The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Billionaires' Choice for President, General Mattis, Was on Theranos's Board
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Daily Beast:

CALL OF DUTY 04.07.16 10:15 PM ET

The Secret Movement to Draft General James Mattis for President

by TIM MAK

Gen. James Mattis doesn’t necessarily want to be president—but that’s not stopping a group of billionaire donors from hatching a plan to get him there.

An anonymous group of conservative billionaires is ready to place their bets on a man dubbed “Mad Dog,” hoping to draft him into the presidential race to confront Donald Trump.

Think of it as a Plan B should Trump be nominated by the Republican Party in Cleveland: swing behind retired U.S. Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis and press him into service yet again as a third-party candidate.

We can tell Gen. Mattis is a good choice for President because he was on the Board of Directors of Elizabeth Holmes’s Theranos blood-testing start-up. From Fortune:

Theranos’ board: Plenty of political connections, little relevant expertise

by Jennifer Reingold @jennrein OCTOBER 15, 2015, 12:49 PM EDT

Theranos’ board of directors was assembled for its government connections, not for its understanding of the company or its technology. …

Let’s take a look at Theranos’ 12-person board (which is an 11-man team if you don’t include CEO and Chairwoman Elizabeth Holmes—interesting given her stated commitment to women in STEM). We have former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of Defense Bill Perry, former Secretary of State George Shultz, former Senators Sam Nunn and Bill Frist (who, it should be noted, is a surgeon), former Navy Admiral Gary Roughead, former Marine Corps General James Mattis …

 
Hide 144 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. They won’t fool anybody with this. The “elites” are very out of touch, very uncool, so to speak.

    The assumption is they can put a man-in-uniform up and enough conservatives will go dumb and vote for him out of doglike obedience. Not enough to win, just to keep the dreaded Trump from winning.

    Won’t work.

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody’s great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    • Agree: Pseudonymic Handle
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    @AndyBoy

    Sadly, it probably would work.

    Imagine the irony of a third party candidate again putting a Clinton in the Whitehouse? I still loathe RP to this day for creating the Clinton machine.

    Replies: @Josh

    , @aerg
    @AndyBoy

    As if Trump has even a snowball's chance in hell of winning in November.

    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    @AndyBoy

    I think John McCain made a number of conservatives cross their taboo about not blindingly supporting military in politics. If anything, he helped them finally notice that in a lot of societies, a military background does not guarantee conservative nationalist sentiments or that one is solely loyal to his country.

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    , @Anonymous
    @AndyBoy

    Don't discount the "squares". Remember the Roman senate had the populist Gracchi assassinated and the populist movement put down violently. The Gracchi made the mistake of overestimating the power of the people and underestimating the "squares" of the Roman senate and elite.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @AndyBoy

    Fully agree.

    After all, right now at this moment, if you were to poll the average, ordinary person. Who has more name recognition, General Mattis or Donald Trump?

    If more than 99% of ordinary, independent regular voters have never even heard of this retired general, its going to be an extremely tough sell to ask people to vote for them when they don't even know where he stands on the issues.

    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot's VP running mate in '92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words "Who am I? What am I doing here?"

    Quite apt.

    Replies: @tbraton, @Jean Cocteausten, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @AndyBoy


    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody’s great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.
     
    Welcome to Low Energy City.
  2. Even if one dislikes the God-Emperor (عليه السلام), one simply cannot help but notice the corruption at the very core of the “GOP” aka “the American conservative movement.”

    “But Trump will destroy the conservative movement!” protest the execrable Conservatism Inc. parasites.

    No, cucks. You did that your goddamned selves. The Don is the rebirth of the American conservative movement.

  3. Where’s Smedley Butler when you need him.

    • Replies: @Hrw-500
    @gruff

    Speaking of the wolf, the idea of President Smedley Butler gived some food for thoughts of alternate history.
    http://www.alternatehistory.com/discussion/showthread.php?t=150436
    http://althistory.wikia.com/wiki/Smedley_D_Butler_%28Kornilovshina%29

  4. If there’s anyone worse than this guy, we haven’t found him yet.

    Young man just came up to me at DCA to tell me he'd be an eager volunteer in a #Mattis2016 campaign. #Groundswell #Providential— Bill Kristol (Kristol) April 27, 2016

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @DCThrowback

    Billy Kristol is Ha-Satan in the flesh.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @Jack D
    @DCThrowback

    Was the young man's name Haven Monahan by any chance?

    Replies: @Bill

    , @Anonymous
    @DCThrowback

    LOL. Things that never happened....

  5. @AndyBoy
    They won't fool anybody with this. The "elites" are very out of touch, very uncool, so to speak.

    The assumption is they can put a man-in-uniform up and enough conservatives will go dumb and vote for him out of doglike obedience. Not enough to win, just to keep the dreaded Trump from winning.

    Won't work.

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody's great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @aerg, @yaqub the mad scientist, @Anonymous, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Sadly, it probably would work.

    Imagine the irony of a third party candidate again putting a Clinton in the Whitehouse? I still loathe RP to this day for creating the Clinton machine.

    • Replies: @Josh
    @DCThrowback

    I know but the other guy was also a world class creep.

  6. Oddly, I called for Trump to pick Mattis as his VP some time back:
    A VP for the Trumpster?

  7. @AndyBoy
    They won't fool anybody with this. The "elites" are very out of touch, very uncool, so to speak.

    The assumption is they can put a man-in-uniform up and enough conservatives will go dumb and vote for him out of doglike obedience. Not enough to win, just to keep the dreaded Trump from winning.

    Won't work.

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody's great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @aerg, @yaqub the mad scientist, @Anonymous, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    As if Trump has even a snowball’s chance in hell of winning in November.

  8. I saw this on the TV MSM.

    Our rulers are looking dumber all the time. I feel like I’m watching an Our Gang/Little Rascals comedy:

    “Hey, we can put on a play!”

    “Yeah, Spanky can be the star, and Buckwheat can sing a song…”

    (Only readers of a certain age will understand.)

  9. Eisenhauer’s words were never truer. Beware the Military-Industrial complex ideed.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Anonymous


    Eisenhauer’s words were never truer. Beware the Military-Industrial complex ideed.
     
    YES! Also, the idea that people want to vote for a "war hero" is just wrong. Time and again you see candidates who play up the military vet angle lose badly, worse than a generic party member.

    In all the following elections, the candidate with the inferior military record won:

    1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008


    By contrast, the better record won in:

    1988

    Replies: @Hibernian

  10. I wonder why they always choose a Marine. In the 1930s it was General Butler.

  11. @DCThrowback
    If there's anyone worse than this guy, we haven't found him yet.

    Young man just came up to me at DCA to tell me he'd be an eager volunteer in a #Mattis2016 campaign. #Groundswell #Providential— Bill Kristol (@BillKristol) April 27, 2016
     

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    Billy Kristol is Ha-Satan in the flesh.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Ha-Satan," I see what you did there. Good one.

  12. The people that are getting behind General Mattis would probably have no problem with a military coup to get back their power.

  13. There was an excellent op-ed in Wednesday’s NY Times entitled “Theranos Isn’t Silicon Valley’s Fault” which makes the point that Walgreen’s just went to wrong part of Silicon Valley and that:

    ” It is tempting to see Theranos as another example of Silicon Valley hype — a company based on a wisp of an unproven idea becomes a multibillion-dollar phenomenon with the backing of pump-and-dump venture capitalists.

    In fact, however, Silicon Valley’s most experienced investors in start-ups saw red flags at Theranos before anyone else. The Theranos saga shows just how well Silicon Valley does its homework, especially when considering medical technology, in which the risks of doing real harm to people are higher than those posed by the next photo-sharing app.” http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/27/opinion/dont-blame-silicon-valley-for-theranos.html

    It turns out that there are two parts of Silicon Valley, the top tier firms and the rest who are basically hustlers. The top tier firms, the 10%, historically produce returns 10 times greater than the average of the remaining 90 percent. It isn’t hard to guess which category Theranos falls into, since the top tier firms as a rule only have investors and partners who are either Ph.Ds or MDs and, thus, know what they are dealing with. Another sign was the board consisting of superannuated former high ranking government officials who didn’t have a clue what they were doing in the business.

    ” Experience in health care is critical for a company like Theranos, which has to comply with government regulations. Instead, even the board of directors was weighted during most of the company’s life with older political figures like George P. Shultz and Henry A. Kissinger.

    Luke Evnin, a co-founder at MPM Capital, said he had never met with Theranos or Ms. Holmes, but he found the makeup of the board puzzling: “It is pretty weird that if you look at her board, there’s not a single person who knows what they’re doing in the business.” ”

    It looks like Gen. Mattis fit in. And to think that Bill Kristol, the man who was responsible for Sarah Palin being on McCain’s ticket in 2008, thinks he will make a fine President is the only thing you need to know.

  14. @Buzz Mohawk
    @DCThrowback

    Billy Kristol is Ha-Satan in the flesh.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    “Ha-Satan,” I see what you did there. Good one.

  15. Without more information, I don’t think it’s particularly interesting or important that he was on the Theranos board.

    What is interesting and important is that corporate governance ain’t what it used to be — in particular, boards of directors have largely abandoned their typical duties of company oversight — instead, being on a board has become just a cushy position where not much is really expected — you get nice benefits while being paid very well to attend pro forma meetings.

    • Agree: Bill
  16. Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 and has been an infantry unit leader.

    So lots of IQ and manhood. Prime obsessions of the HBD community. What’s not to like about the general?

    • Replies: @Mark2
    @Anonymous

    People suffer from a serious lack of scale when it comes to IQ. An IQ of 140 is almost three standard deviations from the mean -- that's over the 99th percentile, iirc. You do not need an IQ that high to endure the military bureaucracy long enough to make O-10. In fact it would probably be counterproductive.

    , @gcochran
    @Anonymous

    "Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 "

    Like Tommy Franks, like Colin Powell.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Drapetomaniac
    @Anonymous

    "Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140"

    So he's a sociopath with some sort of high IQ. History really doesn't need anymore of them.

  17. Come on now. Figuring out Putin isn’t nearly as difficult as a bubbly science chick.

  18. I don’t feel sorry for those guys at all. They were on the board because they expected to get rich the easy way, by getting in on the ground floor with the stock. If they didn’t bother to do the research into their own company, it’s their own fault.

  19. @DCThrowback
    If there's anyone worse than this guy, we haven't found him yet.

    Young man just came up to me at DCA to tell me he'd be an eager volunteer in a #Mattis2016 campaign. #Groundswell #Providential— Bill Kristol (@BillKristol) April 27, 2016
     

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    Was the young man’s name Haven Monahan by any chance?

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Jack D

    Winning comment.

  20. If Elizabeth Holmes wasn’t too young, she would make the perfect running mate for the BLF (Billionaire Liberation Front) party ticket.

  21. Jesus, the House of Representatives has a final say on who gets to be President? The article reads like “how to stage a coup & subvert the Constitution” banana republic style.

    I’m looking forward to a bracing Hillary-Trump electoral battle. He’ll make her up her game, the election should never be a Coronation.

    Today at lunch in Cambridge (the old one) I met this hyper-active Ivy League grad (currently centrist Democrat) from a solid-blue state. Even he was telling me, that as a white man, he couldn’t see a future for himself in the Democratic Party; in 20yrs if he wanted to go into politics he’d have to join the Republican Party. He was also pretty ambivalent about the pc culture in the States and peeved off about how some of the Ivy Leagues no longer uses the term “Master” for the residential dormitories (here Oxbridge is pretty unabashed about it).

    The “Sailerisation” of politics is now hitting the mainstream with the Republican vs. Democrats mirroring the core vs. fringe (how disaffected one is from the cultural mainstream correlates to their voting Dem).

    Finally this chap and I had a very interesting parallel thought as we were discussing the US political landscape. That it would have been much better for the Dems if Hillary had been president 8yrs ago and Obama contesting the election now. He’d have more experience and she’d have been in her Prime.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @Zachary Latif

    I think a huge amount of the impact of SJW activism and protests has to do with weird aspects of social media we haven't quite got a handle on yet, as a society. A few obsessed crazies or zealots can convincingly similate a huge mob of people online, and it's often easy to get a lot of actual people to comment or send a message about something they don't really know anything about. (In a lot of ways, it seems like social media allow lots of people to do nasty and destructive things that were formerly only available to people in the traditional media.)

    My prediction is that this will become less effective over time, as the novelty wears off--organizations will learn that it's dumb to fire people over a Twitter mob calling for their ouster, fewer people will think 30 people camped out in the dean's office plus a flood of support on Facebook means there's much popular support for the movement, etc.

    Replies: @27 year old, @Jack D

  22. @AndyBoy
    They won't fool anybody with this. The "elites" are very out of touch, very uncool, so to speak.

    The assumption is they can put a man-in-uniform up and enough conservatives will go dumb and vote for him out of doglike obedience. Not enough to win, just to keep the dreaded Trump from winning.

    Won't work.

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody's great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @aerg, @yaqub the mad scientist, @Anonymous, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I think John McCain made a number of conservatives cross their taboo about not blindingly supporting military in politics. If anything, he helped them finally notice that in a lot of societies, a military background does not guarantee conservative nationalist sentiments or that one is solely loyal to his country.

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @yaqub the mad scientist

    John McCain was in the military, but never had the strategic background of the high ranking generals who later went on to win the presidency. McCain's experience consisted of around 25 flying hours of combat time and his unfortunate 7 yeas as a POW.

  23. Nothing says “mature, functional democracy” quite like a shadowy cabal of billionaires doing an end-run around normal democratic procedures to put a general into control of the country.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @NOTA

    "Nothing says “mature, functional democracy” quite like a shadowy cabal of billionaires doing an end-run around normal democratic procedures to put a general into control of the country."

    I didn't realize that a group of well-known American citizens who happen to be wealthy lacked the liberty to choose to fund a third party candidate. Where is this "shadowy cabal"? Where is this "end-round" taking place if it's being reported?

    How do YOU therefore propose to make this action other than legal?


    "I think a huge amount of the impact of SJW activism and protests has to do with weird aspects of social media we haven’t quite got a handle on yet, as a society. A few obsessed crazies or zealots can convincingly similate a huge mob of people online, and it’s often easy to get a lot of actual people to comment or send a message about something they don’t really know anything about."

    Replace "impact of SJW activism and protests" with "impact of leftist and rightist fringe groups" and you may have a point.

    Now, what "weird aspects of social media" are you referring to? Furthermore, you are suggesting that those receiving the message lack the reasons behind it. You are underestimating people being hooked into their phone and have a general idea about things, and forming their opinions about matters and discussing them through social media.

    "My prediction is that this will become less effective over time, as the novelty wears off–organizations will learn that it’s dumb to fire people over a Twitter mob calling for their ouster, fewer people will think 30 people camped out in the dean’s office plus a flood of support on Facebook means there’s much popular support for the movement, etc."

    My prediction--the Coalition of the Left and Right fringe groups will still employ these tactics, and their efforts will bear fruit. This strategy is no longer a novelty, it is now standard operating procedure.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  24. @Zachary Latif
    Jesus, the House of Representatives has a final say on who gets to be President? The article reads like "how to stage a coup & subvert the Constitution" banana republic style.

    I'm looking forward to a bracing Hillary-Trump electoral battle. He'll make her up her game, the election should never be a Coronation.

    Today at lunch in Cambridge (the old one) I met this hyper-active Ivy League grad (currently centrist Democrat) from a solid-blue state. Even he was telling me, that as a white man, he couldn't see a future for himself in the Democratic Party; in 20yrs if he wanted to go into politics he'd have to join the Republican Party. He was also pretty ambivalent about the pc culture in the States and peeved off about how some of the Ivy Leagues no longer uses the term "Master" for the residential dormitories (here Oxbridge is pretty unabashed about it).

    The "Sailerisation" of politics is now hitting the mainstream with the Republican vs. Democrats mirroring the core vs. fringe (how disaffected one is from the cultural mainstream correlates to their voting Dem).

    Finally this chap and I had a very interesting parallel thought as we were discussing the US political landscape. That it would have been much better for the Dems if Hillary had been president 8yrs ago and Obama contesting the election now. He'd have more experience and she'd have been in her Prime.

    Replies: @NOTA

    I think a huge amount of the impact of SJW activism and protests has to do with weird aspects of social media we haven’t quite got a handle on yet, as a society. A few obsessed crazies or zealots can convincingly similate a huge mob of people online, and it’s often easy to get a lot of actual people to comment or send a message about something they don’t really know anything about. (In a lot of ways, it seems like social media allow lots of people to do nasty and destructive things that were formerly only available to people in the traditional media.)

    My prediction is that this will become less effective over time, as the novelty wears off–organizations will learn that it’s dumb to fire people over a Twitter mob calling for their ouster, fewer people will think 30 people camped out in the dean’s office plus a flood of support on Facebook means there’s much popular support for the movement, etc.

    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @27 year old
    @NOTA

    They'll figure that out right at the same time that conservatives start using these tactics

    , @Jack D
    @NOTA

    I think social media lowered the cost and raised the number of opportunities for virtue signaling in the way that crack increased the availability of cocaine to the masses (and they both provide addictive highs). In the past if you wanted to virtue signal to your in-group you had to do something inconvenient like attend a sit-in or a political rally or you had to do something lame like put a bumper sticker on your car (if you had a car) or backpack. But now, with only a few keystrokes, you can signal your virtue on your facebook page and in your tweets, etc. for all your friends to see!

  25. @AndyBoy
    They won't fool anybody with this. The "elites" are very out of touch, very uncool, so to speak.

    The assumption is they can put a man-in-uniform up and enough conservatives will go dumb and vote for him out of doglike obedience. Not enough to win, just to keep the dreaded Trump from winning.

    Won't work.

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody's great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @aerg, @yaqub the mad scientist, @Anonymous, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Don’t discount the “squares”. Remember the Roman senate had the populist Gracchi assassinated and the populist movement put down violently. The Gracchi made the mistake of overestimating the power of the people and underestimating the “squares” of the Roman senate and elite.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Anonymous

    That was 2000 years ago in a different society--I doubt you'd get the army to participate in a coup at this point.

    Besides, Trump's probably a lot closer to Caesar in that conflict--the successful man of the people against the established rich.

  26. @DCThrowback
    If there's anyone worse than this guy, we haven't found him yet.

    Young man just came up to me at DCA to tell me he'd be an eager volunteer in a #Mattis2016 campaign. #Groundswell #Providential— Bill Kristol (@BillKristol) April 27, 2016
     

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Jack D, @Anonymous

    LOL. Things that never happened….

  27. This is just like that fat woman having a temper tantrum at UMass Amherst. Entertaining but signifying nothing.

    Mattis already bailed on the idea. And its going to be “war on women” from Hillary! against a GOP nominee who fights back, and does not roll over. Trump will see her “war on women” and call her on “Bill Clinton is a rapist.” Which is true. And add in corruption for both of them. Which is also true.

    And as much as Hillary! entrances nasty “Nice White Ladies” of the Mutti Merkel set, (which is probably most Nice White Ladies), she has nothing for struggling working class women, and repels every man with intact testicles.

    That voice.

  28. Too bad about Mattis. He was to be the millenial jarhead’s Chesty Puller, at least by rhetoric if not by deed.

    But he got sucked into foolishness, greed, and vanity rather than retiring back to the farm or whatever.

    Quite a tragedy, but more an indictment of the era than the individual.

  29. @AndyBoy
    They won't fool anybody with this. The "elites" are very out of touch, very uncool, so to speak.

    The assumption is they can put a man-in-uniform up and enough conservatives will go dumb and vote for him out of doglike obedience. Not enough to win, just to keep the dreaded Trump from winning.

    Won't work.

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody's great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @aerg, @yaqub the mad scientist, @Anonymous, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Fully agree.

    After all, right now at this moment, if you were to poll the average, ordinary person. Who has more name recognition, General Mattis or Donald Trump?

    If more than 99% of ordinary, independent regular voters have never even heard of this retired general, its going to be an extremely tough sell to ask people to vote for them when they don’t even know where he stands on the issues.

    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot’s VP running mate in ’92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words “Who am I? What am I doing here?”

    Quite apt.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    " How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot’s VP running mate in ’92?"

    I too cringed when I saw ADMIRAL Stockdale make those comments in 92, but then I was totally ignorant of his distinguished service to the country at that time. He was justly awarded the Medal of Honor for his brave service as a POW in North Vietnam after his plane was shot down during that war, unlike the phony Silver of Star given to the false hero John McCain. Even more impressive to me was his honest testimony, as one who "had the best seat in the house" during the Tonkin Gulf incidents which led to the misguided Vietnam War, that the North Vietnamese had not attacked during the second incident, as SOD McNamara and the Defense Department falsely claimed. By the time Perot named him as his running mate, he was too old for the job and was totally lacking in any political experience, so Perot did not do him any favors. By all accounts, he was a patriot and a very good man, who was ill-served and used by Perot. I am ashamed that I laughed at him in 92 when I didn't know all the facts.

    Replies: @Milo Minderbinder

    , @Jean Cocteausten
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Those were rhetorical questions signaling a self-introduction to follow. People who repeat this quote implying that he was some kind of blithering idiot ought to be ashamed of themselves. Stockdale was a hero.

    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot’s VP running mate in ’92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words “Who am I? What am I doing here?”

    Quite apt.
     
    That isn't what happened at all. I watched that debate, and what he said was, "I know what many of you must be wondering: Who am I? Why am I here?"

    Its some sort of popular myth that Admiral Stockdale was a doddering old buffoon who went senile on stage, but that event never actually took place. Admiral Stockdale was a bona fide war hero, a scholar of the classics, President of the Citadel, a fellow at the Rockford Institute, and absolutely nobody's fool.

    Replies: @anon

  30. And for Trump, guys, might as well move on, here is how it ends.

    Trump has an epic electoral sweep and his crossover that will be historic will be the minorities just like the blue collar whites were for Reagan.

    Blanket pardon or something for Hillary, who accepts the inevitable during the election, and just sorta phones it in like McCain did against Obama.

    Let’s talk about something else, cuz that is really how it is going to work out, it is just in process.

    • Replies: @MKP
    @anonguy

    As a strong Trump supporter, I love hearing all these comments. Steve has a smart, well-informed comment section, and several such readers are making it sounds like he really has to be favored. Maybe it's possible?

    I proudly voted for him in the primary and can't wait to vote for him in the general. And dumping Bush and Rubio overboard was a massive win, whatever else happens. Love seeing Trump's supporters get loud ... but since this seems to be a "predictions" thread, I'll reiterate my prediction that Hillary wins handily. Too many headwinds. The biggest (though not only) ones:

    (1) his own party failing to support him (or to support him strongly). The importance of party help at the local level - GOTV efforts, coordination of fundraising appeals, etc - is huge.

    (2) constant media attacks, and media protection of Hillary.

    (3) huge numbers of middle aged and elderly women who have already made up their minds. Seriously, go talk to some of the less intelligent women you know.

    "Isss time fo' a WO-muhn." That's what they say.

    "Oh, that's stupid." Of course it's stupid. That's democracy.

    My bet is that there will be a lot of regular iSteve posters eating crow in November. And, yes, if Trump wins, I'll happily come back here and admit I was an idiot and a Debbie Downer.

    I hope everyone has a great weekend.

    Replies: @Nico

  31. Maybe more women would be interested in his candidacy now that the Armed Services committee has moved to put universal conscription in place, meaning that women would be required to register for the draft.

    Does General Mattis have a position on universal conscription?

  32. Yeah, I might have to vote for Trump (rather than the Libertarians) after all given that he has all the right enemies.

  33. @NOTA
    @Zachary Latif

    I think a huge amount of the impact of SJW activism and protests has to do with weird aspects of social media we haven't quite got a handle on yet, as a society. A few obsessed crazies or zealots can convincingly similate a huge mob of people online, and it's often easy to get a lot of actual people to comment or send a message about something they don't really know anything about. (In a lot of ways, it seems like social media allow lots of people to do nasty and destructive things that were formerly only available to people in the traditional media.)

    My prediction is that this will become less effective over time, as the novelty wears off--organizations will learn that it's dumb to fire people over a Twitter mob calling for their ouster, fewer people will think 30 people camped out in the dean's office plus a flood of support on Facebook means there's much popular support for the movement, etc.

    Replies: @27 year old, @Jack D

    They’ll figure that out right at the same time that conservatives start using these tactics

  34. @NOTA
    @Zachary Latif

    I think a huge amount of the impact of SJW activism and protests has to do with weird aspects of social media we haven't quite got a handle on yet, as a society. A few obsessed crazies or zealots can convincingly similate a huge mob of people online, and it's often easy to get a lot of actual people to comment or send a message about something they don't really know anything about. (In a lot of ways, it seems like social media allow lots of people to do nasty and destructive things that were formerly only available to people in the traditional media.)

    My prediction is that this will become less effective over time, as the novelty wears off--organizations will learn that it's dumb to fire people over a Twitter mob calling for their ouster, fewer people will think 30 people camped out in the dean's office plus a flood of support on Facebook means there's much popular support for the movement, etc.

    Replies: @27 year old, @Jack D

    I think social media lowered the cost and raised the number of opportunities for virtue signaling in the way that crack increased the availability of cocaine to the masses (and they both provide addictive highs). In the past if you wanted to virtue signal to your in-group you had to do something inconvenient like attend a sit-in or a political rally or you had to do something lame like put a bumper sticker on your car (if you had a car) or backpack. But now, with only a few keystrokes, you can signal your virtue on your facebook page and in your tweets, etc. for all your friends to see!

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  35. @NOTA
    Nothing says "mature, functional democracy" quite like a shadowy cabal of billionaires doing an end-run around normal democratic procedures to put a general into control of the country.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Nothing says “mature, functional democracy” quite like a shadowy cabal of billionaires doing an end-run around normal democratic procedures to put a general into control of the country.”

    I didn’t realize that a group of well-known American citizens who happen to be wealthy lacked the liberty to choose to fund a third party candidate. Where is this “shadowy cabal”? Where is this “end-round” taking place if it’s being reported?

    How do YOU therefore propose to make this action other than legal?

    “I think a huge amount of the impact of SJW activism and protests has to do with weird aspects of social media we haven’t quite got a handle on yet, as a society. A few obsessed crazies or zealots can convincingly similate a huge mob of people online, and it’s often easy to get a lot of actual people to comment or send a message about something they don’t really know anything about.”

    Replace “impact of SJW activism and protests” with “impact of leftist and rightist fringe groups” and you may have a point.

    Now, what “weird aspects of social media” are you referring to? Furthermore, you are suggesting that those receiving the message lack the reasons behind it. You are underestimating people being hooked into their phone and have a general idea about things, and forming their opinions about matters and discussing them through social media.

    “My prediction is that this will become less effective over time, as the novelty wears off–organizations will learn that it’s dumb to fire people over a Twitter mob calling for their ouster, fewer people will think 30 people camped out in the dean’s office plus a flood of support on Facebook means there’s much popular support for the movement, etc.”

    My prediction–the Coalition of the Left and Right fringe groups will still employ these tactics, and their efforts will bear fruit. This strategy is no longer a novelty, it is now standard operating procedure.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Corvinus

    "I didn’t realize that a group of well-known American citizens who happen to be wealthy lacked the liberty to choose to fund a third party candidate. "

    They have the liberty; the question is, "How many idiots will follow their lead?"

    I say this as a "Never Trump" Cruz supporter. If Trump is nominated, I'll cast my protest vote for Gary Johnson, if the Libertarians nominate him. If they don't, I may stay home.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  36. iSteveFan says:

    A general with no political experience can only run for president if he is famous for his military exploits. Thus you have Generals Washington, Jackson, Grant and Eisenhower cashing their military fame into political advantage.

    There have only been two generals in the past quarter century that could have run for president, and only if they ran at the peak of their popularity. The first was Norman Schwarzkopf following the 1991 Gulf War. He probably could have had a chance in 1992, maybe 1996.

    The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.

    General Mattis just doesn’t have the popularity of the above to be able to jump into the race for president with no prior elective experience. Outside of a handful of military professionals, who has heard of him?

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @iSteveFan

    "The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008."

    Secretly most of the GOP establishment are Hussein Obama supporters as well.

    , @Jefferson
    @iSteveFan

    "The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008."

    Secretly most of the GOP establishment are Hussein Obama supporters as well.

    , @Richard
    @iSteveFan

    The point isn't to elect Mattis president, it's to throw the election to Clinton without actually going on the record in support of her.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Anonymous
    @iSteveFan

    Generals have a better track record of electoral success than businessmen with no political experience like Wendell Willkie.

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    , @Anonymous
    @iSteveFan

    Generals may not have political experience, but they have administrative experience running public institutions and organizations and bureaucracies, which Trump lacks. The Trump Organization is a large organization but it's a personal enterprise run by Trump and his family.

  37. General Jim, the warrior monk, is a very fine man, much beloved in the Marine Corps. Although it was rumored he was pushed into somewhat early retirement by the Obama administration, he helped keep us out of war with Iran by relentlessly asking the president’s men, “Okay, you do that, then what?” And, whatever they answered, he would say again, “Okay, you do that, then what?” pushing them relentlessly to realize for themselves that going to war with Iran would be at best a terrible thing to do and at worst a catastrophic thing to do.
    To get a sense of the man, this excerpt from private correspondence on the importance of reading, made available by Jill Russell, may be of more use than the fact that an acquaintance asked him the favor of being named to the board of some company:

    From General James Mattis, on the matter of professional reading, 20 November
    2003

    ….The problem with being too busy to read is that you learn by experience (or by your men’s experience), i.e. the hard way. By reading, you learn through others’ experiences, generally a better way to do business, especially in our line of work where the consequences of incompetence are so final for young men.

    Thanks to my reading, I have never been caught flat-footed by any situation, never at a loss for how any problem has been addressed (successfully or unsuccessfully) before. It doesn’t give me all the answers, but it lights what is often a dark path ahead.

    With TF 58, I had w/ me Slim’s book, books about the Russian and British experiences in AFG, and a couple others. Going into Iraq, “The Siege” (about the Brits’ defeat at Al Kut in WW I) was req’d reading for field grade officers. I also had Slim’s book; reviewed T.E. Lawrence’s “Seven Pillars of Wisdom”; a good book about the life of Gertrude Bell (the Brit archaeologist who virtually founded the modern Iraq state in the aftermath of WW I and the fall of the Ottoman empire); and “From Beirut to Jerusalem”. I also went deeply into Liddell Hart’s book on Sherman, and Fuller’s book on Alexander the Great got a lot of my attention (although I never imagined that my HQ would end up only 500 meters from where he lay in state in Babylon).

    Ultimately, a real understanding of history means that we face NOTHING new under the sun. For all the “4th Generation of War” intellectuals running around today saying that the nature of war has fundamentally changed, the tactics are wholly new, etc, I must respectfully say… “Not really”: Alex the Great would not be in the least bit perplexed by the enemy that we face right now in Iraq, and our leaders going into this fight do their troops a disservice by not studying (studying, vice just reading) the men who have gone before us.

    We have been fighting on this planet for 5000 years and we should take advantage of their experience. “Winging it” and filling body bags as we sort out what works reminds us of the moral dictates and the cost of incompetence in our profession. As commanders and staff officers, we are coaches and sentries for our units: how can we coach anything if we don’t know a hell of a lot more than just the TTPs? What happens when you’re on a dynamic battlefield and things are changing faster than higher HQ can stay abreast? Do you not adapt because you cannot conceptualize faster than the enemy’s adaptation? (Darwin has a pretty good theory about the outcome for those who cannot adapt to changing circumstance — in the information age things can change rather abruptly and at warp speed, especially the moral high ground which our regimented thinkers cede far too quickly in our recent fights.) And how can you be a sentinel and not have your unit caught flat-footed if you don’t know what the warning signs are — that your unit’s preps are not sufficient for the specifics of a tasking that you have not anticipated?

    Perhaps if you are in support functions waiting on the warfighters to spell out the specifics of what you are to do, you can avoid the consequences of not reading. Those who must adapt to overcoming an independent enemy’s will are not allowed that luxury.

    This is not new to the USMC approach to warfighting — Going into Kuwait 12 years ago, I read (and reread) Rommel’s Papers (remember “Kampstaffel”?), Montgomery’s book (“Eyes Officers”…), “Grant Takes Command” (need for commanders to get along, “commanders’ relationships” being more important than “command relationships”), and some others. As a result, the enemy has paid when I had the opportunity to go against them, and I believe that
    many of my young guys lived because I didn’t waste their lives because I didn’t have the vision in my mind of how to destroy the enemy at least cost to our guys and to the innocents on the battlefields.

    Hope this answers your question…. I will cc my ADC in the event he can add to this. He is theonly officer I know who has read more than I.

    Semper Fi, Mattis

    • Replies: @anon
    @Whoever

    he sounds quite good so how come Kristol likes him?

  38. With Bill Kristol’s record if he managed to install a general as military dictator the guy would turn out to be a secret Nazi.

  39. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3564362/California-lawmakers-reject-John-Wayne-Day-debate.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

    ‘I believe in white supremacy until the blacks are educated to a point of responsibility. I don’t believe in giving authority and positions of leadership and judgment to irresponsible people,’

    Say-racism is bad… but Do-racism is good.

    SF Libs are surely shocked by what Wayne said… but everything they DO is predicated on such assumptions.

  40. It’s inevitable: anytime the WSJ or Forbes slobbers over and then slaps on the front page the mug of any marginally attractive woman, declaring her “The Next Captain Genius Of Industry: Look Out, Boys!”, she either self-implodes, ruins the company, or (at best) achieve mediocre results.

    Damn, old men have zero ability to judge the beauty of young women: apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT and should be showered with the only card doddering geezers have left: wads of cash.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Anonym
    @dumpstersquirrel

    On the contrary, those old guys judged beauty well but competence/honesty, not so much.

    Replies: @Mark2

    , @Anonymous
    @dumpstersquirrel

    Yes, youth makes a huge difference and is a quality of its own. A younger, plainer woman will be more attractive simply by virtue of youth alone than an older woman who might have been beautiful when she was young, especially in the flesh when things like wrinkles and suppleness are more apparent and chemistry like pheromones come into play - younger, fertile women have a different odor than older women.

    You'll understand when you get older.

    , @Wilkey
    @dumpstersquirrel

    apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT

    Yep, pretty much. More seriously, the thing I've noticed in my very, very late 30s is that "flaws" that would have turned me off when I was 20 no longer do so at 39. So which tastes are more enlightened? The great thing about finding *more* women attractive is that you can focus on aspects of a woman beyond mere physical beauty. If you're single (I'm not) that can hardly be counted as a bad thing.

    For the record, in the video I've seen of Miss Holmes she is not remotely hot. She is, at best, a great candidate for one of those makeover shows. Perhaps I'm still not old enough.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Jack D
    @dumpstersquirrel

    HAWTNESS has to be judged on a relative scale. At a Victoria's Secret lingerie show, Elizabeth Holmes wouldn't look HAWT at all, but in Silicon Valley circles she looks pretty good - compared to Ellen Pao she's a 10.

    There are a couple of reasons for this - one is that people who are top talents in one field are already freaks of nature - there are only a few hundred women in the entire US out of 160 million who are beautiful enough to appear in a Victoria's Secret show so the odds that one of them would have the talent to ALSO be a Fortune 500 executive are doubly remote - like lightning striking the same spot twice.

    Second is that Victoria's Secret type models are not just works of nature - they spend a lot of time achieving their looks. Basically looking that beautiful is a full time job in itself which leaves no time to be a business executive, nor vice versa.

    I'm sure Elizabeth Holmes's only asset was not her (relatively modest) beauty. Being reasonably good looking (OF COURSE the women you date are MUCH MUCH HAWTER, I'm sure) didn't hurt her ability to charm older men and get them to sit on her board, etc. but she must have had something else going too or there would be hundreds of cute chick billionaires out there and there aren't.

  41. @iSteveFan
    A general with no political experience can only run for president if he is famous for his military exploits. Thus you have Generals Washington, Jackson, Grant and Eisenhower cashing their military fame into political advantage.

    There have only been two generals in the past quarter century that could have run for president, and only if they ran at the peak of their popularity. The first was Norman Schwarzkopf following the 1991 Gulf War. He probably could have had a chance in 1992, maybe 1996.

    The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.

    General Mattis just doesn't have the popularity of the above to be able to jump into the race for president with no prior elective experience. Outside of a handful of military professionals, who has heard of him?

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson, @Richard, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    “The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.”

    Secretly most of the GOP establishment are Hussein Obama supporters as well.

  42. @iSteveFan
    A general with no political experience can only run for president if he is famous for his military exploits. Thus you have Generals Washington, Jackson, Grant and Eisenhower cashing their military fame into political advantage.

    There have only been two generals in the past quarter century that could have run for president, and only if they ran at the peak of their popularity. The first was Norman Schwarzkopf following the 1991 Gulf War. He probably could have had a chance in 1992, maybe 1996.

    The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.

    General Mattis just doesn't have the popularity of the above to be able to jump into the race for president with no prior elective experience. Outside of a handful of military professionals, who has heard of him?

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson, @Richard, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    “The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.”

    Secretly most of the GOP establishment are Hussein Obama supporters as well.

  43. It would seem the cynicism necessary to graft a billion bucks from a few hundred million people morphs itself into absolute, bald-faced contempt.

  44. @iSteveFan
    A general with no political experience can only run for president if he is famous for his military exploits. Thus you have Generals Washington, Jackson, Grant and Eisenhower cashing their military fame into political advantage.

    There have only been two generals in the past quarter century that could have run for president, and only if they ran at the peak of their popularity. The first was Norman Schwarzkopf following the 1991 Gulf War. He probably could have had a chance in 1992, maybe 1996.

    The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.

    General Mattis just doesn't have the popularity of the above to be able to jump into the race for president with no prior elective experience. Outside of a handful of military professionals, who has heard of him?

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson, @Richard, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    The point isn’t to elect Mattis president, it’s to throw the election to Clinton without actually going on the record in support of her.

    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @anon
    @Richard

    Ah of course, makes sense - they'd need someone good for that and not just a puppet.

    (Also Generation Kill, apart from the usual Simon stuff - good show.)

  45. @iSteveFan
    A general with no political experience can only run for president if he is famous for his military exploits. Thus you have Generals Washington, Jackson, Grant and Eisenhower cashing their military fame into political advantage.

    There have only been two generals in the past quarter century that could have run for president, and only if they ran at the peak of their popularity. The first was Norman Schwarzkopf following the 1991 Gulf War. He probably could have had a chance in 1992, maybe 1996.

    The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.

    General Mattis just doesn't have the popularity of the above to be able to jump into the race for president with no prior elective experience. Outside of a handful of military professionals, who has heard of him?

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson, @Richard, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Generals have a better track record of electoral success than businessmen with no political experience like Wendell Willkie.

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @Anonymous

    Yeah, Generals who have garnered fame during a war.

  46. Mattis is a fairly distinctive and prominent character in the HBO Series Generation Kill. His character come off treated pretty well there.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @PenskeFile

    Yet, according to Sean Naylor's book about JSOC, Relentless Strike, the special forces guys found "Mad Dog" a bit timid.

  47. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Running Mattis would neutralize Trump’s primary strength of personal attacks against people. Trump would either hesitate to commit fully to making personal attacks against a military man, or he’d make personal attacks against the military man, putting off normal people. Personal attacks against Mattis would excite some of the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military, but it would turn off the far more numerous normal Americans.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Oop, too late Mattis has decided not to run.

    http://www.nytimes.com/politics/first-draft/2016/04/29/james-mattis-retired-general-decides-against-independent-presidential-bid/

    I'm sure the General's past is as pure as the driven snow and Trump would have never been able to lay a finger on him (those photos of Mattis and the underage hooker were surely fake), but for whatever reason he has decided not to run. Maybe being the frontman and a spoiler for the Billionaire's Liberation Front was not appealing to him.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Divine Right
    @Anonymous

    "Running Mattis would neutralize Trump’s primary strength of personal attacks against people."

    No, it wouldn't. Most people don't even know or care who Mattis is. Besides, it made no negative impact whatsoever when Trump attacked and made fun of McCain for getting shot down. Don't assume that most people have a blind loyalty to anything "military."

    "Personal attacks against Mattis would excite some of the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military, but it would turn off the far more numerous normal Americans."

    It didn't when he attacked George W. Bush. Considering some of Mattis's previous neocon comments, he'd be just as vulnerable.

  48. “An anonymous group of conservative billionaires is ready to place their bets on a man dubbed “Mad Dog,”

    Since the GOP establishment’s goal is to get Hildabeast elected president, why not just donate to her campaign and vote for her? No need to start a 3rd party. Hildabeast would be a great president for the GOP establishment, because she is a Backpage escort for cheap 3rd World labor and Wall Street.

    Aren’t the GOP establishment confident that Hildabeast can defeat Donald Trump 1 on 1 without a 3rd party spoiler? Do they think Hildabeast is that weak of a candidate?

  49. @Anonymous
    Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 and has been an infantry unit leader.

    So lots of IQ and manhood. Prime obsessions of the HBD community. What's not to like about the general?

    Replies: @Mark2, @gcochran, @Drapetomaniac

    People suffer from a serious lack of scale when it comes to IQ. An IQ of 140 is almost three standard deviations from the mean — that’s over the 99th percentile, iirc. You do not need an IQ that high to endure the military bureaucracy long enough to make O-10. In fact it would probably be counterproductive.

  50. @iSteveFan
    A general with no political experience can only run for president if he is famous for his military exploits. Thus you have Generals Washington, Jackson, Grant and Eisenhower cashing their military fame into political advantage.

    There have only been two generals in the past quarter century that could have run for president, and only if they ran at the peak of their popularity. The first was Norman Schwarzkopf following the 1991 Gulf War. He probably could have had a chance in 1992, maybe 1996.

    The other was Colin Powell. But Powell killed his chances by endorsing Obama in 2008.

    General Mattis just doesn't have the popularity of the above to be able to jump into the race for president with no prior elective experience. Outside of a handful of military professionals, who has heard of him?

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson, @Richard, @Anonymous, @Anonymous

    Generals may not have political experience, but they have administrative experience running public institutions and organizations and bureaucracies, which Trump lacks. The Trump Organization is a large organization but it’s a personal enterprise run by Trump and his family.

  51. @Anonymous
    @iSteveFan

    Generals have a better track record of electoral success than businessmen with no political experience like Wendell Willkie.

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    Yeah, Generals who have garnered fame during a war.

  52. OT: ‘John Wayne Day’ Resolution Fails in California Amid Race Furor

    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/john-wayne-day-resolution-fails-california-amid-race-furor-n564751

    It just never ends. Get a hard copy of all the classics. I wouldn’t be surprised if they’re eventually all de facto banned.

    IMHO, the 5 best John Wayne films

    The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)
    The Quiet Man (1952)
    Fort Apache (1948)
    Red River (1948)
    She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)

  53. @Whoever
    General Jim, the warrior monk, is a very fine man, much beloved in the Marine Corps. Although it was rumored he was pushed into somewhat early retirement by the Obama administration, he helped keep us out of war with Iran by relentlessly asking the president's men, "Okay, you do that, then what?" And, whatever they answered, he would say again, "Okay, you do that, then what?" pushing them relentlessly to realize for themselves that going to war with Iran would be at best a terrible thing to do and at worst a catastrophic thing to do.
    To get a sense of the man, this excerpt from private correspondence on the importance of reading, made available by Jill Russell, may be of more use than the fact that an acquaintance asked him the favor of being named to the board of some company:

    From General James Mattis, on the matter of professional reading, 20 November
    2003

    ….The problem with being too busy to read is that you learn by experience (or by your men’s experience), i.e. the hard way. By reading, you learn through others’ experiences, generally a better way to do business, especially in our line of work where the consequences of incompetence are so final for young men.

    Thanks to my reading, I have never been caught flat-footed by any situation, never at a loss for how any problem has been addressed (successfully or unsuccessfully) before. It doesn’t give me all the answers, but it lights what is often a dark path ahead.

    With TF 58, I had w/ me Slim’s book, books about the Russian and British experiences in AFG, and a couple others. Going into Iraq, “The Siege” (about the Brits’ defeat at Al Kut in WW I) was req’d reading for field grade officers. I also had Slim’s book; reviewed T.E. Lawrence’s “Seven Pillars of Wisdom”; a good book about the life of Gertrude Bell (the Brit archaeologist who virtually founded the modern Iraq state in the aftermath of WW I and the fall of the Ottoman empire); and “From Beirut to Jerusalem”. I also went deeply into Liddell Hart’s book on Sherman, and Fuller’s book on Alexander the Great got a lot of my attention (although I never imagined that my HQ would end up only 500 meters from where he lay in state in Babylon).

    Ultimately, a real understanding of history means that we face NOTHING new under the sun. For all the “4th Generation of War” intellectuals running around today saying that the nature of war has fundamentally changed, the tactics are wholly new, etc, I must respectfully say… “Not really”: Alex the Great would not be in the least bit perplexed by the enemy that we face right now in Iraq, and our leaders going into this fight do their troops a disservice by not studying (studying, vice just reading) the men who have gone before us.

    We have been fighting on this planet for 5000 years and we should take advantage of their experience. “Winging it” and filling body bags as we sort out what works reminds us of the moral dictates and the cost of incompetence in our profession. As commanders and staff officers, we are coaches and sentries for our units: how can we coach anything if we don’t know a hell of a lot more than just the TTPs? What happens when you’re on a dynamic battlefield and things are changing faster than higher HQ can stay abreast? Do you not adapt because you cannot conceptualize faster than the enemy’s adaptation? (Darwin has a pretty good theory about the outcome for those who cannot adapt to changing circumstance — in the information age things can change rather abruptly and at warp speed, especially the moral high ground which our regimented thinkers cede far too quickly in our recent fights.) And how can you be a sentinel and not have your unit caught flat-footed if you don’t know what the warning signs are — that your unit’s preps are not sufficient for the specifics of a tasking that you have not anticipated?

    Perhaps if you are in support functions waiting on the warfighters to spell out the specifics of what you are to do, you can avoid the consequences of not reading. Those who must adapt to overcoming an independent enemy’s will are not allowed that luxury.

    This is not new to the USMC approach to warfighting — Going into Kuwait 12 years ago, I read (and reread) Rommel’s Papers (remember “Kampstaffel”?), Montgomery’s book (“Eyes Officers”…), “Grant Takes Command” (need for commanders to get along, “commanders’ relationships” being more important than “command relationships”), and some others. As a result, the enemy has paid when I had the opportunity to go against them, and I believe that
    many of my young guys lived because I didn’t waste their lives because I didn’t have the vision in my mind of how to destroy the enemy at least cost to our guys and to the innocents on the battlefields.

    Hope this answers your question…. I will cc my ADC in the event he can add to this. He is theonly officer I know who has read more than I.

    Semper Fi, Mattis

    Replies: @anon

    he sounds quite good so how come Kristol likes him?

  54. @Anonymous
    Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 and has been an infantry unit leader.

    So lots of IQ and manhood. Prime obsessions of the HBD community. What's not to like about the general?

    Replies: @Mark2, @gcochran, @Drapetomaniac

    “Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 ”

    Like Tommy Franks, like Colin Powell.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @gcochran

    What makes you so sure that those guys don't have an IQ of 140?

    Replies: @Anonymous

  55. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Can you imagine this retired general releasing his financials and we get to see how much money he is getting sitting on the board of GD and the lots of other DoD/USG contractors?? “He made what from attending four meetings in a year??”

    I met Mattis briefly in my previous career. I have no doubt Mattis would quickly become Trump roadkill, particularly related to his private sector activities. It will be an embarrassing public display, like Adm. Stockdale times a thousand (not to compare Mattis to a real war hero like Stockdale). Financials aside, it would be brutal because Mattis has the cognitive brainpower one would expect from a unremarkable student with a history degree from Central Washington University. One of the least impressive generals I’ve met. No Monty Meigs or Anthony Zinni for sure. And Mattis doesn’t make up for it with a large personality. Someone close to Mattis needs to perform an act of charity and tell him not to even consider being the candidate.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  56. @Richard
    @iSteveFan

    The point isn't to elect Mattis president, it's to throw the election to Clinton without actually going on the record in support of her.

    Replies: @anon

    Ah of course, makes sense – they’d need someone good for that and not just a puppet.

    (Also Generation Kill, apart from the usual Simon stuff – good show.)

  57. @Jack D
    @DCThrowback

    Was the young man's name Haven Monahan by any chance?

    Replies: @Bill

    Winning comment.

  58. @yaqub the mad scientist
    @AndyBoy

    I think John McCain made a number of conservatives cross their taboo about not blindingly supporting military in politics. If anything, he helped them finally notice that in a lot of societies, a military background does not guarantee conservative nationalist sentiments or that one is solely loyal to his country.

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    John McCain was in the military, but never had the strategic background of the high ranking generals who later went on to win the presidency. McCain’s experience consisted of around 25 flying hours of combat time and his unfortunate 7 yeas as a POW.

  59. anon • Disclaimer says:

    off-topic

    http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/up-front/posts/2016/04/27-gun-violence-has-been-massively-underreported-until-now-doleac#.VyJwN5oFFV4.twitter

    this could become a very big thing if it rolls out wider (so I suspect it won’t be)

    the kind of thing missed is for example local gang in a project type environment shooting at trees – no overt crime but the aim is to intimidate everyone in the project – which it does

  60. As if Trump has even a snowball’s chance in hell of winning in November.

    Sure. That’s why TPTB were hell-bent for a brokered convention, and now that the chances of that are fading, they’re going third party candidate; cuz they know Trump has no chance.

    That’s why you’re here running psyops; cuz you no a-scared.

    It looks like Gen. Mattis fit in. And to think that Bill Kristol, the man who was responsible for Sarah Palin being on McCain’s ticket in 2008, thinks he will make a fine President is the only thing you need to know.

    Mattis is clearly a money-grubbing tool. Who else lets himself be used in this way, with everything that’s at stake?

    Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 and has been an infantry unit leader.

    So lots of IQ and manhood. Prime obsessions of the HBD community. What’s not to like about the general?

    Nazis had lots of generals. So did the Soviets. We were ready to kill the lot.

    Any other softballs to throw?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Svigor

    Is it the case that he is a secret Nazi or Soviet?

  61. Running Mattis would neutralize Trump’s primary strength of personal attacks against people. Trump would either hesitate to commit fully to making personal attacks against a military man, or he’d make personal attacks against the military man, putting off normal people. Personal attacks against Mattis would excite some of the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military, but it would turn off the far more numerous normal Americans.

    “I feel bad for this guy. He’s being used by the donor class globalists who want cheap labor and bad trade deals so they can offshore all of America’s wealth. They figure they can stand up some poor general and show some photos of him in his dress uniform and peel off enough voters to put Hillary in the White House.”

  62. …the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military,

    This, along with the obsessive Jew-hatred, is what keeps me from going “all-in” for the alt-right. I’m still one-foot-in, one-foot-out.

    As Trump has shown, there’s a big market for alt-right ideas out there, but they have to be presented in a way that appeals to normal Americans. Normal Americans respect the U.S. military while being highly skeptical about foreign entanglements. Normal Americans find the the neocons’ Israel obsession tiresome, but they don’t automatically see the Israelis as the bad guys. Normal Americans have no use for pointy-headed Jewish intellectualism, but they don’t hate Jews. They recognize, as wise men have for eons, that the Hebrews are useful and entertaining as long as there’s a Leslie Groves around to keep them under adult supervision.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Mr. Blank


    This, along with the obsessive Jew-hatred
     
    Pointing out that the media is overwhelmingly Jewish and that they promote policies for the US the opposite of what they support for Israel is obsessive Jew hatred - right.

    Although it is true that obsessive anti-white paranoia does always lead to obsessive Jew-hatred eventually in a repeating cycle.

    Replies: @JSM

    , @SFG
    @Mr. Blank

    Yeah, even if it weren't for my ancestry I think fascism is a loser. It seems to lead countries to take gambles they can't win. If Hitler hadn't had all these romantic ideas about the destiny of the German people and remaking Europe in his image he could have nipped off the bits of other countries that had German-speakers in them, dug in, and been remembered as the guy who grew Germany. Hell, the Blut und Boden approach Israel is taking now has turned all their former allies against them except for the USA, and even Americans are getting sick of them. You can be too right-wing.

    I think the best you can hope for is a white party to complement the Democrats as a minority party, and they'll negotiate. Just like I feel there needs to be a mens' movement to fight back against feminists on stuff like divorce and rape accusations...but it's not as if women have no legitimate interests at all.

    Replies: @Jack D

  63. The quandry: the more daylight General Tool puts between himself and Trump, the more votes he steals from Hillary.

  64. I don’t dislike or denigrate the military. I just know they do the bidding of the whatever administration is in charge, and the administration usually does the bidding of the globalists.

    No free lunch for ex-military running for office. If a general jumps off a bridge, you gonna go do likewise?

  65. What Trump Derangment Syndrome looks like:

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/04/donald-trump-2016-campaign-biography-psychology-history-barrett-hurt-dantiono-blair-obrien-213835?o=4

    Look, I get that Trump has had a rather uneven past as a businessman, and has some coarseness and boastfulness issues. But surely if you put together five journalists who have written books about him, you ought to be able to come up with a single genuinely positive thing to say about him, right?

    Not, apparently, when Politico chooses the journalists, and goads them in an interview.

    These people could start their own asylum.

  66. A White guy with a Make America Great Again cap and t-shirt was sucker punched in the back by some dirty Mexicans in Burlingame, California. There were lots of Mexican flags present. Surprisingly Black Lies Matter did not have a heavy presence at this anti-Trump protest.

    • Replies: @rod1963
    @Jefferson

    They wouldn't dare show up because the Mexican radicals hate them. Remember in CA, the Mexicans practice ethnic cleansing of blacks from their neighborhoods.

    The animosity between the two groups is pretty bad.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  67. @dumpstersquirrel
    It's inevitable: anytime the WSJ or Forbes slobbers over and then slaps on the front page the mug of any marginally attractive woman, declaring her "The Next Captain Genius Of Industry: Look Out, Boys!", she either self-implodes, ruins the company, or (at best) achieve mediocre results.

    Damn, old men have zero ability to judge the beauty of young women: apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT and should be showered with the only card doddering geezers have left: wads of cash.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anonymous, @Wilkey, @Jack D

    On the contrary, those old guys judged beauty well but competence/honesty, not so much.

    • Replies: @Mark2
    @Anonym

    Seriously? Are that many commenters here that desperate or blind?

    Replies: @Anonym, @Lot

  68. @DCThrowback
    @AndyBoy

    Sadly, it probably would work.

    Imagine the irony of a third party candidate again putting a Clinton in the Whitehouse? I still loathe RP to this day for creating the Clinton machine.

    Replies: @Josh

    I know but the other guy was also a world class creep.

    • Agree: Nico
  69. By the way, “press into service … again” is an oafish metaphor to use when talking about a general or any modery miltary man. It’s hardly as if he had been pressed into service the first time.

  70. Odds that Elizabeth Holmes is a fraud: >99%

    Odds that Elizabeth Holmes will see the inside of a jail cell: <1%

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  71. @Anonymous
    Eisenhauer's words were never truer. Beware the Military-Industrial complex ideed.

    Replies: @Lot

    Eisenhauer’s words were never truer. Beware the Military-Industrial complex ideed.

    YES! Also, the idea that people want to vote for a “war hero” is just wrong. Time and again you see candidates who play up the military vet angle lose badly, worse than a generic party member.

    In all the following elections, the candidate with the inferior military record won:

    1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008

    By contrast, the better record won in:

    1988

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Lot

    You're definitely right about '88 '92, '96, and '08, probably '72 also. (Was McGovern a pilot or a navigator? Nixon was a Naval supply officer. Did he go to sea? I think he left the service as a Lieutenant Commander.) Also probably about '80 and '04. '76, '84, and '00 are arguable. In what capacity did Mondale serve in WW2? I don't remember him talking about it, or anyone talking about it in his behalf.

    Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

  72. @Anonymous
    Running Mattis would neutralize Trump's primary strength of personal attacks against people. Trump would either hesitate to commit fully to making personal attacks against a military man, or he'd make personal attacks against the military man, putting off normal people. Personal attacks against Mattis would excite some of the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military, but it would turn off the far more numerous normal Americans.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Divine Right

    Oop, too late Mattis has decided not to run.

    http://www.nytimes.com/politics/first-draft/2016/04/29/james-mattis-retired-general-decides-against-independent-presidential-bid/

    I’m sure the General’s past is as pure as the driven snow and Trump would have never been able to lay a finger on him (those photos of Mattis and the underage hooker were surely fake), but for whatever reason he has decided not to run. Maybe being the frontman and a spoiler for the Billionaire’s Liberation Front was not appealing to him.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Jack D

    I've often wondered how many public-minded men from business or the military (ie, who have run large organizations) just don't want to deal with 24/7 news channels, Twitter, and armies of people going through their personal lives.

  73. @Anonymous
    Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 and has been an infantry unit leader.

    So lots of IQ and manhood. Prime obsessions of the HBD community. What's not to like about the general?

    Replies: @Mark2, @gcochran, @Drapetomaniac

    “Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140”

    So he’s a sociopath with some sort of high IQ. History really doesn’t need anymore of them.

  74. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:

    Billionaires have so much power.

    I think we should be billionaires too.

    How?

    I’m going to start a new movement: Trans-classism.

    I’ve decided I’m now worth 50 billion dollars. I’m richer than Bill Gates.
    Why? Cuz I said so. If Bruce Jenner is a woman cuz he says so, I’m super-rich cuz I say so. So, just like Jenner can use women’s washrooms, I demand that all rich man’s clubs open up to me. And if I want to buy stuff, all stores better receive my fantasy money. If I go to a car dealership and make believe I gave them 100,000 dollars for a fancy sports car, they better gimme the car. Fantasy money is as good as real money.

    I think i’ll buy a super yacht like the one Larry Ellison has. I have 50 million dollars in my hand right now cuz I say so. They better give it to me too. If they don’t, my rights have been violated.

    Now, I understand why we need ‘gay marriage’ and all these fairy-tale tranny stuff.
    In a world where so many people have less and less, it is wonderfully therapeutic to believe that fantasies are true.
    It used to be we had to go fantasy island and meet the dwarf to have our dreams come true.
    But now, we have fantasy nation where all our dreams can be true.

    No more need for envy or resentment. We are now what we want to be just by believing in it.
    If Rachel Dolezal says she’s black, she is.
    If illegals dream they are citizens, they are.
    If men say they are women, they are.
    If Hillary says Russia is new nazi nation, it is.
    Making believe is same as making it true.

    So, don’t worry about the 1% vs the 99%.
    Via trans-classism, we can all make believe that we are part of the 1% and, golly gee whiz, we are!!! And if anyone says otherwise, he is violating your rights!! He must be punished.

    Yes, fantasize you got billions, and indeed you do!!

    And with virtual reality technology just around the corner, you can put on video goggles and pretend you are surrounded by tons of wealth and good stuff. Wow.

    I feel generous today. I’m gonna give each of you a billion dollars. Here you go.
    You got it? Good. We are all so rich.

    It used to be ‘seeing is believing’. Now, ‘believing is seeing’. I believe I have 50 billion in gold. Wow, I see it, I see it!!

    Walter Mitty was ahead of his time.

  75. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @AndyBoy

    Fully agree.

    After all, right now at this moment, if you were to poll the average, ordinary person. Who has more name recognition, General Mattis or Donald Trump?

    If more than 99% of ordinary, independent regular voters have never even heard of this retired general, its going to be an extremely tough sell to ask people to vote for them when they don't even know where he stands on the issues.

    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot's VP running mate in '92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words "Who am I? What am I doing here?"

    Quite apt.

    Replies: @tbraton, @Jean Cocteausten, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    ” How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot’s VP running mate in ’92?”

    I too cringed when I saw ADMIRAL Stockdale make those comments in 92, but then I was totally ignorant of his distinguished service to the country at that time. He was justly awarded the Medal of Honor for his brave service as a POW in North Vietnam after his plane was shot down during that war, unlike the phony Silver of Star given to the false hero John McCain. Even more impressive to me was his honest testimony, as one who “had the best seat in the house” during the Tonkin Gulf incidents which led to the misguided Vietnam War, that the North Vietnamese had not attacked during the second incident, as SOD McNamara and the Defense Department falsely claimed. By the time Perot named him as his running mate, he was too old for the job and was totally lacking in any political experience, so Perot did not do him any favors. By all accounts, he was a patriot and a very good man, who was ill-served and used by Perot. I am ashamed that I laughed at him in 92 when I didn’t know all the facts.

    • Replies: @Milo Minderbinder
    @tbraton

    Dennis Miller on Stockdale and the 1992 VP Debate:

    "Now I know [Stockdale's name has] become a buzzword in this culture for doddering old man, but let's look at the record, folks. The guy was the first guy in and the last guy out of Vietnam, a war that many Americans, including our present president, did not want to dirty their hands with. The reason he had to turn his hearing aid on at that debate is because those f***ing animals knocked his eardrums out when he wouldn't spill his guts. He teaches philosophy at Stanford University, he's a brilliant, sensitive, courageous man. And yet he committed the one unpardonable sin in our culture: he was bad on television."

    Replies: @SFG, @tbraton

  76. @gcochran
    @Anonymous

    "Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 "

    Like Tommy Franks, like Colin Powell.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    What makes you so sure that those guys don’t have an IQ of 140?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Because those guys remind him of the guys who used to stuff nerds like him into lockers in high school. Nerds hate guys that are smarter than them and can stuff them into lockers at will.

    Replies: @Mark2, @Anonymous

  77. @anonguy
    And for Trump, guys, might as well move on, here is how it ends.

    Trump has an epic electoral sweep and his crossover that will be historic will be the minorities just like the blue collar whites were for Reagan.

    Blanket pardon or something for Hillary, who accepts the inevitable during the election, and just sorta phones it in like McCain did against Obama.

    Let's talk about something else, cuz that is really how it is going to work out, it is just in process.

    Replies: @MKP

    As a strong Trump supporter, I love hearing all these comments. Steve has a smart, well-informed comment section, and several such readers are making it sounds like he really has to be favored. Maybe it’s possible?

    I proudly voted for him in the primary and can’t wait to vote for him in the general. And dumping Bush and Rubio overboard was a massive win, whatever else happens. Love seeing Trump’s supporters get loud … but since this seems to be a “predictions” thread, I’ll reiterate my prediction that Hillary wins handily. Too many headwinds. The biggest (though not only) ones:

    (1) his own party failing to support him (or to support him strongly). The importance of party help at the local level – GOTV efforts, coordination of fundraising appeals, etc – is huge.

    (2) constant media attacks, and media protection of Hillary.

    (3) huge numbers of middle aged and elderly women who have already made up their minds. Seriously, go talk to some of the less intelligent women you know.

    “Isss time fo’ a WO-muhn.” That’s what they say.

    “Oh, that’s stupid.” Of course it’s stupid. That’s democracy.

    My bet is that there will be a lot of regular iSteve posters eating crow in November. And, yes, if Trump wins, I’ll happily come back here and admit I was an idiot and a Debbie Downer.

    I hope everyone has a great weekend.

    • Replies: @Nico
    @MKP

    The Godsend would be if Hillary Clinton nominates another woman to be her running mate. Two wrinkled old white woman feminists for America. Now THAT's the "broad list" Derbyshire had in mind! No less than 75% of American males would vote Republican, probably in the highest male turnout since before the passage of the 19th Amendment.

    But wait! Hillary could still pull off a victory with just the right choice. Imagine Elizabeth Warren? Then the campaign slogan could be, "Two women, two minorities!" Okay, maybe Hillary's NOT a lesbian, but at the very least, she's no less a lesbian than Warren is an American Indian, so who cares?

    Replies: @Jack D

  78. I’m sure the General’s past is as pure as the driven snow and Trump would have never been able to lay a finger on him (those photos of Mattis and the underage hooker were surely fake), but for whatever reason he has decided not to run. Maybe being the frontman and a spoiler for the Billionaire’s Liberation Front was not appealing to him.

    Congrats to Mattis, and my apologies. I was in a hurry and didn’t read any sources – I thought he’d already announced.

  79. I’m too lazy to do the investigative research, but I am starting to suspect that Theranos is really a secret In-Q-Tel project to prolong the lives of a cadre of old, elite Basterds by transfusing them with the essence of young virgins.

    That ready-volunteer who approached Kristol at DCA has undoubtedly already been taken.

  80. “In all the following elections, the candidate with the inferior military record won:”

    1972 … True that … It is hard to dislike a distinguished combat pilot over a supply clerk, but somehow the clerk won ….
    1976 … tough choice; guy who decommissioned melted down nuke reactor over athletic officer
    1980 … Hmmm! Guy who braved radiation to decommission failed reactor over (no offence) a propaganda film maker in a real war
    1984 … Come on! Guy who served two years at Fort Knox during Korean War vs. WW-II propaganda film maker?
    1992 … can’t dispute that
    1996 … cannot at all dispute that
    2000 … Gore’s service is dubious at best
    2004 … Much as I hate to admit it, Kerry did run the risk of getting scratched in a combat zone, while Bush was only subject to a fiery crash by his own stupidity
    2008 … only because McCain actually had military service.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @The Alarmist

    Ford was more than an "athletic officer," although coaching sports was one duty he had during some parts of the war. He volunteered for sea duty. He was an antiaircraft battery commander on an aircraft carrier through many combat missions, and survived an incident where he was nearly knocked overboard in a typhoon.

    , @Lot
    @The Alarmist



    1984 … Come on! Guy who served two years at Fort Knox during Korean War vs. WW-II propaganda film maker?
     
    He volunteered for the army during a war, so I give him a slight edge over Reagan even though he served in the USA.

    2000 … Gore’s service is dubious at best
     
    At least he showed up and was physically present in Vietnam. Bush meanwhile did not even show up repeatedly to his national guard duty, and used his father's influence to take many months off of limited national guard duty to work in a political campaign out of state.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  81. @AndyBoy
    They won't fool anybody with this. The "elites" are very out of touch, very uncool, so to speak.

    The assumption is they can put a man-in-uniform up and enough conservatives will go dumb and vote for him out of doglike obedience. Not enough to win, just to keep the dreaded Trump from winning.

    Won't work.

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody's great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    Replies: @DCThrowback, @aerg, @yaqub the mad scientist, @Anonymous, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Suddenly the elites seem like somebody’s great-Aunt trying to fit in with the rock crowd. As if they think they could revamp Pat Boone to compete with the Beatles.

    Buncha squares.

    Welcome to Low Energy City.

  82. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @AndyBoy

    Fully agree.

    After all, right now at this moment, if you were to poll the average, ordinary person. Who has more name recognition, General Mattis or Donald Trump?

    If more than 99% of ordinary, independent regular voters have never even heard of this retired general, its going to be an extremely tough sell to ask people to vote for them when they don't even know where he stands on the issues.

    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot's VP running mate in '92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words "Who am I? What am I doing here?"

    Quite apt.

    Replies: @tbraton, @Jean Cocteausten, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Those were rhetorical questions signaling a self-introduction to follow. People who repeat this quote implying that he was some kind of blithering idiot ought to be ashamed of themselves. Stockdale was a hero.

  83. @Corvinus
    @NOTA

    "Nothing says “mature, functional democracy” quite like a shadowy cabal of billionaires doing an end-run around normal democratic procedures to put a general into control of the country."

    I didn't realize that a group of well-known American citizens who happen to be wealthy lacked the liberty to choose to fund a third party candidate. Where is this "shadowy cabal"? Where is this "end-round" taking place if it's being reported?

    How do YOU therefore propose to make this action other than legal?


    "I think a huge amount of the impact of SJW activism and protests has to do with weird aspects of social media we haven’t quite got a handle on yet, as a society. A few obsessed crazies or zealots can convincingly similate a huge mob of people online, and it’s often easy to get a lot of actual people to comment or send a message about something they don’t really know anything about."

    Replace "impact of SJW activism and protests" with "impact of leftist and rightist fringe groups" and you may have a point.

    Now, what "weird aspects of social media" are you referring to? Furthermore, you are suggesting that those receiving the message lack the reasons behind it. You are underestimating people being hooked into their phone and have a general idea about things, and forming their opinions about matters and discussing them through social media.

    "My prediction is that this will become less effective over time, as the novelty wears off–organizations will learn that it’s dumb to fire people over a Twitter mob calling for their ouster, fewer people will think 30 people camped out in the dean’s office plus a flood of support on Facebook means there’s much popular support for the movement, etc."

    My prediction--the Coalition of the Left and Right fringe groups will still employ these tactics, and their efforts will bear fruit. This strategy is no longer a novelty, it is now standard operating procedure.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    “I didn’t realize that a group of well-known American citizens who happen to be wealthy lacked the liberty to choose to fund a third party candidate. ”

    They have the liberty; the question is, “How many idiots will follow their lead?”

    I say this as a “Never Trump” Cruz supporter. If Trump is nominated, I’ll cast my protest vote for Gary Johnson, if the Libertarians nominate him. If they don’t, I may stay home.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Hibernian

    "They have the liberty; the question is, “How many idiots will follow their lead?”"

    So, people are idiots for working toward electing someone they believe will be the best person to be president, even if that person is backed by billionaires. Fascinating.

  84. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @AndyBoy

    Fully agree.

    After all, right now at this moment, if you were to poll the average, ordinary person. Who has more name recognition, General Mattis or Donald Trump?

    If more than 99% of ordinary, independent regular voters have never even heard of this retired general, its going to be an extremely tough sell to ask people to vote for them when they don't even know where he stands on the issues.

    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot's VP running mate in '92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words "Who am I? What am I doing here?"

    Quite apt.

    Replies: @tbraton, @Jean Cocteausten, @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot’s VP running mate in ’92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words “Who am I? What am I doing here?”

    Quite apt.

    That isn’t what happened at all. I watched that debate, and what he said was, “I know what many of you must be wondering: Who am I? Why am I here?

    Its some sort of popular myth that Admiral Stockdale was a doddering old buffoon who went senile on stage, but that event never actually took place. Admiral Stockdale was a bona fide war hero, a scholar of the classics, President of the Citadel, a fellow at the Rockford Institute, and absolutely nobody’s fool.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Kevin O'Keeffe

    A good example though of how someone naturally honest will get chewed up by the political machine.

  85. @Lot
    @Anonymous


    Eisenhauer’s words were never truer. Beware the Military-Industrial complex ideed.
     
    YES! Also, the idea that people want to vote for a "war hero" is just wrong. Time and again you see candidates who play up the military vet angle lose badly, worse than a generic party member.

    In all the following elections, the candidate with the inferior military record won:

    1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008


    By contrast, the better record won in:

    1988

    Replies: @Hibernian

    You’re definitely right about ’88 ’92, ’96, and ’08, probably ’72 also. (Was McGovern a pilot or a navigator? Nixon was a Naval supply officer. Did he go to sea? I think he left the service as a Lieutenant Commander.) Also probably about ’80 and ’04. ’76, ’84, and ’00 are arguable. In what capacity did Mondale serve in WW2? I don’t remember him talking about it, or anyone talking about it in his behalf.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Hibernian


    Was McGovern a pilot or a navigator?
     
    George McGovern was a very accomplished bomber pilot.
  86. @Anonym
    @dumpstersquirrel

    On the contrary, those old guys judged beauty well but competence/honesty, not so much.

    Replies: @Mark2

    Seriously? Are that many commenters here that desperate or blind?

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Mark2

    Hmmm. Google image searched her... I would give her a 7. Maybe a high 7. The makeup on Steve's pic is good. Not ugly, but above average.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    , @Lot
    @Mark2

    The internet is so full of studs who bang a new Victoria's Secret model every night.

  87. @Anonymous
    @gcochran

    What makes you so sure that those guys don't have an IQ of 140?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Because those guys remind him of the guys who used to stuff nerds like him into lockers in high school. Nerds hate guys that are smarter than them and can stuff them into lockers at will.

    • Replies: @Mark2
    @Anonymous

    Only somebody that hasn't been anywhere near the military could think that the senior "leadership" selects for IQ.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Even if all of the generals have IQ's of 140 (which I doubt), Greg Cochran's IQ is significantly higher than that.

    Replies: @SFG

  88. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Because those guys remind him of the guys who used to stuff nerds like him into lockers in high school. Nerds hate guys that are smarter than them and can stuff them into lockers at will.

    Replies: @Mark2, @Anonymous

    Only somebody that hasn’t been anywhere near the military could think that the senior “leadership” selects for IQ.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Mark2

    If you think they're a bunch of dummies, you've missed the boat. Smart people do dumb things, in the service as elsewhere.

    , @AndrewR
    @Mark2

    Elaborate please.

    , @Anonymous
    @Mark2

    And I doubt you have been anywhere near the military. It's hard to imagine someone with an IQ of below 120 running a large organization. Those who are promoted to general are those who have near perfect records of running a large organization. Senior generals are even more selected then that. Whatever politics is part of this process, competence at running things is still a critical component.

  89. @The Alarmist
    "In all the following elections, the candidate with the inferior military record won:"

    1972 ... True that ... It is hard to dislike a distinguished combat pilot over a supply clerk, but somehow the clerk won ....
    1976 ... tough choice; guy who decommissioned melted down nuke reactor over athletic officer
    1980 ... Hmmm! Guy who braved radiation to decommission failed reactor over (no offence) a propaganda film maker in a real war
    1984 ... Come on! Guy who served two years at Fort Knox during Korean War vs. WW-II propaganda film maker?
    1992 ... can't dispute that
    1996 ... cannot at all dispute that
    2000 ... Gore's service is dubious at best
    2004 ... Much as I hate to admit it, Kerry did run the risk of getting scratched in a combat zone, while Bush was only subject to a fiery crash by his own stupidity
    2008 ... only because McCain actually had military service.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Lot

    Ford was more than an “athletic officer,” although coaching sports was one duty he had during some parts of the war. He volunteered for sea duty. He was an antiaircraft battery commander on an aircraft carrier through many combat missions, and survived an incident where he was nearly knocked overboard in a typhoon.

  90. @Mark2
    @Anonym

    Seriously? Are that many commenters here that desperate or blind?

    Replies: @Anonym, @Lot

    Hmmm. Google image searched her… I would give her a 7. Maybe a high 7. The makeup on Steve’s pic is good. Not ugly, but above average.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @Anonym

    As Wilkey has mentioned, Elizabeth Holmes doesn't look that good in videos. She has the body, voice, and face of a women's basketball player. Her photos rely on lighting, makeup, and perhaps airbrushing.

    https://youtu.be/UiNFXcI9Rb8

    Replies: @Richard

  91. @Mark2
    @Anonymous

    Only somebody that hasn't been anywhere near the military could think that the senior "leadership" selects for IQ.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    If you think they’re a bunch of dummies, you’ve missed the boat. Smart people do dumb things, in the service as elsewhere.

  92. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @dumpstersquirrel
    It's inevitable: anytime the WSJ or Forbes slobbers over and then slaps on the front page the mug of any marginally attractive woman, declaring her "The Next Captain Genius Of Industry: Look Out, Boys!", she either self-implodes, ruins the company, or (at best) achieve mediocre results.

    Damn, old men have zero ability to judge the beauty of young women: apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT and should be showered with the only card doddering geezers have left: wads of cash.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anonymous, @Wilkey, @Jack D

    Yes, youth makes a huge difference and is a quality of its own. A younger, plainer woman will be more attractive simply by virtue of youth alone than an older woman who might have been beautiful when she was young, especially in the flesh when things like wrinkles and suppleness are more apparent and chemistry like pheromones come into play – younger, fertile women have a different odor than older women.

    You’ll understand when you get older.

  93. @Mark2
    @Anonymous

    Only somebody that hasn't been anywhere near the military could think that the senior "leadership" selects for IQ.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    Elaborate please.

  94. @tbraton
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    " How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot’s VP running mate in ’92?"

    I too cringed when I saw ADMIRAL Stockdale make those comments in 92, but then I was totally ignorant of his distinguished service to the country at that time. He was justly awarded the Medal of Honor for his brave service as a POW in North Vietnam after his plane was shot down during that war, unlike the phony Silver of Star given to the false hero John McCain. Even more impressive to me was his honest testimony, as one who "had the best seat in the house" during the Tonkin Gulf incidents which led to the misguided Vietnam War, that the North Vietnamese had not attacked during the second incident, as SOD McNamara and the Defense Department falsely claimed. By the time Perot named him as his running mate, he was too old for the job and was totally lacking in any political experience, so Perot did not do him any favors. By all accounts, he was a patriot and a very good man, who was ill-served and used by Perot. I am ashamed that I laughed at him in 92 when I didn't know all the facts.

    Replies: @Milo Minderbinder

    Dennis Miller on Stockdale and the 1992 VP Debate:

    “Now I know [Stockdale’s name has] become a buzzword in this culture for doddering old man, but let’s look at the record, folks. The guy was the first guy in and the last guy out of Vietnam, a war that many Americans, including our present president, did not want to dirty their hands with. The reason he had to turn his hearing aid on at that debate is because those f***ing animals knocked his eardrums out when he wouldn’t spill his guts. He teaches philosophy at Stanford University, he’s a brilliant, sensitive, courageous man. And yet he committed the one unpardonable sin in our culture: he was bad on television.”

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Milo Minderbinder

    True. They always taught us the Nixon-JFK debate as an example of the power of television, but my takeaway was that the visual medium put attractiveness forward at the expense of the quality of your arguments.

    , @tbraton
    @Milo Minderbinder

    I totally agree. I was ignorant of Admiral Stockdale's background when I first saw him on TV during that debate performance and reacted in the wrong way. Once I learned his story, I was embarrassed by my initial reaction. Thanks for supplementing the record so others may become aware of his bravery and service to his country. The contrast between this true hero and the phony hero John McCain couldn't be greater.

    BTW I was generally aware of the controversy surrounding McCain's POW stint, but I didn't get deeply involved in the details until 2000 when he was running for President. I didn't get around to reading his 1973 interview in U.S. News until 2008. It was then I realized that all those military veterans who had been on McCain's case from the beginning were spot on. They nailed the phony hero from the start. I suggest that anyone who hasn't read McCain's 1973 interview should read it and compare that first person account to McCain's Silver Star citation and see if they are consistent. The publisher of unz.com, Ron Unz, had a piece running when I first started posting here on a regular basis last July, and he does a very effective job of dissecting McCain's phony POW record.

  95. @The Alarmist
    "In all the following elections, the candidate with the inferior military record won:"

    1972 ... True that ... It is hard to dislike a distinguished combat pilot over a supply clerk, but somehow the clerk won ....
    1976 ... tough choice; guy who decommissioned melted down nuke reactor over athletic officer
    1980 ... Hmmm! Guy who braved radiation to decommission failed reactor over (no offence) a propaganda film maker in a real war
    1984 ... Come on! Guy who served two years at Fort Knox during Korean War vs. WW-II propaganda film maker?
    1992 ... can't dispute that
    1996 ... cannot at all dispute that
    2000 ... Gore's service is dubious at best
    2004 ... Much as I hate to admit it, Kerry did run the risk of getting scratched in a combat zone, while Bush was only subject to a fiery crash by his own stupidity
    2008 ... only because McCain actually had military service.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Lot

    1984 … Come on! Guy who served two years at Fort Knox during Korean War vs. WW-II propaganda film maker?

    He volunteered for the army during a war, so I give him a slight edge over Reagan even though he served in the USA.

    2000 … Gore’s service is dubious at best

    At least he showed up and was physically present in Vietnam. Bush meanwhile did not even show up repeatedly to his national guard duty, and used his father’s influence to take many months off of limited national guard duty to work in a political campaign out of state.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Lot

    Reagan got his commission as a reserve component cavalry officer while working for WHO in Des Moines Iowa in the '30s. How do you know Mondale volunteered, and, if he did, don't you think it might have been draft motivated? The notion that W was AWOL was a "fake but accurate" invention of Dan Rather and his buddies. Gore at one point lied and said he was in combat when he wasn't. He was pulled out of Vietnam after 7 months because his father was a Senator.

  96. @Mark2
    @Anonym

    Seriously? Are that many commenters here that desperate or blind?

    Replies: @Anonym, @Lot

    The internet is so full of studs who bang a new Victoria’s Secret model every night.

  97. @Lot
    @The Alarmist



    1984 … Come on! Guy who served two years at Fort Knox during Korean War vs. WW-II propaganda film maker?
     
    He volunteered for the army during a war, so I give him a slight edge over Reagan even though he served in the USA.

    2000 … Gore’s service is dubious at best
     
    At least he showed up and was physically present in Vietnam. Bush meanwhile did not even show up repeatedly to his national guard duty, and used his father's influence to take many months off of limited national guard duty to work in a political campaign out of state.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Reagan got his commission as a reserve component cavalry officer while working for WHO in Des Moines Iowa in the ’30s. How do you know Mondale volunteered, and, if he did, don’t you think it might have been draft motivated? The notion that W was AWOL was a “fake but accurate” invention of Dan Rather and his buddies. Gore at one point lied and said he was in combat when he wasn’t. He was pulled out of Vietnam after 7 months because his father was a Senator.

  98. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Because those guys remind him of the guys who used to stuff nerds like him into lockers in high school. Nerds hate guys that are smarter than them and can stuff them into lockers at will.

    Replies: @Mark2, @Anonymous

    Even if all of the generals have IQ’s of 140 (which I doubt), Greg Cochran’s IQ is significantly higher than that.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Anonymous

    He's obviously a very, very bright guy, but has he been tested? Above 130 or so the IQ is a poor predictor of achievement, even intellectual achievement.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  99. @Jefferson
    A White guy with a Make America Great Again cap and t-shirt was sucker punched in the back by some dirty Mexicans in Burlingame, California. There were lots of Mexican flags present. Surprisingly Black Lies Matter did not have a heavy presence at this anti-Trump protest.

    Replies: @rod1963

    They wouldn’t dare show up because the Mexican radicals hate them. Remember in CA, the Mexicans practice ethnic cleansing of blacks from their neighborhoods.

    The animosity between the two groups is pretty bad.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @rod1963

    "They wouldn’t dare show up because the Mexican radicals hate them."

    Mexican radicals hate White people a lot more. I doubt very much the same Mexican radicals who beat up a White guy for wearing a Donald Trump t-shirt, would beat up a Black Lies Matter protestor for wearing a Michael Brown t-shirt. Viva La Raza Mexican Radicals will side with a Dindu Nuffin thug over a White Gringo police officer 100 percent of the time. Brown Social Justice Warriors hates White police officers just as much as Black Social Justice Warriors do.

  100. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Mattis#Personal_life

    Mattis is a graduate of the U.S. Marine Corps Amphibious Warfare School, U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and the National War College. Mattis is also noted for his intellectualism and interest in military history,[10] with a personal library that once included over 7,000 volumes,[1] and a penchant for publishing required reading lists for Marines under his command.[32][33] He has never been married and has no children.[1] He is nicknamed “The Warrior Monk” because he devoted his life to studying and fighting war.[34]

    • Replies: @SFG
    @MEH 0910

    My pet theory is he's either a war geek or an alpha male with courage and honor who happens to be gay and really, really, really hates the lifestyle.

    Replies: @Whoever

  101. Priss Factor [AKA "Polly Perkins"] says:

  102. If they were to chose this guy, then perhaps Trump could name R. Lee Ermey as his running mate.

  103. @dumpstersquirrel
    It's inevitable: anytime the WSJ or Forbes slobbers over and then slaps on the front page the mug of any marginally attractive woman, declaring her "The Next Captain Genius Of Industry: Look Out, Boys!", she either self-implodes, ruins the company, or (at best) achieve mediocre results.

    Damn, old men have zero ability to judge the beauty of young women: apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT and should be showered with the only card doddering geezers have left: wads of cash.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anonymous, @Wilkey, @Jack D

    apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT

    Yep, pretty much. More seriously, the thing I’ve noticed in my very, very late 30s is that “flaws” that would have turned me off when I was 20 no longer do so at 39. So which tastes are more enlightened? The great thing about finding *more* women attractive is that you can focus on aspects of a woman beyond mere physical beauty. If you’re single (I’m not) that can hardly be counted as a bad thing.

    For the record, in the video I’ve seen of Miss Holmes she is not remotely hot. She is, at best, a great candidate for one of those makeover shows. Perhaps I’m still not old enough.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Wilkey

    The problem is that if you're still single at our ages (which are nearly the same), the available women are likely to come with kids. It's a lot less desirable and more risky to be a stepfather now in our no-fault divorce and female-biased courts era than it was 50 years ago. The small population of never-married women our age is enriched with personality issues, severe weight problems, etc. I suppose the same could be said for the population of never-married males our age. That's why I think it's too late for SFG and me. On the bright side, we can retire sooner.

  104. @Svigor

    As if Trump has even a snowball’s chance in hell of winning in November.
     
    Sure. That's why TPTB were hell-bent for a brokered convention, and now that the chances of that are fading, they're going third party candidate; cuz they know Trump has no chance.

    That's why you're here running psyops; cuz you no a-scared.

    It looks like Gen. Mattis fit in. And to think that Bill Kristol, the man who was responsible for Sarah Palin being on McCain’s ticket in 2008, thinks he will make a fine President is the only thing you need to know.
     
    Mattis is clearly a money-grubbing tool. Who else lets himself be used in this way, with everything that's at stake?

    Like all senior generals he has an IQ around 140 and has been an infantry unit leader.

    So lots of IQ and manhood. Prime obsessions of the HBD community. What’s not to like about the general?
     
    Nazis had lots of generals. So did the Soviets. We were ready to kill the lot.

    Any other softballs to throw?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Is it the case that he is a secret Nazi or Soviet?

  105. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Mark2
    @Anonymous

    Only somebody that hasn't been anywhere near the military could think that the senior "leadership" selects for IQ.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @AndrewR, @Anonymous

    And I doubt you have been anywhere near the military. It’s hard to imagine someone with an IQ of below 120 running a large organization. Those who are promoted to general are those who have near perfect records of running a large organization. Senior generals are even more selected then that. Whatever politics is part of this process, competence at running things is still a critical component.

  106. @MKP
    @anonguy

    As a strong Trump supporter, I love hearing all these comments. Steve has a smart, well-informed comment section, and several such readers are making it sounds like he really has to be favored. Maybe it's possible?

    I proudly voted for him in the primary and can't wait to vote for him in the general. And dumping Bush and Rubio overboard was a massive win, whatever else happens. Love seeing Trump's supporters get loud ... but since this seems to be a "predictions" thread, I'll reiterate my prediction that Hillary wins handily. Too many headwinds. The biggest (though not only) ones:

    (1) his own party failing to support him (or to support him strongly). The importance of party help at the local level - GOTV efforts, coordination of fundraising appeals, etc - is huge.

    (2) constant media attacks, and media protection of Hillary.

    (3) huge numbers of middle aged and elderly women who have already made up their minds. Seriously, go talk to some of the less intelligent women you know.

    "Isss time fo' a WO-muhn." That's what they say.

    "Oh, that's stupid." Of course it's stupid. That's democracy.

    My bet is that there will be a lot of regular iSteve posters eating crow in November. And, yes, if Trump wins, I'll happily come back here and admit I was an idiot and a Debbie Downer.

    I hope everyone has a great weekend.

    Replies: @Nico

    The Godsend would be if Hillary Clinton nominates another woman to be her running mate. Two wrinkled old white woman feminists for America. Now THAT’s the “broad list” Derbyshire had in mind! No less than 75% of American males would vote Republican, probably in the highest male turnout since before the passage of the 19th Amendment.

    But wait! Hillary could still pull off a victory with just the right choice. Imagine Elizabeth Warren? Then the campaign slogan could be, “Two women, two minorities!” Okay, maybe Hillary’s NOT a lesbian, but at the very least, she’s no less a lesbian than Warren is an American Indian, so who cares?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Nico

    In some ways, Hillary has painted herself into a corner on this. If she chooses a boring old white guy (this worked for Obama) then she is just being conventional or safe and is not really a "change" candidate. If she chooses another woman, she is overcompensating - after all half of Americans are still men, so shouldn't they be represented in the administration too? If she chooses a minority then she is just playing up the fact that the Democrat Party is the coalition of the fringes and doesn't have any place left in it for white males. There are really no good choices - whoever she picks will hurt her as much as it helps her.

    Trump, OTOH, has real potential to make a ticket enhancing choice. He could go with any of the "diverse" Republican candidates and it would be a net plus to his ticket.

    Replies: @rob

  107. @Anonymous
    @AndyBoy

    Don't discount the "squares". Remember the Roman senate had the populist Gracchi assassinated and the populist movement put down violently. The Gracchi made the mistake of overestimating the power of the people and underestimating the "squares" of the Roman senate and elite.

    Replies: @SFG

    That was 2000 years ago in a different society–I doubt you’d get the army to participate in a coup at this point.

    Besides, Trump’s probably a lot closer to Caesar in that conflict–the successful man of the people against the established rich.

  108. @MEH 0910
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Mattis#Personal_life

    Mattis is a graduate of the U.S. Marine Corps Amphibious Warfare School, U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and the National War College. Mattis is also noted for his intellectualism and interest in military history,[10] with a personal library that once included over 7,000 volumes,[1] and a penchant for publishing required reading lists for Marines under his command.[32][33] He has never been married and has no children.[1] He is nicknamed "The Warrior Monk" because he devoted his life to studying and fighting war.[34]
     

    Replies: @SFG

    My pet theory is he’s either a war geek or an alpha male with courage and honor who happens to be gay and really, really, really hates the lifestyle.

    • Replies: @Whoever
    @SFG


    he’s either a war geek
     
    Not sure what you mean by "war geek," but I suspect this Kristol guy would more likely fit that description than Mattis, who actually knows what war is.

    a...male with courage and honor
     
    Yes. (I delete "alpha" because it's redundant and it reeks of "manosphere" nerdiness)

    happens to be gay
     
    A number of males get my gaydar rotating. John Derbyshire, for example, has always seemed obviously gay to me. I couldn't say exactly why, but he just does. Jared Taylor has caused me to squint an eye and cock my head, wondering. But Jim Mattis has never done that. I'm not a Mattis groupie, and certainly disagree with him on things; his views on PTSD, most especially, are at odds with my own. So it's not that I'm refusing to see. I just don't think there is anything to see.
    What I do believe is that Mattis has a deep and sincere affection for the type of young person who joins the Corps, the kind of person about whom Norman Maclean wrote:
    “It is very important to some people to make unmistakably clear to themselves and to the universe that they love the universe but are not intimidated by it and will not be shaken by it, no matter what it has in store. Moreover, they demand something from themselves early in life that can be taken ever after as a demonstration of this abiding feeling.”
    Maclean was writing about firefighters (in his book Young Men and Fire), but it applies to many of those who join the Marines, as well.
    Most ordinary people don't understand individuals who have such an attitude. They think they have a death wish or are crazy or stupid. But Mattis gets them. I'm not sure that he is actually one of them, but he is interested in them. I think it's one thing that drew him to the study of the history of warfare and philosophy. And to a career in the Marine Corps. Someone in this thread compared Mattis to Chesty Puller, but I think a more apt comparison is to Evans Carlson.
  109. @Milo Minderbinder
    @tbraton

    Dennis Miller on Stockdale and the 1992 VP Debate:

    "Now I know [Stockdale's name has] become a buzzword in this culture for doddering old man, but let's look at the record, folks. The guy was the first guy in and the last guy out of Vietnam, a war that many Americans, including our present president, did not want to dirty their hands with. The reason he had to turn his hearing aid on at that debate is because those f***ing animals knocked his eardrums out when he wouldn't spill his guts. He teaches philosophy at Stanford University, he's a brilliant, sensitive, courageous man. And yet he committed the one unpardonable sin in our culture: he was bad on television."

    Replies: @SFG, @tbraton

    True. They always taught us the Nixon-JFK debate as an example of the power of television, but my takeaway was that the visual medium put attractiveness forward at the expense of the quality of your arguments.

  110. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Even if all of the generals have IQ's of 140 (which I doubt), Greg Cochran's IQ is significantly higher than that.

    Replies: @SFG

    He’s obviously a very, very bright guy, but has he been tested? Above 130 or so the IQ is a poor predictor of achievement, even intellectual achievement.

  111. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Blank

    ...the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military,
     
    This, along with the obsessive Jew-hatred, is what keeps me from going "all-in" for the alt-right. I'm still one-foot-in, one-foot-out.

    As Trump has shown, there's a big market for alt-right ideas out there, but they have to be presented in a way that appeals to normal Americans. Normal Americans respect the U.S. military while being highly skeptical about foreign entanglements. Normal Americans find the the neocons' Israel obsession tiresome, but they don't automatically see the Israelis as the bad guys. Normal Americans have no use for pointy-headed Jewish intellectualism, but they don't hate Jews. They recognize, as wise men have for eons, that the Hebrews are useful and entertaining as long as there's a Leslie Groves around to keep them under adult supervision.

    Replies: @anon, @SFG

    This, along with the obsessive Jew-hatred

    Pointing out that the media is overwhelmingly Jewish and that they promote policies for the US the opposite of what they support for Israel is obsessive Jew hatred – right.

    Although it is true that obsessive anti-white paranoia does always lead to obsessive Jew-hatred eventually in a repeating cycle.

    • Replies: @JSM
    @anon

    White folks say, "Jews have too much power, and they misuse it." Jews say, "Nuh-uh. That's just an old, discredited canard by insane anti-semites." So, White folks give some provable examples. Jews say, "So what? That doesn't prove anything. Every group has a *few* bad apples." So Whites give example, after example, after example, ad infinitum. Jews say, "What's with the obsessive Jew-hatred?"

    Replies: @anon

  112. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    Question: How many people recall retired general Stockdale, Perot’s VP running mate in ’92? During his single debate, he opened it with the words “Who am I? What am I doing here?”

    Quite apt.
     
    That isn't what happened at all. I watched that debate, and what he said was, "I know what many of you must be wondering: Who am I? Why am I here?"

    Its some sort of popular myth that Admiral Stockdale was a doddering old buffoon who went senile on stage, but that event never actually took place. Admiral Stockdale was a bona fide war hero, a scholar of the classics, President of the Citadel, a fellow at the Rockford Institute, and absolutely nobody's fool.

    Replies: @anon

    A good example though of how someone naturally honest will get chewed up by the political machine.

  113. My bet is that there will be a lot of regular iSteve posters eating crow in November. And, yes, if Trump wins, I’ll happily come back here and admit I was an idiot and a Debbie Downer.

    Well, like SFG said here a while back, it’s a good idea to hedge emotionally. If Trump loses you can say “I told you so,” and if he wins, you can say “Yippee, glad to be wrong!”

    My basic math is that Hillary won’t get nearly the black turnout that Obama did, which was critical to his success. She won’t get nearly the wave of enthusiastic young voters that Obama did. She won’t inspire nearly the Democrat/leftist enthusiasm that Obama did. Meanwhile Trump is generating a wave of Republican enthusiasm among everyone but the traditional Republicans. He’s bringing in a lot of new voters. Meaning, the Republicans’ most reliable voters staying home will be his greatest vulnerability. I’m not sure these people can stay home. They are conscientious voters and won’t be able to help themselves; they’ll be compelled to vote against Hillary. And Trump is going to drag all of her negatives out into the spotlight, over and over and over, for the whole campaign. He’s going to make her look bad in the debates. Hillary’s play is to run on her experience; her record seems to vary between failure and mediocrity, so I don’t think it’s going to work well for her (there’s also the fact that Obama, Mr. No Record, whupped her handily – Trump would be wise to emphasize this fact repeatedly). Americans are sympathetic to the idea that business experience in the WH might be better than political experience.

    I’m not predicting a Trump win, so much as I am saying he’s definitely in it, and more to the point, Hillary looks kinda weak. The arguments for her invincibility are even weaker. Hillary may win, but I don’t see “handily” in the cards. “Bloody,” more like.

    Is it the case that he is a secret Nazi or Soviet?

    The question suggests you’re missing the point.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Svigor

    Your answer suggests you don't know how to defend your rebuttal.

    , @res
    @Svigor


    Hillary’s play is to run on her experience; her record seems to vary between failure and mediocrity, so I don’t think it’s going to work well for her
     
    I've been wondering if Trump's statement in his foreign policy speech (from the NYT):

    Mr. Trump said he would seek advice from outside the foreign policy establishment. He said he would choose “the best minds” with practical solutions, rather than people with “perfect résumés” and records of failure around the world.
     
    was an early shot at Hillary in addition to being aimed at the neocons.
  114. I like the the Roman system where you couldn’t be a politician unless you’d done your time in the legions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cursus_honorum

  115. @Hibernian
    @Lot

    You're definitely right about '88 '92, '96, and '08, probably '72 also. (Was McGovern a pilot or a navigator? Nixon was a Naval supply officer. Did he go to sea? I think he left the service as a Lieutenant Commander.) Also probably about '80 and '04. '76, '84, and '00 are arguable. In what capacity did Mondale serve in WW2? I don't remember him talking about it, or anyone talking about it in his behalf.

    Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Was McGovern a pilot or a navigator?

    George McGovern was a very accomplished bomber pilot.

  116. @dumpstersquirrel
    It's inevitable: anytime the WSJ or Forbes slobbers over and then slaps on the front page the mug of any marginally attractive woman, declaring her "The Next Captain Genius Of Industry: Look Out, Boys!", she either self-implodes, ruins the company, or (at best) achieve mediocre results.

    Damn, old men have zero ability to judge the beauty of young women: apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT and should be showered with the only card doddering geezers have left: wads of cash.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anonymous, @Wilkey, @Jack D

    HAWTNESS has to be judged on a relative scale. At a Victoria’s Secret lingerie show, Elizabeth Holmes wouldn’t look HAWT at all, but in Silicon Valley circles she looks pretty good – compared to Ellen Pao she’s a 10.

    There are a couple of reasons for this – one is that people who are top talents in one field are already freaks of nature – there are only a few hundred women in the entire US out of 160 million who are beautiful enough to appear in a Victoria’s Secret show so the odds that one of them would have the talent to ALSO be a Fortune 500 executive are doubly remote – like lightning striking the same spot twice.

    Second is that Victoria’s Secret type models are not just works of nature – they spend a lot of time achieving their looks. Basically looking that beautiful is a full time job in itself which leaves no time to be a business executive, nor vice versa.

    I’m sure Elizabeth Holmes’s only asset was not her (relatively modest) beauty. Being reasonably good looking (OF COURSE the women you date are MUCH MUCH HAWTER, I’m sure) didn’t hurt her ability to charm older men and get them to sit on her board, etc. but she must have had something else going too or there would be hundreds of cute chick billionaires out there and there aren’t.

  117. @Nico
    @MKP

    The Godsend would be if Hillary Clinton nominates another woman to be her running mate. Two wrinkled old white woman feminists for America. Now THAT's the "broad list" Derbyshire had in mind! No less than 75% of American males would vote Republican, probably in the highest male turnout since before the passage of the 19th Amendment.

    But wait! Hillary could still pull off a victory with just the right choice. Imagine Elizabeth Warren? Then the campaign slogan could be, "Two women, two minorities!" Okay, maybe Hillary's NOT a lesbian, but at the very least, she's no less a lesbian than Warren is an American Indian, so who cares?

    Replies: @Jack D

    In some ways, Hillary has painted herself into a corner on this. If she chooses a boring old white guy (this worked for Obama) then she is just being conventional or safe and is not really a “change” candidate. If she chooses another woman, she is overcompensating – after all half of Americans are still men, so shouldn’t they be represented in the administration too? If she chooses a minority then she is just playing up the fact that the Democrat Party is the coalition of the fringes and doesn’t have any place left in it for white males. There are really no good choices – whoever she picks will hurt her as much as it helps her.

    Trump, OTOH, has real potential to make a ticket enhancing choice. He could go with any of the “diverse” Republican candidates and it would be a net plus to his ticket.

    • Replies: @rob
    @Jack D

    If she wants to be a pseudo-disruptive candidate she will chose some #NeverTrump Republican looking to jump ship. If she has totally misunderstood Bernie's appeal then she'll pick a Jewish one. If she's totally misunderstood Trump's appeal she'll pick a billionaire. She's warmongering, 'even' the NYT noticed, giving her a Sunday Magazine Cover article on her as a Hawk. But maybe an editor and a writer felt the Berne, you say? Nope. The piece (get it?) was clear pro-Clinton propaganda. Even painting her as 'tough lady that 'mongering* Republicans like William Gates can get behind, except when they're to her left. The NYT actually threw 'shade' at Obama.

    Really, I cannot do it injustice: you must read it yourself. I'm guessing she doesn't go full-frontal and full retard and at least picks some pro-crony-capitalism, chickenhawk total neo-con. . Probably not a Jewish one, though. She won't want to lose support from Jewish people in the media and academia. She also must have noticed the tepid response for Bloomberg when he dipped his toe in the water, and he actually ran his own multistate intelligence operation spying on Muslims. I have no idea who will bring her 'respectable conservatives' Maybe a defense contractor touting his manufacturing as made in America . But I could be completely wrong and she picks an actual pro-American actual progressive, improving her progressive Democratic support while the media touts her as the 'moderate' candidate, the only option for #NeverTrump Republicans.


    *Yes, I do know that 'monger is currently short for whore-monger. That's kinda why I used it.

  118. @Anonym
    @Mark2

    Hmmm. Google image searched her... I would give her a 7. Maybe a high 7. The makeup on Steve's pic is good. Not ugly, but above average.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    As Wilkey has mentioned, Elizabeth Holmes doesn’t look that good in videos. She has the body, voice, and face of a women’s basketball player. Her photos rely on lighting, makeup, and perhaps airbrushing.

    • Replies: @Richard
    @Triumph104

    Learning more about Elizabeth Holmes just makes the Theranos scam even more confusing. When you see her pictures, it seems obvious: a decently attractive young woman charms the wallets and good senses out of a bunch of decaying old men.

    But the videos are disillusioning. Her voice is awful; deep and masculine, with a spergy monotone. She slouches and her motions lack grace. She rarely blinks, and with her large eyes and plastic expression she can look positively deranged. What's the appeal?

  119. @rod1963
    @Jefferson

    They wouldn't dare show up because the Mexican radicals hate them. Remember in CA, the Mexicans practice ethnic cleansing of blacks from their neighborhoods.

    The animosity between the two groups is pretty bad.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “They wouldn’t dare show up because the Mexican radicals hate them.”

    Mexican radicals hate White people a lot more. I doubt very much the same Mexican radicals who beat up a White guy for wearing a Donald Trump t-shirt, would beat up a Black Lies Matter protestor for wearing a Michael Brown t-shirt. Viva La Raza Mexican Radicals will side with a Dindu Nuffin thug over a White Gringo police officer 100 percent of the time. Brown Social Justice Warriors hates White police officers just as much as Black Social Justice Warriors do.

  120. @Mr. Blank

    ...the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military,
     
    This, along with the obsessive Jew-hatred, is what keeps me from going "all-in" for the alt-right. I'm still one-foot-in, one-foot-out.

    As Trump has shown, there's a big market for alt-right ideas out there, but they have to be presented in a way that appeals to normal Americans. Normal Americans respect the U.S. military while being highly skeptical about foreign entanglements. Normal Americans find the the neocons' Israel obsession tiresome, but they don't automatically see the Israelis as the bad guys. Normal Americans have no use for pointy-headed Jewish intellectualism, but they don't hate Jews. They recognize, as wise men have for eons, that the Hebrews are useful and entertaining as long as there's a Leslie Groves around to keep them under adult supervision.

    Replies: @anon, @SFG

    Yeah, even if it weren’t for my ancestry I think fascism is a loser. It seems to lead countries to take gambles they can’t win. If Hitler hadn’t had all these romantic ideas about the destiny of the German people and remaking Europe in his image he could have nipped off the bits of other countries that had German-speakers in them, dug in, and been remembered as the guy who grew Germany. Hell, the Blut und Boden approach Israel is taking now has turned all their former allies against them except for the USA, and even Americans are getting sick of them. You can be too right-wing.

    I think the best you can hope for is a white party to complement the Democrats as a minority party, and they’ll negotiate. Just like I feel there needs to be a mens’ movement to fight back against feminists on stuff like divorce and rape accusations…but it’s not as if women have no legitimate interests at all.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @SFG

    Fascism is a pretty flexible catch all term. Was Franco a Fascist? He didn't take insane risks, he didn't try to expand Spain's territory much at all, he kept Spain out of WWII and he ruled until the last day of his very long life.

    Hitler wasn't (just) a fascist. He was a national Socialist. Socialists are always willing to break a lot of eggs to make that perfect Utopian omelet that they are always cooking up.

    Replies: @Anonym, @SFG

  121. @SFG
    @Mr. Blank

    Yeah, even if it weren't for my ancestry I think fascism is a loser. It seems to lead countries to take gambles they can't win. If Hitler hadn't had all these romantic ideas about the destiny of the German people and remaking Europe in his image he could have nipped off the bits of other countries that had German-speakers in them, dug in, and been remembered as the guy who grew Germany. Hell, the Blut und Boden approach Israel is taking now has turned all their former allies against them except for the USA, and even Americans are getting sick of them. You can be too right-wing.

    I think the best you can hope for is a white party to complement the Democrats as a minority party, and they'll negotiate. Just like I feel there needs to be a mens' movement to fight back against feminists on stuff like divorce and rape accusations...but it's not as if women have no legitimate interests at all.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Fascism is a pretty flexible catch all term. Was Franco a Fascist? He didn’t take insane risks, he didn’t try to expand Spain’s territory much at all, he kept Spain out of WWII and he ruled until the last day of his very long life.

    Hitler wasn’t (just) a fascist. He was a national Socialist. Socialists are always willing to break a lot of eggs to make that perfect Utopian omelet that they are always cooking up.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Jack D

    That is a good point. By current standards pre-1968 Western governments were fascist, and non-expansionist by and large.

    , @SFG
    @Jack D

    Franco's actually a controversial case--from what I read he's considered more of a Latin American caudillo than a true fascist. He certainly seemed to have a more cautious temperament than Hitler or Mussolini, which served him in good stead--he got to enjoy being king for the rest of his life.

    The Socialist thing was just window dressing--he went after trade unions, socialists, and communists. You want to find a socialist with an eight-digit death toll, there's always Stalin and Mao, though you could argue Stalin was for whatever ideology would let him be tsar.

  122. I’m guessing that the anti-military posters and the Lib Lib Libertarian posters here are the same set of peepul.

  123. @Anonymous
    Running Mattis would neutralize Trump's primary strength of personal attacks against people. Trump would either hesitate to commit fully to making personal attacks against a military man, or he'd make personal attacks against the military man, putting off normal people. Personal attacks against Mattis would excite some of the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military, but it would turn off the far more numerous normal Americans.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Divine Right

    “Running Mattis would neutralize Trump’s primary strength of personal attacks against people.”

    No, it wouldn’t. Most people don’t even know or care who Mattis is. Besides, it made no negative impact whatsoever when Trump attacked and made fun of McCain for getting shot down. Don’t assume that most people have a blind loyalty to anything “military.”

    “Personal attacks against Mattis would excite some of the malcontents and misanthropes among the alt-right, which has a strain of European right-wing derived anti-Americanism within it that dislikes and denigrates the US military, but it would turn off the far more numerous normal Americans.”

    It didn’t when he attacked George W. Bush. Considering some of Mattis’s previous neocon comments, he’d be just as vulnerable.

  124. Divine Right,

    You need to make some distinctions. A lot of Americans — me, for instance — are very tired of McCain, whose has dubious claims to being an authentic prisoner of war hero.

    As for G. Bush Jr. — many voters never knew or perceived him to have any military background — maybe something about flying in the Air National Guard, but wasn’t that a way to dodge going to Viet Nam? Bush Jr. and Owl Snore are in the same boat with Commodore Kerry — rather light duty service.

    As for Mattis — distaste for particular retired generals or admirals is not at all the same as being anti US mil.

  125. @Svigor

    My bet is that there will be a lot of regular iSteve posters eating crow in November. And, yes, if Trump wins, I’ll happily come back here and admit I was an idiot and a Debbie Downer.
     
    Well, like SFG said here a while back, it's a good idea to hedge emotionally. If Trump loses you can say "I told you so," and if he wins, you can say "Yippee, glad to be wrong!"

    My basic math is that Hillary won't get nearly the black turnout that Obama did, which was critical to his success. She won't get nearly the wave of enthusiastic young voters that Obama did. She won't inspire nearly the Democrat/leftist enthusiasm that Obama did. Meanwhile Trump is generating a wave of Republican enthusiasm among everyone but the traditional Republicans. He's bringing in a lot of new voters. Meaning, the Republicans' most reliable voters staying home will be his greatest vulnerability. I'm not sure these people can stay home. They are conscientious voters and won't be able to help themselves; they'll be compelled to vote against Hillary. And Trump is going to drag all of her negatives out into the spotlight, over and over and over, for the whole campaign. He's going to make her look bad in the debates. Hillary's play is to run on her experience; her record seems to vary between failure and mediocrity, so I don't think it's going to work well for her (there's also the fact that Obama, Mr. No Record, whupped her handily - Trump would be wise to emphasize this fact repeatedly). Americans are sympathetic to the idea that business experience in the WH might be better than political experience.

    I'm not predicting a Trump win, so much as I am saying he's definitely in it, and more to the point, Hillary looks kinda weak. The arguments for her invincibility are even weaker. Hillary may win, but I don't see "handily" in the cards. "Bloody," more like.

    Is it the case that he is a secret Nazi or Soviet?
     
    The question suggests you're missing the point.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @res

    Your answer suggests you don’t know how to defend your rebuttal.

  126. @anon
    @Mr. Blank


    This, along with the obsessive Jew-hatred
     
    Pointing out that the media is overwhelmingly Jewish and that they promote policies for the US the opposite of what they support for Israel is obsessive Jew hatred - right.

    Although it is true that obsessive anti-white paranoia does always lead to obsessive Jew-hatred eventually in a repeating cycle.

    Replies: @JSM

    White folks say, “Jews have too much power, and they misuse it.” Jews say, “Nuh-uh. That’s just an old, discredited canard by insane anti-semites.” So, White folks give some provable examples. Jews say, “So what? That doesn’t prove anything. Every group has a *few* bad apples.” So Whites give example, after example, after example, ad infinitum. Jews say, “What’s with the obsessive Jew-hatred?”

    • Replies: @anon
    @JSM

    lol yes exactly. I should be used to it by now but it always gets under my skin.

  127. @Triumph104
    @Anonym

    As Wilkey has mentioned, Elizabeth Holmes doesn't look that good in videos. She has the body, voice, and face of a women's basketball player. Her photos rely on lighting, makeup, and perhaps airbrushing.

    https://youtu.be/UiNFXcI9Rb8

    Replies: @Richard

    Learning more about Elizabeth Holmes just makes the Theranos scam even more confusing. When you see her pictures, it seems obvious: a decently attractive young woman charms the wallets and good senses out of a bunch of decaying old men.

    But the videos are disillusioning. Her voice is awful; deep and masculine, with a spergy monotone. She slouches and her motions lack grace. She rarely blinks, and with her large eyes and plastic expression she can look positively deranged. What’s the appeal?

  128. @Jack D
    @SFG

    Fascism is a pretty flexible catch all term. Was Franco a Fascist? He didn't take insane risks, he didn't try to expand Spain's territory much at all, he kept Spain out of WWII and he ruled until the last day of his very long life.

    Hitler wasn't (just) a fascist. He was a national Socialist. Socialists are always willing to break a lot of eggs to make that perfect Utopian omelet that they are always cooking up.

    Replies: @Anonym, @SFG

    That is a good point. By current standards pre-1968 Western governments were fascist, and non-expansionist by and large.

  129. @Jack D
    @SFG

    Fascism is a pretty flexible catch all term. Was Franco a Fascist? He didn't take insane risks, he didn't try to expand Spain's territory much at all, he kept Spain out of WWII and he ruled until the last day of his very long life.

    Hitler wasn't (just) a fascist. He was a national Socialist. Socialists are always willing to break a lot of eggs to make that perfect Utopian omelet that they are always cooking up.

    Replies: @Anonym, @SFG

    Franco’s actually a controversial case–from what I read he’s considered more of a Latin American caudillo than a true fascist. He certainly seemed to have a more cautious temperament than Hitler or Mussolini, which served him in good stead–he got to enjoy being king for the rest of his life.

    The Socialist thing was just window dressing–he went after trade unions, socialists, and communists. You want to find a socialist with an eight-digit death toll, there’s always Stalin and Mao, though you could argue Stalin was for whatever ideology would let him be tsar.

  130. @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    Oop, too late Mattis has decided not to run.

    http://www.nytimes.com/politics/first-draft/2016/04/29/james-mattis-retired-general-decides-against-independent-presidential-bid/

    I'm sure the General's past is as pure as the driven snow and Trump would have never been able to lay a finger on him (those photos of Mattis and the underage hooker were surely fake), but for whatever reason he has decided not to run. Maybe being the frontman and a spoiler for the Billionaire's Liberation Front was not appealing to him.

    Replies: @SFG

    I’ve often wondered how many public-minded men from business or the military (ie, who have run large organizations) just don’t want to deal with 24/7 news channels, Twitter, and armies of people going through their personal lives.

  131. @Hibernian
    @Corvinus

    "I didn’t realize that a group of well-known American citizens who happen to be wealthy lacked the liberty to choose to fund a third party candidate. "

    They have the liberty; the question is, "How many idiots will follow their lead?"

    I say this as a "Never Trump" Cruz supporter. If Trump is nominated, I'll cast my protest vote for Gary Johnson, if the Libertarians nominate him. If they don't, I may stay home.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “They have the liberty; the question is, “How many idiots will follow their lead?””

    So, people are idiots for working toward electing someone they believe will be the best person to be president, even if that person is backed by billionaires. Fascinating.

  132. @Svigor

    My bet is that there will be a lot of regular iSteve posters eating crow in November. And, yes, if Trump wins, I’ll happily come back here and admit I was an idiot and a Debbie Downer.
     
    Well, like SFG said here a while back, it's a good idea to hedge emotionally. If Trump loses you can say "I told you so," and if he wins, you can say "Yippee, glad to be wrong!"

    My basic math is that Hillary won't get nearly the black turnout that Obama did, which was critical to his success. She won't get nearly the wave of enthusiastic young voters that Obama did. She won't inspire nearly the Democrat/leftist enthusiasm that Obama did. Meanwhile Trump is generating a wave of Republican enthusiasm among everyone but the traditional Republicans. He's bringing in a lot of new voters. Meaning, the Republicans' most reliable voters staying home will be his greatest vulnerability. I'm not sure these people can stay home. They are conscientious voters and won't be able to help themselves; they'll be compelled to vote against Hillary. And Trump is going to drag all of her negatives out into the spotlight, over and over and over, for the whole campaign. He's going to make her look bad in the debates. Hillary's play is to run on her experience; her record seems to vary between failure and mediocrity, so I don't think it's going to work well for her (there's also the fact that Obama, Mr. No Record, whupped her handily - Trump would be wise to emphasize this fact repeatedly). Americans are sympathetic to the idea that business experience in the WH might be better than political experience.

    I'm not predicting a Trump win, so much as I am saying he's definitely in it, and more to the point, Hillary looks kinda weak. The arguments for her invincibility are even weaker. Hillary may win, but I don't see "handily" in the cards. "Bloody," more like.

    Is it the case that he is a secret Nazi or Soviet?
     
    The question suggests you're missing the point.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @res

    Hillary’s play is to run on her experience; her record seems to vary between failure and mediocrity, so I don’t think it’s going to work well for her

    I’ve been wondering if Trump’s statement in his foreign policy speech (from the NYT):

    Mr. Trump said he would seek advice from outside the foreign policy establishment. He said he would choose “the best minds” with practical solutions, rather than people with “perfect résumés” and records of failure around the world.

    was an early shot at Hillary in addition to being aimed at the neocons.

  133. @SFG
    @MEH 0910

    My pet theory is he's either a war geek or an alpha male with courage and honor who happens to be gay and really, really, really hates the lifestyle.

    Replies: @Whoever

    he’s either a war geek

    Not sure what you mean by “war geek,” but I suspect this Kristol guy would more likely fit that description than Mattis, who actually knows what war is.

    a…male with courage and honor

    Yes. (I delete “alpha” because it’s redundant and it reeks of “manosphere” nerdiness)

    happens to be gay

    A number of males get my gaydar rotating. John Derbyshire, for example, has always seemed obviously gay to me. I couldn’t say exactly why, but he just does. Jared Taylor has caused me to squint an eye and cock my head, wondering. But Jim Mattis has never done that. I’m not a Mattis groupie, and certainly disagree with him on things; his views on PTSD, most especially, are at odds with my own. So it’s not that I’m refusing to see. I just don’t think there is anything to see.
    What I do believe is that Mattis has a deep and sincere affection for the type of young person who joins the Corps, the kind of person about whom Norman Maclean wrote:
    “It is very important to some people to make unmistakably clear to themselves and to the universe that they love the universe but are not intimidated by it and will not be shaken by it, no matter what it has in store. Moreover, they demand something from themselves early in life that can be taken ever after as a demonstration of this abiding feeling.”
    Maclean was writing about firefighters (in his book Young Men and Fire), but it applies to many of those who join the Marines, as well.
    Most ordinary people don’t understand individuals who have such an attitude. They think they have a death wish or are crazy or stupid. But Mattis gets them. I’m not sure that he is actually one of them, but he is interested in them. I think it’s one thing that drew him to the study of the history of warfare and philosophy. And to a career in the Marine Corps. Someone in this thread compared Mattis to Chesty Puller, but I think a more apt comparison is to Evans Carlson.

  134. @Milo Minderbinder
    @tbraton

    Dennis Miller on Stockdale and the 1992 VP Debate:

    "Now I know [Stockdale's name has] become a buzzword in this culture for doddering old man, but let's look at the record, folks. The guy was the first guy in and the last guy out of Vietnam, a war that many Americans, including our present president, did not want to dirty their hands with. The reason he had to turn his hearing aid on at that debate is because those f***ing animals knocked his eardrums out when he wouldn't spill his guts. He teaches philosophy at Stanford University, he's a brilliant, sensitive, courageous man. And yet he committed the one unpardonable sin in our culture: he was bad on television."

    Replies: @SFG, @tbraton

    I totally agree. I was ignorant of Admiral Stockdale’s background when I first saw him on TV during that debate performance and reacted in the wrong way. Once I learned his story, I was embarrassed by my initial reaction. Thanks for supplementing the record so others may become aware of his bravery and service to his country. The contrast between this true hero and the phony hero John McCain couldn’t be greater.

    BTW I was generally aware of the controversy surrounding McCain’s POW stint, but I didn’t get deeply involved in the details until 2000 when he was running for President. I didn’t get around to reading his 1973 interview in U.S. News until 2008. It was then I realized that all those military veterans who had been on McCain’s case from the beginning were spot on. They nailed the phony hero from the start. I suggest that anyone who hasn’t read McCain’s 1973 interview should read it and compare that first person account to McCain’s Silver Star citation and see if they are consistent. The publisher of unz.com, Ron Unz, had a piece running when I first started posting here on a regular basis last July, and he does a very effective job of dissecting McCain’s phony POW record.

  135. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey
    @dumpstersquirrel

    apparently, after a certain age ALL young women look HAWT

    Yep, pretty much. More seriously, the thing I've noticed in my very, very late 30s is that "flaws" that would have turned me off when I was 20 no longer do so at 39. So which tastes are more enlightened? The great thing about finding *more* women attractive is that you can focus on aspects of a woman beyond mere physical beauty. If you're single (I'm not) that can hardly be counted as a bad thing.

    For the record, in the video I've seen of Miss Holmes she is not remotely hot. She is, at best, a great candidate for one of those makeover shows. Perhaps I'm still not old enough.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The problem is that if you’re still single at our ages (which are nearly the same), the available women are likely to come with kids. It’s a lot less desirable and more risky to be a stepfather now in our no-fault divorce and female-biased courts era than it was 50 years ago. The small population of never-married women our age is enriched with personality issues, severe weight problems, etc. I suppose the same could be said for the population of never-married males our age. That’s why I think it’s too late for SFG and me. On the bright side, we can retire sooner.

  136. @SFG
    @Anonymous

    He's obviously a very, very bright guy, but has he been tested? Above 130 or so the IQ is a poor predictor of achievement, even intellectual achievement.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  137. @gruff
    Where's Smedley Butler when you need him.

    Replies: @Hrw-500

    Speaking of the wolf, the idea of President Smedley Butler gived some food for thoughts of alternate history.
    http://www.alternatehistory.com/discussion/showthread.php?t=150436
    http://althistory.wikia.com/wiki/Smedley_D_Butler_%28Kornilovshina%29

  138. Your answer suggests you don’t know how to defend your rebuttal.

    Just because he’s a general, doesn’t mean he’s fighting for my side. I thought “no free lunches for generals” made my point simple enough for anyone to understand, but you’ve proven me wrong.

    was an early shot at Hillary in addition to being aimed at the neocons.

    Magic 8 ball says “yes.”

    Franco’s actually a controversial case–from what I read he’s considered more of a Latin American caudillo than a true fascist.

    Sold. Do you gift wrap?

    White folks say, “Jews have too much power, and they misuse it.” Jews say, “Nuh-uh. That’s just an old, discredited canard by insane anti-semites.” So, White folks give some provable examples. Jews say, “So what? That doesn’t prove anything. Every group has a *few* bad apples.” So Whites give example, after example, after example, ad infinitum. Jews say, “What’s with the obsessive Jew-hatred?”

    Beautifully said. Same thing with blacks, really. “Whites broke blacks; whites must pay blacks’ bills, forever.” (attack) “No, blacks came that way in the box: see facts x, y, and z.” (defense) “Racist!”

  139. @PenskeFile
    Mattis is a fairly distinctive and prominent character in the HBO Series Generation Kill. His character come off treated pretty well there.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTXzcILPPp8

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Yet, according to Sean Naylor’s book about JSOC, Relentless Strike, the special forces guys found “Mad Dog” a bit timid.

  140. even if it weren’t for my ancestry I think fascism is a loser. […] Hell, the Blut und Boden approach Israel is taking now has turned all their former allies against them except for the USA, and even Americans are getting sick of them. You can be too right-wing.

    I found this amusing.

  141. @JSM
    @anon

    White folks say, "Jews have too much power, and they misuse it." Jews say, "Nuh-uh. That's just an old, discredited canard by insane anti-semites." So, White folks give some provable examples. Jews say, "So what? That doesn't prove anything. Every group has a *few* bad apples." So Whites give example, after example, after example, ad infinitum. Jews say, "What's with the obsessive Jew-hatred?"

    Replies: @anon

    lol yes exactly. I should be used to it by now but it always gets under my skin.

  142. rob says:
    @Jack D
    @Nico

    In some ways, Hillary has painted herself into a corner on this. If she chooses a boring old white guy (this worked for Obama) then she is just being conventional or safe and is not really a "change" candidate. If she chooses another woman, she is overcompensating - after all half of Americans are still men, so shouldn't they be represented in the administration too? If she chooses a minority then she is just playing up the fact that the Democrat Party is the coalition of the fringes and doesn't have any place left in it for white males. There are really no good choices - whoever she picks will hurt her as much as it helps her.

    Trump, OTOH, has real potential to make a ticket enhancing choice. He could go with any of the "diverse" Republican candidates and it would be a net plus to his ticket.

    Replies: @rob

    If she wants to be a pseudo-disruptive candidate she will chose some #NeverTrump Republican looking to jump ship. If she has totally misunderstood Bernie’s appeal then she’ll pick a Jewish one. If she’s totally misunderstood Trump’s appeal she’ll pick a billionaire. She’s warmongering, ‘even’ the NYT noticed, giving her a Sunday Magazine Cover article on her as a Hawk. But maybe an editor and a writer felt the Berne, you say? Nope. The piece (get it?) was clear pro-Clinton propaganda. Even painting her as ‘tough lady that ‘mongering* Republicans like William Gates can get behind, except when they’re to her left. The NYT actually threw ‘shade’ at Obama.

    Really, I cannot do it injustice: you must read it yourself. I’m guessing she doesn’t go full-frontal and full retard and at least picks some pro-crony-capitalism, chickenhawk total neo-con. . Probably not a Jewish one, though. She won’t want to lose support from Jewish people in the media and academia. She also must have noticed the tepid response for Bloomberg when he dipped his toe in the water, and he actually ran his own multistate intelligence operation spying on Muslims. I have no idea who will bring her ‘respectable conservatives’ Maybe a defense contractor touting his manufacturing as made in America . But I could be completely wrong and she picks an actual pro-American actual progressive, improving her progressive Democratic support while the media touts her as the ‘moderate’ candidate, the only option for #NeverTrump Republicans.

    *Yes, I do know that ‘monger is currently short for whore-monger. That’s kinda why I used it.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS