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As I may have mentioned once or twice over the last decade, the Theory of Intersectionality proves that black women, by being the most intersectional, have the most interesting thoughts. So what have they been thinking about since 1619? Mostly, about how they are peeved that people are blind to their fabulousness. Also, their hair.

From the Washington Post:

In Paris, artist Mickalene Thomas takes on Monet, and art history itself

For “Mickalene Thomas: Avec Monet,” the American artist created works that reflect on the French painter and move Black women into the foreground

By Robin Givhan

Robin Givhan is senior critic-at-large writing about politics, race and the arts. A 2006 Pulitzer Prize winner for criticism, Givhan has also worked at Newsweek/Daily Beast, Vogue magazine and the Detroit Free Press.
November 22, 2022 at 6:00 a.m. EST

… There’s only a discreet posting near her building’s buzzer to indicate that behind these industrial doors lies a magical, kaleidoscopic world of paint, paper and paillettes depicting Black women in repose, Black women indulging in the luxury of self-assurance, Black women existing in a world of their own creation.

Thomas, 51, has built her substantial art-world reputation by focusing on Black women … Thomas’s women often look as though they have stepped from a blaxploitation film, the pages of Ebony or Jet magazines, or the imagination of someone who keenly understands the importance of celebrating your own fabulousness when the world is stubbornly blind to it.

“We, too, can recline,” Thomas declares. “We, too, can relax and be seen doing so and have it be empowering and validating for our sense of self. We can be in the moment and in own our space and not be seen as being lazy.”

She’s had a multitude of exhibitions, including at the Brooklyn Museum, the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, and numerous galleries. …

Thomas’s fine art is now the subject of an exhibition that opened in October at the Musée de l’Orangerie in Paris. The museum, in the Tuileries Garden, is known as the permanent home for eight of Claude Monet’s waterlily paintings. The exhibition organizers asked Thomas to create works that reflect on Monet and the time she spent as an artist-in-residence at his former home in Giverny, France, in 2011.

“Mickalene Thomas: Avec Monet” is her first exhibition at a museum in France. … The small museum was constructed in 1852, and over time, its collection has helped to tell the erroneous story of French art, establishing a narrative that European art is White when, in fact, it is Asian and African, too. Thomas disrupts that story in ways both obvious and subtle, by her mere presence and with her work.


Detail from “La Maison de Monet” by Mickalene Thomas.

So, she took some photos of Monet’s house, made a 1978 David Hockney-style collage out of them, and scribbled on it.

Thomas attributes the existence of her exhibition to an art-world reckoning of sorts. In 2018, the Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University presented “Posing Modernity: The Black Model From Manet and Matisse to Today,” which explored how the Black female form was essential to the development of modern art and the manner in which Black women were represented. The exhibition later traveled to the Musée d’Orsay.

Manet’s Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe

This article seems vague about Monet and Manet being different guys. Manet painted several pictures that included a black woman model, such as the famous Olympia. But I can’t find evidence that Monet ever painted a black woman.

“The Black model was always present but was omitted from the conversation,” Thomas says. “I think because of that [exhibition’s] exposure, because of that conversation around the Black model and looking back into history … we’re open to forging forth with some of these conversations that we’ve so long kind of circled around.”

Two revelatory exhibitions upend our understanding of Black models in art

In 2022, she created “Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe: Les Trois Femmes Noires avec Monet.” The mixed-media composition installed at l’Orangerie, along with three other collage paintings and photographs, as well as a video composition, depicts three women at rest in a landscape they have claimed as their own. Thomas created it in response to Monet’s “Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe,” which followed Édouard Manet’s painting of the same title.

Monet’s unfinished Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe

OK, now I get the chain of what passes for logic in contemporary art. You see, while Monet was primarily a landscape painter (he would occasionally have his wife and their child pose to add a focal point to the landscape — the story of M. and Mme. Monet is tragic and beautiful), which is boring to the black ladies writing and starring in this article, and so far as I can tell, Monet never painted a black woman, Monet was inspired by Manet’s huge succès de scandale Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe of a naked lady at a picnic to begin painting his own less famous but prettier and more tasteful picnic picture. But he never finished it and instead went on to develop his famous style with fewer figures in his paintings.

So that gets us from boring old Monet, who is famous not for anything terribly controversial but because he painted a colossal number of beautiful paintings, to Manet, who was more of a 20th Century-style operator with a nose for getting his paintings talked about.

Manet’s second most famous painting is another naked lady picture, Olympia, of a nude strumpet being presented with a bouquet of flowers, presumably from a gentleman admirer, by her black maid. To the black ladies involved with this article, it galls them that everybody looks at the white whore rather than at her black maid who rather recedes into the dark background. It’s time for a Reckoning: from now on, everybody should look at lounging black women instead of lounging white women!

Granted that’s pretty far from having much to do with Monet, but Monet/Manet, they were both white men.

Like her predecessors’, Thomas’s work is lush with flowers and trees. But instead of ivory-skinned picnickers and sunbathers, she positions Black women in their glory, with brown skin and Afros. They look back at the viewer. They aren’t staking a claim on a White world; they’re inhabiting their own realm, one in which Monet exists but over which they have authority. They’re at ease and self-satisfied.

In “Salle à Manger et Sofa avec Monet,” the dining room of Monet’s home is reimagined to incorporate parts of Thomas’s realm, including a pale yellow sofa that has served as something akin to a throne for the subjects of her portraiture.

Thomas’s aesthetic — not just the pieces at l’Orangerie, but her entire body of work — is a corrective. It’s a reclamation of history and future history.

“What I respond to and admire and visually love about Mickalene’s work is she doesn’t shy away from the 19th-century images because they’re fraught with all the layers and stereotypes of women of color,” says Denise Murrell, who curated the “Posing Modernity” show in New York. “She reimagines these images and gives us a sense of the subject and how these women would have, could have been seen by themselves or been seen by others.”

Murrell zeroes in on one of Thomas’s works from 2012, “Din, Une Trés Belle Négresse 1.” It features a Black woman dressed in a floral print and posed against a floral backdrop. She’s wearing a large shell necklace, and her hair is styled in a grand Afro that surrounds her face like a sacred halo. Her full lips are lacquered in a deep blackberry hue, and her eyes are dramatically highlighted in dark shadow. The title, translated, means Din, A Very Beautiful Black Woman, but Thomas uses the discomforting “négresse,” which in art history often has rendered individual Black women as an anonymous commodity.

“She’s taking all the physical features, the hair and lips, that have been stereotyped in a derogatory way in the 19th century and giving them full beauty and lushness. She’s not just presenting a 19th-century woman, but the woman of the current moment,” says Murrell, who is the Merryl H. and James S. Tisch curator at-large at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In Thomas’s portraits, “the attire is of the late 20th century, the pose, the affect, the stance. You could see them at parties or on the street. She’s making these arguments in the artistic language of the current moment,” Murrell adds. “They’re gorgeous and self-possessed. They’re the opposite of the pictorial subordination in previous depictions of Black women. They claim all aspects of their being.”

… One could easily imagine one of Thomas’s women reclining languidly in “Le Jardin d’Eau de Monet,” but they don’t have to be present for their ownership to be evident. It’s still clear that this landscape, this space, belongs to Thomas and her muses.

 
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  1. ic1000 says:

    At the commercial website Artsy, 141 of Mickalene Thomas’s works are showcased. To my untrained eye, she can create collages that would be good enough to include in a high school exhibit. If the teacher or principal had concerns about nudity, that would cut down the number of eligible pictures by half. This creator really likes the unclothed breast.

    (Likely grounds for cancellation, if Mickalene were other-than-a-black-woman.)

    Maybe Thomas’ less well-known works demonstrate proficiency in drawing, painting, perspective, or other skills commonly ascribed to artists?

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  2. J.Ross says:

    “We, too, can recline.”
    There’s nothing a racist can add to improve on born-comfortable black “artists” playing ghetto victim and deciding that the thing to prove is how lazy they can be.

  3. megabar says:

    Perfect title.

    The arts are full of this self-worship crap, even without the idolatry of blacks.

    So you get:
    “The square, iconic and yet stale, is used as a reminder of who we are, but also of who we were. The triangle, bold and perverse — it will not be ignored — slashes against the square in righteous anger. This story as told through pigment and canvas is brilliant and painful.”

    Instead of:
    “The shapes are pleasing to the eye.”

  4. usNthem says:

    To the typical whining black, I’d say Olympia obviously features an early version of the even more famous aunt (tante) jemima, prior to her syrup heyday – lawdy, lawdy…

    • LOL: Muggles
  5. It can be disturbing to see what passes for art. Supposedly, modern art has a language of its own, which has evolved over time logically, and actually makes a kind of sense if you subscribe to the theory. However I once had a friend who was an avant-garde artist, fashioning works out of found bird skeletons. He admitted that half the fun was BS’ing the well-heeled snobs who were trying to impress others in their circles who were similarly clueless and insecure. Ars gratia artis had become ars gratis pecuniae, but pigeons exist to be plucked, after all.

    • Thanks: ic1000
  6. Altai says:

    Campness and post-modernism are inherently parasitic, they don’t just develop from or are inspired by earlier things they must deface or mock them, they are ever dependent on them.

    This is also a great example of how female-dominated spaces (Like art history) have no defences against social media contrived silliness. This is also how the likes of the American pediatrics societies become turbo trans affirming. As the percentage of women (Particularly young women) grows in a field the probability of it becoming captured by organised and socially aggressive SJWs approaches 1.

    Another great example is the Met Gala, once a place for rich women and celebs to show off their (Or their stylists) class they made a mistake of making the theme recently to ‘camp’, well camp can’t be put back into the bottle, now every year looks as if the theme is camp and it has lost it’s prestige among adult women and will eventually lose it’s novelty among Gen Z and under teenage girls.

    But given the inherent narcissism of the people attending the competition for attention will mean the campness will continue. Due to political correctness the fashion community can’t say “Okay, time for campness to go away”.

    The secret, of course, to this is not in what is said even, it’s just to put off the riffraff and leave a nice socialising space for the elites all to themselves.

  7. mmack says:

    Ironically enough The Lovely 🥰 Mrs. and I just attended an immersive presentation on Monet and the Impressionists this past Sunday at a local art museum. With both Monet and Manet. And haystacks and water lilies and Rouen cathedral.

    If Mx. Thomas would like to see Women of Color painted by Impressionists, Paul Gauguin is your man, er, cisgender non binary, or something:

    Even a dude who took Art History at Directional State U knows that. 😏

  8. While I’ve come to appreciate paintings of the old classical world lots more than I used to, there’s still no doubt in my mind that there’s a whole lot of BS in the art world. Because it’s a high-brow world, or supposed to be, most people, whether art appreciators or not, are afraid to say things like “my 3rd grader could do better”, at least, out loud at the gallery.

    There’s fear that one is going to ridiculed for being a rube and “not getting it”. A lot of trash can get extolled as fine art because people are fearful to state otherwise, and this was before all the wokeness/black worship. Talk about a great place for Blaxploitation – the art world is perfect. Nobody was there to call out bad quality already, and now, they surely are not about to for these black “artistes”.

    This is why buying “fine art” as an investment is riskier than the crypto-currency business, IMO. I guess for the former, losing $2 million in a painting still leaves you with something – that painting. Coulda’ gotten a lot of good wine for that money instead …

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @JR Ewing
  9. What’s so sorry about this lady is that she can’t even paint. If she didn’t just make collages, with kindergartener safety scissors and Elmer’s school glue (I’m guessing), and she could paint, I would suggest she paint realistic modern black American scenes, but indoors and out.

    The indoor paintings could have those 2nd-hand yellow couches with that clear plastic protection stuff wrapping them and the same on the path to the kitchen over the worn out carpeting, with 3 rug-rats laying on the floor coloring while eating bags of Doritos, with no man in sight. Call it “L’abode de Louise Jefferson”.

    The outdoor scene would have the family around a propane grill eating ribs, mashed potatoes, and collard greens, with a busted up clothes washer, a broken down 1990s dark-tinted Nissan Altima, and 4 or 5 rusted spinner rims laying in the crabgrass. Call it: “D’shawne done fixed de grille”.

    Keepin’ it Realism. I’d buy some of that art.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  10. Judging from the online journalism (and especially advertising) I see daily, Black Women constitute approximately 90% of the American population. So I think it’s only fair that they’re finally be allowing their own voice, and you racists need to step back and stfu.


    Caption Courageous: “Take them back, Cleo. I looked up his rating in Dun & Bradstreet.”

    • LOL: fish, Inverness
  11. George says:

    Manet’s paintings, unlike Thomas’s, featured sensible hairstyles. Big hair is a modern thing that requires modern access to plumbing, professional hair stylists, grooming equipment and chemicals. Big hair is a statement, I am not afraid of lice. So lollypop afros are historically only possible for the masses after WWII.

    I think Klimt featured bigger hair, and the gilted wall coverings and costumes would look really good against dark skinned women. But maybe that’s just me. Alphons Mucha also featured fantasy women with big hair.

  12. I was at the Menil on a date last year. I’d been drinking earlier that afternoon and started disparaging the artwork that showed no respect for the fundamentals of form, rather loudly. My date for the afternoon was mortified, but soon I had 4 or 5 other young women (interestingly none white) following us to hear me lampoon whatever crap was on the wall. Seems like worshipping hot garbage is kind of a white chick thing. The brown and black women were quite diverted to see a white man with some training in figure work deride the febrile efforts of the trust fund generation

    • LOL: Angharad
  13. Maybe a new Sailer law is needed similar to his law on female journalists: In the future, everyone will acknowledge that black women are more beautiful than white women.

  14. LP5 says:

    When does Coates get his retrospective?

  15. Arclight says:

    As has repeatedly noted on this blog, the move from the constraints of black respectability politics pre-civil rights era to the the current one of unbridled exuberance in Blackness has not been good for blacks or society at large. The forces that kept behavior and ego in check have been removed and the result is a black culture that lacks any subtlety at all. This particular artist (a generous term) has just appropriated European art and centered black women (the self) in it, which is essentially an admission that her identity only exists in relation to whites and the world they created and requires elbowing them out of the picture entirely to feel fully appreciated. What is desired is not equity but supremacy.

    It’s pretty hamfisted, but progressive whites have nurtured this sense of entitlement for several generations at this point, so in part blacks are only doing what their cultural/political allies have encouraged them to do. However, changing demographics inevitably means the left cannot center black concerns to the degree they have historically, which should produce some interesting political infighting.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  16. Mickalene Thomas comes from a long line of untalented Bantu artists (the phenomenon started with Basquiat) who are promoted strictly for being black. If Thomas’s art were a corporation, it would be Woolworth’s. BTW, the WaPo profile was written by an affirmative action black writer.

  17. Jack D says:

    In a sense, we are fortunate that black female artists are obsessed with the figure of the black female. Narcissism is, as a form of mental masturbation, inherently relatively harmless. If Thomas chose others (in particular whites) as the subjects of her art, I would shudder to learn what else is going on in her empty head.

    The current mania for re-writing history has to be self limiting. The basic idea is that in the past, blacks in the West were either entirely absent or served only as menials. So we now go back and improve history and depict blacks as royalty, divas, etc. There are now countless movies, TV shows, plays, etc. that are based on this premise. But it’s an inherently boring premise – seeing George Washington depicted as a black man the first time is a thrill (for some) but seeing him as black for the 10th time is dull. You can only beat this dead horse so much before popular culture has to move on to something else, if for no other reason than the box office.

    And of course demographics will play a part – Latinos have no interest in seeing George Washington depicted as black, and in the Latino imagination (see any Mexican telenovela) they see themselves as white. The imaginary George Washington in the Latino mind looks just like George Washington except that he speaks Spanish. S. Asians and E. Asians also prefer pale skin but they are too intelligent to have this childlike urge to rewrite history and stage Asian Washingtons – they would see this as being inherently stupid. They have their own emperors.

  18. I had a delightful visit to the Musee de L’Orangerie for the first time in earlier this month. Their permanent collection of paintings by Renoir, Cezanne, Modigliani, Laurencin, Rousseau, Soutine and Picasso owned by Paul Guillaume, dealer to Arthur C. Barnes, as well as the two oblong rooms filled with Monet’s paintings of water lilies put me in such a good and grateful mood that when I passed by the small room shunted off to the corner with Mickalene Thomas’s work, all I thought was “Ah well, the obligatory BLM exhibit.”

    There was also a major exhibit of Sam Szafran’s work, which was interesting to me as he hasn’t been exhibited much in the US. He was obsessed with industrial interiors and staircases and was great in both watercolors and pastels. As the masterpiece to dreck ratio was high it was easy for visitors to ignore the BLM room.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  19. @Achmed E. Newman

    This is why buying “fine art” as an investment is riskier than the crypto-currency business…

    Talk about intersections! There is now something called “non-fungible tokens” (NFTs) which run on blockchains but still have an element of reality to them. You can actually look at or listen to the thing.

    If you’re the creative type, it sounds like a way to make something from crypto without losing everything.

    Anyone have experience with this?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  20. Writer seems bizarrely obsessed with black women’s “ownership” and “authority.” Especially in realms thoroughly unconnected – in any way – to black women. And all that hair. LAWWWWWWDEEEE!!!

  21. Jack D says:
    @Arclight

    I think you are overestimating the influence of (progressive) whites on black culture, which operates according to its own internal dynamic. As a low IQ population, this will always be, for the most part, childlike in white eyes. (Jazz music was one great exception but black music has also become more childlike with rap which is centered on literally childish insults). The whole Hotep/ We Wuz Kangs phenomenon has existed in one form or another inside of black culture in various forms for at least a century. If you look at black oriented media from the past, it is not so different from what obsesses blacks today.

    The real difference is in the mainstream media that bombards whites (and others) and in mainstream white political figures. If 50 years ago, Huey Newton has said that a black man invented the light bulb, this would have been unremarkable and true to character. But now you have the (white) President of the United States spouting this nonsense and the ads showing blacks as doctors are not just in Essence magazine but in the pages of the NY Times, where whites have no choice but to be subjected to them.

  22. Black women have taken to shaving their skulls ear-to-ear to the forehead. What’s left, they grow ugly dreadlocks spraying in every direction. They deliberately cultivate a repulsive appearance. Hilarious. And then they bitch as to the directions black men with options take.

  23. @Jack D

    I was about to mash the [AGREE] to this one until “…in the pages of the NY Times, where whites have no choice but to be subjected to them.”

    We’ve all got a choice, all but the school kids, that is.

    • Agree: Renard
    • Replies: @Jack D
  24. Arclight says:
    @Jack D

    I think where our comments converge is that white progressives have mainstreamed black supremacism. 50 years ago most of society could dismiss it as confined to low-circulation magazines and fringe political groups, and the path to middle or upper middle class life for blacks generally meant avoiding those sentiments like the plague. Today it’s practically a prerequisite for professional advancement.

  25. Black woman artist Mickalene Thomas = Mick T. am most woke lesbian charlatan

  26. ‘“The Black model was always present but was omitted from the conversation,” Thomas says…’

    Why defer to reality? Just invent whatever reality your argument requires.

  27. @Jack D

    ‘I think you are overestimating the influence of (progressive) whites on black culture, which operates according to its own internal dynamic…’

    I agree with you as far as the output goes, but I think the stimulus is largely external.

    Who encouraged Huey Newton et al to express themselves, and instructed them in what to say? This all wasn’t their own idea.

    It’s like the local uber-lib family in my old neighborhood back in California. Well, come the Iraq War, all the windows are festooned with anti-war drawings the five year-olds have done.

    Think they decided to do those drawings on their own?

    As I keep saying, blacks, left to their own devices, or more humanely, realistically supervised, will never be an ornament and a blessing — but three-quarters of their noxiousness is our own doing.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  28. Art Deco says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’m informed the Maryland Institute College of Art is one of the top-10 fine arts programs in the United States. I attended their graduation ceremony in 2016. I’m told by others who attended the students’ companion exhibits that what they produced with video and digital technology was quite handsome and interesting. I looked at what they produced with pencils, watercolors, and paint. Either they cannot paint or draw or they are trained and expected to produce work that suggests they cannot paint or draw.

    My last trip to an art museum (bar one) was in Seattle in 1999. Seeing a table with fragments of some dried flowers on it (the sort of thing my childhood cat used to produce with my mother’s intact dried flowers) as one of the exhibits turned me off art museums in toto. I did used to visit one convenient to my office. The institution which operated it had a modest collection of 19th century American art on display and rotating exhibitions of photography. Stuff worth seeing.

    The art world is decadent, and should be stripped of its public subsidies and endowments.

    • Replies: @John Foster
  29. @J.Ross

    Thomas’s women often look as though they have stepped from . . . the imagination of someone who keenly understands the importance of celebrating your own fabulousness when the world is stubbornly blind to it.

    “Celebrating your own fabulousness,” that’s the ticket. Tom Wolf nailed it all those years ago in The Painted Word. The paint on the canvas is just the excuse and jumping off point for the verbal narrative of the critic, which celebrates the fabulousness of whatever she considers fabulous. Indirectly, the art critic, is of course celebrating her own fabulousness as well — “look at how I ‘get it’ and how I paint with words . . . am I not fabulous.”

  30. They aren’t staking a claim on a White world; they’re inhabiting their own realm,

    Sounds like segregation

    one in which Monet exists but over which they have authority. They’re at ease and self-satisfied.

    But segregation will only work if whites supply the civilization for blacks to live in. Now it sounds like slavery for whites. No wonder they’re at ease!

  31. “To the black ladies involved with this article, it galls them that everybody looks at the white whore rather than at her black maid who rather recedes into the dark background.”

    And also, the black maid looks like an Aunt Jemima Mammy. And Mammy vs the sexy nude girl, it’s no contest who’s considered more attractive, and of course who has the prettier hair.

    “so far as I can tell, Monet never painted a black woman”

    Controversial quiet part being said out loud: could it be, perhaps, that Monet didn’t have a whole lot of access to paint a ton of black women in 19th Century France? In other words, France’s population during the 19th Century was like, 99.99% white? (like it had always been since, forever).

    But to some modern artists the theory goes:

    “Monet, Manet, what’s the real difference? They were just a bunch of dead whiteys who stole real art from black folks.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  32. Mr. Anon says:

    A relative of mine said it best: “Modern art………i.e. crap”.

  33. Jack D says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Well, maybe you have a choice not to ready the NY Times in particular. But unless you are willing to shut yourself up in a cabin in the woods with no internet, we are constantly bombarded with “progressive” propaganda in one form or another.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Kylie
  34. JR Ewing says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    While I’ve come to appreciate paintings of the old classical world lots more than I used to, there’s still no doubt in my mind that there’s a whole lot of BS in the art world. Because it’s a high-brow world, or supposed to be, most people, whether art appreciators or not, are afraid to say things like “my 3rd grader could do better”, at least, out loud at the gallery.

    The first time I went to the Pompidou Center in Paris, I was decidedly underwhelmed. The “inside out” architecture was kind of cool, but the interior was filled with a bunch of random junk that people called “modern art”. About 10% of the stuff in there was worthy of praise in my mind, the rest of it was pretentious shit. It was very uncomfortable walking around in there because I couldn’t tell what I was supposed to be impressed with. It all looked like collection of garbage.

    I’m also reminded of a time I went to a birthday party at a house here in Houston that was crammed full of modern art. The owner – a man named “Les”, but it wasn’t his birthday – expected everyone to be in awe of his collection, but instead it made the home feel… Rickety? Junky? Ruined? It was uncomfortable to be in the house and the collection of “modern art people” at the party were impossible to relate to, because there was nothing authentic about them, just the attitude itself.

    Point being, in the old days, art was art because it took skill to make a representation of reality in some way. Which is why we refer to a really skilled craftsman as “artist” after all. Or not even craftsman, but really good plumbers and electricians and welders, too. Any craft that required skill could be art if it was really good.

    And along with that skill, one could stick in messages and meanings into the choice of the subject or the emphasis in the art itself. But the point was the craft, first. THEN then message, second.

    But modern art has eliminated the skill part and is nothing but the message itself. if you buy a painting, you have – you know – a painting, that most people couldn’t recreate themselves. But if you buy a piece of modern art, you’re just buying junk that someone else claims to have a meaning beyond the junk, but junk nonetheless that you could recreate yourself.

    So it’s all pretense and bullshit, which is perfect for a black woman with no skills.

  35. @ic1000

    “she can create collages”

    Headache inducing collages. Black lady art is punitive in nature.

  36. Murrell zeroes in on one of Thomas’s works from 2012, “Din, Une Trés Belle Négresse 1

    What a very subtle name…one wonders the reception Vermeer would receive with a name like “The Sexy Babe with the Pearl Earring.”

  37. @JR Ewing

    “Any craft that required skill could be art if it was really good.”

    To produce a worthy work — painting, poem, sculpture, music, narrative, ect. — requires years of dedication to developing the skill to excel at one’s particular discipline. Through that lens all art is essentially craft.

  38. jb says:
    @J.Ross

    That is one remarkable cartoon. It makes even me cringe, and that takes a lot!

  39. @ChristineC

    “He was obsessed with industrial interiors and staircases …”

    An understandable obsession.

    ” … both watercolors [sic] — watercolours — and pastels.”

    Staircases and industrial interiors in pastels seems slightly psychedelic. Which in my view is the perfect choice for industrial interiors and staircases. Especially staircases.

  40. Bugg says:

    Went to Monet’s home with the Mrs. one summer day several years ago, and then went to the various museums in Paris featuring his work. The gardens are preserved as a work of art themselves. You get a sense of how he captured the beauty of the place when you see the gardens. At a complete loss how somone claiming to be an artist could go there and produce supposed art that features leering people staring back at the viewer like an ad in a magazine. There’s nothing artistic about it; could be selling breakfast cereal.Monet is so much about the landscape and it’s beauty, and these people are about themselves. They miss the whole point of what Claude Monet was doing , merely attaching themselves to his art to sell their shit.

  41. bjdubbs says:

    How does Sailer have the patience to read this stuff?

  42. Jack D says:
    @Colin Wright

    Who encouraged Huey Newton et al to express themselves,

    I don’t think it was whites although lots of Leftist whites went along with his BS.

    Look at the Nation of Islam, which was an early version of black nationalism (though not the earliest). No white person would have thought of (or believed) the story of Yakub. The natural reaction of white people at the antics of blacks is to laugh at their childlike beliefs (or to be horrified when they turn violent) but white progressives have taught themselves to suppress their snickers and ignore the violence. Nowadays, when they think that it will help them either politically or careerwise or with the bottom line, they will even promote the black invented nonsense peddling. Do you think it was a white person who came up with the idea that blacks invented the light bulb?

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @quewin
    , @Bill Jones
  43. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    …the black maid looks like an Aunt Jemima Mammy. And Mammy vs the sexy nude girl, it’s no contest who’s considered more attractive, and of course who has the prettier hair.

    Perhaps Mx Thomas could take on Marcel Duchamp next. Nude Polishing a Staircase.

    Indeed, her “art” is like Dada, if Dada had never known Dad.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  44. Malcolm Y says:

    I would hazard a guess that a painting titled Olympia would concentrate on the main subject and the rest adds to the story that the painter wants to tell about her. Why is she resting on nice white fluffy pillows? Why don’t the pillows get piled on top of her? Is this to show the privileged white woman gets to smother unfortunate nice white fluffy pillows? When they invent a time machine artists will be able to check their creations so no one in the past or future will be offended by them. I suspect the rooms of art museums will be full of blank canvasses – hopefully not white.

  45. Wish I would have saved it, but about ten years ago I happened to watch a video of a young European woman teaching a literacy class to rural Anglophone African young women. For some unfathomable reason she was teaching them a unit on the likes of surrealism, cubism, and abstract expressionism. She was trying to lead them towards some kind of postmodern feminist fluidity of concept, I think. Keep in mind that these are women ambitious for elementary education, literacy, numeracy, health, hygiene, child rearing, household management, project management. They want to build latrines and adopt mosquito nets.

    The students were baffled. Of abstract expressionism they said, that’s just paint. The highpoint of cultural collision was DuChamp’s Urinal. They didn’t know what it was and teacher had to explain that this is a device that men in Europe pee into. They were shocked and thought it indecent to display in public. Next, they had many questions of teacher about why DuChamp did that and why she thought it was art, shaking their heads in disgust at teacher’s stuttered and fumbling answers.

    I bet there was lots of gossip and cackling laughter in the village over the next few days.

    If they had seen Olympia I think they would have a) thought it highly indecent, and b) thought how lucky that girl was to get a job with a rich lady in the city.

  46. Mostly, about how they are peeved that people are blind to their fabulousness. Also, their hair.

    There is a video game called Hair Challenge, but it doesn’t look particularly schwarzfreundlich:

  47. @New Dealer

    People who think they’re struggling have different views than people who are actually struggling.

  48. @J.Ross

    “We, too, can recline.”
    There’s nothing a racist can add to improve on born-comfortable black “artists” playing ghetto victim and deciding that the thing to prove is how lazy they can be.

    Reminds me of a story I read years ago; the late Munya Shapiro was a Israeli Knesset member and was put in charge of a Government Efficiency Commission charged with finding redundancies in government staffing. In keeping with his charge, Shapiro went from office to office interviewing staff as to their responsibilities, job description etc. So he goes into one office in Misrad Hapnim (Interior Ministry) and he finds a guy sitting with his feet up on the desk, drinking coffee and doing the crossword. He turns around and leaves the office and goes next door and finds another guy doing the exact same thing. So he reported a redundancy ; why do we need two guys to sit with their feet up on the desk and do the crossword? One guy is sufficient for that job.

    Exactly how many Ministers of Napping do we need? Isn’t Tricia Hersey enough?

  49. Monet and Manet were strolling down the Elysees:

    And don’t forget Paul Gauguin!

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  50. @Reg Cæsar

    The only thing stupider than bit coins is NFTs.

  51. @kaganovitch

    That video could be circulated whenever the topic of Black Fatigue comes up.

  52. Muggles says:
    @J.Ross

    “We, too, can recline.”

    iSteve has had a number of essays devoted to the “We’re so tired” black lady theme.

    The NYT gets a lot of blank newspaper space filled up with these laments.

    Oddly most of the really fast track & field female athletes are black. Speedy, not reclining.

    But I guess when they hit 30 or so they all mostly tire out.

    “It’s so tiresome…”

    Coming soon for your Christmas shopping! The Black Lady Recliner! Soft, Afro-Centric colors! Built-in Malt Liquor holder! Extra wide bottom seats! Get the Wakanda-Cliner today while supplies last!

  53. Thomm says:

    What is unfortunate is that this type of hairstyle actually looks attractive :

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @AnotherDad
  54. Modern Art has followed the trajectory of the post-60s left. Once it was dreaming up new ways of living, creating communes, new schools of thought etc. Now it’s just getting a piece of the corporate pie.

  55. @Art Deco

    I have a son who went to MICA about 15 years ago. He was kicked out after his second year. He failed to complete any of his spring semester courses. When I asked him WTF, he said that all the courses were pushing technology, when he just wanted to learn to paint (with maybe a bit of sculpture). He then went to the NY Studio School, where he was much happier. And, for me, it was cheaper. He still paints, and occasionally shows, but of course he also needs a day job.

  56. @New Dealer

    Perhaps you mean this Afghan scene

    • Thanks: SOL
    • Replies: @New Dealer
  57. Muggles says:
    @New Dealer

    I bet there was lots of gossip and cackling laughter in the village over the next few days.

    While sub-Saharan Africa is full of brown and some actually very black people, it is decidedly un-Woke.

    Alphabet People not welcome and in some place badly hurt, killed, imprisoned. Anti White racism quite rare. Feminism is unknown and probably highly dangerous.

    In the late 90s a black WaPo reporter who was assigned to east Africa for a few years wrote an interesting book about his experiences there. Dangerous, dirty and quite racist. That is, it irked him considerably in Kenya and elsewhere when hotel doormen, waiters, clerks and others dealing with the public treated White South Africans and other Whites with great deference and politeness.

    He, being black, was treated like just another local. Often rudely. Of course the stereotype of blacks being bad tippers, rude, overly demanding and untrustworthy isn’t based on fantasy. He went to the back of the queue.

    He was an educated male. You can imagine how the black African women are treated.

    The 19th century British gentleman model is still considered the height of civilized behavior in public. (Of course private behavior is another matter.)

    Six months in black Africa living modestly among the locals would do wonders for every college freshmen in the country. For the Ivy League and elite colleges, make it a year.

    An anti-Woke reeducation tour with great cross cultural benefits. If they survive that, a month long tour of Spain, Italy, Greece, France, Switzerland, Germany. And a thorough medical checkup too.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Marat
  58. “…black women in repose…” And who can blame them?

  59. Anon[327] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomm

    No, it looks attractive on a young, thin actress with a perfectly symmetrical face and, from what I can tell, almost no African facial features (nose, lips, jaw) other than skin color. Young Pam Grier would look hot in a clown wig.

    • Agree: Kylie
  60. “A 2006 Pulitzer Prize winner for criticism”

    So, she’s a world renowned, certified nag.

  61. JimB says:

    The future will spawn nothing but Mickelene Thomases, leaving great works of traditional Western art at the mercy of black and Latino museum curators who will either let the works deteriorate or be smashed by woke mobs. The best thing is for all public museums is to sell off their collections to billionaires over the next decade or so to create giant piles of money to buy woke crap to fill the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Put price tags visibly hanging off these craptastic new masterpieces so we can appreciate their value, like Minnie Pearl’s hat

  62. Thomm says:
    @JR Ewing

    This elephant is a better painter than most modern ‘artists’, despite the immense ergonomic disadvantage of having to maneuver a tiny brush meant for human hands.

  63. Anonymous[310] • Disclaimer says:

    the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio

    What, “the Joe Paterno Gallery” was already taken?

  64. Kudos Steve for the discipline to read this dreck, I could only get so far.

    Black women existing in a world of their own creation.

    Paris?

    Not only not their creation, they don’t belong there. Paris is actually north of Seattle (more like Bellingham). Compared to Paris, Minneapolis is bathed in tropical sunlight. That blacks are there–want to be there–is a testament to what they have actually created–even with Western technology–in Africa.

    someone who keenly understands the importance of celebrating your own fabulousness when the world is stubbornly blind to it.

    LOL. Well I guess it’s true, no one else is going to do it.

    [MORE]

    That said, it’s hard to blame these black grifters. Evil white people push this, and stupid/conforming white people follow along. Obviously, some blacks will muscle their untalented selves to be the ones collecting the loot.

  65. @Thomm

    What is unfortunate is that this type of hairstyle actually looks attractive :

    LOL, dude. In high school I went out with girl from work–very attractive, though not quite Pam Grier attractive–who wore her hair natural for one of our dates. (Yes, it was the early 70s.) Trust me, it was not her hair that was what was attractive about her.

    327 beat me to it. But seriously, you post a pic of heavy mixed race young black actress with a pretty face, smooth skin, flat tummy and a righteous chest but with boring natural hair and say “see her hair looks attractive”.

    • Replies: @Thomm
  66. @JR Ewing

    Here you go, J.R. (I couldn’t find the best scene in which Kramer sneezes on the painting and then smears it out, as if adding a finishing touch.)

  67. ‘A narrative that European art is white when it is Asian and African, too.’

    You see this more and more. In Clown World we no longer talk of improving shit hole countries, we assert that the people living in shit hole countries have as much right to live in your country as you do. Likewise, Western visual art, so awe inspiring and therefore humiliating to those who did not produce it, must be taken from them.

    Indigenous to nowhere, without any art or culture of their own, owning nothing in fact. The sheer nastiness of it might give you the impression that the Horde do not come in peace.

  68. Thomm says:
    @AnotherDad

    er… of course Pam Grier is attractive in any hairstyle. That doesn’t change the fact that the female afro can also be attractive. Your interpretation of my comment is not how a normal man would interpret it.

    Btw, this is proof that you need to spend less time on the Internet. Did you know that you comment on TUR about 12-13 times as much as I do?

    From the commenter histories :

    AnotherDad :
    Year 2022 : 2443 comments to date
    Year 2021 : 2261 comments
    Year 2020 : 2395 comments

    Thomm :
    Year 2022 : 210 comments to date
    Year 2021 : 196 comments
    Year 2020 : 361 comments

    So you comment here 12-13 times more often than I do, depending how you measure it. It is even more if you account for many of my comments being repeat postings of poems and songs I have written. If we take just original comments, then from 1/1/2020-present, you commented here 20 times as much as I did.

    Given your advanced age, isn’t there something else you would rather spend your time on? Or is it true that after the kids leave home and the old folks are empty nesters, older men find a variety of ways to avoid interacting with their wives?

    I find it unfortunate, that with the sand emptying out of the upper half of the hourglass quickly, this is where you spend your waking hours. At least Steve can solicit donations. You can’t.

  69. @Muggles

    Muggles, that (very interesting) book your read is Out of America by Keith Richburg.

    Like any literate person would, you’ll probably want to read the 2-part review of this book on Peak Stupidity:

    Part 1
    Part 2

  70. @TelfoedJohn

    I think you’re right. Apologies for my faulty memory.

    I’ve spent a good amount of time in rural West Africa, so I blended those memories with the video memories. There were a few less severe instances of feminist silliness, for example trying to convince peasant women tending children at home to get their farming and herding husbands to share in doing the dishes.

    The many Africans I’ve met were good people. Different cultural groups there are quite different in customs and values; some groups are more moral and disciplined than some American communities today. So-called African-Americans are quite different from them all and are disdained by Africans as brash and immoral.

    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
  71. @Reg Cæsar

    “Indeed, her “art” is like Dada, if Dada had never known Dad.”

    Dada, who’s your daddy?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  72. anon[305] • Disclaimer says:

    “. . .Her full lips are lacquered in a deep blackberry hue. . .”

    Lipstick on a buffalo.

  73. anon[305] • Disclaimer says:

    @JR Ewing #34

    “So it’s all pretense and bullshit, which is perfect for a black woman with no skills. ”

    It’s also perfect for elephants apparently. I saw a British video where an elephant that had been shown how to hold a paintbrush would slosh different colors onto a canvas. The resultant paintings were shown to two different art critics. They both spoke very positively about this exciting new artist. When told this was the work of an elephant, the one guy was a good sport, but the other guy refused to be filmed with a response.

    Kind of puts me in mind of how, every now and then, mischievous researchers deliberately dope up an absolutely meaningless study filled with academic gobbledygook and buzzwords and get them peer-reviewed by experts who sign off on them.

    Which further puts me in mind of what Mort Sahl said probably 50 years ago: “Half of America is faking it.” That percentage can only have increased since then.

  74. J.Ross says:
    @kaganovitch

    There’s a severely dated joke in the Israel movie Blue Milk Canal, that bureaucrats (in the age of universal indoor smoking) get a lot of practice throwing a pocket matchbox onto their desk in such a way that the heavier match heads land on the bottom and allow the box to stand upright.

  75. J.Ross says:
    @kaganovitch

    Absolutely devastating article about DHS, have linked in another comment, at the Verge. Devastating, cannot be exagerrated. Biggest surprise: DHS is not Arbusto’s fault. DHS was the Democrats and the NYT wanting to look tough.

  76. A medeival chapter in the the Wolrd War Hair is about the Fairhair Dynasty – the first royal dynasty of Norway. – As it turns out, a Sami woman and witchcaft plyayed a dark role in it:

    Fairhair dynasty – Wikipedia

    The Fairhair Dynasty is traditionally regarded as the first royal dynasty of the united kingdom of Norway. It was founded by Harald I of Norway, known as Haraldr hinn hárfagri (Harald Fairhair or Finehair), the first King of Norway (as opposed to “in Norway”), who defeated the last resisting petty kings at the Battle of Hafrsfjord in 872.According to the traditional view, after Harald Fairhair first unified the kingdom, Norway was inherited by his agnatic (male) descendants. In the 13th century, this was codified in law. Unlike other Scandinavian monarchies and Anglo-Saxon England, Norway was never an elective monarchy.Harald, we read, once travelled to a valley near Oslo where Harald Fairhair’s fathering of Sigurd Hrise on a Sami girl called Snæfrithr took place.

    Harald’s marriage with Snaefrithr brought four sons in three years, but ended badly and his most loyal son Eirikr Bloodaxe had to help out:

    When Snæfrith suddenly died, Harald was beside himself with grief, but a man known as Thorleif the Wise convinced the king to leave the chamber where the queen laid and told him that it was not honorable to let the dead lie there in the same clothes she perished in. Harald agreed to have the clothes changed and the body moved but when his servants did so the body turned blue and started to smell awful. Men hurried to prepare a pyre, but before they burned her, toads, snakes and lizards crawled out of her body. When Harald realized Snæfrith had been a witch he became furious and had all his sons by Snæfrith sent away. Since that day Harald became ill-disposed towards magicians. When Rǫgnvaldr followed in his mother’s footsteps, Harald sent his most loyal and beloved son Eirikr Bloodaxe to murder Rǫgnvaldr.

  77. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Dada, who’s your daddy?

    – Lost in the depths of DaDa***-ism. – See: Idi Amin DaDa, the son of Idi Amin I, also know as Idi Amin GaGa.

  78. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    I consume media all the time. I control what I consume. My emotional and informational live is objectively better without the factless emotional nudging and outright lying (or the Viagra commercials). There’s a certain tolerable amount of mere crap. The Verge DHS article I’m hyping, because it is devastating, insists on inserting an image of weeping immigrant children separated from their families, but the rest is gold, and in fact the article almost admits that that was not Trump’s idea. No one subjected to the firehouse of leftwing lying and shameless control is getting any informational benefit out of it.

  79. Anonymous[202] • Disclaimer says:

    It could be unfair to pin this on Black women, considering Black men are also preoccupied with how everything is, actually by-the-way, Black. However, the back-biting together with the unaware humorlessness of women as a general trait gives the self-praise that propulsive X factor; a few weeks ago David Cole at Taki’s had this great catch, from February:

    The historical truth about women burned at the stake in America? Most were Black.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/02/25/black-women-history-burned-at-stake/

  80. Kylie says:
    @Jack D

    “Well, maybe you have a choice not to ready the NY Times in particular. But unless you are willing to shut yourself up in a cabin in the woods with no internet, we are constantly bombarded with ‘progressive’ propaganda in one form or another.”

    I’ve excluded quite a lot of progressive propaganda from my life. No network or cable TV since 2010. I did a purge of my books, movies and music around then, too. No magazine or newspaper subscriptions. I still get plenty of exposure to it from Facebook, the Daily Mail online and here. That’s okay, know the enemy.

    There’s so much good art and entertainment from the past (though the rot set in earlier than many suppose) that I have plenty to enjoy. What’s produced today is simply not up to the quality of earlier eras so I’m not missing out.

  81. @New Dealer

    There were a few less severe instances of feminist silliness, for example trying to convince peasant women tending children at home to get their farming and herding husbands to share in doing the dishes.

    I’ve travelled thru Ghana and Nigeria and observed funny instances of middle-class white feminists. Fat white women trying to convince themselves they are ‘being transgressive’ by having African boyfriends, but just revealing themselves as fetishistic sex tourists. Incompetent white women with white saviour syndrome administering photoshoot health care to locals. Insistent vegetarians.

    So-called African-Americans are quite different from them all and are disdained by Africans as brash and immoral.

    True, but many middle class Africans will still have rap video TV blaring in the house. Their former slaves are colonising them.

  82. quewin says:
    @Jack D

    suppress their snickers

    It used to be “suppress their sniggers” but we had to change that.

  83. Marat says:
    @Muggles

    Some Westerners, burdened with sufficient guilt baggage, may come to different conclusions:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  84. To the black ladies involved with this article, it galls them that everybody looks at the white whore rather than at her black maid who rather recedes into the dark background.

    If you zoom in on the hi def version, it rather looks like Mammy is checking out the goods:

    [MORE]

    I would not hang this on my fridge.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  85. @Marat

    I skipped around after a while, Marat. Did you see at the end that the Fraulein was making cloth tampons for her African sisters? They normally don’t bother. Sounds like cultural oppression to me!

  86. Moses says:

    Thomas, 51, has built her substantial art-world reputation by focusing on Black women …

    Oh look – a talentless black woman building her whole career on blackity black blackness. What a novelty.

    It’s all so tiresome.

  87. @Veteran Aryan

    I would not hang this on my fridge.

    You could stick it to the door by wetting the blue parts. That way you could use the back for grocery lists.

    Facing out, it would be a great help in sticking to a diet.

  88. @Jack D

    Do you think it was a white person who came up with the idea that blacks invented the light bulb?

    Weren’t they the people who couldn’t even invent their own “Self Help” group?

  89. “Black Women at the Intersection of Narcissism and Megalomania”

    That is the best Sailer title I can recall ever reading. Steve, you have to edit the accompanying essay such that you won’t violate anyone’s copyright, so you can re-publish some form of it in your comp book.

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