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Biden: Walls for Me But Not for Thee
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From Business Insider a couple of weeks ago:

Biden administration cancels remaining Laredo, Rio Grande Valley contracts for Trump’s border wall, angering Republican lawmakers

Kevin Shalvey Oct 9, 2021, 5:31 AM

From the Washington Examiner yesterday:

DHS awards \$455,000 contract to build fence around Biden beach house

Luke Gentile 1 day ago

A \$455,000 fence may soon surround President Joe Biden’s Delaware beach house.

The Department of Homeland Security awarded a \$456,548 contract in September to Rehoboth’s Turnstone Builders, a Delaware construction company, to erect the security barrier, according to USASpending.gov. …

Biden bought the North Shores home in 2017, and he paid \$2.7 million for the property, according to county tax records.

He has visited the property twice so far during his presidency.

And today:

 
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  1. ladder
    thumb
    ladder
    thumb
    you see your wall
    i got ladders and thumbs
    you look at your wall
    i got ladder and thumbs though

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @J.Ross

    If a wall is high enough, you need two very large ladders. And one of them has to be on the other side.

    Replies: @Bridgeport_IPA

  2. Let’s see, a beach house isn’t usually on that much land, so let’s say this Biden Border Barrier may be something like 1/4 mile or so of perimeter, maybe even 1/2 mile.

    Let’s take the low end – that’s \$2 million per mile. We really don’t need the whole 1,900 miles of the southern border covered (there are impassible lengths), but let’s just take a round 2,000 miles. That’s just \$4 billion bucks. I calculated a quick back-o-the-envelope \$2 billion in “Border control vs. the interstate highway system” and plenty of manpower to man it in “Border control maintenance vs. defending some Koreans from other Koreans”.

    That’s 1/2 a day of US Feral Gov’t spending in a NORMAL year!

    Yea!! So, it IS affordable after all. Build the Big Beautiful Biden Border Barrier, Bitchez!

    • Agree: Sick of Orcs
    • Replies: @Trelane
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You can build a freeway for about $3 million per lane mile (that includes overpasses and bridges). Biden's fenced perimeter, at $500,000 is cheap in comparison but I'd sure like to be the contractor who closed that deal since it's a cheap fence and not a freeway lane.

    Replies: @Pericles

    , @Wilkey
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let’s take the low end – that’s $2 million per mile. We really don’t need the whole 1,900 miles of the southern border covered (there are impassible lengths), but let’s just take a round 2,000 miles. That’s just $4 billion bucks.
     
    The border with Mexico is ~2,000 miles, or about 11 million feet. To be fair, a workable wall at the border would have to be more substantial than a wall around a small residential property and would have to come with access roads and other infratsructure not needed for a wall on a residential property. It might even be a double barrier. So let's say the cost is $3,600 per foot. That's ~$40 billion for a wall on the border and everything else to go with it.

    Is it realistic from an engineering perspective? Well we already have several interstates which are far longer. I-90, which goes from Boston to Seattle, is 3,020 miles long. I-80, I-70, I-40, and I-95 are all longer than the US-Mexico border, as well. I would argue that interstates are actually twice their states length since they are effectively two roads, one in each direction. They also come with load bearing requirements and countless bridges that would not be required of a border wall.

    Is it realistic from a cost perspective? Well a brand new, Gerald Ford-class aircraft carrier costs $12.8 billion - before equipping it with 75+ aircraft. The latest fighters run $80 million each - or about $6 billion worth of aircraft. Thus each aircraft carrier costs, bare minimum, about $20 billion. The US Navy has 13 aircraft carriers either active or under construction.

    So a wall would cost, at most, about the same as two aircraft carriers. How much more defense value do we get from securing our southern border than from two aircraft carriers? I would argue it's worth far more than two carriers. It may be worth five of them. It may even be worth all of them.

    Then there is the question of "efficiency." How much area is Biden's fence protecting versus what a wall would protect? A wall half a mile in perimeter, on perfectly square property, would be 1/8 mile on each side. That would protect a property 10 acres in size, or 1/64th of a square mile. The DHS is spending ~$500,000 to protect less than 1/64th of a square mile.

    The 48 contiguous states are a bit over 3 million square miles - an area about 200 million times larger than Biden's beach house. But even a $40 billion border wall would only cost 80,000 times as much as the fence around Biden's beach house. So Biden's wall cost, relative to the area protected, 2,500 times more than a wall protecting the United States from Mexico. And that's all assuming a very excessive cost of $3,600 per foot.

    The Constitution explicitly requires the federal government to protect the states against invasion. I don't recall it mentioning a damn thing about protecting presidents' beach houses.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

  3. Some quick research tells me that high-end chain-link fencing will cost you around \$40 per linear foot. Thus, the Biden contract price will pay for around 10,000 linear feet, or 2 miles. 2 miles of fencing to surround a house? The contract price seems inflated by around an order of magnitude.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @SafeNow

    I don't think the US Feral Gov't is worried about the high cost of Biden's fence. They've got PLENTY of (your) money.

    , @Colin Wright
    @SafeNow

    'The contract price seems inflated by around an order of magnitude.'

    The Bidens are involved in the transaction. You need to allow for that.

  4. @J.Ross
    ladder
    thumb
    ladder
    thumb
    you see your wall
    i got ladders and thumbs
    you look at your wall
    i got ladder and thumbs though

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    If a wall is high enough, you need two very large ladders. And one of them has to be on the other side.

    • Replies: @Bridgeport_IPA
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    There should be armed Americans on the other side.

  5. It’s the same with guns. No guns for thee, but plenty of armed guards, at your expense, for me.

    • Agree: Dr. X, bomag
  6. @Achmed E. Newman
    Let's see, a beach house isn't usually on that much land, so let's say this Biden Border Barrier may be something like 1/4 mile or so of perimeter, maybe even 1/2 mile.

    Let's take the low end - that's $2 million per mile. We really don't need the whole 1,900 miles of the southern border covered (there are impassible lengths), but let's just take a round 2,000 miles. That's just $4 billion bucks. I calculated a quick back-o-the-envelope $2 billion in "Border control vs. the interstate highway system" and plenty of manpower to man it in "Border control maintenance vs. defending some Koreans from other Koreans".

    That's 1/2 a day of US Feral Gov't spending in a NORMAL year!

    Yea!! So, it IS affordable after all. Build the Big Beautiful Biden Border Barrier, Bitchez!

    Replies: @Trelane, @Wilkey

    You can build a freeway for about \$3 million per lane mile (that includes overpasses and bridges). Biden’s fenced perimeter, at \$500,000 is cheap in comparison but I’d sure like to be the contractor who closed that deal since it’s a cheap fence and not a freeway lane.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Trelane

    I'm thinking the work is done by H. Biden Legit Government Contracts, LLC. Some overruns to be expected.

  7. This run is gonna be pretty bad.

    Looking like the libs who fled to Texas made a terrible mistake.

    Any new Covid strain will most likely emanate from this hearty crowd of fat diabetic “refugees.”

    Biden’s crew expects Americans to take him seriously about a “Covid crisis”?

    Fat chance…

  8. This is classic iSteve feigning outrage over the abuse of taxpayer dollars. When it comes to his preferred in-group, he conveniently looks the other way.

    One of his favorite [activities of] bilking taxpayers for millions of dollars [is] by regularly charging the government for use of his for-profit clubs, which he insisted on visiting throughout his presidency. Last fall, for instance, The Washington Post reported that the 280 visits Trump had made to his own properties from the start of his presidency through October 2020 had cost taxpayers (as well as his political supporters) roughly \$8.1 million, a not-so-insignificant sum that happened to be more than his hotels in Hawaii and Vancouver had generated in revenue during the same period.

    “If I win, I may never see my property — I may never see these places again,” Trump said on the campaign trail in 2016. “Because I’m going to be working for you, I’m not going to have time to go play golf. Believe me.”

    Did you believe him, iSteve?

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    @Corvinus

    What-about-ism much?

    , @AnotherDad
    @Corvinus

    Corny, please re-read the title of the post.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    roughly $8.1 million
     
    That's all? A pittance.

    Anyway, the point isn't that Biden is spending our money on his wall, it's that he is not spending our money on our wall. Get immigration under control (our control, that is, not his), and he can spend $8.1 billion on himself for all we care.

    I will say this much for Biden, though-- he is clearer of mind than you.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  9. @Corvinus
    This is classic iSteve feigning outrage over the abuse of taxpayer dollars. When it comes to his preferred in-group, he conveniently looks the other way.

    One of his favorite [activities of] bilking taxpayers for millions of dollars [is] by regularly charging the government for use of his for-profit clubs, which he insisted on visiting throughout his presidency. Last fall, for instance, The Washington Post reported that the 280 visits Trump had made to his own properties from the start of his presidency through October 2020 had cost taxpayers (as well as his political supporters) roughly $8.1 million, a not-so-insignificant sum that happened to be more than his hotels in Hawaii and Vancouver had generated in revenue during the same period.
     
    “If I win, I may never see my property — I may never see these places again,” Trump said on the campaign trail in 2016. “Because I’m going to be working for you, I’m not going to have time to go play golf. Believe me.”

    Did you believe him, iSteve?

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar

    What-about-ism much?

  10. Mr. Biden, tear down this wall!

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The difference between walls that keep people in and walls that keep people out is actually at the heart of our current crisis. More generally the right to leave and the right to enter.

    A "wall" that keeps people *in* does deprive someone of their rights--slavery, serfdom, the commies locking people in--bad stuff. (We legitimately do this to criminals to keep them out of civilized society where they do bad stuff.)

    A "wall" that keeps people *out* in contrast is required for "having nice things"--national borders, a job interview, a country club fence and fees, CalTech's admission standards, the security on your bank account, the lock on your front door,

    Minoritarianism boils down to the demand that the majority is not allowed to have nice things--schools and country clubs, neighborhoods and nations--for themselves. It's the "you must let me in!" demand. The ideology of the rapist.

  11. “How come the lords get to lounge in fancy castles and eat the best meat and wine, while we must toil on the land all day for nothing but black bread and water?”
    “Because you’re a peasant, peasant.”
    It’s no more complicated than that, just unfamiliar to those accustomed to a more egalitarian system from the mid-twentieth century.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon, Rob McX
    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
  12. “Installing a fence around the house with a lockable gate.”

    How to Prevent Wandering in Alzheimer’s Patients

    https://www.brightfocus.org/alzheimers/article/how-prevent-wandering-alzheimers-patients

    • Thanks: HammerJack
  13. Border walls to keep people OUT are really stupid. You need the Berlin Wall to keep people IN because you lose control over the escapees as soon as they get past the border. But to keep people OUT? You don’t need a wall to do that because you have jurisdiction to enforce your laws against illegals.

    Illegals are highly rational, and they will respond to incentives. Create a high probability of illegals suffering terrible consequences, and they will all leave. How do you do that? A system of bounties will create a near 100% chance of getting caught. The legal members of ethnic communities will turn in their illegal brothers for very modest reward–say \$1000 per illegal. Then make the punishment awful–can only cash in the bounty for a dead illegal.

    If we did that, every single illegal alien would self-deport overnight. We’d have to pay out maybe \$5 million in bounties for a few stupid stragglers. No need for a \$30 billion wall. No impact on bighorn sheep or pygmy owls.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Batman

    That's true. I think the idea so many immigration restrictionists liked a wall was because they thought future administrations would be stuck with it, whether they were against immigration or not. At this stage, it wouldn't surprise me to see the traitors in DC voting to remove a wall that's been built.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  14. 0bama and the Big Guy say they believe in imminent climate disaster and rising seas, but they own lavish beach homes. They say walls don’t work, but the first thing they do with a new house is build a very serious wall around it.

  15. @Corvinus
    This is classic iSteve feigning outrage over the abuse of taxpayer dollars. When it comes to his preferred in-group, he conveniently looks the other way.

    One of his favorite [activities of] bilking taxpayers for millions of dollars [is] by regularly charging the government for use of his for-profit clubs, which he insisted on visiting throughout his presidency. Last fall, for instance, The Washington Post reported that the 280 visits Trump had made to his own properties from the start of his presidency through October 2020 had cost taxpayers (as well as his political supporters) roughly $8.1 million, a not-so-insignificant sum that happened to be more than his hotels in Hawaii and Vancouver had generated in revenue during the same period.
     
    “If I win, I may never see my property — I may never see these places again,” Trump said on the campaign trail in 2016. “Because I’m going to be working for you, I’m not going to have time to go play golf. Believe me.”

    Did you believe him, iSteve?

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar

    Corny, please re-read the title of the post.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @AnotherDad

    I did. That's what makes it so galling.

  16. But America only has Mexicans to worry about. Joe has to guard against Hunter stumbling in stoned at 3am and microwaving their dog.

  17. Do you get the sense that these roadblock set-pieces are just bits of showmanship for the cameras?

    A real roadblock would involve dump trucks, barbed wire, teargas, heavy machine guns, and lots of paddy wagons for captured invaders.

    A bunch of guys with riot shields letting everyone past after putting up 90 seconds of resistance is just show-biz and fodder for television, not a serious effort.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @Ben Kurtz

    Don't you realize it's just a manana country!

  18. @Ben Kurtz
    Do you get the sense that these roadblock set-pieces are just bits of showmanship for the cameras?

    A real roadblock would involve dump trucks, barbed wire, teargas, heavy machine guns, and lots of paddy wagons for captured invaders.

    A bunch of guys with riot shields letting everyone past after putting up 90 seconds of resistance is just show-biz and fodder for television, not a serious effort.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes

    Don’t you realize it’s just a manana country!

  19. Of the first 29 weekends of his presidency, Biden was in Wilmington for 14 of them. Why? He wants to be close to the centre of power.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/apr/25/delaware-tax-loophole-1209-north-orange-trump-clinton There aren’t many things upon which Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump agree, especially as they court very different Delaware voters ahead of a primary on Tuesday. But the candidates for president share an affinity for the same nondescript two-storey office building in Wilmington. […] This squat, yellow brick office building just north of Wilmington’s rundown downtown is the registered address of more than 285,000 companies. That’s more than any other known address in the world, and 15 times more than the 18,000 registered in Ugland House, a five-storey building in the Cayman Islands that Barack Obama called “either the biggest building in the world, or the biggest tax scam on record”. Officially, 1209 North Orange is home to Apple, American Airlines, Coca-Cola, Walmart and dozens of other companies in the Fortune 500 list of America’s biggest companies. Being registered in Delaware lets companies take advantage of strict corporate secrecy rules, business-friendly courts and the “Delaware loophole”, which can allow companies to legally shift earnings from other states to Delaware, where they are not taxed on non-physical incomes generated outside of the state.

    The loophole is said to have cost other states more than \$9bn in lost taxes over the past decade and led to Delaware to be described as “one of the world’s biggest havens for tax avoidance and evasion”.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
    • LOL: bomag
  20. This is clearly foreign interference in our election process. How’s it not a threat to our “democracy “ when people storm the border by hearing banners proclaiming whom they will vote for?

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Thea

    There can't be a more serious form of interference in elections than replacing the electorate.

  21. For that amount of money, they could station SS agents around it 24/7 until he leaves office next year.

  22. It seems to me that protecting President Biden from assassins would be better done by secret service agents, control of the road and sea approaches and airspace than by a fence around the Biden beach house.

    Perhaps the cost of the fence includes a bunkhouse and a brothel for his sentries.

    But maybe the fence is a cheaper option, with the added benefit that it may prevent Biden from wandering off and getting lost if he is confused and will keep his notoriously unruly canines from running out into the road like the Clinton dog Buddy who met his untimely demise in highway traffic.

    Security does not come cheap, as Prince Harry and the Duchess of Susses found when they located to California after having round-the-clock police protection in Britain, particularly since many people would not be too unhappy if they ceased to be, but the amount of resources that a nation devotes to protecting its leader is a measure of the power of that nation, so we should all be grateful that our presidents have their personal bulletproof cars airlifted to foreign countries so that they can feel like they are safe at home.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    It seems to me that protecting President Biden from assassins would be better done by secret service agents, control of the road and sea approaches and airspace than by a fence around the Biden beach house.
     
    Biden has the ultimate protection from assassins:





    https://i1.wp.com/nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/10/USA-ELECTION_HARRIS_1.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&ssl=1



    India Can’t Claim Kamala Harris Until It Addresses its Unapologetic Racism


    5 Jewish things to know about Kamala Harris


    Why Kamala Harris for US President: The world must root for this candidate in the US presidential battle: Kamala Harris has made her racial identity central to her campaign.
    , @J.Ross
    @Jonathan Mason

    Biden is less than the talking head in That Hideous Strength, anyone who tries to assassinate him is a Democrat.
    Hewitt is probably correct that the actual current leaders are Klain and ben-Blinken.

  23. @SafeNow
    Some quick research tells me that high-end chain-link fencing will cost you around $40 per linear foot. Thus, the Biden contract price will pay for around 10,000 linear feet, or 2 miles. 2 miles of fencing to surround a house? The contract price seems inflated by around an order of magnitude.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Colin Wright

    I don’t think the US Feral Gov’t is worried about the high cost of Biden’s fence. They’ve got PLENTY of (your) money.

    • Agree: SafeNow
  24. You know how Hispanos such as Linda Chavez love to say they didn’t cross the border, the border crossed them? You can actually experience this yourself, twice a year, though good luck getting permission from the French and Spanish navies:

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Reg Cæsar

    Then there was Fort Blunder, mistakenly built on the Canadian side of the border. It's a good thing America's dumbed down administration and military have GPS and advanced mapping technology nowadays.

  25. @Jonathan Mason
    It seems to me that protecting President Biden from assassins would be better done by secret service agents, control of the road and sea approaches and airspace than by a fence around the Biden beach house.

    Perhaps the cost of the fence includes a bunkhouse and a brothel for his sentries.

    But maybe the fence is a cheaper option, with the added benefit that it may prevent Biden from wandering off and getting lost if he is confused and will keep his notoriously unruly canines from running out into the road like the Clinton dog Buddy who met his untimely demise in highway traffic.

    Security does not come cheap, as Prince Harry and the Duchess of Susses found when they located to California after having round-the-clock police protection in Britain, particularly since many people would not be too unhappy if they ceased to be, but the amount of resources that a nation devotes to protecting its leader is a measure of the power of that nation, so we should all be grateful that our presidents have their personal bulletproof cars airlifted to foreign countries so that they can feel like they are safe at home.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @J.Ross

    It seems to me that protecting President Biden from assassins would be better done by secret service agents, control of the road and sea approaches and airspace than by a fence around the Biden beach house.

    Biden has the ultimate protection from assassins:

  26. @JohnnyWalker123
    Mr. Biden, tear down this wall!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NjNL4Nsa4Q

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    The difference between walls that keep people in and walls that keep people out is actually at the heart of our current crisis. More generally the right to leave and the right to enter.

    A “wall” that keeps people *in* does deprive someone of their rights–slavery, serfdom, the commies locking people in–bad stuff. (We legitimately do this to criminals to keep them out of civilized society where they do bad stuff.)

    A “wall” that keeps people *out* in contrast is required for “having nice things”–national borders, a job interview, a country club fence and fees, CalTech’s admission standards, the security on your bank account, the lock on your front door,

    Minoritarianism boils down to the demand that the majority is not allowed to have nice things–schools and country clubs, neighborhoods and nations–for themselves. It’s the “you must let me in!” demand. The ideology of the rapist.

  27. It is pure corruption for taxpayer money to be spent to build a wall around Biden’s private house.

    It has been a maxim of the law since Parliament cleaned up after the 1381 Peasants’ Revolt against Richard II that “the King should live of his own,” which means the King should finance his private lifestyle from his own property, not from taxes on the public.

    While he’s in office, the President gets to reside in the executive mansion (the White House) which is owned and maintained by the government and to vacation at Camp David, also government property, and so-on and so-forth, but Biden’s private house in Delaware is not an official amenity.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  28. @AnotherDad
    @Corvinus

    Corny, please re-read the title of the post.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    I did. That’s what makes it so galling.

  29. this is all theater, and it is splendidly annoying to the people I do not like!! hahahhahahhahaaaaaa!

  30. @Corvinus
    This is classic iSteve feigning outrage over the abuse of taxpayer dollars. When it comes to his preferred in-group, he conveniently looks the other way.

    One of his favorite [activities of] bilking taxpayers for millions of dollars [is] by regularly charging the government for use of his for-profit clubs, which he insisted on visiting throughout his presidency. Last fall, for instance, The Washington Post reported that the 280 visits Trump had made to his own properties from the start of his presidency through October 2020 had cost taxpayers (as well as his political supporters) roughly $8.1 million, a not-so-insignificant sum that happened to be more than his hotels in Hawaii and Vancouver had generated in revenue during the same period.
     
    “If I win, I may never see my property — I may never see these places again,” Trump said on the campaign trail in 2016. “Because I’m going to be working for you, I’m not going to have time to go play golf. Believe me.”

    Did you believe him, iSteve?

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @AnotherDad, @Reg Cæsar

    roughly \$8.1 million

    That’s all? A pittance.

    Anyway, the point isn’t that Biden is spending our money on his wall, it’s that he is not spending our money on our wall. Get immigration under control (our control, that is, not his), and he can spend \$8.1 billion on himself for all we care.

    I will say this much for Biden, though– he is clearer of mind than you.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    Of course the optics are patently absurd for Biden. It’s glaringly obvious it’s something he shouldn’t do now or even ever. But that never stopped Trump at all because his minions simply don’t give two shits. He could’ve literally shot someone in broad daylight on Wall Street on live television, said he didn’t do it, and his supporters would believe him.

    Indeed, we as a nation ought to strictly enforce existing immigration laws as I have been consistent on this issue here on this fine opinion webzine. But Democrats and Republicans regrettably just don’t have the stomach for it.

    But there is an underlying issue here, one that iSteve glossed over because it doesn’t move his conversational needle—the misuse of our tax dollars by presidents. He only shows his selective anger on this topic. So I’m not surprised when you flippantly say “a pittance”.

    Now, what is the current status of this Great Wall?

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-46748492.amp

    However, only 80 miles of new barriers have been built where there were none before - that includes 47 miles of primary wall, and 33 miles of secondary wall built to reinforce the initial barrier.

    The vast majority of the 452 miles is replacing existing structures at the border that had been built by previous US administrations. President Trump has argued that this should be regarded as new wall, because it's replacing what he called "old and worthless barriers."

    Despite this, in the run-up to the 3 November 2020 election, President Trump continued to say that "Mexico is paying for it".

    You would think iSteve as a self-proclaimed champion of the rule of law and law and order would have done some more NOTICING on this topic in expanding our knowledge about this essential problem.


    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.texastribune.org/2020/12/23/trump-border-wall-land-texas/amp/

    More than a year earlier, CBP had awarded a contract then worth $33 million to a New Mexico-based company to build 4 miles of fencing in Starr County. The county is one of the top targets of President Donald Trump’s administration for a border wall and a place agents have called the most volatile stretch in the nation. Construction was slated to begin in November 2019, the agency announced.

    There was one problem: The government had awarded the contract before obtaining the land it needed, including Mendoza’s. This September, after more than a year without getting that land, CBP had to suspend the contract to Southwest Valley Constructors, accruing “substantial” charges along the way, according to court documents

    An investigation by ProPublica and The Texas Tribune has found that the government's strategy of awarding contracts before acquiring titles to the land in Texas has led to millions of dollars in costs for delays, according to calculations based on statements made by CBP officials in court filings. On at least two dozen occasions, the agency has used the argument, often successfully, to convince even dubious federal judges to immediately seize land from property owners fighting their eminent domain cases.

    Furthermore…

    https://www.npr.org/2019/01/12/684748447/private-landowners-along-trumps-proposed-border-wall-risk-losing-property

    The interesting thing about the federal government is that in the 1930s when the U.S. was in the middle of the Depression, there was a big movement to stimulate the economy with large public works projects. So because of that need, Congress passed a very special law called the Declaration of Taking Act. And what that essentially did is it gave the government, unlike any other government agency, it gave the federal government the power to quickly seize land. And when I say quickly, I mean the government sends you a letter, and the next day, they can take title to your land. And that's called a declaration of taking. And that's what they used - that's what the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Justice used to take land along the Texas border to build the fence. And what they do is to compensate you is they write you a check, and they say here's the check, we own the land, now let's argue about how much money this check is for. But there's really no argument you make about whether or not they get to take your land. The federal government almost uniquely has the power to take land first and then pay you later.

  31. @Trelane
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You can build a freeway for about $3 million per lane mile (that includes overpasses and bridges). Biden's fenced perimeter, at $500,000 is cheap in comparison but I'd sure like to be the contractor who closed that deal since it's a cheap fence and not a freeway lane.

    Replies: @Pericles

    I’m thinking the work is done by H. Biden Legit Government Contracts, LLC. Some overruns to be expected.

  32. @Achmed E. Newman
    Let's see, a beach house isn't usually on that much land, so let's say this Biden Border Barrier may be something like 1/4 mile or so of perimeter, maybe even 1/2 mile.

    Let's take the low end - that's $2 million per mile. We really don't need the whole 1,900 miles of the southern border covered (there are impassible lengths), but let's just take a round 2,000 miles. That's just $4 billion bucks. I calculated a quick back-o-the-envelope $2 billion in "Border control vs. the interstate highway system" and plenty of manpower to man it in "Border control maintenance vs. defending some Koreans from other Koreans".

    That's 1/2 a day of US Feral Gov't spending in a NORMAL year!

    Yea!! So, it IS affordable after all. Build the Big Beautiful Biden Border Barrier, Bitchez!

    Replies: @Trelane, @Wilkey

    Let’s take the low end – that’s \$2 million per mile. We really don’t need the whole 1,900 miles of the southern border covered (there are impassible lengths), but let’s just take a round 2,000 miles. That’s just \$4 billion bucks.

    The border with Mexico is ~2,000 miles, or about 11 million feet. To be fair, a workable wall at the border would have to be more substantial than a wall around a small residential property and would have to come with access roads and other infratsructure not needed for a wall on a residential property. It might even be a double barrier. So let’s say the cost is \$3,600 per foot. That’s ~\$40 billion for a wall on the border and everything else to go with it.

    Is it realistic from an engineering perspective? Well we already have several interstates which are far longer. I-90, which goes from Boston to Seattle, is 3,020 miles long. I-80, I-70, I-40, and I-95 are all longer than the US-Mexico border, as well. I would argue that interstates are actually twice their states length since they are effectively two roads, one in each direction. They also come with load bearing requirements and countless bridges that would not be required of a border wall.

    Is it realistic from a cost perspective? Well a brand new, Gerald Ford-class aircraft carrier costs \$12.8 billion – before equipping it with 75+ aircraft. The latest fighters run \$80 million each – or about \$6 billion worth of aircraft. Thus each aircraft carrier costs, bare minimum, about \$20 billion. The US Navy has 13 aircraft carriers either active or under construction.

    So a wall would cost, at most, about the same as two aircraft carriers. How much more defense value do we get from securing our southern border than from two aircraft carriers? I would argue it’s worth far more than two carriers. It may be worth five of them. It may even be worth all of them.

    Then there is the question of “efficiency.” How much area is Biden’s fence protecting versus what a wall would protect? A wall half a mile in perimeter, on perfectly square property, would be 1/8 mile on each side. That would protect a property 10 acres in size, or 1/64th of a square mile. The DHS is spending ~\$500,000 to protect less than 1/64th of a square mile.

    The 48 contiguous states are a bit over 3 million square miles – an area about 200 million times larger than Biden’s beach house. But even a \$40 billion border wall would only cost 80,000 times as much as the fence around Biden’s beach house. So Biden’s wall cost, relative to the area protected, 2,500 times more than a wall protecting the United States from Mexico. And that’s all assuming a very excessive cost of \$3,600 per foot.

    The Constitution explicitly requires the federal government to protect the states against invasion. I don’t recall it mentioning a damn thing about protecting presidents’ beach houses.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Wilkey

    Thanks, Wilkey I am not a civil engineer, but I looked up some numbers for interstate highway costs. You should read my posts, though. All that's necessary is two 100 or 200 yard apart tall fences with concertina wire, cameras (which are cheap as all hell now) out the ying-yang, maybe 20 per mile or so (closer than every 100 yards), and manned stations every mile or less, which would provide access to any part of the border barrier within a minute or two. That's all you need.

    Those 25,000 soldiers, sailors, and airmen on the 38th parallel in Korea for the last 68 years (no, not the same guys, dammit!) could MORE than supply the labor - think 2 men per station on 12 hour shifts plus extras for off days, sick days, etc. For 2,000 miles, that's realistically 10 to 15 thousand.

    Interstates need 4 lanes of good pavement, exit/entrance ramps, shoulders, medians, good drainage, bridges, and signage. I picked Interstate Highway per-mile costs as a very high number for comparison, maybe by a factor of 10 or 20.

    Yes, the cost of Zhou Bai Dien the taxpayers' fence is inflated by a factor of 20 to 50 probably. Try bidding out the job and see if you can get it built for 10 grand, OK maybe it'd be 20 grand at the highest. Well, Hunter Biden Fencing, LLC might charge more, but it'd come with art work, so ...

    I appreciate your own back-o-the-envelope (as in, common sense) calculations, Wilkey, but I still say the decent border barrier I described in my first paragraph can be built EASILY for $2 million/mile, even at a cost inflated by the US Government.* I would say it'd be 1/4 to 1/2 of ONE aircraft carrier. The US Feral Gov't spends that much in one afternoon, 24/7/365 with no time even to go take a dump in the Capitol restroom.

    .

    * At the high end, $50/foot for material and installation, so $250,000 per mile x 2, plus concertina wire, I dunno a few tens of thousands for camera/wiring installation, costs for grading, transportation, etc.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Wilkey

    I forgot to add. I agree 100% with your last paragraph too!

  33. Incidentally, the median price of a US home is now about \$300,000. That’s if you can find one on the market to buy.

    Just the wall around Joe Biden’s beach house cost 50% more than what a typical American home is worth – and only 65% of Americans even own a home.

  34. Rich DEMs are always very concerned about the plight of the poor.

  35. @Wilkey
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let’s take the low end – that’s $2 million per mile. We really don’t need the whole 1,900 miles of the southern border covered (there are impassible lengths), but let’s just take a round 2,000 miles. That’s just $4 billion bucks.
     
    The border with Mexico is ~2,000 miles, or about 11 million feet. To be fair, a workable wall at the border would have to be more substantial than a wall around a small residential property and would have to come with access roads and other infratsructure not needed for a wall on a residential property. It might even be a double barrier. So let's say the cost is $3,600 per foot. That's ~$40 billion for a wall on the border and everything else to go with it.

    Is it realistic from an engineering perspective? Well we already have several interstates which are far longer. I-90, which goes from Boston to Seattle, is 3,020 miles long. I-80, I-70, I-40, and I-95 are all longer than the US-Mexico border, as well. I would argue that interstates are actually twice their states length since they are effectively two roads, one in each direction. They also come with load bearing requirements and countless bridges that would not be required of a border wall.

    Is it realistic from a cost perspective? Well a brand new, Gerald Ford-class aircraft carrier costs $12.8 billion - before equipping it with 75+ aircraft. The latest fighters run $80 million each - or about $6 billion worth of aircraft. Thus each aircraft carrier costs, bare minimum, about $20 billion. The US Navy has 13 aircraft carriers either active or under construction.

    So a wall would cost, at most, about the same as two aircraft carriers. How much more defense value do we get from securing our southern border than from two aircraft carriers? I would argue it's worth far more than two carriers. It may be worth five of them. It may even be worth all of them.

    Then there is the question of "efficiency." How much area is Biden's fence protecting versus what a wall would protect? A wall half a mile in perimeter, on perfectly square property, would be 1/8 mile on each side. That would protect a property 10 acres in size, or 1/64th of a square mile. The DHS is spending ~$500,000 to protect less than 1/64th of a square mile.

    The 48 contiguous states are a bit over 3 million square miles - an area about 200 million times larger than Biden's beach house. But even a $40 billion border wall would only cost 80,000 times as much as the fence around Biden's beach house. So Biden's wall cost, relative to the area protected, 2,500 times more than a wall protecting the United States from Mexico. And that's all assuming a very excessive cost of $3,600 per foot.

    The Constitution explicitly requires the federal government to protect the states against invasion. I don't recall it mentioning a damn thing about protecting presidents' beach houses.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks, Wilkey I am not a civil engineer, but I looked up some numbers for interstate highway costs. You should read my posts, though. All that’s necessary is two 100 or 200 yard apart tall fences with concertina wire, cameras (which are cheap as all hell now) out the ying-yang, maybe 20 per mile or so (closer than every 100 yards), and manned stations every mile or less, which would provide access to any part of the border barrier within a minute or two. That’s all you need.

    Those 25,000 soldiers, sailors, and airmen on the 38th parallel in Korea for the last 68 years (no, not the same guys, dammit!) could MORE than supply the labor – think 2 men per station on 12 hour shifts plus extras for off days, sick days, etc. For 2,000 miles, that’s realistically 10 to 15 thousand.

    Interstates need 4 lanes of good pavement, exit/entrance ramps, shoulders, medians, good drainage, bridges, and signage. I picked Interstate Highway per-mile costs as a very high number for comparison, maybe by a factor of 10 or 20.

    Yes, the cost of Zhou Bai Dien the taxpayers’ fence is inflated by a factor of 20 to 50 probably. Try bidding out the job and see if you can get it built for 10 grand, OK maybe it’d be 20 grand at the highest. Well, Hunter Biden Fencing, LLC might charge more, but it’d come with art work, so …

    I appreciate your own back-o-the-envelope (as in, common sense) calculations, Wilkey, but I still say the decent border barrier I described in my first paragraph can be built EASILY for \$2 million/mile, even at a cost inflated by the US Government.* I would say it’d be 1/4 to 1/2 of ONE aircraft carrier. The US Feral Gov’t spends that much in one afternoon, 24/7/365 with no time even to go take a dump in the Capitol restroom.

    .

    * At the high end, \$50/foot for material and installation, so \$250,000 per mile x 2, plus concertina wire, I dunno a few tens of thousands for camera/wiring installation, costs for grading, transportation, etc.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, I was deliberately picking estimates on the very high end. Partly because I do think $2 million per mile is unrealistically low, and partly just to make a close comparison to the price of an aircraft carrier.

    The fact that we drop $20 billion on a new aircraft carrier + planes every 4-5 years makes it ridiculous for anyone to suggest that a wall is economically prohibitive. Aircraft carriers also require crews of about 6,000 people, so the manpower requirements of 2-3 aircraft carriers are comparable to a wall, as well. You don't even have to provide food or housing for the border guards while they aren't on the job.

    And the fact that we've built multiple interstates longer than the border with Mexico makes it ridiculous for anyone to suggest that it is technically impossible. There are hundreds of thousands of miles of roads, walls, and fencing crisscrossing the country. 2,000 more miles of it along the Mexican border is no big deal.

  36. @Wilkey
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Let’s take the low end – that’s $2 million per mile. We really don’t need the whole 1,900 miles of the southern border covered (there are impassible lengths), but let’s just take a round 2,000 miles. That’s just $4 billion bucks.
     
    The border with Mexico is ~2,000 miles, or about 11 million feet. To be fair, a workable wall at the border would have to be more substantial than a wall around a small residential property and would have to come with access roads and other infratsructure not needed for a wall on a residential property. It might even be a double barrier. So let's say the cost is $3,600 per foot. That's ~$40 billion for a wall on the border and everything else to go with it.

    Is it realistic from an engineering perspective? Well we already have several interstates which are far longer. I-90, which goes from Boston to Seattle, is 3,020 miles long. I-80, I-70, I-40, and I-95 are all longer than the US-Mexico border, as well. I would argue that interstates are actually twice their states length since they are effectively two roads, one in each direction. They also come with load bearing requirements and countless bridges that would not be required of a border wall.

    Is it realistic from a cost perspective? Well a brand new, Gerald Ford-class aircraft carrier costs $12.8 billion - before equipping it with 75+ aircraft. The latest fighters run $80 million each - or about $6 billion worth of aircraft. Thus each aircraft carrier costs, bare minimum, about $20 billion. The US Navy has 13 aircraft carriers either active or under construction.

    So a wall would cost, at most, about the same as two aircraft carriers. How much more defense value do we get from securing our southern border than from two aircraft carriers? I would argue it's worth far more than two carriers. It may be worth five of them. It may even be worth all of them.

    Then there is the question of "efficiency." How much area is Biden's fence protecting versus what a wall would protect? A wall half a mile in perimeter, on perfectly square property, would be 1/8 mile on each side. That would protect a property 10 acres in size, or 1/64th of a square mile. The DHS is spending ~$500,000 to protect less than 1/64th of a square mile.

    The 48 contiguous states are a bit over 3 million square miles - an area about 200 million times larger than Biden's beach house. But even a $40 billion border wall would only cost 80,000 times as much as the fence around Biden's beach house. So Biden's wall cost, relative to the area protected, 2,500 times more than a wall protecting the United States from Mexico. And that's all assuming a very excessive cost of $3,600 per foot.

    The Constitution explicitly requires the federal government to protect the states against invasion. I don't recall it mentioning a damn thing about protecting presidents' beach houses.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Achmed E. Newman

    I forgot to add. I agree 100% with your last paragraph too!

  37. @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    roughly $8.1 million
     
    That's all? A pittance.

    Anyway, the point isn't that Biden is spending our money on his wall, it's that he is not spending our money on our wall. Get immigration under control (our control, that is, not his), and he can spend $8.1 billion on himself for all we care.

    I will say this much for Biden, though-- he is clearer of mind than you.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Of course the optics are patently absurd for Biden. It’s glaringly obvious it’s something he shouldn’t do now or even ever. But that never stopped Trump at all because his minions simply don’t give two shits. He could’ve literally shot someone in broad daylight on Wall Street on live television, said he didn’t do it, and his supporters would believe him.

    Indeed, we as a nation ought to strictly enforce existing immigration laws as I have been consistent on this issue here on this fine opinion webzine. But Democrats and Republicans regrettably just don’t have the stomach for it.

    But there is an underlying issue here, one that iSteve glossed over because it doesn’t move his conversational needle—the misuse of our tax dollars by presidents. He only shows his selective anger on this topic. So I’m not surprised when you flippantly say “a pittance”.

    Now, what is the current status of this Great Wall?

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-46748492.amp

    However, only 80 miles of new barriers have been built where there were none before – that includes 47 miles of primary wall, and 33 miles of secondary wall built to reinforce the initial barrier.

    The vast majority of the 452 miles is replacing existing structures at the border that had been built by previous US administrations. President Trump has argued that this should be regarded as new wall, because it’s replacing what he called “old and worthless barriers.”

    Despite this, in the run-up to the 3 November 2020 election, President Trump continued to say that “Mexico is paying for it”.

    You would think iSteve as a self-proclaimed champion of the rule of law and law and order would have done some more NOTICING on this topic in expanding our knowledge about this essential problem.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.texastribune.org/2020/12/23/trump-border-wall-land-texas/amp/

    More than a year earlier, CBP had awarded a contract then worth \$33 million to a New Mexico-based company to build 4 miles of fencing in Starr County. The county is one of the top targets of President Donald Trump’s administration for a border wall and a place agents have called the most volatile stretch in the nation. Construction was slated to begin in November 2019, the agency announced.

    There was one problem: The government had awarded the contract before obtaining the land it needed, including Mendoza’s. This September, after more than a year without getting that land, CBP had to suspend the contract to Southwest Valley Constructors, accruing “substantial” charges along the way, according to court documents

    An investigation by ProPublica and The Texas Tribune has found that the government’s strategy of awarding contracts before acquiring titles to the land in Texas has led to millions of dollars in costs for delays, according to calculations based on statements made by CBP officials in court filings. On at least two dozen occasions, the agency has used the argument, often successfully, to convince even dubious federal judges to immediately seize land from property owners fighting their eminent domain cases.

    Furthermore…

    https://www.npr.org/2019/01/12/684748447/private-landowners-along-trumps-proposed-border-wall-risk-losing-property

    The interesting thing about the federal government is that in the 1930s when the U.S. was in the middle of the Depression, there was a big movement to stimulate the economy with large public works projects. So because of that need, Congress passed a very special law called the Declaration of Taking Act. And what that essentially did is it gave the government, unlike any other government agency, it gave the federal government the power to quickly seize land. And when I say quickly, I mean the government sends you a letter, and the next day, they can take title to your land. And that’s called a declaration of taking. And that’s what they used – that’s what the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Justice used to take land along the Texas border to build the fence. And what they do is to compensate you is they write you a check, and they say here’s the check, we own the land, now let’s argue about how much money this check is for. But there’s really no argument you make about whether or not they get to take your land. The federal government almost uniquely has the power to take land first and then pay you later.

  38. @Batman
    Border walls to keep people OUT are really stupid. You need the Berlin Wall to keep people IN because you lose control over the escapees as soon as they get past the border. But to keep people OUT? You don't need a wall to do that because you have jurisdiction to enforce your laws against illegals.

    Illegals are highly rational, and they will respond to incentives. Create a high probability of illegals suffering terrible consequences, and they will all leave. How do you do that? A system of bounties will create a near 100% chance of getting caught. The legal members of ethnic communities will turn in their illegal brothers for very modest reward--say $1000 per illegal. Then make the punishment awful--can only cash in the bounty for a dead illegal.

    If we did that, every single illegal alien would self-deport overnight. We'd have to pay out maybe $5 million in bounties for a few stupid stragglers. No need for a $30 billion wall. No impact on bighorn sheep or pygmy owls.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    That’s true. I think the idea so many immigration restrictionists liked a wall was because they thought future administrations would be stuck with it, whether they were against immigration or not. At this stage, it wouldn’t surprise me to see the traitors in DC voting to remove a wall that’s been built.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Rob McX

    it wouldn’t surprise me to see the traitors in DC voting to remove a wall that’s been built.

    During his most recent presidential campaign, Bernie Sanders told an immigration activist that he was "open" to tearing down existing sections of wall.

  39. @Thea
    This is clearly foreign interference in our election process. How’s it not a threat to our “democracy “ when people storm the border by hearing banners proclaiming whom they will vote for?

    Replies: @Rob McX

    There can’t be a more serious form of interference in elections than replacing the electorate.

    • Agree: J.Ross
  40. @Reg Cæsar
    You know how Hispanos such as Linda Chavez love to say they didn't cross the border, the border crossed them? You can actually experience this yourself, twice a year, though good luck getting permission from the French and Spanish navies:



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGwjtjgiivE

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Then there was Fort Blunder, mistakenly built on the Canadian side of the border. It’s a good thing America’s dumbed down administration and military have GPS and advanced mapping technology nowadays.

  41. Nothing would be cheaper than constructing The Kaiser’s Wire of Death along the US/Mex border. Unlike the Germans of The Great War, we already have commercial electric power lines to power them. No reason to simply let The Invaders simply walking over the border and having federally funded religious “refugee resettlement” organizations welcoming them with open arms while being funded at taxpayer’s expense.

    https://refugeeresettlementwatch.org/

  42. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Wilkey

    Thanks, Wilkey I am not a civil engineer, but I looked up some numbers for interstate highway costs. You should read my posts, though. All that's necessary is two 100 or 200 yard apart tall fences with concertina wire, cameras (which are cheap as all hell now) out the ying-yang, maybe 20 per mile or so (closer than every 100 yards), and manned stations every mile or less, which would provide access to any part of the border barrier within a minute or two. That's all you need.

    Those 25,000 soldiers, sailors, and airmen on the 38th parallel in Korea for the last 68 years (no, not the same guys, dammit!) could MORE than supply the labor - think 2 men per station on 12 hour shifts plus extras for off days, sick days, etc. For 2,000 miles, that's realistically 10 to 15 thousand.

    Interstates need 4 lanes of good pavement, exit/entrance ramps, shoulders, medians, good drainage, bridges, and signage. I picked Interstate Highway per-mile costs as a very high number for comparison, maybe by a factor of 10 or 20.

    Yes, the cost of Zhou Bai Dien the taxpayers' fence is inflated by a factor of 20 to 50 probably. Try bidding out the job and see if you can get it built for 10 grand, OK maybe it'd be 20 grand at the highest. Well, Hunter Biden Fencing, LLC might charge more, but it'd come with art work, so ...

    I appreciate your own back-o-the-envelope (as in, common sense) calculations, Wilkey, but I still say the decent border barrier I described in my first paragraph can be built EASILY for $2 million/mile, even at a cost inflated by the US Government.* I would say it'd be 1/4 to 1/2 of ONE aircraft carrier. The US Feral Gov't spends that much in one afternoon, 24/7/365 with no time even to go take a dump in the Capitol restroom.

    .

    * At the high end, $50/foot for material and installation, so $250,000 per mile x 2, plus concertina wire, I dunno a few tens of thousands for camera/wiring installation, costs for grading, transportation, etc.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    Yes, I was deliberately picking estimates on the very high end. Partly because I do think \$2 million per mile is unrealistically low, and partly just to make a close comparison to the price of an aircraft carrier.

    The fact that we drop \$20 billion on a new aircraft carrier + planes every 4-5 years makes it ridiculous for anyone to suggest that a wall is economically prohibitive. Aircraft carriers also require crews of about 6,000 people, so the manpower requirements of 2-3 aircraft carriers are comparable to a wall, as well. You don’t even have to provide food or housing for the border guards while they aren’t on the job.

    And the fact that we’ve built multiple interstates longer than the border with Mexico makes it ridiculous for anyone to suggest that it is technically impossible. There are hundreds of thousands of miles of roads, walls, and fencing crisscrossing the country. 2,000 more miles of it along the Mexican border is no big deal.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman, TWS
  43. Yep. Well said, as usual, Wilkey.

    All complaints about “exorbitant cost” are very open lies. We already projects–lots of them–of very similar scale, our interstate highways. Take one side of the road and stand it on end–a wall. The cost of the other side covers the access road, additional fencing. The grading and prep work is probably less. Interstates in open country 5-10m a mile. So the Wall–concrete–would ballpark at \$20b project. And there are even cheaper options. And then the Wall actually saves money on the human–Border Patrol–end.

    And most of all … the Wall wallops illegal immigration, and low skill immigrants–and their children, grandchildren–are extremely expensive. The bottom half of the income distribution is fiscally quite negative for government finance. So every day the Wall–just sitting there–is saving the government \$\$\$. It’s a money maker.

    No, anyone yapping about cost is just a liar.

    They don’t want the Wall because it would keep lots of illegals out and they want the illegals to come. That simple. Taking the nation from Americans is the plan. The Wall is bad because it gets in the way.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @AnotherDad


    And then the Wall actually saves money on the human–Border Patrol–end. And most of all … the Wall wallops illegal immigration, and low skill immigrants–and their children, grandchildren–are extremely expensive.
     
    They keep telling us that immigration is necessary for the economy, that immigrants work hard and don't use welare, etc., but the number of immigrants keeps going up and yet somehow the federal deficit keeps going up. Of the US population of 331 million, over 90 million are immigrants or the children of immigrants.

    We haven't had a balanced budget since 2000, and the average budget deficit for the 21 years since then has been over $1 trillion a year. If they were going to "save the economy" you'd think they would have done that by now.

    Replies: @res

  44. The thing about a wall is that the necessity of building one is based on the assumption that future administrations will be trying hard to replace the population and the wall will at least slow them down. With properly enforced immigration laws, a wall would be an expensive and unnecessary luxury. But of course people are right to assume future politicians will always be looking to bring in more immigrants, and turning a blind eye to the millions of illegal aliens openly flouting the law.

  45. @Rob McX
    @Batman

    That's true. I think the idea so many immigration restrictionists liked a wall was because they thought future administrations would be stuck with it, whether they were against immigration or not. At this stage, it wouldn't surprise me to see the traitors in DC voting to remove a wall that's been built.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    it wouldn’t surprise me to see the traitors in DC voting to remove a wall that’s been built.

    During his most recent presidential campaign, Bernie Sanders told an immigration activist that he was “open” to tearing down existing sections of wall.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
  46. @Jonathan Mason
    It seems to me that protecting President Biden from assassins would be better done by secret service agents, control of the road and sea approaches and airspace than by a fence around the Biden beach house.

    Perhaps the cost of the fence includes a bunkhouse and a brothel for his sentries.

    But maybe the fence is a cheaper option, with the added benefit that it may prevent Biden from wandering off and getting lost if he is confused and will keep his notoriously unruly canines from running out into the road like the Clinton dog Buddy who met his untimely demise in highway traffic.

    Security does not come cheap, as Prince Harry and the Duchess of Susses found when they located to California after having round-the-clock police protection in Britain, particularly since many people would not be too unhappy if they ceased to be, but the amount of resources that a nation devotes to protecting its leader is a measure of the power of that nation, so we should all be grateful that our presidents have their personal bulletproof cars airlifted to foreign countries so that they can feel like they are safe at home.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @J.Ross

    Biden is less than the talking head in That Hideous Strength, anyone who tries to assassinate him is a Democrat.
    Hewitt is probably correct that the actual current leaders are Klain and ben-Blinken.

  47. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @J.Ross

    If a wall is high enough, you need two very large ladders. And one of them has to be on the other side.

    Replies: @Bridgeport_IPA

    There should be armed Americans on the other side.

  48. @AnotherDad
    Yep. Well said, as usual, Wilkey.

    All complaints about "exorbitant cost" are very open lies. We already projects--lots of them--of very similar scale, our interstate highways. Take one side of the road and stand it on end--a wall. The cost of the other side covers the access road, additional fencing. The grading and prep work is probably less. Interstates in open country 5-10m a mile. So the Wall--concrete--would ballpark at $20b project. And there are even cheaper options. And then the Wall actually saves money on the human--Border Patrol--end.

    And most of all ... the Wall wallops illegal immigration, and low skill immigrants--and their children, grandchildren--are extremely expensive. The bottom half of the income distribution is fiscally quite negative for government finance. So every day the Wall--just sitting there--is saving the government $$$. It's a money maker.

    No, anyone yapping about cost is just a liar.

    They don't want the Wall because it would keep lots of illegals out and they want the illegals to come. That simple. Taking the nation from Americans is the plan. The Wall is bad because it gets in the way.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    And then the Wall actually saves money on the human–Border Patrol–end. And most of all … the Wall wallops illegal immigration, and low skill immigrants–and their children, grandchildren–are extremely expensive.

    They keep telling us that immigration is necessary for the economy, that immigrants work hard and don’t use welare, etc., but the number of immigrants keeps going up and yet somehow the federal deficit keeps going up. Of the US population of 331 million, over 90 million are immigrants or the children of immigrants.

    We haven’t had a balanced budget since 2000, and the average budget deficit for the 21 years since then has been over \$1 trillion a year. If they were going to “save the economy” you’d think they would have done that by now.

    • Replies: @res
    @Wilkey


    the average budget deficit for the 21 years since then has been over $1 trillion a year
     
    I had not realized it was that bad. Especially the last two years.
    https://www.thebalance.com/us-deficit-by-year-3306306

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  49. Math! 160,000 illegal aliens paroled into USA.

    https://nypost.com/2021/10/13/around-160000-illegal-immigrants-released-into-the-us-since-march-report/

    Toilet paper usage per year in the USA.

    It takes about 384 trees to make the toilet paper that one man uses within his lifetime.
    The average person uses 100 rolls of toilet paper per year (over 20,000 sheets).
    The daily production of toilet paper is about 83,048,116 rolls per day.

    http://www.toiletpaperhistory.net/toilet-paper-facts/toilet-paper-fun-facts/#:~:text=The%20average%20person%20uses%20100,year%20(over%2020%2C000%20sheets).

    So Biden has caused the USA to expend natural resources to make an additional 16 million toilet paper rolls a year for the The Invaders.

    Now consider all the other environmental burdens that have to be dealt with: water, food production, etc.

    Sheeiit.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Joe Stalin

    But think of how the immigrants are saving the economy with their toilet roll purchases! America is just a jumbo toilet roll away from another recession.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Joe Stalin

    'So Biden has caused the USA to expend natural resources to make an additional 16 million toilet paper rolls a year for the The Invaders.'

    Be fair. You're assuming all of them use toilet paper.

  50. @Wilkey
    @AnotherDad


    And then the Wall actually saves money on the human–Border Patrol–end. And most of all … the Wall wallops illegal immigration, and low skill immigrants–and their children, grandchildren–are extremely expensive.
     
    They keep telling us that immigration is necessary for the economy, that immigrants work hard and don't use welare, etc., but the number of immigrants keeps going up and yet somehow the federal deficit keeps going up. Of the US population of 331 million, over 90 million are immigrants or the children of immigrants.

    We haven't had a balanced budget since 2000, and the average budget deficit for the 21 years since then has been over $1 trillion a year. If they were going to "save the economy" you'd think they would have done that by now.

    Replies: @res

    the average budget deficit for the 21 years since then has been over \$1 trillion a year

    I had not realized it was that bad. Especially the last two years.
    https://www.thebalance.com/us-deficit-by-year-3306306

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @res

    There has not been an actual budget surplus since the 1960s or so, Res. The late 1990s was when the SS accounts were shifted onto the general budget. Back, then, the SS system was still in the black, with lots of people still putting in money (OK getting their money put in) and not as many drawing big amounts out. Putting it all on the general budget was an accounting trick.

    It also had the side effect of making people like me realize "hey, wait, so this money is not sitting there in an account waiting for me to turn 65? Whaaaa?"

  51. So Biden has caused the USA to expend natural resources to make an additional 16 million toilet paper rolls a year for the The Invaders.

    Leonardo da Vinci knew that some people had value only as consumers of toilet paper:

    Some there are who are nothing else than a passage for food and augmentors of excrement and fillers of privies, because through them no other things in the world, nor any good effects are produced, since nothing but full privies results from them.

    • Thanks: Rob McX
  52. @res
    @Wilkey


    the average budget deficit for the 21 years since then has been over $1 trillion a year
     
    I had not realized it was that bad. Especially the last two years.
    https://www.thebalance.com/us-deficit-by-year-3306306

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    There has not been an actual budget surplus since the 1960s or so, Res. The late 1990s was when the SS accounts were shifted onto the general budget. Back, then, the SS system was still in the black, with lots of people still putting in money (OK getting their money put in) and not as many drawing big amounts out. Putting it all on the general budget was an accounting trick.

    It also had the side effect of making people like me realize “hey, wait, so this money is not sitting there in an account waiting for me to turn 65? Whaaaa?”

  53. @Joe Stalin
    Math! 160,000 illegal aliens paroled into USA.

    https://nypost.com/2021/10/13/around-160000-illegal-immigrants-released-into-the-us-since-march-report/
     
    Toilet paper usage per year in the USA.

    It takes about 384 trees to make the toilet paper that one man uses within his lifetime.
    The average person uses 100 rolls of toilet paper per year (over 20,000 sheets).
    The daily production of toilet paper is about 83,048,116 rolls per day.

    http://www.toiletpaperhistory.net/toilet-paper-facts/toilet-paper-fun-facts/#:~:text=The%20average%20person%20uses%20100,year%20(over%2020%2C000%20sheets).
     
    So Biden has caused the USA to expend natural resources to make an additional 16 million toilet paper rolls a year for the The Invaders.

    Now consider all the other environmental burdens that have to be dealt with: water, food production, etc.

    Sheeiit.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Colin Wright

    But think of how the immigrants are saving the economy with their toilet roll purchases! America is just a jumbo toilet roll away from another recession.

    • LOL: Jim Bob Lassiter
  54. @SafeNow
    Some quick research tells me that high-end chain-link fencing will cost you around $40 per linear foot. Thus, the Biden contract price will pay for around 10,000 linear feet, or 2 miles. 2 miles of fencing to surround a house? The contract price seems inflated by around an order of magnitude.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Colin Wright

    ‘The contract price seems inflated by around an order of magnitude.’

    The Bidens are involved in the transaction. You need to allow for that.

  55. @Joe Stalin
    Math! 160,000 illegal aliens paroled into USA.

    https://nypost.com/2021/10/13/around-160000-illegal-immigrants-released-into-the-us-since-march-report/
     
    Toilet paper usage per year in the USA.

    It takes about 384 trees to make the toilet paper that one man uses within his lifetime.
    The average person uses 100 rolls of toilet paper per year (over 20,000 sheets).
    The daily production of toilet paper is about 83,048,116 rolls per day.

    http://www.toiletpaperhistory.net/toilet-paper-facts/toilet-paper-fun-facts/#:~:text=The%20average%20person%20uses%20100,year%20(over%2020%2C000%20sheets).
     
    So Biden has caused the USA to expend natural resources to make an additional 16 million toilet paper rolls a year for the The Invaders.

    Now consider all the other environmental burdens that have to be dealt with: water, food production, etc.

    Sheeiit.

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Colin Wright

    ‘So Biden has caused the USA to expend natural resources to make an additional 16 million toilet paper rolls a year for the The Invaders.’

    Be fair. You’re assuming all of them use toilet paper.

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