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Senator Bob Dole had a great voice, better than Norm’s.

Dole was extremely witty in a sort of bleak, nasty way, appropriate for a man who needed four painful years of intermittent hospital stays to heal from the war wounds that crippled him for life. He probably was too disorganized to have made a good President, but he was hilarious going on the Sunday morning talk shows and just winging it.

My favorite Saturday Night Live Bob Dole clip was 5:45 into a 1988 GOP candidates debate in which Bob (played by Dan Ackroyd) turns to the Rev. Pat Robertson and says:

Ah, come on now, Pat, that’s a load of bunk. You know and I know that you’re an old Bible-thumping revival show con artist from way back, claim to heal people. I’ll tell you something, Pat Robertson, you turn to me and and heal my right arm and I’ll be glad to step aside and let you be President of the United States.

 
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  1. I remember when SNL was wickedly funny, directed at all politicians. It’s been unwatchable for nearly two decades now. Phil Hartman’s take on Bill Clinton was priceless.

    I do wish Bob Dole were as edgy and direct as Norm was when he played the Kansas senator. Republican politicians are often portrayed as more capable and stubborn and singleminded (in an evil way to the celebrity actors) than they ever are in real life. Dole was collegial with all the assholes like Ted Kennedy and did nothing of note legislatively as those Dems eroded what liberties remained in this country.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
    @John Milton's Ghost

    If Bob Dole was "too disorganized to have made a good president," what does that say about our current slow-witted elderly White House occupant, who is completely unable to "just wing it?"

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @John Milton's Ghost


    I remember when SNL was wickedly funny, directed at all politicians. It’s been unwatchable for nearly two decades now. Phil Hartman’s take on Bill Clinton was priceless.
     
    A weekly sketch comedy show with a substantial budget for sets and costumes is probably the only way to really lampoon politicians, because most people aren't that informed about politics so you really need the cues of the set and a panoply of other imitations of politicians to set up the bits, and the bits need to be topical (i.e., what those clowns in Washington did this week). Of course, irreverence doesn't work only half of the time - you really need to stick to that frame when it comes to political friend and foe alike for it to work.

    Norm was asked before his death about the Baldwin impression of Trump, and he said (paraphrasing) that it wasn't good, because you can tell that Baldwin hated Trump and you can't really do an impression of someone you hate. It's probably also the case that you can't do a passable comedic impression of a figure you love and can see no wrong in - SNL cast and writers claimed that "there was nothing funny about Obama" and later finally succumbed to having a cast member imitate him in such a way that everyone else (his political adversaries) were the brunt of the joke, but never Obama himself.

    This iteration of SNL is beneath pathetic, squandering those budgets and weekly topicality in exchange for regime obeisance and "clapter." The current "bit" is having a short, dumpy female cast member do the low effort drag imitation of the object of this week's hatred - usually Ted Cruz, once Joe Manchin. Haha - Ted Cruz and Joe Manchin (when he's misbehaving) are emasculated! So funny! Don't get my pronouns wrong or I'll get you fired, bigot.

    The entire cast is bereft of actual comedic abilities - they're really now just a bunch of overgrown apple-polishing drama club types for whom the dressing up is the punchline. They seem to feel that they're being graded on their dutifulness to current political events and liberal orthodoxy rather than a track record of making anyone erupt in involuntary laughter.
  2. So your favorite quotation by him is something he didn’t say.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @obwandiyag

    The Simpsons - Bob Dole Doesn't Need This
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWz3YzGTLPw

    , @Sollipsist
    @obwandiyag

    Why not? My favorite thing about Burt Reynolds will forever be Turd Ferguson.

  3. Way back sometime in the ’90s, they used to have these diaper commercials for old women. Naturally, I thought it was disgusting, but I deluded myself into thinking men were more discrete and could not be appealed to in the same way.

    And then I started seeing the Viagra commercials. Eventually the one with Bob Dole.

    I think Gorbi had already done his Pizza Hut commercial, but that was food.

    But seeing Bob Dole, a prominent US politician, do the Viagra commercial, (when the man he ran against was in a sex scandal), made me really question the system and how shameless and corrupt it was, on both sides of the political spectrum. Of course, it was disgusting too.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @songbird


    thinking men were more discrete
     
    Everyone is discrete, save a few exceptional cases.


    https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/976/mcs/media/images/67053000/jpg/_67053071_4085099-high_res-abby-and-brittany-joined-for-life.jpg

    https://www.ststworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Chang_and_Eng_Bunker.jpg

    These guys could almost pass for Johnny Carson with the horizontal hold off.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    , @MEH 0910
    @songbird

    1989 Commercial w/ Tip O'Neill Clarion Comfort Inn Hotels
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8Xl7kNemNs

    , @BB753
    @songbird

    We've yet to see an adult diaper ad by Biden.

  4. Dan Aykroyd grew up in Ottawa, Macdonald in Quebec City– the capitals of their respective nations. Good preparation for mocking Washington.

  5. OT – Math Olympiad teams. Guess which team is which:

    https://twitter.com/a_centrism/status/1467354084692930566

    • LOL: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Mr. Anon

    Won't they be surprised when the wokies come for them and half of each team has to be negroes, to make up for historical systemic white supremacy. Whatever is keeping those wokies anyway?

    , @Ian Smith
    @Mr. Anon

    Sigh…maybe the best white people can hope for is to be middle managers in the Chinese global empire…

    , @Muggles
    @Mr. Anon

    How did Team Ethiopia do?

    Replies: @Joe Joe

    , @AnotherDad
    @Mr. Anon

    Basically this thing would be over ...

    ... but China itself--weirdly--never seriously engaged with the eugenic fertility issue. So while in a few years their population will peak and roll over, they've got:

    -- a quickly graying population
    -- a huge sex skew
    -- a bunch of "little emperor" coddled soy boys (which E. Asians tend towards anyway) many of whom will never find a wife
    -- a bunch of entitled young women
    -- restive and lower IQ minorities with higher fertility.

    Not a pretty picture. Only compared to the disaster in the West, do they look pretty good.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    Team America is…American. Glad you are showing your patriotism.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  6. He graduated Washburn law school the year before my uncle began Washburn. It’s been so long i can’t remember hardly but doles dad owned a filing station in i think hays Kansas and my uncle’s father owned a filling station in Hutchinson. I’m prolly wrong about the two towns but anyway they both owned filling stations and had distant relationships by that biz.
    My uncle himself very active as a mason and appointed to temporarily replace members of the Kansas state Supreme court he knew mr dole very well.
    I always thought of him as a real hero. I never lol at any of the foibles and i regretted the viagra commercials. I thought that was…not dignified for such a great American back when i think most all of us believed their were at least a few here and there.
    I never got the pleasure to meet him personally but i did attend a small event at a BBQ joint my then gf(future ex wife) boss owned and he was a not small contributor to the campaign i so hoped he would win although i had by that time given up on voting so no i didn’t vote for him but i did greatly admire him as well as his very loving and adoring wife of so many years. And at the bbq joint he came in, smiled, waved, smiled, waved, and left. I think he said something but no one could really hear. It was great to see him tho and i truly was disappointed he lost. I believe it would’ve…….possibly averted w.
    I always LOVED visiting Kansas and i was so close to attending Kansas state university in the little Apple I was actually enrolled and living in j city. But i said fuck this cold shit and they have to be the worst football team in the nation(and they were but bill self put them on the map)and before the check cleared i was outta there. Wonder how life woulda turned out?
    Well 98 is a good long life and i tink his defeat to billary was about his only real loss. Shame he couldn’t have won.
    Rip Mr vice President dole. A real American hero.

  7. Bob Dole was a cynical DC swamp creature who had no discernible ideology.

    I recall in 2000 when his wife Libby was considering a run for the Republican presidential nomination and a reporter asked him if he’d vote for her. ” He responded, “I’m not sure, I’ll have to hear what the other candidates have to say.”

    That’s kind of funny, but I recall Florence King writing that it was typical of the type of man who likes to undercut his wife at every opportunity. While she was still considering, he wrote a check to John McCain’s campaign.

    During the same period, Bob was doing the erectile dysfunction commercials for Viagra. I wonder how Libby felt about that. Did he really need the money that much?

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @Harry Baldwin

    I’m sure Libby was happy he was making money.

    Replies: @very old statistician

    , @Vinnyvette
    @Harry Baldwin

    Just because Dole's wife was considering running he's supposed to just vote for her?
    I suppose if you're wife voted for Hillary, you're supposed to just vote for Hillary?
    Men like you are the reason this country is in the shitter!

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    I am sure that Mrs Dole was delighted that her husband was doing the Viagra commercials, and no doubt getting a bunch of free samples to bring home.

    He must have been very influential in getting millions of Americans involved in middle-aged recreational sex, and should be honored for his contribution to public service announcements.

    Without Bob Dole there might have been no Jeffrey Epstein with his three times a day habit.

    One of the most endearing things about Bob Dole was that he tended to refer to himself in the third person. "Yes, Bob Dole uses Viagra. Bob Dole knows it works."

    Bob Dole was a wounded veteran and a hero of World War II. They don't make them like Bob Dole anymore. RIP.

    Replies: @BB753, @Art Deco

  8. I read somewhere that he controlled staff meeting by grunt.

  9. In the end, Bob Dole was just yet another ostensbily “conservative” Republican who never conserved anything.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Mr. Anon


    In the end, Bob Dole was just yet another ostensbily “conservative” Republican who never conserved anything.
     
    Bob Dole endorsed and said he voted for Trump twice, and called himself a “Trumper” when damn near all the GOP/conservative establishment betrayed Trump and worked to subvert him. Dole had nothing to gain by doing so.

    I’m happy I voted for Dole and Trump (twice) before leaving the GOP on January 21, 2020.

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Mr. Anon

    , @houston 1992
    @Mr. Anon

    In 1990, Sen Dole floated the idea of cutting US foreign aid by 5% to our big 5 recipients including Israel. Ok, I know, the idea went nowhere

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1990-01-26-me-527-story.html

    Replies: @Jack D

  10. @Harry Baldwin
    Bob Dole was a cynical DC swamp creature who had no discernible ideology.

    I recall in 2000 when his wife Libby was considering a run for the Republican presidential nomination and a reporter asked him if he'd vote for her. " He responded, "I'm not sure, I'll have to hear what the other candidates have to say."

    That's kind of funny, but I recall Florence King writing that it was typical of the type of man who likes to undercut his wife at every opportunity. While she was still considering, he wrote a check to John McCain's campaign.

    During the same period, Bob was doing the erectile dysfunction commercials for Viagra. I wonder how Libby felt about that. Did he really need the money that much?

    Replies: @hhsiii, @Vinnyvette, @Jonathan Mason

    I’m sure Libby was happy he was making money.

    • Agree: Tony massey
    • Replies: @very old statistician
    @hhsiii

    you don't know much about women .

    Replies: @Hhsiii

  11. Anon[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon
    In the end, Bob Dole was just yet another ostensbily "conservative" Republican who never conserved anything.

    Replies: @Anon, @houston 1992

    In the end, Bob Dole was just yet another ostensbily “conservative” Republican who never conserved anything.

    Bob Dole endorsed and said he voted for Trump twice, and called himself a “Trumper” when damn near all the GOP/conservative establishment betrayed Trump and worked to subvert him. Dole had nothing to gain by doing so.

    I’m happy I voted for Dole and Trump (twice) before leaving the GOP on January 21, 2020.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @Anon

    Why did you leave the GOP on that particular date, almost a year before the election? Or did you get the year wrong? (Biden was inaugurated on January 20, 2021.)

    Incidentally, my favorite Dole quote is from the 1988 primary campaign. Tom Brokaw was interviewing Bush 41 and Dole simultaneously. Brokaw asked Dole if he had anything to say to Bush.

    Dole’s reply? “Yeah. Stop lying about my record.”

    Bush giggled nervously.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anon


    Dole had nothing to gain by doing so.
     
    That's true. He had nothing much to lose either by that point, having retired from public life 20 years before. I imagine Dole liked the fact that Trump took the Bush family down a couple pegs (Dole was known to hold grudges - one of his better traits in my view). He was not, by any means, the worst politician the Republican Party has produced. He at least had some wit and a sense of humor. But if he was especially effective at anything, let alone defending our traditional understanding of the Republic, then it is news to me.

    Replies: @Barnard

  12. So someone called Kaplan doesn’t like Whites, who knew?

    Also surely tony is spelled toney FFS.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Gordo

    A) Wrong thread. B) Kaplan is her dead husband's name.

  13. Dole pushed through the big 1982 increase in FICA taxes and told Reagan there would also be budget “cuts” which never occurred, they just spent the extra money and more. It delayed the day of reckoning a few years. Newt called him the tax collector for the welfare state.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ralph L


    Dole pushed through the big 1982 increase in FICA taxes... Newt called him the tax collector for the welfare state.
     
    Welfare states require high taxes on the middle class. This is seen as tolerable in homogeneous countries, otherwise known as "nations". It cannot work in ethnically diverse societies. We ain't payin' their bills!

    Americans want "the rich" to pay for it all. There aren't enough to go around. Other countries know better-- all their rich have left for Monaco.

    , @Jack D
    @Ralph L

    I'm not generally in favor of tax increases, but if Social Security is supposed to be a freestanding self-financing program and not just another part of the overall welfare budget, it was necessary to increase the contributions in order to fund future payouts. Either that or reduce the future payouts.

    Social Security is (and always has been) an intentionally muddled cross between a welfare program and an pension scheme but to the extent that it is the latter, the mandatory contributions (aka FICA taxes) have to bear some relationship to the payouts.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Art Deco

  14. @Mr. Anon
    OT - Math Olympiad teams. Guess which team is which:

    https://twitter.com/a_centrism/status/1467354084692930566

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ian Smith, @Muggles, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    Won’t they be surprised when the wokies come for them and half of each team has to be negroes, to make up for historical systemic white supremacy. Whatever is keeping those wokies anyway?

  15. @songbird
    Way back sometime in the '90s, they used to have these diaper commercials for old women. Naturally, I thought it was disgusting, but I deluded myself into thinking men were more discrete and could not be appealed to in the same way.

    And then I started seeing the Viagra commercials. Eventually the one with Bob Dole.

    I think Gorbi had already done his Pizza Hut commercial, but that was food.

    But seeing Bob Dole, a prominent US politician, do the Viagra commercial, (when the man he ran against was in a sex scandal), made me really question the system and how shameless and corrupt it was, on both sides of the political spectrum. Of course, it was disgusting too.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @MEH 0910, @BB753

    thinking men were more discrete

    Everyone is discrete, save a few exceptional cases.

    These guys could almost pass for Johnny Carson with the horizontal hold off.

    • LOL: songbird
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Reg Cæsar

    Those chicks totally prove my theory that wypipos be cray-cray af.

  16. @Ralph L
    Dole pushed through the big 1982 increase in FICA taxes and told Reagan there would also be budget "cuts" which never occurred, they just spent the extra money and more. It delayed the day of reckoning a few years. Newt called him the tax collector for the welfare state.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    Dole pushed through the big 1982 increase in FICA taxes… Newt called him the tax collector for the welfare state.

    Welfare states require high taxes on the middle class. This is seen as tolerable in homogeneous countries, otherwise known as “nations”. It cannot work in ethnically diverse societies. We ain’t payin’ their bills!

    Americans want “the rich” to pay for it all. There aren’t enough to go around. Other countries know better– all their rich have left for Monaco.

    • Agree: SimpleSong
  17. @Gordo
    So someone called Kaplan doesn’t like Whites, who knew?

    Also surely tony is spelled toney FFS.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    A) Wrong thread. B) Kaplan is her dead husband’s name.

  18. @Anon
    @Mr. Anon


    In the end, Bob Dole was just yet another ostensbily “conservative” Republican who never conserved anything.
     
    Bob Dole endorsed and said he voted for Trump twice, and called himself a “Trumper” when damn near all the GOP/conservative establishment betrayed Trump and worked to subvert him. Dole had nothing to gain by doing so.

    I’m happy I voted for Dole and Trump (twice) before leaving the GOP on January 21, 2020.

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Mr. Anon

    Why did you leave the GOP on that particular date, almost a year before the election? Or did you get the year wrong? (Biden was inaugurated on January 20, 2021.)

    Incidentally, my favorite Dole quote is from the 1988 primary campaign. Tom Brokaw was interviewing Bush 41 and Dole simultaneously. Brokaw asked Dole if he had anything to say to Bush.

    Dole’s reply? “Yeah. Stop lying about my record.”

    Bush giggled nervously.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Stan Adams


    Why did you leave the GOP on that particular date, almost a year before the election? Or did you get the year wrong? (Biden was inaugurated on January 20, 2021.)
     
    😀 My bad, yeah, January 21, 2021.
  19. Bob Dole when all is said and done, might as well not have existed at all. For all the impact he had on the nation. He was in politics forever. And what he will be remembered the most for is Norm McDonald parodying him in a fake “MTV Real World” skit and making a Viagra Commercial.

    • Agree: Daniel H
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @Whiskey

    Robert Dole should be the photo associated with the Wikipedia entry for "Controlled Opposition." And your point is a good one; his impact on American politics will be that of a fist plunged into and then withdrawn from a bucket of water.

    , @dcthrowback
    @Whiskey

    here is that skit:

    https://digg.com/video/heres-norm-macdonalds-legendary-impression-of-bob-dole-appearing-on-the-real-world

    it's very funny.

  20. I remember Bob Dole saying during the presidential campaign that in some ways America used to be a better place. When I heard it, my thought was, as Steve would say, “uh-oh.” Dole was ridiculed as a dinosaur. Of course by 1996 what he said was already quite true. But it is dangerous for Republicans to appear stodgy, nostalgic, and unadaptable, and that statement certainly harmed electoral chances. I don’t know what the current answer is to this problem, because the truth now is that America used to be a much much much better place than today; can a Republican politician remotely say thus? Anyway, RIP.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @SafeNow


    I remember Bob Dole saying during the presidential campaign that in some ways America used to be a better place. When I heard it, my thought was, as Steve would say, “uh-oh.” Dole was ridiculed as a dinosaur. Of course by 1996 what he said was already quite true.
     
    This is true, but even being true how many people would trade and arm and a leg just for 1996 America now?
  21. @Anon
    @Mr. Anon


    In the end, Bob Dole was just yet another ostensbily “conservative” Republican who never conserved anything.
     
    Bob Dole endorsed and said he voted for Trump twice, and called himself a “Trumper” when damn near all the GOP/conservative establishment betrayed Trump and worked to subvert him. Dole had nothing to gain by doing so.

    I’m happy I voted for Dole and Trump (twice) before leaving the GOP on January 21, 2020.

    Replies: @Stan Adams, @Mr. Anon

    Dole had nothing to gain by doing so.

    That’s true. He had nothing much to lose either by that point, having retired from public life 20 years before. I imagine Dole liked the fact that Trump took the Bush family down a couple pegs (Dole was known to hold grudges – one of his better traits in my view). He was not, by any means, the worst politician the Republican Party has produced. He at least had some wit and a sense of humor. But if he was especially effective at anything, let alone defending our traditional understanding of the Republic, then it is news to me.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @Mr. Anon

    Agreed. Gingrich called him a tax collector for the welfare state and that was accurate. It would have been to Dole's credit if he had not run in 1996. At least at that point he exited the stage, helped his wife while she ran for Senate from North Carolina, but other than that he seemed to retire.

  22. Senator Bob Dole had a great voice, better than Norm’s.

    Body tension, body control, wit, charm and – cigarettes (tobacco).

  23. @Mr. Anon
    In the end, Bob Dole was just yet another ostensbily "conservative" Republican who never conserved anything.

    Replies: @Anon, @houston 1992

    In 1990, Sen Dole floated the idea of cutting US foreign aid by 5% to our big 5 recipients including Israel. Ok, I know, the idea went nowhere

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1990-01-26-me-527-story.html

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @houston 1992

    This is exactly how government works in Washington and why Dole had no impact. Democrats create some massive spending program. The radical Republican counter position is not, let's eliminate it but "Let's cut it by FIVE PERCENT." Then Schumer and Pelosi say that if we were to cut this program by 5%, women and children of color will surely DIE. So the Republicans say, okay, we won't cut it after all.

    You can tell how ineffective Dole was by the fact that the NY Times has articles today praising him as someone who "Embodied Shared Values in Washington". The Shared Values were a commitment to Big Government. Democrats wanted really Big Government and Dole wanted the same thing, only slightly smaller. "We want the same thing as the other party but slightly smaller" is not a winning political platform.

  24. He was a freemason, so we all know why he loved his sex-drug. Also why he loved open borders and Israel.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @John Chapter 8


    He was a freemason, so we all know why he loved his sex-drug. Also why he loved open borders and Israel.
     
    Gee, that's mighty 1840 of you.

    Of course back then everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!) and Israel was run by the ever lovable Ottomans.

    And BTW, if the "freemasons" had a sex-drug they'd still be around today...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Bill

  25. Rolled over for the Cucks.

  26. @obwandiyag
    So your favorite quotation by him is something he didn't say.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Sollipsist

    The Simpsons – Bob Dole Doesn’t Need This

  27. @songbird
    Way back sometime in the '90s, they used to have these diaper commercials for old women. Naturally, I thought it was disgusting, but I deluded myself into thinking men were more discrete and could not be appealed to in the same way.

    And then I started seeing the Viagra commercials. Eventually the one with Bob Dole.

    I think Gorbi had already done his Pizza Hut commercial, but that was food.

    But seeing Bob Dole, a prominent US politician, do the Viagra commercial, (when the man he ran against was in a sex scandal), made me really question the system and how shameless and corrupt it was, on both sides of the political spectrum. Of course, it was disgusting too.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @MEH 0910, @BB753

    1989 Commercial w/ Tip O’Neill Clarion Comfort Inn Hotels

    • Thanks: songbird
  28. I didn’t realise he was still alive.

    BTW, is Abe Vigoda still with us?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @The Alarmist


    BTW, is Abe Vigoda still with us?
     
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-stale-pale-male-oscar-voters-not-dying-fast-enough/

    NYT: Despite Abe Vigoda's Passing, Stale Pale Male Oscar Voters Still Not Dying Fast Enough to Suit Academy

    STEVE SAILER • FEBRUARY 5, 2016
     

    Betty White is still alive and approaching 100:

    https://www.the-sun.com/entertainment/4177296/why-is-betty-white-trending/

    [HD] Exclusive Snickers Super Bowl XLIV 44 2010 Commercial with Betty White and Abe Vigoda Ad
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uA7-31Cxc2I
    Feb 7, 2010

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @MEH 0910

    , @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    @The Alarmist

    Fish died in January 2016.

  29. @Stan Adams
    @Anon

    Why did you leave the GOP on that particular date, almost a year before the election? Or did you get the year wrong? (Biden was inaugurated on January 20, 2021.)

    Incidentally, my favorite Dole quote is from the 1988 primary campaign. Tom Brokaw was interviewing Bush 41 and Dole simultaneously. Brokaw asked Dole if he had anything to say to Bush.

    Dole’s reply? “Yeah. Stop lying about my record.”

    Bush giggled nervously.

    Replies: @Anon

    Why did you leave the GOP on that particular date, almost a year before the election? Or did you get the year wrong? (Biden was inaugurated on January 20, 2021.)

    😀 My bad, yeah, January 21, 2021.

  30. Now this was a very dignified and respectful tribute to Senator Dole, and with a nice touch of humor. What I will probably never quite understand, however, is why Steve couldn’t have done at least a basic tribute, let alone a mention of, for when Ross Perot passed away in July of 2020.

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Well, there was a fawning post over the passing of … Donald Rumsfeld.

    Replies: @BB753

  31. @songbird
    Way back sometime in the '90s, they used to have these diaper commercials for old women. Naturally, I thought it was disgusting, but I deluded myself into thinking men were more discrete and could not be appealed to in the same way.

    And then I started seeing the Viagra commercials. Eventually the one with Bob Dole.

    I think Gorbi had already done his Pizza Hut commercial, but that was food.

    But seeing Bob Dole, a prominent US politician, do the Viagra commercial, (when the man he ran against was in a sex scandal), made me really question the system and how shameless and corrupt it was, on both sides of the political spectrum. Of course, it was disgusting too.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @MEH 0910, @BB753

    We’ve yet to see an adult diaper ad by Biden.

  32. Worthless gopertards let Dole, at age 72, run against Cigar Clinton. They’re never serious about winning; they’re the half of the uniparty comfortable–and comfortably compensated–for being spineless losers.

  33. Dole was extremely witty in a sort of bleak, nasty way, appropriate for a man who needed four painful years of intermittent hospital stays to heal from the war wounds that crippled him for life.

    Bleakness is certainly appropriate for anybody who sacrificed his youth and health in war. Moreso for anybody who lived to see that sacrifice wasted in America’s terminal decline. RIP.

  34. @Whiskey
    Bob Dole when all is said and done, might as well not have existed at all. For all the impact he had on the nation. He was in politics forever. And what he will be remembered the most for is Norm McDonald parodying him in a fake "MTV Real World" skit and making a Viagra Commercial.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @dcthrowback

    Robert Dole should be the photo associated with the Wikipedia entry for “Controlled Opposition.” And your point is a good one; his impact on American politics will be that of a fist plunged into and then withdrawn from a bucket of water.

  35. @Reg Cæsar
    @songbird


    thinking men were more discrete
     
    Everyone is discrete, save a few exceptional cases.


    https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/976/mcs/media/images/67053000/jpg/_67053071_4085099-high_res-abby-and-brittany-joined-for-life.jpg

    https://www.ststworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Chang_and_Eng_Bunker.jpg

    These guys could almost pass for Johnny Carson with the horizontal hold off.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Those chicks totally prove my theory that wypipos be cray-cray af.

  36. @Mr. Anon
    OT - Math Olympiad teams. Guess which team is which:

    https://twitter.com/a_centrism/status/1467354084692930566

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ian Smith, @Muggles, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    Sigh…maybe the best white people can hope for is to be middle managers in the Chinese global empire…

  37. Dole wasn’t just a Viagra customer, he was a user in its clinical trial.

  38. Bob Dole was in congress for nearly 40 years. And yet, there is not one noteworthy legislative accomplishment. All the newspaper write-ups discuss his getting wounded in the war, his wry sense of humor, his presidential runs, and most importantly his willingness to capitulate to the Democrats. Plus his willingness to attack Buchanan as a racist is all anyone needs to know about his moral character. Seems worthy of contempt rather than praise.

    His appearance on Letterman with Norm was the ultimate cuck move. Norm savaged Dole on SNL and literally none of it was funny.

  39. @houston 1992
    @Mr. Anon

    In 1990, Sen Dole floated the idea of cutting US foreign aid by 5% to our big 5 recipients including Israel. Ok, I know, the idea went nowhere

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1990-01-26-me-527-story.html

    Replies: @Jack D

    This is exactly how government works in Washington and why Dole had no impact. Democrats create some massive spending program. The radical Republican counter position is not, let’s eliminate it but “Let’s cut it by FIVE PERCENT.” Then Schumer and Pelosi say that if we were to cut this program by 5%, women and children of color will surely DIE. So the Republicans say, okay, we won’t cut it after all.

    You can tell how ineffective Dole was by the fact that the NY Times has articles today praising him as someone who “Embodied Shared Values in Washington”. The Shared Values were a commitment to Big Government. Democrats wanted really Big Government and Dole wanted the same thing, only slightly smaller. “We want the same thing as the other party but slightly smaller” is not a winning political platform.

  40. @Ralph L
    Dole pushed through the big 1982 increase in FICA taxes and told Reagan there would also be budget "cuts" which never occurred, they just spent the extra money and more. It delayed the day of reckoning a few years. Newt called him the tax collector for the welfare state.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jack D

    I’m not generally in favor of tax increases, but if Social Security is supposed to be a freestanding self-financing program and not just another part of the overall welfare budget, it was necessary to increase the contributions in order to fund future payouts. Either that or reduce the future payouts.

    Social Security is (and always has been) an intentionally muddled cross between a welfare program and an pension scheme but to the extent that it is the latter, the mandatory contributions (aka FICA taxes) have to bear some relationship to the payouts.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @Jack D


    I’m not generally in favor of tax increases, but if Social Security is supposed to be a freestanding self-financing program and not just another part of the overall welfare budget, it was necessary to increase the contributions in order to fund future payouts. Either that or reduce the future payouts.

    Social Security is (and always has been) an intentionally muddled cross between a welfare program and an pension scheme but to the extent that it is the latter, the mandatory contributions (aka FICA taxes) have to bear some relationship to the payouts.
     
    Several years ago now when the Democrats wanted to prop up Social Security with additional revenue the WaPo did a piece showing that an average worker paid more in to the (combined Social Security and Medicare) system in absolute, non-inflation adjusted dollars than was expended upon him.

    But of course, the entire piece was misleading, because it utterly failed to account for the time value/opportunity cost of money. FICA contributions made 45 years ago should not equal the same dollar figure in present terms. An astute reader made the point that the taxpayer in question actually lost a few million dollars in value by his compulsory participation in Social Security and Medicare. So really all that Social Security and Medicare are now are scams to disguise current budget shortfalls permitting Congress cover to spend more than its tax revenue.

    All of this said, I think that one of may outcomes of the Great Replacement will be the eventual unwillingness of a future Congress to tax poorer, browner, younger taxpayers to support the retirement years and health care costs of richer, whiter, older former taxpayers. A future post-Replacement Congress will not be shy about spending on the current needs of transplanted third world population rather than fulfilling promises made to the dispossessed by earlier Congresses.
    , @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    The Social Security Administration employs actuaries. They could calculate a schedule of cohort-specific retirement ages which would allow for the ratio of beneficiaries to workers to be a constant or vary between a narrow band. Congress has allowed piecemeal adjustment in the retirement age, but never a scheme which would keep the program sound.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

  41. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Now this was a very dignified and respectful tribute to Senator Dole, and with a nice touch of humor. What I will probably never quite understand, however, is why Steve couldn't have done at least a basic tribute, let alone a mention of, for when Ross Perot passed away in July of 2020.

    Replies: @Greta Handel

    Well, there was a fawning post over the passing of … Donald Rumsfeld.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Greta Handel

    Cheney should be next.

  42. Jack, You write: “Social Security is (and always has been) an intentionally muddled cross between a welfare program and an pension scheme…”. 100% wrong. Completely mistaken. So wrong that it is unlikely that you will ever be able to see the truth and recognize how wrong you were for all those decades, that you could have been so thoroughly propagandized that you believed the lies hook, line and sinker.

    Social security was ALWAYS a general revenue tax on earned income designed expressly to both commit future tax income and prohibit the application of standard (required by law in the private sector annuity and pension businesses) actuarial funding/payout schemes. FDR and ALL of his cohort, with knowledge and forethought, perpetrated the fraud on the USA. The SSN and phony ritual associated therewith was designed specifically (and very effectively) as a totem around which the the con men and the conned would both happily dance, with the conned insisting over the decades that more and mor of their income be taken to keep the scam going.

    I could go on but will not. If you do not se how wrong you were, please look into it a bit more. It will make the dirty work of cleaning out our government a bit easier for you.

  43. @The Alarmist
    I didn’t realise he was still alive.

    BTW, is Abe Vigoda still with us?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    BTW, is Abe Vigoda still with us?

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-stale-pale-male-oscar-voters-not-dying-fast-enough/

    NYT: Despite Abe Vigoda’s Passing, Stale Pale Male Oscar Voters Still Not Dying Fast Enough to Suit Academy

    STEVE SAILER • FEBRUARY 5, 2016

    Betty White is still alive and approaching 100:

    https://www.the-sun.com/entertainment/4177296/why-is-betty-white-trending/

    [MORE]

    [HD] Exclusive Snickers Super Bowl XLIV 44 2010 Commercial with Betty White and Abe Vigoda Ad

    Feb 7, 2010

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @MEH 0910

    Thanks.

    I brought it up as a joke. I once literally bumped into Vigoda in Manhattan, so I mentioned this to one of the producers with whom I worked who was a big Godfather fan, and he replied, “Abe Vigoda is still alive?”

    Surprisingly, this website is still alive ...

    http://www.abevigoda.com

    https://www.masslive.com/resizer/DcxDeXylIigW4uuiw96bM1H7Rv0=/1280x0/smart/advancelocal-adapter-image-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/image.masslive.com/home/mass-media/width2048/img/entertainment/photo/screen-shot-2016-01-26-at-45556-pmpng-5edb5eaef3116114.png

    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    December 28:
    https://twitter.com/people/status/1475815505286111236

    December 31:
    https://twitter.com/people/status/1476998107107926030

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_White


    Betty Marion White Ludden (January 17, 1922 – December 31, 2021) was an American actress and comedian.
     

    https://twitter.com/people/status/1477025778294562817
  44. @John Milton's Ghost
    I remember when SNL was wickedly funny, directed at all politicians. It's been unwatchable for nearly two decades now. Phil Hartman's take on Bill Clinton was priceless.

    I do wish Bob Dole were as edgy and direct as Norm was when he played the Kansas senator. Republican politicians are often portrayed as more capable and stubborn and singleminded (in an evil way to the celebrity actors) than they ever are in real life. Dole was collegial with all the assholes like Ted Kennedy and did nothing of note legislatively as those Dems eroded what liberties remained in this country.

    Replies: @follyofwar, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    If Bob Dole was “too disorganized to have made a good president,” what does that say about our current slow-witted elderly White House occupant, who is completely unable to “just wing it?”

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @follyofwar

    Biden doesn't actually exercise executive or policy-making power, so it doesn't matter that he's disorganized (i.e., senile).

  45. @MEH 0910
    @The Alarmist


    BTW, is Abe Vigoda still with us?
     
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-stale-pale-male-oscar-voters-not-dying-fast-enough/

    NYT: Despite Abe Vigoda's Passing, Stale Pale Male Oscar Voters Still Not Dying Fast Enough to Suit Academy

    STEVE SAILER • FEBRUARY 5, 2016
     

    Betty White is still alive and approaching 100:

    https://www.the-sun.com/entertainment/4177296/why-is-betty-white-trending/

    [HD] Exclusive Snickers Super Bowl XLIV 44 2010 Commercial with Betty White and Abe Vigoda Ad
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uA7-31Cxc2I
    Feb 7, 2010

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @MEH 0910

    Thanks.

    I brought it up as a joke. I once literally bumped into Vigoda in Manhattan, so I mentioned this to one of the producers with whom I worked who was a big Godfather fan, and he replied, “Abe Vigoda is still alive?”

    Surprisingly, this website is still alive …

    http://www.abevigoda.com

  46. @John Milton's Ghost
    I remember when SNL was wickedly funny, directed at all politicians. It's been unwatchable for nearly two decades now. Phil Hartman's take on Bill Clinton was priceless.

    I do wish Bob Dole were as edgy and direct as Norm was when he played the Kansas senator. Republican politicians are often portrayed as more capable and stubborn and singleminded (in an evil way to the celebrity actors) than they ever are in real life. Dole was collegial with all the assholes like Ted Kennedy and did nothing of note legislatively as those Dems eroded what liberties remained in this country.

    Replies: @follyofwar, @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    I remember when SNL was wickedly funny, directed at all politicians. It’s been unwatchable for nearly two decades now. Phil Hartman’s take on Bill Clinton was priceless.

    A weekly sketch comedy show with a substantial budget for sets and costumes is probably the only way to really lampoon politicians, because most people aren’t that informed about politics so you really need the cues of the set and a panoply of other imitations of politicians to set up the bits, and the bits need to be topical (i.e., what those clowns in Washington did this week). Of course, irreverence doesn’t work only half of the time – you really need to stick to that frame when it comes to political friend and foe alike for it to work.

    Norm was asked before his death about the Baldwin impression of Trump, and he said (paraphrasing) that it wasn’t good, because you can tell that Baldwin hated Trump and you can’t really do an impression of someone you hate. It’s probably also the case that you can’t do a passable comedic impression of a figure you love and can see no wrong in – SNL cast and writers claimed that “there was nothing funny about Obama” and later finally succumbed to having a cast member imitate him in such a way that everyone else (his political adversaries) were the brunt of the joke, but never Obama himself.

    This iteration of SNL is beneath pathetic, squandering those budgets and weekly topicality in exchange for regime obeisance and “clapter.” The current “bit” is having a short, dumpy female cast member do the low effort drag imitation of the object of this week’s hatred – usually Ted Cruz, once Joe Manchin. Haha – Ted Cruz and Joe Manchin (when he’s misbehaving) are emasculated! So funny! Don’t get my pronouns wrong or I’ll get you fired, bigot.

    The entire cast is bereft of actual comedic abilities – they’re really now just a bunch of overgrown apple-polishing drama club types for whom the dressing up is the punchline. They seem to feel that they’re being graded on their dutifulness to current political events and liberal orthodoxy rather than a track record of making anyone erupt in involuntary laughter.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  47. @SafeNow
    I remember Bob Dole saying during the presidential campaign that in some ways America used to be a better place. When I heard it, my thought was, as Steve would say, “uh-oh.” Dole was ridiculed as a dinosaur. Of course by 1996 what he said was already quite true. But it is dangerous for Republicans to appear stodgy, nostalgic, and unadaptable, and that statement certainly harmed electoral chances. I don’t know what the current answer is to this problem, because the truth now is that America used to be a much much much better place than today; can a Republican politician remotely say thus? Anyway, RIP.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    I remember Bob Dole saying during the presidential campaign that in some ways America used to be a better place. When I heard it, my thought was, as Steve would say, “uh-oh.” Dole was ridiculed as a dinosaur. Of course by 1996 what he said was already quite true.

    This is true, but even being true how many people would trade and arm and a leg just for 1996 America now?

  48. @Jack D
    @Ralph L

    I'm not generally in favor of tax increases, but if Social Security is supposed to be a freestanding self-financing program and not just another part of the overall welfare budget, it was necessary to increase the contributions in order to fund future payouts. Either that or reduce the future payouts.

    Social Security is (and always has been) an intentionally muddled cross between a welfare program and an pension scheme but to the extent that it is the latter, the mandatory contributions (aka FICA taxes) have to bear some relationship to the payouts.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Art Deco

    I’m not generally in favor of tax increases, but if Social Security is supposed to be a freestanding self-financing program and not just another part of the overall welfare budget, it was necessary to increase the contributions in order to fund future payouts. Either that or reduce the future payouts.

    Social Security is (and always has been) an intentionally muddled cross between a welfare program and an pension scheme but to the extent that it is the latter, the mandatory contributions (aka FICA taxes) have to bear some relationship to the payouts.

    Several years ago now when the Democrats wanted to prop up Social Security with additional revenue the WaPo did a piece showing that an average worker paid more in to the (combined Social Security and Medicare) system in absolute, non-inflation adjusted dollars than was expended upon him.

    But of course, the entire piece was misleading, because it utterly failed to account for the time value/opportunity cost of money. FICA contributions made 45 years ago should not equal the same dollar figure in present terms. An astute reader made the point that the taxpayer in question actually lost a few million dollars in value by his compulsory participation in Social Security and Medicare. So really all that Social Security and Medicare are now are scams to disguise current budget shortfalls permitting Congress cover to spend more than its tax revenue.

    All of this said, I think that one of may outcomes of the Great Replacement will be the eventual unwillingness of a future Congress to tax poorer, browner, younger taxpayers to support the retirement years and health care costs of richer, whiter, older former taxpayers. A future post-Replacement Congress will not be shy about spending on the current needs of transplanted third world population rather than fulfilling promises made to the dispossessed by earlier Congresses.

  49. He probably was too disorganized to have made a good President, but he was hilarious going on the Sunday morning talk shows and just winging it.

    That’s a peculiar take on the man. Where is the evidence he was ‘disorganized’?

    He’d never held an executive position, and that made him a suboptimal candidate for the job. OTOH, he understood Congress and was (one might wager) less given to prevarication than almost anyone else who has been nominated by one of the major parties in the last 40-odd years.

    Dole had excellent work habits in the sense he was willing to remain in the office for 80 hours a week. The trouble was, Congress is shot through with such people and they accomplish scarcely anything of value. Like Gerald Ford, he was a technician who had never formulated an understanding of proper policy above and beyond the biases you’d expect a person from a certain background to have.

    Once he recovered from his wounds (an impressive story), he spent then next 40-odd years in electoral politics, then went into lobbying. It was just the sort of career that’s all too common among the top echelon in Congress and one that shouldn’t as a matter of law be possible. His domestic life was truncated. He and his 1st wife had just one child, he and his 2d wife none. His daughter never married or had any children

  50. @Jack D
    @Ralph L

    I'm not generally in favor of tax increases, but if Social Security is supposed to be a freestanding self-financing program and not just another part of the overall welfare budget, it was necessary to increase the contributions in order to fund future payouts. Either that or reduce the future payouts.

    Social Security is (and always has been) an intentionally muddled cross between a welfare program and an pension scheme but to the extent that it is the latter, the mandatory contributions (aka FICA taxes) have to bear some relationship to the payouts.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Art Deco

    The Social Security Administration employs actuaries. They could calculate a schedule of cohort-specific retirement ages which would allow for the ratio of beneficiaries to workers to be a constant or vary between a narrow band. Congress has allowed piecemeal adjustment in the retirement age, but never a scheme which would keep the program sound.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    , @AnotherDad
    @Art Deco



    They could calculate a schedule of cohort-specific retirement ages which would allow for the ratio of beneficiaries to workers to be a constant or vary between a narrow band.
     
    An entertaining version would be very cohort specific:

    You received the SS taxes paid by your own kids.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  51. @Mr. Anon
    @Anon


    Dole had nothing to gain by doing so.
     
    That's true. He had nothing much to lose either by that point, having retired from public life 20 years before. I imagine Dole liked the fact that Trump took the Bush family down a couple pegs (Dole was known to hold grudges - one of his better traits in my view). He was not, by any means, the worst politician the Republican Party has produced. He at least had some wit and a sense of humor. But if he was especially effective at anything, let alone defending our traditional understanding of the Republic, then it is news to me.

    Replies: @Barnard

    Agreed. Gingrich called him a tax collector for the welfare state and that was accurate. It would have been to Dole’s credit if he had not run in 1996. At least at that point he exited the stage, helped his wife while she ran for Senate from North Carolina, but other than that he seemed to retire.

  52. @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    The Social Security Administration employs actuaries. They could calculate a schedule of cohort-specific retirement ages which would allow for the ratio of beneficiaries to workers to be a constant or vary between a narrow band. Congress has allowed piecemeal adjustment in the retirement age, but never a scheme which would keep the program sound.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.
     
    Blame the boomers! They could have persuaded their parents to vote for Goldwater!


    https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/_KWBCSQk6a3dsxmHln8ddBcbpgg=/0x0:3375x2933/1720x0/filters:focal(0x0:3375x2933):format(webp):no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/7431577/1964.png
    , @Brutusale
    @Jack D


    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.
     
    Sorry, Jack, but a government that can float a trial balloon about paying illegal aliens $450K can pay me the benefits that I've paid into since I had my first job 50 years ago.

    Replies: @Jack D

  53. Below is my favorite Bob Dole moment. I think of this at least once a year.

    Do you remember Scott McClellan? He was GWB’s press secretary who, in 2008, wrote a tell-all on the administration. This resulted in the usual carousel of praise from the regime class. But not Bob Dole. Shortly after publication of the McClellan book, Dole wrote an email to McClellan. The link below has the whole story. Here’s the best part:


    Dole assures McClellan that he won’t read the book — “because if all these awful things were happening, and perhaps some may have been, you should have spoken up publicly like a man, or quit your cushy, high-profile job.”

    “That would have taken integrity and courage but then you would have had credibility and your complaints could have been aired objectively,” Dole concludes. “You’re a hot ticket now, but don’t you, deep down, feel like a total ingrate?”

    He signs the email simply: “BOB DOLE”

    RIP
    https://www.politico.com/blogs/jonathanmartin/0508/Bob_Dole_unloads_on_McClellan.html

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Thanks: ScarletNumber
  54. @Mr. Anon
    OT - Math Olympiad teams. Guess which team is which:

    https://twitter.com/a_centrism/status/1467354084692930566

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ian Smith, @Muggles, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    How did Team Ethiopia do?

    • Replies: @Joe Joe
    @Muggles

    Probably a lot better than Team Uganda!!! ;-)

  55. @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    The Social Security Administration employs actuaries. They could calculate a schedule of cohort-specific retirement ages which would allow for the ratio of beneficiaries to workers to be a constant or vary between a narrow band. Congress has allowed piecemeal adjustment in the retirement age, but never a scheme which would keep the program sound.

    Replies: @Jack D, @AnotherDad

    They could calculate a schedule of cohort-specific retirement ages which would allow for the ratio of beneficiaries to workers to be a constant or vary between a narrow band.

    An entertaining version would be very cohort specific:

    You received the SS taxes paid by your own kids.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    An entertaining version would be very cohort specific:

    You received the SS taxes paid by your own kids.
     
    Or, in the case of Ida May Fuller, somebody else's kids:

    The First Social Security Beneficiary


    She lived in FDR's worst state, and was a classmate of Calvin Coolidge.


    https://www.history.com/.image/t_share/MTY0MDYxODczODQ5OTAyOTgw/socialsecurity_ap_5010040102.jpg
  56. @John Chapter 8
    He was a freemason, so we all know why he loved his sex-drug. Also why he loved open borders and Israel.

    Replies: @Muggles

    He was a freemason, so we all know why he loved his sex-drug. Also why he loved open borders and Israel.

    Gee, that’s mighty 1840 of you.

    Of course back then everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!) and Israel was run by the ever lovable Ottomans.

    And BTW, if the “freemasons” had a sex-drug they’d still be around today…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Muggles


    Gee, that’s mighty 1840 of you.

    Of course back then everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!) and Israel was run by the ever lovable Ottomans.
     
    Back then, the Vice President was married to an octoroon. Today, the Vice President is a quadroon.

    everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!)
     
    When she was granted statehood eight years later, Wisconsin was the first state to allow aliens to vote before being naturalized. This was to encourage (the right kind of) people to move there. Many interior states adopted this later, but none of the big urban ones did. WW1 made the practice unpopular, and Arkansas was the final nail in the coffin, repealing it in 1926.

    If a foreign man married a citizen, which one of them could vote depended on which state they lived in: he, she, both, or neither. Ain't federalism grand?

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Bill
    @Muggles

    The Freemasons: not around today

    Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein

  57. @Mr. Anon
    OT - Math Olympiad teams. Guess which team is which:

    https://twitter.com/a_centrism/status/1467354084692930566

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ian Smith, @Muggles, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    Basically this thing would be over …

    … but China itself–weirdly–never seriously engaged with the eugenic fertility issue. So while in a few years their population will peak and roll over, they’ve got:

    — a quickly graying population
    — a huge sex skew
    — a bunch of “little emperor” coddled soy boys (which E. Asians tend towards anyway) many of whom will never find a wife
    — a bunch of entitled young women
    — restive and lower IQ minorities with higher fertility.

    Not a pretty picture. Only compared to the disaster in the West, do they look pretty good.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad


    but China itself–weirdly–never seriously engaged with the eugenic fertility issue.
     
    We accuse China of oppressing her minorities, often with good reason. But sometimes the opposite is true. Mao practiced affirmative action as he thought-- again with good reason-- they would make for more revolutionary revolutionaries.

    The one-child policy never applied to them. Part of this is the Hu line, across which the population is sparse. Alaska as opposed to LA County. But another reason jumps to mind--

    Applying the one-child policy to a population other than your own would constitute genocide under one of the UN's definitions. China, at least Red China, hadn't been in the UN very long when the policy began, and they might not have wanted to stir up the issue.

    In the meantime, minorities have jumped from 4% to 8% of the PRC's population.
  58. Sen. Bob Dole put through legislation to allow the import of old surplus guns like M-1 Garands and bolt-actions to at least mitigate some of the damage caused by the Gun Control Act of 1968.

    He was allegedly “pro-gun.”

    https://dolearchivecollections.ku.edu/collections/speeches/046/c019_046_006_all.pdf

  59. @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.

    Blame the boomers! They could have persuaded their parents to vote for Goldwater!

  60. @AnotherDad
    @Art Deco



    They could calculate a schedule of cohort-specific retirement ages which would allow for the ratio of beneficiaries to workers to be a constant or vary between a narrow band.
     
    An entertaining version would be very cohort specific:

    You received the SS taxes paid by your own kids.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    An entertaining version would be very cohort specific:

    You received the SS taxes paid by your own kids.

    Or, in the case of Ida May Fuller, somebody else’s kids:

    The First Social Security Beneficiary

    She lived in FDR’s worst state, and was a classmate of Calvin Coolidge.

  61. @Muggles
    @John Chapter 8


    He was a freemason, so we all know why he loved his sex-drug. Also why he loved open borders and Israel.
     
    Gee, that's mighty 1840 of you.

    Of course back then everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!) and Israel was run by the ever lovable Ottomans.

    And BTW, if the "freemasons" had a sex-drug they'd still be around today...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Bill

    Gee, that’s mighty 1840 of you.

    Of course back then everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!) and Israel was run by the ever lovable Ottomans.

    Back then, the Vice President was married to an octoroon. Today, the Vice President is a quadroon.

    everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!)

    When she was granted statehood eight years later, Wisconsin was the first state to allow aliens to vote before being naturalized. This was to encourage (the right kind of) people to move there. Many interior states adopted this later, but none of the big urban ones did. WW1 made the practice unpopular, and Arkansas was the final nail in the coffin, repealing it in 1926.

    If a foreign man married a citizen, which one of them could vote depended on which state they lived in: he, she, both, or neither. Ain’t federalism grand?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the other hand, under the federal Expatriation Act of 1907 , it was provided that “any American woman who marries a foreigner shall take the nationality of her husband.”

    This actually happened to my wife's grandmother. Even though she was born and bred in Philly, when she married her immigrant husband, she lost her American citizenship and could no longer vote. She had to wait until her husband became a naturalized American citizen and when he did, she regained her citizenship as well.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Reg Cæsar, @Charlotte

  62. No respect for viagra man.

    He lost the election but got an erection. What a joke.

  63. @Reg Cæsar
    @Muggles


    Gee, that’s mighty 1840 of you.

    Of course back then everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!) and Israel was run by the ever lovable Ottomans.
     
    Back then, the Vice President was married to an octoroon. Today, the Vice President is a quadroon.

    everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!)
     
    When she was granted statehood eight years later, Wisconsin was the first state to allow aliens to vote before being naturalized. This was to encourage (the right kind of) people to move there. Many interior states adopted this later, but none of the big urban ones did. WW1 made the practice unpopular, and Arkansas was the final nail in the coffin, repealing it in 1926.

    If a foreign man married a citizen, which one of them could vote depended on which state they lived in: he, she, both, or neither. Ain't federalism grand?

    Replies: @Jack D

    On the other hand, under the federal Expatriation Act of 1907 , it was provided that “any American woman who marries a foreigner shall take the nationality of her husband.”

    This actually happened to my wife’s grandmother. Even though she was born and bred in Philly, when she married her immigrant husband, she lost her American citizenship and could no longer vote. She had to wait until her husband became a naturalized American citizen and when he did, she regained her citizenship as well.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Jack D

    My SIL's grandfather became a US citizen (or nearly so) but went back home to a Friesen island (formerly Danish) to get married in the summer of 1914 and spent the next 4 years in the German army.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    ...when she married her immigrant husband, she lost her American citizenship and could no longer vote.
     
    In some states, she could have, after six months.
    , @Charlotte
    @Jack D

    If the woman happened to marry a German, she had to register as an enemy alien during WWI; here’s an example https://catalog.archives.gov/id/286202#.Ya73_njKWGA.link. Also, if the husband didn’t naturalize before the law was changed to uncouple the citizenship of husbands and wives, she would have had to apply for citizenship to get her own back.

  64. Bob Dole on Democrat Party wars from 1976:

    “I guess, but it’s (Watergate and the pardon of Richard Nixon) not a very good issue any more than the war in Vietnam would be or World War II, or World War I, or the war in Korea, all Democrat wars, all in this century. I figured up the other day, if we added up the killed and wounded in Democrat wars in this century, it’d be about one point six million Americans – enough to fill the city of Detroit.”

  65. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the other hand, under the federal Expatriation Act of 1907 , it was provided that “any American woman who marries a foreigner shall take the nationality of her husband.”

    This actually happened to my wife's grandmother. Even though she was born and bred in Philly, when she married her immigrant husband, she lost her American citizenship and could no longer vote. She had to wait until her husband became a naturalized American citizen and when he did, she regained her citizenship as well.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Reg Cæsar, @Charlotte

    My SIL’s grandfather became a US citizen (or nearly so) but went back home to a Friesen island (formerly Danish) to get married in the summer of 1914 and spent the next 4 years in the German army.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Ralph L

    My wife's cousin was born in Petaluma, California but his parents were Communists and went back to the Soviet Union in 1936. Within a few years, both of his parents were dead. It took him 50 years to get out of the Soviet Union despite being a US citizen.

  66. @AnotherDad
    @Mr. Anon

    Basically this thing would be over ...

    ... but China itself--weirdly--never seriously engaged with the eugenic fertility issue. So while in a few years their population will peak and roll over, they've got:

    -- a quickly graying population
    -- a huge sex skew
    -- a bunch of "little emperor" coddled soy boys (which E. Asians tend towards anyway) many of whom will never find a wife
    -- a bunch of entitled young women
    -- restive and lower IQ minorities with higher fertility.

    Not a pretty picture. Only compared to the disaster in the West, do they look pretty good.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    but China itself–weirdly–never seriously engaged with the eugenic fertility issue.

    We accuse China of oppressing her minorities, often with good reason. But sometimes the opposite is true. Mao practiced affirmative action as he thought– again with good reason– they would make for more revolutionary revolutionaries.

    The one-child policy never applied to them. Part of this is the Hu line, across which the population is sparse. Alaska as opposed to LA County. But another reason jumps to mind–

    Applying the one-child policy to a population other than your own would constitute genocide under one of the UN’s definitions. China, at least Red China, hadn’t been in the UN very long when the policy began, and they might not have wanted to stir up the issue.

    In the meantime, minorities have jumped from 4% to 8% of the PRC’s population.

  67. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the other hand, under the federal Expatriation Act of 1907 , it was provided that “any American woman who marries a foreigner shall take the nationality of her husband.”

    This actually happened to my wife's grandmother. Even though she was born and bred in Philly, when she married her immigrant husband, she lost her American citizenship and could no longer vote. She had to wait until her husband became a naturalized American citizen and when he did, she regained her citizenship as well.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Reg Cæsar, @Charlotte

    …when she married her immigrant husband, she lost her American citizenship and could no longer vote.

    In some states, she could have, after six months.

  68. @Muggles
    @John Chapter 8


    He was a freemason, so we all know why he loved his sex-drug. Also why he loved open borders and Israel.
     
    Gee, that's mighty 1840 of you.

    Of course back then everyone was for open borders (Americans need land!) and Israel was run by the ever lovable Ottomans.

    And BTW, if the "freemasons" had a sex-drug they'd still be around today...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Bill

    The Freemasons: not around today

    • Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    @Bill

    That's what they want you to believe.

    *Adjusts tinfoil hat to a jaunty, rakish angle*

  69. @Mr. Anon
    OT - Math Olympiad teams. Guess which team is which:

    https://twitter.com/a_centrism/status/1467354084692930566

    Replies: @Polistra, @Ian Smith, @Muggles, @AnotherDad, @Corvinus

    Team America is…American. Glad you are showing your patriotism.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus


    Team America is…American.
     
    God forbid you should ever believe the evidence of your own eyes.

    They're all Chinese, you simpering idiot.

    But "Team America" is about your speed. "Murica......F**k Yeah!"
  70. @Whiskey
    Bob Dole when all is said and done, might as well not have existed at all. For all the impact he had on the nation. He was in politics forever. And what he will be remembered the most for is Norm McDonald parodying him in a fake "MTV Real World" skit and making a Viagra Commercial.

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic, @dcthrowback

  71. Ole Bobdole was never supposed to win the Presidency. He was chosen because he couldn’t, and he obviously didn’t care. I called him the “Happy Loser.”

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @very old statistician
    @Bizarro World Observer

    I agree, he did not seem to care much.
    A hero in his way, but not a hero who seemed to care much about the people who needed someone better than him to do what needed to be done.

  72. @The Alarmist
    I didn’t realise he was still alive.

    BTW, is Abe Vigoda still with us?

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    Fish died in January 2016.

  73. @Bill
    @Muggles

    The Freemasons: not around today

    Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    That’s what they want you to believe.

    *Adjusts tinfoil hat to a jaunty, rakish angle*

  74. Still waiting for a notable person under the age of 75 to die from COVID….Two years of COVID 19 and still waiting. Excess deaths are higher in 2021 than last year and despite having a vaccine which is 95% effective we have more Covid deaths in 2021 than last year when it was a novel virus and few Americans had immunity.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Conservative talk show hosts and televangelists?

    There aren't that many jobs where you can be a celebrity and be fat as an average American, but radio is one of them.

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    The other side of the coin: Two members of Poco, Rusty Young and Paul Cotton, died shortly after getting the Jab. There are probably more such cases like this.

    Replies: @very old statistician

  75. @Ralph L
    @Jack D

    My SIL's grandfather became a US citizen (or nearly so) but went back home to a Friesen island (formerly Danish) to get married in the summer of 1914 and spent the next 4 years in the German army.

    Replies: @Jack D

    My wife’s cousin was born in Petaluma, California but his parents were Communists and went back to the Soviet Union in 1936. Within a few years, both of his parents were dead. It took him 50 years to get out of the Soviet Union despite being a US citizen.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  76. @Corvinus
    @Mr. Anon

    Team America is…American. Glad you are showing your patriotism.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Team America is…American.

    God forbid you should ever believe the evidence of your own eyes.

    They’re all Chinese, you simpering idiot.

    But “Team America” is about your speed. “Murica……F**k Yeah!”

  77. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    Still waiting for a notable person under the age of 75 to die from COVID....Two years of COVID 19 and still waiting. Excess deaths are higher in 2021 than last year and despite having a vaccine which is 95% effective we have more Covid deaths in 2021 than last year when it was a novel virus and few Americans had immunity.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ron Mexico

    Conservative talk show hosts and televangelists?

    There aren’t that many jobs where you can be a celebrity and be fat as an average American, but radio is one of them.

  78. Don’t know about Norm MacDonald, but, Chris Farley’s relatively good natured impersonation of Newt Gingrich from that same mid 1990’s time period would probably get him ‘canceled’ today, not to mention death threats from the so called ‘woke’ crowd.

    https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4462349/chris-farley-imitates-newt-gingrich

    • Agree: Vinnyvette
  79. A great American, the last of the few. Their valor, selflessness and love of country made postwar America into the greatest civilization the world will ever see. My father was among this group and it will always be a source of pride for me.

    Their greatest failure? The stewardship of the next generation which sowed the seeds of the country’s demise.

    From the greatest came the worst.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @Bernard

    The Greatest and Silent Generation threw spike strips on this countries financial and cultural highways that eventually punctured the Boomer's tires. America has been increasingly at war against itself since 1946 (when Boomers were first born, not when they were in charge). Brown V Board of Education in 1954 in particular was the beginning of America tearing itself apart with regard to reach exceeding grasp. Boomers had to deal with the first "integrated" schools. Boomers recognized the idiocy of the Great Society welfare state that their parents created. They recognized that elder entitlement programs like Social Security were an absurd favoring of the old at the expense of the young. Now it's true that Boomers "got in" before things got really ugly in the 1990's. But their parents, as middle aged and elderly adults also were in on it and evidently felt no shame about it (unlike Boomers who vocally complained about the world their kids were growing up in).

    Throughout the West, it's the same story: the Greatest and Silent Generations mucked around with increasingly grandiose and delusional schemes to transform society, while Boomers happened to be privileged enough to be born early enough to actually afford a decent life if they played their cards right. Gen X used to complain that Boomers had it too easy, but I think they started to shut up about it when it became clear how screwed Millennials are.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  80. @obwandiyag
    So your favorite quotation by him is something he didn't say.

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Sollipsist

    Why not? My favorite thing about Burt Reynolds will forever be Turd Ferguson.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  81. @hhsiii
    @Harry Baldwin

    I’m sure Libby was happy he was making money.

    Replies: @very old statistician

    you don’t know much about women .

    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    @very old statistician

    Do tell.

  82. @Bizarro World Observer
    Ole Bobdole was never supposed to win the Presidency. He was chosen because he couldn’t, and he obviously didn’t care. I called him the “Happy Loser.”

    Replies: @very old statistician

    I agree, he did not seem to care much.
    A hero in his way, but not a hero who seemed to care much about the people who needed someone better than him to do what needed to be done.

  83. Dole got himself in trouble at one of the VP debates in 1976 by referring to World War II (in which he was crippled) as the “Democrats’ War.” He had to backtrack quickly (can’t refer to the Holy War in unholy terms). To me, it was evidence of his understandable bitterness at being crippled in a war against enemies who did not threaten us until induced to do so.

  84. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the other hand, under the federal Expatriation Act of 1907 , it was provided that “any American woman who marries a foreigner shall take the nationality of her husband.”

    This actually happened to my wife's grandmother. Even though she was born and bred in Philly, when she married her immigrant husband, she lost her American citizenship and could no longer vote. She had to wait until her husband became a naturalized American citizen and when he did, she regained her citizenship as well.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @Reg Cæsar, @Charlotte

    If the woman happened to marry a German, she had to register as an enemy alien during WWI; here’s an example https://catalog.archives.gov/id/286202#.Ya73_njKWGA.link. Also, if the husband didn’t naturalize before the law was changed to uncouple the citizenship of husbands and wives, she would have had to apply for citizenship to get her own back.

  85. Former US Senator Al Franken (DFL-MN) weighs in

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @ScarletNumber

    Franken's tweet: First half good but remainder marred by sender's usual megalomania!

  86. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    Still waiting for a notable person under the age of 75 to die from COVID....Two years of COVID 19 and still waiting. Excess deaths are higher in 2021 than last year and despite having a vaccine which is 95% effective we have more Covid deaths in 2021 than last year when it was a novel virus and few Americans had immunity.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ron Mexico

    The other side of the coin: Two members of Poco, Rusty Young and Paul Cotton, died shortly after getting the Jab. There are probably more such cases like this.

    • Replies: @very old statistician
    @Ron Mexico

    nobody cares about that now.

    people will care when the war crimes trials get underway, but for now, THERE ARE DOZENS OF SOCCER PLAYERS DROPPING ON THE FIELD but if you notice YOU ARE NOTICING THINGS YOU SHOULD NOT NOTICE.

  87. Bob Dole, Noble Loser.

  88. @Greta Handel
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Well, there was a fawning post over the passing of … Donald Rumsfeld.

    Replies: @BB753

    Cheney should be next.

  89. @Harry Baldwin
    Bob Dole was a cynical DC swamp creature who had no discernible ideology.

    I recall in 2000 when his wife Libby was considering a run for the Republican presidential nomination and a reporter asked him if he'd vote for her. " He responded, "I'm not sure, I'll have to hear what the other candidates have to say."

    That's kind of funny, but I recall Florence King writing that it was typical of the type of man who likes to undercut his wife at every opportunity. While she was still considering, he wrote a check to John McCain's campaign.

    During the same period, Bob was doing the erectile dysfunction commercials for Viagra. I wonder how Libby felt about that. Did he really need the money that much?

    Replies: @hhsiii, @Vinnyvette, @Jonathan Mason

    Just because Dole’s wife was considering running he’s supposed to just vote for her?
    I suppose if you’re wife voted for Hillary, you’re supposed to just vote for Hillary?
    Men like you are the reason this country is in the shitter!

  90. Bob Dole was one of the last “true statesmen” politicians. Like Nixon, he had a scrappiness about him, although both men carried themselves with class, likely a reflection of their respective hard working, blue collar backgrounds.
    That said, at the end of the day he was just another country club republican and did nothing to “conserve” anything.
    God bless him for the sacrifices he made for the former U.S.A..

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Vinnyvette

    Neither man came from a wage-earner family. Francis Nixon was a grocer and Dole's family owned a creamery. It is true the Dole's lived at economic ground zero during the Depression, and were broke for a number of years. Ronald Reagan, Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, George McGovern, Walter Mondale, and Dole all came from the same class of people in venues of similar type. The Reagans and the Doles had their lean years and the Nixons buried two of their sons. Life could be tough for the early 20th c middle class.

  91. @Jack D
    @Art Deco

    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.

    Sorry, Jack, but a government that can float a trial balloon about paying illegal aliens \$450K can pay me the benefits that I’ve paid into since I had my first job 50 years ago.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Brutusale

    Yes, this proves my point that benefits are politically untouchable.

    The problem is that the benefits are not strictly tied to the amount that you paid in. For example, they are indexed to inflation. If you had invested the social security taxes that you and your employer paid into the system in a government bond fund and then used the account balance to buy a lifetime annuity, the amount of your monthly pension might or might not be as much as you are collecting from social security. In many cases (especially that of lower paid workers) you get a lot more from soc. sec. that you would from a self-paying system.

    But all that people want to hear is that "I paid in" without considering whether what they are drawing out is more than what they paid in.

    Replies: @Bernard

  92. @ScarletNumber
    Former US Senator Al Franken (DFL-MN) weighs in

    https://twitter.com/alfranken/status/1467559051097686025

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Franken’s tweet: First half good but remainder marred by sender’s usual megalomania!

  93. @Brutusale
    @Jack D


    Of course Social Security could be fixed but this might entail reducing or delaying benefits. That part is politically untenable.
     
    Sorry, Jack, but a government that can float a trial balloon about paying illegal aliens $450K can pay me the benefits that I've paid into since I had my first job 50 years ago.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Yes, this proves my point that benefits are politically untouchable.

    The problem is that the benefits are not strictly tied to the amount that you paid in. For example, they are indexed to inflation. If you had invested the social security taxes that you and your employer paid into the system in a government bond fund and then used the account balance to buy a lifetime annuity, the amount of your monthly pension might or might not be as much as you are collecting from social security. In many cases (especially that of lower paid workers) you get a lot more from soc. sec. that you would from a self-paying system.

    But all that people want to hear is that “I paid in” without considering whether what they are drawing out is more than what they paid in.

    • Replies: @Bernard
    @Jack D


    Jack D says:Next New Comment
    December 7, 2021 at 6:03 pm GMT • 6.5 hours ago • 100 Words ↑
    @Brutusale
    Yes, this proves my point that benefits are politically untouchable.

    The problem is that the benefits are not strictly tied to the amount that you paid in. For example, they are indexed to inflation. If you had invested the social security taxes that you and your employer paid into the system in a government bond fund and then used the account balance to buy a lifetime annuity, the amount of your monthly pension might or might not be as much as you are collecting from social security. In many cases (especially that of lower paid workers) you get a lot more from soc. sec. that you would from a self-paying system.

    But all that people want to hear is that “I paid in” without considering whether what they are drawing out is more than what they paid in.
     
    I have a simple solution. Make the benefit fully recapture-able upon death of the recipient once the total benefit has exceeded that which an annuity would provide if purchased each year with the same contributions. Any remaining estate would be required to refund the excess amounts. If there is no remaining estate, then it would simply be a welfare payment.
  94. @follyofwar
    @John Milton's Ghost

    If Bob Dole was "too disorganized to have made a good president," what does that say about our current slow-witted elderly White House occupant, who is completely unable to "just wing it?"

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Biden doesn’t actually exercise executive or policy-making power, so it doesn’t matter that he’s disorganized (i.e., senile).

    • Agree: mc23
    • Disagree: Corvinus
  95. One thing I remember (and appreciate) about Bob Dole, is the fact that among the five then-living ex-GOP Presidential nominees, he was the only one of the group to endorse Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.

    • Replies: @very old statistician
    @Servant of Gla'aki

    that was good but don't forget Sarah Palin, too.

    Bush, Romney, McCain, and the other Bush --- none of them were, in 2016, the good men they used to be, long ago.


    I love my country and I have no respect for what those clowns were by the time they had lived to 2016.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  96. @Harry Baldwin
    Bob Dole was a cynical DC swamp creature who had no discernible ideology.

    I recall in 2000 when his wife Libby was considering a run for the Republican presidential nomination and a reporter asked him if he'd vote for her. " He responded, "I'm not sure, I'll have to hear what the other candidates have to say."

    That's kind of funny, but I recall Florence King writing that it was typical of the type of man who likes to undercut his wife at every opportunity. While she was still considering, he wrote a check to John McCain's campaign.

    During the same period, Bob was doing the erectile dysfunction commercials for Viagra. I wonder how Libby felt about that. Did he really need the money that much?

    Replies: @hhsiii, @Vinnyvette, @Jonathan Mason

    I am sure that Mrs Dole was delighted that her husband was doing the Viagra commercials, and no doubt getting a bunch of free samples to bring home.

    He must have been very influential in getting millions of Americans involved in middle-aged recreational sex, and should be honored for his contribution to public service announcements.

    Without Bob Dole there might have been no Jeffrey Epstein with his three times a day habit.

    One of the most endearing things about Bob Dole was that he tended to refer to himself in the third person. “Yes, Bob Dole uses Viagra. Bob Dole knows it works.”

    Bob Dole was a wounded veteran and a hero of World War II. They don’t make them like Bob Dole anymore. RIP.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Jonathan Mason

    So, recreational sex for old geezers is a goal "devoutly to be wished"? Man, how morally bankrupt this society has become!

    , @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    He must have been very influential in getting millions of Americans involved in middle-aged recreational sex,

    At the time he made the bloody ads, his trophy wife was over 60 and he was over 70. His daughter was middle aged, but as she had and has no history of procreative sex, I don't think she needed that sort of encouragement. The whole business was gross, and not his finest hour.

  97. @Jack D
    @Brutusale

    Yes, this proves my point that benefits are politically untouchable.

    The problem is that the benefits are not strictly tied to the amount that you paid in. For example, they are indexed to inflation. If you had invested the social security taxes that you and your employer paid into the system in a government bond fund and then used the account balance to buy a lifetime annuity, the amount of your monthly pension might or might not be as much as you are collecting from social security. In many cases (especially that of lower paid workers) you get a lot more from soc. sec. that you would from a self-paying system.

    But all that people want to hear is that "I paid in" without considering whether what they are drawing out is more than what they paid in.

    Replies: @Bernard

    Jack D says:Next New Comment
    December 7, 2021 at 6:03 pm GMT • 6.5 hours ago • 100 Words ↑

    Yes, this proves my point that benefits are politically untouchable.

    The problem is that the benefits are not strictly tied to the amount that you paid in. For example, they are indexed to inflation. If you had invested the social security taxes that you and your employer paid into the system in a government bond fund and then used the account balance to buy a lifetime annuity, the amount of your monthly pension might or might not be as much as you are collecting from social security. In many cases (especially that of lower paid workers) you get a lot more from soc. sec. that you would from a self-paying system.

    But all that people want to hear is that “I paid in” without considering whether what they are drawing out is more than what they paid in.

    I have a simple solution. Make the benefit fully recapture-able upon death of the recipient once the total benefit has exceeded that which an annuity would provide if purchased each year with the same contributions. Any remaining estate would be required to refund the excess amounts. If there is no remaining estate, then it would simply be a welfare payment.

  98. @Ron Mexico
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    The other side of the coin: Two members of Poco, Rusty Young and Paul Cotton, died shortly after getting the Jab. There are probably more such cases like this.

    Replies: @very old statistician

    nobody cares about that now.

    people will care when the war crimes trials get underway, but for now, THERE ARE DOZENS OF SOCCER PLAYERS DROPPING ON THE FIELD but if you notice YOU ARE NOTICING THINGS YOU SHOULD NOT NOTICE.

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  99. @Servant of Gla'aki
    One thing I remember (and appreciate) about Bob Dole, is the fact that among the five then-living ex-GOP Presidential nominees, he was the only one of the group to endorse Trump's 2016 presidential campaign.

    Replies: @very old statistician

    that was good but don’t forget Sarah Palin, too.

    Bush, Romney, McCain, and the other Bush — none of them were, in 2016, the good men they used to be, long ago.

    I love my country and I have no respect for what those clowns were by the time they had lived to 2016.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @very old statistician

    The McCains have some defensible personal reasons for not doing any favors for Trump. The rest of them haven't any excuses. George W. Bush's smarmy remarks about 6 January should be sufficient to make him persona non grata at Republican events until he dies. There are some other prominent Republicans who would improve public life by departing it: all the Cheneys, Bitc* McConnell, Kevin McCarthy, John [Hic] Boehner, Paul Ryan...

  100. @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    I am sure that Mrs Dole was delighted that her husband was doing the Viagra commercials, and no doubt getting a bunch of free samples to bring home.

    He must have been very influential in getting millions of Americans involved in middle-aged recreational sex, and should be honored for his contribution to public service announcements.

    Without Bob Dole there might have been no Jeffrey Epstein with his three times a day habit.

    One of the most endearing things about Bob Dole was that he tended to refer to himself in the third person. "Yes, Bob Dole uses Viagra. Bob Dole knows it works."

    Bob Dole was a wounded veteran and a hero of World War II. They don't make them like Bob Dole anymore. RIP.

    Replies: @BB753, @Art Deco

    So, recreational sex for old geezers is a goal “devoutly to be wished”? Man, how morally bankrupt this society has become!

  101. @Muggles
    @Mr. Anon

    How did Team Ethiopia do?

    Replies: @Joe Joe

    Probably a lot better than Team Uganda!!! 😉

  102. @very old statistician
    @hhsiii

    you don't know much about women .

    Replies: @Hhsiii

    Do tell.

  103. @Vinnyvette
    Bob Dole was one of the last "true statesmen" politicians. Like Nixon, he had a scrappiness about him, although both men carried themselves with class, likely a reflection of their respective hard working, blue collar backgrounds.
    That said, at the end of the day he was just another country club republican and did nothing to "conserve" anything.
    God bless him for the sacrifices he made for the former U.S.A..

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Neither man came from a wage-earner family. Francis Nixon was a grocer and Dole’s family owned a creamery. It is true the Dole’s lived at economic ground zero during the Depression, and were broke for a number of years. Ronald Reagan, Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, George McGovern, Walter Mondale, and Dole all came from the same class of people in venues of similar type. The Reagans and the Doles had their lean years and the Nixons buried two of their sons. Life could be tough for the early 20th c middle class.

  104. @very old statistician
    @Servant of Gla'aki

    that was good but don't forget Sarah Palin, too.

    Bush, Romney, McCain, and the other Bush --- none of them were, in 2016, the good men they used to be, long ago.


    I love my country and I have no respect for what those clowns were by the time they had lived to 2016.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The McCains have some defensible personal reasons for not doing any favors for Trump. The rest of them haven’t any excuses. George W. Bush’s smarmy remarks about 6 January should be sufficient to make him persona non grata at Republican events until he dies. There are some other prominent Republicans who would improve public life by departing it: all the Cheneys, Bitc* McConnell, Kevin McCarthy, John [Hic] Boehner, Paul Ryan…

  105. @Jonathan Mason
    @Harry Baldwin

    I am sure that Mrs Dole was delighted that her husband was doing the Viagra commercials, and no doubt getting a bunch of free samples to bring home.

    He must have been very influential in getting millions of Americans involved in middle-aged recreational sex, and should be honored for his contribution to public service announcements.

    Without Bob Dole there might have been no Jeffrey Epstein with his three times a day habit.

    One of the most endearing things about Bob Dole was that he tended to refer to himself in the third person. "Yes, Bob Dole uses Viagra. Bob Dole knows it works."

    Bob Dole was a wounded veteran and a hero of World War II. They don't make them like Bob Dole anymore. RIP.

    Replies: @BB753, @Art Deco

    He must have been very influential in getting millions of Americans involved in middle-aged recreational sex,

    At the time he made the bloody ads, his trophy wife was over 60 and he was over 70. His daughter was middle aged, but as she had and has no history of procreative sex, I don’t think she needed that sort of encouragement. The whole business was gross, and not his finest hour.

  106. @Bernard
    A great American, the last of the few. Their valor, selflessness and love of country made postwar America into the greatest civilization the world will ever see. My father was among this group and it will always be a source of pride for me.

    Their greatest failure? The stewardship of the next generation which sowed the seeds of the country’s demise.

    From the greatest came the worst.

    Replies: @Feryl

    The Greatest and Silent Generation threw spike strips on this countries financial and cultural highways that eventually punctured the Boomer’s tires. America has been increasingly at war against itself since 1946 (when Boomers were first born, not when they were in charge). Brown V Board of Education in 1954 in particular was the beginning of America tearing itself apart with regard to reach exceeding grasp. Boomers had to deal with the first “integrated” schools. Boomers recognized the idiocy of the Great Society welfare state that their parents created. They recognized that elder entitlement programs like Social Security were an absurd favoring of the old at the expense of the young. Now it’s true that Boomers “got in” before things got really ugly in the 1990’s. But their parents, as middle aged and elderly adults also were in on it and evidently felt no shame about it (unlike Boomers who vocally complained about the world their kids were growing up in).

    Throughout the West, it’s the same story: the Greatest and Silent Generations mucked around with increasingly grandiose and delusional schemes to transform society, while Boomers happened to be privileged enough to be born early enough to actually afford a decent life if they played their cards right. Gen X used to complain that Boomers had it too easy, but I think they started to shut up about it when it became clear how screwed Millennials are.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Feryl

    The Greatest and Silent Generation threw spike strips on this countries financial and cultural highways that eventually punctured the Boomer’s tires.

    This is an idiot fantasy.


    <i< Brown V Board of Education in 1954 in particular was the beginning of America tearing itself apart with regard to reach exceeding grasp. Boomers had to deal with the first “integrated” schools.

    Schools were throughout the northern United States as integrated as urban neighborhoods. That did not change after 1954. School integration was not a contentious issue in the Southern United States after 1971, except in Louisville.


    Boomers recognized the idiocy of the Great Society welfare state that their parents created. They recognized that elder entitlement programs like Social Security were an absurd favoring of the old at the expense of the young. Now it’s true that Boomers “got in” before things got really ugly in the 1990’s. But their parents, as middle aged and elderly adults also were in on it and evidently felt no shame about it (unlike Boomers who vocally complained about the world their kids were growing up in).

    This has no reality outside your imagination.

    Replies: @Feryl

  107. @Feryl
    @Bernard

    The Greatest and Silent Generation threw spike strips on this countries financial and cultural highways that eventually punctured the Boomer's tires. America has been increasingly at war against itself since 1946 (when Boomers were first born, not when they were in charge). Brown V Board of Education in 1954 in particular was the beginning of America tearing itself apart with regard to reach exceeding grasp. Boomers had to deal with the first "integrated" schools. Boomers recognized the idiocy of the Great Society welfare state that their parents created. They recognized that elder entitlement programs like Social Security were an absurd favoring of the old at the expense of the young. Now it's true that Boomers "got in" before things got really ugly in the 1990's. But their parents, as middle aged and elderly adults also were in on it and evidently felt no shame about it (unlike Boomers who vocally complained about the world their kids were growing up in).

    Throughout the West, it's the same story: the Greatest and Silent Generations mucked around with increasingly grandiose and delusional schemes to transform society, while Boomers happened to be privileged enough to be born early enough to actually afford a decent life if they played their cards right. Gen X used to complain that Boomers had it too easy, but I think they started to shut up about it when it became clear how screwed Millennials are.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The Greatest and Silent Generation threw spike strips on this countries financial and cultural highways that eventually punctured the Boomer’s tires.

    This is an idiot fantasy.

    <i< Brown V Board of Education in 1954 in particular was the beginning of America tearing itself apart with regard to reach exceeding grasp. Boomers had to deal with the first “integrated” schools.

    Schools were throughout the northern United States as integrated as urban neighborhoods. That did not change after 1954. School integration was not a contentious issue in the Southern United States after 1971, except in Louisville.

    Boomers recognized the idiocy of the Great Society welfare state that their parents created. They recognized that elder entitlement programs like Social Security were an absurd favoring of the old at the expense of the young. Now it’s true that Boomers “got in” before things got really ugly in the 1990’s. But their parents, as middle aged and elderly adults also were in on it and evidently felt no shame about it (unlike Boomers who vocally complained about the world their kids were growing up in).

    This has no reality outside your imagination.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    @Art Deco

    America peaked socially during the early New Deal era of circa 1930-1945. Then it plateaued from 1946-1963. Then it's been sliding further and further downhill ever since. The Missionary and Lost Generation was in charge before 1946. The Greatest Gen took over after WW2. The Silent Gen began to take over in the 70's, the decade when things really came apart. Boomers were infants, kids, or very young adults when this country was flushed down the toilet.

    True, Boomers didn't arrest the downfall, but neither did Gen X, nor will Millennials or...Gen Z. So hating on Boomers is unfair and pointless. All that stupid legislation regarding welfare, civil rights, immigration, etc. from the 1950's-1970's was spearheaded by pre-Boomers. America's turn toward woke imperialism in the mid-20th century was not invented by Boomers, and the recent extreme wokefication has coincided with Gen X and early Millennials beginning to have as much, or more, power than Boomers. Do you really think that hedonistic Boomers want stern enforcement of speech codes? Going back to the early 90's, it was preachy Gen X-ers who were on campus during the first wave of PC and who complained that Boomers were insufficiently anti-racist and anti-homophobe.

  108. @Art Deco
    @Feryl

    The Greatest and Silent Generation threw spike strips on this countries financial and cultural highways that eventually punctured the Boomer’s tires.

    This is an idiot fantasy.


    <i< Brown V Board of Education in 1954 in particular was the beginning of America tearing itself apart with regard to reach exceeding grasp. Boomers had to deal with the first “integrated” schools.

    Schools were throughout the northern United States as integrated as urban neighborhoods. That did not change after 1954. School integration was not a contentious issue in the Southern United States after 1971, except in Louisville.


    Boomers recognized the idiocy of the Great Society welfare state that their parents created. They recognized that elder entitlement programs like Social Security were an absurd favoring of the old at the expense of the young. Now it’s true that Boomers “got in” before things got really ugly in the 1990’s. But their parents, as middle aged and elderly adults also were in on it and evidently felt no shame about it (unlike Boomers who vocally complained about the world their kids were growing up in).

    This has no reality outside your imagination.

    Replies: @Feryl

    America peaked socially during the early New Deal era of circa 1930-1945. Then it plateaued from 1946-1963. Then it’s been sliding further and further downhill ever since. The Missionary and Lost Generation was in charge before 1946. The Greatest Gen took over after WW2. The Silent Gen began to take over in the 70’s, the decade when things really came apart. Boomers were infants, kids, or very young adults when this country was flushed down the toilet.

    True, Boomers didn’t arrest the downfall, but neither did Gen X, nor will Millennials or…Gen Z. So hating on Boomers is unfair and pointless. All that stupid legislation regarding welfare, civil rights, immigration, etc. from the 1950’s-1970’s was spearheaded by pre-Boomers. America’s turn toward woke imperialism in the mid-20th century was not invented by Boomers, and the recent extreme wokefication has coincided with Gen X and early Millennials beginning to have as much, or more, power than Boomers. Do you really think that hedonistic Boomers want stern enforcement of speech codes? Going back to the early 90’s, it was preachy Gen X-ers who were on campus during the first wave of PC and who complained that Boomers were insufficiently anti-racist and anti-homophobe.

  109. @MEH 0910
    @The Alarmist


    BTW, is Abe Vigoda still with us?
     
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-stale-pale-male-oscar-voters-not-dying-fast-enough/

    NYT: Despite Abe Vigoda's Passing, Stale Pale Male Oscar Voters Still Not Dying Fast Enough to Suit Academy

    STEVE SAILER • FEBRUARY 5, 2016
     

    Betty White is still alive and approaching 100:

    https://www.the-sun.com/entertainment/4177296/why-is-betty-white-trending/

    [HD] Exclusive Snickers Super Bowl XLIV 44 2010 Commercial with Betty White and Abe Vigoda Ad
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uA7-31Cxc2I
    Feb 7, 2010

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @MEH 0910

    December 28:

    December 31:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_White

    Betty Marion White Ludden (January 17, 1922 – December 31, 2021) was an American actress and comedian.

    [MORE]

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