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  1. Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Reg Cæsar

    when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    A few seasons ago when some soccer players took to wearing snoods (though they were a different garment, a sort of scarf). They seemed to be favoured particularly by players from warmer climes who played in Northern European clubs.

    , @Single malt
    @Reg Cæsar

    Dialogue from the movie “White Christmas”...

    Phil Davis (Danny Kaye): [Buying train tickets] Uh, I don’t seem to have any cash.
    Bob Wallace (Bing Crosby): Where’d you leave that? In your snood?

    , @Muggles
    @Reg Cæsar


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?
     
    Doing a crossword puzzle.
    , @3g4me
    @Reg Cæsar

    I have owned a winter one (black knit with faux-fur around the front edge) for years. I've also long known what the original word was, because I read a steady diet of British-authored books growing up. I believe it also featured in "Little Women" (the book, never the movie). It's not particularly odd or rare to anyone familiar with British cultural heritage.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    Does reading historical novels count?

    , @al gore rhythms
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is still used in English factories to describe the beard coverings that must be worn in food production. I last heard the word 'snood' last year in that context. The thing that covers your hair is a 'hairnet' though.

    , @Known Fact
    @Reg Cæsar

    My wife -- of hearty Polish-American stock -- has a winter headscarf she calls a snood

  2. This will just become dumber and dumber.

    Meanwhile, Truly Important News from the superfund site of BSE-infected holy cows that is the left:

    But you DID say it was America’s ‘true founding’! Atlantic writer shocked after 1619 Project author changes her entire story

    Now that US President Donald Trump has declared the 1619 Project ‘toxic,’ its lead author tried to accuse “the right” of making up her main point. One writer who had defended her all along refused to accept the gaslighting.

    “One thing in which the right has been tremendously successful is getting media to frame stories in their language and through their lens,” Nikole Hannah-Jones tweeted on Friday, adding that the 1619 Project “does not argue that 1619 is our true founding.”

    Conor Friedersdorf of the Atlantic called her claim “staggering,” given what he himself had written about Hannah-Jones’s Pulitzer Prize-winning work.

    “Am I going crazy?” Friedersdorf wonders, digging through old tweets and essays to see if he’d been mistaken about her central claim all along. Turns out he wasn’t. Hannah-Jones used the exact phrase to call conservative pundit Ben Shapiro a liar, for example.

  3. Robert Maxwell liked Black hair. Black skulls too.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks to Yahweh, Robt Maxwell had the good sense and foresight to change his name before undertaking his endless misdeeds. Like those other 'businessmen' Arthur L. Carter, Charles E. Smith, Robt Sterling, Steve Wynn, Sumner Redstone, Thomas H. Lee, Jack Nash, Leslie Alexander, Eli M. Black, Steve Ross, George Soros, etc etc etc.

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Robert Maxwell liked Black hair. Black skulls too.
     
    So did Michael Rockefeller.



    What Really Happened to Michael Rockefeller
  4. Steve, if you need money you should start making compilations of your most interesting writing into books. Got enough material for one about black women’s hair yet? 🙂

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @Some Guy

    Chris Rock made a documentary about black women's hair -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpgIJUW0VxE

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    , @Elmer T. Jones
    @Some Guy

    A coffee table book would sell briskly among liberal white females who live nowhere near any blacks.

  5. In this time of tension and difficulty, I’m glad our public figures are striving to maintain calm and composure.

    • Replies: @Escher
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Mr. Aslan still retains the action oriented genes of his Eye-ray-nian ancestors.

    , @obwandiyag
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Aslan is a fool. But the Supreme Court sucks anyway. All the way through. Sucks. Then and now and in the future. Sucks.

  6. @JohnnyWalker123
    Robert Maxwell liked Black hair. Black skulls too.

    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1306951397590654978

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks to Yahweh, Robt Maxwell had the good sense and foresight to change his name before undertaking his endless misdeeds. Like those other ‘businessmen’ Arthur L. Carter, Charles E. Smith, Robt Sterling, Steve Wynn, Sumner Redstone, Thomas H. Lee, Jack Nash, Leslie Alexander, Eli M. Black, Steve Ross, George Soros, etc etc etc.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Mr McKenna


    Thanks to Yahweh, Robt Maxwell had the good sense and foresight to change his name before undertaking his endless misdeeds. Like those other ‘businessmen’ Arthur L. Carter, Charles E. Smith, Robt Sterling, Steve Wynn, Sumner Redstone, Thomas H. Lee, Jack Nash, Leslie Alexander, Eli M. Black, Steve Ross, George Soros, etc etc etc.
     
    So I guess "Mr. McKenna" here would prefer that people like these should be required to wear a bright yellow Star of David patch on their business suits. Would make his "research" far easier.
  7. @JohnnyWalker123
    In this time of tension and difficulty, I'm glad our public figures are striving to maintain calm and composure.

    https://twitter.com/rezaaslan/status/1307107507131875330

    Replies: @Escher, @obwandiyag

    Mr. Aslan still retains the action oriented genes of his Eye-ray-nian ancestors.

  8. Has BLM finally jumped the proverbial shark?

    By rights, yes.

    Something tells me that the audience won’t notice though.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Almost Missouri


    Has BLM finally jumped the proverbial shark?
     
    I admit, I read that as, ‘has BLM finally jumped the proverbial mudshark. I was vaguely embarrassed when I realized my error. But some time has passed, and now I am hoping that “jumping the mudshark” becomes a acceptable phrase, at least around this corner of the web. Anyone wanna help me on that?
  9. @Some Guy
    Steve, if you need money you should start making compilations of your most interesting writing into books. Got enough material for one about black women's hair yet? :)

    Replies: @Anonymouse, @Elmer T. Jones

    Chris Rock made a documentary about black women’s hair –

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @Anonymouse

    I started watching it again and I had the same reaction as the first time I saw it. It is a stupendous 1 hour and 35 minutes long. En principe, since I am a committed cinephile I watched the whole thing which was a huge mistake. Movie provides much raw info on the business of black hair. Black hair management and related products is huge. 12% of the population and responsible for 80% of hair related expenditures in the US.

    Rock who is a genetic Negro and has bad hair wears a buzz cut. His attitude towards his subject is neutral, objectives, just accurate journalistic reportage with mild Chris Rock bemusement. We the viewers white folks are not spared the view of fat and slim and yet more fat black women dealing with their hair on and on and on for 95 minutes which grew excessively tedious. It's like all of Steve's columns on black hair going on and on and on. Give it a rest, Steve!

    Here's an odd anecdote. About 20 years ago I visited an old girlfriend from the 1960s in rural Vermont. She had 3 children, one natural, 2 adopted. One still lived at home, a 16 year old black girl adopted from Africa. Mother had lived an adventurous life in Iran before the mullahs at one point. Daughter played soccer I was told at the local high school. She was frosty towards me at first because she thought I was going to hit on her mother. After she realized that that was not so, she dropped her frostiness. I did hear her say to her mother "Mom, I hate my hair."

    Replies: @Anonymouse

  10. @Reg Cæsar
    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/It8AAOSwWjFcAAMz/s-l300.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/41/b7/5e41b7d477407d2b40bcc266cf6fce46.jpg


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Single malt, @Muggles, @3g4me, @Anon, @al gore rhythms, @Known Fact

    when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    A few seasons ago when some soccer players took to wearing snoods (though they were a different garment, a sort of scarf). They seemed to be favoured particularly by players from warmer climes who played in Northern European clubs.

  11. @Anonymouse
    @Some Guy

    Chris Rock made a documentary about black women's hair -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpgIJUW0VxE

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    I started watching it again and I had the same reaction as the first time I saw it. It is a stupendous 1 hour and 35 minutes long. En principe, since I am a committed cinephile I watched the whole thing which was a huge mistake. Movie provides much raw info on the business of black hair. Black hair management and related products is huge. 12% of the population and responsible for 80% of hair related expenditures in the US.

    Rock who is a genetic Negro and has bad hair wears a buzz cut. His attitude towards his subject is neutral, objectives, just accurate journalistic reportage with mild Chris Rock bemusement. We the viewers white folks are not spared the view of fat and slim and yet more fat black women dealing with their hair on and on and on for 95 minutes which grew excessively tedious. It’s like all of Steve’s columns on black hair going on and on and on. Give it a rest, Steve!

    Here’s an odd anecdote. About 20 years ago I visited an old girlfriend from the 1960s in rural Vermont. She had 3 children, one natural, 2 adopted. One still lived at home, a 16 year old black girl adopted from Africa. Mother had lived an adventurous life in Iran before the mullahs at one point. Daughter played soccer I was told at the local high school. She was frosty towards me at first because she thought I was going to hit on her mother. After she realized that that was not so, she dropped her frostiness. I did hear her say to her mother “Mom, I hate my hair.”

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @Anonymouse

    Negroes can't help being black and having bad hair. Skin whitening products in the past for Negroes existed, happily no longer. Flawless black skin on a comely woman is sexy, as are various shades of brown and pale white skin assuming comeliness. All very sexy. Flowing cranial hair is best on the basis of pure form of whatever color, brown, blond or red. So the desire of black women with nappy hair to have flowing hair is quite reasonable if futile. We really should not mock them.

    Gwen Ifill beloved far and wide who died tragically young from endometriosis once observed that she was not surprised on waking up by the reality of having black skin.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

  12. @Anonymouse
    @Anonymouse

    I started watching it again and I had the same reaction as the first time I saw it. It is a stupendous 1 hour and 35 minutes long. En principe, since I am a committed cinephile I watched the whole thing which was a huge mistake. Movie provides much raw info on the business of black hair. Black hair management and related products is huge. 12% of the population and responsible for 80% of hair related expenditures in the US.

    Rock who is a genetic Negro and has bad hair wears a buzz cut. His attitude towards his subject is neutral, objectives, just accurate journalistic reportage with mild Chris Rock bemusement. We the viewers white folks are not spared the view of fat and slim and yet more fat black women dealing with their hair on and on and on for 95 minutes which grew excessively tedious. It's like all of Steve's columns on black hair going on and on and on. Give it a rest, Steve!

    Here's an odd anecdote. About 20 years ago I visited an old girlfriend from the 1960s in rural Vermont. She had 3 children, one natural, 2 adopted. One still lived at home, a 16 year old black girl adopted from Africa. Mother had lived an adventurous life in Iran before the mullahs at one point. Daughter played soccer I was told at the local high school. She was frosty towards me at first because she thought I was going to hit on her mother. After she realized that that was not so, she dropped her frostiness. I did hear her say to her mother "Mom, I hate my hair."

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    Negroes can’t help being black and having bad hair. Skin whitening products in the past for Negroes existed, happily no longer. Flawless black skin on a comely woman is sexy, as are various shades of brown and pale white skin assuming comeliness. All very sexy. Flowing cranial hair is best on the basis of pure form of whatever color, brown, blond or red. So the desire of black women with nappy hair to have flowing hair is quite reasonable if futile. We really should not mock them.

    Gwen Ifill beloved far and wide who died tragically young from endometriosis once observed that she was not surprised on waking up by the reality of having black skin.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Anonymouse

    I have no interest in mocking them. If they would make a serious effort to at least minimally respect the norms of Western civilization, I wouldn’t even notice their hair. But they keep banging on about what a horrid racist I am for being obsessed with their hair that I have a hard time resisting taking the mickey out if their delusions.

    Replies: @usNthem

  13. @Some Guy
    Steve, if you need money you should start making compilations of your most interesting writing into books. Got enough material for one about black women's hair yet? :)

    Replies: @Anonymouse, @Elmer T. Jones

    A coffee table book would sell briskly among liberal white females who live nowhere near any blacks.

  14. BHm: Black Hair Matters

    Not when it is on a can of Coke® …. Watch Creepy Joe and his posse savage Anita Hill ….punch line at 3:19.

  15. Fuck this gay earth

  16. Courtesy of the comments on this week’s Friday post by Jim Kunstler, here’s an article that spends significant time whining about the struggles of black hair care in Singapore:

    https://cnalifestyle.channelnewsasia.com/trending/africans-in-singapore-being-black-ayer-hitam-fringe-festival-11079618

    As Douglas Murray recently stated, this and other Woke struggles are enormous civilisational time wasters that are a net negative.

    In other words, it’s all so tiresome…so, so tiresome….

  17. ‘Nikole Hannah-Jones tweeted on Friday, adding that the 1619 Project “does not argue that 1619 is our true founding’

    Blacks seem to genuinely have a hard time grasping the concept of ‘truth’ as a white or an Asian would understand it.

    I’m serious about this — I’m not just indiscriminately denigrating blacks. Hannah-Jones’ remark is another example of something I’ve long observed: blacks just don’t seem to be conscious of the distinction between ‘truth’ and ‘falsehood.’

    Even if you’re feeling benevolently inclined towards them, it’s best to bear this in mind. What a black says just bears no necessary relationship to objective reality at all. They literally do not distinguish between what they would like to be the truth and what is the truth. I mean, we can all be deficient in this respect — but blacks just go zero for twenty on this one. They seem to be literally unaware of any possible distinction.

    • Agree: unit472
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @Colin Wright

    I recall reading somewhere that some African languages don’t even have a word for truth.

    Replies: @Wielgus

    , @Wielgus
    @Colin Wright

    Perhaps too much should not be read into this, but on Facebook I once contradicted someone's notion that Einstein was left-handed. The other person was black, if his FB page was any guide. His response - "the world is a dangerous place". In other words, threatening me for contradicting his cherished notion that Einstein was left-handed. I think a white guy committed to the theory would just have called me an a**hole but this guy acted like he would kill someone in the name of the erroneous proposition that Einstein was a southpaw.

    Replies: @black sea, @Colin Wright

  18. @JohnnyWalker123
    In this time of tension and difficulty, I'm glad our public figures are striving to maintain calm and composure.

    https://twitter.com/rezaaslan/status/1307107507131875330

    Replies: @Escher, @obwandiyag

    Aslan is a fool. But the Supreme Court sucks anyway. All the way through. Sucks. Then and now and in the future. Sucks.

  19. @Reg Cæsar
    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/It8AAOSwWjFcAAMz/s-l300.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/41/b7/5e41b7d477407d2b40bcc266cf6fce46.jpg


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Single malt, @Muggles, @3g4me, @Anon, @al gore rhythms, @Known Fact

    Dialogue from the movie “White Christmas”…

    Phil Davis (Danny Kaye): [Buying train tickets] Uh, I don’t seem to have any cash.
    Bob Wallace (Bing Crosby): Where’d you leave that? In your snood?

  20. @JohnnyWalker123
    Robert Maxwell liked Black hair. Black skulls too.

    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1306951397590654978

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Reg Cæsar

    Robert Maxwell liked Black hair. Black skulls too.

    So did Michael Rockefeller.


    What Really Happened to Michael Rockefeller

  21. @Reg Cæsar
    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/It8AAOSwWjFcAAMz/s-l300.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/41/b7/5e41b7d477407d2b40bcc266cf6fce46.jpg


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Single malt, @Muggles, @3g4me, @Anon, @al gore rhythms, @Known Fact

    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Doing a crossword puzzle.

  22. @Reg Cæsar
    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/It8AAOSwWjFcAAMz/s-l300.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/41/b7/5e41b7d477407d2b40bcc266cf6fce46.jpg


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Single malt, @Muggles, @3g4me, @Anon, @al gore rhythms, @Known Fact

    I have owned a winter one (black knit with faux-fur around the front edge) for years. I’ve also long known what the original word was, because I read a steady diet of British-authored books growing up. I believe it also featured in “Little Women” (the book, never the movie). It’s not particularly odd or rare to anyone familiar with British cultural heritage.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @3g4me

    I’ve watched a zillion old movies including historical movies. Snoods have gone in and out of style for centuries. They’re probably very easy to crochet. In some historical movies I’ve seen gold ir silver mesh ones with jewels and sparkles. It’s a creepy word, snooood, like Snerd. I don’t think they are attractive.

    Blacks are so pampered and spoiled these days all they have to complain about is their hair. But they can’t blame Whites for their hair. It’s the one thing they can’t blame Whites for.

    Replies: @3g4me, @usNthem

  23. @Mr McKenna
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks to Yahweh, Robt Maxwell had the good sense and foresight to change his name before undertaking his endless misdeeds. Like those other 'businessmen' Arthur L. Carter, Charles E. Smith, Robt Sterling, Steve Wynn, Sumner Redstone, Thomas H. Lee, Jack Nash, Leslie Alexander, Eli M. Black, Steve Ross, George Soros, etc etc etc.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Thanks to Yahweh, Robt Maxwell had the good sense and foresight to change his name before undertaking his endless misdeeds. Like those other ‘businessmen’ Arthur L. Carter, Charles E. Smith, Robt Sterling, Steve Wynn, Sumner Redstone, Thomas H. Lee, Jack Nash, Leslie Alexander, Eli M. Black, Steve Ross, George Soros, etc etc etc.

    So I guess “Mr. McKenna” here would prefer that people like these should be required to wear a bright yellow Star of David patch on their business suits. Would make his “research” far easier.

    • Troll: HammerJack
  24. @Almost Missouri
    Has BLM finally jumped the proverbial shark?

    By rights, yes.

    Something tells me that the audience won't notice though.

    Replies: @Rob

    Has BLM finally jumped the proverbial shark?

    I admit, I read that as, ‘has BLM finally jumped the proverbial mudshark. I was vaguely embarrassed when I realized my error. But some time has passed, and now I am hoping that “jumping the mudshark” becomes a acceptable phrase, at least around this corner of the web. Anyone wanna help me on that?

  25. @Reg Cæsar
    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/It8AAOSwWjFcAAMz/s-l300.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/41/b7/5e41b7d477407d2b40bcc266cf6fce46.jpg


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Single malt, @Muggles, @3g4me, @Anon, @al gore rhythms, @Known Fact

    Does reading historical novels count?

  26. Why negro hair is the way it is seems to have eluded much study. No other mammal seems to have developed such kinky hair or fur. Not even in Africa. It provides no camouflage, no warmth or anything else except to exaggerate the size of the head if not trimmed.

    That is not to say that European and Middle Eastern men are exempt from hair ‘issues’ its just that these seem to be age related. In my case as the hair on the top of my head has thinned for some reason my ears decided to increase theirs and more than a few develop luxuriant coats of unwanted back hair as they age,

    Given the importance of ‘hair’ it is puzzling that the Pharma industry has not created its own “Warp Speed” type program to allow people of all races to have the hair texture and color they want. I doubt anyone would ‘choose’ negro hair.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @unit472


    In my case as the hair on the top of my head has thinned for some reason my ears decided to increase theirs and more than a few develop luxuriant coats of unwanted back hair as they age,
     
    In middle age, your hair stops growing where you want it and starts growing where you don't.
  27. Sophomore year of university I was offered a great deal to live in one of the best dorms. A five-minute walk to most classes. Giant rooms, just across from the football stadium with a primo parking spot; plenty of dorm-sanctioned keg parties and pig pickins (not what a NY kid expected at a BBQ). A bunch of jocks and some wildcards.

    Turned out the dorm room that was offered to me was occupied by a black guy who’d not gotten along with his earlier white roomies. We survived for two semesters without ever throwing any punches, although we certainly had our moments. And he did despise me, I’m sure, because he considered me privileged, as they now say. I didn’t despise him, although I can’t remember his name. We spoke so rarely.

    Then I moved off-campus.

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Kibernetika

    And we haven't even addressed the "ashy skin" issue.

  28. @Anonymouse
    @Anonymouse

    Negroes can't help being black and having bad hair. Skin whitening products in the past for Negroes existed, happily no longer. Flawless black skin on a comely woman is sexy, as are various shades of brown and pale white skin assuming comeliness. All very sexy. Flowing cranial hair is best on the basis of pure form of whatever color, brown, blond or red. So the desire of black women with nappy hair to have flowing hair is quite reasonable if futile. We really should not mock them.

    Gwen Ifill beloved far and wide who died tragically young from endometriosis once observed that she was not surprised on waking up by the reality of having black skin.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    I have no interest in mocking them. If they would make a serious effort to at least minimally respect the norms of Western civilization, I wouldn’t even notice their hair. But they keep banging on about what a horrid racist I am for being obsessed with their hair that I have a hard time resisting taking the mickey out if their delusions.

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @MBlanc46

    I’m sure a lot of folks feel the same, but in recent years, joggers have gotten so publicly insufferable and full of themselves, it’s open season now.

  29. @Colin Wright
    'Nikole Hannah-Jones tweeted on Friday, adding that the 1619 Project “does not argue that 1619 is our true founding'

    Blacks seem to genuinely have a hard time grasping the concept of 'truth' as a white or an Asian would understand it.

    I'm serious about this -- I'm not just indiscriminately denigrating blacks. Hannah-Jones' remark is another example of something I've long observed: blacks just don't seem to be conscious of the distinction between 'truth' and 'falsehood.'

    Even if you're feeling benevolently inclined towards them, it's best to bear this in mind. What a black says just bears no necessary relationship to objective reality at all. They literally do not distinguish between what they would like to be the truth and what is the truth. I mean, we can all be deficient in this respect -- but blacks just go zero for twenty on this one. They seem to be literally unaware of any possible distinction.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Wielgus

    I recall reading somewhere that some African languages don’t even have a word for truth.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    @MBlanc46

    Reagan was fond of the notion that Russian has no word for "freedom". In fact it does.

  30. @Kibernetika
    Sophomore year of university I was offered a great deal to live in one of the best dorms. A five-minute walk to most classes. Giant rooms, just across from the football stadium with a primo parking spot; plenty of dorm-sanctioned keg parties and pig pickins (not what a NY kid expected at a BBQ). A bunch of jocks and some wildcards.

    Turned out the dorm room that was offered to me was occupied by a black guy who'd not gotten along with his earlier white roomies. We survived for two semesters without ever throwing any punches, although we certainly had our moments. And he did despise me, I'm sure, because he considered me privileged, as they now say. I didn't despise him, although I can't remember his name. We spoke so rarely.

    Then I moved off-campus.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    And we haven’t even addressed the “ashy skin” issue.

  31. @unit472
    Why negro hair is the way it is seems to have eluded much study. No other mammal seems to have developed such kinky hair or fur. Not even in Africa. It provides no camouflage, no warmth or anything else except to exaggerate the size of the head if not trimmed.

    That is not to say that European and Middle Eastern men are exempt from hair 'issues' its just that these seem to be age related. In my case as the hair on the top of my head has thinned for some reason my ears decided to increase theirs and more than a few develop luxuriant coats of unwanted back hair as they age,

    Given the importance of 'hair' it is puzzling that the Pharma industry has not created its own "Warp Speed" type program to allow people of all races to have the hair texture and color they want. I doubt anyone would 'choose' negro hair.

    Replies: @black sea

    In my case as the hair on the top of my head has thinned for some reason my ears decided to increase theirs and more than a few develop luxuriant coats of unwanted back hair as they age,

    In middle age, your hair stops growing where you want it and starts growing where you don’t.

  32. @Reg Cæsar
    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/It8AAOSwWjFcAAMz/s-l300.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/41/b7/5e41b7d477407d2b40bcc266cf6fce46.jpg


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Single malt, @Muggles, @3g4me, @Anon, @al gore rhythms, @Known Fact

    It is still used in English factories to describe the beard coverings that must be worn in food production. I last heard the word ‘snood’ last year in that context. The thing that covers your hair is a ‘hairnet’ though.

  33. Steve, did you properly parse the name Kitty Shackleford? It’s all right there in the Twitter avatar.

    Rusty Shackleford was Dale Gribble’s alternate legal persona on King of the Hill. You can tell because this Kitty person’s icon is a cat wearing Dale’s hat.

  34. @3g4me
    @Reg Cæsar

    I have owned a winter one (black knit with faux-fur around the front edge) for years. I've also long known what the original word was, because I read a steady diet of British-authored books growing up. I believe it also featured in "Little Women" (the book, never the movie). It's not particularly odd or rare to anyone familiar with British cultural heritage.

    Replies: @Alden

    I’ve watched a zillion old movies including historical movies. Snoods have gone in and out of style for centuries. They’re probably very easy to crochet. In some historical movies I’ve seen gold ir silver mesh ones with jewels and sparkles. It’s a creepy word, snooood, like Snerd. I don’t think they are attractive.

    Blacks are so pampered and spoiled these days all they have to complain about is their hair. But they can’t blame Whites for their hair. It’s the one thing they can’t blame Whites for.

    • Replies: @3g4me
    @Alden

    Alden - Blacks may not be able to blame Whites for their hair, but they resent the f**k out of it anyhow. A black woman I worked with years ago readily admitted she envied the hell out of White women's hair. While most of them want lighter skin and thinner noses, almost all of them wish for European -textured hair. Those who give up on those efforts then do a 180% and start pushing the 'glories' of 'natural' hair. They're lying. They know it, we know it, and other black women know it most of all.

    , @usNthem
    @Alden

    We sure get blamed for noticing it, or not noticing as the case may be.

  35. Bad hair day for Kendra:

    Special panel votes to remove Oklahoma judge from office

    https://apnews.com/b8d65648e14f36b6e0c8475266d6aed7

    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Henry's Cat

    And bad teef day as well.

  36. There are two T-shirts or laws signs I’d like to see in a “BLACK LIVES MATTER” logo treatment:

    1. BLACK HAIR MATTERS

    2. BACON LETTUCE TOMATO

  37. @Colin Wright
    'Nikole Hannah-Jones tweeted on Friday, adding that the 1619 Project “does not argue that 1619 is our true founding'

    Blacks seem to genuinely have a hard time grasping the concept of 'truth' as a white or an Asian would understand it.

    I'm serious about this -- I'm not just indiscriminately denigrating blacks. Hannah-Jones' remark is another example of something I've long observed: blacks just don't seem to be conscious of the distinction between 'truth' and 'falsehood.'

    Even if you're feeling benevolently inclined towards them, it's best to bear this in mind. What a black says just bears no necessary relationship to objective reality at all. They literally do not distinguish between what they would like to be the truth and what is the truth. I mean, we can all be deficient in this respect -- but blacks just go zero for twenty on this one. They seem to be literally unaware of any possible distinction.

    Replies: @MBlanc46, @Wielgus

    Perhaps too much should not be read into this, but on Facebook I once contradicted someone’s notion that Einstein was left-handed. The other person was black, if his FB page was any guide. His response – “the world is a dangerous place”. In other words, threatening me for contradicting his cherished notion that Einstein was left-handed. I think a white guy committed to the theory would just have called me an a**hole but this guy acted like he would kill someone in the name of the erroneous proposition that Einstein was a southpaw.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Wielgus

    I've mentioned this on iSteve before, but in the days following the death of James Brown, a guy in Alabama killed a friend in a quarrel over whether or not James Brown might be considered short.

    Replies: @Wielgus

    , @Colin Wright
    @Wielgus

    'Perhaps too much should not be read into this, but on Facebook I once contradicted someone’s notion that Einstein was left-handed. The other person was black, if his FB page was any guide. His response – “the world is a dangerous place”...'

    I'd suggest that this is because Blacks seem to regard any conversation as a matter of either consensus or challenge.

    Of course we all tend to be aware of that subtext -- but if you and I are arguing about, say, the causes of the American Civil War, we're also aware there's a body of external facts -- that is, truths -- out there, independent of our claims. We may start feeling quite hostile -- but there's always this body of external records, actions, expressed sentiments, etc out there, exterior to both of us.

    Thus, to return to Einstein, given a white interlocutor, the question -- bruised feelings or no -- would have included 'was Einstein in fact left-handed?'

    If you're arguing with a black, that may not even enter into it. Your claim is going to be taken simply as a challenge -- and therefore a threat. There's not even any genuine awareness that's there's a question of fact external to either one of you. To drop it is to submit to his dominance, to continue to dispute the point is to attempt to unseat him. That's the entirety of the issue.

    This is actually one of the dangers of the whole 'Black Lives Matter' phenomenon.

    Presumably, there are some whites who genuinely think there is such a thing as 'systemic racism,' and blacks are aggrieved about this, and if measures are taken to address this supposed problem, blacks will be appeased.

    They're quite wrong. There could be 'systemic racism,' but it wouldn't matter. There isn't -- but the truth or falsity of that isn't even relevant.

    Blacks are asserting their dominance, their immunity from white opinion, judgement, and control. Blacks are to be free to take what they want, attack who they want, and kill who they want -- and whites may not object or interfere.

    Some whites apparently think they can give blacks fair treatment somehow, and that's what they're doing, and that's what blacks want.

    That may be what they think they're doing. What's actually going on is that blacks are asserting their dominance, and these whites are submitting.

    This all can't end well. Since I, for one, am not prepared to accept becoming a member of a lower caste, blacks are going to have to be disabused of the impression that they are now the masters that they are being allowed to gain.

    That's not going to be very pleasant. It all could have been avoided, too.

    Replies: @Marty

  38. @Wielgus
    @Colin Wright

    Perhaps too much should not be read into this, but on Facebook I once contradicted someone's notion that Einstein was left-handed. The other person was black, if his FB page was any guide. His response - "the world is a dangerous place". In other words, threatening me for contradicting his cherished notion that Einstein was left-handed. I think a white guy committed to the theory would just have called me an a**hole but this guy acted like he would kill someone in the name of the erroneous proposition that Einstein was a southpaw.

    Replies: @black sea, @Colin Wright

    I’ve mentioned this on iSteve before, but in the days following the death of James Brown, a guy in Alabama killed a friend in a quarrel over whether or not James Brown might be considered short.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    @black sea

    Were both guys black?
    It would be especially alarming if no alcohol was imbibed by either party.

    Replies: @black sea

  39. @Alden
    @3g4me

    I’ve watched a zillion old movies including historical movies. Snoods have gone in and out of style for centuries. They’re probably very easy to crochet. In some historical movies I’ve seen gold ir silver mesh ones with jewels and sparkles. It’s a creepy word, snooood, like Snerd. I don’t think they are attractive.

    Blacks are so pampered and spoiled these days all they have to complain about is their hair. But they can’t blame Whites for their hair. It’s the one thing they can’t blame Whites for.

    Replies: @3g4me, @usNthem

    Alden – Blacks may not be able to blame Whites for their hair, but they resent the f**k out of it anyhow. A black woman I worked with years ago readily admitted she envied the hell out of White women’s hair. While most of them want lighter skin and thinner noses, almost all of them wish for European -textured hair. Those who give up on those efforts then do a 180% and start pushing the ‘glories’ of ‘natural’ hair. They’re lying. They know it, we know it, and other black women know it most of all.

  40. @Reg Cæsar
    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/It8AAOSwWjFcAAMz/s-l300.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/41/b7/5e41b7d477407d2b40bcc266cf6fce46.jpg


    Tell the truth, when was the last time you used, or even heard, the word snood?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Single malt, @Muggles, @3g4me, @Anon, @al gore rhythms, @Known Fact

    My wife — of hearty Polish-American stock — has a winter headscarf she calls a snood

  41. @black sea
    @Wielgus

    I've mentioned this on iSteve before, but in the days following the death of James Brown, a guy in Alabama killed a friend in a quarrel over whether or not James Brown might be considered short.

    Replies: @Wielgus

    Were both guys black?
    It would be especially alarming if no alcohol was imbibed by either party.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Wielgus

    I can't find any photographs of the shooter or the victim. Police said neither alcohol or drugs were involved. The shooter was 70 at the time, so senility may have played a role. It turns out the victim survived the shooting.

  42. @MBlanc46
    @Colin Wright

    I recall reading somewhere that some African languages don’t even have a word for truth.

    Replies: @Wielgus

    Reagan was fond of the notion that Russian has no word for “freedom”. In fact it does.

  43. @MBlanc46
    @Anonymouse

    I have no interest in mocking them. If they would make a serious effort to at least minimally respect the norms of Western civilization, I wouldn’t even notice their hair. But they keep banging on about what a horrid racist I am for being obsessed with their hair that I have a hard time resisting taking the mickey out if their delusions.

    Replies: @usNthem

    I’m sure a lot of folks feel the same, but in recent years, joggers have gotten so publicly insufferable and full of themselves, it’s open season now.

  44. @Alden
    @3g4me

    I’ve watched a zillion old movies including historical movies. Snoods have gone in and out of style for centuries. They’re probably very easy to crochet. In some historical movies I’ve seen gold ir silver mesh ones with jewels and sparkles. It’s a creepy word, snooood, like Snerd. I don’t think they are attractive.

    Blacks are so pampered and spoiled these days all they have to complain about is their hair. But they can’t blame Whites for their hair. It’s the one thing they can’t blame Whites for.

    Replies: @3g4me, @usNthem

    We sure get blamed for noticing it, or not noticing as the case may be.

  45. @Henry's Cat
    Bad hair day for Kendra:

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/0dbe0e25db7f4839bd1d835eeaf8571b/800.jpeg

    Special panel votes to remove Oklahoma judge from office
     
    https://apnews.com/b8d65648e14f36b6e0c8475266d6aed7

    Replies: @usNthem

    And bad teef day as well.

  46. @Wielgus
    @Colin Wright

    Perhaps too much should not be read into this, but on Facebook I once contradicted someone's notion that Einstein was left-handed. The other person was black, if his FB page was any guide. His response - "the world is a dangerous place". In other words, threatening me for contradicting his cherished notion that Einstein was left-handed. I think a white guy committed to the theory would just have called me an a**hole but this guy acted like he would kill someone in the name of the erroneous proposition that Einstein was a southpaw.

    Replies: @black sea, @Colin Wright

    ‘Perhaps too much should not be read into this, but on Facebook I once contradicted someone’s notion that Einstein was left-handed. The other person was black, if his FB page was any guide. His response – “the world is a dangerous place”…’

    I’d suggest that this is because Blacks seem to regard any conversation as a matter of either consensus or challenge.

    Of course we all tend to be aware of that subtext — but if you and I are arguing about, say, the causes of the American Civil War, we’re also aware there’s a body of external facts — that is, truths — out there, independent of our claims. We may start feeling quite hostile — but there’s always this body of external records, actions, expressed sentiments, etc out there, exterior to both of us.

    Thus, to return to Einstein, given a white interlocutor, the question — bruised feelings or no — would have included ‘was Einstein in fact left-handed?’

    If you’re arguing with a black, that may not even enter into it. Your claim is going to be taken simply as a challenge — and therefore a threat. There’s not even any genuine awareness that’s there’s a question of fact external to either one of you. To drop it is to submit to his dominance, to continue to dispute the point is to attempt to unseat him. That’s the entirety of the issue.

    This is actually one of the dangers of the whole ‘Black Lives Matter’ phenomenon.

    Presumably, there are some whites who genuinely think there is such a thing as ‘systemic racism,’ and blacks are aggrieved about this, and if measures are taken to address this supposed problem, blacks will be appeased.

    They’re quite wrong. There could be ‘systemic racism,’ but it wouldn’t matter. There isn’t — but the truth or falsity of that isn’t even relevant.

    Blacks are asserting their dominance, their immunity from white opinion, judgement, and control. Blacks are to be free to take what they want, attack who they want, and kill who they want — and whites may not object or interfere.

    Some whites apparently think they can give blacks fair treatment somehow, and that’s what they’re doing, and that’s what blacks want.

    That may be what they think they’re doing. What’s actually going on is that blacks are asserting their dominance, and these whites are submitting.

    This all can’t end well. Since I, for one, am not prepared to accept becoming a member of a lower caste, blacks are going to have to be disabused of the impression that they are now the masters that they are being allowed to gain.

    That’s not going to be very pleasant. It all could have been avoided, too.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Marty
    @Colin Wright

    I’ve never been involved in an argument with blacks over an “external fact,” but I do occasionally get into it with them over their insistence on being exempted from rules. One example, a restaurant in Berkeley with some benches outside and a sign, “no smoking within 20 feet.” 20-year old black girl, a non-customer, sitting there smoking. I tell her how great it would be if she deigned to follow the rules like everyone else, and she says, “I wish my father was here now.”

  47. @Wielgus
    @black sea

    Were both guys black?
    It would be especially alarming if no alcohol was imbibed by either party.

    Replies: @black sea

    I can’t find any photographs of the shooter or the victim. Police said neither alcohol or drugs were involved. The shooter was 70 at the time, so senility may have played a role. It turns out the victim survived the shooting.

  48. @Colin Wright
    @Wielgus

    'Perhaps too much should not be read into this, but on Facebook I once contradicted someone’s notion that Einstein was left-handed. The other person was black, if his FB page was any guide. His response – “the world is a dangerous place”...'

    I'd suggest that this is because Blacks seem to regard any conversation as a matter of either consensus or challenge.

    Of course we all tend to be aware of that subtext -- but if you and I are arguing about, say, the causes of the American Civil War, we're also aware there's a body of external facts -- that is, truths -- out there, independent of our claims. We may start feeling quite hostile -- but there's always this body of external records, actions, expressed sentiments, etc out there, exterior to both of us.

    Thus, to return to Einstein, given a white interlocutor, the question -- bruised feelings or no -- would have included 'was Einstein in fact left-handed?'

    If you're arguing with a black, that may not even enter into it. Your claim is going to be taken simply as a challenge -- and therefore a threat. There's not even any genuine awareness that's there's a question of fact external to either one of you. To drop it is to submit to his dominance, to continue to dispute the point is to attempt to unseat him. That's the entirety of the issue.

    This is actually one of the dangers of the whole 'Black Lives Matter' phenomenon.

    Presumably, there are some whites who genuinely think there is such a thing as 'systemic racism,' and blacks are aggrieved about this, and if measures are taken to address this supposed problem, blacks will be appeased.

    They're quite wrong. There could be 'systemic racism,' but it wouldn't matter. There isn't -- but the truth or falsity of that isn't even relevant.

    Blacks are asserting their dominance, their immunity from white opinion, judgement, and control. Blacks are to be free to take what they want, attack who they want, and kill who they want -- and whites may not object or interfere.

    Some whites apparently think they can give blacks fair treatment somehow, and that's what they're doing, and that's what blacks want.

    That may be what they think they're doing. What's actually going on is that blacks are asserting their dominance, and these whites are submitting.

    This all can't end well. Since I, for one, am not prepared to accept becoming a member of a lower caste, blacks are going to have to be disabused of the impression that they are now the masters that they are being allowed to gain.

    That's not going to be very pleasant. It all could have been avoided, too.

    Replies: @Marty

    I’ve never been involved in an argument with blacks over an “external fact,” but I do occasionally get into it with them over their insistence on being exempted from rules. One example, a restaurant in Berkeley with some benches outside and a sign, “no smoking within 20 feet.” 20-year old black girl, a non-customer, sitting there smoking. I tell her how great it would be if she deigned to follow the rules like everyone else, and she says, “I wish my father was here now.”

    • LOL: Colin Wright

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