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In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.

 
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  1. Speaking at the George W. Bush Institute. Why does every former President have an institute or a foundation? Why do they all have libraries? It’s a crock. They are supposed to be elected public officials, not mini God-Emperors. They are not supposed to be that important. After office, they should return to private life and shut the Hell up. All their supposed philanthropy is nothing but an exercise in self-ego-stroking.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Mr. Anon

    The foundations are the best way to make a fortune. The Clintons and Al Gore made several hundred million in tax deductible donations. I’d like to see all tax deductible donations abolished

    It’s the non profits and their causes that have done the most damage. Brown vs Topeka AJC and ADL ‘O’Connor vs Donaldson that closed the mental hospitals the ACLU. The feminazi movement you guys hate so much the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations. Roe vs Wade that you guys hate so much, the Playboy Foundation.

    The Mellon Foundation has just committed 240 million to a Rethink American Monuments Project. A racist black woman in charge. Her first project is getting rid of the Stone Mountain Confederate Monument.

    The environmentalists that want to get rid of gas heating for far more expensive electrical heating. And force everyone to get electric stoves and electric cars even though the charging stations are few and far between. And a recent study found that on average, about 20 percent aren’t functioning.

    Those save Mother Earth people are funded and directed by the entire electrical industry. If the gas and oil industries funded them they would be ranting about how much more electrical heat costs than gas, tell the truth about the real maintenance cost of solar panels, That the power generated goes into the grid and the company sells it back to the homeowner etc, the very high cost and disadvantages of electric cars.

    Those foundations have done irreparable harm to this country. And will continue . As well as complaining about the satanic judges, start complaining about the foundations that file the lawsuits.

    , @Koffeefutures
    @Mr. Anon

    Think : Slushfund.

  2. In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.

    Don’t go soft on him. But I guess there have been some good side effects of the Bush disaster. For one, Republican Inc. is thoroughly, probably permanently, discredited. A Trumpish Republican party is forever.

    • Agree: Pixo
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Daniel H


    A Trumpish Republican party is forever.
     
    Now if only they can find an intelligent leader. Heck, maybe even a wise one! We can dream.
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Daniel H

    "For one, Republican Inc. is thoroughly, probably permanently, discredited."

    The pool of white people who voted for Republican Inc. and often against their own economic interests, is draining into graveyards across the fruity plain.

    "A Trumpish Republican party is forever."

    A GOP rejecting neoliberalism and supporting nationalist economic policies that nurture and grow a stable middle class will have staying power based on results. A GOP that embraces individualism and liberty and seeks to decentralize federal power will draw in peeps like me who are philosophically unburdened by extreme ideologies.

    , @Bill
    @Daniel H

    Didn't Ronald Reagan defeat the "blueblood Republicans?" Didn't W defeat the "country club Republicans?" Then Trump defeated them again.

    How come those guys keep getting defeated yet always get exactly what they want?

    Replies: @Twinkie

  3. “In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.”

    LOL Citation needed.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Mike Tre



    “In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.”
     
    LOL Citation needed.
     
    Bush: "Islam is a peaceful religion."

    😵OL Citation especially needed!


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/3a/09/62/3a09626510412e655cd26ce7b7987c26.jpg

    , @SafeNow
    @Mike Tre

    LOL Citation needed.
     

    “Guilt refers to our sense of having done something wrong, either in reality or in our imagination. It relates to real or imagined actions or inactions which have caused real or imagined harm to others. This may then lead to a sense of having to pay a debt or repair something. The word guilt derives from the German word geld which means money or debt. In more severe forms of guilt we may feel we need to be punished”
     

    (emphasis added)


    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/advances-in-psychiatric-treatment/article/working-with-guilt-and-shame/E274C3EC63EF0191113B049C5F2C86F3

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @Onebelowall
    @Mike Tre

    In all seriousness, there's been a lot of speculation about his picking up painting as a hobby and if it was a way of trying to soothe his feelings over Iraq.

  4. “I stared into his soul, and found a bro”.

    • LOL: Daniel H
  5. Just as “W” said some years ago, “A wasted mind is a terrible thing…I mean, terrible minds waste everything…errh, mine waste is terrible, I think… that is, ah, screw it, gimme another snort of that good stuff, will ya, Billy!

  6. Magnificent find. Reminder that this is the sort of candidate Hugh Hewitt wants the GOP to resume offering. Trump was not just a response to Obama, he was at least as much a response to Arbusto.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @J.Ross

    You think Mitt Romney even bothers with focus group polls for running again? What about Jeb?

    https://pics.me.me/after-the-recount-clinton-trump-jeb-538-undecided-0-me-7700469.png

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Chrisnonymous

  7. G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Enemy of Earth


    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.
     
    Agreed. But the disaster of Bush, is not what most people think--Iraq.

    Iraq is probably better off for Bush's invasion--though the future is unwritten. And the US is a big rich nation and can afford even expensive debacles. The US government the last couple years has been throwing around trillions like it's popcorn money. (It's only now catching up with us.)

    This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    911 was a massive rebuke to the "diversity is our greatest strength" ideology. A reasonable and prudent response would have been something like:

    "Hey, maybe we 'can all get along' best in separate nations. When people from different backgrounds, especially different civilizations are rubbing together there is friction, contention. Let's pause. Stop bringing in different people and allow those here to commit to assimilating to American norms, or send them home. Then take the time for assimilation, and commit ourselves to never repeating this mistake."
     
    Instead, Bush rolled out all his "Islam is a religion of Peace" gasbaggery and romped on the immigration gas pedal, including two pushes for amnesty--with a housing boom to squeeze everyone in and the Iraq attack. Sailer's invade, invite, in-hock.

    Replies: @WJ, @nebulafox, @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @HammerJack
    @Enemy of Earth


    I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.
     
    Yes. The worst presidency ever, near as I can figure. Yes, even worse than (fill in the blank). Second place? Maybe Wilson or LBJ.

    I'm proud to say I didn't vote for him either time. No, I didn't vote for Gore either.

    Here's the DM play, FWIW...


    https://i.ibb.co/x6LLGsn/Screenshot-20220519-112100-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

  8. Is it Guilty Conscience or Subconscious? Any psychologists?

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    @epebble

    Freudian slip.

  9. Did you hear him say “Iraq too”…wow

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Danindc

    That was an absolutely amazing admission.

    Far more astounding than the initial faux pas.

    A Freudian slip? Or did he just officially concede that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @BB753

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Danindc

    "Iraq too...heh, heh, heh..."

    He knows, now does he understand his hypocrisy here too?

  10. @Mike Tre
    "In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq."

    LOL Citation needed.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SafeNow, @Onebelowall

    “In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.”

    LOL Citation needed.

    Bush: “Islam is a peaceful religion.”

    😵OL Citation especially needed!

  11. @Mike Tre
    "In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq."

    LOL Citation needed.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SafeNow, @Onebelowall

    LOL Citation needed.

    “Guilt refers to our sense of having done something wrong, either in reality or in our imagination. It relates to real or imagined actions or inactions which have caused real or imagined harm to others. This may then lead to a sense of having to pay a debt or repair something. The word guilt derives from the German word geld which means money or debt. In more severe forms of guilt we may feel we need to be punished”

    (emphasis added)

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/advances-in-psychiatric-treatment/article/working-with-guilt-and-shame/E274C3EC63EF0191113B049C5F2C86F3

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @SafeNow


    The word guilt derives from the German word geld which means money or debt. In more severe forms of guilt we may feel we need to be punished”
     
    Oh, I see - we invented that guilt thing. - The ways of the Lord are inscrutable (= inpenetrable... - see below...).



    (btw.: go tell that Klaus Schwab... - - see his quote: We penetrated lots of governments worldwide with participants in our yound leaders progeamme....
  12. The decision of one man to launch a wholly unjustified and brutal invasion of Iraq.

    Bush didn’t start a second war in Iraq, he merely resumed an earlier one. Which paused for a truce.

    Which invites the question whether the first Bush invasion was justified. Women wouldn’t have been raped on the streets of the Kuwait city-state unless Allah wished it so.

    Besides, women could vote in Iraq, but not in Kuwait. Shades of 1940!

  13. @Danindc
    Did you hear him say “Iraq too”…wow

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Chrisnonymous

    That was an absolutely amazing admission.

    Far more astounding than the initial faux pas.

    A Freudian slip? Or did he just officially concede that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake?

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @JohnnyWalker123


    A Freudian slip? Or did he just officially concede that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake?
     
    In fairness to Bush, he was probably confused by the fact that the missing WMDs finally turned up in Ukraine (although they happened to be in our own bioweapons labs).
    , @BB753
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It's the Revelation of the Method.
    "According to Michael Hoffman: first they suppress the counterargument, and when the most opportune time arrives, they reveal aspects of what’s really happened, but in a limited hangout sort of way.

    We were told the vaccines were harmless, until Pfizer debased their own safety claims, but not before the entire world had been vaccinated. Lockdown Apologists across the corporate media are now almost unanimous that lockdowns do more harm than good. This is no arbitrary volte-face, but rather a carefully planned sequence of disclosures when the time is ripe.

    Michael Hoffman suggests that the ruling elite are giving notice of their supremacy. Declaring themselves virtuoso criminal masterminds, above the law and beyond reproach. But most of all, they are telling you, in no uncertain terms, that you are without recourse, these events are beyond your control, as is your own destiny for that matter. Eventually a sense of apathy and abulia engulfs humanity, demoralising us to the point of conceding defeat to a system we are powerless to change."
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2022/04/29/revelation-of-the-method/

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  14. No, he’s doesn’t.

    That you think this says a lot about you.

  15. @Mr. Anon
    Speaking at the George W. Bush Institute. Why does every former President have an institute or a foundation? Why do they all have libraries? It's a crock. They are supposed to be elected public officials, not mini God-Emperors. They are not supposed to be that important. After office, they should return to private life and shut the Hell up. All their supposed philanthropy is nothing but an exercise in self-ego-stroking.

    Replies: @Alden, @Koffeefutures

    The foundations are the best way to make a fortune. The Clintons and Al Gore made several hundred million in tax deductible donations. I’d like to see all tax deductible donations abolished

    It’s the non profits and their causes that have done the most damage. Brown vs Topeka AJC and ADL ‘O’Connor vs Donaldson that closed the mental hospitals the ACLU. The feminazi movement you guys hate so much the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations. Roe vs Wade that you guys hate so much, the Playboy Foundation.

    The Mellon Foundation has just committed 240 million to a Rethink American Monuments Project. A racist black woman in charge. Her first project is getting rid of the Stone Mountain Confederate Monument.

    The environmentalists that want to get rid of gas heating for far more expensive electrical heating. And force everyone to get electric stoves and electric cars even though the charging stations are few and far between. And a recent study found that on average, about 20 percent aren’t functioning.

    Those save Mother Earth people are funded and directed by the entire electrical industry. If the gas and oil industries funded them they would be ranting about how much more electrical heat costs than gas, tell the truth about the real maintenance cost of solar panels, That the power generated goes into the grid and the company sells it back to the homeowner etc, the very high cost and disadvantages of electric cars.

    Those foundations have done irreparable harm to this country. And will continue . As well as complaining about the satanic judges, start complaining about the foundations that file the lawsuits.

    • Agree: BB753
  16. This is how the first Iraq War was sold.

    Lies about “incubator babies.”

    Watch the above 3-minute video if you want to understand how dishonest propaganda was used to sell the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  17. @J.Ross
    Magnificent find. Reminder that this is the sort of candidate Hugh Hewitt wants the GOP to resume offering. Trump was not just a response to Obama, he was at least as much a response to Arbusto.

    Replies: @Kronos

    You think Mitt Romney even bothers with focus group polls for running again? What about Jeb?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Kronos

    There are others like them, for example, I have heard it argued (I don't know or necessarily agree) that Dave McCormick is pretty much an establishment Republican.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Kronos

    I don't know if this is a swing at Bush vs Gore, but let's not forget that recount was done and Bush won. The re-re-recounts were opposed because two years earlier the Florida Democrats were caught stuffing ballots and a judge overturned a Miami mayoral election.

    Replies: @Kronos

  18. Bush–the ex-president who keeps reminding me why I despise him so much.

    Apr 20, 2021 — George W. Bush condemns the Republican Party as ‘isolationist, protectionist,’ and ‘nativist’ and says it’s scaring people about immigration.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon
  19. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Danindc

    That was an absolutely amazing admission.

    Far more astounding than the initial faux pas.

    A Freudian slip? Or did he just officially concede that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @BB753

    A Freudian slip? Or did he just officially concede that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake?

    In fairness to Bush, he was probably confused by the fact that the missing WMDs finally turned up in Ukraine (although they happened to be in our own bioweapons labs).

  20. “In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.”

    Uh, not as much as he does over not doing enough to help the black victims who suffered during Hurricane Katrina.

  21. “ In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.”

    Covid hysteria has damn near ruined your mind Steve. Bush could eat babies with a knife and he wouldn’t feel guilty. He’s a demon.

    • Agree: AndrewR
  22. anonymous[215] • Disclaimer says:

    That’s the best laugh I’ve had in weeks. I’ll never forget the day I first heard of him. It was 1998 and I was standing at a magazine rack in an Egyptian-owned smoke shop a block from the Berkeley campus, and he was the cover story in Harper’s as the next R nominee. I could tell from his picture he was going to say “nucular.”

  23. @Kronos
    @J.Ross

    You think Mitt Romney even bothers with focus group polls for running again? What about Jeb?

    https://pics.me.me/after-the-recount-clinton-trump-jeb-538-undecided-0-me-7700469.png

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Chrisnonymous

    There are others like them, for example, I have heard it argued (I don’t know or necessarily agree) that Dave McCormick is pretty much an establishment Republican.

  24. Don’t be wobbly! Look st Madeline Albright. She died in bed smiling like a little angel.

  25. People think that Obama made Trump possible. Not true. W made Trump possible. Trump’s campaign in 2016 was more of a repudiation of the Bush/McCain/Romney Republican party than it was of the Obama/Hillary/Biden Democratic party.

    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this. Republicans must be made to understand it.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Mr. Anon


    Trump’s campaign in 2016 was more of a repudiation of the Bush/McCain/Romney Republican party than it was of the Obama/Hillary/Biden Democratic party.

    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this. Republicans must be made to understand it.
     
    Truer words were never typed.
    , @vinteuil
    @Mr. Anon


    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this.
     
    It's so weird. There doesn't seem to be a single Democrat voter in the world who understands that Donald Trump was a charismatic insurgent candidate who single-handedly destroyed the limitlessly corrupt Bush crime family.
    , @Precious
    @Mr. Anon

    Amen. It was a great moment when Trump took down Jeb after Jeb defended his brother during the 2016 Republican primary election cycle. I had a good laugh when all the neocons got furious over that and started claiming Trump had supported Bush's Iraq war by quoting Trump saying, "I guess so."

  26. He looks like he’s very ill…worse than Putin.

  27. George W Bush Reveals Ukraine’s ‘Mission’ in Convo With Infamous Russian Pranksters

    The full call is supposed to be released today.

    https://sputniknews.com/20220517/george-w-bush-reveals-ukraines-mission-in-convo-with-infamous-russian-pranksters-video-1095583378.html

  28. Does he say “of Iraq too” after catching his mistake?

  29. @Danindc
    Did you hear him say “Iraq too”…wow

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Chrisnonymous

    “Iraq too…heh, heh, heh…”

    He knows, now does he understand his hypocrisy here too?

  30. @Kronos
    @J.Ross

    You think Mitt Romney even bothers with focus group polls for running again? What about Jeb?

    https://pics.me.me/after-the-recount-clinton-trump-jeb-538-undecided-0-me-7700469.png

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Chrisnonymous

    I don’t know if this is a swing at Bush vs Gore, but let’s not forget that recount was done and Bush won. The re-re-recounts were opposed because two years earlier the Florida Democrats were caught stuffing ballots and a judge overturned a Miami mayoral election.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Chrisnonymous

    Partially. But this more had to do with the 2016 Presidential recounts.

  31. He has the temerity to make jokes about it. For cheap laughs. He was and is, apparently, a buffoon, a buffoon who is responsible for the deaths of thousands of America’s sons.

    A pox on his entire family and their retainers and hangers-on.

    • Agree: Mike Tre, AnotherDad
    • Replies: @WJ
    @Twinkie

    I still remember Bush's hilarious parody of the inability to find the fictional WMDs. He did that the White House correspondent's dinner. This was after quite a bit of blood had already been shed.

  32. @SafeNow
    @Mike Tre

    LOL Citation needed.
     

    “Guilt refers to our sense of having done something wrong, either in reality or in our imagination. It relates to real or imagined actions or inactions which have caused real or imagined harm to others. This may then lead to a sense of having to pay a debt or repair something. The word guilt derives from the German word geld which means money or debt. In more severe forms of guilt we may feel we need to be punished”
     

    (emphasis added)


    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/advances-in-psychiatric-treatment/article/working-with-guilt-and-shame/E274C3EC63EF0191113B049C5F2C86F3

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    The word guilt derives from the German word geld which means money or debt. In more severe forms of guilt we may feel we need to be punished”

    Oh, I see – we invented that guilt thing. – The ways of the Lord are inscrutable (= inpenetrable… – see below…).

    (btw.: go tell that Klaus Schwab… – – see his quote: We penetrated lots of governments worldwide with participants in our yound leaders progeamme….

  33. A history of sociopathic idiots in high places…..those nails are still in our coffin.

  34. want to hear a good joke?

    George W Bush Institute

    what on earth could that possibly be. a collection of coloring books?

  35. As he explains at the end “I’m 75”.

    whereas Biden…

    Faked election, no checks and balances (by the democratic process on the administrative process)
    he clearly got Iraq right and Russia meant US.

  36. I’ve always considered Tony Blair the really evil one when it comes to Iraq

  37. @Enemy of Earth
    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @HammerJack

    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.

    Agreed. But the disaster of Bush, is not what most people think–Iraq.

    Iraq is probably better off for Bush’s invasion–though the future is unwritten. And the US is a big rich nation and can afford even expensive debacles. The US government the last couple years has been throwing around trillions like it’s popcorn money. (It’s only now catching up with us.)

    This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    911 was a massive rebuke to the “diversity is our greatest strength” ideology. A reasonable and prudent response would have been something like:

    “Hey, maybe we ‘can all get along’ best in separate nations. When people from different backgrounds, especially different civilizations are rubbing together there is friction, contention. Let’s pause. Stop bringing in different people and allow those here to commit to assimilating to American norms, or send them home. Then take the time for assimilation, and commit ourselves to never repeating this mistake.”

    Instead, Bush rolled out all his “Islam is a religion of Peace” gasbaggery and romped on the immigration gas pedal, including two pushes for amnesty–with a housing boom to squeeze everyone in and the Iraq attack. Sailer’s invade, invite, in-hock.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin, duncsbaby
    • Replies: @WJ
    @AnotherDad

    The invasion of Iraq was a disaster for Iraq and for the US. It defined GWB as a failed buffoon of a president. It made us no safer, it cost trillions and it maimed and killed thousands of Americans and many more thousands of Iraqis. Under no circumstances is anything better resulting from the invasion, except the security of Iran and perhaps Israel.

    GWB's immigration policy was almost as big a disaster. Fortunately the House and Senate stood up to him for 2 straight years and we avoided a nation ending amnesty and saved him from himself. Too bad they didn't do the same in October of 2002 when they green lighted his invasion of Iraq.

    , @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    The problem with arguing that Iraqis are better off after the invasion is that you run into the fact that it was Saddam's secret police goons who ended up staffing ISIS eventually. They didn't die or disappear or flee: they brought all their expertise in torture and killing to them. That's why they were so over-the-top gory, even on jihadist standards. They were being directed by men who'd had decades of experience doing everything from gassing Kurdish civilians to running rape-and-torture rooms. Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.

    ("De-Ba'aathification". It's like the people at the time were making policy based off what they read in a WWII novel.)

    Not that this is my main concern. No: American lives were thrown away in a region not worth the stubbed toe of a single Carolinian Marine for the same ideological reasons that are currently leading us to play footsie with nuclear weapons over Ukraine. Some weren't just thrown away. Some were agonizingly ruined. Many of them in the service of politicians who have developed nothing but open contempt for them based on their race, religion, beliefs, or all of the above.

    >This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration. In 2004, as Ron Unz put it, he essentially proposed making America's minimum wage its maximum one.

    I think the real turning point came under his old man. While I ultimately think the Baby Boom generation taking power right when the Soviet Union fell and America's elites no longer had any serious restraints on them was the fateful moment, you can already see the beginnings there of so many of the things that have messed up America since then.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Johann Ricke, @Johann Ricke

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @AnotherDad

    "Iraq is probably better off for Bush's invasion ..."

    Well, Iran certainly is. The Bush II invasion of Iraq was also a win-win! for the war merchants. It was a strategic disaster for the neoconservative slime who cooked up the scheme. Though don't worry about the neocons: They've got another war, in Ukraine. Now their phantasies involve NATO tanks rolling through Moscow since they couldn't make it to Tehran.

    Congratulations.

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @AnotherDad

    Better off?

    Some might care to disagree.

    https://twitter.com/ariellecohen/status/1073619818602004481

    https://twitter.com/morphonios/status/1442391270014390273

    Of course, what do the people of Iraq actually know about Iraq? That shoe thrower guy was probably just deranged.

  38. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Over a million excess deaths in Iraq due the U.S. invasion. One. Million.

    When I see how the Globohomshlomo totalitarianism has re-written history (great American historical figures are now all racists, Russia didn’t play a key role in defeating Nazi Germany and oh, by the way, some Nazis are now good if they’re torturing and killing Russian soldiers and civilians, et al.) it reminds me of the joke in the communist Eastern Bloc:

    “How can we know what the future will be like when we can’t even know what the past will be like in ten years?”

  39. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Danindc

    That was an absolutely amazing admission.

    Far more astounding than the initial faux pas.

    A Freudian slip? Or did he just officially concede that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was a mistake?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @BB753

    It’s the Revelation of the Method.
    “According to Michael Hoffman: first they suppress the counterargument, and when the most opportune time arrives, they reveal aspects of what’s really happened, but in a limited hangout sort of way.

    We were told the vaccines were harmless, until Pfizer debased their own safety claims, but not before the entire world had been vaccinated. Lockdown Apologists across the corporate media are now almost unanimous that lockdowns do more harm than good. This is no arbitrary volte-face, but rather a carefully planned sequence of disclosures when the time is ripe.

    Michael Hoffman suggests that the ruling elite are giving notice of their supremacy. Declaring themselves virtuoso criminal masterminds, above the law and beyond reproach. But most of all, they are telling you, in no uncertain terms, that you are without recourse, these events are beyond your control, as is your own destiny for that matter. Eventually a sense of apathy and abulia engulfs humanity, demoralising us to the point of conceding defeat to a system we are powerless to change.”
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2022/04/29/revelation-of-the-method/

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @BB753

    Thanks. VERY interesting article.

    Replies: @BB753

  40. WJ says:
    @AnotherDad
    @Enemy of Earth


    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.
     
    Agreed. But the disaster of Bush, is not what most people think--Iraq.

    Iraq is probably better off for Bush's invasion--though the future is unwritten. And the US is a big rich nation and can afford even expensive debacles. The US government the last couple years has been throwing around trillions like it's popcorn money. (It's only now catching up with us.)

    This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    911 was a massive rebuke to the "diversity is our greatest strength" ideology. A reasonable and prudent response would have been something like:

    "Hey, maybe we 'can all get along' best in separate nations. When people from different backgrounds, especially different civilizations are rubbing together there is friction, contention. Let's pause. Stop bringing in different people and allow those here to commit to assimilating to American norms, or send them home. Then take the time for assimilation, and commit ourselves to never repeating this mistake."
     
    Instead, Bush rolled out all his "Islam is a religion of Peace" gasbaggery and romped on the immigration gas pedal, including two pushes for amnesty--with a housing boom to squeeze everyone in and the Iraq attack. Sailer's invade, invite, in-hock.

    Replies: @WJ, @nebulafox, @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    The invasion of Iraq was a disaster for Iraq and for the US. It defined GWB as a failed buffoon of a president. It made us no safer, it cost trillions and it maimed and killed thousands of Americans and many more thousands of Iraqis. Under no circumstances is anything better resulting from the invasion, except the security of Iran and perhaps Israel.

    GWB’s immigration policy was almost as big a disaster. Fortunately the House and Senate stood up to him for 2 straight years and we avoided a nation ending amnesty and saved him from himself. Too bad they didn’t do the same in October of 2002 when they green lighted his invasion of Iraq.

  41. @Twinkie
    He has the temerity to make jokes about it. For cheap laughs. He was and is, apparently, a buffoon, a buffoon who is responsible for the deaths of thousands of America’s sons.

    A pox on his entire family and their retainers and hangers-on.

    Replies: @WJ

    I still remember Bush’s hilarious parody of the inability to find the fictional WMDs. He did that the White House correspondent’s dinner. This was after quite a bit of blood had already been shed.

  42. @AnotherDad
    @Enemy of Earth


    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.
     
    Agreed. But the disaster of Bush, is not what most people think--Iraq.

    Iraq is probably better off for Bush's invasion--though the future is unwritten. And the US is a big rich nation and can afford even expensive debacles. The US government the last couple years has been throwing around trillions like it's popcorn money. (It's only now catching up with us.)

    This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    911 was a massive rebuke to the "diversity is our greatest strength" ideology. A reasonable and prudent response would have been something like:

    "Hey, maybe we 'can all get along' best in separate nations. When people from different backgrounds, especially different civilizations are rubbing together there is friction, contention. Let's pause. Stop bringing in different people and allow those here to commit to assimilating to American norms, or send them home. Then take the time for assimilation, and commit ourselves to never repeating this mistake."
     
    Instead, Bush rolled out all his "Islam is a religion of Peace" gasbaggery and romped on the immigration gas pedal, including two pushes for amnesty--with a housing boom to squeeze everyone in and the Iraq attack. Sailer's invade, invite, in-hock.

    Replies: @WJ, @nebulafox, @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    The problem with arguing that Iraqis are better off after the invasion is that you run into the fact that it was Saddam’s secret police goons who ended up staffing ISIS eventually. They didn’t die or disappear or flee: they brought all their expertise in torture and killing to them. That’s why they were so over-the-top gory, even on jihadist standards. They were being directed by men who’d had decades of experience doing everything from gassing Kurdish civilians to running rape-and-torture rooms. Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.

    (“De-Ba’aathification”. It’s like the people at the time were making policy based off what they read in a WWII novel.)

    Not that this is my main concern. No: American lives were thrown away in a region not worth the stubbed toe of a single Carolinian Marine for the same ideological reasons that are currently leading us to play footsie with nuclear weapons over Ukraine. Some weren’t just thrown away. Some were agonizingly ruined. Many of them in the service of politicians who have developed nothing but open contempt for them based on their race, religion, beliefs, or all of the above.

    >This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration. In 2004, as Ron Unz put it, he essentially proposed making America’s minimum wage its maximum one.

    I think the real turning point came under his old man. While I ultimately think the Baby Boom generation taking power right when the Soviet Union fell and America’s elites no longer had any serious restraints on them was the fateful moment, you can already see the beginnings there of so many of the things that have messed up America since then.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @nebulafox


    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration.
     
    Yes, Bush was always a Bush.

    The missed opportunity was exactly what i said--the historical moment of 911 In the hands of an actually American American President who actually cared about the American people, that was a great opportunity for reassessment and sanity.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @Johann Ricke
    @nebulafox


    Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.
     
    This is utter nonsense. Sunnis went from overdogs to underdogs. Shiites went from underdogs to overdogs. Kurds went from pariahs to somewhat equal. There was an Iraq in the sense that the average temperature of one cup of boiling and one cup of ice cold water is tepid. The reality is that the vast majority of Iraqis benefited, with two exceptions - the Sunnis went from a privileged caste to a persecuted minority. And that is why in 20 years of elections, Iraq as a whole has never opted for a Sunni leader along the lines of Saddam Hussein.
    , @Johann Ricke
    @nebulafox


    Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.
     
    If I had to put my finger on why non-Sunnis in Iraq were resentful - they thought the US was somehow engaged in a gigantic conspiracy to set Iraqis against each other by creating and feeding sectarian animosity in order to preserve a permanent US troop presence they thought was aimed at stealing Iraq's oil. Only when US troops left did they realize that real sectarian tensions existed that could only be resolved through decisive battlefield victory, which they accomplished largely with the help of American troops re-dispatched to provide them with the firepower they needed.
  43. @Daniel H

    In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.
     
    Don't go soft on him. But I guess there have been some good side effects of the Bush disaster. For one, Republican Inc. is thoroughly, probably permanently, discredited. A Trumpish Republican party is forever.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @SunBakedSuburb, @Bill

    A Trumpish Republican party is forever.

    Now if only they can find an intelligent leader. Heck, maybe even a wise one! We can dream.

  44. @Enemy of Earth
    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @HammerJack

    I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.

    Yes. The worst presidency ever, near as I can figure. Yes, even worse than (fill in the blank). Second place? Maybe Wilson or LBJ.

    I’m proud to say I didn’t vote for him either time. No, I didn’t vote for Gore either.

    Here’s the DM play, FWIW…

  45. @Daniel H

    In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.
     
    Don't go soft on him. But I guess there have been some good side effects of the Bush disaster. For one, Republican Inc. is thoroughly, probably permanently, discredited. A Trumpish Republican party is forever.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @SunBakedSuburb, @Bill

    “For one, Republican Inc. is thoroughly, probably permanently, discredited.”

    The pool of white people who voted for Republican Inc. and often against their own economic interests, is draining into graveyards across the fruity plain.

    “A Trumpish Republican party is forever.”

    A GOP rejecting neoliberalism and supporting nationalist economic policies that nurture and grow a stable middle class will have staying power based on results. A GOP that embraces individualism and liberty and seeks to decentralize federal power will draw in peeps like me who are philosophically unburdened by extreme ideologies.

  46. @AnotherDad
    @Enemy of Earth


    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.
     
    Agreed. But the disaster of Bush, is not what most people think--Iraq.

    Iraq is probably better off for Bush's invasion--though the future is unwritten. And the US is a big rich nation and can afford even expensive debacles. The US government the last couple years has been throwing around trillions like it's popcorn money. (It's only now catching up with us.)

    This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    911 was a massive rebuke to the "diversity is our greatest strength" ideology. A reasonable and prudent response would have been something like:

    "Hey, maybe we 'can all get along' best in separate nations. When people from different backgrounds, especially different civilizations are rubbing together there is friction, contention. Let's pause. Stop bringing in different people and allow those here to commit to assimilating to American norms, or send them home. Then take the time for assimilation, and commit ourselves to never repeating this mistake."
     
    Instead, Bush rolled out all his "Islam is a religion of Peace" gasbaggery and romped on the immigration gas pedal, including two pushes for amnesty--with a housing boom to squeeze everyone in and the Iraq attack. Sailer's invade, invite, in-hock.

    Replies: @WJ, @nebulafox, @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    “Iraq is probably better off for Bush’s invasion …”

    Well, Iran certainly is. The Bush II invasion of Iraq was also a win-win! for the war merchants. It was a strategic disaster for the neoconservative slime who cooked up the scheme. Though don’t worry about the neocons: They’ve got another war, in Ukraine. Now their phantasies involve NATO tanks rolling through Moscow since they couldn’t make it to Tehran.

    Congratulations.

  47. @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    The problem with arguing that Iraqis are better off after the invasion is that you run into the fact that it was Saddam's secret police goons who ended up staffing ISIS eventually. They didn't die or disappear or flee: they brought all their expertise in torture and killing to them. That's why they were so over-the-top gory, even on jihadist standards. They were being directed by men who'd had decades of experience doing everything from gassing Kurdish civilians to running rape-and-torture rooms. Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.

    ("De-Ba'aathification". It's like the people at the time were making policy based off what they read in a WWII novel.)

    Not that this is my main concern. No: American lives were thrown away in a region not worth the stubbed toe of a single Carolinian Marine for the same ideological reasons that are currently leading us to play footsie with nuclear weapons over Ukraine. Some weren't just thrown away. Some were agonizingly ruined. Many of them in the service of politicians who have developed nothing but open contempt for them based on their race, religion, beliefs, or all of the above.

    >This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration. In 2004, as Ron Unz put it, he essentially proposed making America's minimum wage its maximum one.

    I think the real turning point came under his old man. While I ultimately think the Baby Boom generation taking power right when the Soviet Union fell and America's elites no longer had any serious restraints on them was the fateful moment, you can already see the beginnings there of so many of the things that have messed up America since then.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Johann Ricke, @Johann Ricke

    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration.

    Yes, Bush was always a Bush.

    The missed opportunity was exactly what i said–the historical moment of 911 In the hands of an actually American American President who actually cared about the American people, that was a great opportunity for reassessment and sanity.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    Nah, I get you. Still: how can a country that was so on top of the world in 1990 already need a course correction ten years later? I get that we had the credit level to engage in nonstop frivolity for decades, but it does boggle the mind when you look at it retrospectively.

    For what it is worth, Saddam's government was truly depraved on a level that makes most of his contemporary authoritarians, inside and outside of the Middle East, look tame in comparison. This is something I'm very aware of. (You'd have to go all the way to North Korea to find something worse by the later part of his rule in the 1990s, IMO-something that we helped exacerbate when we encouraged the Shi'ites and Kurds to rebel on radio while predictably hanging them out to dry in the end. These are the kinds of memories that led to the communal violence that American troops had to deal with.) And yet, the same people who I'm positive would call the Iraq War an exercise in Yankee imperialism now call any sober discussion of what American interests are stake at a time in Ukraine an exercise in Russo-apologia. To say nothing, of course, of the ties between the Ukrainian government and the White House. Just like the ties between the Gulfies and the White Houses of the 1990s.

    The only difference is that this time, America has been hollowed out by 30 years of policies that sacrificed much of the nation's strength as collateral. And of course, Vladimir Putin actually does have nuclear weapons.

  48. @epebble
    Is it Guilty Conscience or Subconscious? Any psychologists?

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    Freudian slip.

  49. Anonymous[181] • Disclaimer says:

    Bush was a DISASTER!

    First he started a completely unnecessary and avoidable war in Iraq, killing and maiming thousands of Americans (and Iraqis) in the process.
    Then he crashed the economy by waging jihad against traditional standards for mortgage lending, which in turn created the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

    The only good thing to come out of his whole presidency for conservatives was the appointment of Alito (and to a lesser degree Roberts) to the Supreme Court. But bear in mind that if Bush had had his way it would’ve been Harriet Myers and Alberto Gonzales on the Court instead.

    The crisis he created with the Iraq war ended up dominating our political system for most of his presidency rather than the ongoing immigration invasion, which instead could (and should) have been the primary focus of our attention.
    It was this war and the crashing of the economy that paved the way for what up to that point would’ve been considered one of the most preposterous candidates ever for the presidency: Barack Hussein Obama. As Donald Trump so accurately put it, “Bush gave us Obama.” And as a result of Obama being elected the Left arrogantly believed they had finally achieved permanent hegemony over the country, which ultimately spawned the insanity of “wokeness” that we are dealing with today.

  50. Joe Biden voted for — and pushed for — George W Bush’s IRAQ WAR DEBACLE.

    Joe Biden has had at least two brain surgeries to fix the many brain problems and brain malfunctions that have seriously damaged Biden’s ability to think clearly and to remember things clearly.

    Joe Biden is a brain-damaged treasonous politician whore who pushes for more and more overseas war.

    Joe Biden’s brain-damaged warmongering and inability to think clearly is a clear and present threat to the safety, security and sovereignty of the USA.

    Biden falsely claims he opposed George W Bush’s Iraq War Debacle from the beginning — Michael Tracey, September 2019:

  51. Bush was always an amnesty pimp, something he clouded over in his 2000 run for office.

  52. @Daniel H

    In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq.
     
    Don't go soft on him. But I guess there have been some good side effects of the Bush disaster. For one, Republican Inc. is thoroughly, probably permanently, discredited. A Trumpish Republican party is forever.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @SunBakedSuburb, @Bill

    Didn’t Ronald Reagan defeat the “blueblood Republicans?” Didn’t W defeat the “country club Republicans?” Then Trump defeated them again.

    How come those guys keep getting defeated yet always get exactly what they want?

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Bill


    How come those guys keep getting defeated yet always get exactly what they want?
     
    Because the Establishment is very good at co-opting insurgent conservatives/nationalists. For example, at least half or more of the Reagan cabinet was not Reaganite. Personnel is policy and the Establishment is excellent at inserting their people to staff the support personnel for the electoral winners even when insurgents win the elections, you know, “to make sure the trains run on time,” so to speak.

    That’s been the problem with conservative/nationalist insurgencies - not a deep bench of highly capable people who are committed to the cause. After all, if they were so capable, they would benefit greatly by working within the status quo. No, instead, the insurgencies are full of grifters, opportunists, and highly flawed and/or weird people who are incompetent, flame out, cause scandals, or make things worse.

    To put simply, it’s a human resource problem. It’s not enough to elect the right candidate - what’s needed is a deep bench of capable, qualified people who can navigate and defeat the entrenched interests at every bureaucratic and legislative turn for that candidate/leader. And that’s very hard, because it’s hard to find many smart people who like to lose a lot.

    Replies: @Bill, @vinteuil

  53. It is astonishing how many modern politicians are phonies.

    US Presidents are highly visible, and, as someone has mentioned, it is bizarre they need Presidential Libraries & some Institutes. Then, they get rich by giving meaningless speeches all around the world & get paid for it enormously. Public lectures have been the staple of US political culture for two hundreds of years, probably arising from American tradition of preaching various wacky stuff to the dumbos, but- such a behavior is not presidential.

    In serious countries in the past 200 or so years, high offices come with the burden of dignity.

    Relatively recently, Tony Blair was snooping for lucrative business positions in various places; German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has been working for Russian energy companies; Austrian Sebastian Kurz, after his resignation: Kurz has been working as a global strategist for Thiel Capital, the California-based private investment company of American billionaire Peter Thiel.

    Who are these people?

    In normal circumstances, you could not expect Talleyrand, Poincare, Bismark, Witte, … to work, after their political career is over, as highly paid bureaucrats for some multinational companies & public speakers offering their “wisdom” for checks.

    This should be something dignified, and not playing lapdogs of oligarchies & sinking to the bottom of reality shows, worthless ghostwritten memoirs & various humiliating sexual scandals, frequently connected with shady financial deals and nepotism.

    Such political classes may last, but it would spell doom on their respective countries.

  54. @BB753
    @JohnnyWalker123

    It's the Revelation of the Method.
    "According to Michael Hoffman: first they suppress the counterargument, and when the most opportune time arrives, they reveal aspects of what’s really happened, but in a limited hangout sort of way.

    We were told the vaccines were harmless, until Pfizer debased their own safety claims, but not before the entire world had been vaccinated. Lockdown Apologists across the corporate media are now almost unanimous that lockdowns do more harm than good. This is no arbitrary volte-face, but rather a carefully planned sequence of disclosures when the time is ripe.

    Michael Hoffman suggests that the ruling elite are giving notice of their supremacy. Declaring themselves virtuoso criminal masterminds, above the law and beyond reproach. But most of all, they are telling you, in no uncertain terms, that you are without recourse, these events are beyond your control, as is your own destiny for that matter. Eventually a sense of apathy and abulia engulfs humanity, demoralising us to the point of conceding defeat to a system we are powerless to change."
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2022/04/29/revelation-of-the-method/

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks. VERY interesting article.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @JohnnyWalker123

    You're welcome.

  55. @AnotherDad
    @Enemy of Earth


    G.W. was the president who cured me of the folly of voting. During his term I repented of having voted for him. I truly believe his presidency was a disaster of epic proportions.
     
    Agreed. But the disaster of Bush, is not what most people think--Iraq.

    Iraq is probably better off for Bush's invasion--though the future is unwritten. And the US is a big rich nation and can afford even expensive debacles. The US government the last couple years has been throwing around trillions like it's popcorn money. (It's only now catching up with us.)

    This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    911 was a massive rebuke to the "diversity is our greatest strength" ideology. A reasonable and prudent response would have been something like:

    "Hey, maybe we 'can all get along' best in separate nations. When people from different backgrounds, especially different civilizations are rubbing together there is friction, contention. Let's pause. Stop bringing in different people and allow those here to commit to assimilating to American norms, or send them home. Then take the time for assimilation, and commit ourselves to never repeating this mistake."
     
    Instead, Bush rolled out all his "Islam is a religion of Peace" gasbaggery and romped on the immigration gas pedal, including two pushes for amnesty--with a housing boom to squeeze everyone in and the Iraq attack. Sailer's invade, invite, in-hock.

    Replies: @WJ, @nebulafox, @SunBakedSuburb, @JohnnyWalker123

    Better off?

    Some might care to disagree.

    Of course, what do the people of Iraq actually know about Iraq? That shoe thrower guy was probably just deranged.

  56. @Mr. Anon
    People think that Obama made Trump possible. Not true. W made Trump possible. Trump's campaign in 2016 was more of a repudiation of the Bush/McCain/Romney Republican party than it was of the Obama/Hillary/Biden Democratic party.

    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this. Republicans must be made to understand it.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @vinteuil, @Precious

    Trump’s campaign in 2016 was more of a repudiation of the Bush/McCain/Romney Republican party than it was of the Obama/Hillary/Biden Democratic party.

    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this. Republicans must be made to understand it.

    Truer words were never typed.

  57. @Mr. Anon
    People think that Obama made Trump possible. Not true. W made Trump possible. Trump's campaign in 2016 was more of a repudiation of the Bush/McCain/Romney Republican party than it was of the Obama/Hillary/Biden Democratic party.

    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this. Republicans must be made to understand it.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @vinteuil, @Precious

    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this.

    It’s so weird. There doesn’t seem to be a single Democrat voter in the world who understands that Donald Trump was a charismatic insurgent candidate who single-handedly destroyed the limitlessly corrupt Bush crime family.

  58. @Mr. Anon
    Speaking at the George W. Bush Institute. Why does every former President have an institute or a foundation? Why do they all have libraries? It's a crock. They are supposed to be elected public officials, not mini God-Emperors. They are not supposed to be that important. After office, they should return to private life and shut the Hell up. All their supposed philanthropy is nothing but an exercise in self-ego-stroking.

    Replies: @Alden, @Koffeefutures

    Think : Slushfund.

  59. @AnotherDad
    @nebulafox


    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration.
     
    Yes, Bush was always a Bush.

    The missed opportunity was exactly what i said--the historical moment of 911 In the hands of an actually American American President who actually cared about the American people, that was a great opportunity for reassessment and sanity.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Nah, I get you. Still: how can a country that was so on top of the world in 1990 already need a course correction ten years later? I get that we had the credit level to engage in nonstop frivolity for decades, but it does boggle the mind when you look at it retrospectively.

    For what it is worth, Saddam’s government was truly depraved on a level that makes most of his contemporary authoritarians, inside and outside of the Middle East, look tame in comparison. This is something I’m very aware of. (You’d have to go all the way to North Korea to find something worse by the later part of his rule in the 1990s, IMO-something that we helped exacerbate when we encouraged the Shi’ites and Kurds to rebel on radio while predictably hanging them out to dry in the end. These are the kinds of memories that led to the communal violence that American troops had to deal with.) And yet, the same people who I’m positive would call the Iraq War an exercise in Yankee imperialism now call any sober discussion of what American interests are stake at a time in Ukraine an exercise in Russo-apologia. To say nothing, of course, of the ties between the Ukrainian government and the White House. Just like the ties between the Gulfies and the White Houses of the 1990s.

    The only difference is that this time, America has been hollowed out by 30 years of policies that sacrificed much of the nation’s strength as collateral. And of course, Vladimir Putin actually does have nuclear weapons.

  60. @Mike Tre
    "In defense of Bush, I do suspect he sometimes feels guilty over Iraq."

    LOL Citation needed.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SafeNow, @Onebelowall

    In all seriousness, there’s been a lot of speculation about his picking up painting as a hobby and if it was a way of trying to soothe his feelings over Iraq.

  61. @Bill
    @Daniel H

    Didn't Ronald Reagan defeat the "blueblood Republicans?" Didn't W defeat the "country club Republicans?" Then Trump defeated them again.

    How come those guys keep getting defeated yet always get exactly what they want?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    How come those guys keep getting defeated yet always get exactly what they want?

    Because the Establishment is very good at co-opting insurgent conservatives/nationalists. For example, at least half or more of the Reagan cabinet was not Reaganite. Personnel is policy and the Establishment is excellent at inserting their people to staff the support personnel for the electoral winners even when insurgents win the elections, you know, “to make sure the trains run on time,” so to speak.

    That’s been the problem with conservative/nationalist insurgencies – not a deep bench of highly capable people who are committed to the cause. After all, if they were so capable, they would benefit greatly by working within the status quo. No, instead, the insurgencies are full of grifters, opportunists, and highly flawed and/or weird people who are incompetent, flame out, cause scandals, or make things worse.

    To put simply, it’s a human resource problem. It’s not enough to elect the right candidate – what’s needed is a deep bench of capable, qualified people who can navigate and defeat the entrenched interests at every bureaucratic and legislative turn for that candidate/leader. And that’s very hard, because it’s hard to find many smart people who like to lose a lot.

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Twinkie

    Your response is like that joke that ends with the French farmer telling the English balloonist that he's in a field.

    Here it is, but with an accountant:


    One joke has a hot air balloonist blown off course and landing in a field, where he meets someone. The balloonist asks “Where am I?” and the man replies, “You’ve landed in a large field.” The balloonist then tells the man that he must be an accountant (or an economist, or a mathematician, et al.) because the answer was completely accurate and utterly useless.
     
    https://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/hot_air_balloon_lands_in_a_field_accountant_economist_mathematician_joke
    , @vinteuil
    @Twinkie


    ...it’s hard to find many smart people who like to lose a lot...
     
    Lapidary.

    Nothing changes, nothing gets better, until telling truth becomes a winning strategy.
  62. @Chrisnonymous
    @Kronos

    I don't know if this is a swing at Bush vs Gore, but let's not forget that recount was done and Bush won. The re-re-recounts were opposed because two years earlier the Florida Democrats were caught stuffing ballots and a judge overturned a Miami mayoral election.

    Replies: @Kronos

    Partially. But this more had to do with the 2016 Presidential recounts.

  63. @JohnnyWalker123
    @BB753

    Thanks. VERY interesting article.

    Replies: @BB753

    You’re welcome.

  64. Bill says:
    @Twinkie
    @Bill


    How come those guys keep getting defeated yet always get exactly what they want?
     
    Because the Establishment is very good at co-opting insurgent conservatives/nationalists. For example, at least half or more of the Reagan cabinet was not Reaganite. Personnel is policy and the Establishment is excellent at inserting their people to staff the support personnel for the electoral winners even when insurgents win the elections, you know, “to make sure the trains run on time,” so to speak.

    That’s been the problem with conservative/nationalist insurgencies - not a deep bench of highly capable people who are committed to the cause. After all, if they were so capable, they would benefit greatly by working within the status quo. No, instead, the insurgencies are full of grifters, opportunists, and highly flawed and/or weird people who are incompetent, flame out, cause scandals, or make things worse.

    To put simply, it’s a human resource problem. It’s not enough to elect the right candidate - what’s needed is a deep bench of capable, qualified people who can navigate and defeat the entrenched interests at every bureaucratic and legislative turn for that candidate/leader. And that’s very hard, because it’s hard to find many smart people who like to lose a lot.

    Replies: @Bill, @vinteuil

    Your response is like that joke that ends with the French farmer telling the English balloonist that he’s in a field.

    Here it is, but with an accountant:

    One joke has a hot air balloonist blown off course and landing in a field, where he meets someone. The balloonist asks “Where am I?” and the man replies, “You’ve landed in a large field.” The balloonist then tells the man that he must be an accountant (or an economist, or a mathematician, et al.) because the answer was completely accurate and utterly useless.

    https://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/hot_air_balloon_lands_in_a_field_accountant_economist_mathematician_joke

  65. @Twinkie
    @Bill


    How come those guys keep getting defeated yet always get exactly what they want?
     
    Because the Establishment is very good at co-opting insurgent conservatives/nationalists. For example, at least half or more of the Reagan cabinet was not Reaganite. Personnel is policy and the Establishment is excellent at inserting their people to staff the support personnel for the electoral winners even when insurgents win the elections, you know, “to make sure the trains run on time,” so to speak.

    That’s been the problem with conservative/nationalist insurgencies - not a deep bench of highly capable people who are committed to the cause. After all, if they were so capable, they would benefit greatly by working within the status quo. No, instead, the insurgencies are full of grifters, opportunists, and highly flawed and/or weird people who are incompetent, flame out, cause scandals, or make things worse.

    To put simply, it’s a human resource problem. It’s not enough to elect the right candidate - what’s needed is a deep bench of capable, qualified people who can navigate and defeat the entrenched interests at every bureaucratic and legislative turn for that candidate/leader. And that’s very hard, because it’s hard to find many smart people who like to lose a lot.

    Replies: @Bill, @vinteuil

    …it’s hard to find many smart people who like to lose a lot…

    Lapidary.

    Nothing changes, nothing gets better, until telling truth becomes a winning strategy.

  66. @Mr. Anon
    People think that Obama made Trump possible. Not true. W made Trump possible. Trump's campaign in 2016 was more of a repudiation of the Bush/McCain/Romney Republican party than it was of the Obama/Hillary/Biden Democratic party.

    Democrats do not and will not ever understand this. Republicans must be made to understand it.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @vinteuil, @Precious

    Amen. It was a great moment when Trump took down Jeb after Jeb defended his brother during the 2016 Republican primary election cycle. I had a good laugh when all the neocons got furious over that and started claiming Trump had supported Bush’s Iraq war by quoting Trump saying, “I guess so.”

  67. @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    The problem with arguing that Iraqis are better off after the invasion is that you run into the fact that it was Saddam's secret police goons who ended up staffing ISIS eventually. They didn't die or disappear or flee: they brought all their expertise in torture and killing to them. That's why they were so over-the-top gory, even on jihadist standards. They were being directed by men who'd had decades of experience doing everything from gassing Kurdish civilians to running rape-and-torture rooms. Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.

    ("De-Ba'aathification". It's like the people at the time were making policy based off what they read in a WWII novel.)

    Not that this is my main concern. No: American lives were thrown away in a region not worth the stubbed toe of a single Carolinian Marine for the same ideological reasons that are currently leading us to play footsie with nuclear weapons over Ukraine. Some weren't just thrown away. Some were agonizingly ruined. Many of them in the service of politicians who have developed nothing but open contempt for them based on their race, religion, beliefs, or all of the above.

    >This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration. In 2004, as Ron Unz put it, he essentially proposed making America's minimum wage its maximum one.

    I think the real turning point came under his old man. While I ultimately think the Baby Boom generation taking power right when the Soviet Union fell and America's elites no longer had any serious restraints on them was the fateful moment, you can already see the beginnings there of so many of the things that have messed up America since then.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Johann Ricke, @Johann Ricke

    Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.

    This is utter nonsense. Sunnis went from overdogs to underdogs. Shiites went from underdogs to overdogs. Kurds went from pariahs to somewhat equal. There was an Iraq in the sense that the average temperature of one cup of boiling and one cup of ice cold water is tepid. The reality is that the vast majority of Iraqis benefited, with two exceptions – the Sunnis went from a privileged caste to a persecuted minority. And that is why in 20 years of elections, Iraq as a whole has never opted for a Sunni leader along the lines of Saddam Hussein.

  68. @nebulafox
    @AnotherDad

    The problem with arguing that Iraqis are better off after the invasion is that you run into the fact that it was Saddam's secret police goons who ended up staffing ISIS eventually. They didn't die or disappear or flee: they brought all their expertise in torture and killing to them. That's why they were so over-the-top gory, even on jihadist standards. They were being directed by men who'd had decades of experience doing everything from gassing Kurdish civilians to running rape-and-torture rooms. Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.

    ("De-Ba'aathification". It's like the people at the time were making policy based off what they read in a WWII novel.)

    Not that this is my main concern. No: American lives were thrown away in a region not worth the stubbed toe of a single Carolinian Marine for the same ideological reasons that are currently leading us to play footsie with nuclear weapons over Ukraine. Some weren't just thrown away. Some were agonizingly ruined. Many of them in the service of politicians who have developed nothing but open contempt for them based on their race, religion, beliefs, or all of the above.

    >This big disaster of Bush is the missed opportunity on immigration sanity:

    What missed opportunity? Bush was always very clear about his intentions on immigration. In 2004, as Ron Unz put it, he essentially proposed making America's minimum wage its maximum one.

    I think the real turning point came under his old man. While I ultimately think the Baby Boom generation taking power right when the Soviet Union fell and America's elites no longer had any serious restraints on them was the fateful moment, you can already see the beginnings there of so many of the things that have messed up America since then.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Johann Ricke, @Johann Ricke

    Iraq went from being miserable but stable to miserable but fractured to miserable and anarchic. Normies will always choose order and stability over almost anything else.

    If I had to put my finger on why non-Sunnis in Iraq were resentful – they thought the US was somehow engaged in a gigantic conspiracy to set Iraqis against each other by creating and feeding sectarian animosity in order to preserve a permanent US troop presence they thought was aimed at stealing Iraq’s oil. Only when US troops left did they realize that real sectarian tensions existed that could only be resolved through decisive battlefield victory, which they accomplished largely with the help of American troops re-dispatched to provide them with the firepower they needed.

  69. https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/24/politics/george-w-bush-fbi-threat/index.html


  70. https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2022/05/bush-political-dynasty-ends-george-p.html

    [MORE]

    For George P. Bush, the one-time golden boy of Texas politics, running for state attorney general after serving two terms as land commissioner shouldn’t have been too much of a reach. This son of Jeb and Columba Bush, with movie-star looks and Latino heritage, had managed to become the one member of his family who got along with the new ruler of the Republican Party, Donald Trump. The incumbent, moreover, Ken Paxton, had become the most frequently indicted and investigated elected official in Texas, making him an ostensibly soft target.

    But after Bush forced Paxton into a runoff in a March 1 primary, it was all downhill for the dynastic heir to two U.S. presidents and governors of Texas and Florida. Paxton crushed Bush by a 68-32 margin, making the loser a potential political has-been at the ripe old age of 46. In the end, Paxton’s high name ID from being in the headlines so often, and his backing from Donald Trump, mattered most. Efforts by Bush and two other vanquished primary rivals to make Texans ashamed of Paxton’s scandal-ridden tenure seem to have just reinforced his self-image as a MAGA outsider being persecuted for his righteousness, just like the twice-impeached 45th president.

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