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Biden Administration Is Worried by Ukrainian Aggressiveness
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From the New York Times news section:

U.S. Believes Ukrainians Were Behind an Assassination in Russia

American officials said they were not aware of the plan ahead of time for the attack that killed Daria Dugina and that they had admonished Ukraine over it.

By Julian E. Barnes, Adam Goldman, Adam Entous and Michael Schwirtz
Oct. 5, 2022

WASHINGTON — United States intelligence agencies believe parts of the Ukrainian government authorized the car bomb attack near Moscow in August that killed Daria Dugina, the daughter of a prominent Russian nationalist, an element of a covert campaign that U.S. officials fear could widen the conflict.

The United States took no part in the attack, either by providing intelligence or other assistance, officials said. American officials also said they were not aware of the operation ahead of time and would have opposed the killing had they been consulted. Afterward, American officials admonished Ukrainian officials over the assassination, they said.

The closely held assessment of Ukrainian complicity, which has not been previously reported, was shared within the U.S. government last week….

American officials have been frustrated with Ukraine’s lack of transparency about its military and covert plans, especially on Russian soil.

Since the beginning of the war, Ukraine’s security services have demonstrated their ability to reach into Russia to conduct sabotage operations. …

Some American officials suspect Ms. Dugina’s father, Aleksandr Dugin, a Russian ultranationalist, was the actual target of the operation, and that the operatives who carried it out believed he would be in the vehicle with his daughter.

Mr. Dugin, one of Russia’s most prominent voices urging Moscow to intensify its war on Ukraine, has been a leading proponent of an aggressive, imperialist Russia.

… United States officials briefed on the Ukrainian action and the American response spoke on the condition of anonymity, in order to discuss secret information and matters of sensitive diplomacy.

My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.

… The United States has pressed Ukraine to share more about its war plans, with mixed success. Earlier in the war, U.S. officials acknowledged that they often knew more about Russian war plans — thanks to their intense collection efforts — than they did about Kyiv’s intentions.

Cooperation has since increased. During the summer, Ukraine shared its plans for its September military counteroffensive with the United States and Britain.

It’s hardly uncommon in history for smaller countries’ aggressiveness to trouble their larger allies: e.g., Serbia led Russia into the Great War in 1914. And Israel has done things that angered the U.S., like revealing the revolutionary American development of the capability to wipe out Soviet ground radar systems from the air by using an Israeli version of it to wipe out Syrian air defenses in the Bekaa Valley of Lebanon in 1982.

 
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  1. Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous

    C'mon dude, don't post ugly shit like that. This is supposed to be "safe space" for us anti-globo-homo types.

    Hollyweird pervs have insisted on jamming this shit in our faces for decades. Sailer's supposed to be a respite from it.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Anonymous

    Please don’t...

    Instead review the Russ Meyer film , Up ! Or Beneath the Valley of the Ultra Vixens.
    Kitten Natividad was in both films and recently passed away at 74 (not from Covid)
    https://twitter.com/theapollotwin/status/1573843200648876032?s=21

    Replies: @profnasty

    , @clifford brown
    @Anonymous

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrVqBqqq5AA

    , @Mike Tre
    @Anonymous

    It literally sucks. You’re welcome.

    , @JimDandy
    @Anonymous

    Wait, There Are Rom-Coms That Aren’t Gay?

    I heard someone else say that, but I'm stealing it.

    , @Dennis Dale
    @Anonymous

    I will pay money to make Steve watch that thing. Pass me the hat. We can't let him duck the great gay rom-com debate of 2022.

    , @Batman
    @Anonymous

    Why does every mention of the movie Bros choose to preface it with noting that the movie is by Billy Eichner? Is he like Spike Lee or Tyler Perry where he has an entertainment brand associated with his name? I doubt he's a big enough celebrity that it would get more people into the theater than not mentioning it. I also doubt that Bros is a common enough word that you need to preface it with something to avoid it being lost in the Google shuffle, e.g. "Walt Disney's Frozen."

    Is this the world's most complex Google SEO campaign?

  2. God, ‘aggressiveness’ is a crappy midwit word. Remember ‘On Aggression’ (‘ Zur Naturgeschichte der Aggression’) by Lorenz? Recall that he was a pioneer of what turned into evolutionary psychology.

    • Agree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
  3. LOL! It is highly hypocritical for the US to complain about using a car bomb in a war. We are being led by clowns.

  4. I’m SHOCKED to see little Ukraine act with belligerence with the tacit and material support of the entire western world’s nuclear superpowers behind them. Shocked!

    • Agree: Matthew Kelly
  5. … The United States has pressed Ukraine to share more about its war plans, with mixed success.

    I guess $54 billion doesn’t buy you as much as you’d expect.

    • Thanks: SiNCERITY.net, Coemgen
    • LOL: bomag
    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Harry Baldwin

    The common American won't see any if that money back but I take Schadenfreude in knowing that the lend-lease and eventual Marshall plan for Ukraine will lock Ukrainians into debt slavery for generations

    , @Mike Tre
    @Harry Baldwin

    You’d think it’d buy a better laptop repair man.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Harry Baldwin

    Always great when a comment gets an "Agree," a "Thanks," an "LOL", and--the true mark of distinction--a "Troll" from that one who lives under the iSteve bridge, Corvinus. Made my day!

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

  6. It’s hardly uncommon in history for smaller countries’ aggressiveness to trouble their larger allies: e.g., Serbia led Russia into the Great War in 1914.

    Then there was Austro-Hungary, the weaker junior partner of Imperial Germany.

    I believe it was the historian A.J.P. Taylor who said that the junior partner in an alliance, in a perverse way, has the upper hand. They are just important enough that the senior partner has to care what they think, permitting the junior partner to say “you have to indulge me or I will fold”.

    Or put another way, an “ally” like Ukraine is like having a pushy, mouthy girlfriend who is always telling other guys at the sock-hop that her boyfriend can kick their ass.

    • Replies: @anonymouseperson
    @Mr. Anon

    Germany and Russia ironically had no reason to fight each other in 1914. Neither the Baltic or Volga Germans interested the former and Bismark said the Balkans were not worth the bones of one soldier. Likewise, Serbia was of no value or importance to Russia. Both countries were hugely led astray by a smaller junior party that they would have been better off without.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  7. We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Dave Pinsen

    Assassinating the family member of a critic who is irritating you is an act straight out of the Mossad's playbook. Though usually they go for the critic himself.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.
     
    I'd say it's more like Putin created a monster in Ukraine. Turned the sort of routine "people not as well sorted into the right country" of Eastern Ukraine--a problem in numerous countries--into an actual war.

    And we'd have to be exceedingly unlucky to "get us all killed". Putin desiring to use nukes against the West to show he's really, really pissed off, is probably the one thing sure to get the Russian establishment to Beria him. (Russians have families too.)


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution. The US should be continuously working the dialog to figure out where the real concerns and bottom lines are for Russia and Ukraine--not just Putin and Zelensky but the larger establishments--including Russia's issues with us and seeing if there is a rough shape of a peaceful solution, then pushing toward that.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Mark G.

  8. The leak indicates dissension and factional disagreements among various cliques in the know within the U.S. intel and DoD communities.

    There’s pushback against the more fanatical warmongers by people who are starting to realize where this catastrophe is heading. Collapse of the European economy, massive global economic dislocation, nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Voltarde


    Collapse of the European economy, massive global economic dislocation, nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.
     
    Neocons: "Of course, there may be downsides as well..."
    , @Jack D
    @Voltarde


    nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.
     
    Make up your mind - is it going to be a nuclear war or a forever war? Nuclear wars tend to be short. Japan surrendered 6 days after Nagasaki.

    From the Soviet POV, was the Vietnam War a bottomless pit of Soviet funding wasted on yet another forever war or a resounding success in kicking their global competitor down a notch?

    How about a 3rd alternative - it's going to be a short war when the Russian military offense further collapses and Putin has no choice but to withdraw his forces to the (real) Russian border as he already has done in several areas. Is that one of the possible outcomes?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @fredyetagain aka superhonky

  9. The realization that Ukrainian assassins are capable of blowing up politicians’ cars in and around the Kremlin is going to shift the likelihood that any more Chechen assassins (or, to reference Yuschenko’s attempted assassination, dioxin poisoners) will be sent out from Moscow to Kyiv. It seemed for a while that the Russians were ramping up the “Zelensky will soon be gone” rhetoric, though perhaps that was just in response to the increasing fear that Putin is the one whose days are numbered if he continues to bungle everything.

    But more recently, I get the sense that this fevered invocation of how Zelensky must die has subsided. Maybe I’m just imagining that, or maybe that had nothing to do with the Dugina assassination, but I think a message has been delivered and now it’s Moscow’s turn to either face the changing reality of their situation or to ramp up the assassination attempts even further and thereby dare Kyiv to do its worst.

    There is the story of how Tito got annoyed by the repeated efforts by Stalin to assassinate him, and sent a sternly worded letter to the effect that if Stalin continues, Tito would dispatch only a single assassin to Moscow because only a single assassin would be necessary. My guess is that Tito likewise backed that letter up with a mysterious and sudden death of some high figure that Stalin knew he himself didn’t order to have killed (though everyone else probably assumed that’s what happened). Had that not been the case, the Moscow assassins would have just kept coming.

    • Disagree: Gordo
  10. Talking of aggressiveness:

    Professor shot, killed on University of Arizona campus; suspect in custody
    Department of Hydrology professor was shot and killed by a former student.

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/professor-shot-killed-university-arizona-campus-suspect-custody/story?id=91064661

    The suspect was identified by police as Murad Dervish

    Allahu Akbar?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @epebble


    The suspect was identified by police as Murad Dervish
     
    Turk? Forty six years old. "Come to America; be a student forever."
    , @Matthew Kelly
    @epebble

    Looks like the NYU prof who got fired for, ahem, "making his class too difficult", got off easy...

    Replies: @epebble

  11. Anonymous[373] • Disclaimer says:

    The real question from this conflict is if Xi Jinping in China is taking this as a warning that invasions nowadays are really hard, or if he is as delusional as Putin is and thinks he can take Taiwan.

    It’s amazing how the American public is simply unaware that we are likely to get in a shooting war with China over Taiwan before the year 2030. I think the US will come out on top, but China will no doubt land their punches too.

    • Replies: @anonymouseperson
    @Anonymous

    Why should the USA take punches for Taiwan?

    , @njguy73
    @Anonymous


    Taiwan will be re-united with the Motherland….by some combination of economic carrot and military stick. The U.S. will grumble ineffectually, up to the point where the Chinese ambassador loses his patience and asks the U.S. Secretary of State point-blank: “How many cities are you willing to lose over this? We ourselves are willing to lose three or four.” Then we will stop grumbling.
     
    John Derbyshire, National Review, August 2, 2002

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2002/08/unpleasant-truths-john-derbyshire/
    , @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    It’s amazing how the American public is simply unaware that we are likely to get in a shooting war with China over Taiwan before the year 2030.
     
    What is wrong with reunification of Taiwan with China?
  12. I hope this pisses off the Ukes to no end and they decide to go shopping for their weapons somewhere else. They’re pretty entitled and demanding for a country supposedly fighting for its life.

    • Agree: AndrewR, Not Raul
  13. Many memorable characters in literature are in a kind of limbo between the limited man they are, and the more formidable man that, maybe, they wish, they might be. Zel being Jewish, I will observe that this describes a frequent protagonist for Philip Roth’s Zhlubs, for example, Klugman, in Portnoy’s Complaint. These characters are interesting to us, because we recognize the type, and the harm they can do. Pesky Zhlub Zelensky, although only a Zhlub, is in a position to do terrible harm, as he tries to flex his non-muscles.

  14. PhysicistDave:

    The killing must stop.

    God:

    THE KILLING WILL CONTINUE
    UNTIL MORALE IMPROVES

    [MORE]

    SENT FROM MY IPHONE

  15. @Dave Pinsen
    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.

    https://twitter.com/portfolioarmor/status/1577410829875441664?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    Replies: @Polistra, @AnotherDad

    Assassinating the family member of a critic who is irritating you is an act straight out of the Mossad’s playbook. Though usually they go for the critic himself.

    • Agree: Not Raul
  16. “The United States took no part in the attack, either by providing intelligence or other assistance, officials said.”

    I guess the question is who cares what US government officials claim, and further, why would anyone believe them?

    • Agree: Spud Boy, TWS
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @usNthem

    This is the first instance I am aware of of the US regime throwing the Ukrainian regime under the bus. It seems very significant, regardless of the veracity of the US regime's claim.

    Replies: @BosTex

  17. How do you interpret the bullshit that is the NY Times… what is the Deep State trying to say through its official source of propaganda. It must be trying to blow smoke up Germany’s ass.. or Europe’s ass that geez it was the Ukies… not the US… Maybe the Ukies are to the US what the North Koreans are to China.. Damn we just can’t control them (our vassal state)…. they are crazy!!!
    It’s not like the US would have to supply everything possible for the pipeline sabotage….intelligence.. training… explosives… Those damn Ukies are insane Krauts…

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Stonewall Jackson

    The killing of Dugina used a relatively crude small IED, very different to the pipeline sabotage. I doubt Ukraine would be embarrassing the Poles like this while the war makes Poland so vital to Ukraine. On the other hand the assassination of Dugin (or possibly his daughter was target) almost certainly was approved by Zelensky, possibly even was commissioned by him. He is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia's way.

    It is pretty well established that the US was selecting Russian generals for the Ukrainians to hit. Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @HA

  18. @Dave Pinsen
    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.

    https://twitter.com/portfolioarmor/status/1577410829875441664?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    Replies: @Polistra, @AnotherDad

    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.

    I’d say it’s more like Putin created a monster in Ukraine. Turned the sort of routine “people not as well sorted into the right country” of Eastern Ukraine–a problem in numerous countries–into an actual war.

    And we’d have to be exceedingly unlucky to “get us all killed”. Putin desiring to use nukes against the West to show he’s really, really pissed off, is probably the one thing sure to get the Russian establishment to Beria him. (Russians have families too.)

    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution. The US should be continuously working the dialog to figure out where the real concerns and bottom lines are for Russia and Ukraine–not just Putin and Zelensky but the larger establishments–including Russia’s issues with us and seeing if there is a rough shape of a peaceful solution, then pushing toward that.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @AnotherDad

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @HA, @John Johnson

    , @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution.
     
    And yet we didn't then, just as we don't now. And for the same reasons. And all in the interests of the same kind of people.
    , @Bill Jones
    @AnotherDad

    The monster was created by Nuland's 2014 coup.
    You damn well know that.

    , @Mark G.
    @AnotherDad


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution.
     
    When you have a country in serious decline, as this one is, people with poor judgement tend to rise to the top of the government. They then make bad decisions across a whole range of issues like immigration policy, crime policy, Covid policy, energy policy, Federal Reserve policy, education policy, foreign policy and so on. Countries in this situation suffer a slow death by a thousand cuts. We are likely to dribble away money on this conflict for several more years. Since our leaders have bad judgement, of course they will waste money extending this conflict instead of working to end it.

    I'm a short-term pessimist but a long-term optimist. The current system will become totally discredited and then things will improve. Biden has received a respite from his plunging poll numbers due to a slight drop in inflation. This is just temporary, though. It mainly happened because he is depleting the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and putting oil out on the market. That oil will be all gone in a year and then won't be there if we ever really need it. It's just another example of bad judgement by our political leaders. They have been busily alienating other countries, and they are now coming together into an anti-American empire coalition. The new announcement that Saudi Arabia and OPEC is cutting oil production is them siding with Russia.

    Replies: @Unintended Consequence

  19. @Harry Baldwin
    … The United States has pressed Ukraine to share more about its war plans, with mixed success.

    I guess $54 billion doesn't buy you as much as you'd expect.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Mike Tre, @Harry Baldwin

    The common American won’t see any if that money back but I take Schadenfreude in knowing that the lend-lease and eventual Marshall plan for Ukraine will lock Ukrainians into debt slavery for generations

    • LOL: BB753
  20. @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.
     
    I'd say it's more like Putin created a monster in Ukraine. Turned the sort of routine "people not as well sorted into the right country" of Eastern Ukraine--a problem in numerous countries--into an actual war.

    And we'd have to be exceedingly unlucky to "get us all killed". Putin desiring to use nukes against the West to show he's really, really pissed off, is probably the one thing sure to get the Russian establishment to Beria him. (Russians have families too.)


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution. The US should be continuously working the dialog to figure out where the real concerns and bottom lines are for Russia and Ukraine--not just Putin and Zelensky but the larger establishments--including Russia's issues with us and seeing if there is a rough shape of a peaceful solution, then pushing toward that.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Mark G.

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.

    • Agree: Thoughts, Gordo, TWS
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.
     
    Huh? "Aggressive" do you mean just fight "successfully".

    Ukraine has to fight as best it can--this is existential for it--and was doing so immediately. Any country must or it does not survive. This aid has meant it is presumably doing so much more capably than it could otherwise. Not much doubt about that.

    Minsk accords? LOL. The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border. Russia was precisely trashing that border--and for that matter the Donbass autonomy--on day one of the invasion. Putin declared those statelets part of Russia and the border with Russia null and void from the get go. And the invasion was much more massive than just Donetsk and Luhansk, encompassing large areas of Eastern Ukraine with are solidly ethnically and even linguistically Ukrainian.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @EddieSpaghetti, @YetAnotherAnon

    , @HA
    @Dave Pinsen

    "Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords."

    Yeah, because Putin's promises are rock-solid? Because rewarding him with Crimea and then Donbass disincentivizes him from seeking even more? Sounds like a plan, Dave!

    No, had he been given what he wanted without resistance, Putin would have then turned his attention to Georgia, or Transnistria, or Moldova, or Kazakhstan, perhaps with cover from China's attack on Taiwan. And guess who would have. had the "honor" of being chosen to be first into this meat grinder 2.0? Why, those very same Ukrainians who were "rescued" from the clutches of Kyiv. I mean, they gotta show their gratitude somehow, right?


    After months of denials that Russia is driven by imperial ambitions in Ukraine, Putin appeared to embrace that mission, comparing [Peter the Great's] campaign with Russia’s current military actions.

    “Apparently, it is also our lot to return [what is Russia’s] and strengthen [the country]. And if we proceed from the fact that these basic values form the basis of our existence, we will certainly succeed in solving the tasks that we face.”
     

    Of course there would still be other grievances to rectify:

    We won’t let the samurai take even the smallest piece of our land,
    We will stand up and protect the capital of amber [Kaliningrad],
    We will save our Sevastopol and Crimea, for the sake of our descendants.
    And we will return Alaska to the haven of the motherland.
     

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @John Johnson
    @Dave Pinsen

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, .

    That's not true at all.

    The Battle of Kiev was fought before we had sent them HIMARs. It was mainly fought with Soviet weapons.

    Putin actually thought it was a good idea to send a 40 mile column of armor and supply trucks at Kiev. A 5 mph parade of military equipment.

    He also dropped his elite Spetsnaz on the city with orders to find and kill Zelensky. They were wiped out.

    This was going to have a bloody outcome regardless of US involvement. Putin incorrectly assessed that the Ukrainians would welcome them and Zelensky would flee. Even if they had taken Kiev it would have turned into years of partisan warfare. They handed out over 200k AK-47s and thousands of RPGs after the invasion started. The Ukrainians don't want to live under the boot of a little dictator. Why is that so hard for some of you to understand?

    Putin doesn't understand warfare and had no backup plan. He is a cornered rat and is running out of options.

    this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords

    He planned on taking the entire country. Taking Donbas only became the goal after he failed to take Kiev. Those "independent Republics" that he swore to protect are now just Russian territory. He also took two oblasts that weren't claimed by separatists. So completely full of s--t and can't even keep his narrative together.

    Replies: @Jack D

  21. @Anonymous
    Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiJoqTk08AI

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @clifford brown, @Mike Tre, @JimDandy, @Dennis Dale, @Batman

    C’mon dude, don’t post ugly shit like that. This is supposed to be “safe space” for us anti-globo-homo types.

    Hollyweird pervs have insisted on jamming this shit in our faces for decades. Sailer’s supposed to be a respite from it.

    • Agree: Old Prude, BosTex
    • LOL: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad

    Grow up, bro. It's basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years. The trailer for it looks pretty good:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWd-AuIgCrc

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra, @vinteuil, @TWS

  22. @epebble
    Talking of aggressiveness:

    Professor shot, killed on University of Arizona campus; suspect in custody
    Department of Hydrology professor was shot and killed by a former student.

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/professor-shot-killed-university-arizona-campus-suspect-custody/story?id=91064661

    The suspect was identified by police as Murad Dervish

    Allahu Akbar?

    Replies: @bomag, @Matthew Kelly

    The suspect was identified by police as Murad Dervish

    Turk? Forty six years old. “Come to America; be a student forever.”

  23. @Anonymous
    Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiJoqTk08AI

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @clifford brown, @Mike Tre, @JimDandy, @Dennis Dale, @Batman

    Please don’t…

    Instead review the Russ Meyer film , Up ! Or Beneath the Valley of the Ultra Vixens.
    Kitten Natividad was in both films and recently passed away at 74 (not from Covid)

    • Replies: @profnasty
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Really enjoyed/recommend Faster Pussycat Kill Kill. Meyer was inspired.

  24. @Dave Pinsen
    @AnotherDad

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @HA, @John Johnson

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.

    Huh? “Aggressive” do you mean just fight “successfully”.

    Ukraine has to fight as best it can–this is existential for it–and was doing so immediately. Any country must or it does not survive. This aid has meant it is presumably doing so much more capably than it could otherwise. Not much doubt about that.

    Minsk accords? LOL. The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border. Russia was precisely trashing that border–and for that matter the Donbass autonomy–on day one of the invasion. Putin declared those statelets part of Russia and the border with Russia null and void from the get go. And the invasion was much more massive than just Donetsk and Luhansk, encompassing large areas of Eastern Ukraine with are solidly ethnically and even linguistically Ukrainian.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad


    Ukraine has to fight as best it can–this is existential for it–and was doing so immediately.
     
    It isn’t existential for the Ukraine. That is clear as day from Russia’s peace terms, and underscored by Russia’s reasonable actions over the past ten years.

    As you yourself write:

    “The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border.”

    Dave Pinsen had been absolutely spot on all through this.

    Do you know what is “existential”? Existential is when you have millions of foreigners moving into your country with the intention of remaining there permanently. Like what is happening to the United States. And to Canada and Great Britain. Or to the Gentiles in the West Bank of Palestine. Those things are existential. The Ukraine having a government that is friendly to Russia definitely is not.

    Where is the nominally “American” leadership class on those existential crises? They are enabling them in fact. And why, in contrast, are they so up in arms about the Ukraine?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    , @EddieSpaghetti
    @AnotherDad

    From 1991 to 2014, Ukraine had a totally lame army. Yet, during that time period, Ukraine was able to successfully defend its territory without firing a single shot. Unfortunately, thanks largely to the "help" of America, those halcyon days are long gone.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @AnotherDad

    AD, reading the domestic news -"The US elite bastards are stealing my country and telling me it's getting better! You can't believe a word they say!"

    AD, reading the foreign news - "The Russian elite bastards are stealing Ukraine! USA! USA! Slava Zelensky!"

    But, as I keep pointing out to you, Poland and Ukraine have been swapped between various empires for a few centuries now - the Swedes, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, Germany, Soviets again. Over this time millions died, the borders swayed to and fro - but at the end of it, Poland was still full of Poles and Ukraine, or at least the centre-west major part (it was after all created by a Soviet clerk's pen) was still full of Ukrainians.

    If the GAE win, Kiev will look like London. The stabbed people at the side of the road tried to stop bike thieves.

    https://twitter.com/johnnyxl/status/1577944969817595907

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon

  25. @Voltarde
    The leak indicates dissension and factional disagreements among various cliques in the know within the U.S. intel and DoD communities.

    There's pushback against the more fanatical warmongers by people who are starting to realize where this catastrophe is heading. Collapse of the European economy, massive global economic dislocation, nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Jack D

    Collapse of the European economy, massive global economic dislocation, nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.

    Neocons: “Of course, there may be downsides as well…”

  26. @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous

    C'mon dude, don't post ugly shit like that. This is supposed to be "safe space" for us anti-globo-homo types.

    Hollyweird pervs have insisted on jamming this shit in our faces for decades. Sailer's supposed to be a respite from it.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Grow up, bro. It’s basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years. The trailer for it looks pretty good:

    • Troll: duncsbaby, TWS
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous


    Grow up, bro.
     
    Two dudes kissing is disgusting. Every normal man thinks so. Don't project your kink on to the rest of us.

    It’s basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years.
     
    If so (I will never know), it's because the purpose of it is to get straight women on board with the queer agenda.

    The trailer for it looks pretty good:
     
    The very idea of it is vile garbage. I've heard Billy Eichner speak for all of about 60 seconds, and that was enough to determine that he is repellant.

    The time has simply come for normal men to say: "F*&k this degenerate homo-s**t. Closets exist for a reason."

    , @Polistra
    @Anonymous

    https://i.ibb.co/NVpqWV6/38dad7c7430fc41ed1a855dca31a00bde8b02ae9-14.jpg

    , @vinteuil
    @Anonymous

    At 1:20, the protagonists exchange a chaste kiss - and then the camera pulls away, revealing that a couple of other guys are sucking their cocks.

    This is gay "marriage."

    , @TWS
    @Anonymous

    Tame? What I saw was degenerate, vile crap that used to and still should have long prison sentences attached. You are celebrating and encouraging the destruction of everything natural and decent.

  27. Huh? “Aggressive” do you mean just fight “successfully”.

    No, I mean making maximalist demands (e.g., Crimea, regime change in Russia), and being increasingly obnoxious toward their American benefactors (such as Zelensky implying Elon Musk–who donated Starlink satellites to the Ukraine early on–was a Putin stooge for proposing a peace settlement).

    Minsk accords? LOL. The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border. Russia was precisely trashing that border–and for that matter the Donbass autonomy–on day one of the invasion.

    Right, the Ukrainians didn’t abide by the accords, killed thousands of Russian-speakers in the Donbas, and then after eight years of that, Putin invaded. He probably waited eight years too long.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @HA
    @Dave Pinsen

    "such as Zelensky implying Elon Musk–who donated Starlink satellites to the Ukraine early on"

    There's no evidence he donated a dime -- he allowed someone else [probably the US which subsidized his companies massively] to buy it.

    But he was happy to let people think the credit was all due to him.

  28. My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.

    The only true information conveyed by a deep state press release to the NYT (i.e., anonymous “official says . . .”), is that the deep state has, in fact, made the public statement and therefore intends it to have some effect in the “information war.” Steve’s guess is a pretty good one. But this is also generally priming the public to understand that: “We don’t fully control the Ukrainians . . . only the successful ideas are ours, anything unethical or stupid you hear about was all their idea, and they didn’t tell us anything about it.”

    BTW, the Big Serge substack has an interesting discussion on the history of military mobilization, and the internal political dynamics faced by Putin in mounting a partial Russian mobilization.

    In sum, the cycle of military mobilization systems in Europe is a mirror of the political system. Armies were very small during the era where there was little to no mass political participation with the regime. Rome fielded large armies because there was significant political buy-in and a cohesive identity in the form of Roman citizenship. This allowed Rome to generate high military participation, even in the Republican era where the Roman state was very small and bureaucratically sparse. Medieval Europe had fragmented political authority and an extremely low sense of cohesive political identity, and consequently its armies were shockingly small. Armies began to grow in size again as the sense of national identity and participation grew, and it is no coincidence that the largest war in history – the Nazi-Soviet War – was fought between two regimes that had totalizing ideologies that generated an extremely high level of political participation.

    That brings us to today. In the 21st century, with its interconnectedness and crushing availability of both information and misinformation, the process of generating mass political – and hence military – participation is much more nuanced. No country wields a totalizing utopian vision, and it is inarguable that the sense of national cohesion is significantly lower now than it was one hundred years ago.

    Putin, very simply, could not have conducted a large scale mobilization at the onset of the war. He possessed neither a coercive mechanism nor the manifest threat to generate mass political support. Few Russians would have believed that there was some existential threat lurking in the shadow – they needed to be shown, and the west has not disappointed. Likewise, few Russians would likely have supported the obliteration of Ukrainian infrastructure and urban utilities in the opening days of the war. But now, the only vocal criticism of Putin within Russia is on the side of further escalation. The problem with Putin, from the Russian perspective, is that he has not gone far enough. In other words – mass politics have already moved ahead of the government, making mobilization and escalation politically trivial. Above all, we must remember that Clausewitz’s maxim remains true. The military situation is merely a subset of the political situation, and military mobilization is also political mobilization – a manifestation of society’s political participation in the state. https://bigserge.substack.com/p/politics-by-other-means?utm_source=profile&utm_medium=reader2

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Hypnotoad666

    That's one of his better recent posts, and seems less likely to be overtaken by events than some of his previous ones. He and the RWA Podcast guys have similar predictions about the war: further Russian retreats/consolidation over the next few weeks, followed by a stabilization of the front, then followed by a Russian offensive in the new year.

  29. My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.

    Rather than a Polish one?

    The huge amount of explosive used suggests the Russians, whose thinking can be difficult to follow. The former commander of the Marines Van Ripper’s Marius article. Note that the Russians were outnumbered in Ukraine, despite being the attackers–amounting to a profound disadvantage.

    https://www.imetatronink.com/2022/08/a-former-us-marine-corps-officers.html

    One way to resolve this apparent paradox is to characterize the raids of the first five weeks of the war as a grand deception that, while working little in the way of direct destruction, made possible the subsequent attrition of the Ukrainian armed forces. In particular, the threat posed by the raids delayed the movement of Ukrainian forces in the main theater of the war until the Russians had deployed the artillery units, secured the transporting network, and accumulated the stocks of ammunition needed to conduct a long series of big bombardments. This delay also ensured that, when the Ukrainians did deploy additional formations to the Donbass region, the movement of such forces, and the supplies needed to sustain them, had been rendered much more difficult by the ruin wrought upon the Ukrainian rail network by long-range guided missiles. In other words, the Russians conducted a brief campaign of maneuver in the north in order to set the stage for a longer, and, ultimately, more important campaign of attrition in the east. […] The Russian invasion of Ukraine may mark the start of a new cold war, a “long twilight struggle” comparable to the one that ended with the collapse of the Soviet Empire more than three decades ago.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Sean


    The huge amount of explosive used suggests the Russians, whose thinking can be difficult to follow.
     
    Again (and again), why exactly would the Russians go to so much trouble to blow up their own undersea pipeline when they could easily turn off the flow at their end any time they want? Difficult indeed.

    Replies: @Sean

  30. This sounds a lot like disinformation…

    Some inside sources point to Dugin himself to escalate the russian effort by creating a ‘martyr’ and his behaviora and statements afterwards seem like the kinds of things that parents who kill their children say….

    His first official statement could be summarized as: “Don’t waste time trying to figure out who did this… go out and win that war for me!”

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @cliff arroyo

    His first reaction was to appear obviously distraught, looking at the burning wreckage of the car his daughter had been riding in. It was sadistic of Ukraine supporters to suggest he killed his own daughter at the time, and it’s ludicrous of you to suggest it now, after the U.S. government has said the Ukrainians did it—why would the U.S. government carry water for Dugin?

    As for finding the killer, Russia claimed to have identified the killer within a couple days of the murder, and provided video evidence and other documentation in support of that claim. https://twitter.com/_furid/status/1561742930922143745?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

  31. Anonymous[384] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.
     
    Huh? "Aggressive" do you mean just fight "successfully".

    Ukraine has to fight as best it can--this is existential for it--and was doing so immediately. Any country must or it does not survive. This aid has meant it is presumably doing so much more capably than it could otherwise. Not much doubt about that.

    Minsk accords? LOL. The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border. Russia was precisely trashing that border--and for that matter the Donbass autonomy--on day one of the invasion. Putin declared those statelets part of Russia and the border with Russia null and void from the get go. And the invasion was much more massive than just Donetsk and Luhansk, encompassing large areas of Eastern Ukraine with are solidly ethnically and even linguistically Ukrainian.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @EddieSpaghetti, @YetAnotherAnon

    Ukraine has to fight as best it can–this is existential for it–and was doing so immediately.

    It isn’t existential for the Ukraine. That is clear as day from Russia’s peace terms, and underscored by Russia’s reasonable actions over the past ten years.

    As you yourself write:

    “The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border.”

    Dave Pinsen had been absolutely spot on all through this.

    Do you know what is “existential”? Existential is when you have millions of foreigners moving into your country with the intention of remaining there permanently. Like what is happening to the United States. And to Canada and Great Britain. Or to the Gentiles in the West Bank of Palestine. Those things are existential. The Ukraine having a government that is friendly to Russia definitely is not.

    Where is the nominally “American” leadership class on those existential crises? They are enabling them in fact. And why, in contrast, are they so up in arms about the Ukraine?

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    The Ukraine War is existential for Russia, not the Ukraine, though the longer it goes on, the more territory Russia will likely demand. Had Boris Johnson not sabotaged the negotiations in April, Russia likely wouldn’t have annexed the four oblasts it did, and settled for autonomy for them instead.

    Don’t take my word for the war being existential to Russia—listen to Zelensky and the Western blue checks who support him. If Russia loses the war, they won’t stop until it’s wrecked. Think China in the Warlord Era.

    https://twitter.com/apmassaro3/status/1575790467891228672?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    https://twitter.com/ggreenwald/status/1539661895934029824?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    Replies: @Polistra, @Hypnotoad666

  32. @Hypnotoad666

    My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.
     
    The only true information conveyed by a deep state press release to the NYT (i.e., anonymous "official says . . ."), is that the deep state has, in fact, made the public statement and therefore intends it to have some effect in the "information war." Steve's guess is a pretty good one. But this is also generally priming the public to understand that: "We don't fully control the Ukrainians . . . only the successful ideas are ours, anything unethical or stupid you hear about was all their idea, and they didn't tell us anything about it."

    BTW, the Big Serge substack has an interesting discussion on the history of military mobilization, and the internal political dynamics faced by Putin in mounting a partial Russian mobilization.

    In sum, the cycle of military mobilization systems in Europe is a mirror of the political system. Armies were very small during the era where there was little to no mass political participation with the regime. Rome fielded large armies because there was significant political buy-in and a cohesive identity in the form of Roman citizenship. This allowed Rome to generate high military participation, even in the Republican era where the Roman state was very small and bureaucratically sparse. Medieval Europe had fragmented political authority and an extremely low sense of cohesive political identity, and consequently its armies were shockingly small. Armies began to grow in size again as the sense of national identity and participation grew, and it is no coincidence that the largest war in history - the Nazi-Soviet War - was fought between two regimes that had totalizing ideologies that generated an extremely high level of political participation.

    That brings us to today. In the 21st century, with its interconnectedness and crushing availability of both information and misinformation, the process of generating mass political - and hence military - participation is much more nuanced. No country wields a totalizing utopian vision, and it is inarguable that the sense of national cohesion is significantly lower now than it was one hundred years ago.

    Putin, very simply, could not have conducted a large scale mobilization at the onset of the war. He possessed neither a coercive mechanism nor the manifest threat to generate mass political support. Few Russians would have believed that there was some existential threat lurking in the shadow - they needed to be shown, and the west has not disappointed. Likewise, few Russians would likely have supported the obliteration of Ukrainian infrastructure and urban utilities in the opening days of the war. But now, the only vocal criticism of Putin within Russia is on the side of further escalation. The problem with Putin, from the Russian perspective, is that he has not gone far enough. In other words - mass politics have already moved ahead of the government, making mobilization and escalation politically trivial. Above all, we must remember that Clausewitz’s maxim remains true. The military situation is merely a subset of the political situation, and military mobilization is also political mobilization - a manifestation of society’s political participation in the state. https://bigserge.substack.com/p/politics-by-other-means?utm_source=profile&utm_medium=reader2
     

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    That’s one of his better recent posts, and seems less likely to be overtaken by events than some of his previous ones. He and the RWA Podcast guys have similar predictions about the war: further Russian retreats/consolidation over the next few weeks, followed by a stabilization of the front, then followed by a Russian offensive in the new year.

  33. @Sean

    My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.
     
    Rather than a Polish one?

    The huge amount of explosive used suggests the Russians, whose thinking can be difficult to follow. The former commander of the Marines Van Ripper's Marius article. Note that the Russians were outnumbered in Ukraine, despite being the attackers--amounting to a profound disadvantage.


    https://www.imetatronink.com/2022/08/a-former-us-marine-corps-officers.html

    One way to resolve this apparent paradox is to characterize the raids of the first five weeks of the war as a grand deception that, while working little in the way of direct destruction, made possible the subsequent attrition of the Ukrainian armed forces. In particular, the threat posed by the raids delayed the movement of Ukrainian forces in the main theater of the war until the Russians had deployed the artillery units, secured the transporting network, and accumulated the stocks of ammunition needed to conduct a long series of big bombardments. This delay also ensured that, when the Ukrainians did deploy additional formations to the Donbass region, the movement of such forces, and the supplies needed to sustain them, had been rendered much more difficult by the ruin wrought upon the Ukrainian rail network by long-range guided missiles. In other words, the Russians conducted a brief campaign of maneuver in the north in order to set the stage for a longer, and, ultimately, more important campaign of attrition in the east. [...] The Russian invasion of Ukraine may mark the start of a new cold war, a “long twilight struggle” comparable to the one that ended with the collapse of the Soviet Empire more than three decades ago.
     

    Replies: @Polistra

    The huge amount of explosive used suggests the Russians, whose thinking can be difficult to follow.

    Again (and again), why exactly would the Russians go to so much trouble to blow up their own undersea pipeline when they could easily turn off the flow at their end any time they want? Difficult indeed.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Polistra

    Because merely turning the gas off leaves it open for Russia to turn it back on, if it reached a deal with the West over Ukraine. In the aforementioned scenario, the West has a big carrot for the Kremlin including any new occupants that may be there in the next few years. This way, Russia has burnt a bridge for compromise and no restarting of gas will be possible. Putin signals he is playing to win or lose it all with Ukraine, and anyone who might be hankering after an reinstatement of the German__Russia gas trade will now know it is no longer physically possible, and even the overthrow of Putin would not change that. Putin secures his position from Western influenced economic arguments for a peaceful resolution, because they are now futile.

    Poland is another suspect


    Rarely has as a figure as senior as Sir Richard Shirreff, dared to put his name to as ominous a contingency history as one pictured in 2017 War With Russia. It can't happen? Just like the Anschluss of Crimea, or Brexit? Russia is again ruled by one man alone and President Putin has proved capable of gambling with the fate of his country and peace in Europe. In the guise of fast-paced novel, General Shirreff shows how it could actually be done: the disinformation, the subversion, the order of battle. And how woefully unprepared the free world would be to stand up to such a challenge. His warning should be read not only by anyone interested in fate of the West but, above all, by politicians whose decisions on defence determine our options in future emergencies. ― Radoslaw Sikorski
     
    Sikorski seemed to imply it was the US who blew up Nordstream 1 and 2 , but note that Sikorski's thanked the Americans (and this from a former Foreign Minister of Poland). Poland wants to have no option for having gas supplied from Russia. Poland's dream is to be to be totally dependent on America to supply gas to Poland--good and cheap. Well the US will have to now, won't they?

    Replies: @Jack D

  34. American officials have been frustrated with Ukraine’s lack of transparency about its military and covert plans, especially on Russian soil.

    Oh yeah, swear to God, the US didn’t know nuffin’

    It’s hardly uncommon in history for smaller countries’ aggressiveness to trouble their larger allies:

    For sure, because this is totally 1914. I mean, if only we had some surveillance tech.

    • LOL: Kratoklastes
  35. @Stonewall Jackson
    How do you interpret the bullshit that is the NY Times... what is the Deep State trying to say through its official source of propaganda. It must be trying to blow smoke up Germany's ass.. or Europe's ass that geez it was the Ukies... not the US... Maybe the Ukies are to the US what the North Koreans are to China.. Damn we just can't control them (our vassal state).... they are crazy!!!
    It's not like the US would have to supply everything possible for the pipeline sabotage....intelligence.. training... explosives... Those damn Ukies are insane Krauts...

    Replies: @Sean

    The killing of Dugina used a relatively crude small IED, very different to the pipeline sabotage. I doubt Ukraine would be embarrassing the Poles like this while the war makes Poland so vital to Ukraine. On the other hand the assassination of Dugin (or possibly his daughter was target) almost certainly was approved by Zelensky, possibly even was commissioned by him. He is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia’s way.

    It is pretty well established that the US was selecting Russian generals for the Ukrainians to hit. Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Sean

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. Always an education.

    Replies: @Sean

    , @Jack D
    @Sean


    Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.
     
    If (IF) this actually happened, it makes perfect sense. The US has intelligence sources inside of Russia whom it does not want compromised. Even if it is purely based on satellite and electronic intelligence, they don't want to clue the Russians in as to what level of granularity American intelligence has. (BTW, what makes you so sure that the Americans even knew what general was there as distinct from knowing that they had located an important Russian command center? My impression is that most of the hits on Russian generals were lucky hits - they intend to hit a command center and a general just happens to be present.) One of the rules of intelligence in general is that it is shared on a "need to know" basis.

    As far as Ukraine is concerned, ANY dead Russian general is a good hit. ANY Russian command and control center is a good hit, with or without generals. What were they going to do, say, "Oh, no, if it's General Suchandsuchov we don't want to harm him? So the Americans say "we have located an important Russian command and control center at such and such coordinates" and the Ukrainians are only too happy to hit it, no further questions asked. If later on they find out that General Suchandsuchov was visiting that day instead of just a bunch of colonels, they are extra happy.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @HA
    @Sean

    "[Zelensky] is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia’s way."

    Or, he is just responding to a decade of targeted assassinations by Putin, what with Yuschenko's doxine poisoning, and the Chechen hit squads sent to Kyiv (not to mention the polonium and nerve agents used by Putin on his in-house local troublemakers who thought that escaping to distant lands would save them).

    I would note that even Anatoly Karlin -- hey, does anyone still remember him? -- was deeply dismayed that just hours after Izym was taken, Zelensky toured the front line with nary a pop-gun shot in his direction from the nearby Russian forces. Karlin claims this "Suggests either an agreement not to try to kill Zelensky', or else Putin's murderers-for-hire are just total idiots.

    I'm OK with either explanation, but if we're going with the "agreement not to kill", it also suggests that the message the Ukrainians wanted to deliver with the Dugina assassination was heard loud and clear. Now, I'm against bomb assassinations, myself (though I realize that the partisans behind the lines don't have much in the way of other options). There are just too many was that innocent bystanders could get hit. I think it's far more effective to leave a note under a dictator's pillow (or maybe his wife's or daughter's pillow) saying "we can come back any time" (maybe the letter from Tito to Stalin was similarly delivered to the bedroom pillow of Stalin's daughter, for all anyone knows) but I reluctantly admit that sometimes a car bomb works, too.

    In any case, there's a lesson there, Sean. If you're so hot and bothered about the loose cannon in Kyiv, see if you can try to rein in the unhinged little firecracker in Moscow who carries around nuclear codes. I'm far more worried about loose nuclear warheads than loose cannons, and Ukraine agreed to give up their nukes. In fact, I'm thinking that until Russians can agree to be ruled by sane people who aren't threatening to start up Armageddon, all sensible people (even those in China and India) should focus on getting Russians to denuclearize as well. Until then, your shrieking about the loose cannon in Kyiv will come off a deeply hypocritical and yet another weak attempt at deflection and misdirection.

    Replies: @Sean, @Rob

  36. @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.
     
    I'd say it's more like Putin created a monster in Ukraine. Turned the sort of routine "people not as well sorted into the right country" of Eastern Ukraine--a problem in numerous countries--into an actual war.

    And we'd have to be exceedingly unlucky to "get us all killed". Putin desiring to use nukes against the West to show he's really, really pissed off, is probably the one thing sure to get the Russian establishment to Beria him. (Russians have families too.)


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution. The US should be continuously working the dialog to figure out where the real concerns and bottom lines are for Russia and Ukraine--not just Putin and Zelensky but the larger establishments--including Russia's issues with us and seeing if there is a rough shape of a peaceful solution, then pushing toward that.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Mark G.

    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution.

    And yet we didn’t then, just as we don’t now. And for the same reasons. And all in the interests of the same kind of people.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  37. @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad


    Ukraine has to fight as best it can–this is existential for it–and was doing so immediately.
     
    It isn’t existential for the Ukraine. That is clear as day from Russia’s peace terms, and underscored by Russia’s reasonable actions over the past ten years.

    As you yourself write:

    “The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border.”

    Dave Pinsen had been absolutely spot on all through this.

    Do you know what is “existential”? Existential is when you have millions of foreigners moving into your country with the intention of remaining there permanently. Like what is happening to the United States. And to Canada and Great Britain. Or to the Gentiles in the West Bank of Palestine. Those things are existential. The Ukraine having a government that is friendly to Russia definitely is not.

    Where is the nominally “American” leadership class on those existential crises? They are enabling them in fact. And why, in contrast, are they so up in arms about the Ukraine?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    The Ukraine War is existential for Russia, not the Ukraine, though the longer it goes on, the more territory Russia will likely demand. Had Boris Johnson not sabotaged the negotiations in April, Russia likely wouldn’t have annexed the four oblasts it did, and settled for autonomy for them instead.

    Don’t take my word for the war being existential to Russia—listen to Zelensky and the Western blue checks who support him. If Russia loses the war, they won’t stop until it’s wrecked. Think China in the Warlord Era.

    https://twitter.com/apmassaro3/status/1575790467891228672?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Dave Pinsen

    https://i.ibb.co/pdxNQXW/NBMo-R9-Du-format-jpg-name-small.jpg

    That settles it. That old board game "Risk" is the cause of all this.

    Of course, the irony is that Russia isn't the empire that needs carving up.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Dave Pinsen

    Speaking of existential threats: The mating of the deep state with wokeism.

    That was a good article linked by GG:


    I am certain that many of you will take the position that I formerly had; that the adoption of woke terminology in service of empire is a cynical ploy. I no longer believe that. I think that these are true believers. Chechens, Volga Tatars, the Komi, the Yakuts, all “indigenous” peoples suffering under Russian colonization, all yearning to be free, all seeking to release the American that is inside of them, screaming to get out. They are US Blacks who still suffer from the legacy of slavery and segregation, they are the Sioux on the reserve, they are the bullied Transgendered, they are the oppressed WaPo journalist from a rich family who went to Swiss boarding school.
     
  38. @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad

    Grow up, bro. It's basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years. The trailer for it looks pretty good:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWd-AuIgCrc

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra, @vinteuil, @TWS

    Grow up, bro.

    Two dudes kissing is disgusting. Every normal man thinks so. Don’t project your kink on to the rest of us.

    It’s basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years.

    If so (I will never know), it’s because the purpose of it is to get straight women on board with the queer agenda.

    The trailer for it looks pretty good:

    The very idea of it is vile garbage. I’ve heard Billy Eichner speak for all of about 60 seconds, and that was enough to determine that he is repellant.

    The time has simply come for normal men to say: “F*&k this degenerate homo-s**t. Closets exist for a reason.”

  39. @cliff arroyo
    This sounds a lot like disinformation...

    Some inside sources point to Dugin himself to escalate the russian effort by creating a 'martyr' and his behaviora and statements afterwards seem like the kinds of things that parents who kill their children say....

    His first official statement could be summarized as: "Don't waste time trying to figure out who did this... go out and win that war for me!"

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    His first reaction was to appear obviously distraught, looking at the burning wreckage of the car his daughter had been riding in. It was sadistic of Ukraine supporters to suggest he killed his own daughter at the time, and it’s ludicrous of you to suggest it now, after the U.S. government has said the Ukrainians did it—why would the U.S. government carry water for Dugin?

    As for finding the killer, Russia claimed to have identified the killer within a couple days of the murder, and provided video evidence and other documentation in support of that claim. https://twitter.com/_furid/status/1561742930922143745?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    • Agree: Sean
  40. The notion that the Ukrainians are skilled at public relations has always been bs. The real reason that Ukraine has done so well in the public relations aspect of this war is that the Western media has been very successful at covering up, or even blaming Russia for, Ukrainian malfeasance.

    Essentially, Ukraine’s Banderites are the closest thing that Europe has to Syria’s so-called “moderate” head choppers. Ukraine could have had a national arrangement similar to that of Canada. Indeed, the Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly (73% for peace) in 2019 for a Canadian style resolution to this conflict. But instead, Ukraine’s lunatic fringe, with the help of America’s neocon lunatic fringe, has led their country, and possibly the whole world, down the path of self destruction.

    • Agree: dimples, acementhead, Gordo
  41. @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad

    Grow up, bro. It's basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years. The trailer for it looks pretty good:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWd-AuIgCrc

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra, @vinteuil, @TWS

    • LOL: Inverness
  42. @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    The Ukraine War is existential for Russia, not the Ukraine, though the longer it goes on, the more territory Russia will likely demand. Had Boris Johnson not sabotaged the negotiations in April, Russia likely wouldn’t have annexed the four oblasts it did, and settled for autonomy for them instead.

    Don’t take my word for the war being existential to Russia—listen to Zelensky and the Western blue checks who support him. If Russia loses the war, they won’t stop until it’s wrecked. Think China in the Warlord Era.

    https://twitter.com/apmassaro3/status/1575790467891228672?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    https://twitter.com/ggreenwald/status/1539661895934029824?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    Replies: @Polistra, @Hypnotoad666


    That settles it. That old board game “Risk” is the cause of all this.

    Of course, the irony is that Russia isn’t the empire that needs carving up.

    • Agree: Inverness
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Polistra

    That map of Russia is the one displayed on Google earth when I looked earlier this week.

  43. You’re right, his first reaction was to _appear_ distraught… there’s a difference between experiencing shock and grief and portraying it.

    And the russian official story was kind of ridiculous on the face of it.

    And look at his first statement again, no reference to a possible culprit (and explicitly saying ‘don’t go there’).

    If a child of yours was killed which would your first reaction:

    “We have to find and punish whoever did this!”
    or
    “Go out and win the war for her!”

  44. @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.
     
    Huh? "Aggressive" do you mean just fight "successfully".

    Ukraine has to fight as best it can--this is existential for it--and was doing so immediately. Any country must or it does not survive. This aid has meant it is presumably doing so much more capably than it could otherwise. Not much doubt about that.

    Minsk accords? LOL. The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border. Russia was precisely trashing that border--and for that matter the Donbass autonomy--on day one of the invasion. Putin declared those statelets part of Russia and the border with Russia null and void from the get go. And the invasion was much more massive than just Donetsk and Luhansk, encompassing large areas of Eastern Ukraine with are solidly ethnically and even linguistically Ukrainian.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @EddieSpaghetti, @YetAnotherAnon

    From 1991 to 2014, Ukraine had a totally lame army. Yet, during that time period, Ukraine was able to successfully defend its territory without firing a single shot. Unfortunately, thanks largely to the “help” of America, those halcyon days are long gone.

    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
  45. @Anonymous
    Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiJoqTk08AI

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @clifford brown, @Mike Tre, @JimDandy, @Dennis Dale, @Batman

  46. @Anonymous
    Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiJoqTk08AI

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @clifford brown, @Mike Tre, @JimDandy, @Dennis Dale, @Batman

    It literally sucks. You’re welcome.

  47. @Harry Baldwin
    … The United States has pressed Ukraine to share more about its war plans, with mixed success.

    I guess $54 billion doesn't buy you as much as you'd expect.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Mike Tre, @Harry Baldwin

    You’d think it’d buy a better laptop repair man.

  48. Putin did it. It’s all part of his plan to not do what’s in the best interests of Russia even though nobody can seem to figure out what that is.

    I mean, if you took the love child of Hitler, Pol Pot, Stalin, Mao, The Agent from The Matrix, Darth Vader, Thanos, Hans Grueber, Cobra Commander, Megatron, and Miley Cyrus it still wouldn’t be as evil as Putin.

  49. @Anonymous
    Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiJoqTk08AI

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @clifford brown, @Mike Tre, @JimDandy, @Dennis Dale, @Batman

    Wait, There Are Rom-Coms That Aren’t Gay?

    I heard someone else say that, but I’m stealing it.

  50. The premise of this article seems rather silly. It suggests that upon hearing news that the Ukes blew up a single person in Russia, the mass media and political classes will now pivot from blaming Russia for the pipeline sabotage and blame 404 instead. According to this theory, there should now be a steady drip feed of ‘evidence’ coming out from unnamed US sources pointing to 404. But why, do you think, that 404 would not already claim it was them if they had actually done it? Wouldn’t they be proud of their achievement? Don’t aks me, perhaps Mr SS can enlighten us further on this geopolitical question.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @dimples

    Everyone knows the US did it, including the entire media. That's why they get furious when anyone starts talking about US complicity- they already know it's true. They went ape when Jeffrey Sachs said it.

    The question is, who are they trying to fool? The Russians know they didn't do it and so would all other intelligence agencies. Maybe this is a lie aimed at the American people. Although, perhaps they're hoping the German population will far for it, since it was an attack on their economy.

  51. Perhaps the US deep state is signalling that they are worried the Ukrolunatic hive they have stepped on will now start coming after them if they do not supply sufficient top dollar weapons as ordered.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @dimples

    One way to stop the lunatics would be to not send them any more $$$, turn the spigot off at the source if you will. But it seems the chosen solution is to instead blow up the dollar itself, known as "Operation NordStream".

  52. @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.
     
    I'd say it's more like Putin created a monster in Ukraine. Turned the sort of routine "people not as well sorted into the right country" of Eastern Ukraine--a problem in numerous countries--into an actual war.

    And we'd have to be exceedingly unlucky to "get us all killed". Putin desiring to use nukes against the West to show he's really, really pissed off, is probably the one thing sure to get the Russian establishment to Beria him. (Russians have families too.)


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution. The US should be continuously working the dialog to figure out where the real concerns and bottom lines are for Russia and Ukraine--not just Putin and Zelensky but the larger establishments--including Russia's issues with us and seeing if there is a rough shape of a peaceful solution, then pushing toward that.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Mark G.

    The monster was created by Nuland’s 2014 coup.
    You damn well know that.

    • Agree: TWS, AndrewR, acementhead
  53. @Polistra
    @Sean


    The huge amount of explosive used suggests the Russians, whose thinking can be difficult to follow.
     
    Again (and again), why exactly would the Russians go to so much trouble to blow up their own undersea pipeline when they could easily turn off the flow at their end any time they want? Difficult indeed.

    Replies: @Sean

    Because merely turning the gas off leaves it open for Russia to turn it back on, if it reached a deal with the West over Ukraine. In the aforementioned scenario, the West has a big carrot for the Kremlin including any new occupants that may be there in the next few years. This way, Russia has burnt a bridge for compromise and no restarting of gas will be possible. Putin signals he is playing to win or lose it all with Ukraine, and anyone who might be hankering after an reinstatement of the German__Russia gas trade will now know it is no longer physically possible, and even the overthrow of Putin would not change that. Putin secures his position from Western influenced economic arguments for a peaceful resolution, because they are now futile.

    Poland is another suspect

    Rarely has as a figure as senior as Sir Richard Shirreff, dared to put his name to as ominous a contingency history as one pictured in 2017 War With Russia. It can’t happen? Just like the Anschluss of Crimea, or Brexit? Russia is again ruled by one man alone and President Putin has proved capable of gambling with the fate of his country and peace in Europe. In the guise of fast-paced novel, General Shirreff shows how it could actually be done: the disinformation, the subversion, the order of battle. And how woefully unprepared the free world would be to stand up to such a challenge. His warning should be read not only by anyone interested in fate of the West but, above all, by politicians whose decisions on defence determine our options in future emergencies. ― Radoslaw Sikorski

    Sikorski seemed to imply it was the US who blew up Nordstream 1 and 2 , but note that Sikorski’s thanked the Americans (and this from a former Foreign Minister of Poland). Poland wants to have no option for having gas supplied from Russia. Poland’s dream is to be to be totally dependent on America to supply gas to Poland–good and cheap. Well the US will have to now, won’t they?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Sean

    Isn't it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ? If Ukraine (or Ukraine and Poland, or Ukraine and Poland and the US - take your pick) blew it up in order to hold the German's feet to the fire, you would think that they would have been sure to blow up all four lines.

    If OTOH, Putin was "sending a message" then by keeping one line open (the one BTW that has not been turned on up until now for Western political reasons) he can send the message without completely shooting himself in the foot like some Russian draftee trying to avoid becoming cannon meat in Ukraine.

    Of course it is possible that the intention was to blow all 4 lines and one of the charges was a dud. In that case, there is probably an unexploded device still attached that will provide clues as to who placed it there.

    Replies: @Sean, @Mr Mox

  54. @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.
     
    Huh? "Aggressive" do you mean just fight "successfully".

    Ukraine has to fight as best it can--this is existential for it--and was doing so immediately. Any country must or it does not survive. This aid has meant it is presumably doing so much more capably than it could otherwise. Not much doubt about that.

    Minsk accords? LOL. The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border. Russia was precisely trashing that border--and for that matter the Donbass autonomy--on day one of the invasion. Putin declared those statelets part of Russia and the border with Russia null and void from the get go. And the invasion was much more massive than just Donetsk and Luhansk, encompassing large areas of Eastern Ukraine with are solidly ethnically and even linguistically Ukrainian.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @EddieSpaghetti, @YetAnotherAnon

    AD, reading the domestic news -“The US elite bastards are stealing my country and telling me it’s getting better! You can’t believe a word they say!”

    AD, reading the foreign news – “The Russian elite bastards are stealing Ukraine! USA! USA! Slava Zelensky!”

    But, as I keep pointing out to you, Poland and Ukraine have been swapped between various empires for a few centuries now – the Swedes, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, Germany, Soviets again. Over this time millions died, the borders swayed to and fro – but at the end of it, Poland was still full of Poles and Ukraine, or at least the centre-west major part (it was after all created by a Soviet clerk’s pen) was still full of Ukrainians.

    If the GAE win, Kiev will look like London. The stabbed people at the side of the road tried to stop bike thieves.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Both could be true, you know.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, but better rule by Russia and your area still liveable, surrounded by your own people, than ruled by GAE, even if the front men in government look like you - and that mask drops when the immigrant population is high enough. In forty years I've seen the Guardian go from "they're a tiny minority, it's moral to be nice to them" to "they're a large and increasing minority, it's in your interest to be nice to them". Stage 3 will probably be for my kids to deal with.

    https://e3.365dm.com/22/09/1600x900/skynews-reshuffle-truss_5889389.jpg

    There was no need for war or Russian rule in any event. If the GAE hadn't installed a new government in 2014, causing the pro-Russian bits of Ukraine's own armed forces to separate in the Donbass, then trained up the Army and sent them all to bombard the rebel areas... this is America's war.

    I wrote the other day about an expensive flat in a British city centre that was just too dangerous a place for a small young woman to live in. Within living memory in the UK, a "poor area" didn't mean a dangerous one. It does now, unless you're somewhere very remote.

    I rate ADs comments and your writing very highly, but IMHO there's a real blind spot here.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  55. @Dave Pinsen
    @Anonymous

    The Ukraine War is existential for Russia, not the Ukraine, though the longer it goes on, the more territory Russia will likely demand. Had Boris Johnson not sabotaged the negotiations in April, Russia likely wouldn’t have annexed the four oblasts it did, and settled for autonomy for them instead.

    Don’t take my word for the war being existential to Russia—listen to Zelensky and the Western blue checks who support him. If Russia loses the war, they won’t stop until it’s wrecked. Think China in the Warlord Era.

    https://twitter.com/apmassaro3/status/1575790467891228672?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    https://twitter.com/ggreenwald/status/1539661895934029824?s=46&t=HHIqBvxt46D_afynTcNNiA

    Replies: @Polistra, @Hypnotoad666

    Speaking of existential threats: The mating of the deep state with wokeism.

    That was a good article linked by GG:

    I am certain that many of you will take the position that I formerly had; that the adoption of woke terminology in service of empire is a cynical ploy. I no longer believe that. I think that these are true believers. Chechens, Volga Tatars, the Komi, the Yakuts, all “indigenous” peoples suffering under Russian colonization, all yearning to be free, all seeking to release the American that is inside of them, screaming to get out. They are US Blacks who still suffer from the legacy of slavery and segregation, they are the Sioux on the reserve, they are the bullied Transgendered, they are the oppressed WaPo journalist from a rich family who went to Swiss boarding school.

    • LOL: Corvinus
  56. My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.

    Yes, the present scenario seems to be pointing to three possibilities:
    (1) Ukraine did all or some of those things, and America is concerned.
    (2) Ukraine did none of those things, and America wants to falsely incriminate them because they want out and need an excuse/scapegoat.
    (3) There is no real pattern. Things will go on as usual, indefinitely. Perhaps Russia did blow the pipes (and faked an error, so as to keep some of them functional). Ukraine killed Dugina. The US is concerned, but not too much.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Brás Cubas

    Pipeline sabotage could have been done surreptitiously, but was very ostentatious; the gas pipeline from Norway to Poland runs close to where the Nordstream 1 & 2 pipelines were blown up and the Nor-Pol one was coming online the day after the sabotage. So it is an implicit threat of the other Baltic pipelines being hit. Russia did it, and its ready to do it again.


    Not a fan of Anders Puck Neilson Danish military commentator with a naval background who came up with the above. but he nails it

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hk-0qJXyido

    Massive amounts of explosives carelessly placed. How very Russian!

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

  57. My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.

    I think this is what’s called a limited hangout. Not a confession by the intelligence service, but enough info to lead to the conclusion of culpability while still leaving plausible deniability on the table. Knowing what we do about how the FBI operates, how much of a stretch is it from, “the Ukes did it without our knowledge” to handing them the tech/bomb/missile (how many weapons/weapon systems have we sent over that have since gone missing into the black market?) and suggesting, “shame if anything happened to Nordstream II, poor Germany!”

  58. Oh come on – the US is far more deeply involved in Ukrainian viciousness than you pretend.

    The Himars are operated by mercenaries but mercenaries who only just left Nato countries – there are thousands of such people in Ukraine.
    Himars are amongst the artillery that shell civilians in Donbas – as nazis have been doing for 8 years now. And Himars have been used to attack the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant (you know the one which Russia controls, used to send electricity even into Ukrainian controlled areas, but Kiev claims Russia does the shelling…..).
    Russia regularly presents the evidence of Himars shells to the UN – zero coverage in western media.

    50 congressmen meet the Nazis.
    https://thegrayzone.com/2022/10/05/azov-neo-nazi-ukrainian-congress/

    • Agree: acementhead
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @michael droy

    And in the specific case of Dugina, it's not clear if she would have been assassinated had the US and NATO not been involved with Ukrainians over the last however many years. There seems to be some US connections to the Myrotvorets website, and who knows what training might have been provided by the CIA or NATO that contributed to the car bombing operation, even if the operation wasn't ordered by the US.

  59. So they murdered the daughter of a philosopher, to me that makes them scum, no?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Gordo

    One of the benefits of this war, to me at least , is that I've stumbled across a few interesting web sites I otherwise would not know.
    This one https://katehon.com/en is a Russian Cultural Nationalist where Dugin's work occasionally appears.
    The word Katehon means something like "That which withholds" and what it withholds is the Eschaton. Seems like a worthy if difficult goal.

  60. Mr. Sailer couldn’t be bothered to sort out the “Spy vs. Spy” stuff when it concerned the deep state conspiring against Trump, but now it is different for some reason.

  61. American officials have been frustrated with Ukraine’s lack of transparency about its … covert plans,

    Lack of transparency about covert plans? How dare they!

  62. @dimples
    The premise of this article seems rather silly. It suggests that upon hearing news that the Ukes blew up a single person in Russia, the mass media and political classes will now pivot from blaming Russia for the pipeline sabotage and blame 404 instead. According to this theory, there should now be a steady drip feed of 'evidence' coming out from unnamed US sources pointing to 404. But why, do you think, that 404 would not already claim it was them if they had actually done it? Wouldn't they be proud of their achievement? Don't aks me, perhaps Mr SS can enlighten us further on this geopolitical question.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Everyone knows the US did it, including the entire media. That’s why they get furious when anyone starts talking about US complicity- they already know it’s true. They went ape when Jeffrey Sachs said it.

    The question is, who are they trying to fool? The Russians know they didn’t do it and so would all other intelligence agencies. Maybe this is a lie aimed at the American people. Although, perhaps they’re hoping the German population will far for it, since it was an attack on their economy.

  63. The Saudi murder of the “journalist” Khosogghi (sp?) led Biden to declare the Saudi state a pariah.

    So does the Ukraine murder of the “journalist” Dugina call for similar pariah status?

    Personally, I cannot be arsed much to care about either murder. It happened over there and neither infringes on anything important that I care about.

    Be calling the House of Saud a pariah neatly holed below the waterline 120 years of American great game playing in Arabia, which was deeply stupid. But this is what you get when you allow hyper emotional middle aged women a voice in important matters.

  64. Read about some of the Ukie war crimes during WW2. The current day Ukie crew are love & light compared to their grandparents & great-grandparents.

  65. @Brás Cubas

    My guess would be that the Biden Administration leaked this news about the Dugina assassination being a Ukrainian operation to imply to Germany that the Nord Stream pipeline bombing might well have been a Ukrainian operation.
     
    Yes, the present scenario seems to be pointing to three possibilities:
    (1) Ukraine did all or some of those things, and America is concerned.
    (2) Ukraine did none of those things, and America wants to falsely incriminate them because they want out and need an excuse/scapegoat.
    (3) There is no real pattern. Things will go on as usual, indefinitely. Perhaps Russia did blow the pipes (and faked an error, so as to keep some of them functional). Ukraine killed Dugina. The US is concerned, but not too much.

    Replies: @Sean

    Pipeline sabotage could have been done surreptitiously, but was very ostentatious; the gas pipeline from Norway to Poland runs close to where the Nordstream 1 & 2 pipelines were blown up and the Nor-Pol one was coming online the day after the sabotage. So it is an implicit threat of the other Baltic pipelines being hit. Russia did it, and its ready to do it again.

    Not a fan of Anders Puck Neilson Danish military commentator with a naval background who came up with the above. but he nails it

    Massive amounts of explosives carelessly placed. How very Russian!

    • Thanks: Brás Cubas
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Sean

    There is another theory from an energy-industry insider that it does not take intention to blow up an undersea natural gas pipleline. It takes a great deal of attentive intention to not blow up an undersea natural gas pipeline.

    The condition is that if any liquid water or any humidity gets into the pipeline, it bonds with methane under the cold conditions underneaht the sea to form a methane-hydrate plug blocking the pipeline.

    There are meticulous procedures to safely free such a plug, and then there are shortcut procedures. The speculation is that the Russians took such a shortcut, trying to free the plug by increasing the gas pressure on their end, and they ruptured the pipeline when the plug broke lose and when careening down the pipe. Essentially an industrial accident by the Russians being Russians, Chernobl style?

    Replies: @Athenian

  66. @dimples
    Perhaps the US deep state is signalling that they are worried the Ukrolunatic hive they have stepped on will now start coming after them if they do not supply sufficient top dollar weapons as ordered.

    Replies: @Anon

    One way to stop the lunatics would be to not send them any more $$$, turn the spigot off at the source if you will. But it seems the chosen solution is to instead blow up the dollar itself, known as “Operation NordStream”.

  67. @YetAnotherAnon
    @AnotherDad

    AD, reading the domestic news -"The US elite bastards are stealing my country and telling me it's getting better! You can't believe a word they say!"

    AD, reading the foreign news - "The Russian elite bastards are stealing Ukraine! USA! USA! Slava Zelensky!"

    But, as I keep pointing out to you, Poland and Ukraine have been swapped between various empires for a few centuries now - the Swedes, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, Germany, Soviets again. Over this time millions died, the borders swayed to and fro - but at the end of it, Poland was still full of Poles and Ukraine, or at least the centre-west major part (it was after all created by a Soviet clerk's pen) was still full of Ukrainians.

    If the GAE win, Kiev will look like London. The stabbed people at the side of the road tried to stop bike thieves.

    https://twitter.com/johnnyxl/status/1577944969817595907

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon

    Both could be true, you know.

  68. This is the Ukrainian ambassador to Berlin, one day BEFORE NS2 was damaged. He’s taunting people who participated in a stop the boycott rally in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, that NS2 is permanently ended under the Baltic Sea, and to send their gas bills to the state’s current Minister-President (state governor). Remember, this was one day before it happened.

    Confession, perhaps?

  69. @epebble
    Talking of aggressiveness:

    Professor shot, killed on University of Arizona campus; suspect in custody
    Department of Hydrology professor was shot and killed by a former student.

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/professor-shot-killed-university-arizona-campus-suspect-custody/story?id=91064661

    The suspect was identified by police as Murad Dervish

    Allahu Akbar?

    Replies: @bomag, @Matthew Kelly

    Looks like the NYU prof who got fired for, ahem, “making his class too difficult”, got off easy…

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Matthew Kelly

    Sadly, violence by frustrated Grad Students is not uncommon. It happened once too close for comfort.

    The San Diego State University shooting was a school shooting that occurred at the San Diego State University (SDSU) engineering building on August 15, 1996, in San Diego, California. Three professors were killed by master's degree student Frederick Martin Davidson.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Diego_State_University_shooting
    https://murderpedia.org/male.D/d/davidson-frederick-martin.htm

  70. @Sean
    @Stonewall Jackson

    The killing of Dugina used a relatively crude small IED, very different to the pipeline sabotage. I doubt Ukraine would be embarrassing the Poles like this while the war makes Poland so vital to Ukraine. On the other hand the assassination of Dugin (or possibly his daughter was target) almost certainly was approved by Zelensky, possibly even was commissioned by him. He is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia's way.

    It is pretty well established that the US was selecting Russian generals for the Ukrainians to hit. Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @HA

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. Always an education.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Art Deco

    A story about the targeting of certain Russian generals was in the NYT as coming from US intel. You're I'm sure you have better sources.

    The Dugina killing was Ukrainians who went to Estonia and disappeared, indicating government level collusion. Zelensky's country is at war; off course he would have to authorise it The stated US objective as given by Austin is not to help defend Ukraine, but to weaken Russia . So the US wants the longest possible war without Ukraine doing anything to provoke Russia into doing something drastic.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  71. @YetAnotherAnon
    @AnotherDad

    AD, reading the domestic news -"The US elite bastards are stealing my country and telling me it's getting better! You can't believe a word they say!"

    AD, reading the foreign news - "The Russian elite bastards are stealing Ukraine! USA! USA! Slava Zelensky!"

    But, as I keep pointing out to you, Poland and Ukraine have been swapped between various empires for a few centuries now - the Swedes, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, Germany, Soviets again. Over this time millions died, the borders swayed to and fro - but at the end of it, Poland was still full of Poles and Ukraine, or at least the centre-west major part (it was after all created by a Soviet clerk's pen) was still full of Ukrainians.

    If the GAE win, Kiev will look like London. The stabbed people at the side of the road tried to stop bike thieves.

    https://twitter.com/johnnyxl/status/1577944969817595907

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, but better rule by Russia and your area still liveable, surrounded by your own people, than ruled by GAE, even if the front men in government look like you – and that mask drops when the immigrant population is high enough. In forty years I’ve seen the Guardian go from “they’re a tiny minority, it’s moral to be nice to them” to “they’re a large and increasing minority, it’s in your interest to be nice to them”. Stage 3 will probably be for my kids to deal with.

    There was no need for war or Russian rule in any event. If the GAE hadn’t installed a new government in 2014, causing the pro-Russian bits of Ukraine’s own armed forces to separate in the Donbass, then trained up the Army and sent them all to bombard the rebel areas… this is America’s war.

    I wrote the other day about an expensive flat in a British city centre that was just too dangerous a place for a small young woman to live in. Within living memory in the UK, a “poor area” didn’t mean a dangerous one. It does now, unless you’re somewhere very remote.

    I rate ADs comments and your writing very highly, but IMHO there’s a real blind spot here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @YetAnotherAnon


    I rate ADs comments and your writing very highly, but IMHO there’s a real blind spot here.
     
    Please repost this comment directly to Steve so he seees it.
  72. @Harry Baldwin
    … The United States has pressed Ukraine to share more about its war plans, with mixed success.

    I guess $54 billion doesn't buy you as much as you'd expect.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Mike Tre, @Harry Baldwin

    Always great when a comment gets an “Agree,” a “Thanks,” an “LOL”, and–the true mark of distinction–a “Troll” from that one who lives under the iSteve bridge, Corvinus. Made my day!

    • Agree: EddieSpaghetti
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Harry Baldwin

    Problem is, a LOL could either be intended as an Agree or a Troll.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  73. @Art Deco
    @Sean

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. Always an education.

    Replies: @Sean

    A story about the targeting of certain Russian generals was in the NYT as coming from US intel. You’re I’m sure you have better sources.

    The Dugina killing was Ukrainians who went to Estonia and disappeared, indicating government level collusion. Zelensky’s country is at war; off course he would have to authorise it The stated US objective as given by Austin is not to help defend Ukraine, but to weaken Russia . So the US wants the longest possible war without Ukraine doing anything to provoke Russia into doing something drastic.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Sean

    You mean you have a story which consists of anonymous gossip and that interests you.

    Replies: @Johnny Rico, @Sean

  74. @Voltarde
    The leak indicates dissension and factional disagreements among various cliques in the know within the U.S. intel and DoD communities.

    There's pushback against the more fanatical warmongers by people who are starting to realize where this catastrophe is heading. Collapse of the European economy, massive global economic dislocation, nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Jack D

    nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.

    Make up your mind – is it going to be a nuclear war or a forever war? Nuclear wars tend to be short. Japan surrendered 6 days after Nagasaki.

    From the Soviet POV, was the Vietnam War a bottomless pit of Soviet funding wasted on yet another forever war or a resounding success in kicking their global competitor down a notch?

    How about a 3rd alternative – it’s going to be a short war when the Russian military offense further collapses and Putin has no choice but to withdraw his forces to the (real) Russian border as he already has done in several areas. Is that one of the possible outcomes?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Jack D

    I hope the first nuke falls on your house

    , @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    @Jack D

    "Is that one of the possible outcomes?"

    Jack, no it is not. I'll be experiencing limitless schadenfreude when (((you))), Sailer and the rest of the rest of the (((zelensky))) nut-huggers here get to watch the Russian victory parade.
    Christian Russia - 1; globohomo - 0.
    Many more losses for globohomo to come, God willing.

  75. @Gordo
    So they murdered the daughter of a philosopher, to me that makes them scum, no?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    One of the benefits of this war, to me at least , is that I’ve stumbled across a few interesting web sites I otherwise would not know.
    This one https://katehon.com/en is a Russian Cultural Nationalist where Dugin’s work occasionally appears.
    The word Katehon means something like “That which withholds” and what it withholds is the Eschaton. Seems like a worthy if difficult goal.

  76. @Sean
    @Stonewall Jackson

    The killing of Dugina used a relatively crude small IED, very different to the pipeline sabotage. I doubt Ukraine would be embarrassing the Poles like this while the war makes Poland so vital to Ukraine. On the other hand the assassination of Dugin (or possibly his daughter was target) almost certainly was approved by Zelensky, possibly even was commissioned by him. He is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia's way.

    It is pretty well established that the US was selecting Russian generals for the Ukrainians to hit. Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @HA

    Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.

    If (IF) this actually happened, it makes perfect sense. The US has intelligence sources inside of Russia whom it does not want compromised. Even if it is purely based on satellite and electronic intelligence, they don’t want to clue the Russians in as to what level of granularity American intelligence has. (BTW, what makes you so sure that the Americans even knew what general was there as distinct from knowing that they had located an important Russian command center? My impression is that most of the hits on Russian generals were lucky hits – they intend to hit a command center and a general just happens to be present.) One of the rules of intelligence in general is that it is shared on a “need to know” basis.

    As far as Ukraine is concerned, ANY dead Russian general is a good hit. ANY Russian command and control center is a good hit, with or without generals. What were they going to do, say, “Oh, no, if it’s General Suchandsuchov we don’t want to harm him? So the Americans say “we have located an important Russian command and control center at such and such coordinates” and the Ukrainians are only too happy to hit it, no further questions asked. If later on they find out that General Suchandsuchov was visiting that day instead of just a bunch of colonels, they are extra happy.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    The US has intelligence sources inside of Russia whom it does not want compromised.

    See Reuel Marc Gerecht on the CIA's internal operations. Per Gerecht, they promote people based on the number of 'sources' they develop, not on whether the sources tell them anything useful. He insists that in the late Soviet period, they had very few people who told them anything of value.

  77. @Sean
    @Polistra

    Because merely turning the gas off leaves it open for Russia to turn it back on, if it reached a deal with the West over Ukraine. In the aforementioned scenario, the West has a big carrot for the Kremlin including any new occupants that may be there in the next few years. This way, Russia has burnt a bridge for compromise and no restarting of gas will be possible. Putin signals he is playing to win or lose it all with Ukraine, and anyone who might be hankering after an reinstatement of the German__Russia gas trade will now know it is no longer physically possible, and even the overthrow of Putin would not change that. Putin secures his position from Western influenced economic arguments for a peaceful resolution, because they are now futile.

    Poland is another suspect


    Rarely has as a figure as senior as Sir Richard Shirreff, dared to put his name to as ominous a contingency history as one pictured in 2017 War With Russia. It can't happen? Just like the Anschluss of Crimea, or Brexit? Russia is again ruled by one man alone and President Putin has proved capable of gambling with the fate of his country and peace in Europe. In the guise of fast-paced novel, General Shirreff shows how it could actually be done: the disinformation, the subversion, the order of battle. And how woefully unprepared the free world would be to stand up to such a challenge. His warning should be read not only by anyone interested in fate of the West but, above all, by politicians whose decisions on defence determine our options in future emergencies. ― Radoslaw Sikorski
     
    Sikorski seemed to imply it was the US who blew up Nordstream 1 and 2 , but note that Sikorski's thanked the Americans (and this from a former Foreign Minister of Poland). Poland wants to have no option for having gas supplied from Russia. Poland's dream is to be to be totally dependent on America to supply gas to Poland--good and cheap. Well the US will have to now, won't they?

    Replies: @Jack D

    Isn’t it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ? If Ukraine (or Ukraine and Poland, or Ukraine and Poland and the US – take your pick) blew it up in order to hold the German’s feet to the fire, you would think that they would have been sure to blow up all four lines.

    If OTOH, Putin was “sending a message” then by keeping one line open (the one BTW that has not been turned on up until now for Western political reasons) he can send the message without completely shooting himself in the foot like some Russian draftee trying to avoid becoming cannon meat in Ukraine.

    Of course it is possible that the intention was to blow all 4 lines and one of the charges was a dud. In that case, there is probably an unexploded device still attached that will provide clues as to who placed it there.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @Jack D


    Isn’t it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ? If Ukraine (or Ukraine and Poland, or Ukraine and Poland and the US – take your pick) blew it up in order to hold the German’s feet to the fire, you would think that they would have been sure to blow up all four lines.
     
    It was the Russians, see Here. As to whether the undamaged pipeline was part of the plan: dunno. One would have to remember that Russian covert operatives are in a great many cases drunken whore fuckers

    Novichok suspects' drug-fuelled night of 'cannabis ... - Daily Mailhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk › russia › article-6172497
    15 Sept 2018 — Novichok suspects' drug-fuelled night of 'cannabis and prostitutes' at £75-a-night East London hotel just hours before Salisbury attack.

     

    As I think of them and their night of cheap thrills all I can say is: I wish I had half their luck.

    Anyway,


    https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/05/german-minister-criticizes-us-over-astronomical-natural-gas-prices.html#:~:text=German%20minister%20criticizes,energy%20prices%20soaring.

    German minister criticizes U.S. over ‘astronomical’ natural gas prices
    PUBLISHED WED, OCT 5 2022
    Holly Ellyatt

    Germany’s economy minister has accused the U.S. and other “friendly” gas supplier states of astronomical prices for their supplies.
    He suggested some gas suppliers were profiting from the fallout from the war in Ukraine which has sent global energy prices soaring.
     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJ5utsDHP1U
    , @Mr Mox
    @Jack D

    Isn’t it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ?

    What's strange is that whenever Ukraine is mentioned, this happens:



    https://i.imgur.com/YjIVqyA.jpg

    Replies: @BosTex

  78. @Jack D
    @Voltarde


    nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.
     
    Make up your mind - is it going to be a nuclear war or a forever war? Nuclear wars tend to be short. Japan surrendered 6 days after Nagasaki.

    From the Soviet POV, was the Vietnam War a bottomless pit of Soviet funding wasted on yet another forever war or a resounding success in kicking their global competitor down a notch?

    How about a 3rd alternative - it's going to be a short war when the Russian military offense further collapses and Putin has no choice but to withdraw his forces to the (real) Russian border as he already has done in several areas. Is that one of the possible outcomes?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @fredyetagain aka superhonky

    I hope the first nuke falls on your house

    • Agree: acementhead
  79. @Harry Baldwin
    @Harry Baldwin

    Always great when a comment gets an "Agree," a "Thanks," an "LOL", and--the true mark of distinction--a "Troll" from that one who lives under the iSteve bridge, Corvinus. Made my day!

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    Problem is, a LOL could either be intended as an Agree or a Troll.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Inquiring Mind

    I'm not proud, I'll accept it either way.

  80. @Dave Pinsen
    @AnotherDad

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @HA, @John Johnson

    “Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.”

    Yeah, because Putin’s promises are rock-solid? Because rewarding him with Crimea and then Donbass disincentivizes him from seeking even more? Sounds like a plan, Dave!

    No, had he been given what he wanted without resistance, Putin would have then turned his attention to Georgia, or Transnistria, or Moldova, or Kazakhstan, perhaps with cover from China’s attack on Taiwan. And guess who would have. had the “honor” of being chosen to be first into this meat grinder 2.0? Why, those very same Ukrainians who were “rescued” from the clutches of Kyiv. I mean, they gotta show their gratitude somehow, right?

    After months of denials that Russia is driven by imperial ambitions in Ukraine, Putin appeared to embrace that mission, comparing [Peter the Great’s] campaign with Russia’s current military actions.

    “Apparently, it is also our lot to return [what is Russia’s] and strengthen [the country]. And if we proceed from the fact that these basic values form the basis of our existence, we will certainly succeed in solving the tasks that we face.”

    Of course there would still be other grievances to rectify:

    We won’t let the samurai take even the smallest piece of our land,
    We will stand up and protect the capital of amber [Kaliningrad],
    We will save our Sevastopol and Crimea, for the sake of our descendants.
    And we will return Alaska to the haven of the motherland.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @HA

    This doesn't convey the full Hitler-Jugend level sickness. They brainwash little children into singing this song:

    https://youtu.be/-vqHkelXKrg?t=197

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_12fAusEqvc

    Replies: @John Johnson

  81. @Dave Pinsen

    Huh? “Aggressive” do you mean just fight “successfully”.
     
    No, I mean making maximalist demands (e.g., Crimea, regime change in Russia), and being increasingly obnoxious toward their American benefactors (such as Zelensky implying Elon Musk--who donated Starlink satellites to the Ukraine early on--was a Putin stooge for proposing a peace settlement).

    Minsk accords? LOL. The Minsk accords provisions summed down to a sentence were ceasefire, weapons withdraw, some sort of autonomy for Russian districts in the Donbass written into the Ukrainian constitution and Ukraine to control its border. Russia was precisely trashing that border–and for that matter the Donbass autonomy–on day one of the invasion.
     
    Right, the Ukrainians didn't abide by the accords, killed thousands of Russian-speakers in the Donbas, and then after eight years of that, Putin invaded. He probably waited eight years too long.

    Replies: @HA

    “such as Zelensky implying Elon Musk–who donated Starlink satellites to the Ukraine early on”

    There’s no evidence he donated a dime — he allowed someone else [probably the US which subsidized his companies massively] to buy it.

    But he was happy to let people think the credit was all due to him.

  82. @Sean
    @Brás Cubas

    Pipeline sabotage could have been done surreptitiously, but was very ostentatious; the gas pipeline from Norway to Poland runs close to where the Nordstream 1 & 2 pipelines were blown up and the Nor-Pol one was coming online the day after the sabotage. So it is an implicit threat of the other Baltic pipelines being hit. Russia did it, and its ready to do it again.


    Not a fan of Anders Puck Neilson Danish military commentator with a naval background who came up with the above. but he nails it

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hk-0qJXyido

    Massive amounts of explosives carelessly placed. How very Russian!

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    There is another theory from an energy-industry insider that it does not take intention to blow up an undersea natural gas pipleline. It takes a great deal of attentive intention to not blow up an undersea natural gas pipeline.

    The condition is that if any liquid water or any humidity gets into the pipeline, it bonds with methane under the cold conditions underneaht the sea to form a methane-hydrate plug blocking the pipeline.

    There are meticulous procedures to safely free such a plug, and then there are shortcut procedures. The speculation is that the Russians took such a shortcut, trying to free the plug by increasing the gas pressure on their end, and they ruptured the pipeline when the plug broke lose and when careening down the pipe. Essentially an industrial accident by the Russians being Russians, Chernobl style?

    • Replies: @Athenian
    @Inquiring Mind

    Sure, four industrial accidents at the same time, on three separate pipes. Great theory. Makes total sense. Thanks for sharing.

  83. @Jack D
    @Voltarde


    nuclear war, and a bottomless pit of U.S. funding wasted on yet another forever war.
     
    Make up your mind - is it going to be a nuclear war or a forever war? Nuclear wars tend to be short. Japan surrendered 6 days after Nagasaki.

    From the Soviet POV, was the Vietnam War a bottomless pit of Soviet funding wasted on yet another forever war or a resounding success in kicking their global competitor down a notch?

    How about a 3rd alternative - it's going to be a short war when the Russian military offense further collapses and Putin has no choice but to withdraw his forces to the (real) Russian border as he already has done in several areas. Is that one of the possible outcomes?

    Replies: @AndrewR, @fredyetagain aka superhonky

    “Is that one of the possible outcomes?”

    Jack, no it is not. I’ll be experiencing limitless schadenfreude when (((you))), Sailer and the rest of the rest of the (((zelensky))) nut-huggers here get to watch the Russian victory parade.
    Christian Russia – 1; globohomo – 0.
    Many more losses for globohomo to come, God willing.

  84. @usNthem
    “The United States took no part in the attack, either by providing intelligence or other assistance, officials said.”

    I guess the question is who cares what US government officials claim, and further, why would anyone believe them?

    Replies: @AndrewR

    This is the first instance I am aware of of the US regime throwing the Ukrainian regime under the bus. It seems very significant, regardless of the veracity of the US regime’s claim.

    • Agree: megabar, BosTex
    • Replies: @BosTex
    @AndrewR

    Probably a first step to back away from where we are: frankly, if you start killing the children of folks you don’t like or agree with, the next steps tend to be unpleasant for the killer not the victim.

    Keep in mind that these folks look alike to us and to one another and guessing both governments have penetrated one another throughly.

    If I were any high ranking Ukrainian: I would be looking at the safety of my family.

  85. @Dave Pinsen
    @AnotherDad

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @HA, @John Johnson

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, .

    That’s not true at all.

    The Battle of Kiev was fought before we had sent them HIMARs. It was mainly fought with Soviet weapons.

    Putin actually thought it was a good idea to send a 40 mile column of armor and supply trucks at Kiev. A 5 mph parade of military equipment.

    He also dropped his elite Spetsnaz on the city with orders to find and kill Zelensky. They were wiped out.

    This was going to have a bloody outcome regardless of US involvement. Putin incorrectly assessed that the Ukrainians would welcome them and Zelensky would flee. Even if they had taken Kiev it would have turned into years of partisan warfare. They handed out over 200k AK-47s and thousands of RPGs after the invasion started. The Ukrainians don’t want to live under the boot of a little dictator. Why is that so hard for some of you to understand?

    Putin doesn’t understand warfare and had no backup plan. He is a cornered rat and is running out of options.

    this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords

    He planned on taking the entire country. Taking Donbas only became the goal after he failed to take Kiev. Those “independent Republics” that he swore to protect are now just Russian territory. He also took two oblasts that weren’t claimed by separatists. So completely full of s–t and can’t even keep his narrative together.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine's #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Some Russian troops are beginning to surrender in pre-arranged settings. This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt. The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11286219/Russian-troops-filmed-surrendering-Ukraine-Kherson.html

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Harry Baldwin, @HA, @Dave Pinsen

  86. @John Johnson
    @Dave Pinsen

    The Ukraine wouldn’t be this aggressive absent receiving >20 Israels of U.S. aid this year, plus realtime satellite and drone surveillance from us. Without that, .

    That's not true at all.

    The Battle of Kiev was fought before we had sent them HIMARs. It was mainly fought with Soviet weapons.

    Putin actually thought it was a good idea to send a 40 mile column of armor and supply trucks at Kiev. A 5 mph parade of military equipment.

    He also dropped his elite Spetsnaz on the city with orders to find and kill Zelensky. They were wiped out.

    This was going to have a bloody outcome regardless of US involvement. Putin incorrectly assessed that the Ukrainians would welcome them and Zelensky would flee. Even if they had taken Kiev it would have turned into years of partisan warfare. They handed out over 200k AK-47s and thousands of RPGs after the invasion started. The Ukrainians don't want to live under the boot of a little dictator. Why is that so hard for some of you to understand?

    Putin doesn't understand warfare and had no backup plan. He is a cornered rat and is running out of options.

    this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords

    He planned on taking the entire country. Taking Donbas only became the goal after he failed to take Kiev. Those "independent Republics" that he swore to protect are now just Russian territory. He also took two oblasts that weren't claimed by separatists. So completely full of s--t and can't even keep his narrative together.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Some Russian troops are beginning to surrender in pre-arranged settings. This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt. The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11286219/Russian-troops-filmed-surrendering-Ukraine-Kherson.html

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Correct and Russia is running out of artillery anyways.

    Ukrainians would happily take it to urban combat against Putin's 1 week conscripts.

    We will see how well the conscripts do in Kherson. My guess is they will be even less enthused after seeing their neighbors and friends cut in half by machine guns.

    This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt.

    They actually knew about the flaw but didn't care since they didn't expect the tank crew to make it back in a ww3 scenario. They prioritized being able to auto-load rounds over being able to save the crew.

    In a conventional war...... not such a great feature.

    Replies: @Graveldips, @Jack D

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    And six months after that, you'll be driving a cab in NYC.

    , @HA
    @Jack D

    "Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia."

    Yes, according to a recent story, the Russians left so much artillery behind in their, uh,.. heroic withdrawals so as to form a more compact frontline, that for the first time in the war, or however that's supposed to go, the Ukrainians are stocked with artillery for the first time since the war started.

    Granted, it's dilapidated, badly-maintained Soviet-era junk, and they'll no doubt burn through it fast enough, but in a pinch, it'll do.


    Ukraine is no longer low on artillery ammo because Russia abandoned so much in recent retreats, report says
     
    In other words, "keep them HIMARS coming, you beautiful capitalist NATO pigs, but as for the junk-grade shrapnel producers, I think we're flush." On second thought, as long as they can refrain from needlessly blowing it at civilian populations the way the Russians did, the stash might last them a while.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Athenian

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Jack D

    Given the copious videos Ukrainians have posted of them torturing Russian POWs, I wouldn’t be surprised if the video of Russians surrendering with their armored vehicle was staged.

    The head of Wagner told potential recruits all his men carry two grenades to kill themselves with if they get captured.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1576509860065456128?s=46&t=K-yrbGrXyoIRO41PCJ3Obg

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jack D, @Corvinus

  87. @HA
    @Dave Pinsen

    "Without that, this war would have ended in April, with a settlement along the lines of the Minsk Accords."

    Yeah, because Putin's promises are rock-solid? Because rewarding him with Crimea and then Donbass disincentivizes him from seeking even more? Sounds like a plan, Dave!

    No, had he been given what he wanted without resistance, Putin would have then turned his attention to Georgia, or Transnistria, or Moldova, or Kazakhstan, perhaps with cover from China's attack on Taiwan. And guess who would have. had the "honor" of being chosen to be first into this meat grinder 2.0? Why, those very same Ukrainians who were "rescued" from the clutches of Kyiv. I mean, they gotta show their gratitude somehow, right?


    After months of denials that Russia is driven by imperial ambitions in Ukraine, Putin appeared to embrace that mission, comparing [Peter the Great's] campaign with Russia’s current military actions.

    “Apparently, it is also our lot to return [what is Russia’s] and strengthen [the country]. And if we proceed from the fact that these basic values form the basis of our existence, we will certainly succeed in solving the tasks that we face.”
     

    Of course there would still be other grievances to rectify:

    We won’t let the samurai take even the smallest piece of our land,
    We will stand up and protect the capital of amber [Kaliningrad],
    We will save our Sevastopol and Crimea, for the sake of our descendants.
    And we will return Alaska to the haven of the motherland.
     

    Replies: @Jack D

    This doesn’t convey the full Hitler-Jugend level sickness. They brainwash little children into singing this song:

    • Thanks: HA
    • LOL: John Johnson
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    That's nothing compared to what they used to feed Soviet kids.

    They turned Lenin and Marx into religious figures.

    The economy would be in the dumps but the kids would be singing daily about how Communism is going to unite the world and bring utopia.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeEqG6pdREQ

    The 45-55 year old conscripts heading to the front grew up on that crap.

    Time to serve the Motherland!!! Charge!!!!

    (head explodes into red mist before first patriotic verse is finished).

    Replies: @profnasty

  88. @Jack D
    @Sean

    Isn't it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ? If Ukraine (or Ukraine and Poland, or Ukraine and Poland and the US - take your pick) blew it up in order to hold the German's feet to the fire, you would think that they would have been sure to blow up all four lines.

    If OTOH, Putin was "sending a message" then by keeping one line open (the one BTW that has not been turned on up until now for Western political reasons) he can send the message without completely shooting himself in the foot like some Russian draftee trying to avoid becoming cannon meat in Ukraine.

    Of course it is possible that the intention was to blow all 4 lines and one of the charges was a dud. In that case, there is probably an unexploded device still attached that will provide clues as to who placed it there.

    Replies: @Sean, @Mr Mox

    Isn’t it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ? If Ukraine (or Ukraine and Poland, or Ukraine and Poland and the US – take your pick) blew it up in order to hold the German’s feet to the fire, you would think that they would have been sure to blow up all four lines.

    It was the Russians, see Here. As to whether the undamaged pipeline was part of the plan: dunno. One would have to remember that Russian covert operatives are in a great many cases drunken whore fuckers

    Novichok suspects’ drug-fuelled night of ‘cannabis … – Daily Mailhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk › russia › article-6172497
    15 Sept 2018 — Novichok suspects’ drug-fuelled night of ‘cannabis and prostitutes’ at £75-a-night East London hotel just hours before Salisbury attack.

    As I think of them and their night of cheap thrills all I can say is: I wish I had half their luck.

    Anyway,

    https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/05/german-minister-criticizes-us-over-astronomical-natural-gas-prices.html#:~:text=German%20minister%20criticizes,energy%20prices%20soaring.

    German minister criticizes U.S. over ‘astronomical’ natural gas prices
    PUBLISHED WED, OCT 5 2022
    Holly Ellyatt

    Germany’s economy minister has accused the U.S. and other “friendly” gas supplier states of astronomical prices for their supplies.
    He suggested some gas suppliers were profiting from the fallout from the war in Ukraine which has sent global energy prices soaring.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJ5utsDHP1U

  89. @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine's #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Some Russian troops are beginning to surrender in pre-arranged settings. This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt. The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11286219/Russian-troops-filmed-surrendering-Ukraine-Kherson.html

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Harry Baldwin, @HA, @Dave Pinsen

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Correct and Russia is running out of artillery anyways.

    Ukrainians would happily take it to urban combat against Putin’s 1 week conscripts.

    We will see how well the conscripts do in Kherson. My guess is they will be even less enthused after seeing their neighbors and friends cut in half by machine guns.

    This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt.

    They actually knew about the flaw but didn’t care since they didn’t expect the tank crew to make it back in a ww3 scenario. They prioritized being able to auto-load rounds over being able to save the crew.

    In a conventional war…… not such a great feature.

    • Replies: @Graveldips
    @John Johnson

    Any tank turret is full of ammunition, some easy to access and some tucked away wherever you can stuff it, like under the turret basket or in the nose to the left and right of the driver. You have to rotate the turret to a particular position to get at the tucked away rounds once you've used up the ready rounds. You know squat about tanks. Go play some more video games.

    , @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    Russians believe that "quantity has its own quality" as Stalin said. Their priority in a war was to overwhelm the enemy with a LOT of tanks (even now the Russians have kept every tank they ever produced going back to the 1960s in storage so they could say they have x thousands of tanks) and artillery. If the Cold War had turned hot, then 50,000 Soviet tanks were supposed to pour thru the Fulda Gap and head for the Rhine.

    Russia never had the kind of $ we have in the West to spend millions of $ on each tank so if you wanted thousand and thousands of tanks you had to make them kind of cheap and cheerful. This was also good for sales to third world countries who were not rolling in dough either - you could buy 3 or 5 Russian tanks for the price of one American tank (if the Americans would even sell them to you). And an auto-loader reduces the crew from 4 to 3 so you need 25% fewer troops to man X# of tanks. It's true that this is much less survivable than putting the ammo in a separate compartment but hey you gotta make compromises somewhere.

  90. @Jack D
    @Sean

    Isn't it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ? If Ukraine (or Ukraine and Poland, or Ukraine and Poland and the US - take your pick) blew it up in order to hold the German's feet to the fire, you would think that they would have been sure to blow up all four lines.

    If OTOH, Putin was "sending a message" then by keeping one line open (the one BTW that has not been turned on up until now for Western political reasons) he can send the message without completely shooting himself in the foot like some Russian draftee trying to avoid becoming cannon meat in Ukraine.

    Of course it is possible that the intention was to blow all 4 lines and one of the charges was a dud. In that case, there is probably an unexploded device still attached that will provide clues as to who placed it there.

    Replies: @Sean, @Mr Mox

    Isn’t it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ?

    What’s strange is that whenever Ukraine is mentioned, this happens:

    [MORE]

    • Agree: BosTex
    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Mr Mox

    Yes. The volume, immediacy and vehemence of Jack D and HA on any Ukraine post is remarkable.

    Maybe they chipped in and bought Steve a used 2010 Lexus with only 150k miles on it.

    Perhaps Jack D and HA are really iSteve’s alter egos? Cranky elderly Jewish man with a bad case of hemoroids from Philadelphia and smart alecky twat posting from his mother’s basement in Des Moines, IA.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  91. @Anonymous
    Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiJoqTk08AI

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @clifford brown, @Mike Tre, @JimDandy, @Dennis Dale, @Batman

    I will pay money to make Steve watch that thing. Pass me the hat. We can’t let him duck the great gay rom-com debate of 2022.

  92. It’s hardly uncommon in history for smaller countries’ aggressiveness to trouble their larger allies: e.g., Serbia led Russia into the Great War in 1914.

    Yes, and just look at how many times the US has nearly defied Israel.

  93. @Sean
    @Art Deco

    A story about the targeting of certain Russian generals was in the NYT as coming from US intel. You're I'm sure you have better sources.

    The Dugina killing was Ukrainians who went to Estonia and disappeared, indicating government level collusion. Zelensky's country is at war; off course he would have to authorise it The stated US objective as given by Austin is not to help defend Ukraine, but to weaken Russia . So the US wants the longest possible war without Ukraine doing anything to provoke Russia into doing something drastic.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    You mean you have a story which consists of anonymous gossip and that interests you.

    • Replies: @Johnny Rico
    @Art Deco

    Did you catch the part where he said New York Times?

    You know damn well none of this stuff ever gets resolved to everyone's satisfaction. His opinion is as good as yours.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Sean
    @Art Deco


    President Joe Biden was furious about leaks that said US intelligence helped Ukraine kill Russian generals and sink its warship, report says, The New York Times reported on Monday.

    A senior administration official told The Times that after the reports of US involvement in the attacks emerged, Biden reprimanded several top defense officials, including Defense Secretary Lloyd J. Austin III, the Director of National Intelligence Avril D. Haines, and CIA director William J. Burns.

    Biden was concerned that the reports would further provoke Russian President Vladimir Putin, The Times reported.

    Several media outlets reported last week that the US handed crucial information to Ukrainian forces that allowed them to attack and sink one of Russia's most prominent warships, the Moskva, on April 14.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/09/us/politics/biden-lend-lease-ukraine-weapons-war.html

    The story of US intel concluding that Dugina assassination's was by Ukrainian secret service is also from the NYT.

    U.S. Reportedly Thinks Ukraine Authorized Killing Of Putin ...https://www.forbes.com › madelinehalpert › 2022/10/05
    1 day ago — Topline. New intelligence from American officials suggests Ukraine approved a car bombing within Russia that killed Daria Dugina, the daughter ...
     
    "Ukraine" means Zelensky

    President Volodymyr Zelensky has emphasized that Ukraine has no interest in the daughter of the “Russian world” mastermind, Darya Dugina, so her alleged murder "is not our responsibility."
    The president touched upon the topic during a press conference on Tuesday, August 23, Ukrinform reports.

    "It is definitely not our responsibility, she is not a citizen of our country, we are not interested in her, and she is not on the territory of Ukraine," Zelensky said, answering a question regarding Russia’s accusations of Ukraine's involvement in the assassination of Darya Dugina.

     

    At the press conference he looked the very picture of Dr Evil innocence


    https://static.ukrinform.com/photos/2022_08/thumb_files/630_360_1661271509-888.jpg

    The US sanctioned Dugina in March and she had a Telegram channel supporting the war, yet

    Asked about the New York Times account, a Ukrainian presidential aide, Mykhailo Podolyak, said that, “objectively speaking”, Dugina had been of no interest to Kyiv before she was killed.

    “Before Dugina’s murder, the people of Ukraine and representatives of the Ukrainian authorities did not know about her public activities and her influence on propaganda programmes,”
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/oct/06/us-reportedly-believes-ukraine-authorised-moscow-car-bomb
     
    Lies.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  94. @Jack D
    @Sean


    Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.
     
    If (IF) this actually happened, it makes perfect sense. The US has intelligence sources inside of Russia whom it does not want compromised. Even if it is purely based on satellite and electronic intelligence, they don't want to clue the Russians in as to what level of granularity American intelligence has. (BTW, what makes you so sure that the Americans even knew what general was there as distinct from knowing that they had located an important Russian command center? My impression is that most of the hits on Russian generals were lucky hits - they intend to hit a command center and a general just happens to be present.) One of the rules of intelligence in general is that it is shared on a "need to know" basis.

    As far as Ukraine is concerned, ANY dead Russian general is a good hit. ANY Russian command and control center is a good hit, with or without generals. What were they going to do, say, "Oh, no, if it's General Suchandsuchov we don't want to harm him? So the Americans say "we have located an important Russian command and control center at such and such coordinates" and the Ukrainians are only too happy to hit it, no further questions asked. If later on they find out that General Suchandsuchov was visiting that day instead of just a bunch of colonels, they are extra happy.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    The US has intelligence sources inside of Russia whom it does not want compromised.

    See Reuel Marc Gerecht on the CIA’s internal operations. Per Gerecht, they promote people based on the number of ‘sources’ they develop, not on whether the sources tell them anything useful. He insists that in the late Soviet period, they had very few people who told them anything of value.

  95. @Sean
    @Stonewall Jackson

    The killing of Dugina used a relatively crude small IED, very different to the pipeline sabotage. I doubt Ukraine would be embarrassing the Poles like this while the war makes Poland so vital to Ukraine. On the other hand the assassination of Dugin (or possibly his daughter was target) almost certainly was approved by Zelensky, possibly even was commissioned by him. He is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia's way.

    It is pretty well established that the US was selecting Russian generals for the Ukrainians to hit. Ukraine was not told who they were, just that they were a Russian general at such and such a place and time.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Jack D, @HA

    “[Zelensky] is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia’s way.”

    Or, he is just responding to a decade of targeted assassinations by Putin, what with Yuschenko’s doxine poisoning, and the Chechen hit squads sent to Kyiv (not to mention the polonium and nerve agents used by Putin on his in-house local troublemakers who thought that escaping to distant lands would save them).

    I would note that even Anatoly Karlin — hey, does anyone still remember him? — was deeply dismayed that just hours after Izym was taken, Zelensky toured the front line with nary a pop-gun shot in his direction from the nearby Russian forces. Karlin claims this “Suggests either an agreement not to try to kill Zelensky’, or else Putin’s murderers-for-hire are just total idiots.

    I’m OK with either explanation, but if we’re going with the “agreement not to kill”, it also suggests that the message the Ukrainians wanted to deliver with the Dugina assassination was heard loud and clear. Now, I’m against bomb assassinations, myself (though I realize that the partisans behind the lines don’t have much in the way of other options). There are just too many was that innocent bystanders could get hit. I think it’s far more effective to leave a note under a dictator’s pillow (or maybe his wife’s or daughter’s pillow) saying “we can come back any time” (maybe the letter from Tito to Stalin was similarly delivered to the bedroom pillow of Stalin’s daughter, for all anyone knows) but I reluctantly admit that sometimes a car bomb works, too.

    In any case, there’s a lesson there, Sean. If you’re so hot and bothered about the loose cannon in Kyiv, see if you can try to rein in the unhinged little firecracker in Moscow who carries around nuclear codes. I’m far more worried about loose nuclear warheads than loose cannons, and Ukraine agreed to give up their nukes. In fact, I’m thinking that until Russians can agree to be ruled by sane people who aren’t threatening to start up Armageddon, all sensible people (even those in China and India) should focus on getting Russians to denuclearize as well. Until then, your shrieking about the loose cannon in Kyiv will come off a deeply hypocritical and yet another weak attempt at deflection and misdirection.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @HA


    Yuschenko’s doxine poisoning
     
    Was bad, but if he was coked out of his skull when he signed off on (or actually commissioned) the car bomb killing, you cannot blame the FSB for shoveling all that snow up Zelensky's nose

    I would note that even Anatoly Karlin — hey, does anyone still remember him? — was deeply dismayed that just hours after Izym was taken, Zelensky toured the front line
     
    Which is evidence of his impulsiveness and absolute authority to disregard a Ukrainian subordinate's objection to anything El Presidente wants to do.

    In any case, there’s a lesson there, Sean. If you’re so hot and bothered about the loose cannon in Kyiv, see if you can try to rein in the unhinged little firecracker in Moscow who carries around nuclear codes.
     
    Putin's is far more predictable than the often drunk Khrushchev or perma-inebriated Yeltsin. Yes, Putin tried to control then attacked Ukraine, but Ukraine provoked Russia geopolitically. Was Russia a bully? Yes, but it the real world you sometimes can't just tell a bully to get lost and have a good outcome. You can't!

    Replies: @HA

    , @Rob
    @HA

    I want us to scrap the nuclear arsenal if Russia does/we force them. Honestly, the damage the US causes when it throws its weight around in the third world (and now in Europe- ask Germans) is incredible Huge numbers of innocent people die. If your tempted to quibble about that, what’s a good number of innocent people to die for our amazingly incompetent international affairs class playing risk.

    Honestly, we need to scrap the nuclear weapons before we have a shooting civil war and someone decides to use nukes rather than let them be captured by Amero-Nazis or socialists.

    South Africa gave up their nuclear weapons. Whoever was behind that decision should have received the Nobel peace prize. It’d be great if idealistic leaders fantasized about scrapping the nukes. If it were only on the table. Would really trust any Latin American country with nukes?

    Sadly, China would have to give up nukes before we’d imagine it.

    Replies: @HA

  96. @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Correct and Russia is running out of artillery anyways.

    Ukrainians would happily take it to urban combat against Putin's 1 week conscripts.

    We will see how well the conscripts do in Kherson. My guess is they will be even less enthused after seeing their neighbors and friends cut in half by machine guns.

    This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt.

    They actually knew about the flaw but didn't care since they didn't expect the tank crew to make it back in a ww3 scenario. They prioritized being able to auto-load rounds over being able to save the crew.

    In a conventional war...... not such a great feature.

    Replies: @Graveldips, @Jack D

    Any tank turret is full of ammunition, some easy to access and some tucked away wherever you can stuff it, like under the turret basket or in the nose to the left and right of the driver. You have to rotate the turret to a particular position to get at the tucked away rounds once you’ve used up the ready rounds. You know squat about tanks. Go play some more video games.

  97. @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Correct and Russia is running out of artillery anyways.

    Ukrainians would happily take it to urban combat against Putin's 1 week conscripts.

    We will see how well the conscripts do in Kherson. My guess is they will be even less enthused after seeing their neighbors and friends cut in half by machine guns.

    This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt.

    They actually knew about the flaw but didn't care since they didn't expect the tank crew to make it back in a ww3 scenario. They prioritized being able to auto-load rounds over being able to save the crew.

    In a conventional war...... not such a great feature.

    Replies: @Graveldips, @Jack D

    Russians believe that “quantity has its own quality” as Stalin said. Their priority in a war was to overwhelm the enemy with a LOT of tanks (even now the Russians have kept every tank they ever produced going back to the 1960s in storage so they could say they have x thousands of tanks) and artillery. If the Cold War had turned hot, then 50,000 Soviet tanks were supposed to pour thru the Fulda Gap and head for the Rhine.

    Russia never had the kind of $ we have in the West to spend millions of $ on each tank so if you wanted thousand and thousands of tanks you had to make them kind of cheap and cheerful. This was also good for sales to third world countries who were not rolling in dough either – you could buy 3 or 5 Russian tanks for the price of one American tank (if the Americans would even sell them to you). And an auto-loader reduces the crew from 4 to 3 so you need 25% fewer troops to man X# of tanks. It’s true that this is much less survivable than putting the ammo in a separate compartment but hey you gotta make compromises somewhere.

  98. More Ukrainian aggressiveness.

    • Replies: @keypusher
    @Dave Pinsen

    Yep, and good for him. That's the spirit that's allowed them to whip the Russians up to now. But the West will politely blow them off, as with the request for a no-fly zone and accession to NATO.

    , @HA
    @Dave Pinsen

    "More Ukrainian aggressiveness."

    Again, as was noted with Sean, this pearl-clutching over Ukraine's aggressiveness -- i.e. the sole main character in this drama who willingly gave up their nukes -- would seem more sincere if it had been preceded by at least a little cluck-clucking over the guy in Moscow who keeps mumbling about nukes and who actually has a front-row seat next to the red button that launches them. Shouldn't that be the aggressiveness that concerns you more?

    As it is, it's just more "pay no attention to the man behind the curtain" windbaggery from the usual useful idiots.

  99. @Inquiring Mind
    @Harry Baldwin

    Problem is, a LOL could either be intended as an Agree or a Troll.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    I’m not proud, I’ll accept it either way.

    • LOL: EddieSpaghetti
  100. @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine's #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Some Russian troops are beginning to surrender in pre-arranged settings. This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt. The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11286219/Russian-troops-filmed-surrendering-Ukraine-Kherson.html

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Harry Baldwin, @HA, @Dave Pinsen

    The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    And six months after that, you’ll be driving a cab in NYC.

  101. @Dave Pinsen
    More Ukrainian aggressiveness.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1578097733860065281?s=46&t=K-yrbGrXyoIRO41PCJ3Obg

    Replies: @keypusher, @HA

    Yep, and good for him. That’s the spirit that’s allowed them to whip the Russians up to now. But the West will politely blow them off, as with the request for a no-fly zone and accession to NATO.

  102. @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine's #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Some Russian troops are beginning to surrender in pre-arranged settings. This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt. The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11286219/Russian-troops-filmed-surrendering-Ukraine-Kherson.html

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Harry Baldwin, @HA, @Dave Pinsen

    “Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.”

    Yes, according to a recent story, the Russians left so much artillery behind in their, uh,.. heroic withdrawals so as to form a more compact frontline, that for the first time in the war, or however that’s supposed to go, the Ukrainians are stocked with artillery for the first time since the war started.

    Granted, it’s dilapidated, badly-maintained Soviet-era junk, and they’ll no doubt burn through it fast enough, but in a pinch, it’ll do.

    Ukraine is no longer low on artillery ammo because Russia abandoned so much in recent retreats, report says

    In other words, “keep them HIMARS coming, you beautiful capitalist NATO pigs, but as for the junk-grade shrapnel producers, I think we’re flush.” On second thought, as long as they can refrain from needlessly blowing it at civilian populations the way the Russians did, the stash might last them a while.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @HA

    Yes, according to a recent story, the Russians left so much artillery behind in their, uh,.. heroic withdrawals so as to form a more compact frontline

    We call it a strategic military regrouping away from hostile activities for glory of Russia. $10000 Ruble fine plus jail if you call it a withdrawal.

    that for the first time in the war, or however that’s supposed to go, the Ukrainians are stocked with artillery for the first time since the war started.

    They actually started with quite a lot. Putin didn't seem to realize they had one of the largest militaries in Europe. Ukraine handed over nukes to Russia but acquired Soviet bases and conventional weapons. From what I have read they have an endless supply of RPGs and small arms. Worst case scenario is they stop using artillery and switch to urban warfare. Higher risk of casualties but they still have the initiative.

    Granted, it’s dilapidated, badly-maintained Soviet-era junk, and they’ll no doubt burn through it fast enough, but in a pinch, it’ll do.

    Yea especially when they are facing conscripts that don't want to fight.

    The US really doesn't need to be involved at this point. Not taking that position, just stating the reality. The Ukrainians can take Kherson without US aid. They will most likely get even more goodies.

    , @Athenian
    @HA

    I thought the Russian logistics were so bad that they couldnt provide supplies to the front lines. And what little they managed to send was blown up by the glorious himars. Which is it?

    Replies: @HA

  103. @Dave Pinsen
    More Ukrainian aggressiveness.

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1578097733860065281?s=46&t=K-yrbGrXyoIRO41PCJ3Obg

    Replies: @keypusher, @HA

    “More Ukrainian aggressiveness.”

    Again, as was noted with Sean, this pearl-clutching over Ukraine’s aggressiveness — i.e. the sole main character in this drama who willingly gave up their nukes — would seem more sincere if it had been preceded by at least a little cluck-clucking over the guy in Moscow who keeps mumbling about nukes and who actually has a front-row seat next to the red button that launches them. Shouldn’t that be the aggressiveness that concerns you more?

    As it is, it’s just more “pay no attention to the man behind the curtain” windbaggery from the usual useful idiots.

  104. @Jack D
    @John Johnson

    Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine's #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia.

    Some Russian troops are beginning to surrender in pre-arranged settings. This beats being blow to smithereens when the Javelin penetrates the armor of your obsolete tank and sets off the carrousel full of ammo that the Russian tank designers have thoughtfully stored directly underneath your butt. The Ukrainians now have a hotline that Russian soldiers can call in order to arrange their surrender. I understand that if you surrender with equipment the Ukrainians will pay a reward.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11286219/Russian-troops-filmed-surrendering-Ukraine-Kherson.html

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Harry Baldwin, @HA, @Dave Pinsen

    Given the copious videos Ukrainians have posted of them torturing Russian POWs, I wouldn’t be surprised if the video of Russians surrendering with their armored vehicle was staged.

    The head of Wagner told potential recruits all his men carry two grenades to kill themselves with if they get captured.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Dave Pinsen


    The head of Wagner told potential recruits all his men carry two grenades to kill themselves with if they get captured.
     
    Good advice! Don't let them Nazis take you alive! Then we won't have to exchange you for Ukrainian POWs. Also this way, since you committed suicide we don't have to give your wife a Lada with no airbags either.

    Here is some better advice to recruits - use those two grenades to frag Prigozhin.
    , @Jack D
    @Dave Pinsen

    Here is a interview with the guys who turned over the BMP:

    https://twitter.com/heroiam_slava/status/1578272284636479488?s=46&t=XHINh3J616DhfwGbeoqE0g

    Of course this could be fake too, just like the Ukrainian flags over Izyum and Lyman are fake. They were DPR/LNR guys and they got to split $30,000US for turning over the BMP. They got an extra $5,000 bonus because it was low mileage and had leather seats in good condition.

    , @Corvinus
    @Dave Pinsen

    So you’re falling prey yet again to Russian propaganda.

  105. @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad

    Grow up, bro. It's basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years. The trailer for it looks pretty good:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWd-AuIgCrc

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra, @vinteuil, @TWS

    At 1:20, the protagonists exchange a chaste kiss – and then the camera pulls away, revealing that a couple of other guys are sucking their cocks.

    This is gay “marriage.”

  106. @AndrewR
    @usNthem

    This is the first instance I am aware of of the US regime throwing the Ukrainian regime under the bus. It seems very significant, regardless of the veracity of the US regime's claim.

    Replies: @BosTex

    Probably a first step to back away from where we are: frankly, if you start killing the children of folks you don’t like or agree with, the next steps tend to be unpleasant for the killer not the victim.

    Keep in mind that these folks look alike to us and to one another and guessing both governments have penetrated one another throughly.

    If I were any high ranking Ukrainian: I would be looking at the safety of my family.

  107. @Jack D
    @HA

    This doesn't convey the full Hitler-Jugend level sickness. They brainwash little children into singing this song:

    https://youtu.be/-vqHkelXKrg?t=197

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_12fAusEqvc

    Replies: @John Johnson

    That’s nothing compared to what they used to feed Soviet kids.

    They turned Lenin and Marx into religious figures.

    The economy would be in the dumps but the kids would be singing daily about how Communism is going to unite the world and bring utopia.

    The 45-55 year old conscripts heading to the front grew up on that crap.

    Time to serve the Motherland!!! Charge!!!!

    (head explodes into red mist before first patriotic verse is finished).

    • Replies: @profnasty
    @John Johnson

    Russia has learned it's lesson.
    Do you think America ever will?
    Too late. The Zion debt trap is about to spring shut.
    Gotcha!!

  108. @Matthew Kelly
    @epebble

    Looks like the NYU prof who got fired for, ahem, "making his class too difficult", got off easy...

    Replies: @epebble

    Sadly, violence by frustrated Grad Students is not uncommon. It happened once too close for comfort.

    The San Diego State University shooting was a school shooting that occurred at the San Diego State University (SDSU) engineering building on August 15, 1996, in San Diego, California. Three professors were killed by master’s degree student Frederick Martin Davidson.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Diego_State_University_shooting
    https://murderpedia.org/male.D/d/davidson-frederick-martin.htm

  109. I am an American, but I see no reason to cheer American politicians’ quest to rule the world. I don’t even see a reason to cheer American politicians’ quest to rule the U.S. Entangling alliances are the root of all geopolitical evil!

  110. @HA
    @Jack D

    "Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia."

    Yes, according to a recent story, the Russians left so much artillery behind in their, uh,.. heroic withdrawals so as to form a more compact frontline, that for the first time in the war, or however that's supposed to go, the Ukrainians are stocked with artillery for the first time since the war started.

    Granted, it's dilapidated, badly-maintained Soviet-era junk, and they'll no doubt burn through it fast enough, but in a pinch, it'll do.


    Ukraine is no longer low on artillery ammo because Russia abandoned so much in recent retreats, report says
     
    In other words, "keep them HIMARS coming, you beautiful capitalist NATO pigs, but as for the junk-grade shrapnel producers, I think we're flush." On second thought, as long as they can refrain from needlessly blowing it at civilian populations the way the Russians did, the stash might last them a while.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Athenian

    Yes, according to a recent story, the Russians left so much artillery behind in their, uh,.. heroic withdrawals so as to form a more compact frontline

    We call it a strategic military regrouping away from hostile activities for glory of Russia. $10000 Ruble fine plus jail if you call it a withdrawal.

    that for the first time in the war, or however that’s supposed to go, the Ukrainians are stocked with artillery for the first time since the war started.

    They actually started with quite a lot. Putin didn’t seem to realize they had one of the largest militaries in Europe. Ukraine handed over nukes to Russia but acquired Soviet bases and conventional weapons. From what I have read they have an endless supply of RPGs and small arms. Worst case scenario is they stop using artillery and switch to urban warfare. Higher risk of casualties but they still have the initiative.

    Granted, it’s dilapidated, badly-maintained Soviet-era junk, and they’ll no doubt burn through it fast enough, but in a pinch, it’ll do.

    Yea especially when they are facing conscripts that don’t want to fight.

    The US really doesn’t need to be involved at this point. Not taking that position, just stating the reality. The Ukrainians can take Kherson without US aid. They will most likely get even more goodies.

    • Thanks: HA
  111. How can a crime boss, US, not take responsibility for his gunsels?
    If the Zaporyshne(.) Power plant is breached, VP Biden did it. End of discussion.

  112. @John Johnson
    @Jack D

    That's nothing compared to what they used to feed Soviet kids.

    They turned Lenin and Marx into religious figures.

    The economy would be in the dumps but the kids would be singing daily about how Communism is going to unite the world and bring utopia.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeEqG6pdREQ

    The 45-55 year old conscripts heading to the front grew up on that crap.

    Time to serve the Motherland!!! Charge!!!!

    (head explodes into red mist before first patriotic verse is finished).

    Replies: @profnasty

    Russia has learned it’s lesson.
    Do you think America ever will?
    Too late. The Zion debt trap is about to spring shut.
    Gotcha!!

  113. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Anonymous

    Please don’t...

    Instead review the Russ Meyer film , Up ! Or Beneath the Valley of the Ultra Vixens.
    Kitten Natividad was in both films and recently passed away at 74 (not from Covid)
    https://twitter.com/theapollotwin/status/1573843200648876032?s=21

    Replies: @profnasty

    Really enjoyed/recommend Faster Pussycat Kill Kill. Meyer was inspired.

  114. @Mr Mox
    @Jack D

    Isn’t it strange then that one of the four pipelines remains completely intact ?

    What's strange is that whenever Ukraine is mentioned, this happens:



    https://i.imgur.com/YjIVqyA.jpg

    Replies: @BosTex

    Yes. The volume, immediacy and vehemence of Jack D and HA on any Ukraine post is remarkable.

    Maybe they chipped in and bought Steve a used 2010 Lexus with only 150k miles on it.

    Perhaps Jack D and HA are really iSteve’s alter egos? Cranky elderly Jewish man with a bad case of hemoroids from Philadelphia and smart alecky twat posting from his mother’s basement in Des Moines, IA.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @BosTex

    "The volume, immediacy and vehemence of Jack D and HA on any Ukraine post is remarkable."

    Come on, man ! What about John Johnson ? In a newer post (I think on FBI crime stats!) they are to and fro, replying to and agreeing with each other like nobody's business.

    I might drop the odd "Agree" on a PhysicistDave post, but I don't feel the need to fluff him up every time he writes.

  115. @Art Deco
    @Sean

    You mean you have a story which consists of anonymous gossip and that interests you.

    Replies: @Johnny Rico, @Sean

    Did you catch the part where he said New York Times?

    You know damn well none of this stuff ever gets resolved to everyone’s satisfaction. His opinion is as good as yours.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Johnny Rico

    You think I take anonymous sourcing in the Sulzberger Birdcage Liner at face value?

  116. @Inquiring Mind
    @Sean

    There is another theory from an energy-industry insider that it does not take intention to blow up an undersea natural gas pipleline. It takes a great deal of attentive intention to not blow up an undersea natural gas pipeline.

    The condition is that if any liquid water or any humidity gets into the pipeline, it bonds with methane under the cold conditions underneaht the sea to form a methane-hydrate plug blocking the pipeline.

    There are meticulous procedures to safely free such a plug, and then there are shortcut procedures. The speculation is that the Russians took such a shortcut, trying to free the plug by increasing the gas pressure on their end, and they ruptured the pipeline when the plug broke lose and when careening down the pipe. Essentially an industrial accident by the Russians being Russians, Chernobl style?

    Replies: @Athenian

    Sure, four industrial accidents at the same time, on three separate pipes. Great theory. Makes total sense. Thanks for sharing.

  117. @HA
    @Jack D

    "Thanks to all the equipment and ammo that the Russian troops are abandoning as they flee for their lives, Ukraine’s #1 military supplier is not the US, it is Russia."

    Yes, according to a recent story, the Russians left so much artillery behind in their, uh,.. heroic withdrawals so as to form a more compact frontline, that for the first time in the war, or however that's supposed to go, the Ukrainians are stocked with artillery for the first time since the war started.

    Granted, it's dilapidated, badly-maintained Soviet-era junk, and they'll no doubt burn through it fast enough, but in a pinch, it'll do.


    Ukraine is no longer low on artillery ammo because Russia abandoned so much in recent retreats, report says
     
    In other words, "keep them HIMARS coming, you beautiful capitalist NATO pigs, but as for the junk-grade shrapnel producers, I think we're flush." On second thought, as long as they can refrain from needlessly blowing it at civilian populations the way the Russians did, the stash might last them a while.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Athenian

    I thought the Russian logistics were so bad that they couldnt provide supplies to the front lines. And what little they managed to send was blown up by the glorious himars. Which is it?

    • Replies: @HA
    @Athenian

    "I thought the Russian logistics were so bad that they couldnt provide supplies to the front lines. And what little they managed to send was blown up by the glorious himars. Which is it?"

    As I understand it, "elite" formations like the Wagner group enjoy excellent rapport with the logistics people and when they ask for air support, it arrives quickly. Whereas other contingents -- e.g. those composed of Donetsk and Lugansk locals -- get no air support, even when it is promised, and they are left to fend for themselves, to the extent that one can find examples of Russian soldiers pleading on Telegram for their superiors to send them assistance.

    The HIMARS are ideal for targeting large ammunitions dumps. The more scattered piles that the Russians set up in response to the HIMARS are therefore available only when there is a large withdrawal of territory which is what just happened. If one is withdrawing, returning to every scattered pile and min-ammo dump is not feasible and so it must get left behind, though I'm not sure a large concentrated dump of ammunition would be any easier to retreat with.

  118. @Art Deco
    @Sean

    You mean you have a story which consists of anonymous gossip and that interests you.

    Replies: @Johnny Rico, @Sean

    President Joe Biden was furious about leaks that said US intelligence helped Ukraine kill Russian generals and sink its warship, report says, The New York Times reported on Monday.

    A senior administration official told The Times that after the reports of US involvement in the attacks emerged, Biden reprimanded several top defense officials, including Defense Secretary Lloyd J. Austin III, the Director of National Intelligence Avril D. Haines, and CIA director William J. Burns.

    Biden was concerned that the reports would further provoke Russian President Vladimir Putin, The Times reported.

    Several media outlets reported last week that the US handed crucial information to Ukrainian forces that allowed them to attack and sink one of Russia’s most prominent warships, the Moskva, on April 14.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/09/us/politics/biden-lend-lease-ukraine-weapons-war.html

    The story of US intel concluding that Dugina assassination’s was by Ukrainian secret service is also from the NYT.

    U.S. Reportedly Thinks Ukraine Authorized Killing Of Putin …https://www.forbes.com › madelinehalpert › 2022/10/05
    1 day ago — Topline. New intelligence from American officials suggests Ukraine approved a car bombing within Russia that killed Daria Dugina, the daughter …

    “Ukraine” means Zelensky

    President Volodymyr Zelensky has emphasized that Ukraine has no interest in the daughter of the “Russian world” mastermind, Darya Dugina, so her alleged murder “is not our responsibility.”
    The president touched upon the topic during a press conference on Tuesday, August 23, Ukrinform reports.

    “It is definitely not our responsibility, she is not a citizen of our country, we are not interested in her, and she is not on the territory of Ukraine,” Zelensky said, answering a question regarding Russia’s accusations of Ukraine’s involvement in the assassination of Darya Dugina.

    At the press conference he looked the very picture of Dr Evil innocence

    The US sanctioned Dugina in March and she had a Telegram channel supporting the war, yet

    Asked about the New York Times account, a Ukrainian presidential aide, Mykhailo Podolyak, said that, “objectively speaking”, Dugina had been of no interest to Kyiv before she was killed.

    “Before Dugina’s murder, the people of Ukraine and representatives of the Ukrainian authorities did not know about her public activities and her influence on propaganda programmes,”
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/oct/06/us-reportedly-believes-ukraine-authorised-moscow-car-bomb

    Lies.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Sean

    Again, who is saying what with their name attached to it? This isn't that difficult.

  119. @Mr. Anon

    It’s hardly uncommon in history for smaller countries’ aggressiveness to trouble their larger allies: e.g., Serbia led Russia into the Great War in 1914.
     
    Then there was Austro-Hungary, the weaker junior partner of Imperial Germany.

    I believe it was the historian A.J.P. Taylor who said that the junior partner in an alliance, in a perverse way, has the upper hand. They are just important enough that the senior partner has to care what they think, permitting the junior partner to say "you have to indulge me or I will fold".

    Or put another way, an "ally" like Ukraine is like having a pushy, mouthy girlfriend who is always telling other guys at the sock-hop that her boyfriend can kick their ass.

    Replies: @anonymouseperson

    Germany and Russia ironically had no reason to fight each other in 1914. Neither the Baltic or Volga Germans interested the former and Bismark said the Balkans were not worth the bones of one soldier. Likewise, Serbia was of no value or importance to Russia. Both countries were hugely led astray by a smaller junior party that they would have been better off without.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @anonymouseperson


    "Neither the Baltic or Volga Germans interested the former and Bismark said the Balkans were not worth the bones of one soldier. Likewise, Serbia was of no value or importance to Russia."
     
    But the system of alliances, designed to prevent war, turned into a machine for making a huge war inevitable. Now what does that remind you of?

    https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/austria-hungary-issues-ultimatum-to-serbia
  120. @Anonymous
    The real question from this conflict is if Xi Jinping in China is taking this as a warning that invasions nowadays are really hard, or if he is as delusional as Putin is and thinks he can take Taiwan.

    It's amazing how the American public is simply unaware that we are likely to get in a shooting war with China over Taiwan before the year 2030. I think the US will come out on top, but China will no doubt land their punches too.

    Replies: @anonymouseperson, @njguy73, @Anonymous

    Why should the USA take punches for Taiwan?

  121. @HA
    @Sean

    "[Zelensky] is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia’s way."

    Or, he is just responding to a decade of targeted assassinations by Putin, what with Yuschenko's doxine poisoning, and the Chechen hit squads sent to Kyiv (not to mention the polonium and nerve agents used by Putin on his in-house local troublemakers who thought that escaping to distant lands would save them).

    I would note that even Anatoly Karlin -- hey, does anyone still remember him? -- was deeply dismayed that just hours after Izym was taken, Zelensky toured the front line with nary a pop-gun shot in his direction from the nearby Russian forces. Karlin claims this "Suggests either an agreement not to try to kill Zelensky', or else Putin's murderers-for-hire are just total idiots.

    I'm OK with either explanation, but if we're going with the "agreement not to kill", it also suggests that the message the Ukrainians wanted to deliver with the Dugina assassination was heard loud and clear. Now, I'm against bomb assassinations, myself (though I realize that the partisans behind the lines don't have much in the way of other options). There are just too many was that innocent bystanders could get hit. I think it's far more effective to leave a note under a dictator's pillow (or maybe his wife's or daughter's pillow) saying "we can come back any time" (maybe the letter from Tito to Stalin was similarly delivered to the bedroom pillow of Stalin's daughter, for all anyone knows) but I reluctantly admit that sometimes a car bomb works, too.

    In any case, there's a lesson there, Sean. If you're so hot and bothered about the loose cannon in Kyiv, see if you can try to rein in the unhinged little firecracker in Moscow who carries around nuclear codes. I'm far more worried about loose nuclear warheads than loose cannons, and Ukraine agreed to give up their nukes. In fact, I'm thinking that until Russians can agree to be ruled by sane people who aren't threatening to start up Armageddon, all sensible people (even those in China and India) should focus on getting Russians to denuclearize as well. Until then, your shrieking about the loose cannon in Kyiv will come off a deeply hypocritical and yet another weak attempt at deflection and misdirection.

    Replies: @Sean, @Rob

    Yuschenko’s doxine poisoning

    Was bad, but if he was coked out of his skull when he signed off on (or actually commissioned) the car bomb killing, you cannot blame the FSB for shoveling all that snow up Zelensky’s nose

    I would note that even Anatoly Karlin — hey, does anyone still remember him? — was deeply dismayed that just hours after Izym was taken, Zelensky toured the front line

    Which is evidence of his impulsiveness and absolute authority to disregard a Ukrainian subordinate’s objection to anything El Presidente wants to do.

    In any case, there’s a lesson there, Sean. If you’re so hot and bothered about the loose cannon in Kyiv, see if you can try to rein in the unhinged little firecracker in Moscow who carries around nuclear codes.

    Putin’s is far more predictable than the often drunk Khrushchev or perma-inebriated Yeltsin. Yes, Putin tried to control then attacked Ukraine, but Ukraine provoked Russia geopolitically. Was Russia a bully? Yes, but it the real world you sometimes can’t just tell a bully to get lost and have a good outcome. You can’t!

    • Replies: @HA
    @Sean

    Was bad, but if he was coked out of his skull when he signed off on (or actually commissioned) the car bomb killing...

    Kind of a big "if". Should he have been cowering all alone at the edge of his really, really long conference table instead?

    "Putin’s is far more predictable than the often drunk Khrushchev...

    And yet he has continued to surprise any objective observer with one boneheaded move after another. You confidently told us at the beginning of this invasion that "Putin is about to bring down the curtain on this" clown show. How's that working out?

    Clearly, Putin is not as predictable as you make him out to be, or as sane and capable as you predict him to be. Whichever of those options you go with, my point stands.

  122. @Anonymous
    The real question from this conflict is if Xi Jinping in China is taking this as a warning that invasions nowadays are really hard, or if he is as delusional as Putin is and thinks he can take Taiwan.

    It's amazing how the American public is simply unaware that we are likely to get in a shooting war with China over Taiwan before the year 2030. I think the US will come out on top, but China will no doubt land their punches too.

    Replies: @anonymouseperson, @njguy73, @Anonymous

    Taiwan will be re-united with the Motherland….by some combination of economic carrot and military stick. The U.S. will grumble ineffectually, up to the point where the Chinese ambassador loses his patience and asks the U.S. Secretary of State point-blank: “How many cities are you willing to lose over this? We ourselves are willing to lose three or four.” Then we will stop grumbling.

    John Derbyshire, National Review, August 2, 2002

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2002/08/unpleasant-truths-john-derbyshire/

  123. @AnotherDad
    @Dave Pinsen


    We’ve created a monster in the Ukraine, and we’ll be lucky if it doesn’t get us all killed.
     
    I'd say it's more like Putin created a monster in Ukraine. Turned the sort of routine "people not as well sorted into the right country" of Eastern Ukraine--a problem in numerous countries--into an actual war.

    And we'd have to be exceedingly unlucky to "get us all killed". Putin desiring to use nukes against the West to show he's really, really pissed off, is probably the one thing sure to get the Russian establishment to Beria him. (Russians have families too.)


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution. The US should be continuously working the dialog to figure out where the real concerns and bottom lines are for Russia and Ukraine--not just Putin and Zelensky but the larger establishments--including Russia's issues with us and seeing if there is a rough shape of a peaceful solution, then pushing toward that.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Mr. Anon, @Bill Jones, @Mark G.

    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution.

    When you have a country in serious decline, as this one is, people with poor judgement tend to rise to the top of the government. They then make bad decisions across a whole range of issues like immigration policy, crime policy, Covid policy, energy policy, Federal Reserve policy, education policy, foreign policy and so on. Countries in this situation suffer a slow death by a thousand cuts. We are likely to dribble away money on this conflict for several more years. Since our leaders have bad judgement, of course they will waste money extending this conflict instead of working to end it.

    I’m a short-term pessimist but a long-term optimist. The current system will become totally discredited and then things will improve. Biden has received a respite from his plunging poll numbers due to a slight drop in inflation. This is just temporary, though. It mainly happened because he is depleting the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and putting oil out on the market. That oil will be all gone in a year and then won’t be there if we ever really need it. It’s just another example of bad judgement by our political leaders. They have been busily alienating other countries, and they are now coming together into an anti-American empire coalition. The new announcement that Saudi Arabia and OPEC is cutting oil production is them siding with Russia.

    • Replies: @Unintended Consequence
    @Mark G.

    "They have been busily alienating other countries, and they are now coming together into an anti-American empire coalition. The new announcement that Saudi Arabia and OPEC is cutting oil production is them siding with Russia."

    On multiple occasions, I've thought Russia's best option was to stop and hold its position and maybe focus on building the Eastern economic coalition. Instead, they continue expanding further into Ukraine with many reversals. Rhetoric from Putin sounds disturbingly messianic right now though I think it's more psychological warfare than anything else. I don't believe Putin intends to use nukes but think it's more likely that other nations such as China will join in creating multiple fronts. In other words, stopping the escalation in the Ukraine asap is probably the best choice.

  124. @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, but better rule by Russia and your area still liveable, surrounded by your own people, than ruled by GAE, even if the front men in government look like you - and that mask drops when the immigrant population is high enough. In forty years I've seen the Guardian go from "they're a tiny minority, it's moral to be nice to them" to "they're a large and increasing minority, it's in your interest to be nice to them". Stage 3 will probably be for my kids to deal with.

    https://e3.365dm.com/22/09/1600x900/skynews-reshuffle-truss_5889389.jpg

    There was no need for war or Russian rule in any event. If the GAE hadn't installed a new government in 2014, causing the pro-Russian bits of Ukraine's own armed forces to separate in the Donbass, then trained up the Army and sent them all to bombard the rebel areas... this is America's war.

    I wrote the other day about an expensive flat in a British city centre that was just too dangerous a place for a small young woman to live in. Within living memory in the UK, a "poor area" didn't mean a dangerous one. It does now, unless you're somewhere very remote.

    I rate ADs comments and your writing very highly, but IMHO there's a real blind spot here.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I rate ADs comments and your writing very highly, but IMHO there’s a real blind spot here.

    Please repost this comment directly to Steve so he seees it.

  125. @Anonymous
    The real question from this conflict is if Xi Jinping in China is taking this as a warning that invasions nowadays are really hard, or if he is as delusional as Putin is and thinks he can take Taiwan.

    It's amazing how the American public is simply unaware that we are likely to get in a shooting war with China over Taiwan before the year 2030. I think the US will come out on top, but China will no doubt land their punches too.

    Replies: @anonymouseperson, @njguy73, @Anonymous

    It’s amazing how the American public is simply unaware that we are likely to get in a shooting war with China over Taiwan before the year 2030.

    What is wrong with reunification of Taiwan with China?

  126. @Mark G.
    @AnotherDad


    All that said, this has been stupid. As in the Great War the focus of the US should have been on finding a peaceful solution.
     
    When you have a country in serious decline, as this one is, people with poor judgement tend to rise to the top of the government. They then make bad decisions across a whole range of issues like immigration policy, crime policy, Covid policy, energy policy, Federal Reserve policy, education policy, foreign policy and so on. Countries in this situation suffer a slow death by a thousand cuts. We are likely to dribble away money on this conflict for several more years. Since our leaders have bad judgement, of course they will waste money extending this conflict instead of working to end it.

    I'm a short-term pessimist but a long-term optimist. The current system will become totally discredited and then things will improve. Biden has received a respite from his plunging poll numbers due to a slight drop in inflation. This is just temporary, though. It mainly happened because he is depleting the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and putting oil out on the market. That oil will be all gone in a year and then won't be there if we ever really need it. It's just another example of bad judgement by our political leaders. They have been busily alienating other countries, and they are now coming together into an anti-American empire coalition. The new announcement that Saudi Arabia and OPEC is cutting oil production is them siding with Russia.

    Replies: @Unintended Consequence

    “They have been busily alienating other countries, and they are now coming together into an anti-American empire coalition. The new announcement that Saudi Arabia and OPEC is cutting oil production is them siding with Russia.”

    On multiple occasions, I’ve thought Russia’s best option was to stop and hold its position and maybe focus on building the Eastern economic coalition. Instead, they continue expanding further into Ukraine with many reversals. Rhetoric from Putin sounds disturbingly messianic right now though I think it’s more psychological warfare than anything else. I don’t believe Putin intends to use nukes but think it’s more likely that other nations such as China will join in creating multiple fronts. In other words, stopping the escalation in the Ukraine asap is probably the best choice.

  127. @michael droy
    Oh come on - the US is far more deeply involved in Ukrainian viciousness than you pretend.

    The Himars are operated by mercenaries but mercenaries who only just left Nato countries - there are thousands of such people in Ukraine.
    Himars are amongst the artillery that shell civilians in Donbas - as nazis have been doing for 8 years now. And Himars have been used to attack the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant (you know the one which Russia controls, used to send electricity even into Ukrainian controlled areas, but Kiev claims Russia does the shelling.....).
    Russia regularly presents the evidence of Himars shells to the UN - zero coverage in western media.

    50 congressmen meet the Nazis.
    https://thegrayzone.com/2022/10/05/azov-neo-nazi-ukrainian-congress/

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    And in the specific case of Dugina, it’s not clear if she would have been assassinated had the US and NATO not been involved with Ukrainians over the last however many years. There seems to be some US connections to the Myrotvorets website, and who knows what training might have been provided by the CIA or NATO that contributed to the car bombing operation, even if the operation wasn’t ordered by the US.

  128. @BosTex
    @Mr Mox

    Yes. The volume, immediacy and vehemence of Jack D and HA on any Ukraine post is remarkable.

    Maybe they chipped in and bought Steve a used 2010 Lexus with only 150k miles on it.

    Perhaps Jack D and HA are really iSteve’s alter egos? Cranky elderly Jewish man with a bad case of hemoroids from Philadelphia and smart alecky twat posting from his mother’s basement in Des Moines, IA.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “The volume, immediacy and vehemence of Jack D and HA on any Ukraine post is remarkable.”

    Come on, man ! What about John Johnson ? In a newer post (I think on FBI crime stats!) they are to and fro, replying to and agreeing with each other like nobody’s business.

    I might drop the odd “Agree” on a PhysicistDave post, but I don’t feel the need to fluff him up every time he writes.

    • Agree: BosTex
  129. @anonymouseperson
    @Mr. Anon

    Germany and Russia ironically had no reason to fight each other in 1914. Neither the Baltic or Volga Germans interested the former and Bismark said the Balkans were not worth the bones of one soldier. Likewise, Serbia was of no value or importance to Russia. Both countries were hugely led astray by a smaller junior party that they would have been better off without.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “Neither the Baltic or Volga Germans interested the former and Bismark said the Balkans were not worth the bones of one soldier. Likewise, Serbia was of no value or importance to Russia.”

    But the system of alliances, designed to prevent war, turned into a machine for making a huge war inevitable. Now what does that remind you of?

    https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/austria-hungary-issues-ultimatum-to-serbia

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
  130. *honorable mention, John Johnson, junior fluffer to Jack and HA.

    Always, there holding the coat, ready to hit the “agree”’button needlessly, and pile on with a long, pointless post to Jack’s more pithy (though cranky) postings.

  131. @Athenian
    @HA

    I thought the Russian logistics were so bad that they couldnt provide supplies to the front lines. And what little they managed to send was blown up by the glorious himars. Which is it?

    Replies: @HA

    “I thought the Russian logistics were so bad that they couldnt provide supplies to the front lines. And what little they managed to send was blown up by the glorious himars. Which is it?”

    As I understand it, “elite” formations like the Wagner group enjoy excellent rapport with the logistics people and when they ask for air support, it arrives quickly. Whereas other contingents — e.g. those composed of Donetsk and Lugansk locals — get no air support, even when it is promised, and they are left to fend for themselves, to the extent that one can find examples of Russian soldiers pleading on Telegram for their superiors to send them assistance.

    The HIMARS are ideal for targeting large ammunitions dumps. The more scattered piles that the Russians set up in response to the HIMARS are therefore available only when there is a large withdrawal of territory which is what just happened. If one is withdrawing, returning to every scattered pile and min-ammo dump is not feasible and so it must get left behind, though I’m not sure a large concentrated dump of ammunition would be any easier to retreat with.

  132. @Sean
    @HA


    Yuschenko’s doxine poisoning
     
    Was bad, but if he was coked out of his skull when he signed off on (or actually commissioned) the car bomb killing, you cannot blame the FSB for shoveling all that snow up Zelensky's nose

    I would note that even Anatoly Karlin — hey, does anyone still remember him? — was deeply dismayed that just hours after Izym was taken, Zelensky toured the front line
     
    Which is evidence of his impulsiveness and absolute authority to disregard a Ukrainian subordinate's objection to anything El Presidente wants to do.

    In any case, there’s a lesson there, Sean. If you’re so hot and bothered about the loose cannon in Kyiv, see if you can try to rein in the unhinged little firecracker in Moscow who carries around nuclear codes.
     
    Putin's is far more predictable than the often drunk Khrushchev or perma-inebriated Yeltsin. Yes, Putin tried to control then attacked Ukraine, but Ukraine provoked Russia geopolitically. Was Russia a bully? Yes, but it the real world you sometimes can't just tell a bully to get lost and have a good outcome. You can't!

    Replies: @HA

    Was bad, but if he was coked out of his skull when he signed off on (or actually commissioned) the car bomb killing…

    Kind of a big “if”. Should he have been cowering all alone at the edge of his really, really long conference table instead?

    “Putin’s is far more predictable than the often drunk Khrushchev…

    And yet he has continued to surprise any objective observer with one boneheaded move after another. You confidently told us at the beginning of this invasion that “Putin is about to bring down the curtain on this” clown show. How’s that working out?

    Clearly, Putin is not as predictable as you make him out to be, or as sane and capable as you predict him to be. Whichever of those options you go with, my point stands.

  133. @Anonymous
    Steve, are you going to review the new Billy Eichner movie Bros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiJoqTk08AI

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @clifford brown, @Mike Tre, @JimDandy, @Dennis Dale, @Batman

    Why does every mention of the movie Bros choose to preface it with noting that the movie is by Billy Eichner? Is he like Spike Lee or Tyler Perry where he has an entertainment brand associated with his name? I doubt he’s a big enough celebrity that it would get more people into the theater than not mentioning it. I also doubt that Bros is a common enough word that you need to preface it with something to avoid it being lost in the Google shuffle, e.g. “Walt Disney’s Frozen.”

    Is this the world’s most complex Google SEO campaign?

  134. Kind of a big “if”. Should he have been cowering all alone at the edge of his really, really long conference table instead?

    Instead of ordering a horrid cowardly murder?; yes. Dugin was accused of anti Semitism you know; he denounced assimilated, cosmopolitan Jews of which Zelesky is one.

    And yet he has continued to surprise any objective observer with one boneheaded move after another.

    No more than Zelensky is Putin the cowering kind who only fights when certain he iis certainly going to win easy, or at all.

    You confidently told us at the beginning of this invasion that “Putin is about to bring down the curtain on this” clown show. How’s that working out?

    There is disagreement about why but most think after a reckless over confident start Russia has settled into a long term economy of force and attrition mode. How well it has worked depend on how numerous the Ukrainian KIA are–they admit to ten thousand I believe– and whether Ukraine is dissuaded by casualties. I would say Ukraine with Zelensky leading is pretty impervious to the military’s casualties. My expectation is Russia will now start preferentially hitting cities in earnest.

    Russia is a notoriously slow starter in war. Their doctrine is Soviet-era-defensive-artillery, which method is vulnerable (at first)to panic retreats from fear of being surrounded when enemy are found to be on their flanks. The Ukrainians did their resent offensives with off road little trucks with three men aboard driving into the rear pf the Russian lines and firing NLAWs, whereupon the Russians thought they were in danger of being surrounded, and with their own artillery ineffective due to the lack of concentrations near the previous front line, and retreated . It is similar to the British army against the Japs, but the Brit learned from the retreat to Singapore how to go into an all round defensive position with clearly designated fields of fire, from which retreat was forbidden.

    Few people realised the level of military American support that Ukraine was going to have by now; even so I predicted that Putin would end up using thermonuclear weapons. In a scenario of an American conventional attack on Russian forces in Ukraine in retaliation for Putin’s battlefield thermonuclear weapon use, Russia would have already crossed the Rubicon of theatre thermonuclear weapon(s) detonation in anger when conventionally bested. Putin using additional tac nukes on the Americans while the US is directly attacking the Russian army and killing tens of thousands of its soldiers), why wouldn’t he?

    • Replies: @HA
    @Sean

    "Instead of ordering a horrid cowardly murder?; yes."

    Yuschenko has entered the chat. And then there's this:


    Here are 10 critics of Vladimir Putin who died violently or in ...

    "The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by Patrushev, was responsible for carrying out the attacks[resulting in the death of 300]."

    At least 11 high-ranking Russians have died in suspicious ...

    Updated: A list of oligarchs and Putin critics found dead since ...

    A Putin Critic Fell from a Building in Washington. Was It Really ...

    Russian executives, some from Gazprom, keep dying in ...


     

    It's a long list, and I've only scratched the surface -- and keep in mind that the list is densely populated with oligarchs who are supposedly Putin's friends, but I've already made my point. You think Kadyrov and his henchmen were given free rein throughout Russia simply to pull the Burning Bag of Dog Poop" gag on random passersby, to be filmed on smartphones for the viral amusement of TikTokkers the world over? No, it's my understanding his assassins have more sinister intentions. The Azov Batallion has a long way to go before they match up to his goons.

    So try not digging yourself in deeper with each passing comment, Sean. Seems to be a thing with you. Maybe bring the curtain down on your own clown show before worrying about Zelensky's.

    Replies: @Sean

  135. @HA
    @Sean

    "[Zelensky] is a loose cannon; no telling what he might do if the war turns Russia’s way."

    Or, he is just responding to a decade of targeted assassinations by Putin, what with Yuschenko's doxine poisoning, and the Chechen hit squads sent to Kyiv (not to mention the polonium and nerve agents used by Putin on his in-house local troublemakers who thought that escaping to distant lands would save them).

    I would note that even Anatoly Karlin -- hey, does anyone still remember him? -- was deeply dismayed that just hours after Izym was taken, Zelensky toured the front line with nary a pop-gun shot in his direction from the nearby Russian forces. Karlin claims this "Suggests either an agreement not to try to kill Zelensky', or else Putin's murderers-for-hire are just total idiots.

    I'm OK with either explanation, but if we're going with the "agreement not to kill", it also suggests that the message the Ukrainians wanted to deliver with the Dugina assassination was heard loud and clear. Now, I'm against bomb assassinations, myself (though I realize that the partisans behind the lines don't have much in the way of other options). There are just too many was that innocent bystanders could get hit. I think it's far more effective to leave a note under a dictator's pillow (or maybe his wife's or daughter's pillow) saying "we can come back any time" (maybe the letter from Tito to Stalin was similarly delivered to the bedroom pillow of Stalin's daughter, for all anyone knows) but I reluctantly admit that sometimes a car bomb works, too.

    In any case, there's a lesson there, Sean. If you're so hot and bothered about the loose cannon in Kyiv, see if you can try to rein in the unhinged little firecracker in Moscow who carries around nuclear codes. I'm far more worried about loose nuclear warheads than loose cannons, and Ukraine agreed to give up their nukes. In fact, I'm thinking that until Russians can agree to be ruled by sane people who aren't threatening to start up Armageddon, all sensible people (even those in China and India) should focus on getting Russians to denuclearize as well. Until then, your shrieking about the loose cannon in Kyiv will come off a deeply hypocritical and yet another weak attempt at deflection and misdirection.

    Replies: @Sean, @Rob

    I want us to scrap the nuclear arsenal if Russia does/we force them. Honestly, the damage the US causes when it throws its weight around in the third world (and now in Europe- ask Germans) is incredible Huge numbers of innocent people die. If your tempted to quibble about that, what’s a good number of innocent people to die for our amazingly incompetent international affairs class playing risk.

    Honestly, we need to scrap the nuclear weapons before we have a shooting civil war and someone decides to use nukes rather than let them be captured by Amero-Nazis or socialists.

    South Africa gave up their nuclear weapons. Whoever was behind that decision should have received the Nobel peace prize. It’d be great if idealistic leaders fantasized about scrapping the nukes. If it were only on the table. Would really trust any Latin American country with nukes?

    Sadly, China would have to give up nukes before we’d imagine it.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Rob

    "If your tempted to quibble about that, what’s a good number of innocent people to die for our amazingly incompetent international affairs class playing risk."

    I'm happy to return to quibbling about US invasions once Putin decides to put an end to his.

    "the US causes when it throws its weight around in the third world (and now in Europe- ask Germans)"

    That's an odd turn of phrase -- are Germans really the people most fit to complain regarding the vast numbers of people that die when a state throws its weight around callously? And if the US were to completely pull all its aid and weight and NGO's in the the Third World, is there any evidence that the death toll would decrease? I have yet to see this and I want some proof that goes beyond mere polemic.

    Finally, with regard to the specific matter of Ukraine (which isn't technically a Third World country, but at this point, it's close enough), the US and France were both signatories of the Budapest Memorandum which promised that they would have Ukraine's back if Russia were ever to invade. To the extent certain Moscow dictators don't like it when the US throws its weight around, maybe they need to hold up their end of agreements like that. I know, I know, there's that "not one inch to the East" thing about NATO that the US is repeatedly accused of violating, but unlike the Budapest Memorandum, which has dates and signatures, that not-one-inch promise is, sadly, fictional.

    So if people don't want NATO becoming even more popular, and they don't like seeing the US throw its weight around in Ukraine, it's incumbent on them not to do precisely the kinds of things that ensure all that happens. It's a lesson Putin really should have learned by now. Had he not done what he's done, we'd still be in those halcyon days when the US's "weight" was limited to a basket of Nuland's pastries and the occasional bag of Soros money that amounted to a paltry sum in comparison with what Putin's oligarchs had at their disposal. It seems like trying to thwart that basket of pastries would have been a much easier task than trying to dodge all the HIMARS and other guns the US is currently sending, and Putin has only himself to blame for that for that turnaround.

    Replies: @Rob

  136. @Sean

    Kind of a big “if”. Should he have been cowering all alone at the edge of his really, really long conference table instead?
     
    Instead of ordering a horrid cowardly murder?; yes. Dugin was accused of anti Semitism you know; he denounced assimilated, cosmopolitan Jews of which Zelesky is one.

    And yet he has continued to surprise any objective observer with one boneheaded move after another.
     
    No more than Zelensky is Putin the cowering kind who only fights when certain he iis certainly going to win easy, or at all.

    You confidently told us at the beginning of this invasion that “Putin is about to bring down the curtain on this” clown show. How’s that working out?
     
    There is disagreement about why but most think after a reckless over confident start Russia has settled into a long term economy of force and attrition mode. How well it has worked depend on how numerous the Ukrainian KIA are--they admit to ten thousand I believe-- and whether Ukraine is dissuaded by casualties. I would say Ukraine with Zelensky leading is pretty impervious to the military's casualties. My expectation is Russia will now start preferentially hitting cities in earnest.

    Russia is a notoriously slow starter in war. Their doctrine is Soviet-era-defensive-artillery, which method is vulnerable (at first)to panic retreats from fear of being surrounded when enemy are found to be on their flanks. The Ukrainians did their resent offensives with off road little trucks with three men aboard driving into the rear pf the Russian lines and firing NLAWs, whereupon the Russians thought they were in danger of being surrounded, and with their own artillery ineffective due to the lack of concentrations near the previous front line, and retreated . It is similar to the British army against the Japs, but the Brit learned from the retreat to Singapore how to go into an all round defensive position with clearly designated fields of fire, from which retreat was forbidden.


    Few people realised the level of military American support that Ukraine was going to have by now; even so I predicted that Putin would end up using thermonuclear weapons. In a scenario of an American conventional attack on Russian forces in Ukraine in retaliation for Putin's battlefield thermonuclear weapon use, Russia would have already crossed the Rubicon of theatre thermonuclear weapon(s) detonation in anger when conventionally bested. Putin using additional tac nukes on the Americans while the US is directly attacking the Russian army and killing tens of thousands of its soldiers), why wouldn't he?

    Replies: @HA

    “Instead of ordering a horrid cowardly murder?; yes.”

    Yuschenko has entered the chat. And then there’s this:

    Here are 10 critics of Vladimir Putin who died violently or in …

    “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by Patrushev, was responsible for carrying out the attacks[resulting in the death of 300].”

    At least 11 high-ranking Russians have died in suspicious …

    Updated: A list of oligarchs and Putin critics found dead since …

    A Putin Critic Fell from a Building in Washington. Was It Really …

    Russian executives, some from Gazprom, keep dying in …

    It’s a long list, and I’ve only scratched the surface — and keep in mind that the list is densely populated with oligarchs who are supposedly Putin’s friends, but I’ve already made my point. You think Kadyrov and his henchmen were given free rein throughout Russia simply to pull the Burning Bag of Dog Poop” gag on random passersby, to be filmed on smartphones for the viral amusement of TikTokkers the world over? No, it’s my understanding his assassins have more sinister intentions. The Azov Batallion has a long way to go before they match up to his goons.

    So try not digging yourself in deeper with each passing comment, Sean. Seems to be a thing with you. Maybe bring the curtain down on your own clown show before worrying about Zelensky’s.

    • Replies: @Sean
    @HA


    “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by Patrushev, was responsible for carrying out the attacks[resulting in the death of 300].”

     

    You have been a voice of rationality here, but I am afraid that assertion damages your credibility with me.

    So try not digging yourself in deeper with each passing comment, Sean. Seems to be a thing with you. Maybe bring the curtain down on your own clown show before worrying about Zelensky’
     
    The best book about the assassination's of JFK is Russo's Live By The Sword., which is about how the Kennedy brothers attempts to have Casto assassinated backfired, because as Castro said in a speech (a press report of which may have been read by Oswald), two can play at that game.

    I would note that Zelensky has just decreed that Ukraine cannot negotiate with Russia while Putin remains in power. The greatest shock to Putin has been the unwillingness of the Ukrainians or West to negotiate, but he is over that now, and it will be an all out fight between two schools o' thought


    Christopher M. Dougherty
    @C_M_Dougherty
    Russia's mobilization vs. Ukraine's increasingly Western-equipped force could be the nearest thing to an empirical case study in the long-running dispute between capability/quality and capacity/quantity in defense strategy and force planning

     

    Dougherty suggests the Iran (US backed) Iraq war of the 80s as a precedent and notes that one ended in a bloody draw. I 'like' that outcome because given that a dispute is long-running. it suggests there is prolly no definitive conclusion to be reached. As for what the economic consequences will be, I think the West, especially Europe is prolly going to get more than it bargained for. Anyway I'll take your well meant advice and have a rest from commenting for a while.

    Replies: @HA, @Art Deco

  137. @Rob
    @HA

    I want us to scrap the nuclear arsenal if Russia does/we force them. Honestly, the damage the US causes when it throws its weight around in the third world (and now in Europe- ask Germans) is incredible Huge numbers of innocent people die. If your tempted to quibble about that, what’s a good number of innocent people to die for our amazingly incompetent international affairs class playing risk.

    Honestly, we need to scrap the nuclear weapons before we have a shooting civil war and someone decides to use nukes rather than let them be captured by Amero-Nazis or socialists.

    South Africa gave up their nuclear weapons. Whoever was behind that decision should have received the Nobel peace prize. It’d be great if idealistic leaders fantasized about scrapping the nukes. If it were only on the table. Would really trust any Latin American country with nukes?

    Sadly, China would have to give up nukes before we’d imagine it.

    Replies: @HA

    “If your tempted to quibble about that, what’s a good number of innocent people to die for our amazingly incompetent international affairs class playing risk.”

    I’m happy to return to quibbling about US invasions once Putin decides to put an end to his.

    “the US causes when it throws its weight around in the third world (and now in Europe- ask Germans)”

    That’s an odd turn of phrase — are Germans really the people most fit to complain regarding the vast numbers of people that die when a state throws its weight around callously? And if the US were to completely pull all its aid and weight and NGO’s in the the Third World, is there any evidence that the death toll would decrease? I have yet to see this and I want some proof that goes beyond mere polemic.

    [MORE]

    Finally, with regard to the specific matter of Ukraine (which isn’t technically a Third World country, but at this point, it’s close enough), the US and France were both signatories of the Budapest Memorandum which promised that they would have Ukraine’s back if Russia were ever to invade. To the extent certain Moscow dictators don’t like it when the US throws its weight around, maybe they need to hold up their end of agreements like that. I know, I know, there’s that “not one inch to the East” thing about NATO that the US is repeatedly accused of violating, but unlike the Budapest Memorandum, which has dates and signatures, that not-one-inch promise is, sadly, fictional.

    So if people don’t want NATO becoming even more popular, and they don’t like seeing the US throw its weight around in Ukraine, it’s incumbent on them not to do precisely the kinds of things that ensure all that happens. It’s a lesson Putin really should have learned by now. Had he not done what he’s done, we’d still be in those halcyon days when the US’s “weight” was limited to a basket of Nuland’s pastries and the occasional bag of Soros money that amounted to a paltry sum in comparison with what Putin’s oligarchs had at their disposal. It seems like trying to thwart that basket of pastries would have been a much easier task than trying to dodge all the HIMARS and other guns the US is currently sending, and Putin has only himself to blame for that for that turnaround.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @HA

    Your response is orthogonal to mine. I am strongly on the side of Putin getting anything he can even propaganda-spin as victory is a terrible outcome. My big interest here is nuclear weapons in the post-Putin world. If the US had (say) only 3 times China’s arsenal, that’d be fantastic! A nuclear war would do much less harm than one today would (much less the nineteen eighties)

    I don’t blame Russian bad behavior on America. They were assholes before there were Americans! If they were more ethical (and less alcoholic) people, they’d be much better off, but we can’t fix that. Russia is a terrible neighbor, but America is not a great world policeman.

    Expanding NATO? America is not bound by the verbal agreements of former chief executives. If Gorbachev did not want NATO ever to advance, that’s what treaties are for. HW Bush did not expand NATO.

    Let’s say Putin gets coup’ed and the replacement is willing to scrap Russia’s weapons. That’d be a great time for the US to cut its arsenal, too! That’d make the worst-case scenario less bad. Nuclear war? It is a low(ish) risk, but it’d be a super-bad outcome, so we should try to mitigate it.

    I think Putin’s daughter(s) should be in protective custody — in Guantanamo Bay. What with Ukrainian assassins murdering the daughters of bloodthirsty Russian nationalists, those girls are not safe in the West!

    By throwing the country’s weight around in the third world, I mostly mean (non-arms) sanctions. The way being rich vs poor works is that anything that hurts a country’s economy hurts poor people a lot. Poor people in the third world are really poor. If sanctions work, they kill people. If sanctions do not work, why do we do them?

    Luxury sanctions are another matter. These probably have some bite. Sanctions against actively belligerent countries are also great. But, Putin could leave Ukraine today. The Iranian government, though? They are not shooting anyone*, so they cannot stop.

    Despite all that, I’m petty enough that I’m hoping we sanction (or worse) Saudi Arabia. Maybe we should start sending advisors to the Houthi in Yemen! I know nations don’t have friends, they have interests. Cannot wait for KSA to collapse when we get off oil.

    As to the NGOs? I’m not sure they help in Africa. Their lefty bent means that they don’t push for reduced corruption, ease of starting a business or acquiring official title to customary** real estate. The corrupt third-world elites*** skim charity, but without the charity and below-market-rate loans, they’d have an incentive to put their money in profit-seeking enterprises.

    I’m pretty sure I was not discussing the uselessness of developmental econ compared to GDP(IQ) function in Lynn’s book with you. But do you know how Chileans did on IQ tests before/during Pinochet? Is it possible for a country to vault into the richest tier(s) of countries? Ireland did it, but Lynn said they were dumb. I knew a Chilean once, a smart guy, pretty cool, and looked part-native. Costa Rica has an Intel fab. How do they stack up in IQ?

    Anyway, Chile, Ireland, South Korea, Taiwan, China, Mauritius… of the countries that developed post-WWII, how much did charities like NGOs (or churches) contribute to their development? This is not a gotcha. I have no idea. If charities set a ton of the groundwork, that’d be interesting. Be worth knowing the difference between those churches and NGOs in Africa. If the big deal is getting Milton Friedman to talk to the dictator, we’ll, he had a kid, maybe he could give a presentation to all the African dictators?

    That said, people have adjusted to NGO income, so removing it would cause tremendous harm, which means starvation in Africa.

    *Haven’t seen the news tonight. I could be wrong.

    ** Not sure what to call a shack built on 100 sqft that’s been there for years, but the government cannot efficiently tax, and the owner cannot use the property as collateral for a loan. I read about it an Hernando De Soto (not the original) book, The Mystery of Capital. It was about South America, but I’m assuming these issues apply to Africa?

    *** Third-world elites are foul people. We should not let them in, high IQ be damned. If they want to live like rich Americans, they should make their countries as wealthy as the US.

    Tl;dr Reducing nuclear arsenals is a good idea. If Russia has to give up nukes, then that’d be a great reason to reduce the US arsenal. This would be true if Russians were saints and Americans monsters. As it is, neither country is full of saints, so they and we should have fewer nukes.

  138. @Dave Pinsen
    @Jack D

    Given the copious videos Ukrainians have posted of them torturing Russian POWs, I wouldn’t be surprised if the video of Russians surrendering with their armored vehicle was staged.

    The head of Wagner told potential recruits all his men carry two grenades to kill themselves with if they get captured.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1576509860065456128?s=46&t=K-yrbGrXyoIRO41PCJ3Obg

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jack D, @Corvinus

    The head of Wagner told potential recruits all his men carry two grenades to kill themselves with if they get captured.

    Good advice! Don’t let them Nazis take you alive! Then we won’t have to exchange you for Ukrainian POWs. Also this way, since you committed suicide we don’t have to give your wife a Lada with no airbags either.

    Here is some better advice to recruits – use those two grenades to frag Prigozhin.

  139. @Dave Pinsen
    @Jack D

    Given the copious videos Ukrainians have posted of them torturing Russian POWs, I wouldn’t be surprised if the video of Russians surrendering with their armored vehicle was staged.

    The head of Wagner told potential recruits all his men carry two grenades to kill themselves with if they get captured.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1576509860065456128?s=46&t=K-yrbGrXyoIRO41PCJ3Obg

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jack D, @Corvinus

    Here is a interview with the guys who turned over the BMP:

    Of course this could be fake too, just like the Ukrainian flags over Izyum and Lyman are fake. They were DPR/LNR guys and they got to split $30,000US for turning over the BMP. They got an extra $5,000 bonus because it was low mileage and had leather seats in good condition.

  140. @HA
    @Sean

    "Instead of ordering a horrid cowardly murder?; yes."

    Yuschenko has entered the chat. And then there's this:


    Here are 10 critics of Vladimir Putin who died violently or in ...

    "The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by Patrushev, was responsible for carrying out the attacks[resulting in the death of 300]."

    At least 11 high-ranking Russians have died in suspicious ...

    Updated: A list of oligarchs and Putin critics found dead since ...

    A Putin Critic Fell from a Building in Washington. Was It Really ...

    Russian executives, some from Gazprom, keep dying in ...


     

    It's a long list, and I've only scratched the surface -- and keep in mind that the list is densely populated with oligarchs who are supposedly Putin's friends, but I've already made my point. You think Kadyrov and his henchmen were given free rein throughout Russia simply to pull the Burning Bag of Dog Poop" gag on random passersby, to be filmed on smartphones for the viral amusement of TikTokkers the world over? No, it's my understanding his assassins have more sinister intentions. The Azov Batallion has a long way to go before they match up to his goons.

    So try not digging yourself in deeper with each passing comment, Sean. Seems to be a thing with you. Maybe bring the curtain down on your own clown show before worrying about Zelensky's.

    Replies: @Sean

    “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by Patrushev, was responsible for carrying out the attacks[resulting in the death of 300].”

    You have been a voice of rationality here, but I am afraid that assertion damages your credibility with me.

    So try not digging yourself in deeper with each passing comment, Sean. Seems to be a thing with you. Maybe bring the curtain down on your own clown show before worrying about Zelensky’

    The best book about the assassination’s of JFK is Russo’s Live By The Sword., which is about how the Kennedy brothers attempts to have Casto assassinated backfired, because as Castro said in a speech (a press report of which may have been read by Oswald), two can play at that game.

    I would note that Zelensky has just decreed that Ukraine cannot negotiate with Russia while Putin remains in power. The greatest shock to Putin has been the unwillingness of the Ukrainians or West to negotiate, but he is over that now, and it will be an all out fight between two schools o’ thought

    Christopher M. Dougherty
    @C_M_Dougherty
    Russia’s mobilization vs. Ukraine’s increasingly Western-equipped force could be the nearest thing to an empirical case study in the long-running dispute between capability/quality and capacity/quantity in defense strategy and force planning

    Dougherty suggests the Iran (US backed) Iraq war of the 80s as a precedent and notes that one ended in a bloody draw. I ‘like’ that outcome because given that a dispute is long-running. it suggests there is prolly no definitive conclusion to be reached. As for what the economic consequences will be, I think the West, especially Europe is prolly going to get more than it bargained for. Anyway I’ll take your well meant advice and have a rest from commenting for a while.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Sean

    "The greatest shock to Putin has been the unwillingness of the Ukrainians or West to negotiate, but he is over that now,"

    There is absolutely no evidence that Putin is capable of negotiating agreements or abiding by them given what has just happened in the last ten years. If you believe otherwise, you have no business dissing others for their lack of credibility.

    And there was never any negotiation here in the first place. It was always just "here, sign these surrender papers and let us roll all over you so we can move on to bringing all our other wayward 'cousins' in Georgia, Transnistria, Kazakhstan, etc... back into line."

    According to his own head envoy, he had a deal to at least keep Ukraine out of NATO, which he rejected (not that that was ever a real issue prior to his making it so). But given the way he has bungled things, any deal that leaves Ukraine disarmed or without the equivalent of NATO membership in terms of mutual defense guarantees would be absolutely insane, and even if Zelensky were crazy enough to sign it, he'd just be deposed immediately. When he's over his objections to that, let us know.

    , @Art Deco
    @Sean

    The best book about the assassination’s of JFK is Russo’s Live By The Sword., which is about how the Kennedy brothers attempts to have Casto assassinated backfired, because as Castro said in a speech (a press report of which may have been read by Oswald), two can play at that game.

    The only book about the Kennedy assassination worth anything starts with inductive reasoning.

  141. @Sean
    @HA


    “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by Patrushev, was responsible for carrying out the attacks[resulting in the death of 300].”

     

    You have been a voice of rationality here, but I am afraid that assertion damages your credibility with me.

    So try not digging yourself in deeper with each passing comment, Sean. Seems to be a thing with you. Maybe bring the curtain down on your own clown show before worrying about Zelensky’
     
    The best book about the assassination's of JFK is Russo's Live By The Sword., which is about how the Kennedy brothers attempts to have Casto assassinated backfired, because as Castro said in a speech (a press report of which may have been read by Oswald), two can play at that game.

    I would note that Zelensky has just decreed that Ukraine cannot negotiate with Russia while Putin remains in power. The greatest shock to Putin has been the unwillingness of the Ukrainians or West to negotiate, but he is over that now, and it will be an all out fight between two schools o' thought


    Christopher M. Dougherty
    @C_M_Dougherty
    Russia's mobilization vs. Ukraine's increasingly Western-equipped force could be the nearest thing to an empirical case study in the long-running dispute between capability/quality and capacity/quantity in defense strategy and force planning

     

    Dougherty suggests the Iran (US backed) Iraq war of the 80s as a precedent and notes that one ended in a bloody draw. I 'like' that outcome because given that a dispute is long-running. it suggests there is prolly no definitive conclusion to be reached. As for what the economic consequences will be, I think the West, especially Europe is prolly going to get more than it bargained for. Anyway I'll take your well meant advice and have a rest from commenting for a while.

    Replies: @HA, @Art Deco

    “The greatest shock to Putin has been the unwillingness of the Ukrainians or West to negotiate, but he is over that now,”

    There is absolutely no evidence that Putin is capable of negotiating agreements or abiding by them given what has just happened in the last ten years. If you believe otherwise, you have no business dissing others for their lack of credibility.

    And there was never any negotiation here in the first place. It was always just “here, sign these surrender papers and let us roll all over you so we can move on to bringing all our other wayward ‘cousins’ in Georgia, Transnistria, Kazakhstan, etc… back into line.”

    According to his own head envoy, he had a deal to at least keep Ukraine out of NATO, which he rejected (not that that was ever a real issue prior to his making it so). But given the way he has bungled things, any deal that leaves Ukraine disarmed or without the equivalent of NATO membership in terms of mutual defense guarantees would be absolutely insane, and even if Zelensky were crazy enough to sign it, he’d just be deposed immediately. When he’s over his objections to that, let us know.

  142. @Johnny Rico
    @Art Deco

    Did you catch the part where he said New York Times?

    You know damn well none of this stuff ever gets resolved to everyone's satisfaction. His opinion is as good as yours.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    You think I take anonymous sourcing in the Sulzberger Birdcage Liner at face value?

  143. @Sean
    @Art Deco


    President Joe Biden was furious about leaks that said US intelligence helped Ukraine kill Russian generals and sink its warship, report says, The New York Times reported on Monday.

    A senior administration official told The Times that after the reports of US involvement in the attacks emerged, Biden reprimanded several top defense officials, including Defense Secretary Lloyd J. Austin III, the Director of National Intelligence Avril D. Haines, and CIA director William J. Burns.

    Biden was concerned that the reports would further provoke Russian President Vladimir Putin, The Times reported.

    Several media outlets reported last week that the US handed crucial information to Ukrainian forces that allowed them to attack and sink one of Russia's most prominent warships, the Moskva, on April 14.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/09/us/politics/biden-lend-lease-ukraine-weapons-war.html

    The story of US intel concluding that Dugina assassination's was by Ukrainian secret service is also from the NYT.

    U.S. Reportedly Thinks Ukraine Authorized Killing Of Putin ...https://www.forbes.com › madelinehalpert › 2022/10/05
    1 day ago — Topline. New intelligence from American officials suggests Ukraine approved a car bombing within Russia that killed Daria Dugina, the daughter ...
     
    "Ukraine" means Zelensky

    President Volodymyr Zelensky has emphasized that Ukraine has no interest in the daughter of the “Russian world” mastermind, Darya Dugina, so her alleged murder "is not our responsibility."
    The president touched upon the topic during a press conference on Tuesday, August 23, Ukrinform reports.

    "It is definitely not our responsibility, she is not a citizen of our country, we are not interested in her, and she is not on the territory of Ukraine," Zelensky said, answering a question regarding Russia’s accusations of Ukraine's involvement in the assassination of Darya Dugina.

     

    At the press conference he looked the very picture of Dr Evil innocence


    https://static.ukrinform.com/photos/2022_08/thumb_files/630_360_1661271509-888.jpg

    The US sanctioned Dugina in March and she had a Telegram channel supporting the war, yet

    Asked about the New York Times account, a Ukrainian presidential aide, Mykhailo Podolyak, said that, “objectively speaking”, Dugina had been of no interest to Kyiv before she was killed.

    “Before Dugina’s murder, the people of Ukraine and representatives of the Ukrainian authorities did not know about her public activities and her influence on propaganda programmes,”
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/oct/06/us-reportedly-believes-ukraine-authorised-moscow-car-bomb
     
    Lies.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Again, who is saying what with their name attached to it? This isn’t that difficult.

  144. @HA
    @Rob

    "If your tempted to quibble about that, what’s a good number of innocent people to die for our amazingly incompetent international affairs class playing risk."

    I'm happy to return to quibbling about US invasions once Putin decides to put an end to his.

    "the US causes when it throws its weight around in the third world (and now in Europe- ask Germans)"

    That's an odd turn of phrase -- are Germans really the people most fit to complain regarding the vast numbers of people that die when a state throws its weight around callously? And if the US were to completely pull all its aid and weight and NGO's in the the Third World, is there any evidence that the death toll would decrease? I have yet to see this and I want some proof that goes beyond mere polemic.

    Finally, with regard to the specific matter of Ukraine (which isn't technically a Third World country, but at this point, it's close enough), the US and France were both signatories of the Budapest Memorandum which promised that they would have Ukraine's back if Russia were ever to invade. To the extent certain Moscow dictators don't like it when the US throws its weight around, maybe they need to hold up their end of agreements like that. I know, I know, there's that "not one inch to the East" thing about NATO that the US is repeatedly accused of violating, but unlike the Budapest Memorandum, which has dates and signatures, that not-one-inch promise is, sadly, fictional.

    So if people don't want NATO becoming even more popular, and they don't like seeing the US throw its weight around in Ukraine, it's incumbent on them not to do precisely the kinds of things that ensure all that happens. It's a lesson Putin really should have learned by now. Had he not done what he's done, we'd still be in those halcyon days when the US's "weight" was limited to a basket of Nuland's pastries and the occasional bag of Soros money that amounted to a paltry sum in comparison with what Putin's oligarchs had at their disposal. It seems like trying to thwart that basket of pastries would have been a much easier task than trying to dodge all the HIMARS and other guns the US is currently sending, and Putin has only himself to blame for that for that turnaround.

    Replies: @Rob

    Your response is orthogonal to mine. I am strongly on the side of Putin getting anything he can even propaganda-spin as victory is a terrible outcome. My big interest here is nuclear weapons in the post-Putin world. If the US had (say) only 3 times China’s arsenal, that’d be fantastic! A nuclear war would do much less harm than one today would (much less the nineteen eighties)

    I don’t blame Russian bad behavior on America. They were assholes before there were Americans! If they were more ethical (and less alcoholic) people, they’d be much better off, but we can’t fix that. Russia is a terrible neighbor, but America is not a great world policeman.

    Expanding NATO? America is not bound by the verbal agreements of former chief executives. If Gorbachev did not want NATO ever to advance, that’s what treaties are for. HW Bush did not expand NATO.

    Let’s say Putin gets coup’ed and the replacement is willing to scrap Russia’s weapons. That’d be a great time for the US to cut its arsenal, too! That’d make the worst-case scenario less bad. Nuclear war? It is a low(ish) risk, but it’d be a super-bad outcome, so we should try to mitigate it.

    I think Putin’s daughter(s) should be in protective custody — in Guantanamo Bay. What with Ukrainian assassins murdering the daughters of bloodthirsty Russian nationalists, those girls are not safe in the West!

    By throwing the country’s weight around in the third world, I mostly mean (non-arms) sanctions. The way being rich vs poor works is that anything that hurts a country’s economy hurts poor people a lot. Poor people in the third world are really poor. If sanctions work, they kill people. If sanctions do not work, why do we do them?

    Luxury sanctions are another matter. These probably have some bite. Sanctions against actively belligerent countries are also great. But, Putin could leave Ukraine today. The Iranian government, though? They are not shooting anyone*, so they cannot stop.

    Despite all that, I’m petty enough that I’m hoping we sanction (or worse) Saudi Arabia. Maybe we should start sending advisors to the Houthi in Yemen! I know nations don’t have friends, they have interests. Cannot wait for KSA to collapse when we get off oil.

    As to the NGOs? I’m not sure they help in Africa. Their lefty bent means that they don’t push for reduced corruption, ease of starting a business or acquiring official title to customary** real estate. The corrupt third-world elites*** skim charity, but without the charity and below-market-rate loans, they’d have an incentive to put their money in profit-seeking enterprises.

    I’m pretty sure I was not discussing the uselessness of developmental econ compared to GDP(IQ) function in Lynn’s book with you. But do you know how Chileans did on IQ tests before/during Pinochet? Is it possible for a country to vault into the richest tier(s) of countries? Ireland did it, but Lynn said they were dumb. I knew a Chilean once, a smart guy, pretty cool, and looked part-native. Costa Rica has an Intel fab. How do they stack up in IQ?

    Anyway, Chile, Ireland, South Korea, Taiwan, China, Mauritius… of the countries that developed post-WWII, how much did charities like NGOs (or churches) contribute to their development? This is not a gotcha. I have no idea. If charities set a ton of the groundwork, that’d be interesting. Be worth knowing the difference between those churches and NGOs in Africa. If the big deal is getting Milton Friedman to talk to the dictator, we’ll, he had a kid, maybe he could give a presentation to all the African dictators?

    That said, people have adjusted to NGO income, so removing it would cause tremendous harm, which means starvation in Africa.

    *Haven’t seen the news tonight. I could be wrong.

    ** Not sure what to call a shack built on 100 sqft that’s been there for years, but the government cannot efficiently tax, and the owner cannot use the property as collateral for a loan. I read about it an Hernando De Soto (not the original) book, The Mystery of Capital. It was about South America, but I’m assuming these issues apply to Africa?

    *** Third-world elites are foul people. We should not let them in, high IQ be damned. If they want to live like rich Americans, they should make their countries as wealthy as the US.

    Tl;dr Reducing nuclear arsenals is a good idea. If Russia has to give up nukes, then that’d be a great reason to reduce the US arsenal. This would be true if Russians were saints and Americans monsters. As it is, neither country is full of saints, so they and we should have fewer nukes.

  145. @Sean
    @HA


    “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by “The evidence provided in The Moscow Bombings makes it abundantly clear that the FSB of the Russian Republic, headed by Patrushev, was responsible for carrying out the attacks[resulting in the death of 300].”

     

    You have been a voice of rationality here, but I am afraid that assertion damages your credibility with me.

    So try not digging yourself in deeper with each passing comment, Sean. Seems to be a thing with you. Maybe bring the curtain down on your own clown show before worrying about Zelensky’
     
    The best book about the assassination's of JFK is Russo's Live By The Sword., which is about how the Kennedy brothers attempts to have Casto assassinated backfired, because as Castro said in a speech (a press report of which may have been read by Oswald), two can play at that game.

    I would note that Zelensky has just decreed that Ukraine cannot negotiate with Russia while Putin remains in power. The greatest shock to Putin has been the unwillingness of the Ukrainians or West to negotiate, but he is over that now, and it will be an all out fight between two schools o' thought


    Christopher M. Dougherty
    @C_M_Dougherty
    Russia's mobilization vs. Ukraine's increasingly Western-equipped force could be the nearest thing to an empirical case study in the long-running dispute between capability/quality and capacity/quantity in defense strategy and force planning

     

    Dougherty suggests the Iran (US backed) Iraq war of the 80s as a precedent and notes that one ended in a bloody draw. I 'like' that outcome because given that a dispute is long-running. it suggests there is prolly no definitive conclusion to be reached. As for what the economic consequences will be, I think the West, especially Europe is prolly going to get more than it bargained for. Anyway I'll take your well meant advice and have a rest from commenting for a while.

    Replies: @HA, @Art Deco

    The best book about the assassination’s of JFK is Russo’s Live By The Sword., which is about how the Kennedy brothers attempts to have Casto assassinated backfired, because as Castro said in a speech (a press report of which may have been read by Oswald), two can play at that game.

    The only book about the Kennedy assassination worth anything starts with inductive reasoning.

  146. @Dave Pinsen
    @Jack D

    Given the copious videos Ukrainians have posted of them torturing Russian POWs, I wouldn’t be surprised if the video of Russians surrendering with their armored vehicle was staged.

    The head of Wagner told potential recruits all his men carry two grenades to kill themselves with if they get captured.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1576509860065456128?s=46&t=K-yrbGrXyoIRO41PCJ3Obg

    Replies: @Jack D, @Jack D, @Corvinus

    So you’re falling prey yet again to Russian propaganda.

  147. @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad

    Grow up, bro. It's basically a tame rom com and less raunchy than all the Will Ferrell and Judd Apatow movies of the past 20 years. The trailer for it looks pretty good:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWd-AuIgCrc

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Polistra, @vinteuil, @TWS

    Tame? What I saw was degenerate, vile crap that used to and still should have long prison sentences attached. You are celebrating and encouraging the destruction of everything natural and decent.

    • Agree: Bill Jones
  148. @Polistra
    @Dave Pinsen

    https://i.ibb.co/pdxNQXW/NBMo-R9-Du-format-jpg-name-small.jpg

    That settles it. That old board game "Risk" is the cause of all this.

    Of course, the irony is that Russia isn't the empire that needs carving up.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    That map of Russia is the one displayed on Google earth when I looked earlier this week.

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