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Biden Passed Tough Delaware Bar Exam on His First Try (I Think)
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It took Kamala Harris two tries to pass the relatively difficult California bar exam, but what about her boss Joe Biden?

His home state of Delaware has been a heavy hitter in corporate law since the early 20th Century. At that time, most corporations in the U.S. were incorporated in New Jersey, which was conveniently close to the business capital of New York City. But then Gov. Woodrow Wilson raised taxes on corporations, so Delaware swooped in and offered the same convenience as NJ, but with lower fees and taxes.

But how to keep other states from doing to Delaware what it did to New Jersey? Delaware therefore invested in building an excellent court system for adjudicating questions of corporate law, with an emphasis on the smartest Delaware lawyers becoming judges. America’s corporations expect that Delaware judges will offer solid, non-erratic judgments that are unlikely to be overturned by federal courts.

To be a corporate lawyer in Wilmington, Delaware is a nice gig: you play in the national big leagues, and get paid like it, but you don’t have to deal with the expenses and stresses of New York.

What does all this have to do with Joe Biden? Not too much: Joe says that corporate law didn’t appeal to him (although it’s also true to say that Biden, who graduated near the bottom of his class at middling Syracuse law school and had almost been expelled as a first-year student for plagiarizing five pages of a paper, didn’t appeal to the august corporate law firms of Delaware).

But one downstream effect of Delaware taking law seriously is that its bar exam is usually one of the hardest to pass in the country. At present, it requires the highest score to pass, with California second.

Did Joe pass the bar on his first try?

The way to tell is by comparing when a celebrity graduated from law school and when he or she was “called to the bar.” For example, Barack Obama graduated from Harvard Law School in May or June 1991 and was admitted to the Illinois bar on December 17, 1991, suggesting he passed the not too tough Illinois bar exam on his first crack at it in the summer of 1991.

In contrast, Michelle Obama graduated from Harvard Law School in 1988 and was was admitted to the bar on May 12, 1989, suggesting she did not pass the Illinois bar exam at her first chance, but did at her second.

Biden graduated from Syracuse Law School in June 1968. Sources conflict on when he was admitted to the Delaware bar: 1969 in some, but the most authoritative says he was “admitted to the bar December 1968” in Wilmington, DE.

At present, Delaware only offers the bar exam once per year, in late July.

Therefore, my bet would be that Joe passed the tough Delaware bar exam in July 1968 on his one and only try.

This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

Still, it’s pretty good achievement. Joe is perhaps the second most vain man in American politics, after only his opponent in this race, so I’m sure he feels pretty good about himself over this.

Here are some other famous politicians and their experiences with the bar exam:

Hillary Clinton: passed Arkansas Bar Exam on her first attempt, flunked tough DC Bar Exam on her only try, which is probably why she moved to Arkansas and married Bill

4-term California governor Jerry Brown: passed tough California bar exam on second try

California governor Pete Wilson: passed tough California exam on 4th try

Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa: failed Cal four times, gave up

Chicago mayor Richard M. Daley the Younger: passed easy Illinois test on third try.

John Kerry appears to have passed Massachusetts on his first try.

Richard Nixon, unsurprisingly, passed California on his first try.

Gerald Ford appears to have passed Michigan’s bar exam on his first try. As befits an All-American football hero at the U. of Michigan, he appears to have been up and practicing law in Michigan even before his test was graded.

Bob Dole passed on his first try in Kansas; because his right arm had been destroyed charging a German machine gun nest, he was allowed to have his first wife write down the answers he whispered to her.

Kamala Harris: Failed tough California bar exam on first try, passed it on her second

Willie Brown passed California on his first try.

 
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  1. Gosh, I hope things keep going well for our friends in Delaware. They are so awfully smart and do so much for the rest of us.

    A proud history of being good to Americans.

    Be sad if something horrible happened to them.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @RichardTaylor

    You said it. How reassuring to have people running who can relate to regular people and really really care about us!

    Dimwit Joe Biden, the Senator from MBNA, and Hooker Harris with her THREE homes worth a combined EIGHT MILLION DOLLARS (per the Crook Street Journal’s sickening “Mansion” section a few days ago).

    Replies: @vinny

    , @Percy Gryce
    @RichardTaylor

    They had a run at Delaware two decades ago:

    https://newrepublic.com/article/61902/rogue-state

  2. You are assuming that “Fast and Loose Joe” actually sat for his own bar exam. Who’s to say in that day of easier ID requirements that he didn’t use a ringer?

    • Agree: Thomas
    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @The Alarmist

    Very common in those days. I am not speaking from hearsay. Not even a driver's license was asked for in the case of taking the Graduate Record Exam and a US Navy aptitude test, it was almost like an honor system. Perhaps not true of the typical state Bar exam. Perhaps an enterprising journalist might locate someone who took a Bar exam for a friend at the approximate date when Biden passed the bar exam. That would strongly argue that Joe had someone take the exam for him.

    Ted Kennedy had a ringer take his final for a Spanish class at Harvard as an undergraduate and the imposture was revealed. Kennedy was not exactly expelled, he was rusticated and allowed back in after 1 or 2 years. This was well known at Harvard where I was a graduate student 1959-63. I see that that charming anecdote is omitted from the Wikipedia article on him. That fact was brought up in his initial run for Senator but got no traction and he was easily elected being a Kennedy.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @R.G. Camara

    , @Anonymous
    @The Alarmist

    Given he is the son of a Used Car Salesman, Hunter Biden’s shenanigans and the shady business dealing of Joe’s brothers, that certainly seems plausible.

  3. But one downstream effect of Delaware taking law seriously is that its bar exam is usually one of the hardest to pass in the country. At present, it requires the highest score to pass, with California second.

    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.

    What about race-norming? Is that done yet, and why not? Restorative Justice!

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Tlotsi
    @Mr McKenna

    I'd be more impressed to hear these politicians passed the CPA exam on the first try.

    , @jon
    @Mr McKenna


    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere.
     
    Ding, ding, ding! We have a winner. I took the supposedly tough California bar and I and about 90% most of my classmates passed on the first try. And I didn't go to Berkeley or Stanford, so I had plenty of dim classmates. Non-lawyers are always overly impressed by the bar exam.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Mr McKenna

    Given how many of our corrupt thug rulers (not “representatives”) are lawyers — and arrogant, busybody lawyers at that — I can understand the general sentiment against lawyers. I prefer more small business owners (or ANYONE else) in the legislatures than lawyers for sure.

    But the bar exam in california is actually difficult, in part because of the sheer number of state-law subjects covered (though recently somewhat eased, I hear) and the exam in Delaware is difficult even for intelligent, industrious people.

    A mere “majority” pass rate is not high, especially when the many, many people who don’t pass are then unable to practice law — a serious problem, quickly, for the majority of them who have substantial student loans coming due in months.

    , @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.
     
    You could conclude that but you would be wrong. For example, only 5% of blacks passed the Feb 20 Cal. bar exam, vs. 52% (the majority) of whites:

    https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/06/only-5-of-black-first-time-takers-passed-february-california-bar-exam-compared-to-52-of-whites-4.html


    The reason the majority of whites pass is that even though this exam is tough, whites have been at least double filtered by the time they take the test. First of all, they are filtered by having to get into law school and then they are filtered by having to make it thru 3 years of law school and even then only maybe 1/2 of them pass on the first try (generally speaking these are the folks that are in the top 50% of their law school class - blacks are almost always in the bottom half with very rare exceptions). You are talking about an exam that maybe 95% of the US population could never pass - not only does it require tremendous memorization of the law but also the ability to analyze and apply a fact pattern to the law under considerable time pressure.

    I don't know what Biden's story is. Based upon his class rank at Syracuse (near the bottom) he would not have been expected to pass in Del. on his first try. Maybe as someone said he had someone else take it for him. Maybe he got lucky. Maybe Joe's big problem was motivation - his college grades were tremendously variable but he did well in a few courses, which could indicate that he can do well when he wants to but is usually not focused enough. Maybe he got focused this time.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Marty, @HammerJack

  4. a lot of these politician lawyers will have been more involved in politics and other extracurricular activities than in studying when they were in law school, and so may not have been all that well prepared when they came to take the bar exam.

    In some cases they probably only started studying law seriously after they failed the bar exam the first time.

    • Replies: @jon
    @Jonathan Mason


    a lot of these politician lawyers will have been more involved in politics and other extracurricular activities than in studying when they were in law school, and so may not have been all that well prepared when they came to take the bar exam.
     
    Everyone preps for the bar exam by taking a crash course during the summer after graduation. After the mandatory first year courses (that are pretty much identical at every law school and that are all on the bar exam) nobody takes that many subjects that will be on the bar exam. There are too many topics, and they are too different from each other. So most of what you are being tested on are legal topics that you first learned in the month prior to the exam (and that you will never look at again after the bar). You can see the topics for the California bar here: http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Admissions/Examinations/California-Bar-Examination/California-Bar-Examination-Scope

    Replies: @Carol

  5. There may be a difference between future politicians who go to law school because they want to become legislators and people who go to law school because they want to practice law.

  6. Shameless plagiarist Joe Biden? Did he actually take the exam himself?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsus_in_uno,_falsus_in_omnibus

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Coemgen

    Wonder if this is why the Forces of Reaction were so quick to come out with the accusations about Trump cheating on the SAT. Pre-emptive shot.

    And how telling that--despite the total lack of evidence for the charge--it was treated lavishly on CNN, in the NYT and WP, MSN and on and on. Not one of whom would ever dare give coverage to a conspiracy theory or anything like that. Because that would be Fake News!

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Coemgen


    Shameless plagiarist Joe Biden? Did he actually take the exam himself?
     
    Perhaps he hired his friend Neil Kinnock, born the same year, as a ringer.
  7. Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa: failed Cal four times, gave up

    It is worth noting that while Villar is a UCLA alumnus, he went to the unaccredited People’s College of Law to get his JD. PCL does not require the LSAT for admissions because of “cultural bias” in the test.

  8. Meanwhile, in Portland, Andy Ngô continues to do a great job reporting the nightly attempts at mayhem committed by ardent sociopaths, and the police officers who subdue them:

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Anonymous

    Thank you and a particular thanks to Andy Ngo who puts his well-being on the line for truth and freedom.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Anonymous

    The CPD is FINALLY beginning to act as cops; I wonder if Macy's threat to bug out got to Mayor Lightfooot that this is very, VERY BAD what she is doing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Y6VcVLL3Dw

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    How long does this Portland-Palestinian problem persist? Until U.S. is Out Of Afghanistan? Sounds like a reasonable demand IMHO.

    Actually the PNW situation might more closely resemble Belfast/Ulster where thespian training in being a proper telegenic protest-actor originated.

    , @TWS
    @Anonymous

    Mostly peaceful.

  9. @Coemgen
    Shameless plagiarist Joe Biden? Did he actually take the exam himself?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsus_in_uno,_falsus_in_omnibus

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar

    Wonder if this is why the Forces of Reaction were so quick to come out with the accusations about Trump cheating on the SAT. Pre-emptive shot.

    And how telling that–despite the total lack of evidence for the charge–it was treated lavishly on CNN, in the NYT and WP, MSN and on and on. Not one of whom would ever dare give coverage to a conspiracy theory or anything like that. Because that would be Fake News!

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  10. But how to keep other states from doing to Delaware what it did to New Jersey? Delaware therefore invested in building an excellent court system for adjudicating

    How diverse was it then? How diverse is it now? If sufficiently diverse now, when will coporations decide to move elsewhere?

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @James Speaks

    The corporations will never decide to move since they aren’t there now. They simply incorporate under Delaware law and put their headquarters elsewhere.

    Replies: @James Speaks

  11. Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden – Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Who was the smartest president?

    Hoover, by a country mile.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @Anonymous
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.
     

    FDR set both the United States and Europe on the path to destruction by entering the United States into World War II.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden – Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.
     
    You need to be sharper now than you used to be because America’s institutions are now under the sway of hostile foreign interests.
    , @Redman
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I’m conflicted as well. Biden and Harris are probably the least academically qualified candidates in my lifetime. But as a society we’ve become overly obsessed with academia. It would be great to see more non-Ivy types rising to leadership.

    But whoever it is that breaks the mould should have at least some other positive quality going for them. I can’t see any with these two.

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @CJ

    , @Pop Warner
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    FDR wasn't a great president, he was a bastard who took a leading role in starting WWII and getting an unwilling American populace involved. He can rot in Hell next to Wilson

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @BB753

    , @Art Deco
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Agreed. The main brains in the President's chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover's league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.

    Replies: @Bragadocious, @Anonymous

    , @Paleo Liberal
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Good point.

    As far as Ms. Harris, what is the single most important job of a VP candidate?

    To help get the ticket elected.

    Since Biden chose Harris:

    1. Silicon Valley big money donors have contributed large amounts of money.

    2. Biden’s poll numbers have gone up among women.

    3. Biden’s poll numbers have improved slightly among African Americans. Recall that if Hillary Clinton had done as well among black voters as Obama, she would have carried Wisconsin. Having Harris on the ticket could carry Wisconsin for Biden.

    4. The level of support for Biden among Desis (dot Indians) and West Indians has skyrocketed. Note that Florida has a large West Indian population. It is possible that the extra black, Desi and West Indian voters in Florida could carry the state for Biden.

    Who cares what Harris’ IQ is?

    She is bringing in large amounts of money and some extra votes in crucial swing states. That is what is important now. The most brilliant and capable VP candidates are worthless if they don’t get elected.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    , @syonredux
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Who was the smartest president?
     
    That's always a tricky one. Some of the obvious candidates are :

    John Adams

    Thomas Jefferson

    James Madison

    JQ Adams

    James Garfield

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Woodrow Wilson

    Herbert Hoover


    Richard Nixon (at 143, has the highest measured IQ of any president)

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @AnotherDad
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NJ:



    ... Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. ...
     
    Art:

    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover’s league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.
     
    No disagreement that absolute top flight smarts don't magically mean ... success!

    But i don't think Hoover is "responsible for a major disaster". Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover's intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do... because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    FDR--not a top intellect--had no idea what to do either. His 1932 campaign included a promise to balance the budget. His efforts to solve the crisis were mediocre and ineffective. And then in 37-38 FDR put us a recession within the depression! FDR's thuggish big state instincts snuffing out the first flames of recovery. The US absolutely wallowed in the Depression. Hitler's efforts in Germany--the other most severely hit nation--were more effective. The US was only finally crawling out at the end of FDRs normal eight year term because of rearmament. It was overall a highly mediocre performance. One that only looks good in the afterglow of f1945.

    FDR was both economically and reputationally bailed out by the War. And the 1945 settlement left us with a 45 year "Cold War".

    FDR was not a "great President" but rather a President during "great times". Mediocre performance with the US economy. Perhaps missed opportunities that a stronger, more economically successful, more thoughtful President could have grasped to avoid the disaster of the War altogether? Additional IQ, and a better character might have done him--the US, the World--some good.

    ~~

    Reagan did a decent job with the Cold War although parts of his approach (ex. Nicaragua) seem needless.

    But that was basically all that occupied Reagan's brainspace.

    During his Presidency the coup against the American people continued--ramped up! The replacement "Civil Rights" constitution, immigration, financialization, deindustrialization and trade--the US essentially aiding China's rise and hollowing itself out.

    The most salient result of Reagan's Presidency for the long term future of America was Simpson-Mazzoli, a complete debacle--end-to-end--for actual Americans, their children their posterity.

    And i don't believe Reagan--in contrast to some of his successors--was disloyal. Some extra IQ points enabling more "big picture" and "long term" thinking would have come in handy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @AnotherDad, @Art Deco

    , @Ben tillman
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Wilson and FDR has similar records as left-wing abominations.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    You want Kirk in charge,Spock as the second.

    , @syonredux
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Don't underestimate Reagan:


    President Reagan, Mastermind - SNL

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5wfPlgKFh8

  12. Therefore, my bet would be that Joe passed the tough Delaware bar exam in July 1968 on his one and only try.

    Or someone claiming to be Joe Biden passed it in Delaware in 1969, just as somebody claiming to be Edward Kennedy passed it in Virginia in 1959. Remember that Kennedy had a track record for paying others to take his tests, and id forgery was pretty easy in the 1960s.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @JimB
    @JimB

    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Calvin Hobbes, @Jack D

    , @James Braxton
    @JimB

    Oddly, the online member search function of the Delaware Bar Association has been suspended. No reason given on the website.

    In every other state you can look up every attorney and see their bar status and admit date.

  13. @JimB

    Therefore, my bet would be that Joe passed the tough Delaware bar exam in July 1968 on his one and only try.
     
    Or someone claiming to be Joe Biden passed it in Delaware in 1969, just as somebody claiming to be Edward Kennedy passed it in Virginia in 1959. Remember that Kennedy had a track record for paying others to take his tests, and id forgery was pretty easy in the 1960s.

    Replies: @JimB, @James Braxton

    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JimB

    50 years ago. Doesnt practice, hasnt ever really, so pointless.

    , @Calvin Hobbes
    @JimB


    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?
     
    Could that still be done? It’s kind of amazing that Biden is leading in the polls in spite of his obvious dementia ( and all the other scuzzy stuff), but maybe the race would flip if it were proven that Joe had a ringer take his bar exam. At the very least, it would be fun seeing the NYT, et al, try to spin that.

    Off-topic but iStevey, who was Obama’s real father? Maybe it was Barack, Sr., but the marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr., was some sort of sham, so maybe not.

    (Stanley Ann lit off for Seattle shortly after the birth of Baby Barack, away from both her “husband” and her parents, and then returned about the same time Barack, Sr., left Hawaii. It looks like Hawaii was not big enough for both Stanley Ann and her “husband”.)

    A DNA sample from Barack, Jr., or one of his daughters could clinch that case (assuming that his daughters really are his). Plenty of Barack, Sr,’s blood relatives would jump at the chance to spit in a vial for $5. Is the security around his daughters so tight that it wouldn’t be possible to get some object with their DNA on it?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Alden

    , @Jack D
    @JimB

    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.

    Replies: @lysias, @JimB

  14. My Sunday school teacher when I was a yute was a Delaware corporate lawyer who was appointed to the Federal court at age 41 and then upwards to the Court of Appeals.

    Hillary Clinton: passed Arkansas Bar Exam on her first attempt, flunked tough DC Bar Exam on her only try, which is probably why she moved to Arkansas and married Bill.

    HRC may also have realized that she had peed her bed in DC after pretty much getting thrown off the committee investigating Watergate for unethical behavior. Of course, that would have required some introspection and self criticism, so Nah.

  15. Unfortunately, the University of Central Florida is trying to fire professor Professor Charles Negy because he retweeted one of Steve’s essay in Taki’s Magazine, The Bonfire of the Insanities. Link: https://quillette.com/2020/08/13/the-floridian-inquisition/ .

  16. Maybe Neil Kinnock took it for him.

  17. Who cares about Joe’s bar exam history? He’s going to dismantle “systemic racism.”

    http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/

  18. I keep hearing about the Bar Exam being soooooo tough. Here is a deal I am willing to make:

    I will take the Bar exam in any State the Lawyers are willing to designate. In return, said lawyer takes the Comptia A+, CCCNA and CCNA Security exams and we will see the relative difference in performance. ( And yes, I passed all three the first time. I did not kill them, but I passed.)

    BTW, there is NO issue of fraud or cheating on those exams. You go into them with two forms of ID, get photographed before and after, checked for contraband (in test terms) before you go into the room for the exam, and take the exam with a camera on you the whole time.

    Picker up, lawyerly buttercups, you don’t know what a tough exam is.BTW, you don’t have enough time to easily complete the exams, and you don’t get to jump around on the CCNA’s: you answer the Question, you are done. Something 20 questions down the road jogs your memory, tough.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @theMann

    Yes, Mr. Mann, you are Smart. Satisfied?

    , @anon
    @theMann


    I keep hearing about the Bar Exam being soooooo tough. Here is a deal I am willing to make:

    I will take the Bar exam in any State the Lawyers are willing to designate. In return, said lawyer takes the Comptia A+, CCCNA and CCNA Security exams and we will see the relative difference in performance.
     
    What classes can one take that are relevant to the subject matter?
  19. OT.

    In the desperate attempt to keep the Panicdemic going. The Grauniad headlines

    “New Zealand active cases rise to 69”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/aug/16/coronavirus-live-news-australia-close-to-vaccine-deal-england-scraps-public-health-agency

    You couldn’t make this shit up.

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Bill Jones

    Yep, the pandemic just mysteriously died out for no f***ing reason in New Zealand, proof we should listen to geniuses like Bill Jones who know it's not a problem.

  20. @JimB
    @JimB

    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Calvin Hobbes, @Jack D

    50 years ago. Doesnt practice, hasnt ever really, so pointless.

  21. He was smart in his thirties and probably would have thought anyone in their sixties was long in the tooth for political office. Actually he did say that while 29 years old.

    And it won him the senate seat against a supposedly impregnable opponent (Three terms as U.S. Representative from Delaware, two terms as Governor of Delaware, and two terms as U.S. Senator from Delaware). Biden turned 30 just in time to take up his seat. That’s right, while questioning his opponent’s age Biden was under legal age to be a Senator.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Caleb_Boggs#United_States_Senator

    Biden waged an energetic campaign, questioning Boggs’s age and ability, and went on to defeat Boggs by approximately 1.4 percentage points.

    “An astounding upset”.

    Live by the sword …

    • Replies: @Indiana Jack
    @Sean

    Wow. It looks like Biden claimed that his opponent was too old for the Senate at 63 years of age... 14 years younger than Biden is now.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @anon
    @Sean

    Slippery Joey McGill. C’mon, it’s all good, man.

  22. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    Who was the smartest president?

    Hoover, by a country mile.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @dearieme

    Hoover, by a country mile.

    I don't know about that, Thomas Jefferson seems like a pretty intelligent fellow.

  23. @JimB

    Therefore, my bet would be that Joe passed the tough Delaware bar exam in July 1968 on his one and only try.
     
    Or someone claiming to be Joe Biden passed it in Delaware in 1969, just as somebody claiming to be Edward Kennedy passed it in Virginia in 1959. Remember that Kennedy had a track record for paying others to take his tests, and id forgery was pretty easy in the 1960s.

    Replies: @JimB, @James Braxton

    Oddly, the online member search function of the Delaware Bar Association has been suspended. No reason given on the website.

    In every other state you can look up every attorney and see their bar status and admit date.

  24. Slightly OT, they’re having a field day in the comments section of this article in the Daily Mail. Barack Obama’s wealthy black friend from Chicago is prepping Barack’s new retirement palace right by the sea in Hawaii. Right by the sea. As though sea levels won’t be rising much after all. Same deal at Martha’s Vineyard.

    https://mol.im/a/8631723

    Right at sea level, plus armed security, plus…a WALL. As one reader points out, Obama selects island locations where third-world migrants aren’t likely to be swarming. Another asks: How can you retire from doing nothing?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @HammerJack

    Hammer, being at the sea level, with the future rise in sea level a given, probbaly adds to Michelle's depression. So much to worry about,

  25. Intelligence is not effective at preventing dementia.

  26. @JimB
    @JimB

    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Calvin Hobbes, @Jack D

    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?

    Could that still be done? It’s kind of amazing that Biden is leading in the polls in spite of his obvious dementia ( and all the other scuzzy stuff), but maybe the race would flip if it were proven that Joe had a ringer take his bar exam. At the very least, it would be fun seeing the NYT, et al, try to spin that.

    Off-topic but iStevey, who was Obama’s real father? Maybe it was Barack, Sr., but the marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr., was some sort of sham, so maybe not.

    (Stanley Ann lit off for Seattle shortly after the birth of Baby Barack, away from both her “husband” and her parents, and then returned about the same time Barack, Sr., left Hawaii. It looks like Hawaii was not big enough for both Stanley Ann and her “husband”.)

    A DNA sample from Barack, Jr., or one of his daughters could clinch that case (assuming that his daughters really are his). Plenty of Barack, Sr,’s blood relatives would jump at the chance to spit in a vial for $5. Is the security around his daughters so tight that it wouldn’t be possible to get some object with their DNA on it?

    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
    @Calvin Hobbes

    One reason to think that Barack Sr. was the father is that Barack Jr. visited relatives (?) in Kenya. Supposedly Barack Sr came back to Hawaii later and visited his (ex?) wife and son (?).

    But here’s a wild theory that just occurred to me. Maybe Barack Sr. was not the father but thought he was the father, and little Barack was told Barack Sr. was his father.Maybe Stanley Ann got knocked up by another black guy (Frank Marshall Davis comes to mind) and then got Barack Sr to have sex with her (How hard would that have been?) and told him he was the dad. Maybe Barack Sr. even gets paid to marry her so that the kid is not a bastard.

    This is an extremely crazy theory, but the whole situation was so weird that maybe the underlying truth is extremely crazy somehow. Maybe not exactly this way, but maybe some other extremely crazy way.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Alden
    @Calvin Hobbes

    His father could be Frank Marshall Davis; best friend of commie grandpa Dunham and head of the communist party of Hawaii such as it was. At some angles, Obama resembles Davis.

    But, Davis was very light skinned, more butterscotch than caramel. Anne Dunham was very fair skinned. Obama is just too dark to be the child of those 2. Their child would have more of a Cory Booker very light skin color.

    I’m very familiar with those greatest generation communists. They did push their daughters and young women members of the party to have children with black men to produce mulatto children to lead the black masses to revolt.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

  27. @Calvin Hobbes
    @JimB


    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?
     
    Could that still be done? It’s kind of amazing that Biden is leading in the polls in spite of his obvious dementia ( and all the other scuzzy stuff), but maybe the race would flip if it were proven that Joe had a ringer take his bar exam. At the very least, it would be fun seeing the NYT, et al, try to spin that.

    Off-topic but iStevey, who was Obama’s real father? Maybe it was Barack, Sr., but the marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr., was some sort of sham, so maybe not.

    (Stanley Ann lit off for Seattle shortly after the birth of Baby Barack, away from both her “husband” and her parents, and then returned about the same time Barack, Sr., left Hawaii. It looks like Hawaii was not big enough for both Stanley Ann and her “husband”.)

    A DNA sample from Barack, Jr., or one of his daughters could clinch that case (assuming that his daughters really are his). Plenty of Barack, Sr,’s blood relatives would jump at the chance to spit in a vial for $5. Is the security around his daughters so tight that it wouldn’t be possible to get some object with their DNA on it?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Alden

    One reason to think that Barack Sr. was the father is that Barack Jr. visited relatives (?) in Kenya. Supposedly Barack Sr came back to Hawaii later and visited his (ex?) wife and son (?).

    But here’s a wild theory that just occurred to me. Maybe Barack Sr. was not the father but thought he was the father, and little Barack was told Barack Sr. was his father.Maybe Stanley Ann got knocked up by another black guy (Frank Marshall Davis comes to mind) and then got Barack Sr to have sex with her (How hard would that have been?) and told him he was the dad. Maybe Barack Sr. even gets paid to marry her so that the kid is not a bastard.

    This is an extremely crazy theory, but the whole situation was so weird that maybe the underlying truth is extremely crazy somehow. Maybe not exactly this way, but maybe some other extremely crazy way.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Calvin Hobbes

    At the time BO was conceived, the Dunhams had lived on Oahu for all of five months. Frank Marshall Davis and his wife lived at that time about 15 miles away from the Dunhams and he was then self-employed running a distributorship. He was 37 years older than Stanley Ann Dunham, 55 to her 18. Barack Obama Sr. was, like Stanley Ann, enrolled at the University of Hawaii and there are to this day people then enrolled there who will attest that the two were in the same circle. He was six years her senior.

    Frank Marshall Davis was a known friend of Ann Dunham's father, but not at that time. A dozen years later. There would have been in 1960 about 3,000 black males on Oahu capable of siring a child, so it's arbitrary to identify Frank Marshall Davis as the sire.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Buffalo Joe

  28. Anonymous[187] • Disclaimer says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    FDR set both the United States and Europe on the path to destruction by entering the United States into World War II.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden – Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    You need to be sharper now than you used to be because America’s institutions are now under the sway of hostile foreign interests.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  29. There is no educational requirement for someone to be President, right? I mean, a high school dropout could become President.

  30. Everybody NEEDS to watch Lovecraft country tonight

    IT is directed by Jordan Peele and examines the eldritch evils of whiteness and the malice it entails

    https://www.npr.org/2020/08/16/901256615/lovecraft-country-facing-monsters-and-a-monstrous-history

  31. Do freemasons need to pass the bar at all? I mean, it’s just a formality for them, right? Wink, wink!

  32. One of the most important talents for a politician is to be able to tell a lie with a straight face. It is particularly necessary to claim other people’s work and achievements as your own.

    Cheating in the bar exam at a young age would indicate incipient high level political skills.

    There are numerous politicians of whom it has been alleged that they cheated in exams.

    In fact, it is a standard part of the politician curriculum vitae, along with having been admitted to top colleges in exchange for donations by wealthy parents, and being given military postings as swimming instructors in international hot spots of international ̶t̶o̶u̶r̶i̶s̶m̶ terrorism like Hawai’i and Bermuda.

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-last-of-the-kennedy-dynasty/

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • LOL: Jus' Sayin'...
    • Replies: @Bugg
    @Jonathan Mason

    As it happens a very good friend worked with JFK Jr. at the NY County DA's office and became close friends with him. He may not have been an academic genius, but everything I learned about him was he was actually a very decent guy. His various cousins, on the other hand...

    Was told when he finally did pass the bar during the 1989 exam, he was given a private area away form everyone else at the Javits Center. In fairness nobody has ever said he was helped. Nobody taking the bar exam those days much cared that there was a celebrity in their midst. May be it was a curiosity for 5 minutes, but the bar exam was such a pain in the ass and you wanted it over with in the worst way.

    Replies: @JimB

    , @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    In fact, it is a standard part of the politician curriculum vitae, along with having been admitted to top colleges in exchange for donations by wealthy parents, and being given military postings as swimming instructors in international hot spots of international ̶t̶o̶u̶r̶i̶s̶m̶ terrorism like Hawai’i and Bermuda.

    It isn't a standard part. Joseph P. Kennedy was exceptionally unscrupulous and his indulged son gross even in that matrix. NB, one of Ted Kennedy's brothers was killed in action during the 2d World War and another was a combat veteran. Same deal with his sister's husbands: one was killed in action and one saw combat.

    In fairness to Joseph P. Kennedy, at the time he was working the phones to keep his son out of Korea, he'd lost one child to combat and another to a plane crash. A third was in a near-vegetative state consequent to his investment in quack psychosurgery. A fourth was on borrowed time due to Addison's disease.

    Replies: @BB753

    , @Anonymous
    @Jonathan Mason

    I have often thought that Trump’s orange tanning spray is used to avoid Blushing and turning redfaced when lying. Obama never had to worry about that. Clinton used to turn red as an apple when lying. Pols have learned since him.

  33. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    I’m conflicted as well. Biden and Harris are probably the least academically qualified candidates in my lifetime. But as a society we’ve become overly obsessed with academia. It would be great to see more non-Ivy types rising to leadership.

    But whoever it is that breaks the mould should have at least some other positive quality going for them. I can’t see any with these two.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Redman

    "But whoever it is that breaks the mould should have at least some other positive quality going for them. I can’t see any with these two."

    Joe Diapers makes hilarious gaffes, especially as his Alzheimer's progresses, so he has that going for him. Kum One Kum All'Ya is your standard cardboard cutout Angry Black Woman.

    , @CJ
    @Redman

    True enough. Trump, Pence, Biden, Harris - not an Ivy Leaguer among them, unless you count Trump’s MBA at Wharton. Rather surprising really.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  34. Wilmington–isn’t that where the final scene of “Fight Club” is set?

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @For what it's worth

    The first rule of filming Fight Club is that you do not talk about filming Fight Club.

  35. I’ve noticed several comments in previous threads saying that Biden trounced Paul Ryan in their VP debate. That was the takeaway, but I watched it and recall Joe’s technique as mostly eye-rolling, silent laughing, and shaking his head incredulously as Ryan made his wonky points. Ryan didn’t respond to Biden’s clownish behavior, which made him look weak, like the nerd being bullied by the jock.

    The audience wants to see a candidate react like a normal human being. When Bush 2 debated Gore, Gore did a weird thing, obviously pre-planned. While Bush was talking, he left his lectern and walked over to stand beside him. This was probably some dominance posture suggested to him by his consultant Naomi Wolf. Bush just looked over at him, then turned back, smiled, and shook his head. It as a perfect dismissive response that made Gore look foolish.

    It’s striking how much difference these little moments make.

    • Agree: Sean
    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @Harry Baldwin

    The best way to deal with Biden in a debate is to be a crazy attacker.

    Ryan's calm demeanor and attempts to persuade using logic was exactly the wrong approach.

    Biden needs to be put on the defensive, particularly forced to defend his morality.

    Get Biden off his high horse and he becomes the real cripple that he is.

    , @Thomas
    @Harry Baldwin


    Ryan didn’t respond to Biden’s clownish behavior, which made him look weak, like the nerd being bullied by the jock.
     
    Paul Ryan was last seen defending the honor of Stormy Daniels from that mean ol' Chad Trump calling her "horseface."
    , @Bugg
    @Harry Baldwin

    All true. But the only time Ryan perked up was at the mention of expanding the US troop presence in Afghanistan.

    As awful as Obama and Biden were, Romney and Ryan have since shown themselves to be worthless Chamber of Commerce toolbags. Operationally things would have been little different.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  36. FWIW I am an attorney in Wilmington. I have never heard any rumor that Joe failed the bar exam on his first try, or that he hired a ringer to take it for him. (Doesn’t mean it didn’t happen, just that it’s not an open secret in the guild.)

    Once you pass the bar exam, you are required to complete an orientation period called a clerkship, currently five months, under the supervision of an experienced attorney. Time interning before taking the bar exam can count toward that, so it’s common for people to pass the bar in July and be admitted in December of the same year. Also not uncommon for them to pass the bar in July and not be admitted until March or April the following year, if they don’t start working until after taking the bar exam.

    It is pretty well known in town that Joe’s late son Beau passed the Delaware bar on his fourth attempt, which didn’t stop him from being elected attorney general twice. Joe’s other son Hunter is a member of the Connecticut bar, don’t think he ever tried the Delaware bar exam.

  37. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    FDR wasn’t a great president, he was a bastard who took a leading role in starting WWII and getting an unwilling American populace involved. He can rot in Hell next to Wilson

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Pop Warner


    FDR wasn’t a great president, he was a bastard who took a leading role in starting WWII and getting an unwilling American populace involved. He can rot in Hell next to Wilson
     
    Agreed.
    , @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey
    @Pop Warner

    Correct. Eamon de Valera in Ireland is very underrated for this reason. Saved a lot of lives.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Hibernian

    , @BB753
    @Pop Warner

    Don't forget Harry "Hiroshima" Truman and his bloody pointless Korean War, LBJ and the Vietnam War mess, and our current Middle-Eastern quagmire, legacy of the Bushes and Obama. All warmongers and war profiteers.

  38. @The Alarmist
    You are assuming that "Fast and Loose Joe" actually sat for his own bar exam. Who's to say in that day of easier ID requirements that he didn't use a ringer?

    Replies: @Anonymouse, @Anonymous

    Very common in those days. I am not speaking from hearsay. Not even a driver’s license was asked for in the case of taking the Graduate Record Exam and a US Navy aptitude test, it was almost like an honor system. Perhaps not true of the typical state Bar exam. Perhaps an enterprising journalist might locate someone who took a Bar exam for a friend at the approximate date when Biden passed the bar exam. That would strongly argue that Joe had someone take the exam for him.

    Ted Kennedy had a ringer take his final for a Spanish class at Harvard as an undergraduate and the imposture was revealed. Kennedy was not exactly expelled, he was rusticated and allowed back in after 1 or 2 years. This was well known at Harvard where I was a graduate student 1959-63. I see that that charming anecdote is omitted from the Wikipedia article on him. That fact was brought up in his initial run for Senator but got no traction and he was easily elected being a Kennedy.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Anonymouse


    I see that that charming anecdote is omitted from the Wikipedia article on him.
     
    I'm looking at it right now and it is there.
    , @R.G. Camara
    @Anonymouse

    The Kennedy School of Government came into being because of Ted Kennedy.

    Not because he donated the money to start it or spearheaded its development.

    But because Harvard was going to flunk him out/expel him. So Joe Sr. (Teddy, Bobby, and JFK's father) donated enough money for a new spook school. Because those lace-curtain Boston Irish Kennedy's couldn't have their kids getting any sheepskin from anywhere but Harvard.

    Replies: @Nachum

  39. OT but the latest attempt to deplatform the Oriental Observer has been succesfully circumvented. The establishment has been trying to silence Kevin McDonald for years now. The usual sources of internet funding, e.g., Paypal and credit card transactions have been denied him. If you value free speech now might be a good time to make a financial commitment.

    The Occidental Observer
    1750 Delta Waters Rd Suite 102, #374
    Medford, OR 97504

    Note: If you send a check or money order to the above address and do not wish to be anonymous, we would like to acknowledge your contribution. The easiest way to do this is by email. Please include an email address with your donation if you would like us to acknowledge it personally. Thanks!

    Bitcoin deposit address:

    Bitcoin address: 1GT1vz7r6M7chwKBMjA6Ja4yFhXFdaPS2C

    Monero: 82wiYzDYbusKXKyARveSxE1nGMzYywLt2JJnaR1V3jX1Weq9vBJFpJGeDn3RvPzCeTRwAgh1D6oj41MU8RKTk5FYJPGk1C4

    Z-Cash: t1PX1N1A7BUPLxYed3zz9WzPmyYRikCKtdX

    DASH: Xm6fGaGrX64yyGYNf1tGd2BoshRXdUvFcV

  40. He passed the Delaware bar exam over half a century ago, but nowadays he could probably not “pass” a test examining age-related cognitive decline.

  41. My understanding from 1989 is the bar exam is given nationally over 2 days,3 days if you take the exam of a second state. There’s a national part on the first day which is multiple choice followed by specific state exams administered over the next 2 days. Different states weight the national part in different formulas. Personally I did not do well on the national part but aced the NY part on my first try. Other people in my office did better on the national part but ultimately flunked the NY portion. I was admitted they had to take the exam all over again.It’s a very bizarre system because federal or “national” practice is very limited while the state you live and work in is ultimately what matters. Plus it tests esoteric fields of law that don’t have much day to day application. One of the 6 essays was on sureties, which is something most lawyers can figure out in a half hour, but not something most people prepped for. Was lucky the prep class I took somehow did.

  42. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, in Portland, Andy Ngô continues to do a great job reporting the nightly attempts at mayhem committed by ardent sociopaths, and the police officers who subdue them:

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294915598678294528?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294898198922670081?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294901716853198850?s=20

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @TWS

    Thank you and a particular thanks to Andy Ngo who puts his well-being on the line for truth and freedom.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  43. @Jonathan Mason
    One of the most important talents for a politician is to be able to tell a lie with a straight face. It is particularly necessary to claim other people's work and achievements as your own.

    Cheating in the bar exam at a young age would indicate incipient high level political skills.

    There are numerous politicians of whom it has been alleged that they cheated in exams.

    In fact, it is a standard part of the politician curriculum vitae, along with having been admitted to top colleges in exchange for donations by wealthy parents, and being given military postings as swimming instructors in international hot spots of international ̶t̶o̶u̶r̶i̶s̶m̶ terrorism like Hawai'i and Bermuda.


    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-last-of-the-kennedy-dynasty/

    Replies: @Bugg, @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    As it happens a very good friend worked with JFK Jr. at the NY County DA’s office and became close friends with him. He may not have been an academic genius, but everything I learned about him was he was actually a very decent guy. His various cousins, on the other hand…

    Was told when he finally did pass the bar during the 1989 exam, he was given a private area away form everyone else at the Javits Center. In fairness nobody has ever said he was helped. Nobody taking the bar exam those days much cared that there was a celebrity in their midst. May be it was a curiosity for 5 minutes, but the bar exam was such a pain in the ass and you wanted it over with in the worst way.

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Bugg


    As it happens a very good friend worked with JFK Jr. at the NY County DA’s office and became close friends with him. He may not have been an academic genius, but everything I learned about him was he was actually a very decent guy.
     
    Probably JFK Jr. inherited his disposition from his lovely mother.
  44. @Harry Baldwin
    I've noticed several comments in previous threads saying that Biden trounced Paul Ryan in their VP debate. That was the takeaway, but I watched it and recall Joe's technique as mostly eye-rolling, silent laughing, and shaking his head incredulously as Ryan made his wonky points. Ryan didn't respond to Biden's clownish behavior, which made him look weak, like the nerd being bullied by the jock.

    The audience wants to see a candidate react like a normal human being. When Bush 2 debated Gore, Gore did a weird thing, obviously pre-planned. While Bush was talking, he left his lectern and walked over to stand beside him. This was probably some dominance posture suggested to him by his consultant Naomi Wolf. Bush just looked over at him, then turned back, smiled, and shook his head. It as a perfect dismissive response that made Gore look foolish.

    It's striking how much difference these little moments make.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @Thomas, @Bugg

    The best way to deal with Biden in a debate is to be a crazy attacker.

    Ryan’s calm demeanor and attempts to persuade using logic was exactly the wrong approach.

    Biden needs to be put on the defensive, particularly forced to defend his morality.

    Get Biden off his high horse and he becomes the real cripple that he is.

  45. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover’s league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
    @Art Deco

    Slate star codex has a good piece on Hoover. The guy was a friggin' genius and a force of nature. Sadly, like a lot of high IQ white Americans, he had a soft spot for white Europeans and actually saved 000's of thousands of them from starvation. A gesture they wouldn't return in a billion years. And it seems his soft spot for hungry people didn't extend to Americans in 1931.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @Anonymous
    @Art Deco


    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon.
     
    What about Jefferson?
  46. @Harry Baldwin
    I've noticed several comments in previous threads saying that Biden trounced Paul Ryan in their VP debate. That was the takeaway, but I watched it and recall Joe's technique as mostly eye-rolling, silent laughing, and shaking his head incredulously as Ryan made his wonky points. Ryan didn't respond to Biden's clownish behavior, which made him look weak, like the nerd being bullied by the jock.

    The audience wants to see a candidate react like a normal human being. When Bush 2 debated Gore, Gore did a weird thing, obviously pre-planned. While Bush was talking, he left his lectern and walked over to stand beside him. This was probably some dominance posture suggested to him by his consultant Naomi Wolf. Bush just looked over at him, then turned back, smiled, and shook his head. It as a perfect dismissive response that made Gore look foolish.

    It's striking how much difference these little moments make.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @Thomas, @Bugg

    Ryan didn’t respond to Biden’s clownish behavior, which made him look weak, like the nerd being bullied by the jock.

    Paul Ryan was last seen defending the honor of Stormy Daniels from that mean ol’ Chad Trump calling her “horseface.”

  47. @Harry Baldwin
    I've noticed several comments in previous threads saying that Biden trounced Paul Ryan in their VP debate. That was the takeaway, but I watched it and recall Joe's technique as mostly eye-rolling, silent laughing, and shaking his head incredulously as Ryan made his wonky points. Ryan didn't respond to Biden's clownish behavior, which made him look weak, like the nerd being bullied by the jock.

    The audience wants to see a candidate react like a normal human being. When Bush 2 debated Gore, Gore did a weird thing, obviously pre-planned. While Bush was talking, he left his lectern and walked over to stand beside him. This was probably some dominance posture suggested to him by his consultant Naomi Wolf. Bush just looked over at him, then turned back, smiled, and shook his head. It as a perfect dismissive response that made Gore look foolish.

    It's striking how much difference these little moments make.

    Replies: @Justvisiting, @Thomas, @Bugg

    All true. But the only time Ryan perked up was at the mention of expanding the US troop presence in Afghanistan.

    As awful as Obama and Biden were, Romney and Ryan have since shown themselves to be worthless Chamber of Commerce toolbags. Operationally things would have been little different.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Bugg

    Agree, and I despise Paul Ryan more than I do most Democrats. He was wrong about nearly everything and did us tremendous damage.

  48. @Mr McKenna

    But one downstream effect of Delaware taking law seriously is that its bar exam is usually one of the hardest to pass in the country. At present, it requires the highest score to pass, with California second.
     


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.
     
    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn't very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.

    What about race-norming? Is that done yet, and why not? Restorative Justice!

    Replies: @Tlotsi, @jon, @RadicalCenter, @Jack D

    I’d be more impressed to hear these politicians passed the CPA exam on the first try.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  49. @The Alarmist
    You are assuming that "Fast and Loose Joe" actually sat for his own bar exam. Who's to say in that day of easier ID requirements that he didn't use a ringer?

    Replies: @Anonymouse, @Anonymous

    Given he is the son of a Used Car Salesman, Hunter Biden’s shenanigans and the shady business dealing of Joe’s brothers, that certainly seems plausible.

  50. @Jonathan Mason
    One of the most important talents for a politician is to be able to tell a lie with a straight face. It is particularly necessary to claim other people's work and achievements as your own.

    Cheating in the bar exam at a young age would indicate incipient high level political skills.

    There are numerous politicians of whom it has been alleged that they cheated in exams.

    In fact, it is a standard part of the politician curriculum vitae, along with having been admitted to top colleges in exchange for donations by wealthy parents, and being given military postings as swimming instructors in international hot spots of international ̶t̶o̶u̶r̶i̶s̶m̶ terrorism like Hawai'i and Bermuda.


    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-last-of-the-kennedy-dynasty/

    Replies: @Bugg, @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    In fact, it is a standard part of the politician curriculum vitae, along with having been admitted to top colleges in exchange for donations by wealthy parents, and being given military postings as swimming instructors in international hot spots of international ̶t̶o̶u̶r̶i̶s̶m̶ terrorism like Hawai’i and Bermuda.

    It isn’t a standard part. Joseph P. Kennedy was exceptionally unscrupulous and his indulged son gross even in that matrix. NB, one of Ted Kennedy’s brothers was killed in action during the 2d World War and another was a combat veteran. Same deal with his sister’s husbands: one was killed in action and one saw combat.

    In fairness to Joseph P. Kennedy, at the time he was working the phones to keep his son out of Korea, he’d lost one child to combat and another to a plane crash. A third was in a near-vegetative state consequent to his investment in quack psychosurgery. A fourth was on borrowed time due to Addison’s disease.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Art Deco

    Ah, the good old times when plutocrats had to actually send their sons in combat or be shunned by society!

    Replies: @syonredux

  51. @Jonathan Mason
    One of the most important talents for a politician is to be able to tell a lie with a straight face. It is particularly necessary to claim other people's work and achievements as your own.

    Cheating in the bar exam at a young age would indicate incipient high level political skills.

    There are numerous politicians of whom it has been alleged that they cheated in exams.

    In fact, it is a standard part of the politician curriculum vitae, along with having been admitted to top colleges in exchange for donations by wealthy parents, and being given military postings as swimming instructors in international hot spots of international ̶t̶o̶u̶r̶i̶s̶m̶ terrorism like Hawai'i and Bermuda.


    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-last-of-the-kennedy-dynasty/

    Replies: @Bugg, @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    I have often thought that Trump’s orange tanning spray is used to avoid Blushing and turning redfaced when lying. Obama never had to worry about that. Clinton used to turn red as an apple when lying. Pols have learned since him.

  52. Lunch Box Joe is a political whore.

    Liar, Plagiarist, Braggart, Phony, Fraud.

    Biden hasn’t earned the benefit of a doubt.

    I say Neil Kinnock took the bar exam for Biden.

  53. @Mr McKenna

    But one downstream effect of Delaware taking law seriously is that its bar exam is usually one of the hardest to pass in the country. At present, it requires the highest score to pass, with California second.
     


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.
     
    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn't very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.

    What about race-norming? Is that done yet, and why not? Restorative Justice!

    Replies: @Tlotsi, @jon, @RadicalCenter, @Jack D

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere.

    Ding, ding, ding! We have a winner. I took the supposedly tough California bar and I and about 90% most of my classmates passed on the first try. And I didn’t go to Berkeley or Stanford, so I had plenty of dim classmates. Non-lawyers are always overly impressed by the bar exam.

    • Agree: S. Anonyia
    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @jon

    Right. Lots of lawyers in my family and many of them don’t come across as terribly bright. None failed the bar exam.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  54. @Art Deco
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Agreed. The main brains in the President's chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover's league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.

    Replies: @Bragadocious, @Anonymous

    Slate star codex has a good piece on Hoover. The guy was a friggin’ genius and a force of nature. Sadly, like a lot of high IQ white Americans, he had a soft spot for white Europeans and actually saved 000’s of thousands of them from starvation. A gesture they wouldn’t return in a billion years. And it seems his soft spot for hungry people didn’t extend to Americans in 1931.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Bragadocious


    Slate star codex has a good piece on Hoover
     
    Warning for those inclined to read it: it is VERY long, even by SSC standards.
  55. @RichardTaylor
    Gosh, I hope things keep going well for our friends in Delaware. They are so awfully smart and do so much for the rest of us.

    A proud history of being good to Americans.

    Be sad if something horrible happened to them.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @Percy Gryce

    You said it. How reassuring to have people running who can relate to regular people and really really care about us!

    Dimwit Joe Biden, the Senator from MBNA, and Hooker Harris with her THREE homes worth a combined EIGHT MILLION DOLLARS (per the Crook Street Journal’s sickening “Mansion” section a few days ago).

    • Replies: @vinny
    @RadicalCenter

    Better vote for Trump, the candidate for people who hate real estate wealth (!?).

  56. @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    In fact, it is a standard part of the politician curriculum vitae, along with having been admitted to top colleges in exchange for donations by wealthy parents, and being given military postings as swimming instructors in international hot spots of international ̶t̶o̶u̶r̶i̶s̶m̶ terrorism like Hawai’i and Bermuda.

    It isn't a standard part. Joseph P. Kennedy was exceptionally unscrupulous and his indulged son gross even in that matrix. NB, one of Ted Kennedy's brothers was killed in action during the 2d World War and another was a combat veteran. Same deal with his sister's husbands: one was killed in action and one saw combat.

    In fairness to Joseph P. Kennedy, at the time he was working the phones to keep his son out of Korea, he'd lost one child to combat and another to a plane crash. A third was in a near-vegetative state consequent to his investment in quack psychosurgery. A fourth was on borrowed time due to Addison's disease.

    Replies: @BB753

    Ah, the good old times when plutocrats had to actually send their sons in combat or be shunned by society!

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @BB753

    Yeah, one of the things that the old America had going for it was that the sons of the elite would do their bit. All of Theodore Roosevelt's sons served in combat in WW1, with the youngest (Quentin) dying in battle as a flyer. And TR's Rough Riders unit was full to the brim with haute-WASPs like Woodbury Kane:


    Woodbury Kane (February 8, 1859 – December 5, 1905)[1] was a noted yachtsman and bon vivant, and member of Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders. A director of the Metropolitan Register Company, Kane served aboard the Columbia in the 1899 America's Cup race. He also was a noted hunter of big game, both in North America and South Africa.
     

    He was a member of the New York Yacht Club (for many years serving on the club's America's Cup committee), the Metropolitan Club, the Knickerbocker Club, the Racquet Court Club, the Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht Club, the Meadowbrook Hunt Club, the Hudson River Ice Yacht Club, the Larchmont Club, and the Yacht and Country Club.
     

    Kane was born on February 8, 1859 in Newport, Rhode Island. He was one of eight children born to Oliver Delancey Kane (1816–1874) and his wife Louisa (née Langdon) Kane (1821–1894). Among his siblings were brothers were Colonel Delancey Astor Kane, and John Innes Kane, and S. Nicholson Kane. His sisters were Louisa Dorothea Kane,[2] Emily Astor (née Kane) Jay, and Sybil Kent Kane.[3][4] He was a cousin of Lt. Col. John Jacob Astor IV.[1]

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodbury_Kane

    Replies: @JMcG

  57. @Mr McKenna

    But one downstream effect of Delaware taking law seriously is that its bar exam is usually one of the hardest to pass in the country. At present, it requires the highest score to pass, with California second.
     


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.
     
    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn't very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.

    What about race-norming? Is that done yet, and why not? Restorative Justice!

    Replies: @Tlotsi, @jon, @RadicalCenter, @Jack D

    Given how many of our corrupt thug rulers (not “representatives”) are lawyers — and arrogant, busybody lawyers at that — I can understand the general sentiment against lawyers. I prefer more small business owners (or ANYONE else) in the legislatures than lawyers for sure.

    But the bar exam in california is actually difficult, in part because of the sheer number of state-law subjects covered (though recently somewhat eased, I hear) and the exam in Delaware is difficult even for intelligent, industrious people.

    A mere “majority” pass rate is not high, especially when the many, many people who don’t pass are then unable to practice law — a serious problem, quickly, for the majority of them who have substantial student loans coming due in months.

  58. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, in Portland, Andy Ngô continues to do a great job reporting the nightly attempts at mayhem committed by ardent sociopaths, and the police officers who subdue them:

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294915598678294528?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294898198922670081?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294901716853198850?s=20

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @TWS

    The CPD is FINALLY beginning to act as cops; I wonder if Macy’s threat to bug out got to Mayor Lightfooot that this is very, VERY BAD what she is doing.

  59. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    Good point.

    As far as Ms. Harris, what is the single most important job of a VP candidate?

    To help get the ticket elected.

    Since Biden chose Harris:

    1. Silicon Valley big money donors have contributed large amounts of money.

    2. Biden’s poll numbers have gone up among women.

    3. Biden’s poll numbers have improved slightly among African Americans. Recall that if Hillary Clinton had done as well among black voters as Obama, she would have carried Wisconsin. Having Harris on the ticket could carry Wisconsin for Biden.

    4. The level of support for Biden among Desis (dot Indians) and West Indians has skyrocketed. Note that Florida has a large West Indian population. It is possible that the extra black, Desi and West Indian voters in Florida could carry the state for Biden.

    Who cares what Harris’ IQ is?

    She is bringing in large amounts of money and some extra votes in crucial swing states. That is what is important now. The most brilliant and capable VP candidates are worthless if they don’t get elected.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Paleo Liberal


    It is possible that the extra black, Desi and West Indian voters in Florida could carry the state for Biden
     
    Trump’s idiotic FICA tax holiday, and his pledging to repeal the FICA tax altogether has probably already doomed him in Florida. Especially considering he was the only Republican candidate in 2016 that pledged not to touch Social Security.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  60. @Jonathan Mason
    a lot of these politician lawyers will have been more involved in politics and other extracurricular activities than in studying when they were in law school, and so may not have been all that well prepared when they came to take the bar exam.

    In some cases they probably only started studying law seriously after they failed the bar exam the first time.

    Replies: @jon

    a lot of these politician lawyers will have been more involved in politics and other extracurricular activities than in studying when they were in law school, and so may not have been all that well prepared when they came to take the bar exam.

    Everyone preps for the bar exam by taking a crash course during the summer after graduation. After the mandatory first year courses (that are pretty much identical at every law school and that are all on the bar exam) nobody takes that many subjects that will be on the bar exam. There are too many topics, and they are too different from each other. So most of what you are being tested on are legal topics that you first learned in the month prior to the exam (and that you will never look at again after the bar). You can see the topics for the California bar here: http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Admissions/Examinations/California-Bar-Examination/California-Bar-Examination-Scope

    • Replies: @Carol
    @jon

    Yes thank God for BAR-BRI. I never knew so much useful law as I learned there. We had an 80% pass rate.

    The accounting grads were really left hanging when the CPA exam prep pulled out here. I knew people who traveled out of state to take it, multiple times, but never passed.

  61. @Mr McKenna

    But one downstream effect of Delaware taking law seriously is that its bar exam is usually one of the hardest to pass in the country. At present, it requires the highest score to pass, with California second.
     


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.
     
    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn't very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.

    What about race-norming? Is that done yet, and why not? Restorative Justice!

    Replies: @Tlotsi, @jon, @RadicalCenter, @Jack D

    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.

    You could conclude that but you would be wrong. For example, only 5% of blacks passed the Feb 20 Cal. bar exam, vs. 52% (the majority) of whites:

    https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/06/only-5-of-black-first-time-takers-passed-february-california-bar-exam-compared-to-52-of-whites-4.html

    The reason the majority of whites pass is that even though this exam is tough, whites have been at least double filtered by the time they take the test. First of all, they are filtered by having to get into law school and then they are filtered by having to make it thru 3 years of law school and even then only maybe 1/2 of them pass on the first try (generally speaking these are the folks that are in the top 50% of their law school class – blacks are almost always in the bottom half with very rare exceptions). You are talking about an exam that maybe 95% of the US population could never pass – not only does it require tremendous memorization of the law but also the ability to analyze and apply a fact pattern to the law under considerable time pressure.

    I don’t know what Biden’s story is. Based upon his class rank at Syracuse (near the bottom) he would not have been expected to pass in Del. on his first try. Maybe as someone said he had someone else take it for him. Maybe he got lucky. Maybe Joe’s big problem was motivation – his college grades were tremendously variable but he did well in a few courses, which could indicate that he can do well when he wants to but is usually not focused enough. Maybe he got focused this time.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @Jack D

    Taking a test and taking a class are different skills.

    I’ve known people who are great at standardized tests but almost flunk out of school. I’ve known others who were stellar students but couldn’t do well at standardized tests.

    Using concentration has something to do with it. Someone with ADD can hang together for a test. Someone who is extremely well organized does better in the classroom.

    , @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    That's the February exam. Those are the people who skipped or failed the exam given the previous July.

    , @Marty
    @Jack D

    In the early ‘80’s, 87% of takers from my class at respected but not really first-tier CA school passed the June bar on the first try. I was one of them, which was a surprise given my grades. Clearly, being in the top half wasn’t necessary. Years later, a friend got to know a CA bar grader. This was when the test still involved 6 essay questions. The guy said that given the number of tests he had to grade, he didn’t have time to read them all, so if the first essay or two looked passable, he just assumed the rest would be too. I’ve always thought this explained my result.

    , @HammerJack
    @Jack D

    A low pass rate among blacks most certainly does not indicate that the test is particularly hard. Are you even serious?

    Note also Art Deco's point about the February test. It's for losers and dolts, and I've known many lawyers in both categories.

    "Getting into law school" isn't a meaningful achievement. Getting into a good law school, with no fingers on the scale: that's something different.

    Replies: @Jack D, @J.Ross

  62. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    Who was the smartest president?

    That’s always a tricky one. Some of the obvious candidates are :

    John Adams

    Thomas Jefferson

    James Madison

    JQ Adams

    James Garfield

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Woodrow Wilson

    Herbert Hoover

    Richard Nixon (at 143, has the highest measured IQ of any president)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @syonredux

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ? Both TR and his cousin FDR attended but did not complete Columbia Law School.

    Rutherford B. Hayes was a graduate of Harvard Law School. Taft went on to be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. I would bet that they were both high IQ guys.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @prosa123, @syonredux, @lysias, @Hibernian

  63. @JimB
    @JimB

    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Calvin Hobbes, @Jack D

    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.

    • Replies: @lysias
    @Jack D

    I don't remember my fingerprints being taken when I took and passed the Connecticut bar exam in 1994.

    , @JimB
    @Jack D


    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.
     
    I’m assuming it was, but the existing system for finger print confirmation was clunky and would probably not be used by law firms to confirm that their hires had legitimately passed the state bar exam. An associate lawyers competence would become immediately apparent to the partners of the firm. If an associate were incompetent, he would be fired, regardless of his admission to the bar.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JimB

  64. @Art Deco
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Agreed. The main brains in the President's chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover's league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.

    Replies: @Bragadocious, @Anonymous

    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon.

    What about Jefferson?

  65. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.
     
    You could conclude that but you would be wrong. For example, only 5% of blacks passed the Feb 20 Cal. bar exam, vs. 52% (the majority) of whites:

    https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/06/only-5-of-black-first-time-takers-passed-february-california-bar-exam-compared-to-52-of-whites-4.html


    The reason the majority of whites pass is that even though this exam is tough, whites have been at least double filtered by the time they take the test. First of all, they are filtered by having to get into law school and then they are filtered by having to make it thru 3 years of law school and even then only maybe 1/2 of them pass on the first try (generally speaking these are the folks that are in the top 50% of their law school class - blacks are almost always in the bottom half with very rare exceptions). You are talking about an exam that maybe 95% of the US population could never pass - not only does it require tremendous memorization of the law but also the ability to analyze and apply a fact pattern to the law under considerable time pressure.

    I don't know what Biden's story is. Based upon his class rank at Syracuse (near the bottom) he would not have been expected to pass in Del. on his first try. Maybe as someone said he had someone else take it for him. Maybe he got lucky. Maybe Joe's big problem was motivation - his college grades were tremendously variable but he did well in a few courses, which could indicate that he can do well when he wants to but is usually not focused enough. Maybe he got focused this time.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Marty, @HammerJack

    Taking a test and taking a class are different skills.

    I’ve known people who are great at standardized tests but almost flunk out of school. I’ve known others who were stellar students but couldn’t do well at standardized tests.

    Using concentration has something to do with it. Someone with ADD can hang together for a test. Someone who is extremely well organized does better in the classroom.

  66. @syonredux
    @NJ Transit Commuter


    Who was the smartest president?
     
    That's always a tricky one. Some of the obvious candidates are :

    John Adams

    Thomas Jefferson

    James Madison

    JQ Adams

    James Garfield

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Woodrow Wilson

    Herbert Hoover


    Richard Nixon (at 143, has the highest measured IQ of any president)

    Replies: @Jack D

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ? Both TR and his cousin FDR attended but did not complete Columbia Law School.

    Rutherford B. Hayes was a graduate of Harvard Law School. Taft went on to be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. I would bet that they were both high IQ guys.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
    @Jack D


    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?
     
    There is this:

    Mathematical Treasure: James A. Garfield's Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem

    https://www.maa.org/press/periodicals/convergence/mathematical-treasure-james-a-garfields-proof-of-the-pythagorean-theorem
    , @prosa123
    @Jack D

    Garfield's intellectual accomplishments were second to none, and he might well have been one of most respected presidents had he not been assassinated.

    , @syonredux
    @Jack D


    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ?
     
    He was an accomplished amateur historian (his THE NAVAL WAR OF 1812 is a standard work in the field). And his intellect impressed pretty much everyone who knew him. Indeed, one of the reasons why Henry Adams was so annoyed by TR was that he was accustomed to being intellectually and socially superior to US presidents. TR was from the same social milieu, and, while he was probably not quite as smart as Henry, he was smart enough to rattle the grandson and great-grandson of presidents.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

     

    Garfield was extremely intelligent. He could write a sentence in Greek with one hand while simultaneously writing a sentence in Latin with the other. And he discovered a novel proof of the Pythagorean Theorem:

    James Garfield’s Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem


    http://facultyweb.kennesaw.edu/sellerme/docs/garfieldpro.pdf

    Replies: @syonredux

    , @lysias
    @Jack D

    Both Roosevelts had reason for not completing Columbia Law School. TR had been elected to the New York State assembly. FDR had passed the New York bar exam.

    , @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nachum

  67. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ? Both TR and his cousin FDR attended but did not complete Columbia Law School.

    Rutherford B. Hayes was a graduate of Harvard Law School. Taft went on to be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. I would bet that they were both high IQ guys.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @prosa123, @syonredux, @lysias, @Hibernian

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    There is this:

    Mathematical Treasure: James A. Garfield’s Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem

    https://www.maa.org/press/periodicals/convergence/mathematical-treasure-james-a-garfields-proof-of-the-pythagorean-theorem

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
  68. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ? Both TR and his cousin FDR attended but did not complete Columbia Law School.

    Rutherford B. Hayes was a graduate of Harvard Law School. Taft went on to be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. I would bet that they were both high IQ guys.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @prosa123, @syonredux, @lysias, @Hibernian

    Garfield’s intellectual accomplishments were second to none, and he might well have been one of most respected presidents had he not been assassinated.

  69. Steve, I think you are making too much of Michelle Obama’s bar entrance date. After passing the exam, one has to complete a bunch of background investigation work and, in many states, sit for an interview, and then attend an in-person swearing-in. This all takes time. From my own experience, I sat for and passed the bar exam on the first try, but my admission date is nearly 12 months after the exam took place — I was slow to get thru all the post-exam paperwork and schedule the interview and the swearing-in.

  70. @RadicalCenter
    @RichardTaylor

    You said it. How reassuring to have people running who can relate to regular people and really really care about us!

    Dimwit Joe Biden, the Senator from MBNA, and Hooker Harris with her THREE homes worth a combined EIGHT MILLION DOLLARS (per the Crook Street Journal’s sickening “Mansion” section a few days ago).

    Replies: @vinny

    Better vote for Trump, the candidate for people who hate real estate wealth (!?).

  71. @Calvin Hobbes
    @Calvin Hobbes

    One reason to think that Barack Sr. was the father is that Barack Jr. visited relatives (?) in Kenya. Supposedly Barack Sr came back to Hawaii later and visited his (ex?) wife and son (?).

    But here’s a wild theory that just occurred to me. Maybe Barack Sr. was not the father but thought he was the father, and little Barack was told Barack Sr. was his father.Maybe Stanley Ann got knocked up by another black guy (Frank Marshall Davis comes to mind) and then got Barack Sr to have sex with her (How hard would that have been?) and told him he was the dad. Maybe Barack Sr. even gets paid to marry her so that the kid is not a bastard.

    This is an extremely crazy theory, but the whole situation was so weird that maybe the underlying truth is extremely crazy somehow. Maybe not exactly this way, but maybe some other extremely crazy way.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    At the time BO was conceived, the Dunhams had lived on Oahu for all of five months. Frank Marshall Davis and his wife lived at that time about 15 miles away from the Dunhams and he was then self-employed running a distributorship. He was 37 years older than Stanley Ann Dunham, 55 to her 18. Barack Obama Sr. was, like Stanley Ann, enrolled at the University of Hawaii and there are to this day people then enrolled there who will attest that the two were in the same circle. He was six years her senior.

    Frank Marshall Davis was a known friend of Ann Dunham’s father, but not at that time. A dozen years later. There would have been in 1960 about 3,000 black males on Oahu capable of siring a child, so it’s arbitrary to identify Frank Marshall Davis as the sire.

    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
    @Art Deco

    Thanks again. I’m often impressed with your ability to cite relevant facts.

    But what do you think about this marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr.?
    And what do you think about why Stanley Ann left not only her “husband” but also her parents, to live as single mother in Seattle? I would think that an 18-year-old de facto single mother would appreciate being near (or with) her parents so that they could help out with the baby, etc. And then as soon as Barack Sr. is not in Hawaii anymore she comes back?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Art Deco

    Art, thank you, And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Reg Cæsar

  72. @BB753
    @Art Deco

    Ah, the good old times when plutocrats had to actually send their sons in combat or be shunned by society!

    Replies: @syonredux

    Yeah, one of the things that the old America had going for it was that the sons of the elite would do their bit. All of Theodore Roosevelt’s sons served in combat in WW1, with the youngest (Quentin) dying in battle as a flyer. And TR’s Rough Riders unit was full to the brim with haute-WASPs like Woodbury Kane:

    Woodbury Kane (February 8, 1859 – December 5, 1905)[1] was a noted yachtsman and bon vivant, and member of Theodore Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. A director of the Metropolitan Register Company, Kane served aboard the Columbia in the 1899 America’s Cup race. He also was a noted hunter of big game, both in North America and South Africa.

    He was a member of the New York Yacht Club (for many years serving on the club’s America’s Cup committee), the Metropolitan Club, the Knickerbocker Club, the Racquet Court Club, the Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht Club, the Meadowbrook Hunt Club, the Hudson River Ice Yacht Club, the Larchmont Club, and the Yacht and Country Club.

    Kane was born on February 8, 1859 in Newport, Rhode Island. He was one of eight children born to Oliver Delancey Kane (1816–1874) and his wife Louisa (née Langdon) Kane (1821–1894). Among his siblings were brothers were Colonel Delancey Astor Kane, and John Innes Kane, and S. Nicholson Kane. His sisters were Louisa Dorothea Kane,[2] Emily Astor (née Kane) Jay, and Sybil Kent Kane.[3][4] He was a cousin of Lt. Col. John Jacob Astor IV.[1]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodbury_Kane

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @syonredux

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class. There was a sprinkling of black sheep in there, but not too many. I was struck when reading “The First Team” ,about the Naval Aviators who fought the start of the war in the Pacific , by the fact that the names were almost all Anglo-Saxon with a bare sprinkling of Irish amongst them.
    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @Hibernian, @syonredux, @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous

  73. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.
     
    You could conclude that but you would be wrong. For example, only 5% of blacks passed the Feb 20 Cal. bar exam, vs. 52% (the majority) of whites:

    https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/06/only-5-of-black-first-time-takers-passed-february-california-bar-exam-compared-to-52-of-whites-4.html


    The reason the majority of whites pass is that even though this exam is tough, whites have been at least double filtered by the time they take the test. First of all, they are filtered by having to get into law school and then they are filtered by having to make it thru 3 years of law school and even then only maybe 1/2 of them pass on the first try (generally speaking these are the folks that are in the top 50% of their law school class - blacks are almost always in the bottom half with very rare exceptions). You are talking about an exam that maybe 95% of the US population could never pass - not only does it require tremendous memorization of the law but also the ability to analyze and apply a fact pattern to the law under considerable time pressure.

    I don't know what Biden's story is. Based upon his class rank at Syracuse (near the bottom) he would not have been expected to pass in Del. on his first try. Maybe as someone said he had someone else take it for him. Maybe he got lucky. Maybe Joe's big problem was motivation - his college grades were tremendously variable but he did well in a few courses, which could indicate that he can do well when he wants to but is usually not focused enough. Maybe he got focused this time.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Marty, @HammerJack

    That’s the February exam. Those are the people who skipped or failed the exam given the previous July.

  74. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ? Both TR and his cousin FDR attended but did not complete Columbia Law School.

    Rutherford B. Hayes was a graduate of Harvard Law School. Taft went on to be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. I would bet that they were both high IQ guys.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @prosa123, @syonredux, @lysias, @Hibernian

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ?

    He was an accomplished amateur historian (his THE NAVAL WAR OF 1812 is a standard work in the field). And his intellect impressed pretty much everyone who knew him. Indeed, one of the reasons why Henry Adams was so annoyed by TR was that he was accustomed to being intellectually and socially superior to US presidents. TR was from the same social milieu, and, while he was probably not quite as smart as Henry, he was smart enough to rattle the grandson and great-grandson of presidents.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    Garfield was extremely intelligent. He could write a sentence in Greek with one hand while simultaneously writing a sentence in Latin with the other. And he discovered a novel proof of the Pythagorean Theorem:

    James Garfield’s Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem

    http://facultyweb.kennesaw.edu/sellerme/docs/garfieldpro.pdf

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @syonredux


    Garfield was extremely intelligent. He could write a sentence in Greek with one hand while simultaneously writing a sentence in Latin with the other.
     
    I should point out that some have questioned the veracity of this particular tale,but the fact that it gained currency is another sign of Garfield's intellect.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  75. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    NJ:

    … Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. …

    Art:

    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover’s league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.

    No disagreement that absolute top flight smarts don’t magically mean … success!

    But i don’t think Hoover is “responsible for a major disaster”. Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover’s intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do… because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    FDR–not a top intellect–had no idea what to do either. His 1932 campaign included a promise to balance the budget. His efforts to solve the crisis were mediocre and ineffective. And then in 37-38 FDR put us a recession within the depression! FDR’s thuggish big state instincts snuffing out the first flames of recovery. The US absolutely wallowed in the Depression. Hitler’s efforts in Germany–the other most severely hit nation–were more effective. The US was only finally crawling out at the end of FDRs normal eight year term because of rearmament. It was overall a highly mediocre performance. One that only looks good in the afterglow of f1945.

    FDR was both economically and reputationally bailed out by the War. And the 1945 settlement left us with a 45 year “Cold War”.

    FDR was not a “great President” but rather a President during “great times”. Mediocre performance with the US economy. Perhaps missed opportunities that a stronger, more economically successful, more thoughtful President could have grasped to avoid the disaster of the War altogether? Additional IQ, and a better character might have done him–the US, the World–some good.

    ~~

    Reagan did a decent job with the Cold War although parts of his approach (ex. Nicaragua) seem needless.

    But that was basically all that occupied Reagan’s brainspace.

    During his Presidency the coup against the American people continued–ramped up! The replacement “Civil Rights” constitution, immigration, financialization, deindustrialization and trade–the US essentially aiding China’s rise and hollowing itself out.

    The most salient result of Reagan’s Presidency for the long term future of America was Simpson-Mazzoli, a complete debacle–end-to-end–for actual Americans, their children their posterity.

    And i don’t believe Reagan–in contrast to some of his successors–was disloyal. Some extra IQ points enabling more “big picture” and “long term” thinking would have come in handy.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon, sayless
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad

    Another term for "Great President" could be "Callous Bastard" - i.e., someone who is willing to sacrifice hundreds of thousands of American lives in order to be viewed by sychophantic biographers as a "Great President".

    The only great President was Washington. Some of the others were okay. Most were creeps. Reagan had some good instincts but was - like most of them, ultimately - just a tool.

    , @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    The great international political problem of the 20th century was how to unwind the British and French (and Austrian, Ottoman, Russian, Dutch, Belgian, German, US ...) Empires while accommodating the rise of Germany, Russia, Japan as nation states.

    The solution to this is nationalism and something like the post-1945 American system of open global trade.

    The nationalist thrust of Wilson's 14 points was on target. Maybe a stronger Wilson, with more cohesive American political class backing, could have usefully clarified this big picture for Europeans and helped them negotiate out of the crisis. But European leadership wasn't great, the imperialists were pig headed. Oftentimes nations--just like people--have to royally screw up.

    Unfortunately, the American intervention unaccompanied by strong leadership demanding a nationalist, and stable, settlement, just gave the British and French imperialists a few more decades of breathing space for their empires to limp on, generated German enmity and gave German and Japanese imperialist sentiments--lacking a free-nations, open-trade alternative settlement--a boost.

    More IQ all around ... couldn't have hurt.

    ~

    That said, the most important quality of a leader is that he is loyal to his nation, his people, and thus willing to work in the long term interest of the nation.

    But being able to figure out and focus on that long term interest--the problem Enoch Powell outlined so well:


    The supreme function of statesmanship is to provide against preventable evils. In seeking to do so, it encounters obstacles which are deeply rooted in human nature.
    Rivers of Blood: Why Enoch Powell Was Right!

    One is that by the very order of things such evils are not demonstrable until they have occurred: at each stage in their onset there is room for doubt and for dispute whether they be real or imaginary. By the same token, they attract little attention in comparison with current troubles, which are both indisputable and pressing: whence the besetting temptation of all politics to concern itself with the immediate present at the expense of the future.
     

    involves a decent dollop of IQ. At least to be able to hire advisors who are smart and also loyal to the nation, and then be able to understand what's important and what's not.


    Trump is President because he's the first candidate since Reagan who seemed to be actually loyal to the American people. But his governance has been mediocre. And it isn't just his incredible vanity, Trumps seems to lack both high intelligence and discipline. He has hired disloyal and anti-American advisors, and isn't smart enough to know his own mind. As a result Trump's presidency is sort of random walk. Better than the treachery we'd otherwise get, but a far cry from what it should be. Some additional IQ points probably wouldn't "fix it", but would certainly help.

    IQ isn't a "fix" for anything, but it's a useful tool in the right hands.

    , @Art Deco
    @AnotherDad

    But i don’t think Hoover is “responsible for a major disaster”. Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover’s intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do… because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    Ramsay MacDonald's National Government devalued the currency in September 1931 and Britain's economic recovery began within a few months. Here's the decline in domestic product per capita registered in various advanced economies as measured over whole calendar years. Except as noted this compares 1932 with 1929.

    6.1%: Finland
    6.4%: Sweden (1930-32)
    6.4%: Britain
    8.6%: Italy (1929-34, double dip)
    9.0%: Switzerland (1929-33)
    9.3%: Japan (1929-31)
    11.6%: Spain (1929-33)
    15.9%: France
    17.8%: Germany (1928-32)
    19.4%: Argentina
    21.5%: Australia (1927-31)
    23.4%: Austria (1929-33)
    31.0%: United States (1929-33)
    34.8%: Canada (1928-33)

    NB, nearly all of the contraction in production in the US occurred before Roosevelt took office.

    Here's the annual rate of improvement in per capita product from each country's nadir to 1939

    7.0%: Germany
    6.3%: Austria
    6.3%: United States
    6.0%: Canada
    5.5%: Japan
    4.2%: Finland
    4.1%: Sweden
    3.8%: Australia
    3.3%: Italy
    2.8%: Britain
    2.8%: France
    2.4%: Argentina
    0.5%: Switzerland
    -4.0%: Spain (war damage)

    Now here is how per capita product in 1939 compared with the pre-Depression peak:

    39.0%: Japan
    32.2%: Germany
    25.4%: Finland
    23.9%: Sweden
    13.8%: Britain
    10.7%: Austria
    7.3%: Italy
    5.5%: Australia
    1.8%: France
    -0.8%: United States
    -5.0%: Argentina
    -6.3%: Switzerland
    -7.8%: Canada
    -30.9%: Spain

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  76. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.
     
    You could conclude that but you would be wrong. For example, only 5% of blacks passed the Feb 20 Cal. bar exam, vs. 52% (the majority) of whites:

    https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/06/only-5-of-black-first-time-takers-passed-february-california-bar-exam-compared-to-52-of-whites-4.html


    The reason the majority of whites pass is that even though this exam is tough, whites have been at least double filtered by the time they take the test. First of all, they are filtered by having to get into law school and then they are filtered by having to make it thru 3 years of law school and even then only maybe 1/2 of them pass on the first try (generally speaking these are the folks that are in the top 50% of their law school class - blacks are almost always in the bottom half with very rare exceptions). You are talking about an exam that maybe 95% of the US population could never pass - not only does it require tremendous memorization of the law but also the ability to analyze and apply a fact pattern to the law under considerable time pressure.

    I don't know what Biden's story is. Based upon his class rank at Syracuse (near the bottom) he would not have been expected to pass in Del. on his first try. Maybe as someone said he had someone else take it for him. Maybe he got lucky. Maybe Joe's big problem was motivation - his college grades were tremendously variable but he did well in a few courses, which could indicate that he can do well when he wants to but is usually not focused enough. Maybe he got focused this time.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Marty, @HammerJack

    In the early ‘80’s, 87% of takers from my class at respected but not really first-tier CA school passed the June bar on the first try. I was one of them, which was a surprise given my grades. Clearly, being in the top half wasn’t necessary. Years later, a friend got to know a CA bar grader. This was when the test still involved 6 essay questions. The guy said that given the number of tests he had to grade, he didn’t have time to read them all, so if the first essay or two looked passable, he just assumed the rest would be too. I’ve always thought this explained my result.

  77. Smart PhDs in English lit or history passed the bar exam in a study I read decades ago. On the one hand this, on the other hand that, with the heavy use of transition words — therefore, but, accordingly, considering, on balance. Length of answer — fast-writing ability — is a must. Scorer will look at length of answer, and count the transition words. So Joe probably had the above skill. On the other hand, …

  78. @Art Deco
    @Calvin Hobbes

    At the time BO was conceived, the Dunhams had lived on Oahu for all of five months. Frank Marshall Davis and his wife lived at that time about 15 miles away from the Dunhams and he was then self-employed running a distributorship. He was 37 years older than Stanley Ann Dunham, 55 to her 18. Barack Obama Sr. was, like Stanley Ann, enrolled at the University of Hawaii and there are to this day people then enrolled there who will attest that the two were in the same circle. He was six years her senior.

    Frank Marshall Davis was a known friend of Ann Dunham's father, but not at that time. A dozen years later. There would have been in 1960 about 3,000 black males on Oahu capable of siring a child, so it's arbitrary to identify Frank Marshall Davis as the sire.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Buffalo Joe

    Thanks again. I’m often impressed with your ability to cite relevant facts.

    But what do you think about this marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr.?
    And what do you think about why Stanley Ann left not only her “husband” but also her parents, to live as single mother in Seattle? I would think that an 18-year-old de facto single mother would appreciate being near (or with) her parents so that they could help out with the baby, etc. And then as soon as Barack Sr. is not in Hawaii anymore she comes back?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Calvin Hobbes

    No clue. The woman was self-centered and willful, so it could be nothing more than that.

    After he was discharged from the military, her father yanked the three of them around every few years chasing a new job. The six years they spent in the Seattle exurbs were as long as they lived anywhere. Then, as soon as she finishes high school, it's off on another of her father's larks. (Age and the reality that his wife had displaced him as the primary earner in the family inhibited any further moves). And that takes away from her an opportunity to attend Washington state's handsome flagship university. A Honolulu resident of my acquaintance once told me (ca. 1978) that you enroll at the University of Hawaii to make your beach bumming look official.

    She was a frankly ugly little girl. As she grew older, she improved some, so went from being ugly to merely plain. She appears to have been a generically intelligent youth, but with no personal assets and no deep friends. A woman who professed to have known her in high school offered a portrait which suggested she was attempting to distinguish herself by being 'different' (e.g. a professing atheist at age 16). Paul Hollandar in his study of the Venceremos Brigades and others came to the conclusion that people generally get involved in obnoxious and unconventional politics consequent to personal issues.

    Notice, that from 1960 to 1979, people were always cleaning up after her - her mother, her father, her second husband, &c. It wouldn't surprise me to discover that the Madelyn Dunham never quit cutting checks to her. Getting knocked up, shotgun marriage (to a black man who is already married), skipping town, coming back, divorce proceedings, another marriage to an exotic, leaving town again (for a country that's just been through a bout of political violence that left 500,000 people dead), another divorce (subsequent to a refusal to accommodate her husband's quite reasonable desire to have more than one child), then parking your teenage son with your middle aged parents while you lollygag around the Javanese countryside observing artisans. Her whole life from age 18 to age 37 consisted of asserting herself, imposing on people and flipping them the bird. There's a knack to raising an only child; the Dunham's didn't have it.

    From a distance, my impression is that BO Sr. married her to (1) avoid trouble with immigration authorities or (2) avoid embarrassment in front of Neil Abercrombie and others. It seems to me (IIRC) he was some years later ejected from his graduate program at Harvard for moral turpitude or some such and consequently had to return to Kenya (with wife no. 3 in tow), but my memory may be failing me.

    , @Anonymous
    @Calvin Hobbes


    But what do you think about this marriage between Stanley Ann [Dunham]and Barack [Obama], Sr.?
     
    They were never married. There is no record of a divorce. Moreover:

    1. Obama Sr. would have had to disclose his marital status when he applied to study in the U.S., and this would have been investigated at least to some extent (remember Kenya was still a British colony with a functioning administration). Obama Sr. would have been aware (probably having been told by his leftist mentors) that the CIA and FBI would keep an eye on him while he was in the U.S.

    2. Engaging in bigamy was NOT a minor peccadillo that would have been tolerated by the U.S. government in 1961.

    3. After Barry became president, the FBI did a document dump in response to FOIA requests for surveillance reports on Stanley Ann. Sure enough, Stanley Ann had been under observation in the years following Barry's birth. The FBI surveillance reports refer to Stanley Ann as Miss Dunham.

    If Stanley Ann had married Obama Sr., she would have assumed her husband's surname under prevailing custom (and probably law) at the time. Thus, the FBI reports reflect the bureau's view that Dunham was her correct "official" surname. Moreover, a divorce from Obama Sr. - himself a person of some interest to the FBI - would surely have been noted prominently.

    CONCLUSION: Stanley Ann was never married to Obama Sr., whatever white lies the senior Dunhams may have told their neighbors in Honolulu.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  79. @Sean
    He was smart in his thirties and probably would have thought anyone in their sixties was long in the tooth for political office. Actually he did say that while 29 years old.
    http://img.timeinc.net/time/photoessays/2008/joe_biden_moments/joe_biden_1972.jpg


    And it won him the senate seat against a supposedly impregnable opponent (Three terms as U.S. Representative from Delaware, two terms as Governor of Delaware, and two terms as U.S. Senator from Delaware). Biden turned 30 just in time to take up his seat. That's right, while questioning his opponent's age Biden was under legal age to be a Senator.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Caleb_Boggs#United_States_Senator

    Biden waged an energetic campaign, questioning Boggs's age and ability, and went on to defeat Boggs by approximately 1.4 percentage points.
     

    "An astounding upset".

    Live by the sword ...

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @anon

    Wow. It looks like Biden claimed that his opponent was too old for the Senate at 63 years of age… 14 years younger than Biden is now.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Indiana Jack


    Wow. It looks like Biden claimed that his opponent was too old for the Senate at 63 years of age… 14 years younger than Biden is now.
     
    Biden will surpass Reagan's record age at retirement the morning after Election Day. See for yourself:


    https://www.timeanddate.com/date/duration.html


    In happier news, unlike Ireland, Portugal, and South Carolina, one place will not be governed by a Subcontinental:

    Meanwhile, Carlos Delgado, mayor of the northwest town of Isabela for 20 years, was poised to win by a landslide the nomination of the main opposition Popular Democratic Party. Conceding defeat was Puerto Rico Sen. Eduardo Bhatia and San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, known for her public spats with U.S. President Donald Trump.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/puerto-rico-s-governor-loses-primary-in-chaotic-election/ar-BB182440?ocid=spartan-ntp-feeds
     

    Replies: @JMcG

  80. @theMann
    I keep hearing about the Bar Exam being soooooo tough. Here is a deal I am willing to make:


    I will take the Bar exam in any State the Lawyers are willing to designate. In return, said lawyer takes the Comptia A+, CCCNA and CCNA Security exams and we will see the relative difference in performance. ( And yes, I passed all three the first time. I did not kill them, but I passed.)

    BTW, there is NO issue of fraud or cheating on those exams. You go into them with two forms of ID, get photographed before and after, checked for contraband (in test terms) before you go into the room for the exam, and take the exam with a camera on you the whole time.

    Picker up, lawyerly buttercups, you don't know what a tough exam is.BTW, you don't have enough time to easily complete the exams, and you don't get to jump around on the CCNA's: you answer the Question, you are done. Something 20 questions down the road jogs your memory, tough.

    Replies: @anonymous, @anon

    Yes, Mr. Mann, you are Smart. Satisfied?

  81. Maybe it’s the guy who’s running for president that’s the ringer.

    • LOL: The Alarmist
  82. @Bugg
    @Harry Baldwin

    All true. But the only time Ryan perked up was at the mention of expanding the US troop presence in Afghanistan.

    As awful as Obama and Biden were, Romney and Ryan have since shown themselves to be worthless Chamber of Commerce toolbags. Operationally things would have been little different.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Agree, and I despise Paul Ryan more than I do most Democrats. He was wrong about nearly everything and did us tremendous damage.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  83. @AnotherDad
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NJ:



    ... Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. ...
     
    Art:

    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover’s league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.
     
    No disagreement that absolute top flight smarts don't magically mean ... success!

    But i don't think Hoover is "responsible for a major disaster". Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover's intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do... because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    FDR--not a top intellect--had no idea what to do either. His 1932 campaign included a promise to balance the budget. His efforts to solve the crisis were mediocre and ineffective. And then in 37-38 FDR put us a recession within the depression! FDR's thuggish big state instincts snuffing out the first flames of recovery. The US absolutely wallowed in the Depression. Hitler's efforts in Germany--the other most severely hit nation--were more effective. The US was only finally crawling out at the end of FDRs normal eight year term because of rearmament. It was overall a highly mediocre performance. One that only looks good in the afterglow of f1945.

    FDR was both economically and reputationally bailed out by the War. And the 1945 settlement left us with a 45 year "Cold War".

    FDR was not a "great President" but rather a President during "great times". Mediocre performance with the US economy. Perhaps missed opportunities that a stronger, more economically successful, more thoughtful President could have grasped to avoid the disaster of the War altogether? Additional IQ, and a better character might have done him--the US, the World--some good.

    ~~

    Reagan did a decent job with the Cold War although parts of his approach (ex. Nicaragua) seem needless.

    But that was basically all that occupied Reagan's brainspace.

    During his Presidency the coup against the American people continued--ramped up! The replacement "Civil Rights" constitution, immigration, financialization, deindustrialization and trade--the US essentially aiding China's rise and hollowing itself out.

    The most salient result of Reagan's Presidency for the long term future of America was Simpson-Mazzoli, a complete debacle--end-to-end--for actual Americans, their children their posterity.

    And i don't believe Reagan--in contrast to some of his successors--was disloyal. Some extra IQ points enabling more "big picture" and "long term" thinking would have come in handy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @AnotherDad, @Art Deco

    Another term for “Great President” could be “Callous Bastard” – i.e., someone who is willing to sacrifice hundreds of thousands of American lives in order to be viewed by sychophantic biographers as a “Great President”.

    The only great President was Washington. Some of the others were okay. Most were creeps. Reagan had some good instincts but was – like most of them, ultimately – just a tool.

  84. @AnotherDad
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NJ:



    ... Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. ...
     
    Art:

    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover’s league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.
     
    No disagreement that absolute top flight smarts don't magically mean ... success!

    But i don't think Hoover is "responsible for a major disaster". Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover's intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do... because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    FDR--not a top intellect--had no idea what to do either. His 1932 campaign included a promise to balance the budget. His efforts to solve the crisis were mediocre and ineffective. And then in 37-38 FDR put us a recession within the depression! FDR's thuggish big state instincts snuffing out the first flames of recovery. The US absolutely wallowed in the Depression. Hitler's efforts in Germany--the other most severely hit nation--were more effective. The US was only finally crawling out at the end of FDRs normal eight year term because of rearmament. It was overall a highly mediocre performance. One that only looks good in the afterglow of f1945.

    FDR was both economically and reputationally bailed out by the War. And the 1945 settlement left us with a 45 year "Cold War".

    FDR was not a "great President" but rather a President during "great times". Mediocre performance with the US economy. Perhaps missed opportunities that a stronger, more economically successful, more thoughtful President could have grasped to avoid the disaster of the War altogether? Additional IQ, and a better character might have done him--the US, the World--some good.

    ~~

    Reagan did a decent job with the Cold War although parts of his approach (ex. Nicaragua) seem needless.

    But that was basically all that occupied Reagan's brainspace.

    During his Presidency the coup against the American people continued--ramped up! The replacement "Civil Rights" constitution, immigration, financialization, deindustrialization and trade--the US essentially aiding China's rise and hollowing itself out.

    The most salient result of Reagan's Presidency for the long term future of America was Simpson-Mazzoli, a complete debacle--end-to-end--for actual Americans, their children their posterity.

    And i don't believe Reagan--in contrast to some of his successors--was disloyal. Some extra IQ points enabling more "big picture" and "long term" thinking would have come in handy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @AnotherDad, @Art Deco

    The great international political problem of the 20th century was how to unwind the British and French (and Austrian, Ottoman, Russian, Dutch, Belgian, German, US …) Empires while accommodating the rise of Germany, Russia, Japan as nation states.

    The solution to this is nationalism and something like the post-1945 American system of open global trade.

    The nationalist thrust of Wilson’s 14 points was on target. Maybe a stronger Wilson, with more cohesive American political class backing, could have usefully clarified this big picture for Europeans and helped them negotiate out of the crisis. But European leadership wasn’t great, the imperialists were pig headed. Oftentimes nations–just like people–have to royally screw up.

    Unfortunately, the American intervention unaccompanied by strong leadership demanding a nationalist, and stable, settlement, just gave the British and French imperialists a few more decades of breathing space for their empires to limp on, generated German enmity and gave German and Japanese imperialist sentiments–lacking a free-nations, open-trade alternative settlement–a boost.

    More IQ all around … couldn’t have hurt.

    ~

    That said, the most important quality of a leader is that he is loyal to his nation, his people, and thus willing to work in the long term interest of the nation.

    But being able to figure out and focus on that long term interest–the problem Enoch Powell outlined so well:

    The supreme function of statesmanship is to provide against preventable evils. In seeking to do so, it encounters obstacles which are deeply rooted in human nature.
    Rivers of Blood: Why Enoch Powell Was Right!

    One is that by the very order of things such evils are not demonstrable until they have occurred: at each stage in their onset there is room for doubt and for dispute whether they be real or imaginary. By the same token, they attract little attention in comparison with current troubles, which are both indisputable and pressing: whence the besetting temptation of all politics to concern itself with the immediate present at the expense of the future.

    involves a decent dollop of IQ. At least to be able to hire advisors who are smart and also loyal to the nation, and then be able to understand what’s important and what’s not.

    Trump is President because he’s the first candidate since Reagan who seemed to be actually loyal to the American people. But his governance has been mediocre. And it isn’t just his incredible vanity, Trumps seems to lack both high intelligence and discipline. He has hired disloyal and anti-American advisors, and isn’t smart enough to know his own mind. As a result Trump’s presidency is sort of random walk. Better than the treachery we’d otherwise get, but a far cry from what it should be. Some additional IQ points probably wouldn’t “fix it”, but would certainly help.

    IQ isn’t a “fix” for anything, but it’s a useful tool in the right hands.

  85. @For what it's worth
    Wilmington--isn't that where the final scene of "Fight Club" is set?

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    The first rule of filming Fight Club is that you do not talk about filming Fight Club.

  86. @Jack D
    @JimB

    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.

    Replies: @lysias, @JimB

    I don’t remember my fingerprints being taken when I took and passed the Connecticut bar exam in 1994.

  87. @syonredux
    @Jack D


    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ?
     
    He was an accomplished amateur historian (his THE NAVAL WAR OF 1812 is a standard work in the field). And his intellect impressed pretty much everyone who knew him. Indeed, one of the reasons why Henry Adams was so annoyed by TR was that he was accustomed to being intellectually and socially superior to US presidents. TR was from the same social milieu, and, while he was probably not quite as smart as Henry, he was smart enough to rattle the grandson and great-grandson of presidents.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

     

    Garfield was extremely intelligent. He could write a sentence in Greek with one hand while simultaneously writing a sentence in Latin with the other. And he discovered a novel proof of the Pythagorean Theorem:

    James Garfield’s Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem


    http://facultyweb.kennesaw.edu/sellerme/docs/garfieldpro.pdf

    Replies: @syonredux

    Garfield was extremely intelligent. He could write a sentence in Greek with one hand while simultaneously writing a sentence in Latin with the other.

    I should point out that some have questioned the veracity of this particular tale,but the fact that it gained currency is another sign of Garfield’s intellect.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @syonredux

    I don't see how far-fetched it is considering the educational rigor of the day, plus: are these completely original compositions or two of the hundreds of the then widely memorized and regularly used phrases?

    Replies: @syonredux

  88. @James Speaks

    But how to keep other states from doing to Delaware what it did to New Jersey? Delaware therefore invested in building an excellent court system for adjudicating
     
    How diverse was it then? How diverse is it now? If sufficiently diverse now, when will coporations decide to move elsewhere?

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    The corporations will never decide to move since they aren’t there now. They simply incorporate under Delaware law and put their headquarters elsewhere.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Ben tillman

    True, but the point of the paragraph was that the higher standards prevail in Delaware lest corporations decide to incorporate elsewhere.


    His home state of Delaware has been a heavy hitter in corporate law since the early 20th Century. At that time, most corporations in the U.S. were incorporated in New Jersey, which was conveniently close to the business capital of New York City. But then Gov. Woodrow Wilson raised taxes on corporations, so Delaware swooped in and offered the same convenience as NJ, but with lower fees and taxes.

    But how to keep other states from doing to Delaware what it did to New Jersey? Delaware therefore invested in building an excellent court system for adjudicating questions of corporate law, with an emphasis on the smartest Delaware lawyers becoming judges. America’s corporations expect that Delaware judges will offer solid, non-erratic judgments that are unlikely to be overturned by federal courts.
     
    If the lawyers in Del;aware suddenly become more diverse and as I suspect, less white and less competent, would this excellent court system be able to attract corporations?

    Your point is both correct and irrelevant.
  89. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    Wilson and FDR has similar records as left-wing abominations.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ben tillman


    Wilson and FDR has similar records as left-wing abominations.
     
    Perhaps that's why they got over 95% of the vote fo re-election in Ben Tillman's state? 1936 is the record for any candidate in any state in any presidential election.

    Why the Palmettos of the day even bothered with the expense of a presidential election popular vote is a mystery. They could have stayed with the old legislative method they'd used until 1860. Guess which state was second-to-last to abandon that, the legislature choosing electors as late as 1828.

    Florida's legislature chose a slate in 2000, but only as a backup in case the recount wasn't finished. In that case, Gore would only have needed a majority of the elector's votes actually cast and counted, not all 538. But the legislature's slate would have been valid, and Bush would have prevailed.

  90. @Sean
    He was smart in his thirties and probably would have thought anyone in their sixties was long in the tooth for political office. Actually he did say that while 29 years old.
    http://img.timeinc.net/time/photoessays/2008/joe_biden_moments/joe_biden_1972.jpg


    And it won him the senate seat against a supposedly impregnable opponent (Three terms as U.S. Representative from Delaware, two terms as Governor of Delaware, and two terms as U.S. Senator from Delaware). Biden turned 30 just in time to take up his seat. That's right, while questioning his opponent's age Biden was under legal age to be a Senator.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Caleb_Boggs#United_States_Senator

    Biden waged an energetic campaign, questioning Boggs's age and ability, and went on to defeat Boggs by approximately 1.4 percentage points.
     

    "An astounding upset".

    Live by the sword ...

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @anon

    Slippery Joey McGill. C’mon, it’s all good, man.

  91. anon[187] • Disclaimer says:
    @theMann
    I keep hearing about the Bar Exam being soooooo tough. Here is a deal I am willing to make:


    I will take the Bar exam in any State the Lawyers are willing to designate. In return, said lawyer takes the Comptia A+, CCCNA and CCNA Security exams and we will see the relative difference in performance. ( And yes, I passed all three the first time. I did not kill them, but I passed.)

    BTW, there is NO issue of fraud or cheating on those exams. You go into them with two forms of ID, get photographed before and after, checked for contraband (in test terms) before you go into the room for the exam, and take the exam with a camera on you the whole time.

    Picker up, lawyerly buttercups, you don't know what a tough exam is.BTW, you don't have enough time to easily complete the exams, and you don't get to jump around on the CCNA's: you answer the Question, you are done. Something 20 questions down the road jogs your memory, tough.

    Replies: @anonymous, @anon

    I keep hearing about the Bar Exam being soooooo tough. Here is a deal I am willing to make:

    I will take the Bar exam in any State the Lawyers are willing to designate. In return, said lawyer takes the Comptia A+, CCCNA and CCNA Security exams and we will see the relative difference in performance.

    What classes can one take that are relevant to the subject matter?

  92. From the Wilmington News Journal (1968-12-14):

    https://www.newspapers.com/clip/36302073/1968-12-14-joseph-r-biden-jr-1905-marsh/

    “Joseph R. Biden, 1905 Marsh Road”

    • Thanks: ScarletNumber
  93. @HammerJack
    Slightly OT, they're having a field day in the comments section of this article in the Daily Mail. Barack Obama's wealthy black friend from Chicago is prepping Barack's new retirement palace right by the sea in Hawaii. Right by the sea. As though sea levels won't be rising much after all. Same deal at Martha's Vineyard.

    https://mol.im/a/8631723

    Right at sea level, plus armed security, plus...a WALL. As one reader points out, Obama selects island locations where third-world migrants aren't likely to be swarming. Another asks: How can you retire from doing nothing?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Hammer, being at the sea level, with the future rise in sea level a given, probbaly adds to Michelle’s depression. So much to worry about,

    • LOL: HammerJack
  94. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, in Portland, Andy Ngô continues to do a great job reporting the nightly attempts at mayhem committed by ardent sociopaths, and the police officers who subdue them:

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294915598678294528?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294898198922670081?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294901716853198850?s=20

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @TWS

    How long does this Portland-Palestinian problem persist? Until U.S. is Out Of Afghanistan? Sounds like a reasonable demand IMHO.

    Actually the PNW situation might more closely resemble Belfast/Ulster where thespian training in being a proper telegenic protest-actor originated.

  95. California’s bar exam isn’t necessarily that much more difficult. The lower pass rate is partly because of who takes it. California’s one of the only States that lets people without law degrees sit for the exam, so there’s an adverse selection effect.

    California law schools also might not prepare their students as well, although I’ve no basis for comparison. But the point is that the difference may not (just) be in the test, but in the population taking it.

    This makes it marginally worse that Harris failed, if the exam wasn’t actually more difficult.

    Having said that, I don’t think we can reliably infer general intelligence from passing the bar, or vice versa. The bar tests a particular set of skills. You certainly need a threshold level of general intelligence, but most people who don’t have that will get weeded out long before they get to the bar exam.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @CPK

    From what I hear, California has quite a few rather dicey law schools, and the graduates of those law schools have an extremely low rate of passing the Bar.

    Some left wingers are trying to get California to eliminate the Bar because racism. Lawyers say doing so would cause the bogus law schools to proliferate.

    Wisconsin has an interesting way to do things. Any graduate of U Wisconsin or Marquette law schools is automatically admitted to the Wisconsin Bar. Those schools are actually very good ones, and the automatic acceptance makes them even more desirable. But those are the ONLY law schools in the state. Lots of pressure to keep other schools from opening up to compete.

    In addition, anyone who graduates from an out of state law school must take the Wisconsin Bar.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  96. @jon
    @Jonathan Mason


    a lot of these politician lawyers will have been more involved in politics and other extracurricular activities than in studying when they were in law school, and so may not have been all that well prepared when they came to take the bar exam.
     
    Everyone preps for the bar exam by taking a crash course during the summer after graduation. After the mandatory first year courses (that are pretty much identical at every law school and that are all on the bar exam) nobody takes that many subjects that will be on the bar exam. There are too many topics, and they are too different from each other. So most of what you are being tested on are legal topics that you first learned in the month prior to the exam (and that you will never look at again after the bar). You can see the topics for the California bar here: http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Admissions/Examinations/California-Bar-Examination/California-Bar-Examination-Scope

    Replies: @Carol

    Yes thank God for BAR-BRI. I never knew so much useful law as I learned there. We had an 80% pass rate.

    The accounting grads were really left hanging when the CPA exam prep pulled out here. I knew people who traveled out of state to take it, multiple times, but never passed.

  97. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ? Both TR and his cousin FDR attended but did not complete Columbia Law School.

    Rutherford B. Hayes was a graduate of Harvard Law School. Taft went on to be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. I would bet that they were both high IQ guys.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @prosa123, @syonredux, @lysias, @Hibernian

    Both Roosevelts had reason for not completing Columbia Law School. TR had been elected to the New York State assembly. FDR had passed the New York bar exam.

  98. @Art Deco
    @Calvin Hobbes

    At the time BO was conceived, the Dunhams had lived on Oahu for all of five months. Frank Marshall Davis and his wife lived at that time about 15 miles away from the Dunhams and he was then self-employed running a distributorship. He was 37 years older than Stanley Ann Dunham, 55 to her 18. Barack Obama Sr. was, like Stanley Ann, enrolled at the University of Hawaii and there are to this day people then enrolled there who will attest that the two were in the same circle. He was six years her senior.

    Frank Marshall Davis was a known friend of Ann Dunham's father, but not at that time. A dozen years later. There would have been in 1960 about 3,000 black males on Oahu capable of siring a child, so it's arbitrary to identify Frank Marshall Davis as the sire.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Buffalo Joe

    Art, thank you, And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.

    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
    @Buffalo Joe


    And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.
     
    People are still arguing about whether Thomas Jefferson was the father of Sally Hemings’ children, though.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @JimB

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Buffalo Joe


    Art, thank you, And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.
     
    Just not in 1619!
  99. @Pop Warner
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    FDR wasn't a great president, he was a bastard who took a leading role in starting WWII and getting an unwilling American populace involved. He can rot in Hell next to Wilson

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @BB753

    FDR wasn’t a great president, he was a bastard who took a leading role in starting WWII and getting an unwilling American populace involved. He can rot in Hell next to Wilson

    Agreed.

  100. @Jack D
    @JimB

    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.

    Replies: @lysias, @JimB

    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.

    I’m assuming it was, but the existing system for finger print confirmation was clunky and would probably not be used by law firms to confirm that their hires had legitimately passed the state bar exam. An associate lawyers competence would become immediately apparent to the partners of the firm. If an associate were incompetent, he would be fired, regardless of his admission to the bar.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @JimB

    At a large Philadelphia firm where I was once an associate, one year a recession hit so they were looking for excuses to get rid of lawyers. The bar results came in and they announced a new hitherto unknown policy: anyone who did not pass on his first try was fired with immediate effect.

    , @JimB
    @JimB


    An associate lawyers competence would become immediately apparent to the partners of the firm.
     
    This reminds me of stories in the last century of high IQ dilettantes who could successfully pose for decades as top executives, M.D.s, and lawyers. Lately, I haven't heard of such stories.
  101. In practical form, the doctrine of Separation is meant to ensure a healthy tension between the branches.

    Someone who has invested the time, effort, and money necessary to complete the steps leading to admission to a Bar, is always going to be enmeshed with the judiciary.

    It has been a long time since we’ve delightfully heard a chief executive express contempt for a court, e.g. by challenging lawyer-justices to enforce their ruling by themselves.

    Get the licensed-lawyers OUT of the Executive branch!

  102. @Buffalo Joe
    @Art Deco

    Art, thank you, And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Reg Cæsar

    And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.

    People are still arguing about whether Thomas Jefferson was the father of Sally Hemings’ children, though.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Calvin Hobbes

    Not serious people. Real "Americanists" released a major report ("the consensus of all the scholars"). Among people without a history education, say the Wright Museum in Detroit, exhibits were held.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Calvin Hobbes

    Calvin, and in two hundred years people will still be arguing about whether Barack is the father of Michelle's children. I guess my point is all that wasted thought didn't slow down Obama's campaign.

    , @JimB
    @Calvin Hobbes

    The DNA evidence established only a 12.5% likelihood that Thomas Jefferson fathered Sally Hemings six bastards.

  103. @Bugg
    @Jonathan Mason

    As it happens a very good friend worked with JFK Jr. at the NY County DA's office and became close friends with him. He may not have been an academic genius, but everything I learned about him was he was actually a very decent guy. His various cousins, on the other hand...

    Was told when he finally did pass the bar during the 1989 exam, he was given a private area away form everyone else at the Javits Center. In fairness nobody has ever said he was helped. Nobody taking the bar exam those days much cared that there was a celebrity in their midst. May be it was a curiosity for 5 minutes, but the bar exam was such a pain in the ass and you wanted it over with in the worst way.

    Replies: @JimB

    As it happens a very good friend worked with JFK Jr. at the NY County DA’s office and became close friends with him. He may not have been an academic genius, but everything I learned about him was he was actually a very decent guy.

    Probably JFK Jr. inherited his disposition from his lovely mother.

  104. @syonredux
    @BB753

    Yeah, one of the things that the old America had going for it was that the sons of the elite would do their bit. All of Theodore Roosevelt's sons served in combat in WW1, with the youngest (Quentin) dying in battle as a flyer. And TR's Rough Riders unit was full to the brim with haute-WASPs like Woodbury Kane:


    Woodbury Kane (February 8, 1859 – December 5, 1905)[1] was a noted yachtsman and bon vivant, and member of Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders. A director of the Metropolitan Register Company, Kane served aboard the Columbia in the 1899 America's Cup race. He also was a noted hunter of big game, both in North America and South Africa.
     

    He was a member of the New York Yacht Club (for many years serving on the club's America's Cup committee), the Metropolitan Club, the Knickerbocker Club, the Racquet Court Club, the Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht Club, the Meadowbrook Hunt Club, the Hudson River Ice Yacht Club, the Larchmont Club, and the Yacht and Country Club.
     

    Kane was born on February 8, 1859 in Newport, Rhode Island. He was one of eight children born to Oliver Delancey Kane (1816–1874) and his wife Louisa (née Langdon) Kane (1821–1894). Among his siblings were brothers were Colonel Delancey Astor Kane, and John Innes Kane, and S. Nicholson Kane. His sisters were Louisa Dorothea Kane,[2] Emily Astor (née Kane) Jay, and Sybil Kent Kane.[3][4] He was a cousin of Lt. Col. John Jacob Astor IV.[1]

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodbury_Kane

    Replies: @JMcG

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class. There was a sprinkling of black sheep in there, but not too many. I was struck when reading “The First Team” ,about the Naval Aviators who fought the start of the war in the Pacific , by the fact that the names were almost all Anglo-Saxon with a bare sprinkling of Irish amongst them.
    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    • Replies: @Houston 1992
    @JMcG

    I noticed the same at Northwestern.

    2) Harvard and wars ...
    http://veterans.sigs.harvard.edu/article.html?aid=147

    , @Hibernian
    @JMcG


    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.
     
    Only if none of the enlisted mechanics, boiler operators, supply clerks, etc., were Catholic.
    , @syonredux
    @JMcG


    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class.
     
    There were notable exceptions, of course. Eddie Rickenbacker, for example, was certainly not a son of privilege:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Rickenbacker

    And the same also held true for Frank Luke:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Luke

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    , @Paleo Liberal
    @JMcG

    Not all pilots.

    My great uncle was a pilot and flight instructor in both WW I and II. He flew for Canada in WW II before the US entered the war, and that was probably because it was the Depression and he was broke and couldn’t get any other job.

    His family wasn’t upper class by any stretch of the imagination. I think my great grandfather was a postal worker in Indian Territory or something like that. The family had been well to do up to the early 1860s, but the family finances went south in the aftermath of the war.

    , @Anonymous
    @JMcG

    There were also a number of German-surnames among the so-called "First Team": Bauer, Dietrich, Firebaugh (Feuerbach), Heisel, Hermann, Rinehart, etc. There were several part-Indians among these early-war aviators as well, the most famous of them happening to be Marines: Pappy Boyington (part Santee Sioux and something) and Indian Joe Bauer (part Pawnee and part Volga German). But Americans all.

  105. @Coemgen
    Shameless plagiarist Joe Biden? Did he actually take the exam himself?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsus_in_uno,_falsus_in_omnibus

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar

    Shameless plagiarist Joe Biden? Did he actually take the exam himself?

    Perhaps he hired his friend Neil Kinnock, born the same year, as a ringer.

  106. @AnotherDad
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    NJ:



    ... Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. ...
     
    Art:

    Agreed. The main brains in the President’s chair have been Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, and Richard Nixon. Hoover was also admirably accomplished outside the realm of electoral politics (Wilson was accomplished, but not in Hoover’s league; Nixon was meh). Two of these people were responsible for major disasters and one a series of minor disasters that left the country worse off.
     
    No disagreement that absolute top flight smarts don't magically mean ... success!

    But i don't think Hoover is "responsible for a major disaster". Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover's intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do... because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    FDR--not a top intellect--had no idea what to do either. His 1932 campaign included a promise to balance the budget. His efforts to solve the crisis were mediocre and ineffective. And then in 37-38 FDR put us a recession within the depression! FDR's thuggish big state instincts snuffing out the first flames of recovery. The US absolutely wallowed in the Depression. Hitler's efforts in Germany--the other most severely hit nation--were more effective. The US was only finally crawling out at the end of FDRs normal eight year term because of rearmament. It was overall a highly mediocre performance. One that only looks good in the afterglow of f1945.

    FDR was both economically and reputationally bailed out by the War. And the 1945 settlement left us with a 45 year "Cold War".

    FDR was not a "great President" but rather a President during "great times". Mediocre performance with the US economy. Perhaps missed opportunities that a stronger, more economically successful, more thoughtful President could have grasped to avoid the disaster of the War altogether? Additional IQ, and a better character might have done him--the US, the World--some good.

    ~~

    Reagan did a decent job with the Cold War although parts of his approach (ex. Nicaragua) seem needless.

    But that was basically all that occupied Reagan's brainspace.

    During his Presidency the coup against the American people continued--ramped up! The replacement "Civil Rights" constitution, immigration, financialization, deindustrialization and trade--the US essentially aiding China's rise and hollowing itself out.

    The most salient result of Reagan's Presidency for the long term future of America was Simpson-Mazzoli, a complete debacle--end-to-end--for actual Americans, their children their posterity.

    And i don't believe Reagan--in contrast to some of his successors--was disloyal. Some extra IQ points enabling more "big picture" and "long term" thinking would have come in handy.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @AnotherDad, @Art Deco

    But i don’t think Hoover is “responsible for a major disaster”. Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover’s intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do… because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    Ramsay MacDonald’s National Government devalued the currency in September 1931 and Britain’s economic recovery began within a few months. Here’s the decline in domestic product per capita registered in various advanced economies as measured over whole calendar years. Except as noted this compares 1932 with 1929.

    6.1%: Finland
    6.4%: Sweden (1930-32)
    6.4%: Britain
    8.6%: Italy (1929-34, double dip)
    9.0%: Switzerland (1929-33)
    9.3%: Japan (1929-31)
    11.6%: Spain (1929-33)
    15.9%: France
    17.8%: Germany (1928-32)
    19.4%: Argentina
    21.5%: Australia (1927-31)
    23.4%: Austria (1929-33)
    31.0%: United States (1929-33)
    34.8%: Canada (1928-33)

    NB, nearly all of the contraction in production in the US occurred before Roosevelt took office.

    Here’s the annual rate of improvement in per capita product from each country’s nadir to 1939

    7.0%: Germany
    6.3%: Austria
    6.3%: United States
    6.0%: Canada
    5.5%: Japan
    4.2%: Finland
    4.1%: Sweden
    3.8%: Australia
    3.3%: Italy
    2.8%: Britain
    2.8%: France
    2.4%: Argentina
    0.5%: Switzerland
    -4.0%: Spain (war damage)

    Now here is how per capita product in 1939 compared with the pre-Depression peak:

    39.0%: Japan
    32.2%: Germany
    25.4%: Finland
    23.9%: Sweden
    13.8%: Britain
    10.7%: Austria
    7.3%: Italy
    5.5%: Australia
    1.8%: France
    -0.8%: United States
    -5.0%: Argentina
    -6.3%: Switzerland
    -7.8%: Canada
    -30.9%: Spain

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Art Deco

    Thanks for the data Art, interesting stuff.

    However, i don't think this contradicts any of what i said.

    -- Yes, Hoover's term accounts for the contraction. But guess what? Look across the list--all these other nations, not run by Hoover have their own contractions running along for a similar period.

    -- The British devaluation--delinking from gold--was a one off. It was simply reversing a very stupid policy decision by Churchill to relink to the gold and the dollar at the prewar 5-1 rate. And it didn't happen because "everyone understood what was necessary", it happened because Britain was losing all its gold and had exhausted it's credit.

    Everyone can not devalue and win. This was simply a particularly stupid policy (overvaluation) that made Britain particularly vulnerable being reversed. The US had a much less trade dependent economy. The dollar's position relative to other currencies wasn't the US's problem--or solution. It needed a monetary expansion, period, and stimulated demand.

    -- Because the US was hit so hard, it's "growth rate from the nadir"--2nd table--looks relatively good. Ok.

    -- But if you look at the final table--1939 relative to 20s peak--the US is mediocre. Even with War recovery starting the US in 1939 ... is per-capita where it was in 1939. That's not impressive. As i noted, Hitler did better. (Hitler's big mistake was imperialism--invading other nations, messing with other peoples, starting the War. If he'd settled for breaking Versailles, rearming, reclaiming some German speaking territories, big public spending, getting people back to work ... German's would think of him as but successful and patriotic figure.)

    -- Look through the totality of the data, i think the conclusion remains:

    - Hoover isn't "responsible for a major disaster", he was just the guy in charge when it happened who didn't do anything useful to stop it. (Nothing Hoover did was as glaringly stupid as Churchill's relink to gold.) It was all just flailing. Ok, fair enough, you are "responsible" when you've taken the big chair and are in charge. So he's a failure. No argument. (With the benefit of hindsight, i could easily do much, much better.) My point is most everyone else was failing as well.

    - Roosevelt's response was not impressive either. By '33--three, four years in--the overhang is usually done, capacity reduced, the bad debts written off--things naturally should recover.
    But we wallowed through the Depression. Had a recession within the Depression. Came out the other end a decade later--energized by rearmament ... no better off.

    To the extent smarter, more knowledgeable people--Keynes--could have done better than Hoover, they could also have done better than Roosevelt. The US had both a deeper Depression and a crappier Recovery.

  107. OT: 5 people injured, more than 100 shots fired in shootout at San Antonio flea market.

    There is ABSOLUTELY no reason to worry or pay attention!

    “Chief McManus said the shootout was the result of “some type of argument.” He said he does not believe that any of the people shot were innocent bystanders.”

    No bystanders were harmed. Now, that’s up to Detroit standards.

  108. @Ben tillman
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Wilson and FDR has similar records as left-wing abominations.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Wilson and FDR has similar records as left-wing abominations.

    Perhaps that’s why they got over 95% of the vote fo re-election in Ben Tillman’s state? 1936 is the record for any candidate in any state in any presidential election.

    Why the Palmettos of the day even bothered with the expense of a presidential election popular vote is a mystery. They could have stayed with the old legislative method they’d used until 1860. Guess which state was second-to-last to abandon that, the legislature choosing electors as late as 1828.

    Florida’s legislature chose a slate in 2000, but only as a backup in case the recount wasn’t finished. In that case, Gore would only have needed a majority of the elector’s votes actually cast and counted, not all 538. But the legislature’s slate would have been valid, and Bush would have prevailed.

  109. “But his governance has been mediocre.”

    I know what you’re saying. However.

    The Republican party hates him. They can’t wait for him to be gone. The Washington establishment (which is everyone with any experience in government – who else can you appoint?) hates him. They can’t wait for him to be gone. The national media hates him; I’ve never seen this uniform level of hatred, loathing and lying directed toward a political figure. They can’t wait for him to be gone.

    He’s not a king. He can’t make things happen by decree (usually). We sent him there basically without support.

    Just imagine four years of Hillary Clinton’s decisions.

  110. @Buffalo Joe
    @Art Deco

    Art, thank you, And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Reg Cæsar

    Art, thank you, And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.

    Just not in 1619!

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
  111. @jon
    @Mr McKenna


    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere.
     
    Ding, ding, ding! We have a winner. I took the supposedly tough California bar and I and about 90% most of my classmates passed on the first try. And I didn't go to Berkeley or Stanford, so I had plenty of dim classmates. Non-lawyers are always overly impressed by the bar exam.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    Right. Lots of lawyers in my family and many of them don’t come across as terribly bright. None failed the bar exam.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @S. Anonyia

    Anonyia, lawyers make money because they are often brighter than their clients, who are often knuckleheads.

    Replies: @Marty

  112. @Redman
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I’m conflicted as well. Biden and Harris are probably the least academically qualified candidates in my lifetime. But as a society we’ve become overly obsessed with academia. It would be great to see more non-Ivy types rising to leadership.

    But whoever it is that breaks the mould should have at least some other positive quality going for them. I can’t see any with these two.

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @CJ

    “But whoever it is that breaks the mould should have at least some other positive quality going for them. I can’t see any with these two.”

    Joe Diapers makes hilarious gaffes, especially as his Alzheimer’s progresses, so he has that going for him. Kum One Kum All’Ya is your standard cardboard cutout Angry Black Woman.

  113. @Anonymous
    Meanwhile, in Portland, Andy Ngô continues to do a great job reporting the nightly attempts at mayhem committed by ardent sociopaths, and the police officers who subdue them:

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294915598678294528?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294898198922670081?s=20

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1294901716853198850?s=20

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe Stalin, @Anonymous, @TWS

    Mostly peaceful.

  114. OT: Anti Natalism. It is now a thing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/nov/14/anti-natalists-childfree-population-climate-change

    How much insanity can a society harbor before it completely disintegrates.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Mr. Anon

    Yeah, that'll really catch on in Africa.

  115. Don’t be too sure about Michelle. I passed the NY bar on my first try. I took it at the end of July; results came in around November, and then I (like everyone else) had to jump through all sorts of hoops before getting officially approved. Then there was a general delay for some reason, so I missed February and was sworn in around March.

    May seems a bit late, but it also seems a bit early if she only passed a January exam- although I don’t know how Illinois does it.

  116. For this guy, sixth time was the charm for the NY bar exam.

  117. @Bill Jones
    OT.

    In the desperate attempt to keep the Panicdemic going. The Grauniad headlines

    "New Zealand active cases rise to 69"

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/aug/16/coronavirus-live-news-australia-close-to-vaccine-deal-england-scraps-public-health-agency

    You couldn't make this shit up.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    Yep, the pandemic just mysteriously died out for no f***ing reason in New Zealand, proof we should listen to geniuses like Bill Jones who know it’s not a problem.

  118. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    You want Kirk in charge,Spock as the second.

  119. OFF TOPIC: Emily Otiso, daughter of Kenyan immigrant, is microaggressed —

    Young Black woman says she won’t move back after three years of ‘Minnesota Nice’ racism.
    http://strib.mn/3iWMEBJ

  120. I took, and passed, the Texas bar exam in 1996, after graduating from Law School in 1992. In the interim, I spent four years in the Marine Corps, learning Russian. I did take a bar review course.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Hunsdon


    In the interim, I spent four years in the Marine Corps, learning Russian
     
    So we should consider ourselves lucky you weren’t the next Lee Harvey Oswald?
  121. >guy who is now objectively decrepit was once, many decades ago, smarter
    I agree. Steve, your problem is that you’re not controlling the guy on the forklift who stacks the jars of spaghetti.

  122. @syonredux
    @syonredux


    Garfield was extremely intelligent. He could write a sentence in Greek with one hand while simultaneously writing a sentence in Latin with the other.
     
    I should point out that some have questioned the veracity of this particular tale,but the fact that it gained currency is another sign of Garfield's intellect.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    I don’t see how far-fetched it is considering the educational rigor of the day, plus: are these completely original compositions or two of the hundreds of the then widely memorized and regularly used phrases?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @J.Ross


    His talents were so celebrated that people said he could write a sentence in Latin with one hand while simultaneously writing the same sentence in Greek with the other.
     
    Based on this, it would seem that it was the same sentence. But it doesn't indicate if it was a standard passage (e.g., "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?") or something original.


    https://www.history.com/news/first-left-handed-president-ambidextrous-multilingual

    Replies: @J.Ross

  123. anon[209] • Disclaimer says:

    I want a smart President and watching Trump and George W. Bush govern has only increased my desire for intelligence. Didn’t vote for the guy but Clinton seemed to impress some pretty sharp advisors with his intellect and frankly the 90’s seem like a golden age compared to what has followed.

  124. @dearieme
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Who was the smartest president?

    Hoover, by a country mile.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Hoover, by a country mile.

    I don’t know about that, Thomas Jefferson seems like a pretty intelligent fellow.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
  125. OT: How much do you think Soros is paying his minions to protest at Sturgis? I bet he’s paying minimum wage plus transportation and a night in a hotel. I wouldn’t do it for less than 100K.

  126. Anon[168] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Several French aid workers were shot to death in Niger. They were all young women. They were dragged out of their vehicle and shot in the head, and the vehicle was torched. Their guides were also killed. Someone wanted to make thorough work of them.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-niger-security-france-idUSKCN25A26N

    Well, that’s a few less liberal votes. Why do they do this? There seems to be an endless supply of young female lemmings willing to martyr themselves to uplift blacks. If they were married and had children to look after at home, they’d be alive.

    Some women, desperate to have something to look after, go get pets. Other women try to make blacks their pets, except that blacks are a lot more dangerous than pitbulls.

    Cynically, I suspect it was a boyfriend/husband hunting expedition that went wrong.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Anon

    Niger, please.

  127. @Jack D
    @syonredux

    What makes you think that TR had a high IQ? Both TR and his cousin FDR attended but did not complete Columbia Law School.

    Rutherford B. Hayes was a graduate of Harvard Law School. Taft went on to be the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. I would bet that they were both high IQ guys.

    What qualifies Garfield for the high IQ list?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @prosa123, @syonredux, @lysias, @Hibernian

    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Hibernian


    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.
     
    What differences of quality do you perceive between the current educated ones and the ones who didn’t even graduate from college or law school?

    Replies: @syonredux, @Anonymous

    , @Nachum
    @Hibernian

    Law was an undergraduate degree (still is, everywhere in the world but the US and Canada) until the late 1800's when Columbia invented the idea of a "law school." Every other university saw the opportunity (to put it bluntly, they get seven years of tuition instead of four, and those additional three years cost a *lot* more than the first four, and for very little investment) and fell in line.

    And as you said, you didn't even have to finish, or even attend, law school to be a lawyer. Abraham Lincoln never attended...well, he had a year, total, of formal education that ended in his early teens. No high school, no college, no law school. His clients didn't mind. But it's almost impossible to take a US bar exam without a JD.

    For some reason, other countries in the world manage. England, for example, has special solicitor schools and has the Inns of Court for barristers. Most of both do have a college degree, but it's almost incidental. Here in Israel, law school is three years undergrad. One of my professors at my US law school (one of the very few conservative faculty) even pointed out that US law education could be a year, tops. His colleagues hated that.

  128. @Anonymouse
    @The Alarmist

    Very common in those days. I am not speaking from hearsay. Not even a driver's license was asked for in the case of taking the Graduate Record Exam and a US Navy aptitude test, it was almost like an honor system. Perhaps not true of the typical state Bar exam. Perhaps an enterprising journalist might locate someone who took a Bar exam for a friend at the approximate date when Biden passed the bar exam. That would strongly argue that Joe had someone take the exam for him.

    Ted Kennedy had a ringer take his final for a Spanish class at Harvard as an undergraduate and the imposture was revealed. Kennedy was not exactly expelled, he was rusticated and allowed back in after 1 or 2 years. This was well known at Harvard where I was a graduate student 1959-63. I see that that charming anecdote is omitted from the Wikipedia article on him. That fact was brought up in his initial run for Senator but got no traction and he was easily elected being a Kennedy.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @R.G. Camara

    I see that that charming anecdote is omitted from the Wikipedia article on him.

    I’m looking at it right now and it is there.

  129. Anonymous[187] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nachum

    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.

    What differences of quality do you perceive between the current educated ones and the ones who didn’t even graduate from college or law school?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @Anonymous

    There's something to be said for the old system where an aspiring lawyer would read law under an experienced attorney's supervision. For one thing, the apprentice-master set-up ensured that future lawyers would have a good practical understanding of how the legal system actually works.

    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    Robert Jackson was last U.S. supreme court judge who didn’t have a law degree. Died 1954.

  130. @Bragadocious
    @Art Deco

    Slate star codex has a good piece on Hoover. The guy was a friggin' genius and a force of nature. Sadly, like a lot of high IQ white Americans, he had a soft spot for white Europeans and actually saved 000's of thousands of them from starvation. A gesture they wouldn't return in a billion years. And it seems his soft spot for hungry people didn't extend to Americans in 1931.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Slate star codex has a good piece on Hoover

    Warning for those inclined to read it: it is VERY long, even by SSC standards.

  131. @Jack D
    @Mr McKenna


    This is not a spectacular accomplishment: the majority of first-time takers pass Delaware’s test.

    Read between these two lines and you may conclude that the bar exam isn’t very tough anywhere. Lawyers just like to complain, and brag.
     
    You could conclude that but you would be wrong. For example, only 5% of blacks passed the Feb 20 Cal. bar exam, vs. 52% (the majority) of whites:

    https://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2020/06/only-5-of-black-first-time-takers-passed-february-california-bar-exam-compared-to-52-of-whites-4.html


    The reason the majority of whites pass is that even though this exam is tough, whites have been at least double filtered by the time they take the test. First of all, they are filtered by having to get into law school and then they are filtered by having to make it thru 3 years of law school and even then only maybe 1/2 of them pass on the first try (generally speaking these are the folks that are in the top 50% of their law school class - blacks are almost always in the bottom half with very rare exceptions). You are talking about an exam that maybe 95% of the US population could never pass - not only does it require tremendous memorization of the law but also the ability to analyze and apply a fact pattern to the law under considerable time pressure.

    I don't know what Biden's story is. Based upon his class rank at Syracuse (near the bottom) he would not have been expected to pass in Del. on his first try. Maybe as someone said he had someone else take it for him. Maybe he got lucky. Maybe Joe's big problem was motivation - his college grades were tremendously variable but he did well in a few courses, which could indicate that he can do well when he wants to but is usually not focused enough. Maybe he got focused this time.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Marty, @HammerJack

    A low pass rate among blacks most certainly does not indicate that the test is particularly hard. Are you even serious?

    Note also Art Deco’s point about the February test. It’s for losers and dolts, and I’ve known many lawyers in both categories.

    “Getting into law school” isn’t a meaningful achievement. Getting into a good law school, with no fingers on the scale: that’s something different.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @HammerJack

    Yes I am serious. If the bar exam was as easy as McKenna thinks it is then more than 5% of blacks would pass it. Having 95% of blacks flunk after spending 3 years in law school means that the bar exam is racist and needs to be dumbed down or eliminated.

    Replies: @Bernard, @Mr McKenna

    , @J.Ross
    @HammerJack

    As a horrible online personality, beset with racism (which I hate), I have to tell you that when Jack D tells you something about the Constitution-hating client-screwing society-immolating law scam industry, he is on one hundred per cent solid ground. But go ahead and fight him, you're not my joey. Bring up Israel, it'll make it quicker.

  132. @Hunsdon
    I took, and passed, the Texas bar exam in 1996, after graduating from Law School in 1992. In the interim, I spent four years in the Marine Corps, learning Russian. I did take a bar review course.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    In the interim, I spent four years in the Marine Corps, learning Russian

    So we should consider ourselves lucky you weren’t the next Lee Harvey Oswald?

  133. @Paleo Liberal
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Good point.

    As far as Ms. Harris, what is the single most important job of a VP candidate?

    To help get the ticket elected.

    Since Biden chose Harris:

    1. Silicon Valley big money donors have contributed large amounts of money.

    2. Biden’s poll numbers have gone up among women.

    3. Biden’s poll numbers have improved slightly among African Americans. Recall that if Hillary Clinton had done as well among black voters as Obama, she would have carried Wisconsin. Having Harris on the ticket could carry Wisconsin for Biden.

    4. The level of support for Biden among Desis (dot Indians) and West Indians has skyrocketed. Note that Florida has a large West Indian population. It is possible that the extra black, Desi and West Indian voters in Florida could carry the state for Biden.

    Who cares what Harris’ IQ is?

    She is bringing in large amounts of money and some extra votes in crucial swing states. That is what is important now. The most brilliant and capable VP candidates are worthless if they don’t get elected.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy

    It is possible that the extra black, Desi and West Indian voters in Florida could carry the state for Biden

    Trump’s idiotic FICA tax holiday, and his pledging to repeal the FICA tax altogether has probably already doomed him in Florida. Especially considering he was the only Republican candidate in 2016 that pledged not to touch Social Security.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Hapalong Cassidy


    Trump’s idiotic FICA tax holiday, and his pledging to repeal the FICA tax altogether has probably already doomed him in Florida.
     
    How so?

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

  134. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Paleo Liberal


    It is possible that the extra black, Desi and West Indian voters in Florida could carry the state for Biden
     
    Trump’s idiotic FICA tax holiday, and his pledging to repeal the FICA tax altogether has probably already doomed him in Florida. Especially considering he was the only Republican candidate in 2016 that pledged not to touch Social Security.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Trump’s idiotic FICA tax holiday, and his pledging to repeal the FICA tax altogether has probably already doomed him in Florida.

    How so?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @Anonymous

    Because it may weaken Social Security.

    That is the Third Rail of politics.

    Paul Ryan decided not to run for Senate when he got very bad poll numbers after proposing getting rid of SS. But stupid Romney picked him anyway. Oddly enough, the Romney-Ryan ticket carried neither Wisconsin nor Florida. Ryan didn’t carry his state, county, city or precinct. Presumably he carried his own household.

    So how did he keep getting re-elected? Gerrymandering. The First and Second Districts in Wisconsin used to be very competitive. Both Democrats and Republicans moved as many Democrats into one district and Republicans into the other district as they could, while still keeping Democratic Janesville in a heavily Republican district.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  135. @Anonymous
    @Hibernian


    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.
     
    What differences of quality do you perceive between the current educated ones and the ones who didn’t even graduate from college or law school?

    Replies: @syonredux, @Anonymous

    There’s something to be said for the old system where an aspiring lawyer would read law under an experienced attorney’s supervision. For one thing, the apprentice-master set-up ensured that future lawyers would have a good practical understanding of how the legal system actually works.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  136. @NJ Transit Commuter
    Steve, at the end of the day there’s more to being a good leader than raw intelligence, especially in politics. Reagan and FDR didn’t have the sharpest intellects but they were great presidents.

    Who was the smartest president? Wilson? Compared to Reagan and FDR, who ended major global conflicts successfully for the US, he had a pretty poor record.

    Seems to me you want a president with a top 10% intellect, but not top 1%. There are lots of reasons to oppose Biden - Harris. I’m not sure a lack of intellectual firepower is the best.

    Replies: @dearieme, @Anonymous, @Redman, @Pop Warner, @Art Deco, @Paleo Liberal, @syonredux, @AnotherDad, @Ben tillman, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat, @syonredux

    Don’t underestimate Reagan:

    President Reagan, Mastermind – SNL

  137. @Anonymouse
    @The Alarmist

    Very common in those days. I am not speaking from hearsay. Not even a driver's license was asked for in the case of taking the Graduate Record Exam and a US Navy aptitude test, it was almost like an honor system. Perhaps not true of the typical state Bar exam. Perhaps an enterprising journalist might locate someone who took a Bar exam for a friend at the approximate date when Biden passed the bar exam. That would strongly argue that Joe had someone take the exam for him.

    Ted Kennedy had a ringer take his final for a Spanish class at Harvard as an undergraduate and the imposture was revealed. Kennedy was not exactly expelled, he was rusticated and allowed back in after 1 or 2 years. This was well known at Harvard where I was a graduate student 1959-63. I see that that charming anecdote is omitted from the Wikipedia article on him. That fact was brought up in his initial run for Senator but got no traction and he was easily elected being a Kennedy.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @R.G. Camara

    The Kennedy School of Government came into being because of Ted Kennedy.

    Not because he donated the money to start it or spearheaded its development.

    But because Harvard was going to flunk him out/expel him. So Joe Sr. (Teddy, Bobby, and JFK’s father) donated enough money for a new spook school. Because those lace-curtain Boston Irish Kennedy’s couldn’t have their kids getting any sheepskin from anywhere but Harvard.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @R.G. Camara

    I recall hearing that when JFK got an honorary degree from Yale, he said, "Now I have what everyone wants: a Harvard education and a Yale degree."

  138. @Mr. Anon
    OT: Anti Natalism. It is now a thing.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/nov/14/anti-natalists-childfree-population-climate-change

    How much insanity can a society harbor before it completely disintegrates.

    Replies: @Rob McX

    Yeah, that’ll really catch on in Africa.

  139. Are lawyers periodically re-tested like doctors, or do they only have to pass the test once? What is the process for disbarring a lawyer who no longer has the mental ability to do the job?

  140. @CPK
    California's bar exam isn't necessarily that much more difficult. The lower pass rate is partly because of who takes it. California's one of the only States that lets people without law degrees sit for the exam, so there's an adverse selection effect.

    California law schools also might not prepare their students as well, although I've no basis for comparison. But the point is that the difference may not (just) be in the test, but in the population taking it.

    This makes it marginally worse that Harris failed, if the exam wasn't actually more difficult.

    Having said that, I don't think we can reliably infer general intelligence from passing the bar, or vice versa. The bar tests a particular set of skills. You certainly need a threshold level of general intelligence, but most people who don't have that will get weeded out long before they get to the bar exam.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

    From what I hear, California has quite a few rather dicey law schools, and the graduates of those law schools have an extremely low rate of passing the Bar.

    Some left wingers are trying to get California to eliminate the Bar because racism. Lawyers say doing so would cause the bogus law schools to proliferate.

    Wisconsin has an interesting way to do things. Any graduate of U Wisconsin or Marquette law schools is automatically admitted to the Wisconsin Bar. Those schools are actually very good ones, and the automatic acceptance makes them even more desirable. But those are the ONLY law schools in the state. Lots of pressure to keep other schools from opening up to compete.

    In addition, anyone who graduates from an out of state law school must take the Wisconsin Bar.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Paleo Liberal


    From what I hear, California has quite a few rather dicey law schools, and the graduates of those law schools have an extremely low rate of passing the Bar.
     
    As I stated earlier in an earlier response to the post, Antonio Villar is a UCLA alumnus, but he went to the unaccredited People’s College of Law to get his JD. PCL does not require the LSAT for admissions because of “cultural bias” in the test.

    PCL has a first-time passage rate of 15.4%, while Hastings, the alma mater of Kamala Harris, has a first-time passage rate of 80%. For a basis of comparison, Stanford is 94%, Cal is 89%, and UCLA is 88%.

    Replies: @Jack D

  141. @Anonymous
    @Hapalong Cassidy


    Trump’s idiotic FICA tax holiday, and his pledging to repeal the FICA tax altogether has probably already doomed him in Florida.
     
    How so?

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal

    Because it may weaken Social Security.

    That is the Third Rail of politics.

    Paul Ryan decided not to run for Senate when he got very bad poll numbers after proposing getting rid of SS. But stupid Romney picked him anyway. Oddly enough, the Romney-Ryan ticket carried neither Wisconsin nor Florida. Ryan didn’t carry his state, county, city or precinct. Presumably he carried his own household.

    So how did he keep getting re-elected? Gerrymandering. The First and Second Districts in Wisconsin used to be very competitive. Both Democrats and Republicans moved as many Democrats into one district and Republicans into the other district as they could, while still keeping Democratic Janesville in a heavily Republican district.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Paleo Liberal

    So how did he keep getting re-elected? Gerrymandering.

    The 1st district of Wisconsin is nearly rectangular in shape, nestled in the southeast corner of the state. It envelops all of the tract development around Racine, Kenosha, and Janesville and some peripheral suburbs and exurbs of Milwaukee (a metropolis too large to be contained in one district). The district drawn and in effect for the five elections running from 2002 through 2010 was almost identical to the current district. The district boundaries prior to that were almost precisely rectangular and nearly coterminous with the southeastern border counties. It's the most ungerrymandered district you could imagine.

    Pro-tip: the talking point mill you're consulting is composed by people who are full of it. Find another one.

  142. @J.Ross
    @syonredux

    I don't see how far-fetched it is considering the educational rigor of the day, plus: are these completely original compositions or two of the hundreds of the then widely memorized and regularly used phrases?

    Replies: @syonredux

    His talents were so celebrated that people said he could write a sentence in Latin with one hand while simultaneously writing the same sentence in Greek with the other.

    Based on this, it would seem that it was the same sentence. But it doesn’t indicate if it was a standard passage (e.g., “Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?”) or something original.

    https://www.history.com/news/first-left-handed-president-ambidextrous-multilingual

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @syonredux

    That is something of a crawsticker because we're talking about a time when a midwit would be able to quote Livy or Plutarch.

    Replies: @syonredux

  143. @JimB
    @Jack D


    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.
     
    I’m assuming it was, but the existing system for finger print confirmation was clunky and would probably not be used by law firms to confirm that their hires had legitimately passed the state bar exam. An associate lawyers competence would become immediately apparent to the partners of the firm. If an associate were incompetent, he would be fired, regardless of his admission to the bar.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JimB

    At a large Philadelphia firm where I was once an associate, one year a recession hit so they were looking for excuses to get rid of lawyers. The bar results came in and they announced a new hitherto unknown policy: anyone who did not pass on his first try was fired with immediate effect.

  144. Joe Biden should have to pass a test on whether or not he remembers taking the bar exam at all, or what state it was taken in, or what a bar exam even is.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  145. @Calvin Hobbes
    @Buffalo Joe


    And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.
     
    People are still arguing about whether Thomas Jefferson was the father of Sally Hemings’ children, though.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @JimB

    Not serious people. Real “Americanists” released a major report (“the consensus of all the scholars”). Among people without a history education, say the Wright Museum in Detroit, exhibits were held.

  146. @HammerJack
    @Jack D

    A low pass rate among blacks most certainly does not indicate that the test is particularly hard. Are you even serious?

    Note also Art Deco's point about the February test. It's for losers and dolts, and I've known many lawyers in both categories.

    "Getting into law school" isn't a meaningful achievement. Getting into a good law school, with no fingers on the scale: that's something different.

    Replies: @Jack D, @J.Ross

    Yes I am serious. If the bar exam was as easy as McKenna thinks it is then more than 5% of blacks would pass it. Having 95% of blacks flunk after spending 3 years in law school means that the bar exam is racist and needs to be dumbed down or eliminated.

    • Replies: @Bernard
    @Jack D

    Excellent point Jack. We need more people of color in the specialties of cardio and neurosurgery surgery as well. It’s entirely obvious that the standards required are racist and should be done away with. As is the fashion these days, our woke leaders can pledge to use a one of these surgeons of color should the need arise.

    , @Mr McKenna
    @Jack D

    The stats Steve quoted show that a majority of first-time takers pass the hardest bar exam in the country. That means all the others are even easier. You're having issues with comprehension.

  147. @Anonymous
    @Hibernian


    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.
     
    What differences of quality do you perceive between the current educated ones and the ones who didn’t even graduate from college or law school?

    Replies: @syonredux, @Anonymous

    Robert Jackson was last U.S. supreme court judge who didn’t have a law degree. Died 1954.

  148. @syonredux
    @J.Ross


    His talents were so celebrated that people said he could write a sentence in Latin with one hand while simultaneously writing the same sentence in Greek with the other.
     
    Based on this, it would seem that it was the same sentence. But it doesn't indicate if it was a standard passage (e.g., "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?") or something original.


    https://www.history.com/news/first-left-handed-president-ambidextrous-multilingual

    Replies: @J.Ross

    That is something of a crawsticker because we’re talking about a time when a midwit would be able to quote Livy or Plutarch.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @J.Ross

    Indeed:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwEIkXMfL1E

  149. @HammerJack
    @Jack D

    A low pass rate among blacks most certainly does not indicate that the test is particularly hard. Are you even serious?

    Note also Art Deco's point about the February test. It's for losers and dolts, and I've known many lawyers in both categories.

    "Getting into law school" isn't a meaningful achievement. Getting into a good law school, with no fingers on the scale: that's something different.

    Replies: @Jack D, @J.Ross

    As a horrible online personality, beset with racism (which I hate), I have to tell you that when Jack D tells you something about the Constitution-hating client-screwing society-immolating law scam industry, he is on one hundred per cent solid ground. But go ahead and fight him, you’re not my joey. Bring up Israel, it’ll make it quicker.

    • LOL: Adam Smith
  150. @Indiana Jack
    @Sean

    Wow. It looks like Biden claimed that his opponent was too old for the Senate at 63 years of age... 14 years younger than Biden is now.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Wow. It looks like Biden claimed that his opponent was too old for the Senate at 63 years of age… 14 years younger than Biden is now.

    Biden will surpass Reagan’s record age at retirement the morning after Election Day. See for yourself:

    https://www.timeanddate.com/date/duration.html

    In happier news, unlike Ireland, Portugal, and South Carolina, one place will not be governed by a Subcontinental:

    Meanwhile, Carlos Delgado, mayor of the northwest town of Isabela for 20 years, was poised to win by a landslide the nomination of the main opposition Popular Democratic Party. Conceding defeat was Puerto Rico Sen. Eduardo Bhatia and San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, known for her public spats with U.S. President Donald Trump.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/puerto-rico-s-governor-loses-primary-in-chaotic-election/ar-BB182440?ocid=spartan-ntp-feeds

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Reg Cæsar

    For the moment, Ireland is not led by a subcon. Fianna Fail has the premiership for the next two years, after which they are likely to once again have the execrable Leo Varadkar as Taoiseach.

  151. @Calvin Hobbes
    @Buffalo Joe


    And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.
     
    People are still arguing about whether Thomas Jefferson was the father of Sally Hemings’ children, though.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @JimB

    Calvin, and in two hundred years people will still be arguing about whether Barack is the father of Michelle’s children. I guess my point is all that wasted thought didn’t slow down Obama’s campaign.

  152. @Jack D
    @HammerJack

    Yes I am serious. If the bar exam was as easy as McKenna thinks it is then more than 5% of blacks would pass it. Having 95% of blacks flunk after spending 3 years in law school means that the bar exam is racist and needs to be dumbed down or eliminated.

    Replies: @Bernard, @Mr McKenna

    Excellent point Jack. We need more people of color in the specialties of cardio and neurosurgery surgery as well. It’s entirely obvious that the standards required are racist and should be done away with. As is the fashion these days, our woke leaders can pledge to use a one of these surgeons of color should the need arise.

  153. @S. Anonyia
    @jon

    Right. Lots of lawyers in my family and many of them don’t come across as terribly bright. None failed the bar exam.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Anonyia, lawyers make money because they are often brighter than their clients, who are often knuckleheads.

    • Agree: Rob McX
    • Replies: @Marty
    @Buffalo Joe

    Joe, you really need to read Bazelon, “Clients Against Lawyers,” Harper’s Magazine Sept. ‘67. Spend the $6 or whatever for the reprint, you won’t be sorry.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  154. @Calvin Hobbes
    @Art Deco

    Thanks again. I’m often impressed with your ability to cite relevant facts.

    But what do you think about this marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr.?
    And what do you think about why Stanley Ann left not only her “husband” but also her parents, to live as single mother in Seattle? I would think that an 18-year-old de facto single mother would appreciate being near (or with) her parents so that they could help out with the baby, etc. And then as soon as Barack Sr. is not in Hawaii anymore she comes back?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    No clue. The woman was self-centered and willful, so it could be nothing more than that.

    After he was discharged from the military, her father yanked the three of them around every few years chasing a new job. The six years they spent in the Seattle exurbs were as long as they lived anywhere. Then, as soon as she finishes high school, it’s off on another of her father’s larks. (Age and the reality that his wife had displaced him as the primary earner in the family inhibited any further moves). And that takes away from her an opportunity to attend Washington state’s handsome flagship university. A Honolulu resident of my acquaintance once told me (ca. 1978) that you enroll at the University of Hawaii to make your beach bumming look official.

    She was a frankly ugly little girl. As she grew older, she improved some, so went from being ugly to merely plain. She appears to have been a generically intelligent youth, but with no personal assets and no deep friends. A woman who professed to have known her in high school offered a portrait which suggested she was attempting to distinguish herself by being ‘different’ (e.g. a professing atheist at age 16). Paul Hollandar in his study of the Venceremos Brigades and others came to the conclusion that people generally get involved in obnoxious and unconventional politics consequent to personal issues.

    Notice, that from 1960 to 1979, people were always cleaning up after her – her mother, her father, her second husband, &c. It wouldn’t surprise me to discover that the Madelyn Dunham never quit cutting checks to her. Getting knocked up, shotgun marriage (to a black man who is already married), skipping town, coming back, divorce proceedings, another marriage to an exotic, leaving town again (for a country that’s just been through a bout of political violence that left 500,000 people dead), another divorce (subsequent to a refusal to accommodate her husband’s quite reasonable desire to have more than one child), then parking your teenage son with your middle aged parents while you lollygag around the Javanese countryside observing artisans. Her whole life from age 18 to age 37 consisted of asserting herself, imposing on people and flipping them the bird. There’s a knack to raising an only child; the Dunham’s didn’t have it.

    From a distance, my impression is that BO Sr. married her to (1) avoid trouble with immigration authorities or (2) avoid embarrassment in front of Neil Abercrombie and others. It seems to me (IIRC) he was some years later ejected from his graduate program at Harvard for moral turpitude or some such and consequently had to return to Kenya (with wife no. 3 in tow), but my memory may be failing me.

    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
  155. @Redman
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I’m conflicted as well. Biden and Harris are probably the least academically qualified candidates in my lifetime. But as a society we’ve become overly obsessed with academia. It would be great to see more non-Ivy types rising to leadership.

    But whoever it is that breaks the mould should have at least some other positive quality going for them. I can’t see any with these two.

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @CJ

    True enough. Trump, Pence, Biden, Harris – not an Ivy Leaguer among them, unless you count Trump’s MBA at Wharton. Rather surprising really.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @CJ

    Trump doesn't have an MBA. His undergrad was at UPenn, which is an Ivy League school strictly speaking. It is probably at the same level as Columbia.

  156. @JMcG
    @syonredux

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class. There was a sprinkling of black sheep in there, but not too many. I was struck when reading “The First Team” ,about the Naval Aviators who fought the start of the war in the Pacific , by the fact that the names were almost all Anglo-Saxon with a bare sprinkling of Irish amongst them.
    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @Hibernian, @syonredux, @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous

    I noticed the same at Northwestern.

    2) Harvard and wars …
    http://veterans.sigs.harvard.edu/article.html?aid=147

  157. @Reg Cæsar
    @Indiana Jack


    Wow. It looks like Biden claimed that his opponent was too old for the Senate at 63 years of age… 14 years younger than Biden is now.
     
    Biden will surpass Reagan's record age at retirement the morning after Election Day. See for yourself:


    https://www.timeanddate.com/date/duration.html


    In happier news, unlike Ireland, Portugal, and South Carolina, one place will not be governed by a Subcontinental:

    Meanwhile, Carlos Delgado, mayor of the northwest town of Isabela for 20 years, was poised to win by a landslide the nomination of the main opposition Popular Democratic Party. Conceding defeat was Puerto Rico Sen. Eduardo Bhatia and San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, known for her public spats with U.S. President Donald Trump.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/puerto-rico-s-governor-loses-primary-in-chaotic-election/ar-BB182440?ocid=spartan-ntp-feeds
     

    Replies: @JMcG

    For the moment, Ireland is not led by a subcon. Fianna Fail has the premiership for the next two years, after which they are likely to once again have the execrable Leo Varadkar as Taoiseach.

  158. @JMcG
    @syonredux

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class. There was a sprinkling of black sheep in there, but not too many. I was struck when reading “The First Team” ,about the Naval Aviators who fought the start of the war in the Pacific , by the fact that the names were almost all Anglo-Saxon with a bare sprinkling of Irish amongst them.
    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @Hibernian, @syonredux, @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous

    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    Only if none of the enlisted mechanics, boiler operators, supply clerks, etc., were Catholic.

  159. @Paleo Liberal
    @Anonymous

    Because it may weaken Social Security.

    That is the Third Rail of politics.

    Paul Ryan decided not to run for Senate when he got very bad poll numbers after proposing getting rid of SS. But stupid Romney picked him anyway. Oddly enough, the Romney-Ryan ticket carried neither Wisconsin nor Florida. Ryan didn’t carry his state, county, city or precinct. Presumably he carried his own household.

    So how did he keep getting re-elected? Gerrymandering. The First and Second Districts in Wisconsin used to be very competitive. Both Democrats and Republicans moved as many Democrats into one district and Republicans into the other district as they could, while still keeping Democratic Janesville in a heavily Republican district.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    So how did he keep getting re-elected? Gerrymandering.

    The 1st district of Wisconsin is nearly rectangular in shape, nestled in the southeast corner of the state. It envelops all of the tract development around Racine, Kenosha, and Janesville and some peripheral suburbs and exurbs of Milwaukee (a metropolis too large to be contained in one district). The district drawn and in effect for the five elections running from 2002 through 2010 was almost identical to the current district. The district boundaries prior to that were almost precisely rectangular and nearly coterminous with the southeastern border counties. It’s the most ungerrymandered district you could imagine.

    Pro-tip: the talking point mill you’re consulting is composed by people who are full of it. Find another one.

  160. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @Calvin Hobbes
    @Art Deco

    Thanks again. I’m often impressed with your ability to cite relevant facts.

    But what do you think about this marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr.?
    And what do you think about why Stanley Ann left not only her “husband” but also her parents, to live as single mother in Seattle? I would think that an 18-year-old de facto single mother would appreciate being near (or with) her parents so that they could help out with the baby, etc. And then as soon as Barack Sr. is not in Hawaii anymore she comes back?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Anonymous

    But what do you think about this marriage between Stanley Ann [Dunham]and Barack [Obama], Sr.?

    They were never married. There is no record of a divorce. Moreover:

    1. Obama Sr. would have had to disclose his marital status when he applied to study in the U.S., and this would have been investigated at least to some extent (remember Kenya was still a British colony with a functioning administration). Obama Sr. would have been aware (probably having been told by his leftist mentors) that the CIA and FBI would keep an eye on him while he was in the U.S.

    2. Engaging in bigamy was NOT a minor peccadillo that would have been tolerated by the U.S. government in 1961.

    3. After Barry became president, the FBI did a document dump in response to FOIA requests for surveillance reports on Stanley Ann. Sure enough, Stanley Ann had been under observation in the years following Barry’s birth. The FBI surveillance reports refer to Stanley Ann as Miss Dunham.

    If Stanley Ann had married Obama Sr., she would have assumed her husband’s surname under prevailing custom (and probably law) at the time. Thus, the FBI reports reflect the bureau’s view that Dunham was her correct “official” surname. Moreover, a divorce from Obama Sr. – himself a person of some interest to the FBI – would surely have been noted prominently.

    CONCLUSION: Stanley Ann was never married to Obama Sr., whatever white lies the senior Dunhams may have told their neighbors in Honolulu.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    The Social Security Application and Claims Index has this entry under 'Notes'


    May 1959: Name listed as STANLEY ANN DUNHAM; Jan 1963: Name listed as ANN DUNHAM OBAMA; 28 Nov 1995: Name listed as STANLEY A DUNHAM

    Replies: @JMcG

  161. @Calvin Hobbes
    @Buffalo Joe


    And as to where Barack was born and who fathered him, those ships have sailed.
     
    People are still arguing about whether Thomas Jefferson was the father of Sally Hemings’ children, though.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Buffalo Joe, @JimB

    The DNA evidence established only a 12.5% likelihood that Thomas Jefferson fathered Sally Hemings six bastards.

  162. @Jack D
    @HammerJack

    Yes I am serious. If the bar exam was as easy as McKenna thinks it is then more than 5% of blacks would pass it. Having 95% of blacks flunk after spending 3 years in law school means that the bar exam is racist and needs to be dumbed down or eliminated.

    Replies: @Bernard, @Mr McKenna

    The stats Steve quoted show that a majority of first-time takers pass the hardest bar exam in the country. That means all the others are even easier. You’re having issues with comprehension.

  163. @Buffalo Joe
    @S. Anonyia

    Anonyia, lawyers make money because they are often brighter than their clients, who are often knuckleheads.

    Replies: @Marty

    Joe, you really need to read Bazelon, “Clients Against Lawyers,” Harper’s Magazine Sept. ‘67. Spend the $6 or whatever for the reprint, you won’t be sorry.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Marty

    Marty, thank you.

  164. @J.Ross
    @syonredux

    That is something of a crawsticker because we're talking about a time when a midwit would be able to quote Livy or Plutarch.

    Replies: @syonredux

    Indeed:

  165. @JMcG
    @syonredux

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class. There was a sprinkling of black sheep in there, but not too many. I was struck when reading “The First Team” ,about the Naval Aviators who fought the start of the war in the Pacific , by the fact that the names were almost all Anglo-Saxon with a bare sprinkling of Irish amongst them.
    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @Hibernian, @syonredux, @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class.

    There were notable exceptions, of course. Eddie Rickenbacker, for example, was certainly not a son of privilege:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Rickenbacker

    And the same also held true for Frank Luke:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Luke

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @syonredux

    Rickenbacker is one of those weirdly awesome historical people who should be known better. He's faded from memory, but his entire life is one big awesome All-American boy action adventure.

    I could see Steven Spielberg making a superb biopic of Rickenbacker, filled with Indiana Jones-like action scenes in WWI, WWII, and in race car driving.

    Another might be Martin Scorsese, who made a good Howard Hughes biopic with The Aviator, , but the film was hampered because at times Hughes says things or has reactions that didn't fit born-rich WASP millionaire from Texas like Hughes, but more fit born-poor Italian NYC kid like Scorcese. Rickenbacker, however, was, like Scorcese, also a poor son-of-immigrant kid who grew up with non-English speaking parents and who had it rough growing up but also loved the elegant beauty of art (Rickenbacker was a painter as a kid). So lots of Scorcese's outsider-immigrant-poor-kid mentality would fit well shoved into Rickenbacker's mouth.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

  166. @JMcG
    @syonredux

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class. There was a sprinkling of black sheep in there, but not too many. I was struck when reading “The First Team” ,about the Naval Aviators who fought the start of the war in the Pacific , by the fact that the names were almost all Anglo-Saxon with a bare sprinkling of Irish amongst them.
    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @Hibernian, @syonredux, @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous

    Not all pilots.

    My great uncle was a pilot and flight instructor in both WW I and II. He flew for Canada in WW II before the US entered the war, and that was probably because it was the Depression and he was broke and couldn’t get any other job.

    His family wasn’t upper class by any stretch of the imagination. I think my great grandfather was a postal worker in Indian Territory or something like that. The family had been well to do up to the early 1860s, but the family finances went south in the aftermath of the war.

  167. @Anon
    OT: Several French aid workers were shot to death in Niger. They were all young women. They were dragged out of their vehicle and shot in the head, and the vehicle was torched. Their guides were also killed. Someone wanted to make thorough work of them.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-niger-security-france-idUSKCN25A26N

    Well, that's a few less liberal votes. Why do they do this? There seems to be an endless supply of young female lemmings willing to martyr themselves to uplift blacks. If they were married and had children to look after at home, they'd be alive.

    Some women, desperate to have something to look after, go get pets. Other women try to make blacks their pets, except that blacks are a lot more dangerous than pitbulls.

    Cynically, I suspect it was a boyfriend/husband hunting expedition that went wrong.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Niger, please.

  168. @CJ
    @Redman

    True enough. Trump, Pence, Biden, Harris - not an Ivy Leaguer among them, unless you count Trump’s MBA at Wharton. Rather surprising really.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Trump doesn’t have an MBA. His undergrad was at UPenn, which is an Ivy League school strictly speaking. It is probably at the same level as Columbia.

  169. @Paleo Liberal
    @CPK

    From what I hear, California has quite a few rather dicey law schools, and the graduates of those law schools have an extremely low rate of passing the Bar.

    Some left wingers are trying to get California to eliminate the Bar because racism. Lawyers say doing so would cause the bogus law schools to proliferate.

    Wisconsin has an interesting way to do things. Any graduate of U Wisconsin or Marquette law schools is automatically admitted to the Wisconsin Bar. Those schools are actually very good ones, and the automatic acceptance makes them even more desirable. But those are the ONLY law schools in the state. Lots of pressure to keep other schools from opening up to compete.

    In addition, anyone who graduates from an out of state law school must take the Wisconsin Bar.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    From what I hear, California has quite a few rather dicey law schools, and the graduates of those law schools have an extremely low rate of passing the Bar.

    As I stated earlier in an earlier response to the post, Antonio Villar is a UCLA alumnus, but he went to the unaccredited People’s College of Law to get his JD. PCL does not require the LSAT for admissions because of “cultural bias” in the test.

    PCL has a first-time passage rate of 15.4%, while Hastings, the alma mater of Kamala Harris, has a first-time passage rate of 80%. For a basis of comparison, Stanford is 94%, Cal is 89%, and UCLA is 88%.

    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @ScarletNumber


    Hastings, the alma mater of Kamala Harris, has a first-time passage rate of 80%.
     
    Unfortunately, that 80% did not include Kamala. It would be interesting to see what the pass rate for Hastings was in Kamala's year. Hastings has gone a little downhill and was a more highly rated law school in her era than it is now (or actually other law schools have gotten better since they stopped forcing faculty out at 65) so I'll bet it was in the mid-80s back then. But that's just a guess.
  170. @Pop Warner
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    FDR wasn't a great president, he was a bastard who took a leading role in starting WWII and getting an unwilling American populace involved. He can rot in Hell next to Wilson

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @BB753

    Correct. Eamon de Valera in Ireland is very underrated for this reason. Saved a lot of lives.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey

    I agree. Despite the fact that de Valera saved many Irish lives, the current Irish populace (egged on by its liberal cosmopolitan media) holds him in disdain. How Sad!

    Replies: @Ponce Faggy

    , @Hibernian
    @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey

    He could have saved more lives in the early 1920's by accepting, as a temporary measure (the only way almost any Irish people accepted it) the Treaty (making 26 counties of Ireland similar to Canada and Australia.) He eventually accepted it, de facto, anyway, by running for the Irish Dail (Parliament), winning, and taking his seat; not sure if he swore allegiance to the King (of the UK) or if that was even necessary by that time. (It wasn't all that many years later, either.) The Irish Civil War of the early 1920s was his fault. I took a lot of heat from somebody on this site a while back for saying that De Valera ordered Michael Collins' assassination, but I think at least it was a "Who will rid me of this turbulent priest?" situation.

    Replies: @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

  171. @RichardTaylor
    Gosh, I hope things keep going well for our friends in Delaware. They are so awfully smart and do so much for the rest of us.

    A proud history of being good to Americans.

    Be sad if something horrible happened to them.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @Percy Gryce

    They had a run at Delaware two decades ago:

    https://newrepublic.com/article/61902/rogue-state

  172. @R.G. Camara
    @Anonymouse

    The Kennedy School of Government came into being because of Ted Kennedy.

    Not because he donated the money to start it or spearheaded its development.

    But because Harvard was going to flunk him out/expel him. So Joe Sr. (Teddy, Bobby, and JFK's father) donated enough money for a new spook school. Because those lace-curtain Boston Irish Kennedy's couldn't have their kids getting any sheepskin from anywhere but Harvard.

    Replies: @Nachum

    I recall hearing that when JFK got an honorary degree from Yale, he said, “Now I have what everyone wants: a Harvard education and a Yale degree.”

  173. @Hibernian
    @Jack D

    It was common at that time for lawyers to have not completed both college and law school, maybe not either of them. It was not unknown for them to not have set foot in at least one of those two places. This included SCOTUS justices.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Nachum

    Law was an undergraduate degree (still is, everywhere in the world but the US and Canada) until the late 1800’s when Columbia invented the idea of a “law school.” Every other university saw the opportunity (to put it bluntly, they get seven years of tuition instead of four, and those additional three years cost a *lot* more than the first four, and for very little investment) and fell in line.

    And as you said, you didn’t even have to finish, or even attend, law school to be a lawyer. Abraham Lincoln never attended…well, he had a year, total, of formal education that ended in his early teens. No high school, no college, no law school. His clients didn’t mind. But it’s almost impossible to take a US bar exam without a JD.

    For some reason, other countries in the world manage. England, for example, has special solicitor schools and has the Inns of Court for barristers. Most of both do have a college degree, but it’s almost incidental. Here in Israel, law school is three years undergrad. One of my professors at my US law school (one of the very few conservative faculty) even pointed out that US law education could be a year, tops. His colleagues hated that.

  174. @ScarletNumber
    @Paleo Liberal


    From what I hear, California has quite a few rather dicey law schools, and the graduates of those law schools have an extremely low rate of passing the Bar.
     
    As I stated earlier in an earlier response to the post, Antonio Villar is a UCLA alumnus, but he went to the unaccredited People’s College of Law to get his JD. PCL does not require the LSAT for admissions because of “cultural bias” in the test.

    PCL has a first-time passage rate of 15.4%, while Hastings, the alma mater of Kamala Harris, has a first-time passage rate of 80%. For a basis of comparison, Stanford is 94%, Cal is 89%, and UCLA is 88%.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Hastings, the alma mater of Kamala Harris, has a first-time passage rate of 80%.

    Unfortunately, that 80% did not include Kamala. It would be interesting to see what the pass rate for Hastings was in Kamala’s year. Hastings has gone a little downhill and was a more highly rated law school in her era than it is now (or actually other law schools have gotten better since they stopped forcing faculty out at 65) so I’ll bet it was in the mid-80s back then. But that’s just a guess.

  175. @Calvin Hobbes
    @JimB


    Has anyone confirmed that the finger print submitted with Joe’s bar exam was his?
     
    Could that still be done? It’s kind of amazing that Biden is leading in the polls in spite of his obvious dementia ( and all the other scuzzy stuff), but maybe the race would flip if it were proven that Joe had a ringer take his bar exam. At the very least, it would be fun seeing the NYT, et al, try to spin that.

    Off-topic but iStevey, who was Obama’s real father? Maybe it was Barack, Sr., but the marriage between Stanley Ann and Barack, Sr., was some sort of sham, so maybe not.

    (Stanley Ann lit off for Seattle shortly after the birth of Baby Barack, away from both her “husband” and her parents, and then returned about the same time Barack, Sr., left Hawaii. It looks like Hawaii was not big enough for both Stanley Ann and her “husband”.)

    A DNA sample from Barack, Jr., or one of his daughters could clinch that case (assuming that his daughters really are his). Plenty of Barack, Sr,’s blood relatives would jump at the chance to spit in a vial for $5. Is the security around his daughters so tight that it wouldn’t be possible to get some object with their DNA on it?

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes, @Alden

    His father could be Frank Marshall Davis; best friend of commie grandpa Dunham and head of the communist party of Hawaii such as it was. At some angles, Obama resembles Davis.

    But, Davis was very light skinned, more butterscotch than caramel. Anne Dunham was very fair skinned. Obama is just too dark to be the child of those 2. Their child would have more of a Cory Booker very light skin color.

    I’m very familiar with those greatest generation communists. They did push their daughters and young women members of the party to have children with black men to produce mulatto children to lead the black masses to revolt.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    @Alden

    Obama just plain looks Kenyan.

    You are right that his skin color is way too dark to be the son of a light skinned black and a white woman.

    Also there are physical differences between west Africans and Kenyans. Obama doesn’t look west African at all.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Art Deco
    @Alden

    His father could be Frank Marshall Davis; best friend of commie grandpa Dunham and head of the communist party of Hawaii such as it was. At some angles, Obama resembles Davis.

    Except there's no direct evidence he was acquainted with the Dunhams in 1960 and no argument from circumstance which would make such an acquaintanceship at all likely.

    , @Art Deco
    @Alden

    They did push their daughters and young women members of the party to have children with black men to produce mulatto children to lead the black masses to revolt.

    Evidence that Stanley Armour Dunham or Madelyn Payne had jack-squat to do with the Communist Party = 0. Evidence that they encouraged their daughter to behave the way she did = o.

  176. @Anonymous
    @Calvin Hobbes


    But what do you think about this marriage between Stanley Ann [Dunham]and Barack [Obama], Sr.?
     
    They were never married. There is no record of a divorce. Moreover:

    1. Obama Sr. would have had to disclose his marital status when he applied to study in the U.S., and this would have been investigated at least to some extent (remember Kenya was still a British colony with a functioning administration). Obama Sr. would have been aware (probably having been told by his leftist mentors) that the CIA and FBI would keep an eye on him while he was in the U.S.

    2. Engaging in bigamy was NOT a minor peccadillo that would have been tolerated by the U.S. government in 1961.

    3. After Barry became president, the FBI did a document dump in response to FOIA requests for surveillance reports on Stanley Ann. Sure enough, Stanley Ann had been under observation in the years following Barry's birth. The FBI surveillance reports refer to Stanley Ann as Miss Dunham.

    If Stanley Ann had married Obama Sr., she would have assumed her husband's surname under prevailing custom (and probably law) at the time. Thus, the FBI reports reflect the bureau's view that Dunham was her correct "official" surname. Moreover, a divorce from Obama Sr. - himself a person of some interest to the FBI - would surely have been noted prominently.

    CONCLUSION: Stanley Ann was never married to Obama Sr., whatever white lies the senior Dunhams may have told their neighbors in Honolulu.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The Social Security Application and Claims Index has this entry under ‘Notes’

    May 1959: Name listed as STANLEY ANN DUNHAM; Jan 1963: Name listed as ANN DUNHAM OBAMA; 28 Nov 1995: Name listed as STANLEY A DUNHAM

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Art Deco

    Alright, now why does Barry have a Connecticut Social Security Number? I already hate myself for getting into tbis tar pit.

  177. @Ben tillman
    @James Speaks

    The corporations will never decide to move since they aren’t there now. They simply incorporate under Delaware law and put their headquarters elsewhere.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    True, but the point of the paragraph was that the higher standards prevail in Delaware lest corporations decide to incorporate elsewhere.

    His home state of Delaware has been a heavy hitter in corporate law since the early 20th Century. At that time, most corporations in the U.S. were incorporated in New Jersey, which was conveniently close to the business capital of New York City. But then Gov. Woodrow Wilson raised taxes on corporations, so Delaware swooped in and offered the same convenience as NJ, but with lower fees and taxes.

    But how to keep other states from doing to Delaware what it did to New Jersey? Delaware therefore invested in building an excellent court system for adjudicating questions of corporate law, with an emphasis on the smartest Delaware lawyers becoming judges. America’s corporations expect that Delaware judges will offer solid, non-erratic judgments that are unlikely to be overturned by federal courts.

    If the lawyers in Del;aware suddenly become more diverse and as I suspect, less white and less competent, would this excellent court system be able to attract corporations?

    Your point is both correct and irrelevant.

  178. @Alden
    @Calvin Hobbes

    His father could be Frank Marshall Davis; best friend of commie grandpa Dunham and head of the communist party of Hawaii such as it was. At some angles, Obama resembles Davis.

    But, Davis was very light skinned, more butterscotch than caramel. Anne Dunham was very fair skinned. Obama is just too dark to be the child of those 2. Their child would have more of a Cory Booker very light skin color.

    I’m very familiar with those greatest generation communists. They did push their daughters and young women members of the party to have children with black men to produce mulatto children to lead the black masses to revolt.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    Obama just plain looks Kenyan.

    You are right that his skin color is way too dark to be the son of a light skinned black and a white woman.

    Also there are physical differences between west Africans and Kenyans. Obama doesn’t look west African at all.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Paleo Liberal

    True, he doesn't look west African. You'll notice from photographs that the proportions of his face changed as he grew older, in approximately the same way they did for his mother. The 1971 photo with Jr and Sr in the frame show a similar mouth, FWIW. That's about the only similarity between father and son.

    (Frank Marshall Davis was quite generic looking as black men go, so pictures of him are not hypothesis formers).

  179. @syonredux
    @JMcG


    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class.
     
    There were notable exceptions, of course. Eddie Rickenbacker, for example, was certainly not a son of privilege:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Rickenbacker

    And the same also held true for Frank Luke:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Luke

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    Rickenbacker is one of those weirdly awesome historical people who should be known better. He’s faded from memory, but his entire life is one big awesome All-American boy action adventure.

    I could see Steven Spielberg making a superb biopic of Rickenbacker, filled with Indiana Jones-like action scenes in WWI, WWII, and in race car driving.

    Another might be Martin Scorsese, who made a good Howard Hughes biopic with The Aviator, , but the film was hampered because at times Hughes says things or has reactions that didn’t fit born-rich WASP millionaire from Texas like Hughes, but more fit born-poor Italian NYC kid like Scorcese. Rickenbacker, however, was, like Scorcese, also a poor son-of-immigrant kid who grew up with non-English speaking parents and who had it rough growing up but also loved the elegant beauty of art (Rickenbacker was a painter as a kid). So lots of Scorcese’s outsider-immigrant-poor-kid mentality would fit well shoved into Rickenbacker’s mouth.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @R.G. Camara

    Agreed, I have a signed copy of his autobiography right next to my copy of Enola Gay, signed by Tibbetts and Van Kirk.

    , @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    @R.G. Camara

    He is very well known and adored in the mil aviation community, although I agree he needs a movie

  180. @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey
    @Pop Warner

    Correct. Eamon de Valera in Ireland is very underrated for this reason. Saved a lot of lives.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Hibernian

    I agree. Despite the fact that de Valera saved many Irish lives, the current Irish populace (egged on by its liberal cosmopolitan media) holds him in disdain. How Sad!

    • Replies: @Ponce Faggy
    @Dan Hayes

    I'm embarrassed of them. We're a very easily manipulated & oafish race.

  181. @Alden
    @Calvin Hobbes

    His father could be Frank Marshall Davis; best friend of commie grandpa Dunham and head of the communist party of Hawaii such as it was. At some angles, Obama resembles Davis.

    But, Davis was very light skinned, more butterscotch than caramel. Anne Dunham was very fair skinned. Obama is just too dark to be the child of those 2. Their child would have more of a Cory Booker very light skin color.

    I’m very familiar with those greatest generation communists. They did push their daughters and young women members of the party to have children with black men to produce mulatto children to lead the black masses to revolt.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    His father could be Frank Marshall Davis; best friend of commie grandpa Dunham and head of the communist party of Hawaii such as it was. At some angles, Obama resembles Davis.

    Except there’s no direct evidence he was acquainted with the Dunhams in 1960 and no argument from circumstance which would make such an acquaintanceship at all likely.

  182. @Paleo Liberal
    @Alden

    Obama just plain looks Kenyan.

    You are right that his skin color is way too dark to be the son of a light skinned black and a white woman.

    Also there are physical differences between west Africans and Kenyans. Obama doesn’t look west African at all.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    True, he doesn’t look west African. You’ll notice from photographs that the proportions of his face changed as he grew older, in approximately the same way they did for his mother. The 1971 photo with Jr and Sr in the frame show a similar mouth, FWIW. That’s about the only similarity between father and son.

    (Frank Marshall Davis was quite generic looking as black men go, so pictures of him are not hypothesis formers).

  183. @Alden
    @Calvin Hobbes

    His father could be Frank Marshall Davis; best friend of commie grandpa Dunham and head of the communist party of Hawaii such as it was. At some angles, Obama resembles Davis.

    But, Davis was very light skinned, more butterscotch than caramel. Anne Dunham was very fair skinned. Obama is just too dark to be the child of those 2. Their child would have more of a Cory Booker very light skin color.

    I’m very familiar with those greatest generation communists. They did push their daughters and young women members of the party to have children with black men to produce mulatto children to lead the black masses to revolt.

    Replies: @Paleo Liberal, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    They did push their daughters and young women members of the party to have children with black men to produce mulatto children to lead the black masses to revolt.

    Evidence that Stanley Armour Dunham or Madelyn Payne had jack-squat to do with the Communist Party = 0. Evidence that they encouraged their daughter to behave the way she did = o.

  184. @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey
    @Pop Warner

    Correct. Eamon de Valera in Ireland is very underrated for this reason. Saved a lot of lives.

    Replies: @Dan Hayes, @Hibernian

    He could have saved more lives in the early 1920’s by accepting, as a temporary measure (the only way almost any Irish people accepted it) the Treaty (making 26 counties of Ireland similar to Canada and Australia.) He eventually accepted it, de facto, anyway, by running for the Irish Dail (Parliament), winning, and taking his seat; not sure if he swore allegiance to the King (of the UK) or if that was even necessary by that time. (It wasn’t all that many years later, either.) The Irish Civil War of the early 1920s was his fault. I took a lot of heat from somebody on this site a while back for saying that De Valera ordered Michael Collins’ assassination, but I think at least it was a “Who will rid me of this turbulent priest?” situation.

    • Replies: @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    @Hibernian

    I’d have fought you were you stood. MCB-Northern Ireland class of ‘99

    Replies: @Hibernian

  185. @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    The Social Security Application and Claims Index has this entry under 'Notes'


    May 1959: Name listed as STANLEY ANN DUNHAM; Jan 1963: Name listed as ANN DUNHAM OBAMA; 28 Nov 1995: Name listed as STANLEY A DUNHAM

    Replies: @JMcG

    Alright, now why does Barry have a Connecticut Social Security Number? I already hate myself for getting into tbis tar pit.

  186. Anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:
    @JMcG
    @syonredux

    Flyers in WW1 were almost all upper upper class. There was a sprinkling of black sheep in there, but not too many. I was struck when reading “The First Team” ,about the Naval Aviators who fought the start of the war in the Pacific , by the fact that the names were almost all Anglo-Saxon with a bare sprinkling of Irish amongst them.
    I’d say there wouldn’t have been too many Catholic masses said on American carriers up through 1944 or so.

    Replies: @Houston 1992, @Hibernian, @syonredux, @Paleo Liberal, @Anonymous

    There were also a number of German-surnames among the so-called “First Team”: Bauer, Dietrich, Firebaugh (Feuerbach), Heisel, Hermann, Rinehart, etc. There were several part-Indians among these early-war aviators as well, the most famous of them happening to be Marines: Pappy Boyington (part Santee Sioux and something) and Indian Joe Bauer (part Pawnee and part Volga German). But Americans all.

    • Agree: JMcG
  187. @Marty
    @Buffalo Joe

    Joe, you really need to read Bazelon, “Clients Against Lawyers,” Harper’s Magazine Sept. ‘67. Spend the $6 or whatever for the reprint, you won’t be sorry.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Marty, thank you.

  188. @R.G. Camara
    @syonredux

    Rickenbacker is one of those weirdly awesome historical people who should be known better. He's faded from memory, but his entire life is one big awesome All-American boy action adventure.

    I could see Steven Spielberg making a superb biopic of Rickenbacker, filled with Indiana Jones-like action scenes in WWI, WWII, and in race car driving.

    Another might be Martin Scorsese, who made a good Howard Hughes biopic with The Aviator, , but the film was hampered because at times Hughes says things or has reactions that didn't fit born-rich WASP millionaire from Texas like Hughes, but more fit born-poor Italian NYC kid like Scorcese. Rickenbacker, however, was, like Scorcese, also a poor son-of-immigrant kid who grew up with non-English speaking parents and who had it rough growing up but also loved the elegant beauty of art (Rickenbacker was a painter as a kid). So lots of Scorcese's outsider-immigrant-poor-kid mentality would fit well shoved into Rickenbacker's mouth.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    Agreed, I have a signed copy of his autobiography right next to my copy of Enola Gay, signed by Tibbetts and Van Kirk.

  189. @Hibernian
    @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey

    He could have saved more lives in the early 1920's by accepting, as a temporary measure (the only way almost any Irish people accepted it) the Treaty (making 26 counties of Ireland similar to Canada and Australia.) He eventually accepted it, de facto, anyway, by running for the Irish Dail (Parliament), winning, and taking his seat; not sure if he swore allegiance to the King (of the UK) or if that was even necessary by that time. (It wasn't all that many years later, either.) The Irish Civil War of the early 1920s was his fault. I took a lot of heat from somebody on this site a while back for saying that De Valera ordered Michael Collins' assassination, but I think at least it was a "Who will rid me of this turbulent priest?" situation.

    Replies: @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    I’d have fought you were you stood. MCB-Northern Ireland class of ‘99

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    Iowa State University '72. You're apparently either a staunch Republican who went to a Methodist school or a Unionist who would have made the Irish Civil War a three way battle if you could go back to that era in a time machine. (Or you're blurring the line between that War and the Rising which preceded it, in which, of course, Collins and De Valera were on the same side.) Family legend is that my grandfather was an Irish Rafael Cruz, wanted by both sides, in 1902 when he sailed to Hoboken and got on a train, bound for Milwaukee.

  190. @R.G. Camara
    @syonredux

    Rickenbacker is one of those weirdly awesome historical people who should be known better. He's faded from memory, but his entire life is one big awesome All-American boy action adventure.

    I could see Steven Spielberg making a superb biopic of Rickenbacker, filled with Indiana Jones-like action scenes in WWI, WWII, and in race car driving.

    Another might be Martin Scorsese, who made a good Howard Hughes biopic with The Aviator, , but the film was hampered because at times Hughes says things or has reactions that didn't fit born-rich WASP millionaire from Texas like Hughes, but more fit born-poor Italian NYC kid like Scorcese. Rickenbacker, however, was, like Scorcese, also a poor son-of-immigrant kid who grew up with non-English speaking parents and who had it rough growing up but also loved the elegant beauty of art (Rickenbacker was a painter as a kid). So lots of Scorcese's outsider-immigrant-poor-kid mentality would fit well shoved into Rickenbacker's mouth.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    He is very well known and adored in the mil aviation community, although I agree he needs a movie

  191. @Pop Warner
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    FDR wasn't a great president, he was a bastard who took a leading role in starting WWII and getting an unwilling American populace involved. He can rot in Hell next to Wilson

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey, @BB753

    Don’t forget Harry “Hiroshima” Truman and his bloody pointless Korean War, LBJ and the Vietnam War mess, and our current Middle-Eastern quagmire, legacy of the Bushes and Obama. All warmongers and war profiteers.

  192. @Dan Hayes
    @David 'The Diversity Mastermind' Lammey

    I agree. Despite the fact that de Valera saved many Irish lives, the current Irish populace (egged on by its liberal cosmopolitan media) holds him in disdain. How Sad!

    Replies: @Ponce Faggy

    I’m embarrassed of them. We’re a very easily manipulated & oafish race.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  193. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    @Hibernian

    I’d have fought you were you stood. MCB-Northern Ireland class of ‘99

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Iowa State University ’72. You’re apparently either a staunch Republican who went to a Methodist school or a Unionist who would have made the Irish Civil War a three way battle if you could go back to that era in a time machine. (Or you’re blurring the line between that War and the Rising which preceded it, in which, of course, Collins and De Valera were on the same side.) Family legend is that my grandfather was an Irish Rafael Cruz, wanted by both sides, in 1902 when he sailed to Hoboken and got on a train, bound for Milwaukee.

  194. @Art Deco
    @AnotherDad

    But i don’t think Hoover is “responsible for a major disaster”. Hoover was simply the guy in charge when the electrified factory-auto boom bubble popped. And Hoover’s intellect was insufficient to figure out what to do… because most of the smart men of the day did not know what to do.

    Ramsay MacDonald's National Government devalued the currency in September 1931 and Britain's economic recovery began within a few months. Here's the decline in domestic product per capita registered in various advanced economies as measured over whole calendar years. Except as noted this compares 1932 with 1929.

    6.1%: Finland
    6.4%: Sweden (1930-32)
    6.4%: Britain
    8.6%: Italy (1929-34, double dip)
    9.0%: Switzerland (1929-33)
    9.3%: Japan (1929-31)
    11.6%: Spain (1929-33)
    15.9%: France
    17.8%: Germany (1928-32)
    19.4%: Argentina
    21.5%: Australia (1927-31)
    23.4%: Austria (1929-33)
    31.0%: United States (1929-33)
    34.8%: Canada (1928-33)

    NB, nearly all of the contraction in production in the US occurred before Roosevelt took office.

    Here's the annual rate of improvement in per capita product from each country's nadir to 1939

    7.0%: Germany
    6.3%: Austria
    6.3%: United States
    6.0%: Canada
    5.5%: Japan
    4.2%: Finland
    4.1%: Sweden
    3.8%: Australia
    3.3%: Italy
    2.8%: Britain
    2.8%: France
    2.4%: Argentina
    0.5%: Switzerland
    -4.0%: Spain (war damage)

    Now here is how per capita product in 1939 compared with the pre-Depression peak:

    39.0%: Japan
    32.2%: Germany
    25.4%: Finland
    23.9%: Sweden
    13.8%: Britain
    10.7%: Austria
    7.3%: Italy
    5.5%: Australia
    1.8%: France
    -0.8%: United States
    -5.0%: Argentina
    -6.3%: Switzerland
    -7.8%: Canada
    -30.9%: Spain

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Thanks for the data Art, interesting stuff.

    However, i don’t think this contradicts any of what i said.

    — Yes, Hoover’s term accounts for the contraction. But guess what? Look across the list–all these other nations, not run by Hoover have their own contractions running along for a similar period.

    — The British devaluation–delinking from gold–was a one off. It was simply reversing a very stupid policy decision by Churchill to relink to the gold and the dollar at the prewar 5-1 rate. And it didn’t happen because “everyone understood what was necessary”, it happened because Britain was losing all its gold and had exhausted it’s credit.

    Everyone can not devalue and win. This was simply a particularly stupid policy (overvaluation) that made Britain particularly vulnerable being reversed. The US had a much less trade dependent economy. The dollar’s position relative to other currencies wasn’t the US’s problem–or solution. It needed a monetary expansion, period, and stimulated demand.

    — Because the US was hit so hard, it’s “growth rate from the nadir”–2nd table–looks relatively good. Ok.

    — But if you look at the final table–1939 relative to 20s peak–the US is mediocre. Even with War recovery starting the US in 1939 … is per-capita where it was in 1939. That’s not impressive. As i noted, Hitler did better. (Hitler’s big mistake was imperialism–invading other nations, messing with other peoples, starting the War. If he’d settled for breaking Versailles, rearming, reclaiming some German speaking territories, big public spending, getting people back to work … German’s would think of him as but successful and patriotic figure.)

    — Look through the totality of the data, i think the conclusion remains:

    – Hoover isn’t “responsible for a major disaster”, he was just the guy in charge when it happened who didn’t do anything useful to stop it. (Nothing Hoover did was as glaringly stupid as Churchill’s relink to gold.) It was all just flailing. Ok, fair enough, you are “responsible” when you’ve taken the big chair and are in charge. So he’s a failure. No argument. (With the benefit of hindsight, i could easily do much, much better.) My point is most everyone else was failing as well.

    – Roosevelt’s response was not impressive either. By ’33–three, four years in–the overhang is usually done, capacity reduced, the bad debts written off–things naturally should recover.
    But we wallowed through the Depression. Had a recession within the Depression. Came out the other end a decade later–energized by rearmament … no better off.

    To the extent smarter, more knowledgeable people–Keynes–could have done better than Hoover, they could also have done better than Roosevelt. The US had both a deeper Depression and a crappier Recovery.

  195. @JimB
    @Jack D


    Do you know for a fact that fingerprints were required in Del. in 1969? I would be surprised if they were.
     
    I’m assuming it was, but the existing system for finger print confirmation was clunky and would probably not be used by law firms to confirm that their hires had legitimately passed the state bar exam. An associate lawyers competence would become immediately apparent to the partners of the firm. If an associate were incompetent, he would be fired, regardless of his admission to the bar.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JimB

    An associate lawyers competence would become immediately apparent to the partners of the firm.

    This reminds me of stories in the last century of high IQ dilettantes who could successfully pose for decades as top executives, M.D.s, and lawyers. Lately, I haven’t heard of such stories.

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