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Black Woman Cartoonist Boldly Goes Where No New Yorker Cartoon Has Ever Gone Before
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From the Washington Post:

Emma Allen is redefining what a New Yorker cartoon can be

The evolution of New Yorker cartoons sounds potentially interesting but it would require a lot of work on the part of the reporter to do right. For Christmas about 15 years ago I received a massive coffee table book of all New Yorker cartoons of the 20th Century in chronological order. I thought about writing a piece on how New Yorker cartoons changed over the decades thematically, stylistically, and in terms of what types of humor came into and went out of fashion, and also what stayed the same, but never got around to it because it would be a lot of work.

This piece, however, is not it. The reporter takes the much easier path of demographic nose-counting of cartoonists:

By Michael Cavna
Yesterday at 6:00 a.m. EDT

… [Emma] Allen, the humor and cartoon editor for the New Yorker, culls through sketches, separating laugh from chaff, and finds that the coronavirus era has brought odd professional challenges beyond simply working from home.

“Masks have not been good for gag cartoons,” Allen says wryly, noting that if a character dons a mouth covering, you can’t tell who’s speaking — be it a person or a pooch or a ficus. That can be a problem for the magazine’s typically caption-dependent cartoons. On the other hand: “It felt socially irresponsible to have people talking to each other without masks.”

“Socially responsible” is my highest priority in cartoons too.

The tiniest line and the big picture. That is her purview since becoming only the fourth cartoon editor in the magazine’s near-century-long history — and the first woman to ascend to that lofty title — after succeeding Bob Mankoff four years ago.

Here’s Mankoff’s most popular, if socially irresponsible, cartoon:

Allen, 33, is shaking up the popular notion of just what a New Yorker cartoon is, knowing that imitation is the sincerest form of apathy: “There was a vernacular shorthand of what a New Yorker cartoon looked like that people were copying — it was getting into a cycle of preexisting jokes,” which is “rarely the best way to go for a laugh.”

Like what? Well, it would take effort to explain, and the Washington Post can’t afford to do that.

… Yet she is also introducing a wealth of fresh talent, including more women, cartoonists of color and LGBTQ artists — an initiative that began well before one staff archivist criticized the magazine’s decades-long diversity record last month in a viral Twitter thread.

Allen knows what it’s like to laugh in the once-stock face of the status quo.

As a kid raised on the Upper West Side,

After all, how many New Yorker staffers have ever been raised on the Upper West Side?

she would cut out New Yorker cartoons, keeping them in little green folders with all “this anal-retentiveness” of an editor — as well as the social awareness of a middle-schooler whose mother was a partner in a corporate law firm. Many of the cartoons at that time depicted “all these boardrooms and operating rooms with [only] White men,” she says, “which was clearly not the case.”

Then as now, though, Allen could find different perspectives in the work of such cartoonists as Roz Chast (whose work hung in her family’s kitchen) and Liza Donnelly.

Chast is great, but she’s been with the New Yorker since she was 23 in 1978.

Nearly 100 cartoonists have made their New Yorker debut during Allen’s tenure — about half of whom have been women, Maslin says, noting that as a significant increase.

Allen has bought debut work from such top cartoonists of color as Ngozi Ukazu (“Check, Please!”), Keith Knight (“Woke”), Lonnie Millsap (“Bacon”) and Liz Montague (“Cyber Black Girl”).

CORRECTION

This story initially stated that Liz Montague was the first Black woman to have a cartoon published in the New Yorker, according to editors. Emily Sanders Hopkins published one before Montague. The story has been corrected.

“The ‘comic industry,’ generally speaking, is very White, very male and caters to a certain age and income level,” Montague says of the traditional American market. “Prior to Emma becoming editor, New Yorker cartoons especially fell into that category. Emma has really made an effort to seek out different voices and perspectives and, in my case, take seriously a total random who happened to send her an email.”

OK, here’s the punchline of the article (but a punchline that only iSteve readers will get):

Montague cites Allen’s willingness to be bold: “I submitted a draft of someone getting their hand bitten off by a Black person’s hair with the caption, ‘I told you not to touch it,’ and was genuinely positive there was no way they would publish something like that — and they did! It was the shock of my life getting the email from Emma that they wanted that cartoon! That was the moment I realized: ‘Oh wow, she’s actually serious about this diversity thing.’”

This would have been funny if blood was spurting from the agonized white girl’s stump while the black woman’s hair chewed on her ripped-off hand like Goya’s “Saturn Devouring His Son.” Righteously Peeved, however, isn’t funny.

By the way, I guess it’s really hard for even a black woman cartoonist to draw black skin and make facial expressions — other than opening the whites-of-the-eyes-wide — recognizable. For instance, what is the expression on the other black woman’s face?

Maybe we should have some sympathy for AI robots that have a hard time figuring out blacks visually under poor lighting?

 
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  1. The DIE angle aside, that cartoon is so, sooooo bad. Concept, writing, drawing–all terrible.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Getaclue
  2. The more a black talks about their blackness, the stupider, less interesting, and less talented they are.

    Completely unrelated:

    • Agree: PaceLaw
    • Thanks: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Not Raul
  3. Believe it or not, The New Yorker actually used to have funny cartoons. Search on James Thurber to see them.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  4. “You know, we are in a New Yorker cartoon, and therefore we are interesting. Anybody who doesn’t get this is lowbrow.”

  5. iffen says:

    We’s tired.

    We told y’all we’s tired and we git mo tired ere day.

    • LOL: Cortes
  6. Anonymous[950] • Disclaimer says:

    Just another phase. Ethnic jokes ebb and flow. The truth of the humor will withstand the test of time:

    • Replies: @Kylie
  7. Trelane says:

    Cartoonist of color. Harpsichordist of color. Hypnotist of color. Journalist of color. Trauma surgeon of color. Electrical engineer of color. What does any of this even mean?

  8. Before clicking on the full article, I tried to imagine what this black woman cartoonist’s cartoons would look like.

    Your punchline showed, as it so often does, how feeble is my imagination.

  9. Why be funny and clever when you can just demand that people find you funny and clever? Not that I bother with the New Yorker, I’m more of a Stonetoss guy myself.

  10. Polistra says:

    It was the shock of my life getting the email from Emma that they wanted that cartoon! That was the moment I realized: ‘Oh wow, she’s actually serious about this diversity thing.’

    That is shocking! Who knew this ‘diversity thing’ was to be taken seriously?

    Seriously though, you’ve just lost your job for doubting it.

    Just kidding–you’re immune from prosecution.

  11. Ralph L says:

    require a lot of work on the part of the reporter to do write

    Well, he do write for a do rag.

    • Replies: @Bridgeport_IPA
  12. Emma Allen sits in her Brooklyn home, her large rescue tabby cat Dante warming her feet

    Ninth circle of smell for that muhfugga

    Allen, 33, is shaking up the popular notion of just what a New Yorker cartoon is

    “Well, at least she looks funny.”

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Curle
  13. ic1000 says:

    > here’s the punchline of the article… that only iSteve readers will get

    Yeah, that’s a mirthfully clever mashup of World War Hair, hating on Karens, and amputation. Black lady cartoonist Liz Montague, tickling the fancy of the Upper West Side and the Hamptons. What can’t she do!

    Hey, I have an idea for Montague. As these fat Texans are beating up on a slight hostess, one quips, “We don’t tip, anyway.”

    OK then… what if the hostess is missing a hand?

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    , @Pericles
  14. Anon[322] • Disclaimer says:

    I used to subscribe to a monthly cartoon collection called ‘Funny Times’ which was mostly decent material but always featured an explicitly-diverse strip called ‘Dykes to Watch Out For’. In years of skimming it, I could never figure out why it was in a humor magazine.

    Some folks have different definitions of comedy, a few of which are apparently downright sober.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  15. Mike Tre says:

    Always liked this one:

  16. Not Raul says:

    Who are all these Karens touching Black women’s hair, and why haven’t I seen video footage?

  17. Not Raul says:
    @R.G. Camara

    This was actually funny.

    Where did all the funny Black people go? It’s like they’ve been hiding for years.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  18. I don’t know why they think that we’re as obsessed with their hair as they are. I’ve had some want to touch my “white girl” hair, though.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @Curle
  19. I’m reminded of the meta joke that “Every New Yorker cartoon’s dialogue could be replaced with ‘Man, what an asshole’ and it would still work.”

    • LOL: Rob
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  20. Voltarde says:

    Little Things Mean a Lot

    Kitty Kallen

    Blow me a kiss from across the room,
    Say I look nice when I’m not
    Touch my hair as you pass my chair,
    Little things mean a lot

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Etruscan Film Star
  21. DIE has destroyed stand-up comedy. Now it will end the of humor in political cartoons.

  22. @Anon

    Nah, the Left has embraced “anti-Comedy” as their thing these days. Basically, since many Diversity Hire comics aren’t funny, they pretend they meant to not be funny and proceed to lecture the audience and whine.

    There was some Australian dyke “comic” who looked liked Janet Reno who a few years ago was doing “funny” bits based on her supposed tragic life (which of course included a rape tale), and then she decided she didn’t want to work that hard and started touring where she told the audience it was too painful to be funny about her “tragic past” and instead just stood on stage and whined and castigated the audience for her sad past and blamed men. SJWs called it “stunning” and “brave” and a “new way of doing stand up comedy” (i.e. without being funny) and heaped critical praise on her.

    I shit you not.

  23. LadyTheo says:

    NO ONE wants to touch your fucking hair.

    • Agree: Old Prude, Adam Smith, magila
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Catdompanj
  24. I guess it’s really hard for even a black woman cartoonist to draw black skin and make facial expressions — other than opening the whites-of-the-eyes-wide — recognizable. For instance, what is the expression on the other black woman’s face?

    Many self-conscious blacks know the physical way to make blacks funny is to basically draw them exactly as “racist” stereotypes did for hundreds of years —broad white smiles, over affected eye googling, big lips, rubbery facial expressions, etc. But they don’t want to “support the stereotype” and just want a white/Asian significant other and end up making all their blacks act like white/Asian SJWs they know who like indie bands and IPAs.

  25. JimDandy says:

    I get it, we must do better, and I just want to state for the record that I have zero desire to ever touch a black woman’s hair. Wait… I mean…

  26. Anonymous[226] • Disclaimer says:

    Off-topic, but important: Fauci is about to call for a new prolonged quarantine, as the number of deaths from COVID top almost three quarter million Americans killed. A prolonged quarantine will be needed according to epidemiologists, and legal scholars are tying to find loopholes in the Constitution that would allow forced vaccination of the 70 million recalcitrant Americans.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  27. Not Raul says:

    Message: “I said not to touch it.”

    Meta-Message: We make wild accusations about White Karens, go berserk on them, and then consider ourselves to be the victims.

  28. Should we take this as the obituary for the [i]New Yorker[/i] cartoon?

    The punchline is at the end. They can’t even figure out that sanxctimony is not funny. Not unless you ridicule it.

    And they’re not about to do that, are they?

  29. The cartoonists should imitate “Doug.”

    The animation was sophisticated and ironic, but also quite simple. It’d be perfect for a paper or a high-brow magazine.

  30. @Chrisnonymous

    ‘The DIE angle aside, that cartoon is so, sooooo bad. Concept, writing, drawing–all terrible.’

    There’s no humor at all. It’s just vicious.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  31. Kylie says:
    @Anonymous

    Groucho was funny enough but the great Margaret Dumont cracks me up without her having to say a word. Same with Madeline Kahn.

    Anyway, nowadays most women, especially black women, aren’t particularly funny, at least, not intentionally. Too often, they mistake snark for wit.

  32. @Miss Scarlett

    ‘I don’t know why they think that we’re as obsessed with their hair as they are. I’ve had some want to touch my “white girl” hair, though.’

    It is weird. Looking back, it’s going to be one of the phenomena of this era that are going to be simply inexplicable.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  33. @Trelane

    Cartoonist of color. Harpsichordist of color. Hypnotist of color. Journalist of color. Trauma surgeon of color. Electrical engineer of color. What does any of this even mean?

    Pablo Fanque was celebrated as an “artiste of colour”. So said The Illustrated London News... in 1847.

    https://blog.scienceandindustrymuseum.org.uk/pablo-fanque-circus-hero/

  34. @R.G. Camara

    I’m reminded of the meta joke that “Every New Yorker cartoon’s dialogue could be replaced with ‘Man, what an asshole’ and it would still work.”

    “Hi, I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn.”

    • Thanks: R.G. Camara
    • LOL: ic1000
  35. Altai says:

    The vitriolic hatred of attractive Northern European women is on full display here. The joke doesn’t emphasis how much the hair touching might annoy the black woman, it’s how unconcerned she is and how gleeful she is at the white woman having her hand chopped off.

    Here is another classic from a Turkish Islamist born in Australia (Or who moved there as a young child in the 80s) the hatred and anger is pure to see. This was broadcast on the main public broadcaster, the ABC, not the SBS (The ‘Special Broadcast Service’, invented as a place for multi-lingual, multicultural programming for Greeks and Italians who never quite learned to speak English and which metastasized into just anti-straight Anglo Celtic and not-straight Anglo Celt stuff) where it might have gone unnoticed.

    Tellingly the poem has the line ‘Aussie girls, so pretty but so disrespectful’ (In the context of the poem their ‘disrespect’ is the 11 year olds not observing the moment of silence of their Hijabi classmate as she stands to attention to mourn the dead of her fatherland, her real fatherland, Turkey, that is) The amount of resentment (Despite all the photos of her and her classmates decades ago being all smiles) is palpable.

    ‘She wants to break Liz’s nose‘ (Cue shot of her punching her palm) And this is on the ABC proper, I thought the SBS was the quite place Anglo-Celts would never see that you broadcast this.
    ‘Her history teacher, Mr Pavros, who hates the Turks, for sure‘ (Holy moly, when I heard that line I thought the poem would end with her saying she grew up to let go of such anger, nope, Greeks are now more privileged than Turks, their brutal oppressors. The ABC, endorsing hardline Turkish nationalism, because it’s current year you Greek cockroaches!)

    You might ask why this was broadcast, well in Australia ANZAC day is basically the national holiday of the Anglo-Celt people and is also the true national day of Australia with far more events and solemnity than Australia Day. Much like in Canada where it is an implicit Anglo ethnic pride day with recent immigrants and Quebecois feeling no emotional pull to it.

    So, of course, it has to be deconstructed and recontextualised. See also this.

    Now, of course, Australians are aware it was an invasion, so what is really going on here? They’re actually, emotionally, telling people that Gallipoli was nothing to be proud of despite the Ottoman and British empire’s being in a state of war (And the campaign being a bloody failure and the subsequent ethnic cleaning by the heroic Turkish nationalist defenders) and by extension deligitimising Australian national identity and particularly the really problematic implicit expression of Anglo-Celtic ethnic identity and solidarity. That’s why they broadcast a right-wing (If they were living in Turkey, in Australia no doubt they are ‘left wing’) Turkish nationalist seething with anger that the Australian perspective of Gallipoli isn’t the same as the Turkish nationalist perspective. But even with all this context, her cutting line ‘so pretty’ and ‘She wants to break Liz’s nose’ speak to a hatred more personal and raw than any nationalist complaint.

    • Replies: @bomag
  36. The monster in the woman’s hair faintly resembles the snapping turtle turks in 1968 animated Beatles movie Yellow Submarine.

  37. @Wade Hampton

    Believe it or not, The New Yorker actually used to have funny cartoons. Search on James Thurber to see them.

    Believe it or not, Thurber became a cartoonist only after E. B. White rescued his doodles from the wastebasket.

    One of the regular artists complained about getting rejection slips when a fifth-rate cartoonist like Thurber made it into every issue. The editor corrected the man: “Third-rate.”

  38. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    In the Before Times a New Yorker cartoon could be mildly sexist and racist and actually be amusing.

    • LOL: TWS
  39. @Trelane

    They’re letting the world know they achieved their position thru a combination of affirmative action, middling talent, and an HR department that didn’t want to defend itself in a racial discrimination lawsuit. Your job title should have nothing to do with your skin color, unless you work at a tanning salon or are part of a Vaudeville minstrel act.

  40. a punchline that only iSteve readers will get

    Oh no she di’int!

    Look at the squinting hate in the eyes of the young colored people.

  41. @Not Raul

    That funny movie (simply titled CB4)was made in the 90s, starred Chris Rock, and was directed by a female director — who also directed the excellent (and Adam Sandler career-jumpstarting) Billy Madison.

    It’s amazing how diversity did so much better work thirty years ago than Diversity Hires today.

    • Replies: @Danindc
  42. Dr. X says:

    Yet she is also introducing a wealth of fresh talent, including more women, cartoonists of color and LGBTQ artists

    In other words, the most humorless people out there.

  43. As far as cartoonists go, she’s no Gary Larson, Bill Watterson, Art Jaffee, or my personal favorite, Sergio Aragones who drew for Mad Magazine. He did the little doodles in the marginals, the Mad Look At…(usually just a few panels with no dialog), and the comic book “Groo The Wanderer”. Being able to tell a funny story with just a few doodles and no punchline is quite a feat.

  44. Anonymous[921] • Disclaimer says:

    White women touching black hair must be an urban legend.

    It’s the blacks who can’t keep their hands to themselves, and I don’t mean shoplifting, which they do a lot of.

    It’s blacks who are most likely to touch people, shove people(even onto subway trains), and hit people(like in knockout games).

    What a inverse reality we have.

    Israel blows up Gaza and continues to colonize West(and drops bombs on Syria), but US says Israel needs an iron dome to protect itself from Arabs.

    Blacks put their hands all over the place, but we must believe white women can’t keep their hands off black hair(which is oftentimes ‘weave’, btw, wig made from non-black hair, in which case white girls would be touching nonblack hair on black heads; it gets very confusing).

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  45. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    We know Montague is Black, but anyone get an early life confirmation on (currently Tweets-are-protected) UWS-er Emma Allen?

  46. Isn’t it amazing how much black humor focuses on physical violence towards white women? Does anybody wonder whether this actually happened during Reconstruction, and that was what brought on the KKK?

    • Replies: @Curle
  47. Danindc says:
    @R.G. Camara

    That movie wasn’t the least bit funny. I saw it in the theater I was really excited because David spade was in it. Didn’t laugh once. Only Beyond Thunderdome and The Waterboy were bigger disappointments.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    , @Swamp Fox
  48. J.Ross says:

    If white people expressed a desire for violence against blacks as casually and as often as blacks do for whites, the enforcement of anti-racism wouldn’t be possible, and the government would go back to the 1970s position of lying about being on our side.

  49. J.Ross says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    At long last the lyingpress deigns to mention the kidnapping, binding, and torture of a retarded Chicago kid by feral blacks.

  50. National Lampoon had an issue (Humor? Whiteness? I forget) which had parodies of NYer cartoons.
    I still recall them (though not, as you can see, what the issue was).

    Couple looking out from their balcony on a sky full of demons: “Remember when we used to love the night sky?”

    Two women having lunch/dining at French restaurant; one looking aghast at the floor near the kitchen door . as a legless frog emerges on a little wheeled cart.

    Mother confronts son, as father lies dead on the floor: “It was that noise he always made in his throat, remember?”

    Father counseling son: “If you want them to stop calling you a fag, then stop giving them blowjobs.”

    Good times.

    Edit: well almost had it:

  51. SafeNow says:

    To be funny requires exuberant synapses, plus a significant background of educational and cultural exposure that those active synapses can find lurking in the brain. A few blacks have both traits, and a few Asians who are not template-synapsed have both. Jews have both traits, of course, but those sitcom writers can be very mean, sarcastic, and hurtful.

    For cartoonists, the above, plus this. I think it was David Mamet who said that a good plot point has to be both a surprise, and yet, inevitable. I will apply this to an ingenious cartoon. (And the moth joke, of course.)

  52. Mr. Anon says:

    “I submitted a draft of someone getting their hand bitten off by a Black person’s hair with the caption, ‘I told you not to touch it,’ and was genuinely positive there was no way they would publish something like that — and they did! It was the shock of my life getting the email from Emma that they wanted that cartoon!

    This whole “Don’t touch my hair” thing has to be one of the most intensely obsessed about things that never happen. It is the American version of the African “that abino used witchcraft to make my pecker fall off” delusion. So much ink, thought, and rage devoted to a wholly imaginary social phenomenon.

  53. Meanwhile, in a humour galaxy far, far away…

  54. Some New Yorkers’ take on the New Yorker‘s cartoons:

  55. @Voltarde

    I gather that Kitty Kallen was something of a one-hit star, but her performance of “Little Things Mean a Lot” should be in any decent time capsule.

  56. it was getting into a cycle of preexisting jokes,” which is “rarely the best way to go for a laugh.”

    Like what? Well, it would take effort to explain, and the Washington Post can’t afford to do that.

    Certain themes appear over and over — man on desert island, odd character (a fish, a dog…) in a bar, grim reaper at the door, etc. But the captions are different and often brilliant.

  57. Finally! New York based cartoonists are portraying people other than native white Americans!

  58. @Danindc

    I suggest your personal opinion isn’t in line with the masses. The Waterboy was a huge Sandler hit and pushed him beyond his frat-boy appeal of Billy Madison/Happy Gilmore into mainstream comedic leading man. Rob Schneider credits Sandler with being the man who caused him to cease being known as “The Copy Guy” (an SNL skit Schneider did back in the day that became a meme) to the “You can do it!” guy of The Waterboy.

    But Billy Madison was the surprise frat-boy hit that made Sandler bankable. Before that, Roger Ebert had famously opined (in a review of a previous Sandler outing with Damon Wayans) that Sandler was not a leading man and should cease trying to be and concentrate on smaller comedic roles. After Billy Madison, Ebert had to start eating crow.

    I found both movies hilarious then and now, as do many others, given how they are almost in constant reruns. And, as I’ve often said: one day Sandler’s comedy, which is so disparaged today, will be re-evaluated, much as Jerry Lewis and Red Skelton have been re-evaluated by modern critics and found to be geniuses.

    • Replies: @Getaclue
  59. Som notes that Allen facilitated the artist’s inclusion in a “Funny Ladies” Society of Illustrators exhibit that was “a win for transgender cartoonists everywhere.”

    Here’s a stock situation that transgender cartoonists could milk for laughs with countless different punchlines: Naked couple under the sheets. Transwoman looks slyly seductive. Man has horrified look of sudden realization.

  60. Dumbo says:

    On the other hand: “It felt socially irresponsible to have people talking to each other without masks.”

    That’s in a nutshell the problem of almost every artist, cartoonist, comedian, filmmaker etc nowadays.
    They confuse fiction for reality.
    They don’t want to be funny or artistic.
    They want to be “socially responsible”.
    Look, dumb woman, it’s a cartoon, it’s not real life. Masks don’t do anything for cartoon characters except cover their faces and make it hard to see their expressions. (It’s the same with real people, but that’s another story.)

    • Agree: Getaclue
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
  61. @R.G. Camara

    Yes that was embarrassing.

    I was amazed she was so popular.

  62. Emma Allen is redefining what a New Yorker cartoon can be

    Yep. We haven’t had a chance to hear from people of Emma’s background. Their stories, their thoughts, their point of view just hasn’t gotten any space, any attention in American media. We’ll all definitely benefit from her new and different perspective.

  63. Our brave new and diverse future will no doubt be many things.

    But one thing we already know: it won’t be funny.**

    [MORE]

    **Well maybe to the Chinese

  64. AndrewR says:
    @Colin Wright

    I don’t know how to share the video but on Telegram there is a vid going around of an “uncontacted tribe,” perhaps in New Guinea, petting the long mane of a white man they have just met.

  65. AndrewR says:
    @Anonymous

    There are 320 million people in the US. Well over three million people die annually in the US. Most of these “COVID deaths” are dry kindling, and I doubt most of them even died from COVID anyway.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Ragno
  66. Anon55uu says:
    @R.G. Camara

    You are thinking of Hannah Gadsby, who got a special on one of the streaming platforms.

    It has moved basically from “I am an overweight depressed lesbian and here are some jokes” to just the first part. With the audience expected to cheer.

    If anything Janet Reno looked like the old maid she described herself as and seemed more sympathetic than any of the failed careerist mom nominees put up before her. This is not to excuse her actions once in the job.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
  67. @Trelane

    What does any of this even mean?

    There’s a strange, inexplicable lack of consistency in the use of that terminology by the news media. Have you noticed that there don’t seem to be any mass shooters of color? Nor do the media mention rapists of color, rioters of color, arsonists of color, knockout game players of color, or anti-vaxers of color. ‘Tis a puzzlement!

    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
  68. Rob says:

    Is that a meta-joke? Like, “black hair is like pubic hair + vagina dentata? Very clever and very racist. That cartooness should be canceled.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  69. Rob says:

    Is that a meta-joke? Like, “black hair is like pubic hair + vagina dentata?” Very clever and very racist. That cartooness should be canceled posthaste.

  70. EdwardM says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    … or on the latest mass school shooting:

    https://www.fox4news.com/news/school-shooting-reported-at-timberview-high-school-in-arlington

    Granted, the story has not gotten above-the-fold news coverage for obvious reasons. The youth was 18; none of the articles say what grade He is in, nor for how many years He has been in that grade. The latest headlines say He was “bullied,” and He was released on a small bond in one day. No one has yet died.

    Sailer’s Law seems to apply to school shootings too.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  71. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There should be a similar cartoon of Obama tied to a chair by white kids.

    “Now show him projected sea levels on his Martha’s Vineyard estate”

    (I don’t see much squinting hate, more cold indifference in the right hand boy. Can’t make out the girl’s expression at all. It does seem to be harder to do both dark skin AND expression)

    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  72. Oh, the diversity!

    • LOL: Pat Kittle
  73. @YetAnotherAnon

    (I don’t see much squinting hate, more cold indifference in the right hand boy. Can’t make out the girl’s expression at all. It does seem to be harder to do both dark skin AND expression)

    You’re right, it isn’t hate: I should have written “contempt”. Both kids have the same expression (it helps to open the pic separately and make it full size).

    Good point about reversing the races: Someone with time on their hands and a little writing ability could make copies of her cartoons with the races reversed. I’d love to see it. Your Obama example is great.

    Imagine the “hair” one with the same quote but featuring a blonde Rapunzel noose strangling a handsy Black chick: “I said not to touch it.”

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  74. Old Prude says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Is it naughty that I find both the Obama and Rapunzel variations infinitely better than the originals?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  75. @Dumbo

    Letting a woman decide what’s funny is like putting Mexicans in charge of the Sierra Club.

  76. @Herp McDerp

    Our Bimbo of Color cartoonist fantasizes mutilating a White women for a fantasized microaggression. (((New Yorker’s anti-White racists))) expect us to find this vibrantly hilarious.

    Vibrant cartoon suggestion:

    The Negress swats the White woman’s hand away, hands her a used Brillo pad & says “Hyeah, bitch, touch dis!”

    (Also, most Black women are “Of size” — so respect them & depict them realistically.)

  77. Swamp Fox says: • Website
    @Danindc

    David Spade wasn’t in CB4.
    I can see why you were disappointed.

    • Replies: @Danindc
  78. @Old Prude

    Is it naughty that I find both the Obama and Rapunzel variations infinitely better than the originals?

    Not at all. It’s perfectly natural.

    • Agree: bomag
  79. @Trelane

    You are not allowed to say “colored people” by the People who say “people of color”.

  80. Thirdtwin says:

    Forget the hair for a second, and look at those black bodies. Are these gals ten years old?

  81. Brutusale says:
    @EdwardM

    If you saw the video, kid took a serious beating from another black kid, whereupon he took the gun out of his bag and started shooting. All recorded by a classmate.

    Like the video of the water buffalo attacking her disabled teacher, it looks pretty premeditated.

    • Replies: @Getaclue
  82. @Gary in Gramercy

    Letting a woman decide what’s funny is like putting Mexicans in charge of the Sierra Club.

    Christopher Hitchens on Why Women Aren’t Funny: https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2007/01/hitchens200701

    tl;dr – They don’t have to be.

    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    , @pyrrhus
  83. BB753 says:

    Ok, I’ll come clean. You can actually touch Black hair without facing mortal or immortal wrath. I have actually done it! It’s a spiritual experience, nay a religious one! It’s like touching the cotton clouds where angels dwell! Like cotton candy! Like stroking a little lamb! Or a poodle puppy.
    Yes, you can touch holy Black hair and get away with it! But not in America! I’ll say no more.

  84. Ragno says:
    @R.G. Camara

    The hideous Hannah Gasbag, who taught a nation of hipsters that Cliffs Notes aren’t just for English lit finals.

  85. Ragno says:
    @AndrewR

    In the meantime, doctors, nurses and even heads of hospitals complaining that if the death certificates don’t say ‘COVID’ , then the checks don’t clear find themselves trapped in something very like the vacuum of space – where no one can hear you scream, never mind alert the public to widespread scams.

  86. Getaclue says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    The WaPoo most always do an inspection for a vagina and/or non-white skin before praising anyone–basically those are the only real requirements–talent isn’t a consideration

  87. Getaclue says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Tribal membership is a good thing if you want to be a successful “comedian” — you can make losers and duds yet you will be pimped on to victory –not so much one and done goyim failures–the detestable Borat garbage being an excellent example–among many

  88. Getaclue says:
    @Brutusale

    More to it than that–I read the shooter robbed the other kid the day b4–regardless the shooter shot a Teacher in the back and the other kid 7-8 times–when I was a Prosecutor that was attempted Murder and either no bail or a few hundred grand at least–meanwhile Capitol “Paraders” have no bail 9 months later due to DC activist/Establishment “judges”/POS– conditions are tending toward revolution as Biden and his Puppet Masters start the engineered food shortages for their next phase of destroying the USA for the NWO Agenda/”Elite”/Satanists

  89. Ragno says:

    The article is typically dispiriting in that modern manner in which all facets of cultural life are like sequential arrows on the ground that only white folks can see, all leading to a jar marked FENTANYL.

    Those of us old enough to remember when the old NATIONAL LAMPOON used the style and visual vocabulary of New Yorker cartoons to instantly render New Yorker cartoons obsolete, can only wonder how long Emma Allen and Liz Montague would need to breathe deeply from brown paper bags to survive the cartoons of Sam Gross or Charles Rodrigues:

  90. bomag says:
    @Altai

    Another reminder that despite all the GloboHomo blathering, ethnic grievance trumps universalism.

  91. bomag says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    So cartooning is now an avenue for the aggrieved to air their revenge fantasies.

  92. Pericles says:
    @ic1000

    I believe what is shown is a Futakuchi-Onna, or “two-mouthed woman”, a Japanese monster.

    They are characterized by their two mouths – a normal one located on her face and a second one on the back of the head beneath the hair. There, the woman’s skull splits apart, forming lips, teeth and a tongue, creating an entirely functional second mouth.

    In Japanese mythology and folklore, the futakuchi-onna belongs to the same class of stories as the rokurokubi, kuchisake-onna and the yama-uba, women afflicted with a curse or supernatural disease that transforms them into yōkai. The supernatural nature of the women in these stories is usually concealed until the last minute, when the true self is revealed.

  93. cityview says:

    I don’t comment on the touching-hair topics, since I don’t like a lot of the comments, and I don’t like all of them here, but this claim about white women (or men) touching black women’s hair is a myth. As I’ve written, I went all the way through a big-city school system that was largely black before I reached high school. I took public transit, used public libraries, etc. for decades. In all that time, only one person–a black teenager at my high school whom I didn’t know personally–invited a handful of girls of several races to touch her elaborate Afro hairstyle if they wanted to. We all laughed politely. No one had asked her, she volunteered. (This was in the context of a hearing test, where headphones had to fit over her hair.) No one is clamoring to touch black women’s hair–or anyone else’s hair.

    I’m not the audience for cartoons or the New Yorker or New Yorker cartoons (and I’m not certain who those audiences are), but the cartoon shown is violent and unfunny. What is the message? For women to keep their mouths shut in fear of being mutilated by another woman? How is this advancing women’s rights?

    I don’t recognize the name, but Elizabeth Montague sounds like a character in a Jane Austen novel. I doubt that she is from a low-income family.

    Since the New Yorker was mentioned, there is a commenter here who uses a name related to the New Yorker, Eustace Tilley (not), who is consistently funny and doesn’t get paid for it. I don’t want to leave Desanex out either. Not everything they write is aimed at me, but I can acknowledge them as talented, and they aren’t mean. I would have thought the New Yorker would long be out of business.

  94. Curle says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Unless I’m badly mistaken the popular usage of ‘rescue’ these days appears to incorporate otherwise unwanted pets obtained without cost or for minimal cost which would include young animals possibly destined for the shelter if someone doesn’t take the critter off the donator’s hands. I find the inclusion of this very marginal exercise in social virtue, if it is such, to be very off putting. Yet journalists feel the need to record it.

  95. Curle says:
    @Miss Scarlett

    John Updike has a novel, Bech is Back, where the protagonist Henry Bech is a novelist traveling the world on some state department cultural tour. Accompanying him is some young Black American female with a big Afro. In some godforsaken sub Saharan stop it occurs to him that he hasn’t seen a similar hairstyle among Africans the entirety of his time on that continent. The novel is set in the ‘70s.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  96. pyrrhus says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    And Charles Addams, even more so…,.,

  97. pyrrhus says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Women are never funny, because women have little or no sense of humor…As Ambrose Bierce wrote “the woman who can take constructive criticism has not yet been born.”

  98. Curle says:
    @Paperback Writer

    The KKK were a manifestation of posse comitatus active at the time applying rough justice to both whites and blacks in the reconstruction and later era in places where organized law enforcement was mostly or entirely non-existent.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
  99. @R.G. Camara

    She probably laughed like a drain when she picked up the pay-check.

  100. Moses says:
    @Trelane

    Cartoonist of color. Harpsichordist of color. Hypnotist of color. Journalist of color. Trauma surgeon of color. Electrical engineer of color. What does any of this even mean?

    It means “not White” therefore “good.”

    White bad. Not White good.

    That’s all any of this means.

  101. @AndrewR

    ‘That’s the point’

    Sometimes I think so. I once read some piece theorizing that that whole point of the absurdities of Stalinist propaganda was that they were so absurd; in accepting them without open protest, people were being forced to submit. It’s like if a wife accepts her husband’s denials of infidelity when it’s clear he has been cheating. She’s submitting to his authority: ‘whatever you say, I will accept.’

    We had something of the same thing with George Floyd: he was so patently unsaintly, so grotesquely ugly, so obviously had died largely as a result of his own behavior. If his death had been a genuine outrage, if the response had been remotely justifiable, the wholesale groveling on the part of white America wouldn’t have had the significance it did. In this connection, I found it odd that none of the other victims were clearly innocent: Arbery, Trayvon Martin, ‘Hands up don’t shoot’ — in all cases their behavior had a lot to do with their deaths.

    Indeed, perhaps the whole ‘blacks as sainted victims’ owes something to this. Collectively, their behavior so obviously is unacceptable, they so obviously are incapable of achieving more than they do, they so clearly receive more than they should, that to force us to pretend otherwise acquires a significance it wouldn’t have if we were being presented with a defensible proposition.

    We are made to grovel to blacks because they are so undeserving. We know the truth, we can see it — and yet we dare not say it. Ours silence becomes a display of submission. It serves a purpose.

  102. @Curle

    I reread one of Updike’s Bech books recently and it was quite funny. The Bech books let Updike repurpose into fiction all his writerly duties like going on goodwill lecture tours behind the Iron Curtain for the US State Department through a fictional novelist, Bech, who isn’t much like Updike: Bech is Jewish, suffers from decade-long bouts of writers’ block, and wins the Nobel Prize.

  103. @cityview

    Thanks for the mention, even if it is as an afterthought. You say we’re not mean, but you know who is mean? Steve Sailer, when he whims my poems for no apparent good reason, which he has done quite a few times, most recently two days ago.

  104. @Anon55uu

    Actions once in the job?

    I guess burning up the children at Waco to save them was as inexcusable as it gets, but didn’t she “make her bones” in Florida with daycare-workers-as-demon-worshiping-child-abusers cases that Dorothy Rabinowitz at the Wall Street Journal exposed as a grift for New Age-styled “believe the children” expert witnesses?

    If you wanted an Attorney General who wouldn’t flinch at using armored vehicles and incendiary devices to burn out members of a religious cult for whom their children served as hostages, both for the cult members and also the Federal agents surrounding them in a standoff, she had as good a resume as one could find? That and being pals with the then First Lady?

    Yeah, a sympathetic “old maid.”

  105. I was wondering why New Yorker cartoons weren’t very funny anymore. Now I know.

  106. @Ralph L

    Christ, that’s funny. Well done.

  107. Danindc says:
    @Swamp Fox

    Damn it. Chris Elliott. Lol

  108. @Gary in Gramercy

    Letting a woman decide what’s funny is like putting Mexicans in charge of the Sierra Club.

    Corrected below, with erroneous elements crossed out:

    Letting a woman decide what’s funny is like putting Mexicans blacks in charge of the Sierra Club.

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