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From the New York Times news section:

Biden Seeks to Use Infrastructure Plan to Address Racial Inequities

The president’s $2 trillion proposal allocates money to help communities of color, like a New Orleans neighborhood devastated by a highway project a half-century ago.

It was so devastated that nobody has managed to adjust in 50 years.

I live a few blocks from a giant freeway. I should get some Biden Bux for the devastation.

Seriously, the big devastation to the neighborhood due to the freeway only happened recently when Mayor Garcetti decided to let bums live on the sidewalks under the underpass.The freeway opened in 1955, but this is the first time pedestrians have been blocked. Heck, it doesn’t rain 350 days of the year in L.A. lately, so it’s not like the homeless desperately need to be shielded from the rain. Many of them have moved to L.A. to enjoy the year-round sunshine and now the government is telling them to occupy chokepoints under freeways. And have you noticed how much stuff the homeless own these days? Their possessions fill both sidewalks of the underpass, so now no law-abiding pedestrian can walk from one side of the freeway to the other without risking getting run over by cars driving 45 mph.

By Jim Tankersley and Zolan Kanno-Youngs
April 1, 2021
WASHINGTON — America’s most celebrated infrastructure initiative, the interstate highway system, rammed an elevated freeway through the center of Claiborne Avenue in New Orleans in the late 1960s.

It claimed dozens of Black-owned businesses, along with oak trees and azalea bushes that had shaded Black children playing in the large neutral ground in the middle of the street, eviscerating a vibrant neighborhood whose residents fought in vain to stop the construction.

And that’s why the murder rate is high in this one black neighborhood: this highway was constructed 50 years ago. We know that for sure because, in contrast, every other black neighborhood in New Orleans is Bedford Falls.

More than a half-century later, President Biden’s $2 trillion plan to rebuild aging roads, bridges, rail lines and other foundations of the economy comes with a new twist: hundreds of billions of dollars that administration officials say will help reverse long-running racial disparities in how the government builds, repairs and locates a wide range of physical infrastructure.

That includes $20 billion to “reconnect” communities of color to economic opportunity, like the Black residents still living in the interstate’s shadow along Claiborne.

Mr. Biden’s plan, which he unveiled on Wednesday in Pittsburgh, is the first step in a two-part agenda to remake the American economy. The president and his advisers have pitched that agenda — whose total cost could reach $4 trillion — in the grand terms of economic competitiveness and the granular language of shortened commute times.

But they have also stressed its potential to advance racial equity and bridge gaps in economic outcomes.

In addition to dedicated funding for neighborhoods split or splintered by past infrastructure projects, the proposal also includes money for the replacement of lead water pipes that have harmed Black children in cities like Flint, Mich.; the cleanup of environmental hazards that have plagued Hispanic neighborhoods and tribal communities; worker training that would target underserved groups; and funds for home health aides, who are largely women of color. …

The biggest single piece of the plan’s racial equity efforts is not a transportation or environmental project, but a $400 billion investment in in-home care for older and disabled Americans. It would lift the wages of care workers, who are predominantly low-paid, female and not white.

Home care workers are infrastructure? Who knew?

“It’s the first jobs program that is focused primarily on work done by women of color,” said Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union. “It’s going to transform Black, brown and Asian lives, and entire communities.”

White House officials say the $100 billion the plan allocates to improve and build out broadband internet will disproportionately help Black and Latino families, who have less access to affordable broadband than white families do.

Half of the $40 billion the plan would spend to upgrade research labs across the country would be reserved for colleges and universities that historically serve Black and other students of color.

After all, where has R&D spending had a bigger bang for the buck in terms of boosting the whole economy through technical innovation: Stanford or Howard?

… Administration officials say concerns over racial inequality are an animating force of the infrastructure push. They peppered a 25-page explanation of the jobs plan this week with references to racial equity, and they included two specific examples of the sort of communities they hope to lift with the $20 billion for economic revitalization: the Black neighborhood in Syracuse that was partially bulldozed to make way for Interstate 81

You can tell that the reason the black community in Syracuse is struggling so badly is due to some highway built during the Johnson Administration because the black communities in Rochester, Schenectady, and Buffalo are thriving.

, and the Claiborne Expressway in New Orleans. …

But for some communities of color, those projects devastated existing economies, leveling commercial corridors, cutting Black neighborhoods off from downtowns and accelerating suburbanization trends that exacerbated segregation.

“A lot of previous government investment in infrastructure purposely excluded these communities,” said Bharat Ramamurti, a deputy director of Mr. Biden’s National Economic Council.

Wait a minute, I thought the problem was that infrastructure was built in black neighborhoods. Now the problem is it wasn’t built. Which is it?

“So if you look at where we need to invest in infrastructure now, a lot of it is concentrated in these communities.”

Past projects were often built in communities that did not have the political capital or resources to successfully protest.

But your expert just said: “A lot of previous government investment in infrastructure purposely excluded these communities.”

“When it comes time to build an interstate through a city, a pattern emerges: The areas that are displaced by that interstate will overwhelmingly be the areas occupied by African-Americans,” Dr. Logan said. Often, he added, lawmakers choose to build “in the places that have the least political power to make sure this doesn’t happen in their neighborhood.”

Freeways really aren’t that wide. The standard lane is 12 feet wide. I live near a 10 lane freeway, and I can walk under it in one minute. Or I could until the Garcetti-ville was erected on the sidewalks, forcing me to walk in the street with cars going by at 45 mph.

Eric Avila, an urban historian at the University of California, Los Angeles, said a consensus during the Dwight D. Eisenhower administration on the need to invest in highways that would connect neighborhoods to cities led to the exclusion of minority communities.

You say exclusion, the Times says inclusion, let’s call the whole thing off.

The federal government also used “urban renewal” or “slum clearance” redevelopment programs that often led to the clearing of the way for giant infrastructure projects like highways.

“These highways were essentially built as conduits for wealth,” Mr. Avila said. “Primarily white wealth, jobs, people, markets. The highways were built to promote the connectivity between suburbs and cities. The people that were left out were urban minorities. African-Americans, immigrants, Latinos.”

Mr. Avila pointed to how plans for the Inner Belt highway in Cambridge, Mass., were halted after protests by faculty members at Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

And in New Orleans, Mr. Avila said, plans for a highway called the Riverfront Expressway were canceled after officials faced pressure from protesters in the French Quarter. But Black protesters were not able to spare Treme, one of the nation’s oldest communities of free Black residents, from the construction of an elevated six-lane stretch of Interstate 10 along Claiborne Avenue.

So, therefore, Joe Biden is going to spend a gazillion Biden Bux in Neighborhoods of Color. Or maybe he’s going to construct a lot of infrastructure in white neighborhoods as racial punishment. To be honest, I’ve lost the thread of the argument.

Amy Stelly is reminded of that freeway each morning when the truck traffic causes her home to shudder. The emissions from the interstate a block away have turned jewelry that she placed near her window jet black.

“Anyone who lives near an urban highway knows what we’re breathing in every day,” said Ms. Stelly, an urban designer and activist against the project. “There’s a layer of silt that sticks on our properties and houses.”

OK, so Biden should not spend a bazillion dollars on infrastructure, right?

It is unclear from Mr. Biden’s plan, and conversations with White House officials, what the administration envisions for Claiborne Avenue. If the funding survives in any bill Mr. Biden might sign into law, those details will matter, said Deborah Archer, a director of the Center on Race, Inequality and the Law at New York University School of Law.

“I think it’s wonderful to be able to say and have the goal that this historic investment will advance racial equity,” Ms. Archer said. “It’s another thing to distribute these funds in a way that has impact.”

In other words, if you read all the way to the end of the article, the NYT reporters want you to realize that this is all BS. But only insurrectionists have Doubts about the policies of the Biden Administration, so the reporters must also have plausible deniability.

 
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  1. Hyperinflation.

    Buy gold as a hedge.

  2. Flemur says:

    They could fix everything by taking the freeways from black neighborhoods which are terrible because of freeways, and moving them to black neighborhoods which are terrible because of no freeways.

  3. Altai says:

    have you noticed how much stuff the homeless own these days?

    Hoovervilles. Many of these people in SoCal had homes until recently and are not the classic itinerants people associate with the word ‘homeless’. They sometimes have jobs or erratic work and simply can’t afford anywhere to live or are trying to save up some money.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    In the 1920s the existence of this social collapse was cause for huge outrage, in the 2020s the collapse is accepted.

    • Agree: J.Ross
    • Thanks: Neoconned
  4. HenryA says:

    How many of those neighborhoods were Black neighborhoods when they were “devasted” by highway projects back during the Johnson administration?

  5. C’mon Steve! You know what they mean by “infrastructure”…

    Basketball courts and soccer fields in “diverse” areas.

    Light rail in “gentrified” urban areas.

    “Affordable housing” in white suburbs.

    Only around half of the projects will ever be completed, however. But the money will be spent, and it will all be a mystery as to whose pockets it wound up in.

    • Replies: @JackK
    , @Muggles
  6. I believe it was the Clinton Administration that decided to refer to government spending as “investments.” Remember how laughably incongruous it sounded then? But by now, through constant repetition, one hardly notices. In this article alone, the word is misused in this way four times.

  7. So I was going to buy some Nike stock but then I thought just because they’ve got some BidenBux it’s not likely that the local Joggers will eschew undocumented late night shopping at Walmart.

    Looking at the stock, Why the hell did Nike go up 30% after the WuFlu hit: took a not unexpected hammering but then took off like a rocket?

    Has everybody bought new Air Jordans for their Peloton?

    https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/NKE/chart?p=NKE#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–

    • Replies: @Neoconned
  8. Anon[231] • Disclaimer says:

    Presumably most current residents moved in subsequent to the building of the freeway, and benefited from cheaper rent or real estate costs. If they don’t like it, they’re welcome to move out.

    Steve, is your neighborhood full of old retirees and Mexicans? It’s relatively easy to get rid of these tent cities. YouTube has videos showing how the more aggressive residents of Venice are doing it. It’s a squeaky wheel strategy, YouTube uploads plus relentless citizen complaints to your councilman. There’s a German guy who seems to hire himself out to produce syringe-filled videos, complete with interviews with scary schizophrenics. Upload about three of those, organize about three dozen phone calls, and the city will show up for “sidewalk repairs.”

  9. watson79 says:

    Odd the article doesn’t mention the large homeless camp under Claiborne. I noticed quite a few whites among the North Face tents. Other whites were “gutter punks”. Young whites with dreadlocks and dogs. Years ago Derb wrote that New Orleans had a vibe similar to Dakar. Didn’t know Dakar was so bad.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  10. El Dato says:

    Money, money everywhere! And no-one ready to pick up a shovel!

    From “The Roosevelt Myth” by John T. Flynn, which contains many gems

    In 1932 there were 11,385,000 unemployed. But employment improved all during the President’s first term. By June, 1937 unemployment was down to 4,464,000, which was still too large. And it never got any better. It got worse and by November, 1937, there were 7,000,000 people out of work. As early as July men were asking: “What has become of the boom?” The Treasury boasted that relief payments were less than in the same period the preceding year. But this was not so. The Treasury made a practice of keeping tricky books and producing phony results. It had merely shifted relief payments to other accounts. They were, in fact, larger than the year before. Stock prices began to decline and by September the unpleasant prospect could be no longer hidden. Daniel Roper, Secretary of Commerce, was putting out rosy statements about business. But the facts had seeped into the White House and on October 8, 1937, Jim Farley talked to Roosevelt about business. Roosevelt pooh-poohed it. Everything was all right, he said. It was all a move by business to discredit his policies. This was characteristic of Roosevelt. Any unfavorable turn he attributed to a secret plot of his enemies. Any criticism of his measures he put down to some secret hatred of him personally. He was still bitter about the Court defeat. He sneered at the Senate and House. He told Farley the trouble with them, including the Vice-President, was that their thinking was still antiquated. They didn’t see the importance of minimum wage and maximum hour legislation. This was a curious comment from the man who forced the Congress shortly after his first election to ditch minimum wage and maximum hour legislation which the Senate had already passed. There were some other matters, none of outstanding importance, which he wanted to see through and then, he told Farley, “then he would just ride along.”

    At a cabinet meeting later the same day Dan Roper undertook to say that business was all right. Roosevelt jumped on him. “Dan,” he said, “you have just got to stop issuing these Hooverish statements.” Roosevelt didn’t disagree with Roper. He just felt the situation should be ignored and that things would right themselves. “Everything will work out all right if we just sit tight and keep quiet,” he ended. The next day he told Farley there was altogether too much talking and too many press conferences. “I’m going to put the lid on,” he said.

    [MORE]

    But by the end of October, the grim facts about conditions could no longer be ignored. The market crashed and administration critics were saying this was the end of the New Deal. In November, at a cabinet meeting, Miss Perkins brought up a report just prepared by her statistician, Isador Lubin. It showed employment was off two per cent, she said, when it ought to be up two per cent. The heavy industries were behind and sales following the automobile show were disappointing. She feared things might be dangerous in view of conditions. Henry Morgenthau, the Milquetoast of the cabinet, got the courage to speak up. He said business was complaining that the capital gains and undistributed profits taxes were impairing recovery. Then he dared to say: “I think it would be heartening for you to show how far better off we are today.”

    Roosevelt shut him up with a rude rebuff: “Oh, for God’s sake, Henry! Do you want me to read the record again?” Poor Henry reddened as Roosevelt glowered at him amidst an embarrassing silence. Farley spoke up. “Boss,” he said, “I think the situation would be helped if you would say something that would alleviate the fears in business. Frankly, I think you should make a quieting statement.”

    Other cabinet officers — Woodring and Wallace — expressed the same views. But Roosevelt was angry. He blamed the depression on Wall Street. Then he burst out: “I get all kinds of criticisms and complaints about the economic
    situation, but few people come into me with any concrete suggestions as to how the situation can be alleviated. It’s easy enough to criticize, but it’s another thing to help.”

    Here was the man who had blasted Hoover so unmercifully when it was Hoover’s depression. Now there was a Roosevelt depression after he had spent 17 billion dollars. And he didn’t like even to be told of it. He denied it at first. Then he snapped: “I am fully conscious of the situation which exists. I have been studying it for a long time. And I know who’s responsible for it. Business, particularly the banking business, has ganged up on me.”

    The grim specter of disintegrating business continued to haunt the cabinet meetings and to make discussion with Roosevelt difficult. Morgenthau was convinced the country was heading for another depression. After his first rebuff, he shrank from the subject. But on November 7 he wrote a letter to Roosevelt saying plainly we were moving into a depression. That night he telephoned the President and had what he describes as “a grim conversation.” Roosevelt flew into a rage. He told Henry he knew “a wise old bird” who told him business was deliberately causing the depression in order to hold a pistol at his head and force a retreat from the New Deal.

    At a cabinet meeting next day Roosevelt brought the subject up himself. He told the cabinet about Henry’s letter. He grew angry and said: “I’m sick and tired of being told by the cabinet, by Henry and everybody else what’s the matter with the country and nobody suggests what I should do.”

    This was indeed an extraordinary statement. Only a little over a year before he had been elected by the most amazing majority ever given a President upon the theory that he was the one man who knew what to do. And here he was now trapped in the mysterious tangles of a depression and nobody would tell him what to do about it. If there was one thing had been settled in his mind it was that he, above all men, knew what to do about it. Actually he had solved
    the depression. He had driven it from the land. He was in the act of putting on a few extra finishing touches to the great edifice of recovery and, lo! here is that Old Debbil Depression snoopin’ ’round the White House and all the little men in the cabinet frightened to death and nobody will tell the great Depression Killer what to do about it. Apparently the depression hadn’t been killed. It had just been drugged, just flattened out with 17 billion dollars’ worth of knockout drops. Now in spite of everything, the damned thing was opening its eyes, breathing, even snorting again, coming to life. Could it be that all that magic medicine he had administered was no good—just a quack pain-killer?

    When the President uttered his doleful complaint there was an ominous silence around the cabinet board. As Henry Morgenthau relates it, he, the meek and humble shadow of the Great Man, took his courage in his hands and, like an aroused bunny, looked the bull dog in the face. He said: “You can do something about it. You can do something about the railroads. You can do something about housing. Above all, you can do something to reassure business”. Then he waited for the walls to fall in. They didn’t, so he went on: “What business wants to know is: are we headed toward Socialism or are we going to continue on a capitalist basis?” Roosevelt muttered that he had told them that again and again. “All right,” said Henry, “tell them for the fifteenth time.” Jim Farley added: “That’s what they want to know.” Even Henry Wallace seconded the motion.

    So Roosevelt decided to appease business. A few days later Henry Morgenthau was slated to make a speech before the National Academy of Political Science. A Morgan partner was on either side of him and spread out around the numerous tables was the elite of American business. And Henry told them. He told them the New Deal wanted to see capital go into production and private business expand. And then he used a sentence embodying an idea which never yet had gotten any real welcome in the President’s head. Henry said: “We believe that much of the remaining unemployment will disappear if private capital funds are increasingly employed in productive enterprise. We believe that one of the most
    important ways of achieving these ends at this time is to continue progress toward a balance of the federal budget.”

    This sounded terribly like Mr. Hoover or Mr. Ogden Mills or Mr. Landon. Yet the whole theme of Mr. Roosevelt’s New Deal had been war on business. It was a Holy War. And Roosevelt and the men around him took a delight in picturing business itself as evil and profit as criminal. Now Morgenthau was sent as the emissary of the President to deliver this belated appeal to business. The poor creature was horrified at the response. The audience first tittered and then guffawed out loud. To Oliphant, Henry’s croaking New Deal Treasury legal adviser, this proved the whole New Deal case. It showed “the hopelessness of working with them.” After all, it was a little funny and no one can blame the diners
    for laughing. The budget was running in the red at the time to the tune of $300,000,000 a month.

    The Roosevelt technique of trouncing the business man was resumed. Assistant Attorney-General Jackson and Secretary Harold Ickes in December made speeches inspired by the President raising the old ghost of the 60 families who haunt America with their controls. In January, John D. Biggers staggered the administration with his report after a survey that there were 10 million out of work. Soon it would be 11,800,000 — more than were unemployed when Roosevelt was elected in 1932.

    Pessimism spread through the cabinet. Farley wrote in his diary: “The days that are to follow, in my judgment, will be more important to the President than the days after the first inauguration. At that time he was trying to get us out of the depression (of Hoover) and now we are in a period that will be blamed on this administration and its policies.”

    The dark realities of the country had sunk deeply into Roosevelt’s mind now. There were just a year and six months before a Democratic convention would meet to pick his successor. All that gaudy edifice of recovery of which he was the be-medaled architect was crumbling around him. One thing was certain. The Second New Deal was a flop. The First New Deal had been abandoned, as we have seen, immediately after his inauguration. A wholly new approach and a completely unheralded series of devices were put together to the roll of the drums and the blaring of the trumpets. This was the Second New Deal. One by one all of its parts had been discarded save a few well-meaning but quite ineffectual social reforms.

    The President had settled down to a realization that after all priming the pump — spending billions — had by itself done the job and he hoped to skate along on that to the end of his term. But now even that had failed. Despite the billions and the debt, the depression was back. And it was not a new depression. It was the old one which had not been driven away but merely hidden behind a curtain of 15 billion dollars of new government debt. And, worst of all, he did not have a single new idea that he could use. He actually faced at this moment the appalling prospect, after all the ballyhoo, of going out of office in a depression as great as the one he found in 1932. The prospect was humiliating in the extreme, especially to a man whose vanity had allowed him to be blown up into such a giant depression-killer.

    • Thanks: Sollipsist
  11. El Dato says:

    OT:

    At least she’s a good dramatizer and vlogger

    Happy Easter Holiday btw. Maybe Trudeau will even manage to put an actual name on this holiday! Or maybe he will start speaking in tongues on Pentecost. “Speaking in tongues is believed to be an act of strong faith” after all.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  12. bomag says:

    My experience with these DC “infrastructure” bills is a groan-fest.

    ) Current projects triple in price.

    ) State and local are so anxious to lock in the money that they put up cheesy, easy to pass jobs like re-grading current highway rights-of-way.

    ) Proposed jobs are so big that only the largest non-POC contractors can handle them.

    ) Regulatory compliance and planning eat up yuge amounts of time and money; it gets to be welfare for bureaucrats and the usual parasite class.

    ) etc.

    • Agree: donut
  13. In other words we’re paying off black lives matter leadership and the usual Reverends and making it look like it’s not a bribe.

  14. anonymous[109] • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai

    Not true. The homeless in west coast cities nowadays have largely come there from elsewhere, attracted by the permissive local enforcement, legalized weed, quasi-legalized other drugs, social services, and weather. If someone is homeless in the midwest then ok, they are probably a formerly employed local who is down on their luck economically, but a homeless person in LA is more than likely to be a “lifestyle” bum.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  15. Anon[120] • Disclaimer says:

    Biden’s plan is highly suspicious. Most of it isn’t even supposed to go to roads or anything like that. It sounds like it’s one big mass gentrification of America’s urban areas that’s going to end up kicking all the blacks out.

    Blacks need jobs more than anything else.

  16. Dan Smith says:

    My Millennial stepdaughter is making 65K working as a teacher. She’s 24. Voted for Biden. Complained to me last night about how much tax she has to pay. Refrained from telling her it’s going to get worse.

  17. Elli says:

    Factories? Steel mills? Chemical plants? Cotton mills? Pharmaceutical plants? Semiconductors and chips? Rare metal refining? Training machinists and tool and die makers? Training chemists in continuous flow synthesis?

    Jobs for blue collar men that will still be there after the big construction projects are finished? Of course this is government, so we can count on 20 years beyond estimates, a la Boston’s Big Dig.

    A raw materials only nation is impoverished and vulnerable. Pollution is not as icky as poverty and conquest.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  18. have you noticed how much stuff the homeless own these days?

    America is the richest country in the history of the world. The urban campers with their masses of stuff are the richest bums in the history of the world.

    Today, 70% of the homeless are the mentally ill or addicted to drugs and alcohol and should be institutionalized. Most of the other 30% are merely bums, those who prefer to parasitize on an overly generous government and live without personal responsibility. A minority of the 30% are actually people who could benefit from a temporary helping hand to get their lives back on track.

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  19. Let’s just print a Gazillion (that’s like 10 to the googol googol) Dollars and rain them down from transport planes over America’s cities like they were Chinese take-out menus. Why should the Zimbabwe nation bank have anything over the American Fed?

  20. ic1000 says:

    Here in Rust Belt City, Eisenhower’s Interstate Highway System is Whites Only. I’ve never seen a BIPOC on the ring road, or on the freeway that cleaves close-in neighborhoods.

    Female drivers must display their “I’m a Karen” windshield permits.

    KKKrazy and The Handmaid’s Tale.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  21. Government spending (e.g. infrastructure and schools) is not investment. It is waste.

    An “urban historian”. Really.

    Government workers, contractors, retirees, and their domestic partners and financial dependents, should NOT be allowed to vote in civil elections.

    • Agree: Polistra
  22. Every black American alive today and in US history, deserves their own magnificent statue put up in public at state expense. They also need to be compensated for the use of their image with something to the tune of $1 million each. This is only fair. Many decades before I was born a group of people attacked Mr Till.

    • Replies: @Hannah Katz
  23. Arclight says:

    Actually a clever approach – some of this money will be funneled to useful local non-profits and adjuncts of urban political machines, most of it will go to the companies that do the real work and in turn fund the campaigns of the Democratic politicians that will steer who wins and loses. Not much will make its way to real live black proles, but of course that was never the point.

    Obviously there is some segment of the professional left that recognizes that if 60 years of massive wealth transfers via the tax code and social welfare system, affirmative action, featherbedding in the public and private sector, etc. has not really had much of an impact and never will. But there are obviously a lot of credentialed people out there that genuinely believe that *this time* loads of money and massive social interventions in education and the workforce will unleash the true potential of black America. Is there anything that could possibly shake this belief, and if so, what then?

    • Agree: ic1000, bomag, El Dato, Mark G.
    • Replies: @CCZ
    , @PSR
    , @Jack D
    , @Desiderius
  24. They gloss right over *why* white Americans suddenly were reliant on the interstate highway system to move their magic dirt via automobile out to the suburbs, and just commute in to work.

    And yes this bill isn’t meant to build things, it’s meant to hand a trillion dollars to a whole new generation of community-organized malcontents, coming soon to an area near you.

  25. fish says:

    Just wait until reparations beneficiaries realize their 40 acres isn’t Malibu beachfront and “mule” isn’t slang for a 2021 Range Rover with 22 inch spinners.

  26. CCZ says:
    @Arclight

    “…and in turn fund the campaigns of the Democratic politicians that will steer who wins and loses.

    “What $2 billion in federal rescue funds means for Chicago and Mayor Lightfoot.”

    “A massive cash infusion could advance her agenda—and re-election chances—while sparing taxpayers a hike.”

    https://www.chicagobusiness.com/government

    Operating as intended!!

  27. In most parts of America, most home health aides are white.
    Oh, wait! This is one of the times they understand Per Capita!

  28. only insurrectionists have Doubts

    This is an example of the “uncanny ubiquity” problem at the heart of the legitimacy crisis. Institutions, movements, policy packages, research programs, whathaveyou used to feature admissions against interest, sops to the losers, minority reports, meaningful peer reviews, election observers, and the like even if only to throw would be watchdogs off the scent. Now all of that’s out the window. What happened?

    Women

    Famously Hitler’s biggest supporters and Stalin’s biggest putative beneficiaries (if you’ve ever met any Soviet nostalgics they never fail to mention the “elevated” status of women in the Soviet State), nice ladies, white and otherwise, have a whole different set of legitimacy criteria from men.

    The result is sociological Tacoma Narrows Bridges all over the place and a markedly more fragile society, not to mention civilization, with poor decision making one of the least of the problems.

  29. @JohnnyWalker123

    Gold and silver and weapons and ammo. And land and other durable assets. Borrow money to be paid back with next decade’s mini-dollars. Do anything but hold cash or pay off debt.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  30. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:

    OT but ties in with several recent threads. Guess the race of the woman in this headline:

    Burger King customer mad about wait time opens fire in drive-thru, Tennessee cops say

  31. The “infrastructure” verbiage is just a smokescreen. In reality this is just a $2 trillion download of FedBux to Democrat party insiders, grifters and lackeys.

    Aggressive looting is the whole of the Biden Administration, the rest is commentary

  32. jill says:

    NYS lawmakers, Cuomo negotiating $2.1B fund for illegal immigrants, ex-cons:

    New York state lawmakers on Thursday were negotiating a $2.1 billion fund that would give unemployment benefits to illegal immigrants and former inmates — possibly providing some recipients with around $28,000.

    https://nypost.com/2021/04/01/nys-lawmakers-cuomo-negotiating-fund-for-illegal-immigrants-ex-cons/?utm_source=url_sitebuttons&utm_medium=site%20buttons&utm_campaign=site%20buttons

    • Replies: @additionalMike
  33. @Almost Missouri

    In reality this is just a $2 trillion download of FedBux to Democrat party insiders, grifters and lackeys.

    We, the people? A basket of deplorables.

  34. Peterike says:

    Highways wrecking neighborhoods of color is one of the great ongoing Leftist lies.

    “cutting Black neighborhoods off from downtowns”

    Hey I just invented this thing call an “overpass” where cars and people can easily pass under a highway. If we put in a few of these, problem solved!

  35. Wilkey says:

    The emissions from the interstate a block away have turned jewelry that she placed near her window jet black.

    After all, who doesn’t place valuable jewelry right by a window where thieves peaking in can see it, break the window, and take it?

    There’s so much bullshit in this article that I think it must have been written at a cattle ranch.

    Neighborhoods that are too close to interstates are often cheaper than neighborhoods that are further away. That is a given. The people who live there often live there because the housing is cheaper. They do have the option of moving, however. It’s funny how they obsess about how that might tear apart ancient black neighborhoods when the government seems to be heavily invested in doing everything it can to tear apart and disrupt white communities – except for white communities like Malibu and Martha’s Vineyard.

    And it’s funny that you mentioned the homeless problem. What better way to fix the homeless epidemic than to jack up the immigration rate into this country? More immigrants will take up more housing, bring in more drugs to get more Americans addicted, and drive down the price of labor for vulnerable people at the low end of the labor pool. You used to be able to say that at least the immigrants would provide labor for the construction industry, but with the cost of construction materials through the roof, they aren’t likely to help that problem any.

    People are about to find out just how miserable four years with the Woke Left can be.

  36. @Ben tillman

    Gold and silver and weapons and ammo. And land and other durable assets. Borrow money to be paid back with next decade’s mini-dollars. Do anything but hold cash or pay off debt.

    I agree with you about cash vs durable assets — and yet nine out of 10 people who advise stockpiling and “prepping’ also chant the mantra of “pay off all debt, pay off all debt.” That would be wise in normal times, but if you’re expecting the rough times ahead to include hyperinflation, why not borrow now to buy real assets and repay later (if ever) in vastly more worthless dollars? It’s not like paying off debt somehow gets you off the financial grid — there’s always another property tax or some other tax bill on the way

    If I ever called the Dave Ramsey show or something like that, this is the question I would have

  37. There are still plenty of Blacks in the Syracuse area who believe that the elevated portion of Highway I-81, which runs right through the middle of the city, was deliberately constructed by the evil Republicans in that location in order to demolish a vibrant black neighborhood and its voting power. The fact that Syracuse is basically in a valley running north/south, with a good-sized lake at its north west border, making other locations for the highway infeasible, doesn’t seem to deter this tasty conspiracy theory.

    There is only one, inadequate, loop road to the east of the city (481), and I-81 handles a massive amount of traffic coming from the southern part of the state, meeting the New York State Thruway on the north. The Thruway, of course, is the major route between Buffalo at the western border and Albany on the east.

    Now that the elevated portion of I-81 is in need of rebuilding/replacement, the State, in its wisdom, has decided to tear the whole thing down and run this major highway right through the city as a surface street, with lots of traffic lights and opportunities for encounters with pedestrians. There will be traffic calming devices, which always sounds nice, and presumably the black population (generally residing on the South Side of Syracuse, which is kind of a low-rise Chernobyl), will return and restore vibrancy to the area. How all of this truck traffic traffic is going to make its way through city streets, or in the alternative, loop all the way around the city via 481 without massive traffic jams, especially in winter snow storms, is something that no one seems to have thought too deeply about.
    My own perspective on this is that Syracuse no longer has the political mojo to demand adequate highway funds, and the Party, with its power base increasingly centered in New York City, has decided to cut it loose.

  38. Anon[782] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Has anyone noticed that the media focused on Biden’s fall on those airplane steps right after he announced he was going to run again in 2024?

    The Dem elites were furious about that announcement. They want Harris in 2024, and they’re going arrange things with their pet media outlets to make Biden look even more senile than he is to try to shove him out of the race. They didn’t realize that when a guy runs for president as often as Biden has, he’s not letting go until they pry the office out of his cold, dead hands.

    As Biden’s term progresses, the liberal media are going to try to destroy Biden exactly the way they went after Trump. They will be crazy-desperate to get rid of him before 2024. Pretty soon, Biden is going to regret he was ever a Democrat.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  39. “Zolan Kanno-Youngs”. America 2021 is just one ceaseless episode of épater les anglo-saxons.

  40. Wilkey says:

    The biggest single piece of the plan’s racial equity efforts is not a transportation or environmental project, but a $400 billion investment in in-home care for older and disabled Americans.

    My wife and I went through this with her parents. In-home health care may be nice, but it is also incredibly inefficient.

    All those assisted living places you see going up in just about every neighborhood around you serve a useful purpose. They put all the aide workers in one building so they can help dozens of people each shift, instead of just one person. They make the aides far more efficient at their work, meaning we need fewer of them. They put elderly people in a community where they can socialize with others of their age, if they choose to do so. And they free up housing stock – millions of extra homes are available for families because of assisted living.

    I guess this issue must be at the top of Joe Biden’s shrinking mind since it’s basically what he’s receiving right now.

    In-home care may be nice, and if elderly people can afford it through savings or insurance then let them pay for it. In-home hospice care is also great for the terminally ill. But our government, which is already spending trillions it doesn’t have, should not be pouring hundreds of billions of dollars into an inefficient program that keeps elderly people in their homes at a greatly increased cost to society.

  41. Ano says:

    Hi Steve,

    I’m proud to announce the names of the infrastructure companies to whom I have awarded construction contracts under my Build Baksheesh Better plan.

    Bry Bur Ree Corporation (of Peking)
    Ten Per Cent for Big Guy Corporation (of Canton)
    Fun Nee Mun Nee Corporation (of Shanghai)
    Demo Krat Sluzh Fun Corporation (of Nanking)

    I’m also proud to announce my son Hunter is a board member of all the above companies.

    Yours,

    Joe

    PS: Steve, please no expressing doubt at Hunter’s expertise in industry- he has a lot of experience with miners and cracked pipes!

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • LOL: duncsbaby, TWS
    • Troll: schnellandine
  42. Robert Moses destroyed many communities of color with the West side highway, FDR drive, and the countless other expressways he forced through. Oh wait, he destroyed Irish and Jewish neighborhoods. Where is the research showing that Irish and Jewish people are still impoverished 100 years later?

    https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-the-truth-about-robert-moses-and-race-20190919-tsmjeixdyzd4vk5uwlcswxw4du-story.html

  43. Currahee says:

    “azalea bushes that had shaded Black children playing in the large neutral ground in the middle of the street, eviscerating a vibrant neighborhood whose residents fought in vain to stop the construction”

    The perfect Steve trigger.

  44. @Wilkey

    Yes indeed, putting unwanted people in large assisted living facilities is extremely efficient in terms of allowing the spread of viruses like Covid-19.

    Not only that, but crematoriums and cemeteries can be built nearby, thus saving on transportation costs.

    I must say that the vast home health initiative comes as a huge surprise to me, as I do not remember it even being discussed in the presidential debates, however it will provide a lot of jobs.

    A more fundamental question is whether this printing of new money will damage the currency status of the dollar, and if so will this cause harm and what form will the harm take?

    Because the United States dollar is a reserve currency, the United States does not have to worry about balance of payments in the same way that other nations with their own currency must do.

    This seems like a huge benefit for the United States, and if money can just be printed and distributed, then we can all be better off.

    Other nations, like Ecuador for example, which uses the US dollar as its currency, cannot just print or borrow new money ad lib as this would lead to bankruptcy.

    On the plus side, that is $400 billion that will be circulating in the economy and spent on fast food, fuel, and furniture. Some of it will be recuperated in federal state and local taxes and lotteries.

    What will be the savings for Medicare and Medicaid in not providing long-term care in expensive ALFs?

    What type of stocks or corporations will benefit the most, other than home health businesses?

    • Replies: @ic1000
    , @Wilkey
  45. The bigger picture in any of these stories is: if we had run a serious, sensible Republican in 2020 instead of an inflammatory doofus, none of this would be happening. It should be a lesson to be learned for 2024, but it probably won’t be.

  46. I-81 in Syracuse is a useful link between the Thruway and Southern Tier Expressway.

    The real, unstated goal is to limit plebe mobility.

  47. Under the current system if elderly people are placed in residential homes at the end of life on Medicaid, if they own their own homes, the homes have to be sold and they are only allowed to keep a couple of thousand dollars for themselves.

    This can have a devastating effect on members of the same family who live in the home, and on descendants who will not inherit the home.

    One assumes that the new home health initiative will have some effect here. Perhaps that is part of the intention.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Wilkey
    , @Federalist
  48. JMcG says:
    @Wilkey

    It’s a welfare program for people who could never be hired in any kind of real health care facility. Daytime TV is full of ads for this grift. Basically you sign up for some ridiculous training program, get a meaningless certificate, then get paid to sit home with mawmaw. Or not sit home with her, who really GAF.

  49. Since Numbers was such a hit, how about a new flick ret-conning some plucky black female engineers into the creation of the federal interstate system? 1950s period clothes and cars! Behind-the-scenes drama as the wimmin fight for social justice and battle environmental racism!

    Failing that, as with other massive feats of white know-how, interstates must now be historically revised as structurally racist. Black poverty and violence must be blamed on anything white, never a look in the mirror to blame themselves.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  50. David says:

    On the topic of what the left really thinks about blacks, I was listening to NPR yesterday in someone else’s car for about an hour. Both shows I heard parts of featured nonstop denigration of whites but one comment by a hostess named Faith Salie stood out. She said to a black musician that her white son was being encouraged to scat-sing in jazz class and then asked, “Do you think he has what it takes in his genetic wheelhouse to do that?” The audience and other guests all laughed, no one took exception.

  51. @Wilkey

    Blame highways, redlining, gentrification, lack of gentrification, whatever — Nothing destroys black communities like black people themselves, and they’ve done a pretty good job on white communities too when given a chance. Add a flood of illlegals and dangerously crazy homeless people and voila, you can destroy any community you’d like.

    • Agree: Polistra
  52. Jack D says:

    Democrats are like Humpty Dumpty – words mean exactly what they want them to mean, but in the case of the Democrats, especially when they want to spend money. The “Covid Relief” bill contained countless billions for things that have nothing whatsoever to do with Covid.

    Democrats have an endless list of ways to spend your money. There is so much unrighted injustice in the world, so much more money that needs to be spent until “equity” is achieved and an illiterate home health care aid from Liberia can live the same lifestyle as a skilled plumber or owner of a successful small business. In fact, since equity will NEVER be achieved (unless the plumber or businessman ends up as being as poor as a health care aid as in Cuba or Venezuela) there is never going to be a time when the social welfare state doesn’t have an infinite need for money. The list of places where the state could “improve people’s lives” by spending money is literally endless.

    If left completely to their own devices and without any need for fiscal prudence (and they are barely restrained now), Nancy and Chuck could produce a trillion $ spending package for ever week of what remains of their lives. Every Democrat mayor and governor could give you a mile long list of infrastructure he would like to spend money on – new schools and roads and bridges and mass transit and so on. Every environmentalist could list a thousand different ways in which we could spend money to make the world “green” and completely eliminate global warming and pollution by completely getting rid of hydrocarbon use, cleaning up past industrial sites, etc. Ever member of the Coalition of the Fringes would like the government to write them a big reparations check for all the wrongs done in the past to Black, Hispanics, LGBTs, Asians and Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, etc. etc. – every single one of them is due reparations for one reason or another. I could go on and on – there is an infinite number of ways to spend money.

    Going way back into the 1970s, NYC (not having a printing press like the Feds) had a lot of budget shortfalls, especially since millions of tax paying white people had fled to the suburbs in the last burst of black exuberance. The law did not permit long term borrowing to fill short term budget shortfalls. However, it did permit long term borrowing for capital items – things like bridges and schools that have a long life span so it is justified to borrow long term to pay for them. However, you just have to be a little creative. Is not spending on “job training” a form of capital investment? You are investing in human capital, right? So, viola, they began issuing bonds to pay for items in their current year budget. This only ended when the city went bankrupt and a state commission was appointed to oversee their finances. Who is ever going to appoint a commission to oversee the Federal government? No one, so this is not going to end until the whole thing collapses.

  53. Ano says:

    Dear Mr Sailer,

    Fantastic News!

    Joe Biden is going to Cabrini Greenize America’s inner-cities!

    Once the expressways are dug up, and the interstates re-routed into areas which vote Republican, Joe, under his Build Back Whiter negro-relocation plan, will be replacing these blots on the landscape (oh, not just the negroes- I mean the roads as well) with lots of green space, parks, bike-paths, pedestrian areas, jogging tracks, etc etc. Plus SWPL social infrastructure such as libraries, organic fruiterers, book shops, enotecas, etc. etc!!!!

    House and land values are going to soar, pricing out the current property-values-depressing deadbeat disfunctional violent ghetto negroes – pushing them out into the far outskirts and on to all the Trump supporters!

    Do you Big Dig it!

    Once we have bulldozed all the PoC underclass out, new condos and homes will start from prices only Democrat Party insiders can afford!

    Don’t delay! Crawl out of your freeway underpass cardboard box and Call Today!

    Yours,

    Rahm Emanuel
    Rahm Emanuel Real Estate

    • Troll: schnellandine
    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  54. Erik L says:
    @Wilkey

    Here in LA we have million dollar homes a block away from the interstate

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  55. Erik L says:

    Someone on NextDoor claimed that if the homeless don’t leave 3 feet of sidewalk clear it is a violation of the ADA and if you call the non emergency number to report it they will remove it. I’ve noticed a lot of these encampments along my usual dog walk route have been removed recently. I suspect Garcetti sees the problem in having his failure so visible. New campers take over the spots pretty quickly but I see signs they are getting ahead of it. Fingers crossed.

    But if you have time, report the ADA violation and see if it works

  56. Jack D says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    This can have a devastating effect on members of the same family who live in the home, and on descendants who will not inherit the home.

    Yes, wouldn’t it be great if the government would pay to keep my elderly mother in a nursing home while I get to keep her home equity! The entire theme of the 21 century from big corporations down to individuals is “Privatize gains and socialize losses.” A great pandemic (whose economic effects have been made much worse by “lockdowns”) has impacted your business negatively – no problem, the government will socialize your losses thru a “PPP Loan”. This is a very special kind of loan – the kind you don’t have to pay back! A great pandemic (whose economic effects have been made much worse by “lockdowns”) has impacted your business positively (your name is Jeff Bezos) – no problem – enjoy your newfound trillions!

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  57. Forbes says:

    I-81 transits about 10 miles (north/south) through the center of Syracuse. A couple blocks (less than 20% of the project) of (predominately black) low-rise public housing was confiscated for the elevated highway construction in the early 1960s. Much of this occurred under or during the federal “Urban Renewal” period of what was known pejoratively as slum clearance.

    At the same time, parallel to the remaining public housing site, the state of New York built, what was then Upstate Medical Center (a counterpart to downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn), and now known as Upstate Medical University, the largest employer in the region.

    Built later was the east-west I-690 transiting about 7 miles through the heart of Syracuse. There are many neighborhoods that relinquished housing stock for both these giant highway-building projects through Syracuse. Obviously, many more predominately white neighborhoods were impacted than the small portion of a public housing project. That blacks today inhabit much of the formerly white neighborhoods, south of the housing project, and adjacent to I-81, enables the historically illiterate to claim the interstate was purpose built through black neighborhoods.

    Yet now it is racism, or some equally vile derivative, that is used as a complaint to attract federal highway funding to replace the elevated highway through Syracuse, as plans for a replacement have been under discussion for at least a decade–to no avail.

    One proposal is to put the interstate highway at grade-level, with traffic lights interspersing local cross streets, while another is building a three (or more) mile tunnel to by-pass the area. Neither appear practical alternatives–so racism it is.

  58. … It claimed dozens of Black-owned businesses, along with oak trees and azalea bushes that had shaded Black children playing in the large neutral ground in the middle of the street, ….

    This brief quote suggests to me that the writers are spinning a lie of epic proportions. It reminds me of two Negro behaviors that usually blight neighborhoods overrun by Negros. These behaviors belie the rosy picture painted by the quote.

    I lived in East Orange, New Jersey back in the early 1970s, during the shockingly brief period when an influx of Negros turned it from a pleasant, middle class, White suburb of Newark into a dangerous, blighted, urban underclass slum. The early Negro migrants whom I observed seemed to have a boundless antipathy towards decorative plant life, an antipathy which I suspect would have included “oak trees and azalea bushes”. Almost invariably, one of a new Negro resident’s first acts would be to slash down any shrubbery on the property and begin abusing any lawns until they eventually resembled vacant city lots.

    When I saw plant destruction I began considering it as a certain sign that another White family had been replaced by a Negro one. I’ve since observed a dearth of decorative shrubbery and lawns in many Negro urban underclass neighborhoods.

    “Black children playing … in the middle of the street, …” It isn’t just the children. Negroes have a marked propensity to block public thoroughfares and even attack those who attempt to pass through. Street blocking was the immediate offense which precipitated Michael Brown’s fatal confrontation with a Ferguson, Missouri police officer. In many urban areas across the country, gangs of Negros on bicycles or motorcycles have taken over major thoroughfares and even interstate highways, blocking and marauding legitimate users. The resulting rampages have caused public inconvenience, significant property damage, and even injuries and deaths.

    A more common occurrence in Negro neighborhoods is for a small group to deliberately block a street, or for two passing cars to stop, driver’s door to driver’s door, so the occupants can have an extended gabfest, oblivious to the traffic jam they are creating. I’ve observed these behaviors often enough to suspect that they are a fundamental aspect of urban Negro underclass culture.

    • Replies: @Federalist
  59. El Dato says:
    @Desiderius

    Women

    Midwit women on Twitter who save the world like Hermione Granger.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  60. I think you’re wrong, here,Steve, about the long-run effects. Let’s ignore race for a moment, citing this quote from the article:

    “When it comes time to build an interstate through a city, a pattern emerges: The areas that are displaced by that interstate will overwhelmingly be the areas occupied by African-Americans,” Dr. Logan said. Often, he added, lawmakers choose to build “in the places that have the least political power to make sure this doesn’t happen in their neighborhood.”

    I refer here to the chapter in The Power Broker called “one mile.” Here was a lower-middle class Jewish community in the Bronx. Robert Moses, of German Jewish ancestry, had a disdain for the Russian Jews that would get anyone else cited for anti-semitism. The chapter and a following one detail the neighborhood’s fight to move the Cross Bronx Expressway (the building of which required the ethnic cleansing of 10,000 people in its path, most of them white), and the consequences of their lack of political power to oppose Moses (which, frankly, few had. It was only trying to cut down trees in Central Park that led to his final defeat: connected whites near the park, mothers with baby carriages, stopped him)

    Instead of routing the expressway slightly south along the north edge of CrotonaPark (Moses was also parkscommisioner), he chose to plow through the southern section of East Tremont. Houses that weren’t condemned became uninhabitable by people who had choices: the noise of construction in this southernmost spur of sea-level granite drove them away. It created a vacuum filled by blacks moving up from the neighborhood south of CrotonaPark, themselves leaving overcrowded housing that was all they could afford.

    Crime and mugging soon increased in the Jewish part of the neighborhood, leading to more flight. Another effect arose as well. Previously, the people living where the road went through and the people south of the road had formed part of the walk shed for businesses located along Tremont Avenue. Now something like 1/3rd of their customers were unable to shop there, and the Jewish-oriented businesses did not attract customers amongst the new black residents who had replaced the Jews.

    [MORE]

    The result was the utter destruction of the viability of the neighborhood as a middle class polity; it could survive as a lower-class area with people willing to live with noise and lead and diesel dust only because the property was more spacious, and in better condition. When the capital assets of the neighborhood were eventually run down by overuse, the rent load would not support fixing the capital inheritance.

    It’s hard to calculate how much capital destruction was visited upon the area by the powers that be, but it still has not returned to the income levels and upward mobility it exhibited as late as the 50s. Caro suggests that the reason for the bend north in the route was to preserve the bus barn for a private bus company connected to a Bronx politician.

    The same was done in Detroit to the black neighborhood called Black Bottom for its rich soil when first founded. In that case, the neighborhood helped create a black community that, for any faults, did give rise to Motown in the late 50s and 60s. The destruction of that slum (which means overcrowded, not necessarily racial) and replacement with modern housing set off a catabolic collapse of Detroit: the blacks whose overcrowded housing was destroyed moved into poorer white areas, setting off white flight.

    Ironically, the Mies van der Rohe townhouses built over the ruins of the black neighborhood remain a decent area today. The Republican Protestant mayors of Detroit who first conceived of slum clearance in the 1950s might well say:
    “Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
    Nothing beside remains. ”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Stan Adams
  61. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    > Yes indeed, putting unwanted people in large assisted living facilities is extremely efficient in terms of allowing the spread of viruses like Covid-19.

    Huh?

    > Not only that, but crematoriums and cemeteries can be built nearby, thus saving on transportation costs.

    But hearses aren’t like tow trucks, funeral homes charge by the job — Oh. Sarcasm.

    > A more fundamental question is whether this printing of new money will damage the currency status of the dollar, and if so will this cause harm and what form will the harm take? Because the United States dollar is a reserve currency, the United States does not have to worry about balance of payments in the same way that other nations with their own currency must do.

    Good to know! What could possibly go wrong?

    Or was that more sarcasm?

    • Replies: @CCZ
  62. @Wilkey

    Of course, it only turned the jewelry jet black, not the window sill, the walls, the floor the ceiling, and every other thing in the house.

    Alterative explanation: silver tarnishes very easily when touched in just about any environment. She’s bad at cleaning her silver jewelry.

  63. Altai says:
    @Desiderius

    This is an example of the “uncanny ubiquity” problem at the heart of the legitimacy crisis. Institutions, movements, policy packages, research programs, whathaveyou used to feature admissions against interest, sops to the losers, minority reports, meaningful peer reviews, election observers, and the like even if only to throw would be watchdogs off the scent. Now all of that’s out the window. What happened?

    In the low trust world of pure power the Trumpian logic of never apologise in public and never apologise to your adversaries has become the most effective one. But what works for the individual doesn’t always scale well to a society.

  64. Wilkey says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    What will be the savings for Medicare and Medicaid in not providing long-term care in expensive ALFs?

    Assisted living facilities aren’t that expensive. At worst they are break even, and they probably actually save money. The long-term aide my father-in-law was paying for was about 75% of the cost of the assisted living facility he is in, and that aide was only there maybe 40-50 hours a week. The other 120 hours a week of care were on the family, which meant a substantial amount of lost time from work for my wife and her siblings. Elderly people have to live somewhere. They have to be fed. They have to have heat and cooling. Those costs are being paid one way or the other.

    How the government recoups those costs is another matter, of course, but there is no doubt that assisted living is far more efficient than in-home care for everyone involved.

    As for the nursing home COVID deaths, that was largely a mismanagement issue. Not all states had the mass number of nursing home COVID deaths that New York had. In-home aides can also spread deadly viruses. Many of them come from minority communities where COVID was far more widespread. Some of them travel from one home to the next and can spread the disease that way.

    Addressing the issue of caring for the elderly by increasing the supply of in-home aides is only going to hasten the decline to government insolvency. But sure, let’s import a million more aide workers who themselves are huge tax burdens so that they can care for the elderly in the most economically inefficient manner possible.

    • Agree: bomag
  65. “Joe Biden is going to spend a gazillion Biden Bux in Neighborhoods of Color [sic].”

    Biden Bux will help solidify and grow the Overclass of Colour. Pitiful whitey, once a colossus, is now a punching bag for smug OOCs vaulted into societal positions for which they have no talent or qualifications other than a mostly bogus BA degree and their colour. They look out their window and see Steve timing himself with a Casio watch as he walks under the freeway. They laugh and say whitey looks like a ghost.

  66. PSR says:

    Every time I hear or read ‘equity’ I mentally see a sheep bleating.

    • Replies: @schnellandine
  67. In-home aides can also spread deadly viruses. Many of them come from minority communities where COVID was far more widespread. Some of them travel from one home to the next and can spread the disease that way.

    This happened to an elderly man living near me. In New York. So, yes: bad management and a lack of reliable testing. The man died of complications from COVID despite not having left his house: the aides brought it in.

    • Agree: Wilkey
    • Replies: @Jack D
  68. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:

    On a percentage basis, very little is going to be done about highway infrastructure. This is a massive power grab by the democrats. There’s a reason Biden has surrounded himself with the military…

  69. Charles says:
    @Almost Missouri

    It is amazing that so many – let’s say normal – people do not know and would not believe that the entirety of government, right now, is nothing more than a series of kickbacks and various corruptions.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Ben tillman
  70. Wilkey says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Under the current system if elderly people are placed in residential homes at the end of life on Medicaid, if they own their own homes, the homes have to be sold and they are only allowed to keep a couple of thousand dollars for themselves. This can have a devastating effect on members of the same family who live in the home, and on descendants who will not inherit the home.

    Well then, tough shit.

    My father-in-law has worried about this a bit – what happens if/when his insurance runs out. We keep telling him that he has plenty of money, and if he needs to spend it to pay for his care then it’s nothing to us. Sure it would be nice if he left us a little nest egg – a decent amount, but one that will be split six ways between my wife and her five siblings. Caring for elderly parents can be incredibly difficult and time consuming, but you do it because you love them, not because there’s a big payday at the end of it.

    Obviously you do what you can to keep the cost of care from eating away at their assets, both because you never know how long they will live so you need the money to last, and because you’d hope that there will be something left to inherit. But in the end you do what you have to do, and if that means you don’t inherit anything then so be it. We can’t drive the country into bankruptcy because someone wants to inherit a house.

    • Thanks: TomSchmidt
  71. @Jack D

    Yes, wouldn’t it be great if the government would pay to keep my elderly mother in a nursing home while I get to keep her home equity!

    Jack, Jack, Jack!

    It might well indeed if you were able to rent out her house and use the income to support your son or daughter in college, so that they could graduate without a huge debt in college loans and be able to afford to start the next generation of your family.

    Home ownership is the basis of capitalism. Home ownership for one generation can mean an affordable college education for the next generation.

    What is the point of having a government if it doesn’t serve the people? Would somebody else be impoverished if the government took care of your mother in her final years after she had paid taxes all her life?

    Perhaps you would like to sell off her body for medical research so it’s to offset the costs of the funeral?

    The issue referred to is one that is problematical in all societies. It was a huge political issue just a few years ago in the UK when Theresa May was forced to make a U-turn on the so-called ‘dementia tax’ issue.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/22/theresa-may-u-turn-on-dementia-tax-cap-social-care-conservative-manifesto.

    ALFs are massively expensive. I remember dealing a few years ago with a woman who lived in one which was paid for by her sons. She had planned well and had eight living sons!

    However the monthly fees for the ALF were over $5,000 a month, which was still putting a lot of financial pressure on the my family, and there were family disputes as to whether they could afford to pay the extra money to have her medications administered to her versus her just taking them herself, when the problem was that she was not taking them.

    You might think that for $5,000+ a month the ALF would be something special, but in fact it was not located in any kind of scenic area, the rooms were no better than standard economy motel rooms, and the cafeteria served up very mediocre and bland overcooked lunches of gray meat and canned vegetables.

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
  72. PSR says:
    @Arclight

    I’m not sure many of them really believe it. Like Nancy Pelosi dramatically and foolishly kneeling and wearing some African garb it’s just what they do to win elections.

  73. @Wilkey

    The emissions from the interstate a block away have turned jewelry that she placed near her window jet black.

    After all, who doesn’t place valuable jewelry right by a window where thieves peaking in can see it, break the window, and take it?

    Not only that, but who knew that cars in Louisiana run on coal and tar?

  74. Jack D says:
    @Arclight

    Is there anything that could possibly shake this belief, and if so, what then?

    Keynes said, “the markets can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent.”

    This includes not just the markets for stocks and commodities but also the market for ideological stupidity. Once you understand that the Numinous Negro has replaced God in the belief system of Western liberals, it all falls into place. Religious belief systems are not subject to refutation by facts or life experience. Maybe your prayers have not been answered in the past. Maybe you just haven’t been praying hard enough? THIS time pray harder and maybe it will work.

    • Agree: bomag
  75. Wilkey says:

    ALFs are massively expensive. I remember dealing a few years ago with a woman who lived in one which was paid for by her sons. She had planned well and had eight living sons! However the monthly fees for the ALF were over $5,000 a month, which was still putting a lot of financial pressure on the my family

    $5,000 a month certainly sounds like a lot, until you’ve compared it to the alternatives.

    What’s the cost of an in-home aide? Say, $16/hour times 2500 hours a year? That’s $40,000 a year just for the aide.

    And there are 8,760 or 8.784 hours in a year. Who’s there to care for them the other 6,000+ hours? So throw in a fair amount of lost time at work for the family members who fill in the enormous gaps, not to mention lost free time.

    Throw in food, heating, cooling, yard work, property taxes, and all sorts of miscellaneous other expenses, all for a house that the elderly parent can’t enjoy much anymore because they can barely get around.

    Add up all of those costs, then come back to us when you’ve had more experience dealing with these issues personally.

    And those costs are before you consider all the externalities involved. In-home care requires a lot more labor than assisted living facilities. That means more immigrants, who will mostly be net tax burdens. More elderly people still in their homes means millions more homes off the market for younger families to buy.

    Unless they’re living with their adult children – itself a huge burden – caring for the elderly in-home is less efficient in about a million different ways than caring for them in assisted living. It’s not even a close call.

  76. I’m as wary of Biden/Harris and their crazy-seeming bill as the next iSteve fan but — unless the books I’ve read and the historians, architects and developers I’ve talked to are all wrong — there’s a lot to the complaint that the post WWII mania for “urban renewal” and freeway-building damaged many neighborhoods and communities, most of them poor or working-class.

    Thousands of functioning neighborhoods got flattened, cities got chopped up, and millions of people were forced to uproot themselves. Do you love the idea of an eight-lane road with no stoplights run thru the middle of your town? Would you be enthusiastic about the Feds coming in, tearing down your neighborhood and replacing it with stark modernist high-rises? Why would we expect anyone else be? Many of the neighborhoods that were treated this way during the urban renewal/freeway-buildin’ era may have been a little rough or declasse, and they certainly weren’t politically well-connected, but they had nothing really wrong with them. They were functioning homes to many, many people.

    Even so, why we’d trust the same entity — the government — to correct government-caused mistakes, I have no idea. “This time we’ll get it right!,” hah. Not that I believe any of the made-up Biden/Harris money will wind up going to what we’re told it’ll be going to anyway, instead of into the pockets of Dem-connected operators.

  77. Many of the black neighborhoods of Washington DC do look like they have slightly shabbier infrastructure, while the white neighborhoods get gold-plated with lavish swimming pools and state-of art little league fields that are upgraded every year. And this is all done by the local, mostly black-run DC government. I have assumed that the difference is the local government is pressured by black representatives to provide government jobs, welfare and various form of expensive therapy programs, while it tries to please white middle-class residents (who don’t even use DC schools) with gorgeous amenities so they will stay in town and pay taxes to fund government programs for dependent blacks.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    , @Polistra
  78. government is the man who serves two masters. Infrastructure exists to be infrastructure, but wait it also exists as a free cash giveaway to “public servants.” this is why capitalism is ultimately so good at providing for the public good. Toyota only gets money when customers buy its products and they buy its products because they perceive them to improve their lives. So toyota can only make money by taking resources and producing things that are more valuable to society than the resources used to create them(massive simplification.) meanwhile, government does not charge directly for its services so the value they create for society can be a fraction of their cost.

  79. CCZ says:
    @ic1000

    Funeral expenses will be reimbursed:

    April 4 – Families who incurred COVID-19 related funeral expenses may be eligible for assistance from the federal government. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will begin doling out to those who qualify up to $9,000 per funeral to ease the financial burden caused by the pandemic .

    Expenses incurred after January 20, 2020, for deaths related to the coronavirus, will be paid up to a maximum of $35,500, when multiple funerals occurred.

    To be eligible for funeral assistance, you must meet these conditions:

    The death must have occurred in the United States, including the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.

    The death certificate must indicate the death was attributed to COVID-19.

    The applicant must be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien who incurred funeral expenses after January 20, 2020

    There is no requirement for the deceased person to have been a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien. [Illegal aliens welcome??]

    https://www.fema.gov/disasters/coronavirus/economic/funeral-assistance

  80. Mr. Anon says:

    Biden’s infrastructure plan has billions of dollars allocated for tearing down infrastructur.

    In addition to dedicated funding for neighborhoods split or splintered by past infrastructure projects, the proposal also includes money for the replacement of lead water pipes that have harmed Black children in cities like Flint, Mich.

    Whereas white children are not harmed by lead water pipes. Those evil, racist civil engineers of yore used only white lead for the white parts of town.

    Of course it is well known that highway construction destroys neighborhoods and economically disempowers them. Even now, Mountain View, Palo Alto, and Menlo Park struggle, centuries after the Bourbon monarchs of Spain built the El Camino Real.

    It’s infrastructural racism. It’s what happens when you pour tragic concrete over tragic dirt.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  81. Jack D says:
    @TomSchmidt

    Instead of routing the expressway slightly south along the north edge of Crotona Park (Moses was also parks commisioner), he chose to plow through the southern section of East Tremont.

    This is bullshit. Look at a map. The northern edge of Crotona Park is only 2 blocks from where the CBE was actually built. Shifting it 2 blocks would not have made any difference. The thing about the Cross Bronx Expressway is that it crosses the Bronx, which was then a densely populated mostly residential area. There was no possible alignment that would not have required the removal of many residential buildings. At the time it was also heavily Jewish so there was no possible alignment (other than not building it at all) that would not have impacted Jews.

    The areas impacted by the CBE would have declined whether or not the highway was built – these were older buildings and NY’s rent control laws discouraged upkeep. The children of the Jews who lived in those buildings were no longer cutters and sewers in the garment center like their parents – they had gone to college and were now orthodontists and accountants. They didn’t want to live in some sooty old tenement with a rattly elevator that sometimes worked and sometimes didn’t and steam pipes that clanged when the boiler was working, which was not all the time. They bought nice single family houses in Westchester instead and took the commuter train into Grand Central rather than riding the subway. Meanwhile blacks and Puerto Ricans in NY were fruitful and ever multiplying and had to live somewhere so as elderly Jews moved out, they moved in. If they didn’t, then no one would have wanted to live in these obsolete buildings.

    As Steve said, highways are not that wide. The road cut for the CBE, even with the access roads and ramps, is about 250′ across, or roughly 1 block wide. Moses was very careful not to cut most of the through streets – the highway is either in a cut or elevated (at great expense) for most of its length and in the western Bronx (the area you are talking about) the existing street grid continued to flow under or over the highway with little disruption. Again look at a map. The Bronx itself is about 40,250′ feet from north to south. It’s impossible that this one little 250′ strip destroyed the the other 40,000 feet.

    Meanwhile, the CBE is a vital transportation artery which connects Connecticut and the rest of New England to everything to the west and south of NYC. It would have been an enormous mistake to cripple our nation’s transportation infrastructure so that a few old Jews in the Bronx could have hung on for a few more years before leaving for the nursing home or cemetery.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    , @TomSchmidt
  82. @TomSchmidt

    tl;dr Expressways are bad because they cause blacks to move into white areas, prompting whites to flee.

    Of course, those expressways were built to connect the city centers with the sprawling suburbs. And why were those suburbs expanding so rapidly? Because whites were already fleeing blacks.

    Whites begin moving from the inner cities to the suburbs to get away from blacks -> expressways are built to link the cities with the suburbs -> the resulting disruptions uproot both blacks and whites, hastening the white flight to the suburbs.

    Here’s a conspiracy theory for you: suburban property developers and automobile manufacturers influenced politicians to screw up the inner cities to promote white flight, thus ensuring a healthy market for single-family homes on half-acre lots with two cars in every driveway and strip malls with ten-acre parking lots with one car in every spot. (I’m not saying I believe it myself.)

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    , @duncsbaby
  83. Jack D says:
    @TomSchmidt

    This happened a lot. My wife’s mother had 1 cousin left that was older than she is – she is 98 and her cousin was 100. His aide brought Covid into his house and he died. Her aide also got Covid but by some miracle she stopped coming to work before she spread it to my MIL. Both aides were PoC needless to say.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  84. Wilkey says:
    @Paleo Retiree

    Thousands of functioning neighborhoods got flattened, cities got chopped up, and millions of people were forced to uproot themselves.

    True. Thousands more neighborhoods were torn apart by busing, desegregation, Section 8, and forced lending to unqualified minority applicants.

    And thousands more will yet be torn apart by the renewed Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing plan, and the greatly increased levels of immigration the Biden Administration clearly has in store for us.

    Leviathan has absolutely no interest in stable communities. You could argue it has more interest in doing everything it can to destabilize them. Destabilizing the middle class is one thing the government does to help the oligarchs grow ever more powerful. A man who doesn’t know his neighbors isn’t going to politically organize with his neighbors.

    They have torn apart or weaponized every institution that used to make this country what it was. Atomizing the people is the goal. Pretending that what they did to black communities is any different or worse than what they’ve done to the white middle class is only another thing they’re doing to further divide us.

  85. @Paleo Retiree

    Yes, same sentiment as my comment above.

    Steve follows Benjamin Franklin’s idea that what made the USA wealthy was ALL THAT LAND and few people. It’s one view of wealth; it might even be correct.

    I’ve challenged him to review the book Scale, by Geoffrey West, wherein the science of economic wealth creation in cities is reviewed. In a nutshell, a city whose size doubles requires only 1.85 times as much infrastructure to support that doubled population; the excess is available as wealth. A city whose size doubles has residents seeing about 15% more income per capita than the city of half its size.

    The challenge in growth is that crime and other dysfunction also scales super-linearly. So sim city writ large means deriving the extra economic benefits (and social benefits) from scale while avoiding the bad effects. It’s there that moral crusades and crime suppression are critical, and where the crackdown on effective policing is going to lead to a negative effect. Once negative growth sets in in a place like NYC, it becomes impossible to pay for all the infrastructure of a larger city with a smaller, poorer population.

    At a neighborhood level, destroying the positive effects of concentration by uprooting residents and undermining businesses that CAN function with a large enough walkshed sets off a cycle of destruction that can take many years to undo.

    Steve simply hasn’t paid attention to the science. One can anecdotally point out that Hong Kong residents are wealthier than Mongolians, or that highly urban Dutch in the randstad are wealthier per capita by about 8% than lowest-density Finns. He might compare Finland versus Lagos.

    I highly recommend Scale if you haven’t read it yet. I’m guessing you’ve read a lot of what I already have.

    • Agree: Paleo Retiree
  86. @Henry Canaday

    Part of it is that black neighborhoods actively vandalize their infrastructure and workers feel less safe working there. Tools and equipment go missing from trucks when you turn your back.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  87. @Jack D

    You appear to be unfamiliar with the Dan Ryan Expressway, 10 lanes through the SouthSide that served as, for a while, a concrete barrier separating the white neighborhoods to the West from Bronzeville and the black neighborhoods to the East. As told to me by white ethnics from
    Chicago in the 80s, this was by design, with the roadway reinforcing the railroad in keeping some groups there and other groups here. As I recall, Armour Square was one such neighborhood west of the Road. I think the neighborhoods like Bridgeport and Back of the Yards, Saul Alinsky’s old stomping grounds, remained white ethnic. Now I understand that they’ve largely gone Mexican, but not black.

    Building the road across the top of Crotona Park might have established this boundary for East Tremont. Instead it cut off a part of the neighborhood leading to a collapse both of the area cut off, and also for reasons of walkshed making the rest of the area less viable. That Jews fled and were replaced by Blacks, and that crime increased (as documented by Caro) is undeniable, and is a result of the road.

    Meanwhile, the CBE is a vital transportation artery which connects Connecticut and the rest of New England to everything to the west and south of NYC. It would have been an enormous mistake to cripple our nation’s transportation infrastructure
    The crippling of the transportation infrastructure happened when New England lost direct rail shipment through Poughkeepsie because the railroads were bankrupted by trucks running on roads built through areas whose land was originally put to higher-value use. As it works out, the use of the Tappan Zee bridge and 287 avoids NYC and its traffic, and the poorly-engineered CBE with its upgrade that trucks cannot navigate at high speed, causing eternal backups into the GWB.

    Moses took the most highly capital-intensive city in the USA and turned much of its land to low-intensity uses. Care to counter that point?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Steve Sailer
  88. Mr. Anon says:
    @Wilkey

    After all, who doesn’t place valuable jewelry right by a window where thieves peaking in can see it, break the window, and take it?

    There’s so much bullshit in this article that I think it must have been written at a cattle ranch.

    You noticed that jewelry bit too? That pegged my BS meter also.

    What kind of jewelry does a social justice activist have anyway? Her tounge-stud? A nose-ring? Bernie campaign buttons?

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  89. @El Dato

    Midwits are an ever present danger (and resource if productively harnessed!) but women have hardly cornered that particular market. I’m speaking more of network effects.

    If one HR lady or admission committee comes up with the idea “let’s discriminate against the top 10% instead of the bottom, they’ll always find other opportunities” that’s one thing. If they all mysteriously do so that’s a disaster – a sort of inverted Nash disequilibrium.

    Many such cases.

  90. @Known Fact

    “if you’re expecting the rough times ahead to include hyperinflation, why not borrow now to buy real assets and repay later (if ever) in vastly more worthless dollars?”

    Why not borrow? Because, absent UBI and/or neverending CoronaHoax stimuli, household income is relatively fixed and so now, in addition to inflated costs of daily living, the household is burdened with a heavy debtload. This is a recipe for default. Assuming inelastic income, eliminating debt frees up more money for inflated food costs, etc, whilst not losing your house to foreclosure. See: Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  91. Mr. Anon says:

    “These highways were essentially built as conduits for wealth,” Mr. Avila said. “Primarily white wealth, jobs, people, markets. The highways were built to promote the connectivity between suburbs and cities. The people that were left out were urban minorities. African-Americans, immigrants, Latinos.”

    How many immigrants and Latinos were even in these cities when these freeways were built, 50 and 60 years ago? It’s remarkable – the racist mojo these freeways have – to oppress Guatemalans, Nigerians, and Iraqis decades before they even arrive anywhere near them.

    • Agree: Federalist
  92. To throw a few anecdotes into the conversation …

    * When the health and abilities of my elderly in-laws started to plunge a few years ago, my wife and I lined up in-home help for them, because who wouldn’t prefer to spend their final chapters in their own home, right? But, though we worked with a well-regarded local outfit, it was a disaster — ludicrously expensive (the in-laws needed help 24/7) for one thing, and dicey and fraught for another. They weren’t supposed to, but some of the aides did their best to insinuate themselves emotionally into our lives and then play favorites, probably with the goal of getting remembered in various wills. Plus, well, having in-home help means that you’ve got a stranger in your family’s house all the time. That isn’t a great feeling in itself, and here in California rules and regs are such that having these people around is like having spies in the house. You’ve got to be wary of having routine family squabbles, because they’ll wind up in some notebook that eventually gets turned in to someone who might decide to call Adult Protective Services. We eventually found a nice assisted-living place for the in-laws. It took about two weeks for them to adjust to the move, but we’ve all been a lot happier and more peaceful since. It’s 1/3 the cost of 24/7 home health help, there’s always skilled staff around, the food’s good (without having too much sodium in it, lol), the place offers nice activities and is in a quiet, leafy and pleasant setting … It’s nothing like the justly-dreaded “nursing homes” of old. I know there are lousy care facilities around, but if you’ve got some resources you can do well for your elderly relatives these days.

    * An ailing, poor, elderly relative of mine back in NYC was being looked after by city-paid home-health people. The city apparently prefers to look after its indigent elderly in their own apartments. A year ago he picked up COVID from one of the health-care aides and wound up spending six weeks in the hospital. All of that care paid for by the public purse, of course, not to mention the rent control laws he benefits from …

  93. @Arclight

    This time?

    They have no memory by design. Their cultural balls have been cut off as surely as a full MTF tranner.

    Queering is spiritual/cultural gelding.

    Every time is a recurrent first time.

  94. Anon[349] • Disclaimer says:

    When you believe that the reason for different outcomes between races is purely environmental it’s obviously going to lead to these grotesquely elaborate rationalisations for the spending of billions upon billions of dollars on attempts to close said gaps.

    What would Occam say about all this, I wonder?

  95. @Wilkey

    The State of Ohio changed Medicaid to pay for home health aides. $2000/month in-home vs. $3000/month for an assisted living facility.

  96. Steve may well be willing to walk over and/or under freeways but practically speaking he’s unusual. Even in the small, safe, lovely CA city where I live, there are only a couple of points where people routinely cross the freeway. Generally speaking, you’re either on one side of the freeway or you’re on the other side, and going from one to the other nearly always means getting in your car.

    Fwiw, a couple of decades ago a city planner in St Louis spent an afternoon driving me around the city pointing out his professional challenges. One of them was the freeways, which cut off neighborhoods from the ones next door. And no, there were barely any people crossing casually from one side of the freeways to the other. His image was of the city as a body. Once you dismember a body (ie., run freeways thru a city), no matter how hard you try to put the limbs and torso back together again, that body is dead dead dead.

    But we all — even those of us who like post WWII American automobile-suburb livin’ — know instinctively and from everyday experience that a freeway isn’t anything like a routine city or town street, right?

    • Agree: TWS
    • Replies: @Known Fact
  97. Jack D says:
    @TomSchmidt

    and the poorly-engineered CBE with its upgrade that trucks cannot navigate at high speed, causing eternal backups into the GWB.

    The enternal backups into the GWB are caused by heavy volume. At 3AM you can zip right thru. Do the trucks work better at night? The Bronx is not exactly the Rocky Mountains – there is no upgrade steep enough to slow down the truck traffic. If it was really a problem we’ve now had 60 years to fix it.

    Moses took the most highly capital-intensive city in the USA and turned much of its land to low-intensity uses. Care to counter that point?

    If you mean parks then he is guilty. The CBE is one of the most intensely used pieces of capital investment in America. I’m sure whatever it cost to build is a tiny fraction of what it would cost today if it could ever be built at all. Moses belonged to the generation of Americans that got things done – won world wars, built the subways and highways, went to the moon. Was it all perfect? No but perfection on earth does not exist. Now we are all so caught up with bullshit like “walksheds” and endangered frogs than we can’t do shit anymore. Whichever way you turn, someone is bitching about their native burial ground or something. The Chinese are snickering into their sleeves.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  98. Haven’t we been here before? Recall Robert Reich’s “white construction workers” diatribe from 2009.

    Obama did nothing for blacks (except get more of them killed) and neither will death rattle Joe. This is all theater.

  99. @Cloudbuster

    “black neighborhoods … workers feel less safe working there”

    Not just workers: operators of frozen fruit confection and pina colada and banana daiquiri flavoured shaved ice carts face danger in neighborhoods of color [sic]. Also, black customers tend to loiter around the cart while they slurp and munch their snacks with gusto. An unpleasant neurological quandary if recently diagnosed with Misophonia.

    “Tools and equipment go missing from trucks when you turn your back.”

    Never turn your back on black customers because it’s quite likely they will punch you in the back of your head and kick you while you’re down whilst they loot the cart. After the kicking stops remember to roll away whilst the laughing blacks dump the cart on the piece of asphalt on which you were once lying.

  100. @Not Only Wrathful

    I heard Uncle Joe and Kami (pronounced Commie) plan to use the Biden Bucks to buy upscale homes in upscale neighborhoods and then move welfare mothers and their kids in so that the neighbors can “enjoy” the diversity and the schools can be “transformed” into replicas of those in the inner cities from whence came the welfare families. What could go wrong, Joe?

  101. SMK says: • Website
    @Almost Missouri

    At his recent press conference, in response to a question from a worshipful reporter, Biden said he plans to seek re-election in 2024 but joked that there might not be a Republican party for him to run against. Biden is so senile and demented that he doesn’t even realize how senile and demented he is and how senile and demented he’ll be in 2024 -assuming he’ll still be POTUS or even alive in 2024.

    Incidentally, when flashing his tough-guy smart-ass grin -often crooked with his pearly whites, real or dentures(?), gleaming and visible on one side of his mouth and not the other- Biden’s face is even more deserving of a fist than that of the smug and smirking Bill Kristol. And, unlike Kristol, he can’t be avoided. Nor can crazy cackling Kamala.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  102. @Paleo Retiree

    Thousands of functioning neighborhoods got flattened, cities got chopped up, and millions of people were forced to uproot themselves.

    That’s the price of progress – old stuff gets torn down and replaced with new stuff. That’s how we built the dams, roads, bridges, energy and utility plants, etc in building this country. We cut down the eastern forests to make farmland. Would you rather live in a wigwam in the forest?
    Keep the great old buildings, sure, but do you want to keep the shopping mall when it’s time has come for demolition?
    I-5 was built through middle class white Seattle neighborhoods and a swath of houses were torn down. I live a few blocks away from I-5 today and don’t feel flattened, chopped up, or uprooted. The people who were paid for their homes under immanent domain to built I-5 got on with their lives and I’m sure are doing fine today. It’s not a holocaust.
    And I do not believe that poor people have to sell and leave more than others. They built I-5 in the only place it could go. The idea that we target dams, roads and bridges for poor neighborhoods is ridiculous. The terrain and the industrial needs determine where these things are built.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  103. @Mike_from_SGV

    How would things look if Trump hadn’t run in 2016?

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  104. @Stan Adams

    You’re projecting current black dysfunction to the blacks of the 1940s and1950s, a time when black illegitimacy rates were lower than white ones today. Black economic and political power continued to grow because they were working more, earning more, and becoming an economic force that could not be ignored. The Montgomery bus boycott was a threat only because the privately owned bus companies depended on the fares derived from black customers.

    The Civil Rights revolution didn’t cause black empowerment and enrichment, it was a result of their increasing wealth and status in society. Certainly the suited men and well-dressed women of the 1950s far outshine what most people dress like today.

    That progress for all blacks was stopped in the 1960s. Steve seemed to think it was tied to the increase in immigration, which cut the bargaining power of lower-skilled workers. It didn’t help that AFDC switched to essentially requiring the removal of a father from a home in return for benefits; the downward spiral led to the broken family structure and chais you see today.

    White flight from Detroit, for instance, was low until after the destruction of black bottom. The race riots of 1967 really kicked it into gear, and the city elected its last white mayor in 1969, until recently. The existence of the roadways allowed those whites to escape and commute back in, until all those grand 1920s office buildings were made obsolete by crime.

    Here’s a conspiracy theory for you: suburban property developers and automobile manufacturers influenced politicians to screw up the inner cities to promote white flight, thus ensuring a healthy market for single-family homes on half-acre lots with two cars in every driveway and strip malls with ten-acre parking lots with one car in every spot. (I’m not saying I believe it myself.)

    What would it take to make you believe it? Actually creating new things is much harder than destroying existing ones, and plowing down fertile farmland close in to put up houses for people fleeing from crime and dysfunction provides immense profit to a whole host of connected industries. Jane Jacobs and James Kunstler have both expressed this belief, that the joblessness of the Depression so scared the powers that be that they built suburbia to provide make-work jobs and control a proletarian revolution. I can see automakers (it’s sad to read Drucker talking about GM in the 1950s and to realize how great that company once was, and how powerful) and oil companies jumping on the bandwagon.

    I think Steve has also expressed the idea: move blacks around and redevelop the real estate they left behind. The area near Cabrini Green on the near north side, for one example. Close-in neighborhoods in NYC, like Bed-Stuy, Fort Greene, and Harlem have all been gentrified, West Harlem to the point where it is no longer majority black.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Disagree: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @black sea
    , @Stan Adams
  105. @Jack D

    Both aides were PoC needless to say.

    By PoC, do you mean those whose forebears hailed from the Dark Continent?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  106. @Jack D

    There’s a rise before third Avenue westbound that is too steep for interstate standards. Get on the CBE westbound at the Bronx River Parkway at almost any time of the day and you’ll crawl, and the reason is that the trucks cannot take the hill at speed unless they have a good running head start. As you note, they get that at 3am. For all other times of the day, you crawl until you crest the hill, and traffic generally runs about 35 mph after that, unless the GWB is jammed. It’s been that way since it opened, and it will be that way until it falls apart.

    The CBE is one of the most intensely used pieces of capital investment in America.
    It’s certainly heavily used. It’s a toll-free road. It also has some amazing structures crossing it, no doubt built by Moses, with some glorious arched viaducts that still inspire me.

    Look at the road from the point of view of the city: how much property tax yield does the city earn on it now, versus before building? What was the effect on city property tax yield for nearby neighborhoods (Caro goes into this)? How much did the building of the road destroy social order and so cause the city to have to spend money on the area, rather than yielding revenue from the area? You know the answer: the city spends money repairing the road and gets effectively no yield from it, because any trucker with any sense buys diesel outside NYC.

    This destruction of capital value does not factor at all into your calculation. As Jacobs pointed out, it was because planners like Moses could pay far less for the businesses and land seized than they would have been worth without political coercion.

    It seems you support this because it happened to people who aren’t you, and you can see the positive benefits of the CBE but discount the costs paid for it. As you agree with political decisions destroying the value of neighborhoods and private property, can we assume you’re fully behind AFFH?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  107. @Wilkey

    Agree. They do this to the powerless. That was blacks in the 1940s-1960s. It’s white Deplorables today. Keep the white and black lower classes poor, disconnected, and fighting with each other, and you never have to fear the takeover that destroys elite power.

  108. Clyde says:
    @Anon

    YouTube has videos showing how the more aggressive residents of Venice are doing it. It’s a squeaky wheel strategy, YouTube uploads plus relentless citizen complaints to your councilman. There’s a German guy who seems to hire himself out to produce syringe-filled videos, complete with interviews with scary schizophrenics.

    VENICE BEACH— German in Venice
    Update homeless encampment in Venice Beach new skid Row
    1,291,655 views•Feb 25, 2021

  109. @Wilkey

    Obviously, from your comment you’ve never spent time in an assisted living facility (ALF).

    All of these facilities are run by soul less corporations only interested in the bottom line and their stockholders.

    They’re designed to empty the bank accounts of any seasoned citizen unlucky enough to be sucked into their vortex.

    [MORE]

    Generally, only able bodied elders are usually accepted. As soon as your bank accounts run dry you’re shown the door. Or, if you start requiring more care than is acceptable your whisked off to a skilled nursing facility, or as everyone else calls it, a nursing home. And, a little known fact about ALF’s is that once you move in you’re not allowed to move out unless a family member is available to take you into their home.

    Now, there are some facilities that allow what’s called aging in place. But, once you examine the fine print you’ll see that the costs escalate with the level of care needed. Once your cash runs out you’re then transferred to Medicaid to pay the bills. Now, skilled nursing facilities in my area generally run $10k a month unless you qualify for Medicaid. While ALF’s are generally cheaper, they just don’t have the staff to handle incapacitated or bed ridden elders, unlike a skilled nursing facility.

    Now, all of these facilities, ALF’s and nursing homes, generally only hire the state mandated minimum number of attendants. And, most of those attendants generally have at most an 8th grade education level even though they might have a GED or an actual diploma. Believe me, if these people had the intellect to be brain surgeons or rocket scientists, they would be. At the very least they’d be working the front office or some other administrative task.

    It’s not as if the attendants don’t care about their wards, it’s just that they’re overworked to such an extent that the vast majority get burned out within a year. And, generally, most attendants fresh out of Certified Nursing Assistant schools start at not much above minimum wage. And, the schools don’t prepare you in the least for the experience of working in a skilled nursing facility. From what I’ve been told. In my state graduating CNA’s have to spend a number of weeks working in these facilities to receive their certificates.

    And, based upon experience hiring someone to come into the home is fraught with danger. From aids that smoke like a chimney the whole time they’re at your home, or spend all their time texting and playing games on their cell phone. Or, forgetting basic duties like dispensing medicine at the appropriate times. Or, getting an attitude at the mere suggestion on how to perform their duties, especially Wakandians. The list is too long to describe all the crap you have to put up with. And, if you piss them off they either call in to say they’ve quit or they just don’t bother showing up. And, there you are with an elder parent on your hands that needs their diaper changed, their ass wiped, and their stomach fed.

    Honestly, unless you have lots of money, like Kirk Douglas, and can afford top notch quality care takers then living long enough that you become a ward of the state is not what I’d call quality of life.

    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
    • Replies: @Wilkey
  110. @watson79

    I live reasonably close to New Orleans. The gutter punks get shipped out of town 1-2 times a year and occupy our downtown, usually for a few weeks in Spring. Then they find their way back to New Orleans.

    They actually haven’t shown up since COVID. Maybe since there was no Mardi Gras or tourists to enjoy the pleasant weather, they didn’t get cleared out? We have Mardi Gras too but much smaller celebrations.

    Also let’s hope Biden doesn’t try to rectify the inequities by constructing infrastructure near the French Quarter. History, food, and drink is pretty much all New Orleans has going for it.

    It’s always strange driving through New Orleans because it’s one of the few big cities in which there is plenty of room on the interstate. Even my city has worse traffic, and it’s less than half the size. New Orleans’ population never recovered since Katrina, everything was built for more people.

  111. Tom Grey says: • Website

    I was thinking, based on the title, that this would be about actual reparations, rather than just BS racist throw money at govt projects for Blacks. Whether that means more construction in Black areas or not is not so clear, tho it allows the BS to be seen more clearly.

    “the reporters must also have plausible deniability.” — also the politicians and all the (mostly White) politically connected crony capitalists whose million dollar projects will all balloon into multi-million dollar boondoggles.

    Tax cuts on worker’s salaries, including reducing Social Security collected, would provide more stimulus and help worker’s more.

  112. @jill

    I am pretty sure that is meant to allow the Feds to dump illegals to New York.

  113. Anonymous[122] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Are these nice temperate climates the incubators of civilization the way we’ve been told? Because in real life they just attract bums.

    Sure, there is a short period where things are nice after white folks from harsher environments move in. Like all the Whites who moved to California in the 1800s. But then it goes down pretty fast in historical time.

    The Middle East went to crap thousands of years ago.

  114. @PSR

    Every time I hear or read ‘equity’ I mentally see a sheep bleating.

    Sheep hover:
    – a lot to unpack here
    – Stay safe.
    – that’s a cope
    – that’s a big ask
    – x walked back x
    – through the lens of x
    – i feel like [v. think/believe]
    – talking point
    – teachable moment

    [MORE]

    – Here’s why [headline]
    – What you need to know [headline]
    – unless and until
    – active shooter
    – compare and contrast
    – in before / inb4
    – income inequality
    – get the jab [Americans anyway]
    – firstly
    – my personal opinion
    – thanks in advance
    – gun buyback
    – not a good look / optics
    – Do better.
    – BREAKING
    – In fact…
    – Actually,
    – pay it forward
    – hill you want to die on
    – This.
    – reach out
    – going forward
    – are currently
    – x of my life i’ll never get back
    – epic fail
    – x, no?
    – x, yes?
    – It’s almost as if
    – The fact that
    – drops [as in ‘published’]
    – source (verb)
    – x’s wheelhouse
    – Leader of the free world
    – Commander-in-chief of the US
    – System of checks and balances
    – currently [as in “we are currently”]
    – Both of these things can be true
    – I see what you did there
    – in and of itself
    – Personally, I…
    – What say you?
    – To ask it is to answer
    – It’s the right thing to do.
    – It’s time to x
    – speak truth to power
    – It’s all good.
    – not who we are
    – Too x by half
    – A bridge too far
    – Tell us how you really feel!
    – metric[s]
    – square that circle
    – No harm, no foul.
    – Here, here! [sic, classic]
    – It wasn’t meant to be.
    – bad/hot/your take
    – no adults in the room
    – game changer
    – right side of history
    – new normal
    – a third way
    – a way/path forward
    – on a daily basis [AKA daily]
    – an x event [‘snow’ is now ‘a snow event’]
    – …way, shape, or form
    – I, for one, [not followed by ‘overlords’]
    – deep dive [aooogah]
    – x on the ground
    – Own it
    – for all intents and purposes
    – as per
    – flex [noun]
    – shoot me a[n] text/[email]

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  115. Jack D says:
    @TomSchmidt

    planners like Moses could pay far less for the businesses and land seized than they would have been worth without political coercion.

    Eminent domain law says that the government has to pay fair market value for condemned land. Everyone thinks that their property is worth more than it is and no one likes to be forced into a sale, but without eminent domain no roads could ever be built. If you don’t like the offer you get for a condemned property you can take it to court. It’s not a perfect system but I think it’s a fair balancing between public (REAL public interests, not some socialist idea of public interests) and private interests and I can’t think of any other way to do this that would be more fair.

    This is very different than AFFH.

    As far as yield on property tax, if they closed ALL the streets and built buildings on them, then NYC could get even more property taxes. Ditto parks – Central Park alone would yield a fortune in land sales and future property taxes. But a city is not a business. And interstate highways have to be built with national, not only state and city interests in mind. Sure NYC would be better off if interstate truck traffic bypassed the city completely – less traffic, less noise, less pollution (and as you say, because of the Tappan Zee it does to some extent) but because of geography it’s necessary for a certain amount of interstate traffic to pass thru the city regardless of whether that is good for NYC by itself. NYC benefits by being part of an advanced Western country that has a highway system.

  116. Off topic . . . a heart-warming article for the iSteve blog . . .

    CNN offers a serious discussion of the Ferguson Effect.

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/03/us/us-crime-rate-rise-2020/index.html

  117. Jack D says:
    @TomSchmidt

    the powers that be that they built suburbia to provide make-work jobs and control a proletarian revolution

    Except that the government didn’t build suburbia – it was built by the private sector because there was strong demand for housing by returning veterans starting new families. And it was a great success – those houses are for the most part still standing and valuable to this day. Whatever loans the government provided to the vets were repaid with interest so the program cost the government nothing.

    Now the government building big expensive downtown high rise housing projects that were money losers from day 1 and would have to get torn down in a few short years because they were unsuitable for housing a feral black population – THOSE were make work jobs.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  118. Marat says:
    @Anon

    Once upon a time on the Venice/Marina del Rey border, a resourceful woman built her own speedbump in a narrow street that was heavily used as a shortcut to the beach. That was back when neighbors sometimes mingled on their porches with passers-through in an impromptu open-house vibe on Sundays. Just before the weightlifter pants craze and Schwartzenegger as governor/restaurant owner phase.

    The city flattened it a few months later. Such a shame, as it was a great demonstration of do-it-yourself-ism. The same lady later put in a jury-rigged second story lookout/sundeck masked by banana tree leaves and bamboo.

    Come to think of it, there have been a lot of additions being surreptitiously built during Covid, all over the westside, without the overhead of approvals and permits. Perhaps the Cities will make millions on fines when the building departments conduct their annual satellite comparisons. There’s a lesson in there somewhere for the Biden administration.

  119. Dan Smith says:

    St Paul MN liberal mythology includes the tale of the Rondo neighborhood, a black Shanghai-La that was Lake Wobegon for inhabitants: all the children above average etc. Then I-94 cleaved it in two and the descendants became a bunch of ignorant welfare queens, pimps, and addicts. Drop a few billion on them and things will change.

  120. anon[407] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike_from_SGV

    The bigger picture in any of these stories is: if we had run a serious, sensible Republican in 2020 instead of an inflammatory doofus, none of this would be happening.

    Evan McMullin, is that you?

    • LOL: Muggles
  121. @Mike_from_SGV

    I get your point. I recommend we nominate Majorie Taylor Greene for President and Kris Kobach for VP in 2024. Thanks for the valuable input.

    • Agree: Catdog
    • Replies: @sayless
  122. @Dan Smith

    Refrained from telling her it’s going to get worse.

    When it does get worse, remind her she’s getting exactly what she voted for.

  123. @Anon

    They didn’t realize that when a guy runs for president as often as Biden has, he’s not letting go until they pry the office out of his cold, dead hands.

    So, these people are so dumb they don’t understand possession is 9/10ths of the law?

    Watching this mess play out will be funny for all the wrong reasons.

  124. @Ben tillman

    How would things look if Trump hadn’t run in 2016?

    Killary would have started and lost a significant conflict with Russia in the Ukraine, with a high chance that conflict involved tactical nukes.

    • Thanks: ben tillman
  125. @JohnnyWalker123

    I’m glad you’re on the subject this time, Johnny. I don’t care about Jeff Epstein or Miss Ghisilane or any of that… When you are on the subject, you are right on though. This is pretty much what I was about to write, and here you are, comment #1. Oh, and what Ben Tillman said too.

    As soon as I skimmed through half of the NY Times excerpts (I read all of Steve’s excellent retorts), my thoughts were: GET THE HELL OUT OF THE US DOLLAR! It will become Monopoly money soon enough.

    BTW, I still can’s stand the writing of “Biden will spend …”, etc. The President doesn’t spend anything. The Congress does. The D’s are on-board though, and the R’s are almost all too pussified to resist.

  126. Steve, I really recommend you stay in your closet and blog instead of being out in the hot California sunshine threading your way under the interstates.

    It’s just that I’m more and more picturing you like this guy:

    • Replies: @Charles St. Charles
  127. @Wade Hampton

    America is the richest country in the history of the world. The urban campers with their masses of stuff are the richest bums in the history of the world.

    I agree, General Hampton. In addition, I’d say the days of the Golden Girls and through the 00’s were the best for seniors. Peak Stupidity says we are “Passing Peak Rich Old People”.

  128. JackK says:
    @Technite78

    It’ll be no mystery as to pockets to where money goes … names will be on the demos big donor list and woke corporates

  129. @Mike_from_SGV

    4,457 days that Hillary hasn’t been president. Thanks Obama and Trump.

  130. @Jack D

    The road cut for the CBE, even with the access roads and ramps, is about 250′ across, or roughly 1 block wide. Moses was very careful not to cut most of the through streets – the highway is either in a cut or elevated (at great expense) for most of its length and in the western Bronx (the area you are talking about) the existing street grid continued to flow under or over the highway with little disruption. Again look at a map.

    I wondered about this, so I looked it up. You’re quite wrong for the area in question. A map from 1921, long before Progressive reformer Moses got his hands on enough power to destroy the neighborhood, the area mapped like this, with West being “up” on the map, instead of North. So all the streets traversing left to right, between Crotona Park and Bronx Park, cross the area where the CBE later went through.

    The modern map is here. You’ll notice that most of the streets that cross the route of the CBE have been removed, making a short walk to Tremont avenue now many blocks longer. This, by itself, in an area where people didn’t mostly own cars, both destroyed the viability of housing south of the expressway (because they certainly weren’t going to go south into the black neighborhood to shop), and undermined the economic vitality of the businesses whose customers could no longer easily walk to them. Require a walk of more than 15 minutes and people increasingly prefer cars. The CBE turned viable walks into unviable ones, leaving aside crime.

  131. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, white people in New York City continue to experience ever increasing
    “Negroes Out of Nowhere.”

    https://nypost.com/2021/04/04/victim-of-caught-on-video-midtown-attack-didnt-see-it-coming/

    • Replies: @Luzzatto
  132. Muggles says:
    @Technite78

    Only around half of the projects will ever be completed, however. But the money will be spent, and it will all be a mystery as to whose pockets it wound up in.

    This reminds me of the racket that happened when cable TV took off. When cable TV tech started to boom, various localities, cities, etc. decided that they had to “award franchises” to keep things, you know, orderly. So only one “legal” franchise per defined area.

    As you may recall, or at least I do, these franchises were all divvied up politically, by ethnicity and race, or local political juice.

    Within a couple of years they all got bought out by real cable TV firms, now huge giants. Cable was buried, homes wired, etc. but the original “franchises” were merely temporary rental units for the politically favored and selected. The original “owners” of these had a pay the startup entry fee and agreed to annual political “franchise fees” i.e. taxes to operate. As they were bought up the fees renegotiated, etc. but the original owners cashed out.

    So the black, Hispanic, local political insiders, etc. all made “money for nothing” and the proclaimed “diversity” and so on for these artificial franchisers vanished as TimeWarner, etc. took over.

    So it will be with the Green New Deal or supposed “Infrastructure” projects being funded. The connected Pioneer Grifters will loot these schemes and eventually go away. What will remain, unless some concrete is actually poured, will be trillions of debt to be paid by your grandchildren. Or not. Enjoy!

  133. @Desiderius

    Alice knows Vermont, too.

  134. Once upon a time we really knew how to do shit. We really knew how to get things accomplished. The Vietnam War, yay! The Hart-Celler Act, awesome! Affirmative action, nothing better!!!

    After winning WWII (or at least feeling like we won WWII), the Greatest Gen’s elites got a little carried away. If we can beat the Nazis, we can accomplish anything! And we can do it in the topdown way we won the war! Highways! Suburbs! Civil rights! Industrial food! Urban renewal! Shopping malls!!! All we gotta do is pass some laws!!!

  135. @Paleo Retiree

    There are neighborhoods where residents are very happy to be cut off from the crappier areas nearby

  136. Flip says:

    “I am in favor of tax-free rebates from the Federal
    government — any time, any place, any amount. Just send
    out the checks. The taxpayers can do better things with
    their money than the Federal government can.

    So, I am in favor of Federal deficits, if the
    alternative is higher taxes. I am in favor of lower taxes,
    even if these lead to higher deficits. I think the Federal
    government will not cut spending for any reason but one:
    bankruptcy. So, as long as the beast is going to spend
    money, it might as well raise it by borrowing. Let the
    people who trust the government wind up as creditors to the
    government. When the government defaults, one way or the
    other, those hurt most will be those who trusted
    politicians the most. This is as it should be. There is a
    kind of raw justice in the arrangement.”

    Gary North

  137. @Achmed E. Newman

    I can confirm Steve’s frustration – I lived in North Hollywood up until a few months ago and during the Year of Wuhan it became nearly impossible to take a decent walk in any direction because of the bum-clogged underpasses. Plus the stink eye from the masked-outdoors Karens. Big increase in Black schizos walking, too. It became too much. In the quiet and melanin-deprived Midwest now.

  138. @Erik L

    Here in LA we have million dollar homes a block away from the interstate.

    That’s what Wilkey was trying to tell you, houses are much cheaper near the Interstate.

    ;-}

  139. Flip says:

    Things are starting to remind me of Atlas Shrugged

    • Agree: Mark G.
  140. @Known Fact

    I’ve been going back and forth on that thought myself, K.F. I can do exactly that, but I have a hard time getting myself to do it. I see Mr. Mateen’s point, along with the 9 out of 10 preppers’. To do something like this, you’d just have to have some timing. I don’t see HOW things could go on like this financially for another 5 years even, but then I would have said that 10 years ago.

    As Jack D. quoted, “the markets can remain irrational longer than you can stay solvent”. That’s what I’d be worried about, getting in debt by borrowing against the house to buy other real assets, then having that debt hanging against me till, well, when exactly? I wish I knew.

    I’ve really enjoyed the thoughts on this thread. Maybe iSteve can throw out some red meat to the preppers more often??

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  141. @Known Fact

    Not Numbers, I meant Hidden Figures. Sorry for any confusion. Accuracy is crucial with classic TV episodes, but movies have become pretty interchangeable.

  142. @Mr. Anon

    … the Bourbon monarchs of Spain built the El Camino Real.

    Not to be pedantic, Mr. Anon, but the real El Camino was built by General Motors.

    OK, my work is done for today…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  143. @Charles

    Bush did one $1 trillion boondoggle giveaway in eight years.

    Obama did one $1 trillion boondoggle giveaway in eight years.

    Biden has done SIX trillion in boondoggle giveaways in 2.5 months!!!!!!!!!

  144. @Jack D

    Except that the government didn’t build suburbia – it was built by the private sector because there was strong demand for housing by returning veterans starting new families.

    And betraying abandoning their hometowns and neighborhoods. Which subsequently collapsed.

    BTW, Pennsylvania’s Levittown was designed to allow every child to walk to school without crossing a single street. (The development straddled four municipalities.) With the consolidation of public schools, that can’t be true anymore. Government decisions in suburbia.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
    , @Art Deco
  145. @Achmed E. Newman

    Not to be pedantic, Mr. Anon, but the real El Camino was built by General Motors.

    Only the hoi polloi would say “the El Camino”. Try to avoid the the redundancy, and the the repetitiveness.

    Sadly, phthalates are phthick in phthe phthings phthat we consume, and phthus it affects our orphthograthphy.

  146. It’s all kind of academic.

    Whatever the notional purpose of the funds, the vast majority of them will go to pay government clerks to lackadaisically push papers back and and forth across desks.

    You can say the funding is to somehow make it all better for blacks, or to increase the fertility of the Easter Bunny. The primary effect will be the same in either case.

    Government clerks will get paid to lackadaisically push papers back and forth across desks.

    Of course, most of those clerks are black, so I guess this kinda works out.

  147. TWS says:
    @Desiderius

    Ah, Galloping Gertie.

  148. TWS says:
    @Mike_from_SGV

    You do understand vote fraud?

  149. Luzzatto says:
    @Anonymous

    There is a Tri-State Area joke that African American males in New York City would never commit the knock out game in a Puerto Rican neighborhood because Puerto Ricans always carry a big knife with them!

  150. @Reg Cæsar

    And betraying abandoning their hometowns and neighborhoods. Which subsequently collapsed.

    Whites were driven out by the genocidal policies you support. That’s why it’s called White Flight.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  151. @Dan Smith

    Government workers (e.g. public school teachers) do not pay taxes. They leech off of the tax pie.

    If a $65K private sector worker nets $53K, then it takes 4.4 of them to pay for one, similarly priced bureaucrat.

    Those monotonically increasing numbers, at the bottom of their paystubs, are just accounting fictions.

  152. BenjaminL says:
    @Desiderius

    This is a good piece that puts the 2005 Larry Summers brouhaha as a key turning point in moving toward Female Discourse and away from facts and logic.

    https://thoughtsofstone.com/the-day-the-logic-died/

  153. @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    Why not borrow? Because, absent UBI and/or neverending CoronaHoax stimuli, household income is relatively fixed and so now, in addition to inflated costs of daily living, the household is burdened with a heavy debtload. This is a recipe for default.

    1. Household income increases with inflation.

    2. Who gives a shit about default? I don’t. I live in Texas.

  154. @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve been going back and forth on that thought myself, K.F. I can do exactly that, but I have a hard time getting myself to do it. I see Mr. Mateen’s point, along with the 9 out of 10 preppers’. To do something like this, you’d just have to have some timing. I don’t see HOW things could go on like this financially for another 5 years even, but then I would have said that 10 years ago.

    As Jack D. quoted, “the markets can remain irrational longer than you can stay solvent”. That’s what I’d be worried about, getting in debt by borrowing against the house to buy other real assets, then having that debt hanging against me till, well, when exactly? I wish I knew.

    Who said anything about mortgaging your house? Borrowing money at a rate lower than the inflation rate is a tautological profit-producer.

    To do something like this, you’d just have to have some timing. I don’t see HOW things could go on like this financially for another 5 years even, but then I would have said that 10 years ago.

    Bush did one $1 trillion boondoggle giveaway in eight years.

    Obama did one $1 trillion boondoggle giveaway in eight years.

    Biden has done SIX trillion in boondoggle giveaways in 2.5 months!!!!!!!!!

  155. black sea says:
    @TomSchmidt

    Suburbia flourished because the mass affordability of cars made possible a transition that most people were eager for anyway. Contrary to contemporary thinking, most people don’t like living in cookie-cutter, densely packed apartment buildings, and that’s the only type of urban-core housing they’re ever going to be able to afford. On top of that, city schools have a host of problems, and in the post-war era people could see that those problems were only going to get worse.

    Yes, now that people are marrying later, they can indulge a semi-fantasy of being a hipster or hipsterette for 15 or 20 years before nature asserts itself and they find themselves with at least one young child. Then it’s off to the ‘burbs for three good-sized bedrooms and a back yard.

    The construction of the interstate highway system facilitated this, but it didn’t cause it. People have been wanting to own their hut or cottage on a little patch of land for the past several millennia.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @TomSchmidt
  156. @RichardTaylor

    Whites were driven out by the genocidal policies you support.

    Name one. Bet you can’t.

    Well, okay… the Thirteenth Amendment, which you oppose. But that could do no damage in a true white man’s land.

    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
  157. Whiskey says: • Website

    This will be 2009 on steroids. Obama’s recovery bill just funneled money to the States and to Universities for Feminist and black studies.

    This will be trillions to BLM and the Nation of Islam and other grievance groups, illegals, and of course violent black felons. Latino ones too of course.

    All funded by a tax on White people. Get ready Whitey to pay the White tax. Brought to you by Biden.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  158. Wilkey says:
    @My SIMPLE Pseudonymic Handle

    Obviously, from your comment you’ve never spent time in an assisted living facility (ALF). All of these facilities are run by soul less corporations only interested in the bottom line and their stockholders….

    I mentioned that my father-in-law is in one of them – several times, in fact. My wife’s family has had great luck with the facility he is in.

    But then I live in a part of America that still looks (mostly) like America looked back when it was the envy of the world – though my state’s politicians are doing every last damn thing in their power to change that.

    But if things change I’ll be glad to let you know.

  159. @black sea

    My father was born in the Chicago suburb of Oak Park, IL in 1917. Frank Lloyd Wright opened his office in Oak Park in 1898 and developed the Prairie School of domestic architecture for suburban homes. Ernest Hemingway was born there the next year.

    Oak Park, 9 miles west of the Loop, was the last stop of the Chicago elevated rail, so it was a great place for white collar workers to live.

  160. @BenjaminL

    I wrote four articles in 2005 about the Larry Summers brouhaha. It seemed like a turning point at the time.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @RichardTaylor
  161. @TomSchmidt

    My vague impression is the Cross-Bronx Expressway is good for the Tri-State Area as a whole, but not so good for the Bronx, with the effect on NYC somewhere in the middle. To what level of geography did Robert Moses owe a fiduciary duty?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @CCZ
    , @TomSchmidt
  162. @Reg Cæsar

    All the policies that force integration against the will of White people which are too many to name. That’s why federal programs costing billions to enforce them every year is in effect. This includes so-called “civil rights” legislation.

    Name a business, neighborhood, city or school that is allowed to stay White on principle.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  163. @Paleo Retiree

    It would be interesting to compare places where they ran the interstate highway around the town (e.g., Pixar’s “Cars” is set in the once thriving Route 66 crossroads of Radiator Springs, which was cut off from prosperity by the interstate bypassing the town) vs. where they ran it through the urban center: e.g., Santa Barbara, which is pretty much paradise, but would likely be even nicer if they had run the 101 freeway around the city through the suburban foothills instead of through the center of the city.

    I can think of various examples, but I can’t see a consistent pattern. E.g., Pasadena has a giant freeway, about 14 lanes, through the middle of town. Pasadena has been thriving ever since the smog was cleared up, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the freeway construction had negative effects for the the first 25 years or so.

    Hollywood may have been hurt by the 101’s construction 70 years ago, but it is prospering now. Whenever tax revenues pour in, they start talking about putting a lid on the Hollywood Freeway to provide park space to the enormous population density of east Hollywood.

    The 405 seems essential to the enormous prosperity of L.A.’s coast by providing access to LAX.

    The rich people of the beautiful suburb of South Pasadena have been successfully resisting the completion of the now dead-ending 710 for generations. Eventually, the freeway will probably be finished as a tunnel.

    Commenter Dennis Dale grew up in a neighborhood surrounded by buildings condemned for the drawn-out construction of the 105 Century freeway to LAX. That’s probably the worst situation: the government exercises eminent domain and then lawsuits go on for many years with nothing happening one way or another.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  164. @Steve Sailer

    60% of college administrators are women. Almost half of all profs, asst. profs, etc. are women. The majority of students are female.

    So, it looks like the university is gonna be a female institution forever more, and we kinda know what that means.

    Therefore, won’t the long term reputation of universities take a big hit? And won’t there be incentives to move STEM somewhere else?

  165. Polistra says:
    @Henry Canaday

    Many of the black neighborhoods of Washington DC do look like they have slightly shabbier infrastructure, while the white neighborhoods get gold-plated with lavish swimming pools and state-of art little league fields that are upgraded every year. And this is all done by the local, mostly black-run DC government.

    Having spent many years in Washington DC, I have virtually no idea what you’re talking about. Things like public pools and playing fields exist in black neighborhoods, sure, but they sure don’t in upscale white ‘hoods. Kalorama? Mass Ave Heights? Georgetown? Spring Valley? The residents of these places would mount an insurrection before they’d permit public facilities in their midst.

    Now I’m sure Art Deco can quickly find an exception, probably in Columbia Heights or some such–I certainly don’t know all the ‘hoods in town. But I do know the ones I mentioned in my previous paragraph. They aren’t soaking up tax dollars, that’s for sure. And in fact many provide their own basic services at their own cost, despite also paying high taxes to the City. It’s really the only way to get anything done.

    • Replies: @Henry Canaday
    , @cityview
  166. @TomSchmidt

    The suburbs were booming even before black dysfunction reached toxic levels. The first waves of whites fleeing the cities may not have been motivated strictly by racial concerns. But suburban migration was always an explicitly white phenomenon. There were no integrated suburbs in the ‘50s.

    The Great Society initiatives did not improve the situation, to be sure.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  167. @ben tillman

    No, I get that, Ben. You may need some collateral to borrow, and for most people that’d be their house. (Sure you can get lots of credit cards, but then you’d have to put up with those really high rates till whenever.)

    The point is to buy real assets with that money. Rental property is an idea, but I’ve done that before, and I’m not sure I’m up for being struggled against as a landlord when the Feral Gov’t goes full Mao. There were hints of this during the Kung Flu PanicFest – a hilarious scene when Chinese landlords were protesting guaranteed rents cut down to 25% in Cali.- see Xia Den Flu De – that’s Chinglish for a German word.

    You can get real money (precious metals) with this borrowed American currency (not going to be money for long), but you’ve got to cover your debt in the meantime, and that means having money coming in. I get that wages MAY go up. They did during the inflationary “spiral” times in the 1970s but now, they just get more cheap labor to replace Americans instead. The spiral for wages in real money is a downward one.

    I just plain don’t like being in any debt, but I get the idea, Ben.

  168. @ben tillman

    As I wrote before, the President doesn’t spend the money. If you mean during the “ABC administration(s)”, it was a whole lot worse than your figures. From this table*, the additional debt from the beginning of the Bush 1st term to end of his 2nd was ~ $5.5 Trillion. For the Øb☭ma years it was ~ $8 or $8.5 Trillion. During the 4 Trump years, since I can tell you the debt was right around $22 Trillion TOTAL before the PanicFest, somewhere between $2 and $3 Trillion additional debt was added, not counting it.

    The COVID-19 PanicFest has been #AMAZING. You’ve never seen such spending. It’s been ~$4 Trillion before the Biden woke crowd took over. Will it go over $30 Trillion by end-o-bidness year? Every ONE Trillion is $10,000 more owed by each of the very roughly 100,000,000 working and actually-tax-paying (not just filing) American families… that will never be able to pay it back.

    .

    * I had to interpolate a little bit because the president takes office on Jan 20th, but the dates for these debt amounts are Sept 30th. Again, it depends on Congressional voting.

    • Thanks: Desiderius
  169. duncsbaby says:
    @Mr. Anon

    What kind of jewelry does a social justice activist have anyway? Her tounge-stud? A nose-ring? Bernie campaign buttons?

    I used to work with a guy who would always be cracking wise about rich people having gold-studded butt plugs. I used to laugh because just what the hell was a butt plug and why would anyone have it gold-studded?! It was freakin’ absurd. Little did I know.

    • Replies: @additionalMike
  170. @Known Fact

    …why not borrow now to buy real assets and repay later (if ever) in vastly more worthless dollars?

    If “hard times” ever do come, they might not like you returning debt in dollars. Pray they only demand renminbi, because your anal virginity or firstborn son isn’t off the table, depending on how hard the times get.

  171. @Steve Sailer

    NYC has always famously served as a sort of duty-free zone, if you take my meaning.

  172. TyRade says:

    History shows that more autostrada and autobahnen and pretty soon the trains will be running on time.

  173. @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, I-75 was one of the first (if not the first) Interstates and Crosley Field and environs kind of took it in the nuts but the surrounding areas boomed. Now seventy years later seeing furtive efforts (some seeming successful) to revivify those neighborhoods themselves.

    I rode my big wheel on the east side equivalent while it was under construction before it got NIMBYed. Not sure how much longer the relative affluence of those Boehner/Bidenvilles will hold out. Yards looking kind of spotty.

  174. duncsbaby says:
    @Ano

    I can Big Dig it, daddy-o!

  175. @Polistra

    Polistra – My experience has been in leafy third alphabet Northwest, which the city does treat very nicely, sometimes too nicely in my view.

  176. @Anon

    If you don’t like Biden’s America, you’re welcome to move out.

    • Troll: Sick of Orcs
    • Replies: @anon
  177. duncsbaby says:
    @Stan Adams

    White flight in Chicago was happening in the 1920’s. James T. Farrell was a communist but he wrote honestly about race relations in Chicago long before a lot of people. The Irish were being pressured out of their south side neighborhoods right after World War I. Hell, read Richard Wright, another Chicago communist, he talks about phenomenon of white flight as well, although he doesn’t call it that. You’re right that the civil rights era did not help things but blacks were driving down property values w/crime and overpopulation in major American cities long before that.

  178. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:

    Spending like a bunch of drunken Demorats….

    And we White tax payers are always…

    Damned if we do
    Damned if we don’t

    Anybody else notice that all these Black thug attacks on elderly Asians are blamed on us Whites because we somehow have supernatural powers to:

    Control the climate

    We supposedly created a “climate of racial hatred against Asians” we’re the Blue Eyed Devils that the NOI always rants about – we somehow hypnotized those sainted Black African Americans to attack elderly Asians, just as we evil Whites supposedly did climate change to keep the 3rd world Black Africans poor.

    The best response is to salute these drunken Democrat $ trillion spenders with a middle finger salute and suggest that the lying media should consider honoring BLM martyr George Floyd by living and ending their lives they way George Floyd did….

    Consume large amounts of Opioids and Meth and leave this world.

  179. sayless says:
    @Wade Hampton

    Meghan Markle’s name is in circulation for 2024.

    Her own brother wrote a letter to the royal family, or maybe just to Harry, trying to warn them off of her. Wonder who he’ll write to now if this gathers any momentum.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Wilkey
  180. @RichardTaylor

    All the policies that force integration against the will of White people which are too many to name.

    When did I support any of those? Private entities should be allowed to make their own policies. (Including Montgomery City Lines, which wasn’t.) Public entities are are different because coercion is involved by definition. What you Fire Eaters can’t– or won’t — admit is that freedom of association is a two-way street.

    You only want it for yourselves. Not for others who have been represented in Congress since 1789.

    And whose idea was that?

    Another Dad is right. He’s the one who supports white institutions, not you.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  181. CCZ says:
    @Steve Sailer

    A thoroughly documented analysis of the “historic significance” of the Cross Bronx Expressway and its effect on the East Tremont neighborhood of the Bronx is found in:

    “CROSS-BRONX, TRANS-MANHATTAN: PRESERVING A SIGNIFICANT URBAN EXPRESSWAY AND ITS MEGASTRUCTURE,” Michael Dimitrios Caratzas, 2002

    The story of the Cross-Bronx Expressway’s impact on East Tremont is a complex one. Although the expressway was not, as Robert Caro argues, the sole cause of the neighborhood’s decline in the 1970s, it was certainly a destabilizing force, causing the uprooting of thousands of established residents and some businesses. Caro does appear to be on target, however, in writing that East Tremont before the expressway’s construction was not a slum, and in fact, was quite well kept, a position that is backed up by tax photographs taken in the late 1930s and early ’40s, at the same time that the Home Owners Loan Corporation was giving East Tremont, apparently unfairly, its lowest possible rating.

    And yet, the remarkable recovery of East Tremont, including the blocks directly adjacent to the Cross-Bronx, forces us to ask whether, over the very long term – more than four decades after the completion of Section Two – the choices made by the highway’s engineers may not have been so bad. Assuming the Cross-Bronx had to go somewhere through East Tremont – and agreeing that the residents’ 1953 fight for an alternate route was a valiant one – would it be preferable, looking back from today, to have had the expressway destroy a 225-foot swath of Crotona Park, a potential scenic landmark that is now on the path to restoration and revitalization? And is the expressway, as has been charged, a barrier to north-south pedestrian movement within the neighborhood, especially when one considers that all of the streets crossed by the road were replaced by overpasses, and that the wide, East 176th Street bridge topping the expressway includes a large playground that makes its user forget that the highway is below? The Cross-Bronx is not too intimidating to have prevented the recovery of the blocks between it and Crotona Park, where residents must cross the highway to visit the stores on East Tremont Avenue, virtually the only shopping available to them.

    There is a difference between arguing that an urban expressway is a good thing and that it is relatively benign. And while it may seem imprudent to argue even the latter, one must consider, in all fairness to Robert Moses and his engineers, that it could have been much worse. The Cross-Bronx could have been an elevated rather than depressed expressway that would forever have rained down noise upon the surrounding blocks and created a forbidding, shadowy barrier between north and south. It could have torn through the neighborhood without providing overpasses that restored the streetgrid. It could have run straight down the center of East Tremont Avenue, blighting the vital shopping street that is the neighborhood’s agora. It could have callously obliterated schools and churches, including St. Thomas Aquinas, which has been an anchor through bad times and good, and which has played a central role in East Tremont’s recovery. The Cross-Bronx could have done any one of these things, and it did not, and for that its builders deserve at least a little credit.

    [from original document pages 197-198 or pdf pages 215-216]

    With a 70 page “APPENDIX B” (beginning on original document page 290 or pdf page 308) with “Base maps and photographs, circa 1939 to 1941, of all buildings demolished for the construction of the Cross-Bronx Expressway and the Arthur H. Murphy Houses in the Bronx neighborhood of East Tremont. All photographs are copied from microfilm located at the New York City Municipal Archives.”

    Full document (with all maps and photographs) can be downloaded from: https://academiccommons.columbia.edu/doi/10.7916/D8V69RPB

    • Thanks: TomSchmidt
  182. cityview says:
    @Polistra

    I wasn’t going to comment, but I don’t agree with Mr. Canaday, and I don’t totally agree with Polistra either. What are the lavish swimming pools in Ward 3? Woodrow Wilson High School had its swimming pool rebuilt when the school was overhauled some years ago. I don’t know what it looks like, but the original, trouble-prone pool was not lavish. There is no other public pool in Ward 3. Spring Valley has the playing field from its public elementary school, Horace Mann, but nothing else.

    Georgetown (Ward 2) has had a public pool and playground since at least the 1930s. The old one was what most of you would consider low-income by today’s standards, as were a good number of its users. It was completely rebuilt maybe twenty years ago and looked more expensive the last time I saw it, which wasn’t recently. Mitchell Park is a city-owned playing field in Kalorama. It too has been there for decades. I don’t recall it being fancy. I agree that many public facilities have a “friends of” group that raises private money for it, as is done in places all over the country.

    On white people not using the DC schools, some of them do, but I won’t belabor this point. I’ve already said this, but I can’t force people to believe it. The third alphabet likes its public schools, for the most part.

  183. Art Deco says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    And betraying abandoning their hometowns and neighborhoods. Which subsequently collapsed.

    They didn’t. Perhaps 10% of the population as we speak lives in slum neighborhoods. What you see in other core city neighborhoods is a deficit of families with children, not collapse. Where I grew up, the population of the core city declined by about 1/3 over the period running from 1930 to 1980. That was manifest in fewer people living in existing houses and apartments (throughout about 3/4 of the city’s land area) and the replacement of the housing stock in the northeast quadrant. In 1930, the population living in developed tracts was about 400,000, about 90% in the core city. By 1980, you had over 300,000 living in tract development in one of 11 suburban townships. You had 240,000 left in the core city, of which about 60,000 were living in slums and perhaps 40,000 in sketchy neighborhoods adjacent to slums.

    There were a great many regrettable features of the post-war suburban expansion, but the outward movement itself was a natural process and a continuation of the process of settlement expansion logged prior to 1930. (To some extent it was goosed by subsidies, of course).

  184. Anonymous[171] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams

    It was a WASP phenomenon. If you read old magazines and papers from the 1950s and 60s, you see it taken as given that WASPs live in the suburbs and ‘ethnics’ in the cities (and Blacks in the South).

  185. CCZ says:

    “Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union. “It’s going to transform Black, brown and Asian lives, and entire communities.””

    Blacks are already transforming Asian lives and communities:

    “Black Panthers Cause Asian Nail Salon to Close Permanently”

    MILWAUKEE, Wisconsin—A video recently went viral in March, which showed 10 Milwaukee Black Panthers intimidating and harassing an Asian nail salon—Jade’s Nails and Spa on Brady Street. The incident itself occurred in January.

    Wisconsin Right Now traced the origins to the Facebook page of “Darryl King Rick Farmer II.” His Facebook page proclaims “Leader and Black General of the Original Black Panthers Nationwide and Other Countries.”

    On April 4, Wisconsin Right Now went to the nail salon’s location at 1422 E. Brady St and discovered the business is closed, permanently. The business sign is gone, the phone is disconnected, and the building is completely empty.

    Farmer took credit for the business closing down, “The Original Black Panthers and the biggest Panther in the jungle, King Rick!! We are proud to announce the permanent closing of Jade’s Nails on Brady St.!! Due to the efforts of the OBP and community they no longer exist!! They disrespected our queens and paid the ultimate price!! Out of business!! Black Panther power once again in full effect!” he wrote on Facebook.

    https://www.asian-dawn.com/2021/04/05/black-panthers-cause-asian-nail-salon-to-close-permanently/

  186. Anonymous[955] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    White people are forced to be a minority in every former white majority country on earth, white children are indoctrinated to condemn their own ancestors, and anti-white propaganda is on every media platform.

    Don’t you think it’s a bit silly to debate whether or not there were anti-white genocidal policies at work?

    Obviously there were.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Anon
  187. @sayless

    Meghan Markle’s name is in circulation for 2024.

  188. @SMK

    I call her, “giggles.”

  189. @Steve Sailer

    Moses owed fiduciary duty only to the bondholders of the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority. He figured out that the Federal Government forbid interference in contracts, and so the bond contracts for bonds issued to build his bridges could not be interfered with. And if they specified that Robert Moses was to run the TBTA? His genius was in continually extending the bond contracts and thus building an unassailable fiefdom as an authority in NY State to get things done.

    He liked to build, and frankly he did get stuff built, more quickly and cheaply than others. But his goal was to increase tolls on his bridges, and that meant connecting them to each other by expressways that were free. If it cost the city money (as in his original plan to build a bridge to cover up the battery and mar that skyline view from the harbor while destroying many taxpaying buildings to build ramps) that mattered less to him, so long as the TBTA’s costs weren’t increased and its tolls lowered.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  190. @black sea

    for three good-sized bedrooms and a back yard
    You realize that this is a description of what Detroit was like before road construction and “urban renewal” set off the catabolic collapse of the city, right? It wasn’t a city of apartment buildings, though the black area, Black Bottom, was overcrowded. When they knocked it down and rebuilt it with fewer housing units, the blacks had to go somewhere.

    That set off the cycle of neighborhood change, and the collapse of the city to 1/3rd its peak size. Now with bout 4200/sqM, or 6.56 per acre; with a quarter-acre urban lot, that’s a little over 1.5 people per household now.

    The Bronx, by contrast, was a lot more densely populated, and lost 800,000 people from 1970 to 1980.

    • Replies: @Anon
  191. @Jonathan Mason

    Under the current system if elderly people are placed in residential homes at the end of life on Medicaid, if they own their own homes, the homes have to be sold and they are only allowed to keep a couple of thousand dollars for themselves.

    Incorrect.

  192. @Jus' Sayin'...

    I suspect would have included “oak trees and azalea bushes”. Almost invariably, one of a new Negro resident’s first acts would be to slash down any shrubbery on the property

    The Live Oaks and Azaleas mentioned were on the neutral ground (what are called medians everywhere else), rather than private property. The blacks weren’t cutting them down.

  193. Wilkey says:
    @sayless

    Meghan Markle’s name is in circulation for 2024. Her own brother wrote a letter to the royal family, or maybe just to Harry, trying to warn them off of her. Wonder who he’ll write to now if this gathers any momentum.

    The funny thing about Meghan Markle bitching about how racist the royal family is…is that the royal family actually showed up to – and paid for – her wedding. Most of her own family didn’t even come.

    If the royals weren’t always all that welcoming of Markle, perhaps it was because they were well aware that it would turn into a royal shit show. Unstable people send all sorts of subliminal signals about their instability before they finally blow.

    In all likelihood the royals only accepted her because she was black, not in spite of it. They knew very well that rejecting a black bride for Harry would have been a PR disaster.

  194. Jack D says:
    @Johann Ricke

    Yes, at least some of them. In the American fashion you ignore the European half or so.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  195. @rebel yell

    “The people who were paid for their homes under immanent domain to built I-5 got on with their lives and I’m sure are doing fine today. It’s not a holocaust.”

    One point Jane Jacobs made about eminent domain buying businesses in East Harlem is that the businesses were only compensated for tangible assets. There was nothing for valuable intangibles like goodwill. So much of the value of a business or a home might be taken and yet not legally be paid.

    Caro has the example in his book of mixed Scandinavian Sunset Park being undermined by the road running elevated down Third Avenue. Thesameroad, dug into a trench further north in richer Cobble Hill,had no such deleterious effect.

    I saw the remains of the Alaskan Way viaduct in Fall 2019. I wonder what they’ll do with that valuable real estate.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @TWS
  196. Their possessions fill both sidewalks of the underpass, so now no law-abiding pedestrian can walk from one side of the freeway to the other without risking getting run over by cars driving 45 mph.

    From immigration, through crime and schooling, on down to bum encampments … our elite masters’ attitude toward ordinary middle and working class Americans can be summed up in two words:

    F.U.

  197. @Whiskey

    There won’t be any taxing. Ruffles the geese whose feathers are plucked. They’ll steal the value from everyone who holds dollars by inflating them away from their owners.

  198. @duncsbaby

    I am not aware of the utility of that device.
    Please do not enlighten me.

  199. jon says:

    Amy Stelly is reminded of that freeway each morning when the truck traffic causes when she wakes up in her home that she was able to afford because, although close to the city center, with all of its amenities and jobs, is also close to a freeway

    If that neighborhood didn’t have a freeway, she would in government housing or she’d be riding a bus for 2 hours every day to get into the city.

  200. @Desiderius

    A better bridge analogy would be the Florida International University bridge deadly disaster. That abortive bridge was designed by an all-female engineering firm.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  201. @Hamlet's Ghost

    “That abortive bridge was designed by an all-female engineering firm.”

    I’ve heard that often, but is it really true?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  202. @TomSchmidt

    When investors attempt a leveraged buy out of a publicly traded corporation, they typically offer about 30% more than the first is trading for on the market. The market price is set by those who want to buy and sell, and normally only a modest number want to sell at the moment. Eminent domain buyouts should come at a premium, probably more than 30% since moving out of your home has more downsides than selling some stock.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  203. Anonymous[171] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The team of engineers was all-female. Claims that the firm was all-female or run by females are incorrect. (These are straw-man claims promoted by e.g. ‘fact check’ websites to muddy the picture.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  204. Neoconned says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    …..any previous metal…..plus guns & bullets plus rural farmland with a good water supply….

    And some will say no but buy the 4 main cryptos: bitcoin/doge/lite/ETH….

  205. Neoconned says:
    @Altai

    I call them Bushvilles or BushBurbs after Dubyas mighty screwup in 08…..

  206. Neoconned says:
    @Bill Jones

    Why did Gamestop go up or down? I sided with the market vigilantes on that 1 but let’s get real here…..does any stock valuations make sense at this point? Tesla worth more than Toyota?

    Oh please…..

  207. Jiminy says:

    It’s beautiful that the magic money can solve so many problems. Whilst Biden’s got his xerox going, he should print some up for a BRI of his own, connecting one black community to another all across the country. Probably won’t be any financial benefit to it, like the Asian BRI, but what the heck. Really, in 50 years they couldn’t plant some oak trees or azaleas?
    Sure it’s sad that people lose their houses, but every cloud has a silver lining. Think of all of the free vitamin d that those overpass dwelling citizens are receiving. While millions of Americans are dying from the new flu, they are just getting stronger and healthier. Good on them.
    Owning a house isn’t easy though. Mowing the lawn, painting the walls in and out, the odd plumbing job, trimming the wife’s bush, watering the plants, cleaning the pool. Just thinking about it is tiring. A lot of people actually just can’t cope with owning a house and looking after it. That’s life.
    To just turn your back on all of your worries and walk away is just so tempting. I suppose that’s why so many do.

  208. CCZ says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The below primary source documents identify who was responsible for the design, engineering, and construction of the collapsed Florida International University Pedestrian Bridge.

    “The Florida International University (“FIU”) Board of Trustees entered into a design-build contract with prime contractor, Munilla Construction Management (“MCM”), to construct a pedestrian bridge that would cross over SW Eighth Street. MCM entered into a subcontract with Figg Engineering to provide design and engineering services associated with the bridge. Mr. William Denny Pate, an employee of Figg, served as the designated Engineer of Record (“EOR”). Figg also entered into a sub-subcontract with Louis Berger to conduct the required peer review of the design. In total, there were approximately 41 parties involved in the FIU pedestrian bridge project.”

    Source: https://assets.documentcloud.org/documents/7034297/FIGG-and-Pate-v-FHWAmemo-in-Supprt-Motion-for.pdf

    FIGG’s CEO is Linda Figg, (BS, civil engineering) the daughter of the company’s founder, Eugene Figg Jr., an internationally recognized structural engineer who made numerous contributions to bridge engineering, especially in the design of the cable-stayed bridge and segmental concrete construction.

    William Denny Pate is FIGG’s Senior Vice-President and Principal Bridge Engineer and his signature and Professional Engineer (PE) seal appear on all of the FIU bridge plan sheets.

    From: FIGG Proposal For FIU Pedestrian Bridge

    FIGG
    As the Visual Quality Designer and Sustainability Manager, FIGG’s Linda Figg, will personally lead the bridge aesthetics design and sustainability for the project. Linda’s passion is bridge aesthetics and sustainability. She is an international speaker on Creating Bridges As Art® and has a passion for creating functional bridge sculpture. She will work closely with FIU, the design team, shareholders and agencies to ensure that every detail is thoughtfully, carefully, and fully addressed. The cornerstone of her bridge designs are that every detail matters.

    As the Design Manager, FIGG’s Dwight Dempsey, P.E. will provide essential leadership for the design of the new signature pedestrian bridge, ensuring the design schedule, quality and commitment. His experience includes design management of many Signature Bridges including a new pedestrian Signature Bridge for the Gateway to Florida’s Capital City.

    As the Lead Technical Designer, FIGG Engineering’s William Denney Pate, P.E., will benefit the project with his extensive experience in design of over 30 complex, signature cable-supported bridges. He was a lead designer of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, FL and the Zakim Bridge in Boston. Denney and Linda work as a team merging function and form into each bridge masterpiece. His creative engineering ideas will deliver a cost-effective, eco-friendly and innovative bridge, focused on constructability, quality and beauty.

    MCM
    As the Design-Build Manager, MCM’s Joseph (Joe) Martin, P.E., has extensive experience in both design and construction. He will serve as the hub for communication between the design and construction teams, as well as the MCM+FIGG Team’s single point of contact. Joe is a proactive communicator with all team members. He will lead the weekly meetings with key personnel of the team to ensure: 1) comprehensive coordination between design and construction; 2) progress of work meets the production schedule (and milestones); 3) resolution of pending issues and critical action items; and 4) that design and construction meet or exceed RFP requirements.

    As the Construction Project Manager, MCM’s Rodrigo Isaza,will provide project construction leadership and oversight. His similar recent experience includes the award winning I-95 Express Lanes Design-Build project in Miami-Dade County.

    Source (pdf page 5, full project senior personnel on page 22): https://facilities.fiu.edu/projects/BT_904/MCM_FIGG_Proposal_for_FIU_Pedestrian_Bridge_9-30-2015.pdf

    See also: https://miami.cbslocal.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/15909786/2019/11/NTSB-Final-FIU-Bridge-Collapse-Report.pdf

    Linda Figg:
    https://engrhof.org/members/linda-a-figg/

    https://www.tallahasseemagazine.com/linda-figg-and-company-build-bridges-that-are-functional-works-of-art/

    • Replies: @Jack D
  209. @Steve Sailer

    https://newsarchives.fiu.edu/2018/03/community-gathers-to-watch-950-ton-bridge-move-across-southwest-8th-street

    Note the “update” in red lettering at the top to make it clear that Senora Flores had absolutely NOTHINK to do with this bridge, despite whatever impression a reader might get.

    Said Leonor: “It’s very important for me as a woman and an engineer to be able to promote that to my daughter, because I think women have a different perspective. We’re able to put in an artistic touch and we’re able to build, too.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  210. @Anonymous

    Don’t you think it’s a bit silly to debate whether or not there were anti-white genocidal policies at work?

    Obviously there were.

    Of course. Our quibble is whether they began in 1965, 1865, or 1619.

    I say 1619.

  211. @BenjaminL

    If certain things are genetic, is Larry Summers an uncle to James Damore?

  212. Jack D says:
    @CCZ

    This whole fiacso is like an allegory of modern America.

    The firm’s founder, Eugene Figg Jr., was an internationally recognized structural engineer who made numerous contributions to bridge engineering, especially in the design of cable-stayed bridges. Apparently, he had no son to take over so he was succeeded by his daughter, Linda. By her own admission, Linda’s passion was not structural engineering but “bridge aesthetics and sustainability”. She didn’t care how bridges worked, just how they LOOKED and their impact upon the environment.

    She should have stuck to clothing design or floral arrangement or some other traditional female occupation that is focused on superficial aesthetics. Most women don’t like nuts and bolts just as many men care more about how stuff works than about how stuff looks – this is hardwired into our brains. Men with feminized brains who care a lot about superficial appearances are usually gay. But being biologically ill suited to your occupation is no impediment to high positions in modern American society if you are a female or a minority.

    The FIU Bridge LOOKED (I’m sure thanks to Linda, and thanks to the FIU trustees who wanted a showpiece bridge instead of a mundane pedestrian overpass, especially since the government was paying the hugely inflated cost for this showpiece) like a real cable stay bridge. But the “cable stays” were fake – they were purely aesthetic elements that didn’t actually hold the bridge up at all (while adding many millions to the cost). As a matter of fact, at the time of the bridge’s collapse, the fake “cable stays” and mast weren’t even installed yet – as decorative elements they were going to be put on AFTER the bridge was up. It was a Potemkin cable stay bridge but it sure looked good in those renderings.

    Meanwhile, FIGG flubbed basic load and capacity calculations that any competent first year engineering student should be able to do. They overestimated the strength of the bridge in the region that failed and underestimated the load it would be expected to carry. When the bridge was put into place it began to crack immediately at the eventual failure point because the load was more than it could bear but they didn’t even have enough sense to block off traffic under the bridge so that when it collapsed a bunch of passing motorists were killed.

    The FIGG engineer placed a call to the Florida Dept. of Transportation to let them know that the bridge was cracking (but he wrongly stated that it wasn’t an immediate safety issue). However, the FDOT employee was out of the office and didn’t listen to his messages until a couple of days later so it wouldn’t have made any difference what FIGG told them since the government wasn’t listening anyway.

    Actual construction was performed by a minority (Hispanic) firm – Munilla. They really didn’t seem to have done anything wrong (the tests of the concrete and rebar showed that they were not defective and had been installed according to the plans provided by FIGG) but were sued into bankruptcy anyway.

    Meanwhile, FIGG’s insurers denied coverage under their policy based upon some technicality in the policy – FIGG was supposed to give them notice of something or other and they failed to give the notice.

    Welcome to 21st century America!

    • Thanks: TomSchmidt
    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  213. CCZ says:

    “Big win for Democrats: Senate parliamentarian to allow additional budget legislation to bypass potential GOP filibuster.”

    “Senate parliamentarian to let Democrats bypass GOP filibuster on two bills.”

    “The Senate parliamentarian ruled Monday that Democrats can use special budgetary rules to avoid a GOP filibuster on two more pieces of legislation, setting the stage for President Biden’s infrastructure agenda to pass in two packages with simple-majority votes.”

    “It’s a win for Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) that allows him to pass Biden’s $2.25 trillion package by revising the fiscal 2021 Budget Resolution.”

    ‘Schumer could pass a budget resolution for fiscal 2022 to do a third reconciliation package for the second half of the Biden infrastructure agenda. Or the fiscal 2021 budget could be revised a third time to set up a third reconciliation package.”

    https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/546215-senate-parliamentarian-to-let-democrats-bypass-filibuster-with-third-bill

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    , @Jack D
  214. @CCZ

    But is there the possibility of ONE Senator on the Dem side not going along if prodded by constituency?

  215. TWS says:
    @TomSchmidt

    The developers worked long and hard to get rid of the viaduct. The value of the near by property sky rockets who cares if you can’t get from north to South?

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  216. Jack D says:
    @CCZ

    This is 100% Trump’s fault for letting the Georgia Senate seats go. He was so distracted with his hopeless “I really won the election” nonsense that was never going to fly (even if it was true) that he failed to campaign properly for the Georgia Republican candidates. Trump never really cared about anyone not named Trump. All they needed to do was to win ONE of those seats and they couldn’t even do that, against weak Dem candidates.

    • Agree: Sick of Orcs
  217. Jack D says:
    @Hamlet's Ghost

    We’re able to put in an artistic touch and we’re able to build, too.”

    Well one out of two ain’t bad. I wonder if Sra. Flores kept her job after her employer filed for bankruptcy due to the tens of millions of $ of uninsured death and injury claims against them?

  218. @Steve Sailer

    Since Kelo, there’s been quite the incentive to take private property to transfer to connected developers for those people to turn a profit. Buying cheaper becomes an imperative. But there is also something to be said for good development, where upscaling an area leads to value creation for all. New York, notably, has NOT made local laws preventing the practice, as many states did since Kelo.

    Maybe a Kelo requirement might be call options or warrants on the value of the property developed on the seized land, issued to the original owners eminently domained off of it.

  219. @TWS

    I thought they put I5 into a tunnel? Why can you not go north to south in that?

  220. @Jack D

    This is 100% Trump’s fault for letting the Georgia Senate seats go. He was so distracted with his hopeless “I really won the election” nonsense that was never going to fly (even if it was true) that he failed to campaign properly for the Georgia Republican candidates. Trump never really cared about anyone not named Trump. All they needed to do was to win ONE of those seats and they couldn’t even do that, against weak Dem candidates.

    While I agree with you, it’s also sad that a major league *^%$ like Trump was the only person in the GOP inclined to defend the interests of the Forgotten Man over those of a plutocracy bent on screwing him in every way possible. Trump’s voters picked him not because he was ideal, but because he was good enough, and better than all the other GOP *^%$. That is why if Trump runs again, he will be the GOP nominee, and anyone who runs against him has just killed his own political career.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
  221. Anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Don’t you think it’s a bit silly to debate whether or not there were anti-white genocidal policies at work?

    Obviously there were.

    “Obviously”? Where’s the evidence it was intentional? How would you prove intent at a trial on that?

  222. Anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @TomSchmidt

    The Bronx, by contrast, was a lot more densely populated, and lost 800,000 people from 1970 to 1980.

    What caused the Bronx to lose people?

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  223. @Jack D

    For his second run, Lazy Orange harped on “lowest black unemployment” and mentioned neither the unbuilt fence or immigration.

    He needed a landslide to clear the democrat chasm of voter fraud but instead trotted to his doom.

    Shame he was a just a plain narcissist rather than a paranoid one.

  224. a $400 billion investment in in-home care for older and disabled Americans. It would lift the wages of care workers, who are predominantly low-paid, female and not white.

    Will have an effect the opposite of what was intended. Raising the pay rate of in-home care workers will mean white people competing for those jobs.

  225. @Anon

    Economic contraction. Crime. Drugs. Taxes. Rent Control causing landlords to burn rather than fix buildings.

    Some of the economic contraction was caused by underinvestment in rail versus roads; there was a thriving “little Pittsburgh” area of custom steel fabrication in the South Bronx eventually destroyed by inadequacy of rail.

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