, good luck with that. Meth is cheaper than beer around here how would you make heroine and meth cheaper? Give it away?

    I’ll give you that there would be fewer people in jail at the edges. Of course more in rehab but jail’s more expensive usually.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS