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Baseball appears to be on the verge of revamping its postseason.

Many are criticizing that the 88 win Atlanta Braves, winner of the National League Eastern Division, were seeded into the second round of the playoff and given home field advantage in the third round. In contrast, the 106 win Los Angeles Dodgers lost the NL Western Division to the 107 win San Francisco Giants in perhaps the greatest pennant race of all time. Three games back with 20 to play, the Dodgers won 17 of their last 20. But the Giants won 15 of 20 to win by 1.

Hence, the second place Dodgers were seeded into a one game Wild Card playoff against St. Louis, then had to beat the Giants in a superb second round series, before being thoroughly beaten by the Braves in the semifinals in six games.

Those saying Atlanta Braves should have had to go to the Wild Card Round and not get home field advantage for having fewer wins don’t grasp that under a most-wins system of seeding the Dodgers would have shut down with about ten days to go rather than fight Giants to the bitter end, depriving the West of a great pennant race. The Dodgers lost Hall of Fame pitcher Clayton Kershaw to a season-ending injury in the third to last game and their leading slugger Max Muncy in the last game of the season.

The 2021 NL West pennant race between the S.F. Giants vs. L.A. Dodgers was perhaps the best ever, but because their home games don’t finish in time for ESPN SportsCenter in East and Central time zones, they don’t get the attention of, say, New York Yankees vs Boston Red Sox pennant races.

Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game because the whole country caught up with Saturday’s college football action in the newspapers on Sunday. But now, Pac-12 games happen at one million o’clock in the morning in the Eastern and Central time zones so nobody cares.

Sports are an interesting example of how electronic communications has reimposed the tyranny of distance due to time zones. Highest viewership is right before going to bed, so SouthEastern Conference night games have the most viewers, Pacific 12 night games the fewest.

When I was a kid, it was widely assumed that, due to electronic communication, elite workers would soon move to Hawaii to enjoy the paradisiacal climate and beauty. But, perhaps due to time zones, that didn’t happen: e.g., NY Stock Exchange opens at 3:30 AM in Honolulu.

What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm?

 
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  1. Fu*k Rob Manfred. Georgia vs Texas, I love it

    • Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard
    @YM

    Atlanta cannot lose really. Even if the Astros win all the Braves' fans will accuse them of cheating. : )

    Replies: @Prester John

    , @Marty T
    @YM

    I think a lot of conservatives who didn't watch baseball this season are rooting for the Braves, not just due to the all-star game but they also do the very non PC tomahawk chop.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  2. Can Atlanta win a second world championship? At one time or perhaps twice, Atlanta had 4 MAJOR FRANCHISES in the MLB, the NFL, the NBA and NHL. Yeah, Atlanta had two NHL teams, the Thrashers and the Flames and both hauled ass. Anyhow, Atlanta has had professional big time sports since 1966 and they can only claim one world title. Hell, Milwaukee, the place the Braves played before moving to Atlanta has that and they only have two professional sports teams in the Big 4. And I am not even counting the Milwaukee Braves, just the Brew Crew and the Bucks. The Braves won something like 14 consecutive division titles and went to 4 World Series and they have only won one. And the Falcons and that loss to the Patriots has to be the biggest CHOKE in history.

    Okay, I don’t want to hate the ATL, and as a Baltimore Oriole fan, I know about suffering and the Orioles are the worst team in baseball, and of course the O’s haven’t even been to the WS since 1983. Now they should have went in 1997 and 2014, especially 1997, how in the hell they lost to the Indians is beyond me. Anyhow, even a much smaller market like Baltimore has 2 NFL championships, 3 Super Bowl titles, 3 World Series titles, and IF you care to count the Washington Bullets who started out in Baltimore, you could even arguably add an NBA title. Baltimore was just a few years ahead of Atlanta, they got to the big leagues in 1953 with the Colts and 1954 with the O’s. IF Atlanta chokes AGAIN, I don’t see even serious Atlanta fans even giving a shit IF Atlanta makes it to the BIG GAME again.

    I don’t care about MLB or NFL and NEVER cared about the NBA, but since the Atlanta has been so shutout from gaining world titles over the years, I will root for the Buffalo Bills of baseball, the Atlanta Braves, even though I won’t watch a single game.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Trinity


    Anyhow, Atlanta has had professional big time sports since 1966 and they can only claim one world title. Hell, Milwaukee, the place the Braves played before moving to Atlanta has that and they only have two professional sports teams in the Big 4.
     
    The current Milwaukee teams actually have two, as the Kareem & Oscar Bucks won in 71. You mentioned the Braves winning in Milwaukee but I'm sure they would also claim the Packers, as they played multiple games in Milwaukee during most of their championship seasons, including the 67 NFL Western Conference championship game against the Rams. This was the week before the famous Ice Bowl. Ironically, because of the rotational system used then, the 9-4-1 Packers hosted the 11-1-2 Rams that day.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Trinity, @Jay Fink

  3. What’s the point of being rich if your idea of fun is watching sports on TV? Can’t you do that while relatively poor? Also:

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=MusyO7J2inM

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    What’s the point of being rich if your idea of fun is watching sports on TV? Can’t you do that while relatively poor?

    There is a scene in Annie Hall where Woody Allen sneaks away from a socialite party to watch the knicks. He basically says that intellectuals are full of s--t and needed a break. I really get the sentiment. Most of our intellectual class is a political club where virtue signaling is valued over independent thinking.

    I will sometimes turn on a game because it is usually less insulting than anything else on TV.

    In theory I would like to watch the news but which channel? They all have over the top bias. NPR is supposed to be public and is just as insulting as CNN. I don't think we even have news channels. They are political channels whereby producers try to push their view of the world.

    Sports are one of the few areas that clown world doesn't control. Sure they will push PC narratives at times but there is still a basic level of competition. If our clownish overlords could have their way then they would probably eliminate sports as they undermine the belief that racial genetics don't matter. If they didn't matter then 20% of defense lines would be Asian.

    Replies: @Up2Drew, @Dacian Julien Soros

  4. OT, but I would like to signal-boost this within the dissident right.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/how-do-you-make-7-million-workers-disappear/620475/

    The elites are starting to worry about the ‘labor shortage’ and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.

    “What’s abundantly clear is that America needs more workers.” Yeah, God forbid wages start to rise.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    @SFG

    Michelle Goldberg in the NYT:


    MERKEL WAS RIGHT

    But the refugees had more to offer Germany than a burnished self-image. In an aging country with a low birthrate, they were a useful addition to the work force. The economy, Stelzenmüller said, “was looking for labor before the pandemic, and so there was a real demand and presumably a willingness from the labor market and companies to help people. And of course we have a long experience, a decades-long practice, of on-the-job training that is seen as a model by other European countries and in fact by America.”
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/22/opinion/angela-merkel-refugees-germany.html

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2021/10/22/opinion/22goldberg1/merlin_195922284_0430d1be-4ce4-4bcd-9166-f8128416bde0-superJumbo.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp
    , @Travis
    @SFG

    As soon as we get 90% fully vaccinated things will get back to normal.....

    People hate wearing with masks at work. I would have quit my job in September due to the stupid mask mandates but i found a mesh mask with holes big enough to allow Mosquitoes to fly thru, but they may fire me soon anyway for being unvaccinated. Wondering why they have allowed me and my wife to teach without being vaxxed. We have also refused to submit to the weekly testing. So far they have not bothered me about it. I also refuse to wear the mask when teaching and allow my students to take off their masks in class, so far nobody has complained. But two of the other math teachers have already quit this month. If they fire me they will be short 3 math teachers.

    Replies: @Polistra, @JMcG

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @SFG

    The worker shortage/supply chain disruption is definitely starting to hurt. Industrial production was down 1.3%. The decline was not caused by a lack of demand but supply issues.

    IP was also revised down for early months.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @SFG


    The elites are starting to worry about the ‘labor shortage’ and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.
     
    When did they stop the last push for more immigration?

    They're always pushing for more immigration, but like a 12 year old boy who wants a puppy they serially employ any facile reason closest at hand.

    Spicy ethic food > who we are > jobs Americans won't do > America is too stale and pale > rinse/repeat.

    "The duopoly wants cut-rate labor to keep wages down and more clients for the identity welfare spoils state" isn't a runaway electoral winner just yet.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG

    A hymn we sang at Mass today contains the lyric

    The harvest is plenty, laborers are few.
    Come with me into the fields.


    With this interesting final verse:

    The seeds were sown by other hands than yours;
    nurtured and cared for they grew.
    But those who have sown will not harvest them;
    the reaping will not be their care.


    http://choirmusicpage.blogspot.com/2017/04/come-with-me-into-fields.html

  5. Off-topic, or maybe back-topic. Ok, maybe it’s not exactly either, but deaf/LGBT related:

  6. iSteve is on top of the social concerns that ought to be on people’s consciences.

    What a country!

  7. Sports like every other media topic is east-coast-centric and Eastern Time Zone-centric. Six inches of snow in the Beltway equals the entire state of Kansas getting incinerated a la The Day After. Imagine the extra outrage Steve would stir living in NY or DC.

    One example: Sports Illustrated did a look-back feature on The Greatest Upset No One’s Ever Heard Of — Chaminade of Hawaii, a teeny-tiny school out there, beat Ralph Sampson’s top-ranked Virginia hoopsters in an early season 1982 game that was played at about 3 AM NYC-time, and pre-internet, so almost zero coverage

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Known Fact

    I was a sports fanatic back then and remember it being a huge deal. That year did have the greatest upset in sports history…which was NC State winning the national title in basketball. They needed to win the ACC tournament just to get into the NCAA’s and won 3 thrillers just to do that. Then they should’ve lost the opener in the NCAA to Fresno State and probably should’ve lost 2-3 more times. Truly amazing run.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    , @Peterike
    @Known Fact

    “ Chaminade of Hawaii, a teeny-tiny school out there, beat Ralph Sampson’s top-ranked Virginia hoopsters in an early season 1982 game that was played at about 3 AM NYC-time, and pre-internet, so almost zero coverage”

    I was living in NYC at the time and I distinctly recall that game.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Known Fact

  8. I care nothing for big-time sports anymore, but what I like about the upcoming WS is that the woke MLB had shifted the All-Star game away from Atlanta because Georgia’s voting laws were not up to Woke standards, but now MLB had to give the NL championship trophy to the Georgia team, and maybe the WS championship also. It’s rather pathetic that these symbolic hits to the Woke regime are all we can hope for presently, but it’s better than nothing.

    • Agree: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @Marty T
    @Mike_from_SGV

    We also have "F Joe Biden" in college football stadiums also (and Let's go Brandon appeared at a Braves game)

  9. @SFG
    OT, but I would like to signal-boost this within the dissident right.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/how-do-you-make-7-million-workers-disappear/620475/

    The elites are starting to worry about the 'labor shortage' and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.

    "What's abundantly clear is that America needs more workers." Yeah, God forbid wages start to rise.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @Travis, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Reg Cæsar

    Michelle Goldberg in the NYT:

    MERKEL WAS RIGHT

    But the refugees had more to offer Germany than a burnished self-image. In an aging country with a low birthrate, they were a useful addition to the work force. The economy, Stelzenmüller said, “was looking for labor before the pandemic, and so there was a real demand and presumably a willingness from the labor market and companies to help people. And of course we have a long experience, a decades-long practice, of on-the-job training that is seen as a model by other European countries and in fact by America.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/22/opinion/angela-merkel-refugees-germany.html

  10. Kind of falls into the “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” category. Given the random nature of baseball relative to other sports, it made no sense to add a second wild card team and have a play-in game. It just served to further devalue the regular season. The old system was better, with just one wild card team, and that wild card team could not play their division winner in the first round. Under that system, the Dodgers would have played the Brewers in the first round, and the Braves would have played the Giants, with the Brewers and Giants having home field advantage. That would have been the best of both worlds – still recognizing the value of winning divisions, but not totally screwing over the wild card team.

    • Replies: @Wade Hampton
    @Hapalong Cassidy


    The old system was better,
     
    I'm with you so far...

    with just one wild card team, and that wild card team could not play their division winner in the first round. Under that system...
     
    And from there, the author descends further into insanity.

    The old system, the correct system, was that the winner of the National League played a best of seven World Series against the winner of the American League. That's the system to which we should return. I'm not proposing that we go back to the 1921 and prior best of nine approach. I'm a crazy innovator.

    Let the sports that heathens play like ice hockey and basketball have these goofy multi-tiered playoff schedules. Nobody but commies likes them.

    And the Houston franchise should go back to the NL and change their name back to the Colt 45s.

  11. @SFG
    OT, but I would like to signal-boost this within the dissident right.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/how-do-you-make-7-million-workers-disappear/620475/

    The elites are starting to worry about the 'labor shortage' and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.

    "What's abundantly clear is that America needs more workers." Yeah, God forbid wages start to rise.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @Travis, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Reg Cæsar

    As soon as we get 90% fully vaccinated things will get back to normal…..

    People hate wearing with masks at work. I would have quit my job in September due to the stupid mask mandates but i found a mesh mask with holes big enough to allow Mosquitoes to fly thru, but they may fire me soon anyway for being unvaccinated. Wondering why they have allowed me and my wife to teach without being vaxxed. We have also refused to submit to the weekly testing. So far they have not bothered me about it. I also refuse to wear the mask when teaching and allow my students to take off their masks in class, so far nobody has complained. But two of the other math teachers have already quit this month. If they fire me they will be short 3 math teachers.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Travis

    No problem. We'll just replace you with new math teachers from Somalia. And we'll have your most advanced students counting on their fingers in no time.

    , @JMcG
    @Travis

    Ireland is 90% vaccinated. Not close to being back to normal.

  12. Well the 1973 New York Mets finished 82-79 and they beat a MUCH BETTER Cincinnati Reds team that finished 99-63. Hell, the AL Championship I talked about earlier where the Cleveland Indians beat Baltimore was another example of the lesser team winning in a short series. The O’s finished 1997 with a record of 98-64 but lost in 6 games to the Indians who sported a record of 86-75. Hell, the O’s had 96 wins to KC’s 89 wins and lost in that championship series. And look at the Giants who beat the Pats in not one but two Super Bowls. Once the playoffs start everyone is 0-0. Those are the breaks. Look at the 1988 Dodgers who beat Oakland. No way were the Dodgers the better team. The A’s won 104 games to the Dodgers 94.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Trinity

    The Orioles choked so badly in that series. In Game 6 they stranded 15 runners and were something like 0-20 with RISP. They would’ve destroyed the Marlins in the WS…at least I think so who knows. The Orioles should have at least 7 World Series but have only managed a measly 3. Earl Weaver only has 1 FFS!

    Replies: @Trinity

    , @Johnny789
    @Trinity

    The Indians didn’t really try that hard in the regular season that year. Their division was easy to win so they took it easy because they didn’t want to go into the Playoffs worn down after they had lost the last two years.

  13. Where will they play the World Series?

    I mean – if they’re being consistent in their standards from the All-Star game… you gotta cancel because Georgia and Texas are so racist. MLB needs to find a neutral site outside of these racist states. Will any state allow the team from Atlanta to play, despite their hateful tomahawk chop and offensive name ? How can MLB tolerate the Braves continued mocking of Native Americans?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Travis


    Where will they play the World Series?
     
    How about that bastion of free speech, Cuba?
    , @guest007
    @Travis

    the punishment will come with the very low TV rating. Out of all of the major league sports, baseball TV ratings are the most dependent on who is in the world series. Most people are not baseball fans as much as fans of the local team when the local team is winning.

    And the Atlanta team does even play in Atlanta but in a suburb that sold its soul to get the team to move there.

    , @Trinity
    @Travis

    Braves = Not offensive. Actually flattering.

    Seminoles = Okay.

    Chiefs = Okay.

    Indians = Sounded Okay to me? WTF?

    Redskins = ? Okay, I am the last person to be accused of being politically correct but I actually see a point on this one. Would be kind of like calling the Minnesota team the Minnesota Pale Faces instead of Vikings or calling the Detroit Lions something like the Detroit Hoodrats.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @G. Poulin, @Brutusale

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @Travis

    Travis, great comment. Where are the wokesters?

  14. @SFG
    OT, but I would like to signal-boost this within the dissident right.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/how-do-you-make-7-million-workers-disappear/620475/

    The elites are starting to worry about the 'labor shortage' and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.

    "What's abundantly clear is that America needs more workers." Yeah, God forbid wages start to rise.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @Travis, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Reg Cæsar

    The worker shortage/supply chain disruption is definitely starting to hurt. Industrial production was down 1.3%. The decline was not caused by a lack of demand but supply issues.

    IP was also revised down for early months.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Worker shortage, huh. I guess it makes sense—given that we lost over ten million of our fellow citizens in the prime of their lives, due to the covid epidemic. Hold on, someone's handing me a note..

  15. In the Eastern and Central time zones it’s fun to go out after attending a nighttime sporting event because there are sporting events from the west coast to occupy you. On the west coast it’s boring as hell to go out after a game at say Staples Center at night because everything else is done.

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Johnny789

    And if you live out west and your team is on a road trip back east, you've got to deal with games starting at 10 AM --- way too early in the day to be thinking sports, unless beer is your breakfast of champions

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Johnny789


    In the Eastern and Central time zones it’s fun to go out after attending a nighttime sporting event because there are sporting events from the west coast to occupy you.
     
    On TV. You call that "going out"?

    On the west coast it’s boring as hell to go out after a game at say Staples Center at night because everything else is done.
     
    Not the nightlife. Or is LA another SLC?

    Besides, day games in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would start about that time.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    , @Marty T
    @Johnny789

    I love being out at a bar at 2 or even 3 am and some Pac12 game is still going.

  16. Are the Astros any good?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Gamecock

    Gamecock, at cheating.

    , @theMann
    @Gamecock

    They are going to their 3rd WS in five seasons.


    Any team starting with Altuve, Correa, and Bregman at 2B-SS-3B is, pitching aside, better than any other team in the Majors; and looking at their 5 year run differential they already qualify as one of the best teams in ML history.


    And the really astounding part is that the Astros organization built through the draft, which is usually a stupendous crapshoot.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  17. Yes, the Giants-Dodgers race was great. Seems like both teams pushed themselves to the subsequent detriment of both.

    The playoff structure is OK . I like the wildcard single game, but all series MUST. BE. SEVEN. GAMES.

    And adjust the regular season (more double headers???) for a mid October World Series. An early November storm will make Fenway, Yankee Stadium or some northern city a snowy joke – it’s only a matter of time.

    And implement a pitching clock – the baseball gods be damned.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @mikeInThe716

    Agree with regards to the remaining playoffs but I think a single wild card game is more appropriate to the NFL, where the number of regular season games pale in comparison to MLB. A single game play off should only be utilized in a case where two teams are tied at the end of the regular season; otherwise, I think the wild card should be best of three.

    , @Magic Dirt Resident
    @mikeInThe716

    Yes, definitely agree about all series being seven games. It's unfair that division winners like the Giants and Rays can be eliminated in five games. Could go back to a 154 game regular season to shorten it up by ten or so days. Something has to be done about the constant pitching changes. It's so boring seeing a low scoring game in which both teams use 7-8 pitchers. I also wish more players would hit against the shift like Bellinger did on his RBI single last night.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @mikeInThe716


    An early November storm will make Fenway, Yankee Stadium or some northern city a snowy joke – it’s only a matter of time.
     
    The late, unlamented Metrodome had a game snowed out in its opening week. The field playing surface was untouched, but nobody could get downtown for the game.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  18. Sailer #REKT

    as all black team defeats the dodgers and newsome bans golf courses amidst drought and climate change.

    ” Im going to have to take a break and rethink some of my, did you ever notice schtick ” he was heard muttering as he exited a midrange restaurant in Irvine

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Anonymous

    Not likely there, TD. Irvine is about sixty miles from where Steve lives and can be about a two hour drive each way, sometimes even on a weekend depending on how screwed up the freeways are from the perpetual expansion work.

  19. What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm?

    To paraphrase a letter I once saw from Jeff Bezos on the topic of profits, sleep is for p*ssies. But on the topic of operating hours, there are many other markets open in the world while financial types of “the city that never sleeps” are tucked into their suburban or uptown beds.

  20. The Dodgers were obviously done after the Giants series; that they even won two games against the Braves was testament to how talented and good they really were. Roberts is a very mediocre manager, as are almost all in MLB nowadays, and by not having key pieces of their team at crucial times, as well as using up the bullpen for lefty-righty matchups, their chances of coming back dried up. The Braves may have only had 88 wins, but the NL East is tough and those teams beats each other up all season long; even the Marlins play tough games, especially in Miami. There are no walkovers. I’d be surprised if the World Series doesn’t go at least six games and I’d also be surprised if the Braves didn’t beat the Astros. We see this all the time.

  21. @YM
    Fu*k Rob Manfred. Georgia vs Texas, I love it

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Marty T

    Atlanta cannot lose really. Even if the Astros win all the Braves’ fans will accuse them of cheating. : )

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    If so, the 'Stros brought it on themselves.

  22. So Steve

    I’m at my favorite bakery this morning in bucolic Wainscott and I’m waiting on line and I ask out loud:

    “Hey..has Alec been in this morning?”….and some wisenheimer says:”No…Alec is busy talking to his lawyers at home in Amagansett”….I can’t imagine why on a Sunday Morning Alec would be talking to his Lawyers on a beautiful Fall Day….I hope it’s nothing serious……

    • LOL: Lurker
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @War for Blair Mountain

    https://i.ibb.co/ys1RqhW/jDlSf5vT.jpg

    [In case anyone's missed it]

    Replies: @Goddard, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  23. …depriving the West of a great pennant race.

    Depriving the entire National League of a great pennant race. There was no excuse for any other participants to look forward to a postseason. And had the Giants and Dodgers been in different “divisions”, there would have been no race at all, just two blowouts.

    Either the best teams are in the same division, and the others are pointless (2021, 1987), or they are in different divisions, and there is no race (2014, 2013). Or both (2018).The underlying problem is the division of the league into bogus minileagues. It’s bush. (Almost literally– look up “Shaughnessy playoffs”.) It’s tolerable in football because of the small number of games and an unbalanced schedule.

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @Reg Cæsar


    Depriving the entire National League of a great pennant race.
     
    But, sir, it was a MAGNIFICENT pennant race. Amazing. Historic.

    Says Gamecock, giddy as a schoolgirl.
  24. I spent a year and a half until last spring working at an Extremely Large Online Retailer’s fulfillment center, until transferring to one of their much smaller facilities because it was a lot less driving. Most of the time I worked three nights a week from 6pm to 6am. I was in the Eastern time zone, the importance of which will soon be apparent.

    On a screen at my workstation I was able to compare my performance in real time, which in my process area was measured in terms of units per hour stowed, to the other people performing the same function in my workgroup (usually ~25), in the building (~100), and nationwide (~5,000). One thing I kept noticing is that later in my shift, especially after 2am or so, my performance would be in the top 25% to 30% in the workgroup and building but not even close to being in the top half nationwide.* It took me a while to realize it was because the people in the Pacific time zone, where the company has many fulfillment centers, were three hours earlier into their shifts at more reasonable times of the night. Of course they’d be performing better.

    * = although the managers would keep reminding everyone of “production standards” you’d have to be in the top 10% to meet them, and low production would only become a potential problem if you were in the bottom 3% for the building.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @prosa123

    Spent 5 seconds

    TLDR

  25. “don’t grasp that under a most-wins system of seeding the Dodgers would have shut down with about ten days to go rather than fight Giants to the bitter end, depriving the West of a great pennant race. ”

    Like in 1951, when BRK was 13.5 games ahead of NY in August, which ended in a spectacular pennant race finish for the NL.

    “What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 PM?”

    You’ll have to ask Zuckerberg and Oprah about that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The excitement never ended for this guy:


    Miracle Ball: My Hunt for the Shot Heard 'Round the World

    It's a gripping read, so I won't spoil it, other than to say the ball is in California today, not far from the Giants. A TV documentary was made from the book, too.


    Notice the number at left fielder Andy Pafko's feet-- 315.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @Ganderson
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    There was a pretty good episode of MASH wrapped around the ‘51 pennant race.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  26. Regional prejudices are just as strong as Class prejudices.

    Two Southern teams in the World Series.

    Get over it.

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @Trinity
    @theMann

    I never really considered Texas a true Southern state though. Big difference between the Deep South and Texas. And there is a big difference between Atlanta and Dallas, never been to Htown, so cannot comment on that one. Texas is much more of a Western state. Okies from Oklahoma? I almost consider them closer to Kansans and Nebraskans and Texans are not about to claim Oklahoma in no way, shape or form.

  27. The big loser in all this is Fox Sports. With the Yankees out of the picture as a result of that stupid “one and done” wild card arrangement, that left only two big-market, so called “national” teams: the Dodgers and the Red Sox, with Fox panting for either a WS pitting the two v. each other or, alternatively, a WS featuring one of the two. Both have been eliminated. The one good thing that can come of all this is that they turn the Wild Card into a best-of-three series. In the meantime–Houston v. Atlanta? Outside of Houston and Atlanta, who cares?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Prester John


    With the Yankees out of the picture as a result of that stupid “one and done” wild card arrangement...
     
    There weren't too few such games, but one too many. The Yanks and Sox were eight games out. To the showers, to dream of next season.
    , @Peterike
    @Prester John

    “ In the meantime–Houston v. Atlanta? Outside of Houston and Atlanta, who cares?”

    Actual Americans.

  28. @Emil Nikola Richard
    @YM

    Atlanta cannot lose really. Even if the Astros win all the Braves' fans will accuse them of cheating. : )

    Replies: @Prester John

    If so, the ‘Stros brought it on themselves.

  29. Sports are an interesting example of how electronic communications has reimposed the tyranny of distance due to time zones. Highest viewership is right before going to bed, so SouthEastern Conference night games have the most viewers, Pacific 12 night games the fewest.

    An interesting quirk – it’s probably the case that the television exposure of SEC football has granted it an advantage in recruiting, which makes SEC games better competition, better competition with better players attracts more NFL scouting interest, etc. creating a reinforcing effect.

    The only thing rivaling the spectacle high level of SEC play to me is late season BIG10 night games and the chance that in places like Madison/Ann Arbor/Happy Valley that you will get some snowfall to create that snow globe effect.

    When I was a kid, it was widely assumed that, due to electronic communication, elite workers would soon move to Hawaii to enjoy the paradisiacal climate and beauty. But, perhaps due to time zones, that didn’t happen: e.g., NY Stock Exchange opens at 3:30 AM in Honolulu.

    What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm?

    I think already being rich in Hawaii is a better plan than grinding to get rich in Hawaii. It’s a strange place in a lot of respects, where even the young East Asians don’t seem overly motivated. Hawaii is basically the only thing I’ve seen capable of corrupting the try-hard, monotony loving nature of East Asians to the extent that they become sort of like normal Americans.

    Bermuda would seem like a better choice for someone who still needs to have his head “in the game” so to speak while enjoying a subtropical environment. You’ve got an hour head start on the East Coast of the United States. And it has quietly become something of a hub in the reinsurance industry. The traditional Bermudan business dress says it all:

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Bermuda has been a big reinsurance industry hub for a while now--I think "quietly" only because nobody thinks much about reinsurance. Anyway, yeah: a good friend now runs a big reinsurer, but for many years when he was slightly lower on the chart he had to go to Bermuda a lot.

  30. @mikeInThe716
    Yes, the Giants-Dodgers race was great. Seems like both teams pushed themselves to the subsequent detriment of both.

    The playoff structure is OK . I like the wildcard single game, but all series MUST. BE. SEVEN. GAMES.

    And adjust the regular season (more double headers???) for a mid October World Series. An early November storm will make Fenway, Yankee Stadium or some northern city a snowy joke - it's only a matter of time.

    And implement a pitching clock - the baseball gods be damned.

    Replies: @Prester John, @Magic Dirt Resident, @Reg Cæsar

    Agree with regards to the remaining playoffs but I think a single wild card game is more appropriate to the NFL, where the number of regular season games pale in comparison to MLB. A single game play off should only be utilized in a case where two teams are tied at the end of the regular season; otherwise, I think the wild card should be best of three.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  31. @SFG
    OT, but I would like to signal-boost this within the dissident right.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/how-do-you-make-7-million-workers-disappear/620475/

    The elites are starting to worry about the 'labor shortage' and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.

    "What's abundantly clear is that America needs more workers." Yeah, God forbid wages start to rise.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @Travis, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Reg Cæsar

    The elites are starting to worry about the ‘labor shortage’ and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.

    When did they stop the last push for more immigration?

    They’re always pushing for more immigration, but like a 12 year old boy who wants a puppy they serially employ any facile reason closest at hand.

    Spicy ethic food > who we are > jobs Americans won’t do > America is too stale and pale > rinse/repeat.

    “The duopoly wants cut-rate labor to keep wages down and more clients for the identity welfare spoils state” isn’t a runaway electoral winner just yet.

    • Agree: Polistra
  32. Y’all on the West Coast get to watch football at 10 in the morning on Sunday, quit complaining.

  33. @prosa123
    I spent a year and a half until last spring working at an Extremely Large Online Retailer's fulfillment center, until transferring to one of their much smaller facilities because it was a lot less driving. Most of the time I worked three nights a week from 6pm to 6am. I was in the Eastern time zone, the importance of which will soon be apparent.

    On a screen at my workstation I was able to compare my performance in real time, which in my process area was measured in terms of units per hour stowed, to the other people performing the same function in my workgroup (usually ~25), in the building (~100), and nationwide (~5,000). One thing I kept noticing is that later in my shift, especially after 2am or so, my performance would be in the top 25% to 30% in the workgroup and building but not even close to being in the top half nationwide.* It took me a while to realize it was because the people in the Pacific time zone, where the company has many fulfillment centers, were three hours earlier into their shifts at more reasonable times of the night. Of course they'd be performing better.

    * = although the managers would keep reminding everyone of "production standards" you'd have to be in the top 10% to meet them, and low production would only become a potential problem if you were in the bottom 3% for the building.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Spent 5 seconds

    TLDR

  34. @Travis
    Where will they play the World Series?

    I mean - if they’re being consistent in their standards from the All-Star game… you gotta cancel because Georgia and Texas are so racist. MLB needs to find a neutral site outside of these racist states. Will any state allow the team from Atlanta to play, despite their hateful tomahawk chop and offensive name ? How can MLB tolerate the Braves continued mocking of Native Americans?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @guest007, @Trinity, @Buffalo Joe

    Where will they play the World Series?

    How about that bastion of free speech, Cuba?

  35. As Chico Escuela once said, “Béisbol been berry berry good to me.”

  36. @SFG
    OT, but I would like to signal-boost this within the dissident right.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/how-do-you-make-7-million-workers-disappear/620475/

    The elites are starting to worry about the 'labor shortage' and are going to use this to make another push for more immigration.

    "What's abundantly clear is that America needs more workers." Yeah, God forbid wages start to rise.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong, @Travis, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Alec Leamas (hard at work), @Reg Cæsar

    A hymn we sang at Mass today contains the lyric

    The harvest is plenty, laborers are few.
    Come with me into the fields.

    With this interesting final verse:

    The seeds were sown by other hands than yours;
    nurtured and cared for they grew.
    But those who have sown will not harvest them;
    the reaping will not be their care.

    http://choirmusicpage.blogspot.com/2017/04/come-with-me-into-fields.html

  37. But, perhaps due to time zones, that didn’t happen: e.g., NY Stock Exchange opens at 3:30 AM in Honolulu.

    Even in the Mountain zone, this was an inconvenience, the Exchange opening at 7:30 MST. Guys had to get up pretty early and have their morning meetings before that time.

    Now with the whole world a market, you have to be an insomniac and keep UR and iSteve on tabs…

  38. @Travis
    Where will they play the World Series?

    I mean - if they’re being consistent in their standards from the All-Star game… you gotta cancel because Georgia and Texas are so racist. MLB needs to find a neutral site outside of these racist states. Will any state allow the team from Atlanta to play, despite their hateful tomahawk chop and offensive name ? How can MLB tolerate the Braves continued mocking of Native Americans?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @guest007, @Trinity, @Buffalo Joe

    the punishment will come with the very low TV rating. Out of all of the major league sports, baseball TV ratings are the most dependent on who is in the world series. Most people are not baseball fans as much as fans of the local team when the local team is winning.

    And the Atlanta team does even play in Atlanta but in a suburb that sold its soul to get the team to move there.

  39. The West Coast problem is just not for finance businesses. Several speciality technical companies are on the west coast. To do business with customers on the East Coast, they open earlier in local time to be able to deal with customers. No customer wants to wait until 12:00 noon for a company to start answer their phones or replying to emails.

  40. What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm?

    How about we shut down the casino and just have the market open once per day–at say 4 pm Eastern?

    The financial folks interested in analyzing the days news have all day to assess the day’s news, then put in their bids/trades by 4 pm. Then at 4:05 you run “market” and resolve all the resolvable trades.

    Throw in a 1/2 percent asset transaction tax–a non-issue for actual investors–to throw some sand in the gears and push down speculation, high frequency trading, etc. etc.

    These people aren’t drilling for oil or building rocket engines or developing new battery technology or the thorium cycle or new cancer treatments.

    The point of having a financial sector is to provide capital to actually productive business, encourage entrepreneurship and provide a way for people to buy a share of the productive economy (and it’s future profit streams) with their savings. Beyond that it’s speculative b.s. and rent collection.

    There. Now the rich people in Hawaii can sleep in.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @AnotherDad

    Dad- you’re spot on. Way too many of the really smart kids I’ve taught go into finance- not enough into manufacturing, engineering, etc

  41. “What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 PM?”

    When you are actually “rich” you don’t have to work and can keep whatever hours suit you.

    Of course many people we think of as rich (and are) are still working, running businesses, making deals, overseeing investments and property, etc. Many are rich because they’ve always worked hard and pay attention.

    Once you step off that treadmill, you let others worry about the details. Of course phone calls, texts, etc. tend to need real time congruence.

    When I vacationed in Hawaii (a long time ago, unfortunately) I was somewhat surprised at how the locals all had this early morning orientation. Not because tourists needed or wanted that, but because the Real World (in the US) demanded attendance for the non tourist/local interactions.

    iSteve’s comments about sporting events and interest, based on time zone occurrence, is on point. Also even now (when there is no real need for that) most major US media are east coast/NYC oriented even though that is now only about 25% or less of the population. DC is in the Eastern Time Zone as is the NYSE. I have never (other than visits) lived in the Eastern Time Zone and it was interesting to note that “local news” there starts at 11 PM, not 10 or earlier. Broadcast TV is also “later” there than it is elsewhere, though intentionally delayed in the west.

    I think in part of the Stalin era in the USSR, they had the entire country on a single “time zone” though that meant you might be eating breakfast at midnight. I believe they eventually changed that though I suspect in the far east of Russia things are still pretty screwed up.

    There are current plans for a 24 hour daily US based electronic stock trading platform to be implemented. 24 hour trading is now possible using foreign exchanges but not many use it.

    Ignoring body clock/time is unhealthy and very stressful. Another way mankind is killing itself.

    • Replies: @CJ
    @Muggles

    I don’t know if the Soviet Union ever used a single time zone, but China - which is wider than the 48 contiguous states of the USA - did and does.

    https://www.timeanddate.com/time/zone/china

  42. “ What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm”

    Really rich people don’t have to get up early for the markets or anything else for that matter. I know few islanders who are big spectator sports people and those that are become HS sports enthusiasts. My sense of the Hawaiian attitude is why watch when you can do. I never watch tv when there.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Curle

    Hawaii is an NFL oriented place since it comes on Sunday morning. The sports bars do Sunday brunch with their NFL. Monday night football was an adventure in Hawaii when it was on ABC because it was live on the radio but delayed on TV (the game started at 06:30 local time on TV). With Monday Night football being on ESPN, the interest is just not there because it starts while people are still at work.

    Very few basketball or baseball fans in Hawaii because cannot be watched live.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Tony massey

    , @Ganderson
    @Curle

    In Ball Four Bouton pitched for the Seattle Pilots, whose AAA club was Honolulu. He observed the following: you get sent down, and 6 weeks later you’re called back up. What if you don’t wanna go?

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  43. @mikeInThe716
    Yes, the Giants-Dodgers race was great. Seems like both teams pushed themselves to the subsequent detriment of both.

    The playoff structure is OK . I like the wildcard single game, but all series MUST. BE. SEVEN. GAMES.

    And adjust the regular season (more double headers???) for a mid October World Series. An early November storm will make Fenway, Yankee Stadium or some northern city a snowy joke - it's only a matter of time.

    And implement a pitching clock - the baseball gods be damned.

    Replies: @Prester John, @Magic Dirt Resident, @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, definitely agree about all series being seven games. It’s unfair that division winners like the Giants and Rays can be eliminated in five games. Could go back to a 154 game regular season to shorten it up by ten or so days. Something has to be done about the constant pitching changes. It’s so boring seeing a low scoring game in which both teams use 7-8 pitchers. I also wish more players would hit against the shift like Bellinger did on his RBI single last night.

  44. “Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game”

    Back in 1967 the Big Game was On Oct. 1 in Fenway Park between the Red Sox with Jim Lonborg & the MN Twins with Dean Chance – both 20 game winners – to decide the AL pennant in what amounted to an unofficial league playoff; even though, mercifully, they didn’t have a playoff format in big league baseball then. The playoffs are just a money-spinner anyway; the World Serious is where it’s at. The game was simpler then, the seats were cheap (\$1.00 to sit in the bleachers in Fenway), & the players were regular guys making worker’s wages. Ah, those were the days, when America (& Baseball) were still great again.

  45. Oh my god, who the hell cares.

  46. @Travis
    Where will they play the World Series?

    I mean - if they’re being consistent in their standards from the All-Star game… you gotta cancel because Georgia and Texas are so racist. MLB needs to find a neutral site outside of these racist states. Will any state allow the team from Atlanta to play, despite their hateful tomahawk chop and offensive name ? How can MLB tolerate the Braves continued mocking of Native Americans?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @guest007, @Trinity, @Buffalo Joe

    Braves = Not offensive. Actually flattering.

    Seminoles = Okay.

    Chiefs = Okay.

    Indians = Sounded Okay to me? WTF?

    Redskins = ? Okay, I am the last person to be accused of being politically correct but I actually see a point on this one. Would be kind of like calling the Minnesota team the Minnesota Pale Faces instead of Vikings or calling the Detroit Lions something like the Detroit Hoodrats.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Trinity

    Don't forget the Baltimore Bullets, another team name that was deemed too offensive, or too deadly accurate. St Johns Redmen, even the Hofstra Flying Dutchmen, also gone here in NY

    Replies: @Trinity

    , @G. Poulin
    @Trinity

    There's a team in Hartford called the Yard Goats. "Hood Rats" would be an improvement.

    , @Brutusale
    @Trinity

    The Massachusetts Turnpike changed logos back in 1989 due to a letter campaign instigated by a moonbat teacher in central Massachusetts complaining that it was offensive to feather Indians.

    Old logo:
    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alpsroads.net%2Froads%2Fma%2Fi-90%2Farrow.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

    New logo:
    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.alpsroads.net%2Froads%2Fma%2Fi-90%2Fe.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

    I dunno, if I'm a local Nipmuc or Wampanoag, I would prefer the logo that shows my ancestors fought back!

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  47. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "don’t grasp that under a most-wins system of seeding the Dodgers would have shut down with about ten days to go rather than fight Giants to the bitter end, depriving the West of a great pennant race. "

    Like in 1951, when BRK was 13.5 games ahead of NY in August, which ended in a spectacular pennant race finish for the NL.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxzEC4ZH8DI






    "What's the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 PM?"

    You'll have to ask Zuckerberg and Oprah about that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ganderson

    The excitement never ended for this guy:

    Miracle Ball: My Hunt for the Shot Heard ‘Round the World

    It’s a gripping read, so I won’t spoil it, other than to say the ball is in California today, not far from the Giants. A TV documentary was made from the book, too.

    Notice the number at left fielder Andy Pafko’s feet– 315.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    Notice the number at left fielder Andy Pafko’s feet– 315.


    Since the game was played at the Polo Grounds, that was what one of LF's poweralleys was, 315 FT.

    The rest of the Polo Grounds poweralleys:

    Left Center 1 360 ft
    Left Center 2 414 ft
    Deep Left Center 447 ft
    Deep Left Center 455 ft

    CF was of course 483 FT

    I have asked Steve quite a few times, why exactly modern MLB stadiums today don't have these types of poweralleys. Apparently even 360 FT is considered a bit of a stretch to expect HR sluggers to consistently reach.

    Let's see MLB HR sluggers today hit with poweralleys that average 440 FT. NOT CF straightaway, but the poweralleys, where the bulk of about 95% of all HR sluggers tend to hit their HR's--in the poweralleys (That's why they're so named, where the slugger's power blasts tend to land based on curve projection of their swings, that's where the ball tends to land). Most HR sluggers don't have a compact swing enough to actually peck the ball at the foul poles. That's not how power hitters tend to hit the ball. Big wide swings that tend to go for the poweralleys.


    LF, straightaway LF at the foul pole was 279 FT, also known as a "Chinese Home Run". RF was 258 FT.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  48. If you have not read it already, get your hands on a copy of the Roaring 2000’s by a Harry S. Dent. Back during what we would now recognize as the Dotcom Bubble, he was on a similar “where will the elite knowledge workers go now bcs of technology?” quest. Obviously things didn’t work out quite the way he envisioned …

    It would be interesting to know how many of the places he identified are now Zoom Towns (Zoom Town is the title of the Wikipedia article, if the term is unfamiliar)

  49. What effect did this pennant race have on Scherzer’s arm? He said it was “dead.”

  50. @Reg Cæsar

    ...depriving the West of a great pennant race.
     
    Depriving the entire National League of a great pennant race. There was no excuse for any other participants to look forward to a postseason. And had the Giants and Dodgers been in different "divisions", there would have been no race at all, just two blowouts.

    Either the best teams are in the same division, and the others are pointless (2021, 1987), or they are in different divisions, and there is no race (2014, 2013). Or both (2018).The underlying problem is the division of the league into bogus minileagues. It's bush. (Almost literally-- look up "Shaughnessy playoffs".) It's tolerable in football because of the small number of games and an unbalanced schedule.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    Depriving the entire National League of a great pennant race.

    But, sir, it was a MAGNIFICENT pennant race. Amazing. Historic.

    Says Gamecock, giddy as a schoolgirl.

  51. @Travis
    Where will they play the World Series?

    I mean - if they’re being consistent in their standards from the All-Star game… you gotta cancel because Georgia and Texas are so racist. MLB needs to find a neutral site outside of these racist states. Will any state allow the team from Atlanta to play, despite their hateful tomahawk chop and offensive name ? How can MLB tolerate the Braves continued mocking of Native Americans?

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @guest007, @Trinity, @Buffalo Joe

    Travis, great comment. Where are the wokesters?

  52. @Gamecock
    Are the Astros any good?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @theMann

    Gamecock, at cheating.

  53. And the sports Cucks get all in a lather! There’s nothing they love more than cheering for their BBCs (big black champions).

  54. @Travis
    @SFG

    As soon as we get 90% fully vaccinated things will get back to normal.....

    People hate wearing with masks at work. I would have quit my job in September due to the stupid mask mandates but i found a mesh mask with holes big enough to allow Mosquitoes to fly thru, but they may fire me soon anyway for being unvaccinated. Wondering why they have allowed me and my wife to teach without being vaxxed. We have also refused to submit to the weekly testing. So far they have not bothered me about it. I also refuse to wear the mask when teaching and allow my students to take off their masks in class, so far nobody has complained. But two of the other math teachers have already quit this month. If they fire me they will be short 3 math teachers.

    Replies: @Polistra, @JMcG

    No problem. We’ll just replace you with new math teachers from Somalia. And we’ll have your most advanced students counting on their fingers in no time.

  55. @Known Fact
    Sports like every other media topic is east-coast-centric and Eastern Time Zone-centric. Six inches of snow in the Beltway equals the entire state of Kansas getting incinerated a la The Day After. Imagine the extra outrage Steve would stir living in NY or DC.

    One example: Sports Illustrated did a look-back feature on The Greatest Upset No One's Ever Heard Of -- Chaminade of Hawaii, a teeny-tiny school out there, beat Ralph Sampson's top-ranked Virginia hoopsters in an early season 1982 game that was played at about 3 AM NYC-time, and pre-internet, so almost zero coverage

    Replies: @Danindc, @Peterike

    I was a sports fanatic back then and remember it being a huge deal. That year did have the greatest upset in sports history…which was NC State winning the national title in basketball. They needed to win the ACC tournament just to get into the NCAA’s and won 3 thrillers just to do that. Then they should’ve lost the opener in the NCAA to Fresno State and probably should’ve lost 2-3 more times. Truly amazing run.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Danindc


    [NC State] needed to win the ACC tournament just to get into the NCAA’s and won 3 thrillers just to do that.
     
    Their three wins came by a total of 11 points and the semi against UNC went to OT. However, I think they would have made it anyway as the ACC sent 4 teams (out of 52) that year. Maryland ended up being an 8 seed in the Midwest, while NC State was a 6 out West.

    Then they should’ve lost the opener in the NCAA to Fresno State and probably should’ve lost 2-3 more times.
     
    You could argue they should have lost that opening game (but it was against Dane Suttle and Pepperdine), as well as the regional quarterfinal against Sidney Green and UNLV, the regional final against Ralph Sampson and Virginia, and well as the National Championship against Phi Slama Jama and Houston.

    It is worth noting that they were the first team to have to win 6 games in the NCAA in order to win the title. The following year Georgetown only had to win 5, but it has been 6 ever since.

    Replies: @Danindc

  56. The entire time-zone discussion assumes that viewers will be watching the game in real time. But these days, with so many (intolerable) commercials, don’t many viewers record the game and watch it some other time? And btw, I think a high percent of Unz commenters stopped watching pro sports a long time ago because the players became insufferable; I have seen many comments to that effect, on various sites.

  57. @Gamecock
    Are the Astros any good?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @theMann

    They are going to their 3rd WS in five seasons.

    Any team starting with Altuve, Correa, and Bregman at 2B-SS-3B is, pitching aside, better than any other team in the Majors; and looking at their 5 year run differential they already qualify as one of the best teams in ML history.

    And the really astounding part is that the Astros organization built through the draft, which is usually a stupendous crapshoot.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @theMann

    Altuve was an undrafted free agent. He cost the Astros $15,000.

  58. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @SFG

    The worker shortage/supply chain disruption is definitely starting to hurt. Industrial production was down 1.3%. The decline was not caused by a lack of demand but supply issues.

    IP was also revised down for early months.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Worker shortage, huh. I guess it makes sense—given that we lost over ten million of our fellow citizens in the prime of their lives, due to the covid epidemic. Hold on, someone’s handing me a note..

  59. @Trinity
    Well the 1973 New York Mets finished 82-79 and they beat a MUCH BETTER Cincinnati Reds team that finished 99-63. Hell, the AL Championship I talked about earlier where the Cleveland Indians beat Baltimore was another example of the lesser team winning in a short series. The O's finished 1997 with a record of 98-64 but lost in 6 games to the Indians who sported a record of 86-75. Hell, the O's had 96 wins to KC's 89 wins and lost in that championship series. And look at the Giants who beat the Pats in not one but two Super Bowls. Once the playoffs start everyone is 0-0. Those are the breaks. Look at the 1988 Dodgers who beat Oakland. No way were the Dodgers the better team. The A's won 104 games to the Dodgers 94.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Johnny789

    The Orioles choked so badly in that series. In Game 6 they stranded 15 runners and were something like 0-20 with RISP. They would’ve destroyed the Marlins in the WS…at least I think so who knows. The Orioles should have at least 7 World Series but have only managed a measly 3. Earl Weaver only has 1 FFS!

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @Trinity
    @Danindc

    I think the O's should be 4-2 in the World Series. Yep, they should have went on to the World Series against the Marlins in 1997, and the Giants in 2014, I don't see them beating the Giants in 2014 though. So that would put the O's at 4-4. All 3 of the Orioles losses in World Series play came against teams they should have beat easily, they choked both times against the inferior Pirates and lost to the pathetic Miracle Mets. Ironically, they should not have beaten the Dodgers in 1966 or the Reds in 1970. Take away the two chokes against Pittsburgh and that puts them at a pretty good hypothetical series record of 6-2 which isn't exactly the Yankees or Cardinals but still not bad. And lest we forget the O's won 100 games in 1980 and didn't even make it to the playoffs. They finished 3 games behind the Yankees that year. Was a sucessful franchise for decades, but now, not so much.

    Replies: @Danindc

  60. @War for Blair Mountain
    So Steve

    I’m at my favorite bakery this morning in bucolic Wainscott and I’m waiting on line and I ask out loud:

    “Hey..has Alec been in this morning?”….and some wisenheimer says:”No…Alec is busy talking to his lawyers at home in Amagansett”….I can’t imagine why on a Sunday Morning Alec would be talking to his Lawyers on a beautiful Fall Day….I hope it’s nothing serious……

    Replies: @Polistra

    [In case anyone’s missed it]

    • Replies: @Goddard
    @Polistra

    Put that fucker Baldwin in jail.

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Polistra

    And now he knows. Would this qualify as involuntary manslaughter?

  61. @Hapalong Cassidy
    Kind of falls into the “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” category. Given the random nature of baseball relative to other sports, it made no sense to add a second wild card team and have a play-in game. It just served to further devalue the regular season. The old system was better, with just one wild card team, and that wild card team could not play their division winner in the first round. Under that system, the Dodgers would have played the Brewers in the first round, and the Braves would have played the Giants, with the Brewers and Giants having home field advantage. That would have been the best of both worlds - still recognizing the value of winning divisions, but not totally screwing over the wild card team.

    Replies: @Wade Hampton

    The old system was better,

    I’m with you so far…

    with just one wild card team, and that wild card team could not play their division winner in the first round. Under that system…

    And from there, the author descends further into insanity.

    The old system, the correct system, was that the winner of the National League played a best of seven World Series against the winner of the American League. That’s the system to which we should return. I’m not proposing that we go back to the 1921 and prior best of nine approach. I’m a crazy innovator.

    Let the sports that heathens play like ice hockey and basketball have these goofy multi-tiered playoff schedules. Nobody but commies likes them.

    And the Houston franchise should go back to the NL and change their name back to the Colt 45s.

  62. They started putting West Coast games, especially playoffs, on at around twelve midnight in the early 1970’s. Hardier in our youth, my basketball buddies and I would play during half time out in the driveway, which was equipped with suitable lights.

    Not popular with the neighbors, but we were into it.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=DlhWPVJNAOo

  63. @Curle
    “ What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm”

    Really rich people don’t have to get up early for the markets or anything else for that matter. I know few islanders who are big spectator sports people and those that are become HS sports enthusiasts. My sense of the Hawaiian attitude is why watch when you can do. I never watch tv when there.

    Replies: @guest007, @Ganderson

    Hawaii is an NFL oriented place since it comes on Sunday morning. The sports bars do Sunday brunch with their NFL. Monday night football was an adventure in Hawaii when it was on ABC because it was live on the radio but delayed on TV (the game started at 06:30 local time on TV). With Monday Night football being on ESPN, the interest is just not there because it starts while people are still at work.

    Very few basketball or baseball fans in Hawaii because cannot be watched live.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @guest007

    Do they still have a minor league baseball team in Hawaii? They did in 1970, a good triple A team made up mostly of MLB veterans who'd aged out the big leagues and looked forward to collecting one or two more years paychecks in Hawaii.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @guest007, @ScarletNumber

    , @Tony massey
    @guest007

    I rarely missed a Cardinals game when i lived in the cook islands.
    And of course getting up at 3 am to watch the Vols on Saturday.
    I didn't know a single person that had the slightest interest in any sport save for maybe surfing/paddle boarding or frisbee golf if that is a sport. Nobody cares about sport in the cook islands.
    Watched MLB all the time guy. For some reason the Oakland as and Giants were always on.
    Maholo

    Replies: @guest007

  64. @theMann
    Regional prejudices are just as strong as Class prejudices.

    Two Southern teams in the World Series.


    Get over it.

    Replies: @Trinity

    I never really considered Texas a true Southern state though. Big difference between the Deep South and Texas. And there is a big difference between Atlanta and Dallas, never been to Htown, so cannot comment on that one. Texas is much more of a Western state. Okies from Oklahoma? I almost consider them closer to Kansans and Nebraskans and Texans are not about to claim Oklahoma in no way, shape or form.

  65. @Johnny789
    In the Eastern and Central time zones it’s fun to go out after attending a nighttime sporting event because there are sporting events from the west coast to occupy you. On the west coast it’s boring as hell to go out after a game at say Staples Center at night because everything else is done.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Reg Cæsar, @Marty T

    And if you live out west and your team is on a road trip back east, you’ve got to deal with games starting at 10 AM — way too early in the day to be thinking sports, unless beer is your breakfast of champions

  66. @mikeInThe716
    Yes, the Giants-Dodgers race was great. Seems like both teams pushed themselves to the subsequent detriment of both.

    The playoff structure is OK . I like the wildcard single game, but all series MUST. BE. SEVEN. GAMES.

    And adjust the regular season (more double headers???) for a mid October World Series. An early November storm will make Fenway, Yankee Stadium or some northern city a snowy joke - it's only a matter of time.

    And implement a pitching clock - the baseball gods be damned.

    Replies: @Prester John, @Magic Dirt Resident, @Reg Cæsar

    An early November storm will make Fenway, Yankee Stadium or some northern city a snowy joke – it’s only a matter of time.

    The late, unlamented Metrodome had a game snowed out in its opening week. The field playing surface was untouched, but nobody could get downtown for the game.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Reg Cæsar

    This never happened. AFAIK the only game in Metrodome history to be postponed was on December 12, 2010. The Giants weren't able to fly in to play the Vikings that day due to a blizzard so the game was postponed a day. It ended up being a moot point as the roof collapsed anyway so the game was moved to Detroit.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  67. @Trinity
    @Travis

    Braves = Not offensive. Actually flattering.

    Seminoles = Okay.

    Chiefs = Okay.

    Indians = Sounded Okay to me? WTF?

    Redskins = ? Okay, I am the last person to be accused of being politically correct but I actually see a point on this one. Would be kind of like calling the Minnesota team the Minnesota Pale Faces instead of Vikings or calling the Detroit Lions something like the Detroit Hoodrats.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @G. Poulin, @Brutusale

    Don’t forget the Baltimore Bullets, another team name that was deemed too offensive, or too deadly accurate. St Johns Redmen, even the Hofstra Flying Dutchmen, also gone here in NY

    • Replies: @Trinity
    @Known Fact

    Nah, I can't forget the Baltimore Bullets aka Washington Bullets. I remember Gus Johnson came to my elementary school back in the day. To this day, I think the Baltimore Bullets was one of the coolest names in sports. IF I remember right, I think they changed it due to the fact that Washington became the murder capital of America during the time the team was named the Washington Bullets. Maybe or maybe not, but whether Washington led the nation in murders per capita the term Bullets was a little bit to spot on when describing this more violent than average city at the time. I don't look for declining Baltimore to ever sport 3 BIG LEAGUE teams again any time soon, but during one brief time period Baltimore's teams were almost as good as Tampa's sports franchises now, unless they played a team based out of New York called the Mets, Jets or Knicks. haha. And Earl The Pearl will always be a Baltimore Bullet and not a New York Knick. Knicks and the Bullets had quite the rivalry back long ago.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Danindc, @Reg Cæsar

  68. I don’t get adults being into watching sports, get a life

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
  69. @Reg Cæsar
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    The excitement never ended for this guy:


    Miracle Ball: My Hunt for the Shot Heard 'Round the World

    It's a gripping read, so I won't spoil it, other than to say the ball is in California today, not far from the Giants. A TV documentary was made from the book, too.


    Notice the number at left fielder Andy Pafko's feet-- 315.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Notice the number at left fielder Andy Pafko’s feet– 315.

    Since the game was played at the Polo Grounds, that was what one of LF’s poweralleys was, 315 FT.

    The rest of the Polo Grounds poweralleys:

    Left Center 1 360 ft
    Left Center 2 414 ft
    Deep Left Center 447 ft
    Deep Left Center 455 ft

    CF was of course 483 FT

    I have asked Steve quite a few times, why exactly modern MLB stadiums today don’t have these types of poweralleys. Apparently even 360 FT is considered a bit of a stretch to expect HR sluggers to consistently reach.

    Let’s see MLB HR sluggers today hit with poweralleys that average 440 FT. NOT CF straightaway, but the poweralleys, where the bulk of about 95% of all HR sluggers tend to hit their HR’s–in the poweralleys (That’s why they’re so named, where the slugger’s power blasts tend to land based on curve projection of their swings, that’s where the ball tends to land). Most HR sluggers don’t have a compact swing enough to actually peck the ball at the foul poles. That’s not how power hitters tend to hit the ball. Big wide swings that tend to go for the poweralleys.

    LF, straightaway LF at the foul pole was 279 FT, also known as a “Chinese Home Run”. RF was 258 FT.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Retro ballparks from the most recent turn of the century tend to have irregular outfield fences, in imitation of previous turn of the century ballparks like the Polo Grounds and Fenway Park, unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.

    The SF Giants ballpark, built 20 years ago, is 421 feet to right center to induce more triples and the occasional inside the park home run. The Astros ballpark has some weird features. It used to have a steep hill in deep center, but that was kind of silly and was taken out.

    The new Atlanta stadium is mostly symmetrical but it is slightly shorter to right than to left because lefthanders need even more advantages in baseball than they already have. Or something.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

  70. @Johnny789
    In the Eastern and Central time zones it’s fun to go out after attending a nighttime sporting event because there are sporting events from the west coast to occupy you. On the west coast it’s boring as hell to go out after a game at say Staples Center at night because everything else is done.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Reg Cæsar, @Marty T

    In the Eastern and Central time zones it’s fun to go out after attending a nighttime sporting event because there are sporting events from the west coast to occupy you.

    On TV. You call that “going out”?

    On the west coast it’s boring as hell to go out after a game at say Staples Center at night because everything else is done.

    Not the nightlife. Or is LA another SLC?

    Besides, day games in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would start about that time.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Reg Cæsar

    LA is town known for most of its nightlife shutting down very early given its size. Its due to film/television industry being there; most shooting begins early in the AM as are most casting calls. And looks are mondo important, so showing up looking tired can kill a tryout or a scene. Not so in NYC.

    Yes, the pretty people and those in the know can find an after-hours spot, but LA is mostly dead after dark due to the industry.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  71. Back in the 1960s and 70s it might have seemed the center of the country was shifting to California, so there’s that too. Then in the 1980s New York roared back financially with Wall Street and then in 1990s it became safe to live there again, so that tends to obscure why East Coast Bias is still a thing.

    But Steve: why are you deliberately watching sports? They are kneeling for the fanthem and the flag and whining about racism while making zillions. Spitting in your face and your children’s faces while trolling you. And you’re helping them earn \$\$\$\$!

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @prosa123
    @R.G. Camara

    Back in the 1960s and 70s it might have seemed the center of the country was shifting to California, so there’s that too. Then in the 1980s New York roared back financially with Wall Street and then in 1990s it became safe to live there again, so that tends to obscure why East Coast Bias is still a thing.

    Today, especially with Covid, it seems as if the center of the country's economy and spirit is in the Dallas-Austin-Houston triangle, in other words in the Central time zone.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

  72. @YM
    Fu*k Rob Manfred. Georgia vs Texas, I love it

    Replies: @Emil Nikola Richard, @Marty T

    I think a lot of conservatives who didn’t watch baseball this season are rooting for the Braves, not just due to the all-star game but they also do the very non PC tomahawk chop.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Marty T

    The Indian song that Braves fans sing sounds really fun to do in a stadium with 40,000 other people singing it at the tops of their lungs.

    Replies: @Gamecock

  73. @Reg Cæsar
    @Johnny789


    In the Eastern and Central time zones it’s fun to go out after attending a nighttime sporting event because there are sporting events from the west coast to occupy you.
     
    On TV. You call that "going out"?

    On the west coast it’s boring as hell to go out after a game at say Staples Center at night because everything else is done.
     
    Not the nightlife. Or is LA another SLC?

    Besides, day games in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would start about that time.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    LA is town known for most of its nightlife shutting down very early given its size. Its due to film/television industry being there; most shooting begins early in the AM as are most casting calls. And looks are mondo important, so showing up looking tired can kill a tryout or a scene. Not so in NYC.

    Yes, the pretty people and those in the know can find an after-hours spot, but LA is mostly dead after dark due to the industry.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Los Angeles is America's least expected early to bed, early to rise town.

    Replies: @Corn, @R.G. Camara

  74. @Prester John
    The big loser in all this is Fox Sports. With the Yankees out of the picture as a result of that stupid "one and done" wild card arrangement, that left only two big-market, so called "national" teams: the Dodgers and the Red Sox, with Fox panting for either a WS pitting the two v. each other or, alternatively, a WS featuring one of the two. Both have been eliminated. The one good thing that can come of all this is that they turn the Wild Card into a best-of-three series. In the meantime--Houston v. Atlanta? Outside of Houston and Atlanta, who cares?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Peterike

    With the Yankees out of the picture as a result of that stupid “one and done” wild card arrangement…

    There weren’t too few such games, but one too many. The Yanks and Sox were eight games out. To the showers, to dream of next season.

  75. Meet the Mets, meet the Mets, step right up and greet the Mets!

  76. @Anonymous
    Sailer #REKT

    as all black team defeats the dodgers and newsome bans golf courses amidst drought and climate change.


    " Im going to have to take a break and rethink some of my, did you ever notice schtick " he was heard muttering as he exited a midrange restaurant in Irvine

    Replies: @Alfa158

    Not likely there, TD. Irvine is about sixty miles from where Steve lives and can be about a two hour drive each way, sometimes even on a weekend depending on how screwed up the freeways are from the perpetual expansion work.

  77. @R.G. Camara
    @Reg Cæsar

    LA is town known for most of its nightlife shutting down very early given its size. Its due to film/television industry being there; most shooting begins early in the AM as are most casting calls. And looks are mondo important, so showing up looking tired can kill a tryout or a scene. Not so in NYC.

    Yes, the pretty people and those in the know can find an after-hours spot, but LA is mostly dead after dark due to the industry.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Los Angeles is America’s least expected early to bed, early to rise town.

    • Replies: @Corn
    @Steve Sailer

    It’s certainly news to me in flyover country

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer

    Here's an article describing the phenomenon that multiple people who moved to Los Angeles have relayed to me: LA is dead after dark. LA is a 2am town for the most part, its not NYC or London or Tokyo.

    https://www.discotech.me/los-angeles/best-la-after-hours-spots/

    Obviously, you can always find exceptions.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  78. @Marty T
    @YM

    I think a lot of conservatives who didn't watch baseball this season are rooting for the Braves, not just due to the all-star game but they also do the very non PC tomahawk chop.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Indian song that Braves fans sing sounds really fun to do in a stadium with 40,000 other people singing it at the tops of their lungs.

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @Steve Sailer


    The Indian song that Braves fans sing sounds really fun to do in a stadium with 40,000 other people singing it at the tops of their lungs.
     
    Technically, not a song. It's a chant.

    Indian war chant.
  79. @R.G. Camara
    Back in the 1960s and 70s it might have seemed the center of the country was shifting to California, so there's that too. Then in the 1980s New York roared back financially with Wall Street and then in 1990s it became safe to live there again, so that tends to obscure why East Coast Bias is still a thing.

    But Steve: why are you deliberately watching sports? They are kneeling for the fanthem and the flag and whining about racism while making zillions. Spitting in your face and your children's faces while trolling you. And you're helping them earn $$$$!

    Replies: @prosa123

    Back in the 1960s and 70s it might have seemed the center of the country was shifting to California, so there’s that too. Then in the 1980s New York roared back financially with Wall Street and then in 1990s it became safe to live there again, so that tends to obscure why East Coast Bias is still a thing.

    Today, especially with Covid, it seems as if the center of the country’s economy and spirit is in the Dallas-Austin-Houston triangle, in other words in the Central time zone.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @prosa123

    The internet may have (finally) borne the long-championed fruit of people being able to work from anywhere, and doing it.

    Alex Jones and Joe Rogan have, separately, impressed upon much of their followers that one does not need to be in New York, DC, LA to be a major media figure (both) or have a national media empire (Jones).

    Meanwhile, Michael Voris at Church Militant has set up a powerful religious-anti-marxist news organization on the outskirts of Detroit and taken quite a few scalps while looking professional and no-different than corporate cable media.

    And many lesser-known but still popular YouTube personalities have shown that success is possible for people outside the old media triangle, e.g. Joker in Montana, Fresh & Fit in Miami, etc.

    It took COVID and a national crime wave to do it, but hey, I think its happening.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  80. @Known Fact
    Sports like every other media topic is east-coast-centric and Eastern Time Zone-centric. Six inches of snow in the Beltway equals the entire state of Kansas getting incinerated a la The Day After. Imagine the extra outrage Steve would stir living in NY or DC.

    One example: Sports Illustrated did a look-back feature on The Greatest Upset No One's Ever Heard Of -- Chaminade of Hawaii, a teeny-tiny school out there, beat Ralph Sampson's top-ranked Virginia hoopsters in an early season 1982 game that was played at about 3 AM NYC-time, and pre-internet, so almost zero coverage

    Replies: @Danindc, @Peterike

    “ Chaminade of Hawaii, a teeny-tiny school out there, beat Ralph Sampson’s top-ranked Virginia hoopsters in an early season 1982 game that was played at about 3 AM NYC-time, and pre-internet, so almost zero coverage”

    I was living in NYC at the time and I distinctly recall that game.

    • Agree: Polistra
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Peterike

    I can recall that 1982 game, too. I probably read about it in the newspaper or maybe several days later in Sports Illustrated. Like I'm saying, print and next day on TV coverage of sports evened out locations across the country (although some West Coast games didn't make the morning paper's deadlines). But now everybody expects same day coverage, so time zones matter more.

    , @Known Fact
    @Peterike

    Well I was working in Florida at the time so the 1982 set of brain cells understandably suffered some serious damage. I didn't even go to bed until 3 or 4 AM (especially if Braves Replay was on), and I still was only vaguely aware of that upset until the (2012 I believe) SI retrospective.

  81. @Prester John
    The big loser in all this is Fox Sports. With the Yankees out of the picture as a result of that stupid "one and done" wild card arrangement, that left only two big-market, so called "national" teams: the Dodgers and the Red Sox, with Fox panting for either a WS pitting the two v. each other or, alternatively, a WS featuring one of the two. Both have been eliminated. The one good thing that can come of all this is that they turn the Wild Card into a best-of-three series. In the meantime--Houston v. Atlanta? Outside of Houston and Atlanta, who cares?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Peterike

    “ In the meantime–Houston v. Atlanta? Outside of Houston and Atlanta, who cares?”

    Actual Americans.

  82. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    Notice the number at left fielder Andy Pafko’s feet– 315.


    Since the game was played at the Polo Grounds, that was what one of LF's poweralleys was, 315 FT.

    The rest of the Polo Grounds poweralleys:

    Left Center 1 360 ft
    Left Center 2 414 ft
    Deep Left Center 447 ft
    Deep Left Center 455 ft

    CF was of course 483 FT

    I have asked Steve quite a few times, why exactly modern MLB stadiums today don't have these types of poweralleys. Apparently even 360 FT is considered a bit of a stretch to expect HR sluggers to consistently reach.

    Let's see MLB HR sluggers today hit with poweralleys that average 440 FT. NOT CF straightaway, but the poweralleys, where the bulk of about 95% of all HR sluggers tend to hit their HR's--in the poweralleys (That's why they're so named, where the slugger's power blasts tend to land based on curve projection of their swings, that's where the ball tends to land). Most HR sluggers don't have a compact swing enough to actually peck the ball at the foul poles. That's not how power hitters tend to hit the ball. Big wide swings that tend to go for the poweralleys.


    LF, straightaway LF at the foul pole was 279 FT, also known as a "Chinese Home Run". RF was 258 FT.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Retro ballparks from the most recent turn of the century tend to have irregular outfield fences, in imitation of previous turn of the century ballparks like the Polo Grounds and Fenway Park, unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.

    The SF Giants ballpark, built 20 years ago, is 421 feet to right center to induce more triples and the occasional inside the park home run. The Astros ballpark has some weird features. It used to have a steep hill in deep center, but that was kind of silly and was taken out.

    The new Atlanta stadium is mostly symmetrical but it is slightly shorter to right than to left because lefthanders need even more advantages in baseball than they already have. Or something.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    In the late '50's, MLB imposed a rule where poweralleys were not allowed to be less than 325 FT, and for newer ballparks to be built, the foul poles had to be at least around 320 or so; they wanted ballparks to be more symmetrical, as well as a more uniform way of measuring HR's. No more cheap homeruns at foul poles less than 300 FT. Sabermetrics of all disciplines, should appreciate that nod to uniformity, because it means that if all the ballparks are uniform in their dimensions, then it's easier to compare HR stats across the board and that there's no unfair advantage by hitting in one ballpark over another.

    All of MLB's ballparks built in the early 1910's were built during the heyday of the Dead Ball Era, which meant: asymmetrical dimensions, for the simple reason was that HR's were fairly rare. There wren't as many inside the park HR's either (else the official stats of that era would bear out that so and so a hitter had 25+ HR's, with 23 of them inside the park). Plenty of triples, yes. HR's, not so much.

    For the most part, starting with Camden Yards, the retro ballparks built maintain their poweralleys around 335-345 FT in LFCenter and RFCenter. Owners have long understood from the times of the 1930's, the shorter the poweralleys' distances, the more HRs hit. Example: PNC park's LF/RF poweralleys are 325 FT, which is more common than either Houston or SF's ballpark poweralleys.

    If every MLB ballpark were to suddenly make their poweralleys average 445 FT, and CF around 460 FT, then the total HR output would precipitously drop across the board.

    Example: during the span of the Polo Grounds in NY, only 4 hitters hit the ball toward the 483 FT sign in straight CF. Four. Period. It simply isn't going to be done. The thing about modern HR sluggers, for the most part, is that they aren't very fast on the bases. So while a couple of HR sluggers could theoretically slug the ball 460 FT, they don't have the speed to make it around the bases. At best, most of them could make it to 2B. We can see this borne out as very few modern sluggers have double digit triples in any given year. A triple is one of the benchmarks of a pure speedster. One thing to hit the ball to the fence, another thing entirely to actually make it around the bases to 3B. And most sluggers simply can't, they'd be thrown out by a mile if they attempted to make it to 3B.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.
     
    Comiskey Park, built in 1910, was the first symmetrical field. It was also the oldest MLB park its last two decades. In a spacious lot, asymmetry raises suspicions. The old parks were lopsided because they were wedged into tight downtown lots.

    The Polo Grounds obviously wasn't intended for baseball. Across the Pond, the Baseball Ground served Derby County Football Club from the 19th to the 21st century. Now they use something called Pride Park. Eww.

    Sir Francis Ley attempted to introduce baseball to England through his factory league. Didn't take.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

  83. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Los Angeles is America's least expected early to bed, early to rise town.

    Replies: @Corn, @R.G. Camara

    It’s certainly news to me in flyover country

  84. @guest007
    @Curle

    Hawaii is an NFL oriented place since it comes on Sunday morning. The sports bars do Sunday brunch with their NFL. Monday night football was an adventure in Hawaii when it was on ABC because it was live on the radio but delayed on TV (the game started at 06:30 local time on TV). With Monday Night football being on ESPN, the interest is just not there because it starts while people are still at work.

    Very few basketball or baseball fans in Hawaii because cannot be watched live.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Tony massey

    Do they still have a minor league baseball team in Hawaii? They did in 1970, a good triple A team made up mostly of MLB veterans who’d aged out the big leagues and looked forward to collecting one or two more years paychecks in Hawaii.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Steve Sailer

    Hawaii 5-0 used their rickety old ballpark for a two-part early 1970s episode with Pernell Roberts as an aging minor leaguer/former pro catcher. He's a devoted single father with a developmentally challenged son who's suspected in a string of murdered women. Needless to say the final chase scene takes place under the stands while the crowd is cheering the ballgame. There's no minor-league team there anymore

    , @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    The AAA team left Hawaii in 1987. Since then Hawaii has tried twice to have a winter league baseball but both failed quickly.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_Islanders

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @ScarletNumber

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Steve Sailer

    The star pitchers of that team were Dennis Bennett (18-8) and Juan Pizarro (9-0). They were both former MLB pitchers, but Pizarro was a 2-time All-Star in 63 64 while going 16-8 and 19-9.

    Their star batter was Jim Hicks, who played 93 games in MLB 64-70 mostly with the Angels.

  85. Steve,

    Not to troll you for being a Dodgers fan, but don’t you think there should be an asterisk next to the Dodgers 2020 WS title? They played less than half a regular season, no fans, strange playoff format, and players missing due to phony Covid test.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alvin

    Who was going to beat them? They went 43-17 in the regular season and 13-5 in the post season. They played three fine teams in the playoffs -- San Diego, Atlanta, and Tampa Bay.

    Sure, if they'd played a 162 game season, they might have suffered catastrophic injuries that would have kept them from winning the World Series. But that just suggests that 2020 was _less_ fluky: the Dodgers were clearly the best team in baseball in 2020.

    Replies: @Anon

  86. @Peterike
    @Known Fact

    “ Chaminade of Hawaii, a teeny-tiny school out there, beat Ralph Sampson’s top-ranked Virginia hoopsters in an early season 1982 game that was played at about 3 AM NYC-time, and pre-internet, so almost zero coverage”

    I was living in NYC at the time and I distinctly recall that game.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Known Fact

    I can recall that 1982 game, too. I probably read about it in the newspaper or maybe several days later in Sports Illustrated. Like I’m saying, print and next day on TV coverage of sports evened out locations across the country (although some West Coast games didn’t make the morning paper’s deadlines). But now everybody expects same day coverage, so time zones matter more.

  87. @prosa123
    @R.G. Camara

    Back in the 1960s and 70s it might have seemed the center of the country was shifting to California, so there’s that too. Then in the 1980s New York roared back financially with Wall Street and then in 1990s it became safe to live there again, so that tends to obscure why East Coast Bias is still a thing.

    Today, especially with Covid, it seems as if the center of the country's economy and spirit is in the Dallas-Austin-Houston triangle, in other words in the Central time zone.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    The internet may have (finally) borne the long-championed fruit of people being able to work from anywhere, and doing it.

    Alex Jones and Joe Rogan have, separately, impressed upon much of their followers that one does not need to be in New York, DC, LA to be a major media figure (both) or have a national media empire (Jones).

    Meanwhile, Michael Voris at Church Militant has set up a powerful religious-anti-marxist news organization on the outskirts of Detroit and taken quite a few scalps while looking professional and no-different than corporate cable media.

    And many lesser-known but still popular YouTube personalities have shown that success is possible for people outside the old media triangle, e.g. Joker in Montana, Fresh & Fit in Miami, etc.

    It took COVID and a national crime wave to do it, but hey, I think its happening.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Does Rogan have his guests fly into Austin?

    Late night talk shows are typically filmed in L.A. or N.Y. because that's where the celebrities are.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @R.G. Camara

    "The internet may have (finally) borne the long-championed fruit of people being able to work from anywhere, and doing it."


    One of the major keys to the equations you're missing, is that while it's true that many can now host a national show from just about anywhere, that doesn't mean that if the show is reliant upon hosting live guests, that the guests want to trudge out to nowheresville. Sometimes there is more to just hosting an online show: people do like to see the "live" event, hosted from downtown Manhattan, or Burbank. And why not? It's not broken, no need to fix it. "Anyone" can work from home and host an online show, but why exactly should they be expected to get guests in studio seated alongside them? Anyone can do a virtual show with virtual guests for shoestring budgets, including shoestring advertising revenue.

    Another important matter is the role of advertising. Advertisers, for better or worse, still like the networks format of live guest in a specific Alist location. It's lasted for decades for a reason, even in 2021. And most Alisters actually like being flown out to NY, or LA rather than say, Huntsville, AL or Albuquerque, NM.

    * As Hollywood is about 50-50 women, most actresses, if given the choice, would definitely prefer to be interviewed live in studio from LA or NY, and not from nowheresville, USA. Referring to live shows with live guests in studio, the US is intended to be the audience for NY or LA, not the other way around. And it still remains this way.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  88. @Mike_from_SGV
    I care nothing for big-time sports anymore, but what I like about the upcoming WS is that the woke MLB had shifted the All-Star game away from Atlanta because Georgia's voting laws were not up to Woke standards, but now MLB had to give the NL championship trophy to the Georgia team, and maybe the WS championship also. It's rather pathetic that these symbolic hits to the Woke regime are all we can hope for presently, but it's better than nothing.

    Replies: @Marty T

    We also have “F Joe Biden” in college football stadiums also (and Let’s go Brandon appeared at a Braves game)

  89. @R.G. Camara
    @prosa123

    The internet may have (finally) borne the long-championed fruit of people being able to work from anywhere, and doing it.

    Alex Jones and Joe Rogan have, separately, impressed upon much of their followers that one does not need to be in New York, DC, LA to be a major media figure (both) or have a national media empire (Jones).

    Meanwhile, Michael Voris at Church Militant has set up a powerful religious-anti-marxist news organization on the outskirts of Detroit and taken quite a few scalps while looking professional and no-different than corporate cable media.

    And many lesser-known but still popular YouTube personalities have shown that success is possible for people outside the old media triangle, e.g. Joker in Montana, Fresh & Fit in Miami, etc.

    It took COVID and a national crime wave to do it, but hey, I think its happening.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Does Rogan have his guests fly into Austin?

    Late night talk shows are typically filmed in L.A. or N.Y. because that’s where the celebrities are.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer


    Does Rogan have his guests fly into Austin?
     
    I believe so. I don't think Spotify (to which Rogan is signed) or Rogan at his current level would have made the move if they weren't confident Rogan could still get famous people on despite being in Austin. Of course, Rogan is very good at getting interesting lesser-known folks on to talk about niche subjects and have everyone riveted. I'd much rather listen to a Rogan interview of a flat earther or a guy realy knowledgable about high-end watches than some A-list celeb interview where Rogan has been barred pre-interview from asking about various sensitive subjects, his interview with Robert Downey Jr. (at least in the clips I saw) was so kid-glove friendly I stopped watching.

    Late night talk shows are typically filmed in L.A. or N.Y. because that’s where the celebrities are.
     
    True, more in LA than NYC for obvious reasons. Conan O' Brien agreed to move from NYC to LA to host The Tonight Show (which Leno subsequently stole back), and then stayed in LA to do his TBS show -- both for the same reason: LA had more celebs.

    I always thought this was a mistake. O'Brien's previous show was filmed in NYC --Late Night With Conan O'Brien -- and he shined when, thanks to his shoestring budget, location, and low expectations, he basically had no A-list celebrities for years, so he had to make do with B-Listers, skit-making, and interacting with everyday folks during remote spots or normal folks getting 15-minutes in his guest chair.

    This made O'Brien hyper-creative and good at making bad things work, and also allowed him to find truly "funny" guests and not just famous ones -- e.g. Norm MacDonald was a constant guest even when he was just " new guy from SNL", and folks like Amy Poehler and Will Ferrell were constantly present even very early in their careers, or find folks like Fabio or Abe Vigoda or Al Roker or Chuck Norris who were funnier and more laid back and self-lampooning than anyone ever thought. And his skits with NYCers were awesome as he managed to make even old-timey baseball games funny.

    But by the end of his Late Night run, when he was getting A-listers, he seemed far too hemmed in by the A-Listers and their demands on his interviews (e.g. no questions about their arrest records or drug use or other tabloid fodder). Moving to LA made him very A-list dependent and took away his style. He should've gone back to NYC and scrounged around more, O'Brien is at his best when working with nothing.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  90. @Johnny789
    In the Eastern and Central time zones it’s fun to go out after attending a nighttime sporting event because there are sporting events from the west coast to occupy you. On the west coast it’s boring as hell to go out after a game at say Staples Center at night because everything else is done.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Reg Cæsar, @Marty T

    I love being out at a bar at 2 or even 3 am and some Pac12 game is still going.

  91. @Alvin
    Steve,

    Not to troll you for being a Dodgers fan, but don't you think there should be an asterisk next to the Dodgers 2020 WS title? They played less than half a regular season, no fans, strange playoff format, and players missing due to phony Covid test.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Who was going to beat them? They went 43-17 in the regular season and 13-5 in the post season. They played three fine teams in the playoffs — San Diego, Atlanta, and Tampa Bay.

    Sure, if they’d played a 162 game season, they might have suffered catastrophic injuries that would have kept them from winning the World Series. But that just suggests that 2020 was _less_ fluky: the Dodgers were clearly the best team in baseball in 2020.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Injuries are a part of the game. So is playing a real, actual 162 game season and not some less than 100 game BS. Dodgers fans coping that their "World Series" "Win" Isn't the same thing as George Floyd and Trayvon Martin being declared holy men by the New York Times

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  92. Well, it could be done fairly by simply making sure every team plays the exact same schedule against everyone else. You could keep the divisions as it, but the playoff seeding is based on overall record.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yancey Ward

    Baseball is pretty regional. San Diego sells out when the Dodgers come to town. Milwaukee joined the National League to play the Cubs more often. Houston joined the AL to play the Texas Rangers.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  93. @Dacian Julien Soros
    What's the point of being rich if your idea of fun is watching sports on TV? Can't you do that while relatively poor? Also:

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=MusyO7J2inM

    Replies: @John Johnson

    What’s the point of being rich if your idea of fun is watching sports on TV? Can’t you do that while relatively poor?

    There is a scene in Annie Hall where Woody Allen sneaks away from a socialite party to watch the knicks. He basically says that intellectuals are full of s–t and needed a break. I really get the sentiment. Most of our intellectual class is a political club where virtue signaling is valued over independent thinking.

    I will sometimes turn on a game because it is usually less insulting than anything else on TV.

    In theory I would like to watch the news but which channel? They all have over the top bias. NPR is supposed to be public and is just as insulting as CNN. I don’t think we even have news channels. They are political channels whereby producers try to push their view of the world.

    Sports are one of the few areas that clown world doesn’t control. Sure they will push PC narratives at times but there is still a basic level of competition. If our clownish overlords could have their way then they would probably eliminate sports as they undermine the belief that racial genetics don’t matter. If they didn’t matter then 20% of defense lines would be Asian.

    • Replies: @Up2Drew
    @John Johnson

    Sports is one of the few things in the modern world where the outcome is indeterminate. The drama is real - a bad hop or a wind-blown kick can end a team's season or make memories for an entire city of followers.

    When was the last time you saw a movie in which you didn't know within the first twenty minutes - especially in this woke culture - how it was going to end?

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @Dacian Julien Soros
    @John Johnson

    Actually, team sports is a huge social construct. In Romania, most of the soccer teams we knew as children either went bankrupt, or, worse, went bankrupt and re-organized by two competing groups of business people. I understand now that such changes have been common in the history of professional sport. It's easy to root for a team when you are 15, and the team seem to be there forever; it's harder to do so, when, overnight, you get two Steaua Bucharest.

    In the US, teams are franchises which business leaders shift from here to there, to wherever a new narrative needs to be written. Not only players get transferred to the team that pays them most, mocking the idea of a team; but in the US, you have the make-belief student players and the draft.

    Individual sports are somewhat safer, although you still get a Caster Semenya case of social constructs prevailing over reality. The trouble with individual sports is they are usually boring. Without rooting, many sports are also boring, as not all games are World Cup finals. And this last paragraph is ironic, because rooting is also a social construct.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  94. Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game because the whole country caught up with Saturday’s college football action in the newspapers on Sunday. But now, Pac-12 games happen at one million o’clock in the morning in the Eastern and Central time zones so nobody cares.

    The 1967 USC-UCLA game was the Big Game (that year’s Game of the Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game because the whole country caught up with Saturday’s college football action in the newspapers on Sunday. But now, Pac-12 games happen at one million o’clock in the morning in the Eastern and Central time zones so nobody cares. Decade) partly because it featured the number 1 (UCLA) and number 4 (USC) ranked teams near the end of the season. USC had defeated each of the previous season’s top two teams (Notre Dame and Michigan State) plus Texas but had lost to Oregon State on a muddy field that had turned into a bog, neutralizing OJ.

    The major reason was that it was the only NCAA football game televised that day. NCAA rules at that time permitted eight national and five regional games to be televised each year, total. No team could appear on TV more than twice. ABC was the sole telecaster of NCAA college football. If you watched college football that Saturday, USC-UCLA was the only game on.

    Personal note: I attended that game. My dad was given a ticket to the game by a friend at work. Out of paternal love, he gave the ticket to me. The ticket was on the top row of the Coliseum in the NW corner, but it was in the stadium.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @FPD72

    Oops, my first paragraph had an accidental paste of your quote. It should read:

    The 1967 USC-UCLA game was the Big Game (that year’s Game of the Decade) partly because it featured the number 1 (UCLA) and number 4 (USC) ranked teams near the end of the season. USC had defeated each of the previous season’s top two teams (Notre Dame and Michigan State) plus Texas but had lost to Oregon State on a muddy field that had turned into a bog, neutralizing OJ.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @FPD72

    "The ticket was on the top row of the Coliseum in the NW corner,"

    I sat in the top row of the Coliseum for the 1968 USC vs. Oregon State game. O.J. had a career high like 238 yards rushing.

    My dad and I had gone to museums next to the Coliseum in the morning. When we came out, the game had already started, and the scalpers were desperate to unload their tickets. My dad offered a scalper all the money in his pockets, which turned out to be $1.10, for two tickets. They turned out to be in the end zone in the 89th row. But it was actually a good view for watching Simpson and Bill Enyart run.

  95. @FPD72

    Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game because the whole country caught up with Saturday’s college football action in the newspapers on Sunday. But now, Pac-12 games happen at one million o’clock in the morning in the Eastern and Central time zones so nobody cares.
     
    The 1967 USC-UCLA game was the Big Game (that year’s Game of the Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game because the whole country caught up with Saturday’s college football action in the newspapers on Sunday. But now, Pac-12 games happen at one million o’clock in the morning in the Eastern and Central time zones so nobody cares. Decade) partly because it featured the number 1 (UCLA) and number 4 (USC) ranked teams near the end of the season. USC had defeated each of the previous season’s top two teams (Notre Dame and Michigan State) plus Texas but had lost to Oregon State on a muddy field that had turned into a bog, neutralizing OJ.

    The major reason was that it was the only NCAA football game televised that day. NCAA rules at that time permitted eight national and five regional games to be televised each year, total. No team could appear on TV more than twice. ABC was the sole telecaster of NCAA college football. If you watched college football that Saturday, USC-UCLA was the only game on.

    Personal note: I attended that game. My dad was given a ticket to the game by a friend at work. Out of paternal love, he gave the ticket to me. The ticket was on the top row of the Coliseum in the NW corner, but it was in the stadium.

    Replies: @FPD72, @Steve Sailer

    Oops, my first paragraph had an accidental paste of your quote. It should read:

    The 1967 USC-UCLA game was the Big Game (that year’s Game of the Decade) partly because it featured the number 1 (UCLA) and number 4 (USC) ranked teams near the end of the season. USC had defeated each of the previous season’s top two teams (Notre Dame and Michigan State) plus Texas but had lost to Oregon State on a muddy field that had turned into a bog, neutralizing OJ.

  96. @Muggles

    “What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 PM?”
     
    When you are actually "rich" you don't have to work and can keep whatever hours suit you.

    Of course many people we think of as rich (and are) are still working, running businesses, making deals, overseeing investments and property, etc. Many are rich because they've always worked hard and pay attention.

    Once you step off that treadmill, you let others worry about the details. Of course phone calls, texts, etc. tend to need real time congruence.

    When I vacationed in Hawaii (a long time ago, unfortunately) I was somewhat surprised at how the locals all had this early morning orientation. Not because tourists needed or wanted that, but because the Real World (in the US) demanded attendance for the non tourist/local interactions.

    iSteve's comments about sporting events and interest, based on time zone occurrence, is on point. Also even now (when there is no real need for that) most major US media are east coast/NYC oriented even though that is now only about 25% or less of the population. DC is in the Eastern Time Zone as is the NYSE. I have never (other than visits) lived in the Eastern Time Zone and it was interesting to note that "local news" there starts at 11 PM, not 10 or earlier. Broadcast TV is also "later" there than it is elsewhere, though intentionally delayed in the west.

    I think in part of the Stalin era in the USSR, they had the entire country on a single "time zone" though that meant you might be eating breakfast at midnight. I believe they eventually changed that though I suspect in the far east of Russia things are still pretty screwed up.

    There are current plans for a 24 hour daily US based electronic stock trading platform to be implemented. 24 hour trading is now possible using foreign exchanges but not many use it.

    Ignoring body clock/time is unhealthy and very stressful. Another way mankind is killing itself.

    Replies: @CJ

    I don’t know if the Soviet Union ever used a single time zone, but China – which is wider than the 48 contiguous states of the USA – did and does.

    https://www.timeanddate.com/time/zone/china

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
  97. @FPD72

    Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game because the whole country caught up with Saturday’s college football action in the newspapers on Sunday. But now, Pac-12 games happen at one million o’clock in the morning in the Eastern and Central time zones so nobody cares.
     
    The 1967 USC-UCLA game was the Big Game (that year’s Game of the Back in 1967, USC with O.J. Simpson vs. UCLA with Gary Beban was the Big Game because the whole country caught up with Saturday’s college football action in the newspapers on Sunday. But now, Pac-12 games happen at one million o’clock in the morning in the Eastern and Central time zones so nobody cares. Decade) partly because it featured the number 1 (UCLA) and number 4 (USC) ranked teams near the end of the season. USC had defeated each of the previous season’s top two teams (Notre Dame and Michigan State) plus Texas but had lost to Oregon State on a muddy field that had turned into a bog, neutralizing OJ.

    The major reason was that it was the only NCAA football game televised that day. NCAA rules at that time permitted eight national and five regional games to be televised each year, total. No team could appear on TV more than twice. ABC was the sole telecaster of NCAA college football. If you watched college football that Saturday, USC-UCLA was the only game on.

    Personal note: I attended that game. My dad was given a ticket to the game by a friend at work. Out of paternal love, he gave the ticket to me. The ticket was on the top row of the Coliseum in the NW corner, but it was in the stadium.

    Replies: @FPD72, @Steve Sailer

    “The ticket was on the top row of the Coliseum in the NW corner,”

    I sat in the top row of the Coliseum for the 1968 USC vs. Oregon State game. O.J. had a career high like 238 yards rushing.

    My dad and I had gone to museums next to the Coliseum in the morning. When we came out, the game had already started, and the scalpers were desperate to unload their tickets. My dad offered a scalper all the money in his pockets, which turned out to be \$1.10, for two tickets. They turned out to be in the end zone in the 89th row. But it was actually a good view for watching Simpson and Bill Enyart run.

  98. @Yancey Ward
    Well, it could be done fairly by simply making sure every team plays the exact same schedule against everyone else. You could keep the divisions as it, but the playoff seeding is based on overall record.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Baseball is pretty regional. San Diego sells out when the Dodgers come to town. Milwaukee joined the National League to play the Cubs more often. Houston joined the AL to play the Texas Rangers.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    Actually, from observation of last half decade, HOU may have joined the AL in no small part to make it easier to qualify for the postseason. May not be a slam dunk to advance to WS with LA and SF (and others of high competitive nature) in the NL.

  99. @Trinity
    Can Atlanta win a second world championship? At one time or perhaps twice, Atlanta had 4 MAJOR FRANCHISES in the MLB, the NFL, the NBA and NHL. Yeah, Atlanta had two NHL teams, the Thrashers and the Flames and both hauled ass. Anyhow, Atlanta has had professional big time sports since 1966 and they can only claim one world title. Hell, Milwaukee, the place the Braves played before moving to Atlanta has that and they only have two professional sports teams in the Big 4. And I am not even counting the Milwaukee Braves, just the Brew Crew and the Bucks. The Braves won something like 14 consecutive division titles and went to 4 World Series and they have only won one. And the Falcons and that loss to the Patriots has to be the biggest CHOKE in history.

    Okay, I don't want to hate the ATL, and as a Baltimore Oriole fan, I know about suffering and the Orioles are the worst team in baseball, and of course the O's haven't even been to the WS since 1983. Now they should have went in 1997 and 2014, especially 1997, how in the hell they lost to the Indians is beyond me. Anyhow, even a much smaller market like Baltimore has 2 NFL championships, 3 Super Bowl titles, 3 World Series titles, and IF you care to count the Washington Bullets who started out in Baltimore, you could even arguably add an NBA title. Baltimore was just a few years ahead of Atlanta, they got to the big leagues in 1953 with the Colts and 1954 with the O's. IF Atlanta chokes AGAIN, I don't see even serious Atlanta fans even giving a shit IF Atlanta makes it to the BIG GAME again.

    I don't care about MLB or NFL and NEVER cared about the NBA, but since the Atlanta has been so shutout from gaining world titles over the years, I will root for the Buffalo Bills of baseball, the Atlanta Braves, even though I won't watch a single game.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Anyhow, Atlanta has had professional big time sports since 1966 and they can only claim one world title. Hell, Milwaukee, the place the Braves played before moving to Atlanta has that and they only have two professional sports teams in the Big 4.

    The current Milwaukee teams actually have two, as the Kareem & Oscar Bucks won in 71. You mentioned the Braves winning in Milwaukee but I’m sure they would also claim the Packers, as they played multiple games in Milwaukee during most of their championship seasons, including the 67 NFL Western Conference championship game against the Rams. This was the week before the famous Ice Bowl. Ironically, because of the rotational system used then, the 9-4-1 Packers hosted the 11-1-2 Rams that day.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @ScarletNumber

    I happened to be at Disney World when the Braves opened their spring training complex there. A guy in front of me was wearing a cap the claimed three WS championships for Atlanta. I told him the hat is only true with a "B" and an "M" on it in addition to the "A".

    , @Trinity
    @ScarletNumber

    Yeah I thought about that after I typed that one out. The Bucks shut down the Bullets in a 4 game sweep. Bullets would make it back again in 1975 only to be swept AGAIN this time by Rick Barry and the Golden State Warriors. The Brew Crew took it to the final day of the season before they edged out the O's for the 1982 AL East Title. The Braves played St. Louis in the NL championship that year so a Braves vs. Brewer WS was in the works. Budweiser beat Miller in the battle of breweries WS of 1982. Good ole Harvey's Wallbangers power hitters played hard but came up empty against the anemic Cardinals with their 67 total home runs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @Jay Fink
    @ScarletNumber

    I was a kid living in Milwaukee and was a huge fan of the early 70s Bucks. A couple of years after they won their championship my parents were selling our house in suburban Fox Point. Bucks player Bobby Dandridge looked at our house. Our neighbors didn't realize he was a Buck, they just saw a black man. They were not happy about it!

    We received several calls and visits from neighbors telling us not to sell to a black. Someone even called in a death threat! When they found out it wasn't just any random black guy but a Milwaukee Buck most changed their mind. One man went from angry to excited. "I hope he buys the house so he can play basketball with my kids". He never did buy the house because the ceilings in parts of the house were too low for him.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  100. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Does Rogan have his guests fly into Austin?

    Late night talk shows are typically filmed in L.A. or N.Y. because that's where the celebrities are.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    Does Rogan have his guests fly into Austin?

    I believe so. I don’t think Spotify (to which Rogan is signed) or Rogan at his current level would have made the move if they weren’t confident Rogan could still get famous people on despite being in Austin. Of course, Rogan is very good at getting interesting lesser-known folks on to talk about niche subjects and have everyone riveted. I’d much rather listen to a Rogan interview of a flat earther or a guy realy knowledgable about high-end watches than some A-list celeb interview where Rogan has been barred pre-interview from asking about various sensitive subjects, his interview with Robert Downey Jr. (at least in the clips I saw) was so kid-glove friendly I stopped watching.

    Late night talk shows are typically filmed in L.A. or N.Y. because that’s where the celebrities are.

    True, more in LA than NYC for obvious reasons. Conan O’ Brien agreed to move from NYC to LA to host The Tonight Show (which Leno subsequently stole back), and then stayed in LA to do his TBS show — both for the same reason: LA had more celebs.

    I always thought this was a mistake. O’Brien’s previous show was filmed in NYC —Late Night With Conan O’Brien — and he shined when, thanks to his shoestring budget, location, and low expectations, he basically had no A-list celebrities for years, so he had to make do with B-Listers, skit-making, and interacting with everyday folks during remote spots or normal folks getting 15-minutes in his guest chair.

    This made O’Brien hyper-creative and good at making bad things work, and also allowed him to find truly “funny” guests and not just famous ones — e.g. Norm MacDonald was a constant guest even when he was just ” new guy from SNL”, and folks like Amy Poehler and Will Ferrell were constantly present even very early in their careers, or find folks like Fabio or Abe Vigoda or Al Roker or Chuck Norris who were funnier and more laid back and self-lampooning than anyone ever thought. And his skits with NYCers were awesome as he managed to make even old-timey baseball games funny.

    But by the end of his Late Night run, when he was getting A-listers, he seemed far too hemmed in by the A-Listers and their demands on his interviews (e.g. no questions about their arrest records or drug use or other tabloid fodder). Moving to LA made him very A-list dependent and took away his style. He should’ve gone back to NYC and scrounged around more, O’Brien is at his best when working with nothing.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @R.G. Camara


    O’Brien’s previous show was filmed in NYC —Late Night With Conan O’Brien — and he shined when, thanks to his shoestring budget, location, and low expectations, he basically had no A-list celebrities for years, so he had to make do with B-Listers
     
    This was Letterman's key to success when he hosted the same program. Johnny Carson owned a piece of the show and to differentiate between the shows Johnny imposed these limitations on it. That's why Letterman's band had no brass as well.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  101. @Trinity
    Well the 1973 New York Mets finished 82-79 and they beat a MUCH BETTER Cincinnati Reds team that finished 99-63. Hell, the AL Championship I talked about earlier where the Cleveland Indians beat Baltimore was another example of the lesser team winning in a short series. The O's finished 1997 with a record of 98-64 but lost in 6 games to the Indians who sported a record of 86-75. Hell, the O's had 96 wins to KC's 89 wins and lost in that championship series. And look at the Giants who beat the Pats in not one but two Super Bowls. Once the playoffs start everyone is 0-0. Those are the breaks. Look at the 1988 Dodgers who beat Oakland. No way were the Dodgers the better team. The A's won 104 games to the Dodgers 94.

    Replies: @Danindc, @Johnny789

    The Indians didn’t really try that hard in the regular season that year. Their division was easy to win so they took it easy because they didn’t want to go into the Playoffs worn down after they had lost the last two years.

  102. @Trinity
    @Travis

    Braves = Not offensive. Actually flattering.

    Seminoles = Okay.

    Chiefs = Okay.

    Indians = Sounded Okay to me? WTF?

    Redskins = ? Okay, I am the last person to be accused of being politically correct but I actually see a point on this one. Would be kind of like calling the Minnesota team the Minnesota Pale Faces instead of Vikings or calling the Detroit Lions something like the Detroit Hoodrats.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @G. Poulin, @Brutusale

    There’s a team in Hartford called the Yard Goats. “Hood Rats” would be an improvement.

  103. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Sports are an interesting example of how electronic communications has reimposed the tyranny of distance due to time zones. Highest viewership is right before going to bed, so SouthEastern Conference night games have the most viewers, Pacific 12 night games the fewest.
     
    An interesting quirk - it's probably the case that the television exposure of SEC football has granted it an advantage in recruiting, which makes SEC games better competition, better competition with better players attracts more NFL scouting interest, etc. creating a reinforcing effect.

    The only thing rivaling the spectacle high level of SEC play to me is late season BIG10 night games and the chance that in places like Madison/Ann Arbor/Happy Valley that you will get some snowfall to create that snow globe effect.

    When I was a kid, it was widely assumed that, due to electronic communication, elite workers would soon move to Hawaii to enjoy the paradisiacal climate and beauty. But, perhaps due to time zones, that didn’t happen: e.g., NY Stock Exchange opens at 3:30 AM in Honolulu.

    What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm?
     
    I think already being rich in Hawaii is a better plan than grinding to get rich in Hawaii. It's a strange place in a lot of respects, where even the young East Asians don't seem overly motivated. Hawaii is basically the only thing I've seen capable of corrupting the try-hard, monotony loving nature of East Asians to the extent that they become sort of like normal Americans.

    Bermuda would seem like a better choice for someone who still needs to have his head "in the game" so to speak while enjoying a subtropical environment. You've got an hour head start on the East Coast of the United States. And it has quietly become something of a hub in the reinsurance industry. The traditional Bermudan business dress says it all:

    http://www.bermuda-online.org/bermudashorts003.jpg

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Bermuda has been a big reinsurance industry hub for a while now–I think “quietly” only because nobody thinks much about reinsurance. Anyway, yeah: a good friend now runs a big reinsurer, but for many years when he was slightly lower on the chart he had to go to Bermuda a lot.

  104. @Steve Sailer
    @guest007

    Do they still have a minor league baseball team in Hawaii? They did in 1970, a good triple A team made up mostly of MLB veterans who'd aged out the big leagues and looked forward to collecting one or two more years paychecks in Hawaii.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @guest007, @ScarletNumber

    Hawaii 5-0 used their rickety old ballpark for a two-part early 1970s episode with Pernell Roberts as an aging minor leaguer/former pro catcher. He’s a devoted single father with a developmentally challenged son who’s suspected in a string of murdered women. Needless to say the final chase scene takes place under the stands while the crowd is cheering the ballgame. There’s no minor-league team there anymore

  105. @Danindc
    @Trinity

    The Orioles choked so badly in that series. In Game 6 they stranded 15 runners and were something like 0-20 with RISP. They would’ve destroyed the Marlins in the WS…at least I think so who knows. The Orioles should have at least 7 World Series but have only managed a measly 3. Earl Weaver only has 1 FFS!

    Replies: @Trinity

    I think the O’s should be 4-2 in the World Series. Yep, they should have went on to the World Series against the Marlins in 1997, and the Giants in 2014, I don’t see them beating the Giants in 2014 though. So that would put the O’s at 4-4. All 3 of the Orioles losses in World Series play came against teams they should have beat easily, they choked both times against the inferior Pirates and lost to the pathetic Miracle Mets. Ironically, they should not have beaten the Dodgers in 1966 or the Reds in 1970. Take away the two chokes against Pittsburgh and that puts them at a pretty good hypothetical series record of 6-2 which isn’t exactly the Yankees or Cardinals but still not bad. And lest we forget the O’s won 100 games in 1980 and didn’t even make it to the playoffs. They finished 3 games behind the Yankees that year. Was a sucessful franchise for decades, but now, not so much.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @Trinity

    That seems about right but they did blow out the Dodgers and Reds. Don’t forget Jeffrey Maier in 1996.

  106. @Peterike
    @Known Fact

    “ Chaminade of Hawaii, a teeny-tiny school out there, beat Ralph Sampson’s top-ranked Virginia hoopsters in an early season 1982 game that was played at about 3 AM NYC-time, and pre-internet, so almost zero coverage”

    I was living in NYC at the time and I distinctly recall that game.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Known Fact

    Well I was working in Florida at the time so the 1982 set of brain cells understandably suffered some serious damage. I didn’t even go to bed until 3 or 4 AM (especially if Braves Replay was on), and I still was only vaguely aware of that upset until the (2012 I believe) SI retrospective.

  107. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "don’t grasp that under a most-wins system of seeding the Dodgers would have shut down with about ten days to go rather than fight Giants to the bitter end, depriving the West of a great pennant race. "

    Like in 1951, when BRK was 13.5 games ahead of NY in August, which ended in a spectacular pennant race finish for the NL.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxzEC4ZH8DI






    "What's the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 PM?"

    You'll have to ask Zuckerberg and Oprah about that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ganderson

    There was a pretty good episode of MASH wrapped around the ‘51 pennant race.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Ganderson

    A War for All Seasons, episode 906, aired December 29, 1980. It covered all of 1951 from beginning to end. Directed by Burt Metcalfe and written by Dan Wilcox & Thad Mumford.

  108. @Known Fact
    @Trinity

    Don't forget the Baltimore Bullets, another team name that was deemed too offensive, or too deadly accurate. St Johns Redmen, even the Hofstra Flying Dutchmen, also gone here in NY

    Replies: @Trinity

    Nah, I can’t forget the Baltimore Bullets aka Washington Bullets. I remember Gus Johnson came to my elementary school back in the day. To this day, I think the Baltimore Bullets was one of the coolest names in sports. IF I remember right, I think they changed it due to the fact that Washington became the murder capital of America during the time the team was named the Washington Bullets. Maybe or maybe not, but whether Washington led the nation in murders per capita the term Bullets was a little bit to spot on when describing this more violent than average city at the time. I don’t look for declining Baltimore to ever sport 3 BIG LEAGUE teams again any time soon, but during one brief time period Baltimore’s teams were almost as good as Tampa’s sports franchises now, unless they played a team based out of New York called the Mets, Jets or Knicks. haha. And Earl The Pearl will always be a Baltimore Bullet and not a New York Knick. Knicks and the Bullets had quite the rivalry back long ago.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Trinity

    The Bullets were an entertaining act and had a lively rivalry with the Knicks way back when. Both teams actually played with a team concept. And they absolutely did change their name due to sensitivity over out-of-control black violence. (I haven't checked lately, is there still a Detroit Pistons? Aren't engines bad for the climate?)

    I also fondly recall rolling into Baltimore once in a while for a few days of baseball at the old yard. Same section, same usher, I've even got pictures with him -- kinda like that beloved (although imaginary) train conductor Joe Biden is always babbling about.

    , @Danindc
    @Trinity

    Abe Pollin changed it after the assaination of some Israeli PM. Maybe Shamir can’t remember.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Trinity


    To this day, I think the Baltimore Bullets was one of the coolest names in sports.
     
    They were named for a sneaker:


    https://i.etsystatic.com/7357104/r/il/b04edc/1978628292/il_794xN.1978628292_4omi.jpg

    I think they changed it due to the fact that Washington became the murder capital of America during the time the team was named the Washington Bullets.
     
    How many of those homicides were over sneakers?
  109. @AnotherDad

    What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm?
     
    How about we shut down the casino and just have the market open once per day--at say 4 pm Eastern?

    The financial folks interested in analyzing the days news have all day to assess the day's news, then put in their bids/trades by 4 pm. Then at 4:05 you run "market" and resolve all the resolvable trades.

    Throw in a 1/2 percent asset transaction tax--a non-issue for actual investors--to throw some sand in the gears and push down speculation, high frequency trading, etc. etc.

    These people aren't drilling for oil or building rocket engines or developing new battery technology or the thorium cycle or new cancer treatments.

    The point of having a financial sector is to provide capital to actually productive business, encourage entrepreneurship and provide a way for people to buy a share of the productive economy (and it's future profit streams) with their savings. Beyond that it's speculative b.s. and rent collection.

    There. Now the rich people in Hawaii can sleep in.

    Replies: @Ganderson

    Dad- you’re spot on. Way too many of the really smart kids I’ve taught go into finance- not enough into manufacturing, engineering, etc

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
  110. @Curle
    “ What’s the point of being rich in Hawaii if you have to go to bed at 6 pm”

    Really rich people don’t have to get up early for the markets or anything else for that matter. I know few islanders who are big spectator sports people and those that are become HS sports enthusiasts. My sense of the Hawaiian attitude is why watch when you can do. I never watch tv when there.

    Replies: @guest007, @Ganderson

    In Ball Four Bouton pitched for the Seattle Pilots, whose AAA club was Honolulu. He observed the following: you get sent down, and 6 weeks later you’re called back up. What if you don’t wanna go?

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Ganderson

    Your memory is playing slight tricks on you. When Bouton pitched for the Pilots, their AAA team was in Vancouver, while the Hawaii team was affiliated with the Angels. Coincidentally the previous year Bouton pitched for the AAA Seattle Angels in the same stadium he would pitch in the AL the following year.

    TLDR: Bouton pitched in Hawaii as a minor leaguer in 1969, but only as a visitor.

    Replies: @Ganderson

  111. Back in the 60s and 70s, we said, “If it weren’t for Georgia Tech, Atlanta wouldn’t have any professional teams.”

    • Replies: @Trinity
    @Gamecock

    It could be worse. You could be a San Diego or Minnesota fan. Vikings = O + 0 for 4 in the big game , Twins = 2 and they have a few years on the ATLANTA Braves, Timberwolves = Goose egg, * North Stars = defunct but O for 26.


    San Diego has to not only be perpetual losers but they play in a state with legendary teams like the Raiders ( well used to be the Raiders were in Cali), the Swinging A's, San Fran Giants/49ers, Golden State Warriors, Los Angeles Lakers/Dodgers. San Diego Chargers = no Superbowl wins, have to go way back to the AFL days where they snagged a couple titles. Padres = 0. Only saving grace for San Diego is that they only had 2 teams and not 4 like the ATL had at one time.

    Probably could think of other cities that could vie for the Loserville, USA title. New Orleans would be in the running. Tampa used to be a major loser with football and baseball until the last few years. Tampa Bucs in the Creamsickle era where the worst of the worst and the Rays took quite awhile to get going. The ATL is safe as long as you have the San Diego and Minnesota type teams around and of course, those Buffalo Bills of the 1990s and the terrible teams they had when the Juice ran for his life every Sunday.

  112. @Steve Sailer
    @Marty T

    The Indian song that Braves fans sing sounds really fun to do in a stadium with 40,000 other people singing it at the tops of their lungs.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    The Indian song that Braves fans sing sounds really fun to do in a stadium with 40,000 other people singing it at the tops of their lungs.

    Technically, not a song. It’s a chant.

    Indian war chant.

  113. @Trinity
    @Travis

    Braves = Not offensive. Actually flattering.

    Seminoles = Okay.

    Chiefs = Okay.

    Indians = Sounded Okay to me? WTF?

    Redskins = ? Okay, I am the last person to be accused of being politically correct but I actually see a point on this one. Would be kind of like calling the Minnesota team the Minnesota Pale Faces instead of Vikings or calling the Detroit Lions something like the Detroit Hoodrats.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @G. Poulin, @Brutusale

    The Massachusetts Turnpike changed logos back in 1989 due to a letter campaign instigated by a moonbat teacher in central Massachusetts complaining that it was offensive to feather Indians.

    Old logo:
    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alpsroads.net%2Froads%2Fma%2Fi-90%2Farrow.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

    New logo:
    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.alpsroads.net%2Froads%2Fma%2Fi-90%2Fe.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

    I dunno, if I’m a local Nipmuc or Wampanoag, I would prefer the logo that shows my ancestors fought back!

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Brutusale


    a letter campaign instigated by a moonbat teacher in central Massachusetts complaining
     
    I don't understand why people give these obnoxious busy bodies a platform by responding. What if the Turnpike people just threw the letters in the trash?

    Another example was that Burk woman that scolded Augusta National for not having women members. All the Augusta chairman had to do was throw her letter away. Instead he replied defending them not having women members, and the next day the whole golf world knew who Martha Burk was and a s**t storm ensued, while one day earlier nobody had ever heard of her.

    If asked "hey what did you think of that Martha Burk letter" by some reporter, the correct answer is "Who is Martha Burk"?

    Replies: @Gamecock

  114. @theMann
    @Gamecock

    They are going to their 3rd WS in five seasons.


    Any team starting with Altuve, Correa, and Bregman at 2B-SS-3B is, pitching aside, better than any other team in the Majors; and looking at their 5 year run differential they already qualify as one of the best teams in ML history.


    And the really astounding part is that the Astros organization built through the draft, which is usually a stupendous crapshoot.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Altuve was an undrafted free agent. He cost the Astros \$15,000.

  115. @ScarletNumber
    @Trinity


    Anyhow, Atlanta has had professional big time sports since 1966 and they can only claim one world title. Hell, Milwaukee, the place the Braves played before moving to Atlanta has that and they only have two professional sports teams in the Big 4.
     
    The current Milwaukee teams actually have two, as the Kareem & Oscar Bucks won in 71. You mentioned the Braves winning in Milwaukee but I'm sure they would also claim the Packers, as they played multiple games in Milwaukee during most of their championship seasons, including the 67 NFL Western Conference championship game against the Rams. This was the week before the famous Ice Bowl. Ironically, because of the rotational system used then, the 9-4-1 Packers hosted the 11-1-2 Rams that day.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Trinity, @Jay Fink

    I happened to be at Disney World when the Braves opened their spring training complex there. A guy in front of me was wearing a cap the claimed three WS championships for Atlanta. I told him the hat is only true with a “B” and an “M” on it in addition to the “A”.

  116. @Steve Sailer
    @guest007

    Do they still have a minor league baseball team in Hawaii? They did in 1970, a good triple A team made up mostly of MLB veterans who'd aged out the big leagues and looked forward to collecting one or two more years paychecks in Hawaii.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @guest007, @ScarletNumber

    The AAA team left Hawaii in 1987. Since then Hawaii has tried twice to have a winter league baseball but both failed quickly.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_Islanders

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @guest007


    Since then Hawaii has tried twice to have a winter league baseball but both failed quickly.
     
    Have they tried collegiate leagues? This has worked for a number of small cities who couldn't keep a professional franchise. A notable example is Green Bay.



    https://northwoodsleague.com/green-bay-booyah/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/Story_SS-777x432.png


    "Booya(h)" is a dish of Belgian origin beloved by parishes and clubs of many ethnicities all over Minnesota and Wisconsin. The ingredients are traditionally kept a mystery, which seems to align with much of lower-level baseball's attitude. Green Bay is Belgian hotspot-- e.g., Curly Lambeau and Paul Gigot.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @ScarletNumber
    @guest007

    That 1987 team had Mike Yastrzemski, the father of the current Giant and the son of the former Red Sox. Ironically gramps is still alive while Mike died at 43.

    The last noteworthy player to play for Hawaii was Barry Bonds, who hit .311/.435/.527 in 44 games in 1986, earning himself a June call up with the Pirates.

  117. @ScarletNumber
    @Trinity


    Anyhow, Atlanta has had professional big time sports since 1966 and they can only claim one world title. Hell, Milwaukee, the place the Braves played before moving to Atlanta has that and they only have two professional sports teams in the Big 4.
     
    The current Milwaukee teams actually have two, as the Kareem & Oscar Bucks won in 71. You mentioned the Braves winning in Milwaukee but I'm sure they would also claim the Packers, as they played multiple games in Milwaukee during most of their championship seasons, including the 67 NFL Western Conference championship game against the Rams. This was the week before the famous Ice Bowl. Ironically, because of the rotational system used then, the 9-4-1 Packers hosted the 11-1-2 Rams that day.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Trinity, @Jay Fink

    Yeah I thought about that after I typed that one out. The Bucks shut down the Bullets in a 4 game sweep. Bullets would make it back again in 1975 only to be swept AGAIN this time by Rick Barry and the Golden State Warriors. The Brew Crew took it to the final day of the season before they edged out the O’s for the 1982 AL East Title. The Braves played St. Louis in the NL championship that year so a Braves vs. Brewer WS was in the works. Budweiser beat Miller in the battle of breweries WS of 1982. Good ole Harvey’s Wallbangers power hitters played hard but came up empty against the anemic Cardinals with their 67 total home runs.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Trinity

    What do you expect with the likes of Gorman Thomas? 35+ HRs, 110+ RBIs, and .240 BA? Once the big bats go silent, it's all over and the SO's pile up.

    Replies: @Ganderson

  118. @guest007
    @Curle

    Hawaii is an NFL oriented place since it comes on Sunday morning. The sports bars do Sunday brunch with their NFL. Monday night football was an adventure in Hawaii when it was on ABC because it was live on the radio but delayed on TV (the game started at 06:30 local time on TV). With Monday Night football being on ESPN, the interest is just not there because it starts while people are still at work.

    Very few basketball or baseball fans in Hawaii because cannot be watched live.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Tony massey

    I rarely missed a Cardinals game when i lived in the cook islands.
    And of course getting up at 3 am to watch the Vols on Saturday.
    I didn’t know a single person that had the slightest interest in any sport save for maybe surfing/paddle boarding or frisbee golf if that is a sport. Nobody cares about sport in the cook islands.
    Watched MLB all the time guy. For some reason the Oakland as and Giants were always on.
    Maholo

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Tony massey

    Hawaii used to be a 49ers area since the underwater cables from the U.S. to Hawaii started in San Francisco instead of Los Angeles. While visiting Johnston Island during the chemical weapon destruction operations, the television was provided by satellite out of Denver. So people there tended to be Broncos fans. New Mexico is odd because is used to be both Cowboys and Broncos media markets since the entire state was considered one television market operating out of Albuquerque.

    When Facebook does the analysis of where the fan bases are located, it is odd to see the areas that are far from any football market like Montana will default to being Packers or Cowboys fans.

  119. @John Johnson
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    What’s the point of being rich if your idea of fun is watching sports on TV? Can’t you do that while relatively poor?

    There is a scene in Annie Hall where Woody Allen sneaks away from a socialite party to watch the knicks. He basically says that intellectuals are full of s--t and needed a break. I really get the sentiment. Most of our intellectual class is a political club where virtue signaling is valued over independent thinking.

    I will sometimes turn on a game because it is usually less insulting than anything else on TV.

    In theory I would like to watch the news but which channel? They all have over the top bias. NPR is supposed to be public and is just as insulting as CNN. I don't think we even have news channels. They are political channels whereby producers try to push their view of the world.

    Sports are one of the few areas that clown world doesn't control. Sure they will push PC narratives at times but there is still a basic level of competition. If our clownish overlords could have their way then they would probably eliminate sports as they undermine the belief that racial genetics don't matter. If they didn't matter then 20% of defense lines would be Asian.

    Replies: @Up2Drew, @Dacian Julien Soros

    Sports is one of the few things in the modern world where the outcome is indeterminate. The drama is real – a bad hop or a wind-blown kick can end a team’s season or make memories for an entire city of followers.

    When was the last time you saw a movie in which you didn’t know within the first twenty minutes – especially in this woke culture – how it was going to end?

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Up2Drew


    When was the last time you saw a movie in which you didn’t know within the first twenty minutes – especially in this woke culture – how it was going to end?
     
    1973, The Long Goodbye -- because they took one of my favorite novels and brutally, inexplicably rewrote the last 20 minutes. "Chandler fans will hate my guts," said director Robert Altman. "I don't give a damn."
  120. @Trinity
    @Known Fact

    Nah, I can't forget the Baltimore Bullets aka Washington Bullets. I remember Gus Johnson came to my elementary school back in the day. To this day, I think the Baltimore Bullets was one of the coolest names in sports. IF I remember right, I think they changed it due to the fact that Washington became the murder capital of America during the time the team was named the Washington Bullets. Maybe or maybe not, but whether Washington led the nation in murders per capita the term Bullets was a little bit to spot on when describing this more violent than average city at the time. I don't look for declining Baltimore to ever sport 3 BIG LEAGUE teams again any time soon, but during one brief time period Baltimore's teams were almost as good as Tampa's sports franchises now, unless they played a team based out of New York called the Mets, Jets or Knicks. haha. And Earl The Pearl will always be a Baltimore Bullet and not a New York Knick. Knicks and the Bullets had quite the rivalry back long ago.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Danindc, @Reg Cæsar

    The Bullets were an entertaining act and had a lively rivalry with the Knicks way back when. Both teams actually played with a team concept. And they absolutely did change their name due to sensitivity over out-of-control black violence. (I haven’t checked lately, is there still a Detroit Pistons? Aren’t engines bad for the climate?)

    I also fondly recall rolling into Baltimore once in a while for a few days of baseball at the old yard. Same section, same usher, I’ve even got pictures with him — kinda like that beloved (although imaginary) train conductor Joe Biden is always babbling about.

  121. @Brutusale
    @Trinity

    The Massachusetts Turnpike changed logos back in 1989 due to a letter campaign instigated by a moonbat teacher in central Massachusetts complaining that it was offensive to feather Indians.

    Old logo:
    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alpsroads.net%2Froads%2Fma%2Fi-90%2Farrow.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

    New logo:
    https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.alpsroads.net%2Froads%2Fma%2Fi-90%2Fe.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

    I dunno, if I'm a local Nipmuc or Wampanoag, I would prefer the logo that shows my ancestors fought back!

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    a letter campaign instigated by a moonbat teacher in central Massachusetts complaining

    I don’t understand why people give these obnoxious busy bodies a platform by responding. What if the Turnpike people just threw the letters in the trash?

    Another example was that Burk woman that scolded Augusta National for not having women members. All the Augusta chairman had to do was throw her letter away. Instead he replied defending them not having women members, and the next day the whole golf world knew who Martha Burk was and a s**t storm ensued, while one day earlier nobody had ever heard of her.

    If asked “hey what did you think of that Martha Burk letter” by some reporter, the correct answer is “Who is Martha Burk”?

    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @William Badwhite

    Legacy press lost all their ad revenue to the internet. So the poor slobs scower twitter for content. The nation is being run by two millinials in their mothers' basements.

    Limbaugh (GRHS) used to say the country was run by two losers with a fax machine.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  122. @Up2Drew
    @John Johnson

    Sports is one of the few things in the modern world where the outcome is indeterminate. The drama is real - a bad hop or a wind-blown kick can end a team's season or make memories for an entire city of followers.

    When was the last time you saw a movie in which you didn't know within the first twenty minutes - especially in this woke culture - how it was going to end?

    Replies: @Known Fact

    When was the last time you saw a movie in which you didn’t know within the first twenty minutes – especially in this woke culture – how it was going to end?

    1973, The Long Goodbye — because they took one of my favorite novels and brutally, inexplicably rewrote the last 20 minutes. “Chandler fans will hate my guts,” said director Robert Altman. “I don’t give a damn.”

  123. @Steve Sailer
    @Yancey Ward

    Baseball is pretty regional. San Diego sells out when the Dodgers come to town. Milwaukee joined the National League to play the Cubs more often. Houston joined the AL to play the Texas Rangers.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Actually, from observation of last half decade, HOU may have joined the AL in no small part to make it easier to qualify for the postseason. May not be a slam dunk to advance to WS with LA and SF (and others of high competitive nature) in the NL.

  124. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Retro ballparks from the most recent turn of the century tend to have irregular outfield fences, in imitation of previous turn of the century ballparks like the Polo Grounds and Fenway Park, unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.

    The SF Giants ballpark, built 20 years ago, is 421 feet to right center to induce more triples and the occasional inside the park home run. The Astros ballpark has some weird features. It used to have a steep hill in deep center, but that was kind of silly and was taken out.

    The new Atlanta stadium is mostly symmetrical but it is slightly shorter to right than to left because lefthanders need even more advantages in baseball than they already have. Or something.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

    In the late ’50’s, MLB imposed a rule where poweralleys were not allowed to be less than 325 FT, and for newer ballparks to be built, the foul poles had to be at least around 320 or so; they wanted ballparks to be more symmetrical, as well as a more uniform way of measuring HR’s. No more cheap homeruns at foul poles less than 300 FT. Sabermetrics of all disciplines, should appreciate that nod to uniformity, because it means that if all the ballparks are uniform in their dimensions, then it’s easier to compare HR stats across the board and that there’s no unfair advantage by hitting in one ballpark over another.

    All of MLB’s ballparks built in the early 1910’s were built during the heyday of the Dead Ball Era, which meant: asymmetrical dimensions, for the simple reason was that HR’s were fairly rare. There wren’t as many inside the park HR’s either (else the official stats of that era would bear out that so and so a hitter had 25+ HR’s, with 23 of them inside the park). Plenty of triples, yes. HR’s, not so much.

    For the most part, starting with Camden Yards, the retro ballparks built maintain their poweralleys around 335-345 FT in LFCenter and RFCenter. Owners have long understood from the times of the 1930’s, the shorter the poweralleys’ distances, the more HRs hit. Example: PNC park’s LF/RF poweralleys are 325 FT, which is more common than either Houston or SF’s ballpark poweralleys.

    If every MLB ballpark were to suddenly make their poweralleys average 445 FT, and CF around 460 FT, then the total HR output would precipitously drop across the board.

    Example: during the span of the Polo Grounds in NY, only 4 hitters hit the ball toward the 483 FT sign in straight CF. Four. Period. It simply isn’t going to be done. The thing about modern HR sluggers, for the most part, is that they aren’t very fast on the bases. So while a couple of HR sluggers could theoretically slug the ball 460 FT, they don’t have the speed to make it around the bases. At best, most of them could make it to 2B. We can see this borne out as very few modern sluggers have double digit triples in any given year. A triple is one of the benchmarks of a pure speedster. One thing to hit the ball to the fence, another thing entirely to actually make it around the bases to 3B. And most sluggers simply can’t, they’d be thrown out by a mile if they attempted to make it to 3B.

  125. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Retro ballparks from the most recent turn of the century tend to have irregular outfield fences, in imitation of previous turn of the century ballparks like the Polo Grounds and Fenway Park, unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.

    The SF Giants ballpark, built 20 years ago, is 421 feet to right center to induce more triples and the occasional inside the park home run. The Astros ballpark has some weird features. It used to have a steep hill in deep center, but that was kind of silly and was taken out.

    The new Atlanta stadium is mostly symmetrical but it is slightly shorter to right than to left because lefthanders need even more advantages in baseball than they already have. Or something.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

    unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.

    Comiskey Park, built in 1910, was the first symmetrical field. It was also the oldest MLB park its last two decades. In a spacious lot, asymmetry raises suspicions. The old parks were lopsided because they were wedged into tight downtown lots.

    The Polo Grounds obviously wasn’t intended for baseball. Across the Pond, the Baseball Ground served Derby County Football Club from the 19th to the 21st century. Now they use something called Pride Park. Eww.

    Sir Francis Ley attempted to introduce baseball to England through his factory league. Didn’t take.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    The old parks were also built before a major innovation that took off starting in the 1920's: cars. As the decades wore on, it became apparent that the old MLB parks were doomed to be slated for demolition due to a lack of parking space. This became more pronounced in the '50's and especially during the '60's.

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Polo Grounds was actually built for Baseball by the owner of the NY Giants in 1890. The original Polo Grounds was at 112th street, but the city used eminent domain to seize the property in 1889 forcing the Giants to play in Jersey City while they built the new stadium up on 155th st. and Eighth Avenue.

    The New Polo Grounds was built specifically for Baseball in 1890, and rebuilt in 1911 after it burned to the ground. It was a strange looking baseball stadium, but it was indeed built as a baseball stadium and never used for Polo, the NY football Giants and the Jets both played football at the Polo grounds after the Giants moved to California.

  126. @R.G. Camara
    @prosa123

    The internet may have (finally) borne the long-championed fruit of people being able to work from anywhere, and doing it.

    Alex Jones and Joe Rogan have, separately, impressed upon much of their followers that one does not need to be in New York, DC, LA to be a major media figure (both) or have a national media empire (Jones).

    Meanwhile, Michael Voris at Church Militant has set up a powerful religious-anti-marxist news organization on the outskirts of Detroit and taken quite a few scalps while looking professional and no-different than corporate cable media.

    And many lesser-known but still popular YouTube personalities have shown that success is possible for people outside the old media triangle, e.g. Joker in Montana, Fresh & Fit in Miami, etc.

    It took COVID and a national crime wave to do it, but hey, I think its happening.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “The internet may have (finally) borne the long-championed fruit of people being able to work from anywhere, and doing it.”

    One of the major keys to the equations you’re missing, is that while it’s true that many can now host a national show from just about anywhere, that doesn’t mean that if the show is reliant upon hosting live guests, that the guests want to trudge out to nowheresville. Sometimes there is more to just hosting an online show: people do like to see the “live” event, hosted from downtown Manhattan, or Burbank. And why not? It’s not broken, no need to fix it. “Anyone” can work from home and host an online show, but why exactly should they be expected to get guests in studio seated alongside them? Anyone can do a virtual show with virtual guests for shoestring budgets, including shoestring advertising revenue.

    Another important matter is the role of advertising. Advertisers, for better or worse, still like the networks format of live guest in a specific Alist location. It’s lasted for decades for a reason, even in 2021. And most Alisters actually like being flown out to NY, or LA rather than say, Huntsville, AL or Albuquerque, NM.

    * As Hollywood is about 50-50 women, most actresses, if given the choice, would definitely prefer to be interviewed live in studio from LA or NY, and not from nowheresville, USA. Referring to live shows with live guests in studio, the US is intended to be the audience for NY or LA, not the other way around. And it still remains this way.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    ...while it’s true that many can now host a national show from just about anywhere, that doesn’t mean that if the show is reliant upon hosting live guests, that the guests want to trudge out to nowheresville.
     
    Then times have changed. A list of guests who "trudged" to Philadelphia, and before that Cleveland, to chat with Mike Douglas:

    Bob Hope, James Stewart, Edie Adams, Muhammad Ali, Marty Allen, Steve Allen, Ian Anderson, Lynn Anderson, Dana Andrews, Paul Anka, Louis Armstrong, Eddy Arnold, Fred Astaire, Joan Baez, Pearl Bailey, Lucille Ball, Sandy Baron, Leonard Barr, Yank Barry, Harry Belafonte, Richard Belzer, Joan Bennett, Milton Berle, Joey Bishop, Amanda Blake, Elayne Boosler, Victor Borge, Foster Brooks, Mel Brooks, Victor Buono, George Burns, Sid Caesar, Charlie Callas, George Carlin, Diahann Carroll, Jack Carter, Johnny Cash, Roy Clark, Rosemary Clooney, Imogene Coca, Sean Connery, Pat Cooper, Irwin Corey, Bill Cosby, Howard Cosell, Joan Crawford, Bing Crosby, Norm Crosby, Tony Curtis, Rodney Dangerfield, Jimmy Dean, Phyllis Diller, Angela Davis, Bette Davis, Sammy Davis Jr., Amrit Desai, Ronnie Dove, Richard Dreyfuss, Cass Elliott, Nanette Fabray, Lola Falana, Totie Fields, Carrie Fisher, Fannie Flagg, Harrison Ford, Redd Foxx, Connie Francis, Judy Garland, Eydie Gorme, Frank Gorshin, Robert Goulet, Shecky Greene, Tammy Grimes, Buddy Hackett, Mark Hamill, George Hamilton, Valerie Harper, Joey Heatherton, Alfred Hitchcock, Celeste Holm, Moe Howard of The Three Stooges, Janis Ian, George Jessel, Artie Johnson, Van Johnson, Jack Jones, Jim Jones, Stan Kann, Andy Kaufman, Howard Keel, Gene Kelly, Alan King, Martin Luther King Jr., Eartha Kitt, Robert Klein, Kreskin, Frankie Laine, Dorothy Lamour, Steve Landesberg, Peter Lawford, Carol Lawrence, Jack Lemmon, Jay Leno, Rich Little, Ernst Lohmeyer, Jack Lord, Malcolm X, Marcel Marceau, Dick Martin, Lee Marvin, Sergio Mendes, Ethel Merman, James Meredith, Liza Minnelli, Martha Mitchell, Ricardo Montalban, Roger Moore, Mother Teresa, Jan Murray, Madelyn Murray O'Hair, Ralph Nader, Joe Namath, Paul Newman, Olivia Newton-John, Richard Nixon, Patti Page, Gloria Parker, Jack Palance, Molly Picon, Vincent Price, George Raft, Lou Rawls, Martha Raye, Rex Reed, Mason Reese, Debbie Reynolds, Buddy Rich, Joan Rivers, Pernell Roberts, Cliff Robertson, Lawrence Rocks, Ginger Rogers, Kenny Rogers, Mickey Rooney, Dan Rowan, Jerry Rubin, Soupy Sales, Tony Sandler, George Schindler,[2] William Shatner, Dick Shawn, Sam Sheppard, Beverly Sills, Gene Simmons, Red Skelton, Kaye Stevens, Ray Stevens, Dr. Cody Sweet, Bernie Taupin, Rip Taylor, Gene Tierney, Tiny Tim, Lily Tomlin, John Travolta, Tina Turner, Vivian Vance, Natalie Wood, Robert Wagner, Peter Ustinov, Jerry Vale, Caterina Valente, Frankie Valli, Gwen Verdon, Ben Vereen, Tom Waits, Jimmie Walker, Jonathan Winters, Roger Williams (pianist), Fulton J. Sheen, Tiger Woods


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mike_Douglas_Show#Guests
     
    KOkay, Woods was only two.)

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  127. @Tony massey
    @guest007

    I rarely missed a Cardinals game when i lived in the cook islands.
    And of course getting up at 3 am to watch the Vols on Saturday.
    I didn't know a single person that had the slightest interest in any sport save for maybe surfing/paddle boarding or frisbee golf if that is a sport. Nobody cares about sport in the cook islands.
    Watched MLB all the time guy. For some reason the Oakland as and Giants were always on.
    Maholo

    Replies: @guest007

    Hawaii used to be a 49ers area since the underwater cables from the U.S. to Hawaii started in San Francisco instead of Los Angeles. While visiting Johnston Island during the chemical weapon destruction operations, the television was provided by satellite out of Denver. So people there tended to be Broncos fans. New Mexico is odd because is used to be both Cowboys and Broncos media markets since the entire state was considered one television market operating out of Albuquerque.

    When Facebook does the analysis of where the fan bases are located, it is odd to see the areas that are far from any football market like Montana will default to being Packers or Cowboys fans.

  128. When MLB went to four divisions in 1969, with the two division winners in each league playing a series to see which team won the pennant, it created a situation where a weak division winner could win the pennant, by getting lucky in the series, over several teams in the other division that had better seasons. This was first demonstrated with the 1973 Mets, and happened several other times.

    The problem was that in 1969 each league went to twelve teams each. Fans of the weaker teams in each league/ division losing interest in the second half of the season was already a problem when there were two leagues with eight teams each. There was no way to avoid divisional play as the number of teams in each team increased. The problem was expansion, not the format.

    For example, if MLB had stuck with the four division format, there would be seven or eight teams in each division, about the same number that were in each league before 1961. And the National League East winner would have been the 95-67 Brewers, or the 90-72 Cardinals, if in this universe the Astros -Brewers League switch does not happen. That is better than the 88-73 Braves, but not by much.

    Granted, forcing ten teams, out of thirty, into the playoffs, through the wild card “play in” games, makes the problem worse, though under the system introduced in 1995, the Braves still make the playoffs.

    I’m in favor of contraction myself, but if we are to have thirty teams, and ten of those in the playoffs, I would prefer a system of five three team divisions in each league. The five division winners in each league qualify for a round robin playoff, where the top two finishers of the round robin go to the championship series. In the round robin, the team with the better record would have home field advantage, so the team with the best regular season record in the league would play all their round robin games at home, so would have a bigger advantage than in the present system.

    In 2020, if MLB had announced that the entire season was cancelled due to COVID, but the the Dodgers would be the official champion that year since they were obviously the best team on paper, I don’t think people would have complained that much.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @eD


    where a weak division winner could win the pennant, by getting lucky in the series
     
    Or worse, take the last week off to relax after clinching the losing division, which is what Minnesota did in 1987. I know, because my housemate there predicted this would happen early that September. The Twins' last win was the clincher. This is not illegal, but it's certainly unethical.

    Johnny789 says the Indians did this too, after being cheated the two previous seasons. In their case, it was justified.
  129. @Gamecock
    Back in the 60s and 70s, we said, "If it weren't for Georgia Tech, Atlanta wouldn't have any professional teams."

    Replies: @Trinity

    It could be worse. You could be a San Diego or Minnesota fan. Vikings = O + 0 for 4 in the big game , Twins = 2 and they have a few years on the ATLANTA Braves, Timberwolves = Goose egg, * North Stars = defunct but O for 26.

    San Diego has to not only be perpetual losers but they play in a state with legendary teams like the Raiders ( well used to be the Raiders were in Cali), the Swinging A’s, San Fran Giants/49ers, Golden State Warriors, Los Angeles Lakers/Dodgers. San Diego Chargers = no Superbowl wins, have to go way back to the AFL days where they snagged a couple titles. Padres = 0. Only saving grace for San Diego is that they only had 2 teams and not 4 like the ATL had at one time.

    Probably could think of other cities that could vie for the Loserville, USA title. New Orleans would be in the running. Tampa used to be a major loser with football and baseball until the last few years. Tampa Bucs in the Creamsickle era where the worst of the worst and the Rays took quite awhile to get going. The ATL is safe as long as you have the San Diego and Minnesota type teams around and of course, those Buffalo Bills of the 1990s and the terrible teams they had when the Juice ran for his life every Sunday.

  130. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.
     
    Comiskey Park, built in 1910, was the first symmetrical field. It was also the oldest MLB park its last two decades. In a spacious lot, asymmetry raises suspicions. The old parks were lopsided because they were wedged into tight downtown lots.

    The Polo Grounds obviously wasn't intended for baseball. Across the Pond, the Baseball Ground served Derby County Football Club from the 19th to the 21st century. Now they use something called Pride Park. Eww.

    Sir Francis Ley attempted to introduce baseball to England through his factory league. Didn't take.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    The old parks were also built before a major innovation that took off starting in the 1920’s: cars. As the decades wore on, it became apparent that the old MLB parks were doomed to be slated for demolition due to a lack of parking space. This became more pronounced in the ’50’s and especially during the ’60’s.

  131. @Trinity
    @ScarletNumber

    Yeah I thought about that after I typed that one out. The Bucks shut down the Bullets in a 4 game sweep. Bullets would make it back again in 1975 only to be swept AGAIN this time by Rick Barry and the Golden State Warriors. The Brew Crew took it to the final day of the season before they edged out the O's for the 1982 AL East Title. The Braves played St. Louis in the NL championship that year so a Braves vs. Brewer WS was in the works. Budweiser beat Miller in the battle of breweries WS of 1982. Good ole Harvey's Wallbangers power hitters played hard but came up empty against the anemic Cardinals with their 67 total home runs.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    What do you expect with the likes of Gorman Thomas? 35+ HRs, 110+ RBIs, and .240 BA? Once the big bats go silent, it’s all over and the SO’s pile up.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    One of my prized possessions is a “Stormin’ Gorman” bobblehead in the uniform of the Seattle Pilots.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  132. @Trinity
    @Known Fact

    Nah, I can't forget the Baltimore Bullets aka Washington Bullets. I remember Gus Johnson came to my elementary school back in the day. To this day, I think the Baltimore Bullets was one of the coolest names in sports. IF I remember right, I think they changed it due to the fact that Washington became the murder capital of America during the time the team was named the Washington Bullets. Maybe or maybe not, but whether Washington led the nation in murders per capita the term Bullets was a little bit to spot on when describing this more violent than average city at the time. I don't look for declining Baltimore to ever sport 3 BIG LEAGUE teams again any time soon, but during one brief time period Baltimore's teams were almost as good as Tampa's sports franchises now, unless they played a team based out of New York called the Mets, Jets or Knicks. haha. And Earl The Pearl will always be a Baltimore Bullet and not a New York Knick. Knicks and the Bullets had quite the rivalry back long ago.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Danindc, @Reg Cæsar

    Abe Pollin changed it after the assaination of some Israeli PM. Maybe Shamir can’t remember.

  133. @Trinity
    @Danindc

    I think the O's should be 4-2 in the World Series. Yep, they should have went on to the World Series against the Marlins in 1997, and the Giants in 2014, I don't see them beating the Giants in 2014 though. So that would put the O's at 4-4. All 3 of the Orioles losses in World Series play came against teams they should have beat easily, they choked both times against the inferior Pirates and lost to the pathetic Miracle Mets. Ironically, they should not have beaten the Dodgers in 1966 or the Reds in 1970. Take away the two chokes against Pittsburgh and that puts them at a pretty good hypothetical series record of 6-2 which isn't exactly the Yankees or Cardinals but still not bad. And lest we forget the O's won 100 games in 1980 and didn't even make it to the playoffs. They finished 3 games behind the Yankees that year. Was a sucessful franchise for decades, but now, not so much.

    Replies: @Danindc

    That seems about right but they did blow out the Dodgers and Reds. Don’t forget Jeffrey Maier in 1996.

    • Thanks: Trinity
  134. I don’t know if the Soviet Union ever used a single time zone, but China – which is wider than the 48 contiguous states of the USA – did and does.

    China abuts Afghanistan at the Wakhan corridor. The three-and-a-half-hour jump is the biggest in the world, unless you count the International Date Line. And that’s less jarring in practice; you change the day, usually not the hour.

    Only local tribesmen are permitted to cross the Afghan-Chinese border. They measure time in days, not hours. Even Chinese aren’t allowed to visit the area on their side.

    For comparison, Lahore, Pakistan is about the same longitude as this border, and Lombok in Indonesia lies straight down the meridian from Peking. Their respective times are three hours apart.

    That’s how wacky Chinese time is. It’s almost a justification for independence by itself.

  135. @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    The AAA team left Hawaii in 1987. Since then Hawaii has tried twice to have a winter league baseball but both failed quickly.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_Islanders

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @ScarletNumber

    Since then Hawaii has tried twice to have a winter league baseball but both failed quickly.

    Have they tried collegiate leagues? This has worked for a number of small cities who couldn’t keep a professional franchise. A notable example is Green Bay.

    “Booya(h)” is a dish of Belgian origin beloved by parishes and clubs of many ethnicities all over Minnesota and Wisconsin. The ingredients are traditionally kept a mystery, which seems to align with much of lower-level baseball’s attitude. Green Bay is Belgian hotspot– e.g., Curly Lambeau and Paul Gigot.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    As a whole, the state of WI was mainly settled by Germans. Then some Poles came in later on, and there went the neighborhood.

    You sure Booyah is a Belgian word? Sounds like it could be Yiddish.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ganderson

  136. @Reg Cæsar
    @guest007


    Since then Hawaii has tried twice to have a winter league baseball but both failed quickly.
     
    Have they tried collegiate leagues? This has worked for a number of small cities who couldn't keep a professional franchise. A notable example is Green Bay.



    https://northwoodsleague.com/green-bay-booyah/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2018/11/Story_SS-777x432.png


    "Booya(h)" is a dish of Belgian origin beloved by parishes and clubs of many ethnicities all over Minnesota and Wisconsin. The ingredients are traditionally kept a mystery, which seems to align with much of lower-level baseball's attitude. Green Bay is Belgian hotspot-- e.g., Curly Lambeau and Paul Gigot.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    As a whole, the state of WI was mainly settled by Germans. Then some Poles came in later on, and there went the neighborhood.

    You sure Booyah is a Belgian word? Sounds like it could be Yiddish.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    You sure Booyah is a Belgian word? Sounds like it could be Yiddish.
     
    It's supposedly from bouillon. Not many Yids in the Green Bay area.
    , @Ganderson
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    No shortage of Scandinavians in America’s Dairyland, either.

  137. @eD
    When MLB went to four divisions in 1969, with the two division winners in each league playing a series to see which team won the pennant, it created a situation where a weak division winner could win the pennant, by getting lucky in the series, over several teams in the other division that had better seasons. This was first demonstrated with the 1973 Mets, and happened several other times.

    The problem was that in 1969 each league went to twelve teams each. Fans of the weaker teams in each league/ division losing interest in the second half of the season was already a problem when there were two leagues with eight teams each. There was no way to avoid divisional play as the number of teams in each team increased. The problem was expansion, not the format.

    For example, if MLB had stuck with the four division format, there would be seven or eight teams in each division, about the same number that were in each league before 1961. And the National League East winner would have been the 95-67 Brewers, or the 90-72 Cardinals, if in this universe the Astros -Brewers League switch does not happen. That is better than the 88-73 Braves, but not by much.

    Granted, forcing ten teams, out of thirty, into the playoffs, through the wild card "play in" games, makes the problem worse, though under the system introduced in 1995, the Braves still make the playoffs.

    I'm in favor of contraction myself, but if we are to have thirty teams, and ten of those in the playoffs, I would prefer a system of five three team divisions in each league. The five division winners in each league qualify for a round robin playoff, where the top two finishers of the round robin go to the championship series. In the round robin, the team with the better record would have home field advantage, so the team with the best regular season record in the league would play all their round robin games at home, so would have a bigger advantage than in the present system.

    In 2020, if MLB had announced that the entire season was cancelled due to COVID, but the the Dodgers would be the official champion that year since they were obviously the best team on paper, I don't think people would have complained that much.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    where a weak division winner could win the pennant, by getting lucky in the series

    Or worse, take the last week off to relax after clinching the losing division, which is what Minnesota did in 1987. I know, because my housemate there predicted this would happen early that September. The Twins’ last win was the clincher. This is not illegal, but it’s certainly unethical.

    Johnny789 says the Indians did this too, after being cheated the two previous seasons. In their case, it was justified.

  138. @Trinity
    @Known Fact

    Nah, I can't forget the Baltimore Bullets aka Washington Bullets. I remember Gus Johnson came to my elementary school back in the day. To this day, I think the Baltimore Bullets was one of the coolest names in sports. IF I remember right, I think they changed it due to the fact that Washington became the murder capital of America during the time the team was named the Washington Bullets. Maybe or maybe not, but whether Washington led the nation in murders per capita the term Bullets was a little bit to spot on when describing this more violent than average city at the time. I don't look for declining Baltimore to ever sport 3 BIG LEAGUE teams again any time soon, but during one brief time period Baltimore's teams were almost as good as Tampa's sports franchises now, unless they played a team based out of New York called the Mets, Jets or Knicks. haha. And Earl The Pearl will always be a Baltimore Bullet and not a New York Knick. Knicks and the Bullets had quite the rivalry back long ago.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Danindc, @Reg Cæsar

    To this day, I think the Baltimore Bullets was one of the coolest names in sports.

    They were named for a sneaker:

    I think they changed it due to the fact that Washington became the murder capital of America during the time the team was named the Washington Bullets.

    How many of those homicides were over sneakers?

    • LOL: Trinity
  139. @William Badwhite
    @Brutusale


    a letter campaign instigated by a moonbat teacher in central Massachusetts complaining
     
    I don't understand why people give these obnoxious busy bodies a platform by responding. What if the Turnpike people just threw the letters in the trash?

    Another example was that Burk woman that scolded Augusta National for not having women members. All the Augusta chairman had to do was throw her letter away. Instead he replied defending them not having women members, and the next day the whole golf world knew who Martha Burk was and a s**t storm ensued, while one day earlier nobody had ever heard of her.

    If asked "hey what did you think of that Martha Burk letter" by some reporter, the correct answer is "Who is Martha Burk"?

    Replies: @Gamecock

    Legacy press lost all their ad revenue to the internet. So the poor slobs scower twitter for content. The nation is being run by two millinials in their mothers’ basements.

    Limbaugh (GRHS) used to say the country was run by two losers with a fax machine.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Gamecock


    So the poor slobs scower twitter for content.
     
    Martha Burk didn't have twitter in 2002.

    The "no women at Augusta National" only became headline news because Hootie Johnson chose to publicly respond to a letter from some nagging shrew. All he had to do to avoid the situation was throw her letter in the trash.
  140. @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer


    Does Rogan have his guests fly into Austin?
     
    I believe so. I don't think Spotify (to which Rogan is signed) or Rogan at his current level would have made the move if they weren't confident Rogan could still get famous people on despite being in Austin. Of course, Rogan is very good at getting interesting lesser-known folks on to talk about niche subjects and have everyone riveted. I'd much rather listen to a Rogan interview of a flat earther or a guy realy knowledgable about high-end watches than some A-list celeb interview where Rogan has been barred pre-interview from asking about various sensitive subjects, his interview with Robert Downey Jr. (at least in the clips I saw) was so kid-glove friendly I stopped watching.

    Late night talk shows are typically filmed in L.A. or N.Y. because that’s where the celebrities are.
     
    True, more in LA than NYC for obvious reasons. Conan O' Brien agreed to move from NYC to LA to host The Tonight Show (which Leno subsequently stole back), and then stayed in LA to do his TBS show -- both for the same reason: LA had more celebs.

    I always thought this was a mistake. O'Brien's previous show was filmed in NYC --Late Night With Conan O'Brien -- and he shined when, thanks to his shoestring budget, location, and low expectations, he basically had no A-list celebrities for years, so he had to make do with B-Listers, skit-making, and interacting with everyday folks during remote spots or normal folks getting 15-minutes in his guest chair.

    This made O'Brien hyper-creative and good at making bad things work, and also allowed him to find truly "funny" guests and not just famous ones -- e.g. Norm MacDonald was a constant guest even when he was just " new guy from SNL", and folks like Amy Poehler and Will Ferrell were constantly present even very early in their careers, or find folks like Fabio or Abe Vigoda or Al Roker or Chuck Norris who were funnier and more laid back and self-lampooning than anyone ever thought. And his skits with NYCers were awesome as he managed to make even old-timey baseball games funny.

    But by the end of his Late Night run, when he was getting A-listers, he seemed far too hemmed in by the A-Listers and their demands on his interviews (e.g. no questions about their arrest records or drug use or other tabloid fodder). Moving to LA made him very A-list dependent and took away his style. He should've gone back to NYC and scrounged around more, O'Brien is at his best when working with nothing.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    O’Brien’s previous show was filmed in NYC —Late Night With Conan O’Brien — and he shined when, thanks to his shoestring budget, location, and low expectations, he basically had no A-list celebrities for years, so he had to make do with B-Listers

    This was Letterman’s key to success when he hosted the same program. Johnny Carson owned a piece of the show and to differentiate between the shows Johnny imposed these limitations on it. That’s why Letterman’s band had no brass as well.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @ScarletNumber

    Because of these limitations, perhaps Letterman thought that these were dues he was paying until one day Johnny would tap him to be his successor. Letterman certainly thought he was going to be Carson's successor to the Tonight Show. Probably came as a complete shocker when Leno got the show instead.

  141. @Ganderson
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    There was a pretty good episode of MASH wrapped around the ‘51 pennant race.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    A War for All Seasons, episode 906, aired December 29, 1980. It covered all of 1951 from beginning to end. Directed by Burt Metcalfe and written by Dan Wilcox & Thad Mumford.

  142. @ScarletNumber
    @R.G. Camara


    O’Brien’s previous show was filmed in NYC —Late Night With Conan O’Brien — and he shined when, thanks to his shoestring budget, location, and low expectations, he basically had no A-list celebrities for years, so he had to make do with B-Listers
     
    This was Letterman's key to success when he hosted the same program. Johnny Carson owned a piece of the show and to differentiate between the shows Johnny imposed these limitations on it. That's why Letterman's band had no brass as well.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Because of these limitations, perhaps Letterman thought that these were dues he was paying until one day Johnny would tap him to be his successor. Letterman certainly thought he was going to be Carson’s successor to the Tonight Show. Probably came as a complete shocker when Leno got the show instead.

  143. @Ganderson
    @Curle

    In Ball Four Bouton pitched for the Seattle Pilots, whose AAA club was Honolulu. He observed the following: you get sent down, and 6 weeks later you’re called back up. What if you don’t wanna go?

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Your memory is playing slight tricks on you. When Bouton pitched for the Pilots, their AAA team was in Vancouver, while the Hawaii team was affiliated with the Angels. Coincidentally the previous year Bouton pitched for the AAA Seattle Angels in the same stadium he would pitch in the AL the following year.

    TLDR: Bouton pitched in Hawaii as a minor leaguer in 1969, but only as a visitor.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @ScarletNumber

    Thanks- it’s been awhile since I read the book, but I think he did make the point about being sent down to Honolulu.

  144. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    As a whole, the state of WI was mainly settled by Germans. Then some Poles came in later on, and there went the neighborhood.

    You sure Booyah is a Belgian word? Sounds like it could be Yiddish.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ganderson

    You sure Booyah is a Belgian word? Sounds like it could be Yiddish.

    It’s supposedly from bouillon. Not many Yids in the Green Bay area.

  145. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @R.G. Camara

    "The internet may have (finally) borne the long-championed fruit of people being able to work from anywhere, and doing it."


    One of the major keys to the equations you're missing, is that while it's true that many can now host a national show from just about anywhere, that doesn't mean that if the show is reliant upon hosting live guests, that the guests want to trudge out to nowheresville. Sometimes there is more to just hosting an online show: people do like to see the "live" event, hosted from downtown Manhattan, or Burbank. And why not? It's not broken, no need to fix it. "Anyone" can work from home and host an online show, but why exactly should they be expected to get guests in studio seated alongside them? Anyone can do a virtual show with virtual guests for shoestring budgets, including shoestring advertising revenue.

    Another important matter is the role of advertising. Advertisers, for better or worse, still like the networks format of live guest in a specific Alist location. It's lasted for decades for a reason, even in 2021. And most Alisters actually like being flown out to NY, or LA rather than say, Huntsville, AL or Albuquerque, NM.

    * As Hollywood is about 50-50 women, most actresses, if given the choice, would definitely prefer to be interviewed live in studio from LA or NY, and not from nowheresville, USA. Referring to live shows with live guests in studio, the US is intended to be the audience for NY or LA, not the other way around. And it still remains this way.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …while it’s true that many can now host a national show from just about anywhere, that doesn’t mean that if the show is reliant upon hosting live guests, that the guests want to trudge out to nowheresville.

    Then times have changed. A list of guests who “trudged” to Philadelphia, and before that Cleveland, to chat with Mike Douglas:

    Bob Hope, James Stewart, Edie Adams, Muhammad Ali, Marty Allen, Steve Allen, Ian Anderson, Lynn Anderson, Dana Andrews, Paul Anka, Louis Armstrong, Eddy Arnold, Fred Astaire, Joan Baez, Pearl Bailey, Lucille Ball, Sandy Baron, Leonard Barr, Yank Barry, Harry Belafonte, Richard Belzer, Joan Bennett, Milton Berle, Joey Bishop, Amanda Blake, Elayne Boosler, Victor Borge, Foster Brooks, Mel Brooks, Victor Buono, George Burns, Sid Caesar, Charlie Callas, George Carlin, Diahann Carroll, Jack Carter, Johnny Cash, Roy Clark, Rosemary Clooney, Imogene Coca, Sean Connery, Pat Cooper, Irwin Corey, Bill Cosby, Howard Cosell, Joan Crawford, Bing Crosby, Norm Crosby, Tony Curtis, Rodney Dangerfield, Jimmy Dean, Phyllis Diller, Angela Davis, Bette Davis, Sammy Davis Jr., Amrit Desai, Ronnie Dove, Richard Dreyfuss, Cass Elliott, Nanette Fabray, Lola Falana, Totie Fields, Carrie Fisher, Fannie Flagg, Harrison Ford, Redd Foxx, Connie Francis, Judy Garland, Eydie Gorme, Frank Gorshin, Robert Goulet, Shecky Greene, Tammy Grimes, Buddy Hackett, Mark Hamill, George Hamilton, Valerie Harper, Joey Heatherton, Alfred Hitchcock, Celeste Holm, Moe Howard of The Three Stooges, Janis Ian, George Jessel, Artie Johnson, Van Johnson, Jack Jones, Jim Jones, Stan Kann, Andy Kaufman, Howard Keel, Gene Kelly, Alan King, Martin Luther King Jr., Eartha Kitt, Robert Klein, Kreskin, Frankie Laine, Dorothy Lamour, Steve Landesberg, Peter Lawford, Carol Lawrence, Jack Lemmon, Jay Leno, Rich Little, Ernst Lohmeyer, Jack Lord, Malcolm X, Marcel Marceau, Dick Martin, Lee Marvin, Sergio Mendes, Ethel Merman, James Meredith, Liza Minnelli, Martha Mitchell, Ricardo Montalban, Roger Moore, Mother Teresa, Jan Murray, Madelyn Murray O’Hair, Ralph Nader, Joe Namath, Paul Newman, Olivia Newton-John, Richard Nixon, Patti Page, Gloria Parker, Jack Palance, Molly Picon, Vincent Price, George Raft, Lou Rawls, Martha Raye, Rex Reed, Mason Reese, Debbie Reynolds, Buddy Rich, Joan Rivers, Pernell Roberts, Cliff Robertson, Lawrence Rocks, Ginger Rogers, Kenny Rogers, Mickey Rooney, Dan Rowan, Jerry Rubin, Soupy Sales, Tony Sandler, George Schindler,[2] William Shatner, Dick Shawn, Sam Sheppard, Beverly Sills, Gene Simmons, Red Skelton, Kaye Stevens, Ray Stevens, Dr. Cody Sweet, Bernie Taupin, Rip Taylor, Gene Tierney, Tiny Tim, Lily Tomlin, John Travolta, Tina Turner, Vivian Vance, Natalie Wood, Robert Wagner, Peter Ustinov, Jerry Vale, Caterina Valente, Frankie Valli, Gwen Verdon, Ben Vereen, Tom Waits, Jimmie Walker, Jonathan Winters, Roger Williams (pianist), Fulton J. Sheen, Tiger Woods

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mike_Douglas_Show#Guests

    KOkay, Woods was only two.)

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    Philly is somewhat of a low Alist, or high B list city.

    Also for the most part, if one takes the time to observe, the vast majority of network shows are based in NY or LA (sometimes in DC, which tends to make sense if the show is politically centered).

    Like, it makes sense, does it not, that the vast majority of Hollywood focused shows on the networks are based in, you know, the LA area? Or at least in NY. If we go down the list, Carson, Leno, Fallon, Letterman, Paar, Allen, etc. where were these shows based? Either in NY or in LA.

    There's a reason why pop culture in general focused on these two cities. Three guesses as to why that is so. Variety shows in general as well as game shows (Trabeck, Barker, Sajak, etc) were based in NY or in LA.

  146. @guest007
    @Steve Sailer

    The AAA team left Hawaii in 1987. Since then Hawaii has tried twice to have a winter league baseball but both failed quickly.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_Islanders

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @ScarletNumber

    That 1987 team had Mike Yastrzemski, the father of the current Giant and the son of the former Red Sox. Ironically gramps is still alive while Mike died at 43.

    The last noteworthy player to play for Hawaii was Barry Bonds, who hit .311/.435/.527 in 44 games in 1986, earning himself a June call up with the Pirates.

  147. @Steve Sailer
    @guest007

    Do they still have a minor league baseball team in Hawaii? They did in 1970, a good triple A team made up mostly of MLB veterans who'd aged out the big leagues and looked forward to collecting one or two more years paychecks in Hawaii.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @guest007, @ScarletNumber

    The star pitchers of that team were Dennis Bennett (18-8) and Juan Pizarro (9-0). They were both former MLB pitchers, but Pizarro was a 2-time All-Star in 63 64 while going 16-8 and 19-9.

    Their star batter was Jim Hicks, who played 93 games in MLB 64-70 mostly with the Angels.

  148. @Reg Cæsar
    @mikeInThe716


    An early November storm will make Fenway, Yankee Stadium or some northern city a snowy joke – it’s only a matter of time.
     
    The late, unlamented Metrodome had a game snowed out in its opening week. The field playing surface was untouched, but nobody could get downtown for the game.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    This never happened. AFAIK the only game in Metrodome history to be postponed was on December 12, 2010. The Giants weren’t able to fly in to play the Vikings that day due to a blizzard so the game was postponed a day. It ended up being a moot point as the roof collapsed anyway so the game was moved to Detroit.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ScarletNumber

    I got the year wrong. It was the stadium's second season:


    Another myth concerns the only postponement to date at the Metrodome. The stadium’s roof was prone to collapsing under the weight of snow. The first time this happened was in November of 1981, before the Metrodome opened. Early in the 1983 season, a storm dropped 13 ½ inches of wet, heavy snow on the Twin Cites beginning on Wednesday night, April 13 and continuing into the next morning. The Twins had a game scheduled against the California Angels at the Metrodome on Thursday night that was postponed because of the storm. Late Thursday evening, a chunk of ice tore a 20-foot gap in the roof of the Metrodome, causing it to deflate. The roof collapse is often given as the reason for the postponement. However, the game had already been postponed nearly 12 hours before out of concern for safety of the fans and Twins players trying to get to the game as well as the fact that the Twins opponents weren’t available. The Angels had taken an overnight flight from California and arrived over the Twin Cities at about 5:30 on Thursday morning. The plane was unable to land and was diverted to Chicago, where the Angels spent the day. The roof was quickly repaired and re-inflated, and the Angels arrived in Minnesota in time for the Friday night game to be played.

    https://sabr.org/bioproj/park/metrodome-minneapolis/

     

    The Astrodome had a similar, if warmer incident, and the SkyDome as well.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrodome#June_15.2C_1976_.22The_Rainout.22

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  149. @Steve Sailer
    @Alvin

    Who was going to beat them? They went 43-17 in the regular season and 13-5 in the post season. They played three fine teams in the playoffs -- San Diego, Atlanta, and Tampa Bay.

    Sure, if they'd played a 162 game season, they might have suffered catastrophic injuries that would have kept them from winning the World Series. But that just suggests that 2020 was _less_ fluky: the Dodgers were clearly the best team in baseball in 2020.

    Replies: @Anon

    Injuries are a part of the game. So is playing a real, actual 162 game season and not some less than 100 game BS. Dodgers fans coping that their “World Series” “Win” Isn’t the same thing as George Floyd and Trayvon Martin being declared holy men by the New York Times

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The wimpy MLB should play 200 games per year like the old Pacific Coast League.

    Replies: @John Johnson

  150. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Injuries are a part of the game. So is playing a real, actual 162 game season and not some less than 100 game BS. Dodgers fans coping that their "World Series" "Win" Isn't the same thing as George Floyd and Trayvon Martin being declared holy men by the New York Times

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The wimpy MLB should play 200 games per year like the old Pacific Coast League.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Steve Sailer

    Try watching baseball in a state with actual seasons.

    Californians freak out when the weather drops below 50. I would like to see how many would show up to games in below freezing weather.

    162 games requires too many pitchers. A low budget team can come across an amazing pitcher but still lose the season because there are so many damn games. 7 innings and 100 games would make it harder for the wealthier teams to just bankroll power hitters that crack off average pitchers.

  151. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The wimpy MLB should play 200 games per year like the old Pacific Coast League.

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Try watching baseball in a state with actual seasons.

    Californians freak out when the weather drops below 50. I would like to see how many would show up to games in below freezing weather.

    162 games requires too many pitchers. A low budget team can come across an amazing pitcher but still lose the season because there are so many damn games. 7 innings and 100 games would make it harder for the wealthier teams to just bankroll power hitters that crack off average pitchers.

  152. @Reg Cæsar
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi


    ...while it’s true that many can now host a national show from just about anywhere, that doesn’t mean that if the show is reliant upon hosting live guests, that the guests want to trudge out to nowheresville.
     
    Then times have changed. A list of guests who "trudged" to Philadelphia, and before that Cleveland, to chat with Mike Douglas:

    Bob Hope, James Stewart, Edie Adams, Muhammad Ali, Marty Allen, Steve Allen, Ian Anderson, Lynn Anderson, Dana Andrews, Paul Anka, Louis Armstrong, Eddy Arnold, Fred Astaire, Joan Baez, Pearl Bailey, Lucille Ball, Sandy Baron, Leonard Barr, Yank Barry, Harry Belafonte, Richard Belzer, Joan Bennett, Milton Berle, Joey Bishop, Amanda Blake, Elayne Boosler, Victor Borge, Foster Brooks, Mel Brooks, Victor Buono, George Burns, Sid Caesar, Charlie Callas, George Carlin, Diahann Carroll, Jack Carter, Johnny Cash, Roy Clark, Rosemary Clooney, Imogene Coca, Sean Connery, Pat Cooper, Irwin Corey, Bill Cosby, Howard Cosell, Joan Crawford, Bing Crosby, Norm Crosby, Tony Curtis, Rodney Dangerfield, Jimmy Dean, Phyllis Diller, Angela Davis, Bette Davis, Sammy Davis Jr., Amrit Desai, Ronnie Dove, Richard Dreyfuss, Cass Elliott, Nanette Fabray, Lola Falana, Totie Fields, Carrie Fisher, Fannie Flagg, Harrison Ford, Redd Foxx, Connie Francis, Judy Garland, Eydie Gorme, Frank Gorshin, Robert Goulet, Shecky Greene, Tammy Grimes, Buddy Hackett, Mark Hamill, George Hamilton, Valerie Harper, Joey Heatherton, Alfred Hitchcock, Celeste Holm, Moe Howard of The Three Stooges, Janis Ian, George Jessel, Artie Johnson, Van Johnson, Jack Jones, Jim Jones, Stan Kann, Andy Kaufman, Howard Keel, Gene Kelly, Alan King, Martin Luther King Jr., Eartha Kitt, Robert Klein, Kreskin, Frankie Laine, Dorothy Lamour, Steve Landesberg, Peter Lawford, Carol Lawrence, Jack Lemmon, Jay Leno, Rich Little, Ernst Lohmeyer, Jack Lord, Malcolm X, Marcel Marceau, Dick Martin, Lee Marvin, Sergio Mendes, Ethel Merman, James Meredith, Liza Minnelli, Martha Mitchell, Ricardo Montalban, Roger Moore, Mother Teresa, Jan Murray, Madelyn Murray O'Hair, Ralph Nader, Joe Namath, Paul Newman, Olivia Newton-John, Richard Nixon, Patti Page, Gloria Parker, Jack Palance, Molly Picon, Vincent Price, George Raft, Lou Rawls, Martha Raye, Rex Reed, Mason Reese, Debbie Reynolds, Buddy Rich, Joan Rivers, Pernell Roberts, Cliff Robertson, Lawrence Rocks, Ginger Rogers, Kenny Rogers, Mickey Rooney, Dan Rowan, Jerry Rubin, Soupy Sales, Tony Sandler, George Schindler,[2] William Shatner, Dick Shawn, Sam Sheppard, Beverly Sills, Gene Simmons, Red Skelton, Kaye Stevens, Ray Stevens, Dr. Cody Sweet, Bernie Taupin, Rip Taylor, Gene Tierney, Tiny Tim, Lily Tomlin, John Travolta, Tina Turner, Vivian Vance, Natalie Wood, Robert Wagner, Peter Ustinov, Jerry Vale, Caterina Valente, Frankie Valli, Gwen Verdon, Ben Vereen, Tom Waits, Jimmie Walker, Jonathan Winters, Roger Williams (pianist), Fulton J. Sheen, Tiger Woods


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mike_Douglas_Show#Guests
     
    KOkay, Woods was only two.)

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Philly is somewhat of a low Alist, or high B list city.

    Also for the most part, if one takes the time to observe, the vast majority of network shows are based in NY or LA (sometimes in DC, which tends to make sense if the show is politically centered).

    Like, it makes sense, does it not, that the vast majority of Hollywood focused shows on the networks are based in, you know, the LA area? Or at least in NY. If we go down the list, Carson, Leno, Fallon, Letterman, Paar, Allen, etc. where were these shows based? Either in NY or in LA.

    There’s a reason why pop culture in general focused on these two cities. Three guesses as to why that is so. Variety shows in general as well as game shows (Trabeck, Barker, Sajak, etc) were based in NY or in LA.

  153. NYC v. LA

    Nightlife — NYC

    Food —-NYC by a lot

    Historical significance —NYC, are you kidding me

    Architecture, skyline, buildings —–NYC by a mile

    beautiful bodies and pretty faces — LA by a lot

    outdoor activities and weather —-LA by significant amount. Pacific ocean beats the East river. haha.

    Sporting events, parks, zoos, amusement parks, etc. —-NYC by comfortable amount

    museums and libraries, Broadway shows, and other artsy fartsy type of entertainment —–NYC by 10 miles

    NYC beats Los Angeles pretty convincingly. Chicago? Hell, Chicago, are they still America’s #3 city or has Houston taken that spot yet?

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Trinity

    You forgot a couple, more on the reality based ones:

    Higher crime rates - NY, and now its by a lot

    Younger demographics - LA, which tend to follow the trends and current pop culture

    Sports - About even. Most of NY's teams suck, aside from NY in AL

    Better public schools - both are bad

    Better place to raise a family - both aren't looking too good right now

    Food - actually, NY may have been in the lead a few decades ago, but now thanks to all the vibrant diversity for both cities, its probably a draw at this point. C'mon, who has better Mexican and South American food in general? -- LA, by a whole bunch a lot. LA has plenty of five start restaurants to compete. After all, the globalist elites live on both coasts and like to have plenty of comforts.

  154. @ScarletNumber
    @Ganderson

    Your memory is playing slight tricks on you. When Bouton pitched for the Pilots, their AAA team was in Vancouver, while the Hawaii team was affiliated with the Angels. Coincidentally the previous year Bouton pitched for the AAA Seattle Angels in the same stadium he would pitch in the AL the following year.

    TLDR: Bouton pitched in Hawaii as a minor leaguer in 1969, but only as a visitor.

    Replies: @Ganderson

    Thanks- it’s been awhile since I read the book, but I think he did make the point about being sent down to Honolulu.

  155. @Gamecock
    @William Badwhite

    Legacy press lost all their ad revenue to the internet. So the poor slobs scower twitter for content. The nation is being run by two millinials in their mothers' basements.

    Limbaugh (GRHS) used to say the country was run by two losers with a fax machine.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    So the poor slobs scower twitter for content.

    Martha Burk didn’t have twitter in 2002.

    The “no women at Augusta National” only became headline news because Hootie Johnson chose to publicly respond to a letter from some nagging shrew. All he had to do to avoid the situation was throw her letter in the trash.

  156. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Reg Cæsar

    As a whole, the state of WI was mainly settled by Germans. Then some Poles came in later on, and there went the neighborhood.

    You sure Booyah is a Belgian word? Sounds like it could be Yiddish.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Ganderson

    No shortage of Scandinavians in America’s Dairyland, either.

  157. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Trinity

    What do you expect with the likes of Gorman Thomas? 35+ HRs, 110+ RBIs, and .240 BA? Once the big bats go silent, it's all over and the SO's pile up.

    Replies: @Ganderson

    One of my prized possessions is a “Stormin’ Gorman” bobblehead in the uniform of the Seattle Pilots.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Ganderson

    And just watch. Some Sabermetrician will come along and start making a convincing argument that Gorman Thomas, Cecil Fielder, and Cecil Cooper should all get some HOF votes. After all, their OPS and On Base percentages were always perennial league leaders, simply off the charts. If you can induct CHI OF Andre Dawson, why not Gorman Thomas? Here's how it works: Thomas took over for aging Hank Aaron in late '76, so basically he was Hank Aaron's successor. Isn't it kind of racist to ignore Gorman Thomas's contributions to MLB? After all, he was Hank Aaron's successor, and Aaron was black. End of story.

    Facts don't care about feelings. A perennial HR slugger also draws a large share of walks, and thus has a hefty on base percentage, so ipso facto, HOF Thomas should be inducted.

    The injustices of MLB's HOF voting. First they ignore Dave Kingman, and now they're blatantly ignoring Gorman Thomas. And don't get me started on Pete Vuckovich, a true ultimate travesty of justice. There's WAR, and then there's W-A-R. And Vuck clearly had it going in his favor. Incredible these guys aren't getting more HOF consideration that they deserve.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ganderson

  158. @ScarletNumber
    @Reg Cæsar

    This never happened. AFAIK the only game in Metrodome history to be postponed was on December 12, 2010. The Giants weren't able to fly in to play the Vikings that day due to a blizzard so the game was postponed a day. It ended up being a moot point as the roof collapsed anyway so the game was moved to Detroit.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I got the year wrong. It was the stadium’s second season:

    Another myth concerns the only postponement to date at the Metrodome. The stadium’s roof was prone to collapsing under the weight of snow. The first time this happened was in November of 1981, before the Metrodome opened. Early in the 1983 season, a storm dropped 13 ½ inches of wet, heavy snow on the Twin Cites beginning on Wednesday night, April 13 and continuing into the next morning. The Twins had a game scheduled against the California Angels at the Metrodome on Thursday night that was postponed because of the storm. Late Thursday evening, a chunk of ice tore a 20-foot gap in the roof of the Metrodome, causing it to deflate. The roof collapse is often given as the reason for the postponement. However, the game had already been postponed nearly 12 hours before out of concern for safety of the fans and Twins players trying to get to the game as well as the fact that the Twins opponents weren’t available. The Angels had taken an overnight flight from California and arrived over the Twin Cities at about 5:30 on Thursday morning. The plane was unable to land and was diverted to Chicago, where the Angels spent the day. The roof was quickly repaired and re-inflated, and the Angels arrived in Minnesota in time for the Friday night game to be played.

    https://sabr.org/bioproj/park/metrodome-minneapolis/

    The Astrodome had a similar, if warmer incident, and the SkyDome as well.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrodome#June_15.2C_1976_.22The_Rainout.22

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Reg Cæsar

    Because the Angels arrived a day late, the game had to be made up as part of a DH in August. The starting CF for the Twins that day in game 1 didn't join the team until June so he couldn't have played in the original game. He was a former NCAA DIII College World Series MOP and ending up winning two World Series rings: one as Kirk Gibson's backup with the Tigers and another coaching first base with the Royals. I mention him because of his nameRusty Kuntz

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  159. @Travis
    @SFG

    As soon as we get 90% fully vaccinated things will get back to normal.....

    People hate wearing with masks at work. I would have quit my job in September due to the stupid mask mandates but i found a mesh mask with holes big enough to allow Mosquitoes to fly thru, but they may fire me soon anyway for being unvaccinated. Wondering why they have allowed me and my wife to teach without being vaxxed. We have also refused to submit to the weekly testing. So far they have not bothered me about it. I also refuse to wear the mask when teaching and allow my students to take off their masks in class, so far nobody has complained. But two of the other math teachers have already quit this month. If they fire me they will be short 3 math teachers.

    Replies: @Polistra, @JMcG

    Ireland is 90% vaccinated. Not close to being back to normal.

  160. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    unlike super-symmetrical 1960s-1970s ballparks like Dodger Stadium.
     
    Comiskey Park, built in 1910, was the first symmetrical field. It was also the oldest MLB park its last two decades. In a spacious lot, asymmetry raises suspicions. The old parks were lopsided because they were wedged into tight downtown lots.

    The Polo Grounds obviously wasn't intended for baseball. Across the Pond, the Baseball Ground served Derby County Football Club from the 19th to the 21st century. Now they use something called Pride Park. Eww.

    Sir Francis Ley attempted to introduce baseball to England through his factory league. Didn't take.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    The Polo Grounds was actually built for Baseball by the owner of the NY Giants in 1890. The original Polo Grounds was at 112th street, but the city used eminent domain to seize the property in 1889 forcing the Giants to play in Jersey City while they built the new stadium up on 155th st. and Eighth Avenue.

    The New Polo Grounds was built specifically for Baseball in 1890, and rebuilt in 1911 after it burned to the ground. It was a strange looking baseball stadium, but it was indeed built as a baseball stadium and never used for Polo, the NY football Giants and the Jets both played football at the Polo grounds after the Giants moved to California.

  161. @Trinity
    NYC v. LA

    Nightlife --- NYC

    Food ----NYC by a lot

    Historical significance ---NYC, are you kidding me

    Architecture, skyline, buildings -----NYC by a mile

    beautiful bodies and pretty faces --- LA by a lot

    outdoor activities and weather ----LA by significant amount. Pacific ocean beats the East river. haha.

    Sporting events, parks, zoos, amusement parks, etc. ----NYC by comfortable amount

    museums and libraries, Broadway shows, and other artsy fartsy type of entertainment -----NYC by 10 miles


    NYC beats Los Angeles pretty convincingly. Chicago? Hell, Chicago, are they still America's #3 city or has Houston taken that spot yet?

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    You forgot a couple, more on the reality based ones:

    Higher crime rates – NY, and now its by a lot

    Younger demographics – LA, which tend to follow the trends and current pop culture

    Sports – About even. Most of NY’s teams suck, aside from NY in AL

    Better public schools – both are bad

    Better place to raise a family – both aren’t looking too good right now

    Food – actually, NY may have been in the lead a few decades ago, but now thanks to all the vibrant diversity for both cities, its probably a draw at this point. C’mon, who has better Mexican and South American food in general? — LA, by a whole bunch a lot. LA has plenty of five start restaurants to compete. After all, the globalist elites live on both coasts and like to have plenty of comforts.

  162. @Ganderson
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    One of my prized possessions is a “Stormin’ Gorman” bobblehead in the uniform of the Seattle Pilots.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    And just watch. Some Sabermetrician will come along and start making a convincing argument that Gorman Thomas, Cecil Fielder, and Cecil Cooper should all get some HOF votes. After all, their OPS and On Base percentages were always perennial league leaders, simply off the charts. If you can induct CHI OF Andre Dawson, why not Gorman Thomas? Here’s how it works: Thomas took over for aging Hank Aaron in late ’76, so basically he was Hank Aaron’s successor. Isn’t it kind of racist to ignore Gorman Thomas’s contributions to MLB? After all, he was Hank Aaron’s successor, and Aaron was black. End of story.

    Facts don’t care about feelings. A perennial HR slugger also draws a large share of walks, and thus has a hefty on base percentage, so ipso facto, HOF Thomas should be inducted.

    The injustices of MLB’s HOF voting. First they ignore Dave Kingman, and now they’re blatantly ignoring Gorman Thomas. And don’t get me started on Pete Vuckovich, a true ultimate travesty of justice. There’s WAR, and then there’s W-A-R. And Vuck clearly had it going in his favor. Incredible these guys aren’t getting more HOF consideration that they deserve.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Nah, those three didn't have particularly high on base percentages despite their power. Cecil Cooper was good all around player, hit for average and power with lots of doubles, but he would have been better if he walked just the league average amount. Gorman Thomas was an interesting power specialist but his batting average was so low his on-base percentage was low too. Cecil Fielder was for a few years a mighty power hitter, and got about the expected number of walks his power would be expected to elicit, but he was pretty bad at everything else.

    All three didn't contribute much with the glove.

    Hence, all three players don't come close to sophisticated standards for the Hall of Fame.

    Rob Deer and Dave Kingman were similar to Gorman Thomas. Kingman's personality didn't help.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    , @Ganderson
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Vukovitch should be in the Hall for his work in Major League!

  163. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Ganderson

    And just watch. Some Sabermetrician will come along and start making a convincing argument that Gorman Thomas, Cecil Fielder, and Cecil Cooper should all get some HOF votes. After all, their OPS and On Base percentages were always perennial league leaders, simply off the charts. If you can induct CHI OF Andre Dawson, why not Gorman Thomas? Here's how it works: Thomas took over for aging Hank Aaron in late '76, so basically he was Hank Aaron's successor. Isn't it kind of racist to ignore Gorman Thomas's contributions to MLB? After all, he was Hank Aaron's successor, and Aaron was black. End of story.

    Facts don't care about feelings. A perennial HR slugger also draws a large share of walks, and thus has a hefty on base percentage, so ipso facto, HOF Thomas should be inducted.

    The injustices of MLB's HOF voting. First they ignore Dave Kingman, and now they're blatantly ignoring Gorman Thomas. And don't get me started on Pete Vuckovich, a true ultimate travesty of justice. There's WAR, and then there's W-A-R. And Vuck clearly had it going in his favor. Incredible these guys aren't getting more HOF consideration that they deserve.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ganderson

    Nah, those three didn’t have particularly high on base percentages despite their power. Cecil Cooper was good all around player, hit for average and power with lots of doubles, but he would have been better if he walked just the league average amount. Gorman Thomas was an interesting power specialist but his batting average was so low his on-base percentage was low too. Cecil Fielder was for a few years a mighty power hitter, and got about the expected number of walks his power would be expected to elicit, but he was pretty bad at everything else.

    All three didn’t contribute much with the glove.

    Hence, all three players don’t come close to sophisticated standards for the Hall of Fame.

    Rob Deer and Dave Kingman were similar to Gorman Thomas. Kingman’s personality didn’t help.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    "Hence, all three players don’t come close to sophisticated standards for the Hall of Fame."

    Steve, I really didn't presume that you'd take the bait and go all Bill James on explaining why three middling players don't belong in the HOF. But, once all in, especially about how drawing walks is one of the most important stats for HOF consideration, well, then there you have it.


    "Rob Deer and Dave Kingman were similar to Gorman Thomas."

    Dave Kingman has as many career HR's as quite a few inducted HOFers. There is a legitimate case to be made for Kingman. Even in Sabermetrics, the HR stat is a very, very important one for HOF consideration.


    "Kingman’s personality didn’t help."

    And HOF Ty Cobb's personality was saccharine and sweet? Now former MLBers are inducted based on their personalities? Wait, what?

    Whether a player is likable or not is irrelevant. His on field stats are all that matter.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  164. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Ganderson

    And just watch. Some Sabermetrician will come along and start making a convincing argument that Gorman Thomas, Cecil Fielder, and Cecil Cooper should all get some HOF votes. After all, their OPS and On Base percentages were always perennial league leaders, simply off the charts. If you can induct CHI OF Andre Dawson, why not Gorman Thomas? Here's how it works: Thomas took over for aging Hank Aaron in late '76, so basically he was Hank Aaron's successor. Isn't it kind of racist to ignore Gorman Thomas's contributions to MLB? After all, he was Hank Aaron's successor, and Aaron was black. End of story.

    Facts don't care about feelings. A perennial HR slugger also draws a large share of walks, and thus has a hefty on base percentage, so ipso facto, HOF Thomas should be inducted.

    The injustices of MLB's HOF voting. First they ignore Dave Kingman, and now they're blatantly ignoring Gorman Thomas. And don't get me started on Pete Vuckovich, a true ultimate travesty of justice. There's WAR, and then there's W-A-R. And Vuck clearly had it going in his favor. Incredible these guys aren't getting more HOF consideration that they deserve.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ganderson

    Vukovitch should be in the Hall for his work in Major League!

  165. @John Johnson
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    What’s the point of being rich if your idea of fun is watching sports on TV? Can’t you do that while relatively poor?

    There is a scene in Annie Hall where Woody Allen sneaks away from a socialite party to watch the knicks. He basically says that intellectuals are full of s--t and needed a break. I really get the sentiment. Most of our intellectual class is a political club where virtue signaling is valued over independent thinking.

    I will sometimes turn on a game because it is usually less insulting than anything else on TV.

    In theory I would like to watch the news but which channel? They all have over the top bias. NPR is supposed to be public and is just as insulting as CNN. I don't think we even have news channels. They are political channels whereby producers try to push their view of the world.

    Sports are one of the few areas that clown world doesn't control. Sure they will push PC narratives at times but there is still a basic level of competition. If our clownish overlords could have their way then they would probably eliminate sports as they undermine the belief that racial genetics don't matter. If they didn't matter then 20% of defense lines would be Asian.

    Replies: @Up2Drew, @Dacian Julien Soros

    Actually, team sports is a huge social construct. In Romania, most of the soccer teams we knew as children either went bankrupt, or, worse, went bankrupt and re-organized by two competing groups of business people. I understand now that such changes have been common in the history of professional sport. It’s easy to root for a team when you are 15, and the team seem to be there forever; it’s harder to do so, when, overnight, you get two Steaua Bucharest.

    In the US, teams are franchises which business leaders shift from here to there, to wherever a new narrative needs to be written. Not only players get transferred to the team that pays them most, mocking the idea of a team; but in the US, you have the make-belief student players and the draft.

    Individual sports are somewhat safer, although you still get a Caster Semenya case of social constructs prevailing over reality. The trouble with individual sports is they are usually boring. Without rooting, many sports are also boring, as not all games are World Cup finals. And this last paragraph is ironic, because rooting is also a social construct.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    As Jerry Seinfeld said, "We're cheering for laundry."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  166. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Nah, those three didn't have particularly high on base percentages despite their power. Cecil Cooper was good all around player, hit for average and power with lots of doubles, but he would have been better if he walked just the league average amount. Gorman Thomas was an interesting power specialist but his batting average was so low his on-base percentage was low too. Cecil Fielder was for a few years a mighty power hitter, and got about the expected number of walks his power would be expected to elicit, but he was pretty bad at everything else.

    All three didn't contribute much with the glove.

    Hence, all three players don't come close to sophisticated standards for the Hall of Fame.

    Rob Deer and Dave Kingman were similar to Gorman Thomas. Kingman's personality didn't help.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Hence, all three players don’t come close to sophisticated standards for the Hall of Fame.”

    Steve, I really didn’t presume that you’d take the bait and go all Bill James on explaining why three middling players don’t belong in the HOF. But, once all in, especially about how drawing walks is one of the most important stats for HOF consideration, well, then there you have it.

    “Rob Deer and Dave Kingman were similar to Gorman Thomas.”

    Dave Kingman has as many career HR’s as quite a few inducted HOFers. There is a legitimate case to be made for Kingman. Even in Sabermetrics, the HR stat is a very, very important one for HOF consideration.

    “Kingman’s personality didn’t help.”

    And HOF Ty Cobb’s personality was saccharine and sweet? Now former MLBers are inducted based on their personalities? Wait, what?

    Whether a player is likable or not is irrelevant. His on field stats are all that matter.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Dave Kingman's personality didn't help his team win ballgames. He didn't care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. Late in his career he got to DH in Oakland and made a comeback, but his bad glove and bad attitude were a bad fit for the National League.

    I remember Kingman being called up to the Giants in the 1971 pennant race. He was always doing interesting things or having interesting things happen to him. Late in September he crushed what looked like a homer that would have clinched the pennant race for SF. But the Candlestick Park winds suddenly howled in and took 40 feet off his blast, and the Giants lost.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  167. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    "Hence, all three players don’t come close to sophisticated standards for the Hall of Fame."

    Steve, I really didn't presume that you'd take the bait and go all Bill James on explaining why three middling players don't belong in the HOF. But, once all in, especially about how drawing walks is one of the most important stats for HOF consideration, well, then there you have it.


    "Rob Deer and Dave Kingman were similar to Gorman Thomas."

    Dave Kingman has as many career HR's as quite a few inducted HOFers. There is a legitimate case to be made for Kingman. Even in Sabermetrics, the HR stat is a very, very important one for HOF consideration.


    "Kingman’s personality didn’t help."

    And HOF Ty Cobb's personality was saccharine and sweet? Now former MLBers are inducted based on their personalities? Wait, what?

    Whether a player is likable or not is irrelevant. His on field stats are all that matter.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Dave Kingman’s personality didn’t help his team win ballgames. He didn’t care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. Late in his career he got to DH in Oakland and made a comeback, but his bad glove and bad attitude were a bad fit for the National League.

    I remember Kingman being called up to the Giants in the 1971 pennant race. He was always doing interesting things or having interesting things happen to him. Late in September he crushed what looked like a homer that would have clinched the pennant race for SF. But the Candlestick Park winds suddenly howled in and took 40 feet off his blast, and the Giants lost.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Steve Sailer

    While I don't doubt the gist of your story, the Giants closed out 1971 on a 9-game road trip. Since they ended up winning the west by 1 game over the Dodgers that year they weren't in a position to clinch until Game 161.

    Kingman ended up starting games 1 and 2 in Candlestick against the Pirates, but after going 1-for-9 Charlie Fox replaced him with Bobby Bonds in games 3 and 4 in Three Rivers.

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    "Dave Kingman’s personality didn’t help his team win ballgames. He didn’t care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. "

    That isn't relevant. HOFer CHI Ernie Banks didn't play in a WS, much less a playoff game. For most of his career, the Cubs were under .500. Is the onus entirely on Banks that the Cubs were mediocre to downright horrible? Of course not.

    Whether an individual MLBer played in the postseason, or if he contributed to his teams wins is irrelevant; what matters is whether or not his career stats warrant Cooperstown. (Obviously, it is a plus if an individual player does contribute to his team's success, but there are examples of HOFers who played on dreadful teams) After all, there are 8 other guys on the field at any given moment. It's a team sport. Noticing various players that were inducted over the decades, Dave Kingman certainly isn't any worse and by that standard should warrant some HOF votes for induction. If Cooperstown can induct Jim Rice, for instance, then they certainly can induct Dave Kingman.

    His teammates certainly appreciated when he connected for HRs. All he can do is hit the ball, he can't control for wind, or pitcher ballparks. If Kingman had played his career in a more hitter friendly ballpark, say, in Tiger Stadium for instance, then he would be in Cooperstown today.

    "But the Candlestick Park winds suddenly howled in and took 40 feet off his blast, and the Giants lost."

    All a player can do is hit the ball. He can't control for the winds. McCovey hit the ball as hard as he could in game 7 of the '62 WS vs NY. Unfortunately it was directly at 2B Bobby Richardson. It does happen.

    I remember Kingman playing against hometown team when he was with CHI. He hit 2 HRs that day, which directly contributed to the Cubs win.

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    "Dave Kingman’s personality didn’t help his team win ballgames. He didn’t care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. "

    If abrasive personality, not helping his team win ballgames, indifferent to fielding, and only caring about hitting in general, were a major criteria for judging HOF calibre talent, then that would automatically disqualify HOF BOS OF Ted Williams from Cooperstown.

    After all, who knows how many games BOS would've won had not Williams bothered to hit to all fields during the 1947-51 seasons when BOS finished 2nd? More runs scored equate to more AL Pennants won. In his only WS appearance ('46), Williams BA was .200. That's not getting it done. That is a major bat to go silent for inarguably the most important 7 game stretch of his career.

    STL manager Eddie Dyer employed a shift similar to CLE player-manager Lou Boudreau. Cardinals won WS in 7.

    There is a reason why when it comes to Williams that MLB fans talk about his hitting during regular season. In the case of HOF NY CF Joe DiMaggio, MLB fans talk about his all around play during the season and during the postseason.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  168. @Dacian Julien Soros
    @John Johnson

    Actually, team sports is a huge social construct. In Romania, most of the soccer teams we knew as children either went bankrupt, or, worse, went bankrupt and re-organized by two competing groups of business people. I understand now that such changes have been common in the history of professional sport. It's easy to root for a team when you are 15, and the team seem to be there forever; it's harder to do so, when, overnight, you get two Steaua Bucharest.

    In the US, teams are franchises which business leaders shift from here to there, to wherever a new narrative needs to be written. Not only players get transferred to the team that pays them most, mocking the idea of a team; but in the US, you have the make-belief student players and the draft.

    Individual sports are somewhat safer, although you still get a Caster Semenya case of social constructs prevailing over reality. The trouble with individual sports is they are usually boring. Without rooting, many sports are also boring, as not all games are World Cup finals. And this last paragraph is ironic, because rooting is also a social construct.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    As Jerry Seinfeld said, “We’re cheering for laundry.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    As Jerry Seinfeld said, “We’re cheering for laundry.”
     
    I thought that was Gavin Newsom.



    https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/13/75/36/19912634/5/1200x0.jpg
  169. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Dave Kingman's personality didn't help his team win ballgames. He didn't care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. Late in his career he got to DH in Oakland and made a comeback, but his bad glove and bad attitude were a bad fit for the National League.

    I remember Kingman being called up to the Giants in the 1971 pennant race. He was always doing interesting things or having interesting things happen to him. Late in September he crushed what looked like a homer that would have clinched the pennant race for SF. But the Candlestick Park winds suddenly howled in and took 40 feet off his blast, and the Giants lost.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    While I don’t doubt the gist of your story, the Giants closed out 1971 on a 9-game road trip. Since they ended up winning the west by 1 game over the Dodgers that year they weren’t in a position to clinch until Game 161.

    Kingman ended up starting games 1 and 2 in Candlestick against the Pirates, but after going 1-for-9 Charlie Fox replaced him with Bobby Bonds in games 3 and 4 in Three Rivers.

  170. @Reg Cæsar
    @ScarletNumber

    I got the year wrong. It was the stadium's second season:


    Another myth concerns the only postponement to date at the Metrodome. The stadium’s roof was prone to collapsing under the weight of snow. The first time this happened was in November of 1981, before the Metrodome opened. Early in the 1983 season, a storm dropped 13 ½ inches of wet, heavy snow on the Twin Cites beginning on Wednesday night, April 13 and continuing into the next morning. The Twins had a game scheduled against the California Angels at the Metrodome on Thursday night that was postponed because of the storm. Late Thursday evening, a chunk of ice tore a 20-foot gap in the roof of the Metrodome, causing it to deflate. The roof collapse is often given as the reason for the postponement. However, the game had already been postponed nearly 12 hours before out of concern for safety of the fans and Twins players trying to get to the game as well as the fact that the Twins opponents weren’t available. The Angels had taken an overnight flight from California and arrived over the Twin Cities at about 5:30 on Thursday morning. The plane was unable to land and was diverted to Chicago, where the Angels spent the day. The roof was quickly repaired and re-inflated, and the Angels arrived in Minnesota in time for the Friday night game to be played.

    https://sabr.org/bioproj/park/metrodome-minneapolis/

     

    The Astrodome had a similar, if warmer incident, and the SkyDome as well.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrodome#June_15.2C_1976_.22The_Rainout.22

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Because the Angels arrived a day late, the game had to be made up as part of a DH in August. The starting CF for the Twins that day in game 1 didn’t join the team until June so he couldn’t have played in the original game. He was a former NCAA DIII College World Series MOP and ending up winning two World Series rings: one as Kirk Gibson’s backup with the Tigers and another coaching first base with the Royals. I mention him because of his name

    [MORE]
    Rusty Kuntz

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ScarletNumber


    Because the Angels arrived a day late, the game had to be made up as part of a DH in August.
     
    Oh, for the days when "DH" meant "double header"!

    The Bridegrooms and Innocents played a tripleheader in 1890:

    https://sabr.org/journal/article/the-last-tripleheader/

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubleheader_(baseball)#Tripleheaders


    https://baseballmagazine.wordpress.com/2015/10/08/the-last-tripleheader/
  171. @Danindc
    @Known Fact

    I was a sports fanatic back then and remember it being a huge deal. That year did have the greatest upset in sports history…which was NC State winning the national title in basketball. They needed to win the ACC tournament just to get into the NCAA’s and won 3 thrillers just to do that. Then they should’ve lost the opener in the NCAA to Fresno State and probably should’ve lost 2-3 more times. Truly amazing run.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    [NC State] needed to win the ACC tournament just to get into the NCAA’s and won 3 thrillers just to do that.

    Their three wins came by a total of 11 points and the semi against UNC went to OT. However, I think they would have made it anyway as the ACC sent 4 teams (out of 52) that year. Maryland ended up being an 8 seed in the Midwest, while NC State was a 6 out West.

    Then they should’ve lost the opener in the NCAA to Fresno State and probably should’ve lost 2-3 more times.

    You could argue they should have lost that opening game (but it was against Dane Suttle and Pepperdine), as well as the regional quarterfinal against Sidney Green and UNLV, the regional final against Ralph Sampson and Virginia, and well as the National Championship against Phi Slama Jama and Houston.

    It is worth noting that they were the first team to have to win 6 games in the NCAA in order to win the title. The following year Georgetown only had to win 5, but it has been 6 ever since.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    @ScarletNumber

    Good stuff, thanks. Maybe they get in if they lose ACC final but they were not in conversation to begin tournament.

  172. @Polistra
    @War for Blair Mountain

    https://i.ibb.co/ys1RqhW/jDlSf5vT.jpg

    [In case anyone's missed it]

    Replies: @Goddard, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Put that fucker Baldwin in jail.

    • LOL: Trinity
  173. @ScarletNumber
    @Reg Cæsar

    Because the Angels arrived a day late, the game had to be made up as part of a DH in August. The starting CF for the Twins that day in game 1 didn't join the team until June so he couldn't have played in the original game. He was a former NCAA DIII College World Series MOP and ending up winning two World Series rings: one as Kirk Gibson's backup with the Tigers and another coaching first base with the Royals. I mention him because of his nameRusty Kuntz

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Because the Angels arrived a day late, the game had to be made up as part of a DH in August.

    Oh, for the days when “DH” meant “double header”!

    The Bridegrooms and Innocents played a tripleheader in 1890:

    https://sabr.org/journal/article/the-last-tripleheader/

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubleheader_(baseball)#Tripleheaders

    https://baseballmagazine.wordpress.com/2015/10/08/the-last-tripleheader/

  174. @Steve Sailer
    @Dacian Julien Soros

    As Jerry Seinfeld said, "We're cheering for laundry."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    As Jerry Seinfeld said, “We’re cheering for laundry.”

    I thought that was Gavin Newsom.

  175. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Dave Kingman's personality didn't help his team win ballgames. He didn't care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. Late in his career he got to DH in Oakland and made a comeback, but his bad glove and bad attitude were a bad fit for the National League.

    I remember Kingman being called up to the Giants in the 1971 pennant race. He was always doing interesting things or having interesting things happen to him. Late in September he crushed what looked like a homer that would have clinched the pennant race for SF. But the Candlestick Park winds suddenly howled in and took 40 feet off his blast, and the Giants lost.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Dave Kingman’s personality didn’t help his team win ballgames. He didn’t care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. ”

    That isn’t relevant. HOFer CHI Ernie Banks didn’t play in a WS, much less a playoff game. For most of his career, the Cubs were under .500. Is the onus entirely on Banks that the Cubs were mediocre to downright horrible? Of course not.

    Whether an individual MLBer played in the postseason, or if he contributed to his teams wins is irrelevant; what matters is whether or not his career stats warrant Cooperstown. (Obviously, it is a plus if an individual player does contribute to his team’s success, but there are examples of HOFers who played on dreadful teams) After all, there are 8 other guys on the field at any given moment. It’s a team sport. Noticing various players that were inducted over the decades, Dave Kingman certainly isn’t any worse and by that standard should warrant some HOF votes for induction. If Cooperstown can induct Jim Rice, for instance, then they certainly can induct Dave Kingman.

    His teammates certainly appreciated when he connected for HRs. All he can do is hit the ball, he can’t control for wind, or pitcher ballparks. If Kingman had played his career in a more hitter friendly ballpark, say, in Tiger Stadium for instance, then he would be in Cooperstown today.

    “But the Candlestick Park winds suddenly howled in and took 40 feet off his blast, and the Giants lost.”

    All a player can do is hit the ball. He can’t control for the winds. McCovey hit the ball as hard as he could in game 7 of the ’62 WS vs NY. Unfortunately it was directly at 2B Bobby Richardson. It does happen.

    I remember Kingman playing against hometown team when he was with CHI. He hit 2 HRs that day, which directly contributed to the Cubs win.

  176. @Polistra
    @War for Blair Mountain

    https://i.ibb.co/ys1RqhW/jDlSf5vT.jpg

    [In case anyone's missed it]

    Replies: @Goddard, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    And now he knows. Would this qualify as involuntary manslaughter?

  177. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Dave Kingman's personality didn't help his team win ballgames. He didn't care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. Late in his career he got to DH in Oakland and made a comeback, but his bad glove and bad attitude were a bad fit for the National League.

    I remember Kingman being called up to the Giants in the 1971 pennant race. He was always doing interesting things or having interesting things happen to him. Late in September he crushed what looked like a homer that would have clinched the pennant race for SF. But the Candlestick Park winds suddenly howled in and took 40 feet off his blast, and the Giants lost.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Dave Kingman’s personality didn’t help his team win ballgames. He didn’t care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. ”

    If abrasive personality, not helping his team win ballgames, indifferent to fielding, and only caring about hitting in general, were a major criteria for judging HOF calibre talent, then that would automatically disqualify HOF BOS OF Ted Williams from Cooperstown.

    After all, who knows how many games BOS would’ve won had not Williams bothered to hit to all fields during the 1947-51 seasons when BOS finished 2nd? More runs scored equate to more AL Pennants won. In his only WS appearance (’46), Williams BA was .200. That’s not getting it done. That is a major bat to go silent for inarguably the most important 7 game stretch of his career.

    STL manager Eddie Dyer employed a shift similar to CLE player-manager Lou Boudreau. Cardinals won WS in 7.

    There is a reason why when it comes to Williams that MLB fans talk about his hitting during regular season. In the case of HOF NY CF Joe DiMaggio, MLB fans talk about his all around play during the season and during the postseason.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Boston sportswriters constantly complained about Ted Williams.

    DiMaggio's postseason hitting was okay but not spectacular. Projecting his 51 World Series games to a 153 game season, he would have hit .271 - 24 homers - 90 RBIS - 81 runs, considerably less than a typical regular season. Against tough world series pitching that's very good, but not as impressive as the post-season stats of some turn of the century Yankees like Derek Jeter and Bernie Williams. In 158 post season games (one full season), Jeter hit .308 - 20 HRs - 61 RBIs - 111 runs, slightly better than his regular season career performance.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

  178. @Steve Sailer
    @R.G. Camara

    Los Angeles is America's least expected early to bed, early to rise town.

    Replies: @Corn, @R.G. Camara

    Here’s an article describing the phenomenon that multiple people who moved to Los Angeles have relayed to me: LA is dead after dark. LA is a 2am town for the most part, its not NYC or London or Tokyo.

    https://www.discotech.me/los-angeles/best-la-after-hours-spots/

    Obviously, you can always find exceptions.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @R.G. Camara

    Legally speaking, what does a person have to do after 2AM (aside from going to sleep) that he can't do adequately enough before 2AM? Realistically, a person is probably doing drugs, over drinking, over nightclubbing between 2-5AM. And also the possibility of committing crimes. The rest of humanity (aside from working the graveyard shift) is home asleep.

    The LA metro is also far more spread out than the NY Metro.

  179. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    "Dave Kingman’s personality didn’t help his team win ballgames. He didn’t care about fielding, just hitting homers, which his teammates tended not to appreciate. "

    If abrasive personality, not helping his team win ballgames, indifferent to fielding, and only caring about hitting in general, were a major criteria for judging HOF calibre talent, then that would automatically disqualify HOF BOS OF Ted Williams from Cooperstown.

    After all, who knows how many games BOS would've won had not Williams bothered to hit to all fields during the 1947-51 seasons when BOS finished 2nd? More runs scored equate to more AL Pennants won. In his only WS appearance ('46), Williams BA was .200. That's not getting it done. That is a major bat to go silent for inarguably the most important 7 game stretch of his career.

    STL manager Eddie Dyer employed a shift similar to CLE player-manager Lou Boudreau. Cardinals won WS in 7.

    There is a reason why when it comes to Williams that MLB fans talk about his hitting during regular season. In the case of HOF NY CF Joe DiMaggio, MLB fans talk about his all around play during the season and during the postseason.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Boston sportswriters constantly complained about Ted Williams.

    DiMaggio’s postseason hitting was okay but not spectacular. Projecting his 51 World Series games to a 153 game season, he would have hit .271 – 24 homers – 90 RBIS – 81 runs, considerably less than a typical regular season. Against tough world series pitching that’s very good, but not as impressive as the post-season stats of some turn of the century Yankees like Derek Jeter and Bernie Williams. In 158 post season games (one full season), Jeter hit .308 – 20 HRs – 61 RBIs – 111 runs, slightly better than his regular season career performance.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    Boston sportswriters had a point about Williams' overall play. Certainly they had a reason to criticize him when all those years and only one WS appearance (and no championship) to show for it.

    DiMaggio played in 10 World Series, winning 9. His only loss was in the 1942 World Series. He batted . 271 (54-199), with 27 runs scored, 8 home runs and 30 RBI in 51 post-season games. Respectable numbers. In other words, he obviously didn't foul up NY's dominant run of WS Championships. He was a key component during the WS, with timely hitting during key crucial points in most of the WS that he played.

    By the same metric, if we were to project Williams' .200 BA, 5 H, 1 RBI, 0 HR, 5 K, 5 BB, 333 OBP, .200 SLG, and .533 OPS, over 10-15 seasons, how exactly would that translate into a HOF calibre career? If we can do this with DiMaggio, we can do it with Williams. What can be compared with both HOFers is that they both played in at least 1 WS, and thus the stats can be compared and estimated over a career.

    Obviously Williams didn't have as many opportunites as DiMaggio to play in the postseason. Perhaps, if he had been more willing to help his team by hitting to all fields (like his NL counterpart, Stan Musial, who played in more WS) then BOS would've perhaps made the WS more times during his career.

    The point being, that a player must make the most of his opportunities. During the most important games of his career, Williams did not. As before, there is a significant reason as to why most Ted Williams aficionados tend to overlook the most important 7 game stretch of his career, the 1946 WS.

  180. @ScarletNumber
    @Trinity


    Anyhow, Atlanta has had professional big time sports since 1966 and they can only claim one world title. Hell, Milwaukee, the place the Braves played before moving to Atlanta has that and they only have two professional sports teams in the Big 4.
     
    The current Milwaukee teams actually have two, as the Kareem & Oscar Bucks won in 71. You mentioned the Braves winning in Milwaukee but I'm sure they would also claim the Packers, as they played multiple games in Milwaukee during most of their championship seasons, including the 67 NFL Western Conference championship game against the Rams. This was the week before the famous Ice Bowl. Ironically, because of the rotational system used then, the 9-4-1 Packers hosted the 11-1-2 Rams that day.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Trinity, @Jay Fink

    I was a kid living in Milwaukee and was a huge fan of the early 70s Bucks. A couple of years after they won their championship my parents were selling our house in suburban Fox Point. Bucks player Bobby Dandridge looked at our house. Our neighbors didn’t realize he was a Buck, they just saw a black man. They were not happy about it!

    We received several calls and visits from neighbors telling us not to sell to a black. Someone even called in a death threat! When they found out it wasn’t just any random black guy but a Milwaukee Buck most changed their mind. One man went from angry to excited. “I hope he buys the house so he can play basketball with my kids”. He never did buy the house because the ceilings in parts of the house were too low for him.

    • Thanks: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jay Fink

    Good ballplayer, Bobby Dandridge.

  181. @Steve Sailer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Boston sportswriters constantly complained about Ted Williams.

    DiMaggio's postseason hitting was okay but not spectacular. Projecting his 51 World Series games to a 153 game season, he would have hit .271 - 24 homers - 90 RBIS - 81 runs, considerably less than a typical regular season. Against tough world series pitching that's very good, but not as impressive as the post-season stats of some turn of the century Yankees like Derek Jeter and Bernie Williams. In 158 post season games (one full season), Jeter hit .308 - 20 HRs - 61 RBIs - 111 runs, slightly better than his regular season career performance.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Boston sportswriters had a point about Williams’ overall play. Certainly they had a reason to criticize him when all those years and only one WS appearance (and no championship) to show for it.

    DiMaggio played in 10 World Series, winning 9. His only loss was in the 1942 World Series. He batted . 271 (54-199), with 27 runs scored, 8 home runs and 30 RBI in 51 post-season games. Respectable numbers. In other words, he obviously didn’t foul up NY’s dominant run of WS Championships. He was a key component during the WS, with timely hitting during key crucial points in most of the WS that he played.

    By the same metric, if we were to project Williams’ .200 BA, 5 H, 1 RBI, 0 HR, 5 K, 5 BB, 333 OBP, .200 SLG, and .533 OPS, over 10-15 seasons, how exactly would that translate into a HOF calibre career? If we can do this with DiMaggio, we can do it with Williams. What can be compared with both HOFers is that they both played in at least 1 WS, and thus the stats can be compared and estimated over a career.

    Obviously Williams didn’t have as many opportunites as DiMaggio to play in the postseason. Perhaps, if he had been more willing to help his team by hitting to all fields (like his NL counterpart, Stan Musial, who played in more WS) then BOS would’ve perhaps made the WS more times during his career.

    The point being, that a player must make the most of his opportunities. During the most important games of his career, Williams did not. As before, there is a significant reason as to why most Ted Williams aficionados tend to overlook the most important 7 game stretch of his career, the 1946 WS.

  182. @Jay Fink
    @ScarletNumber

    I was a kid living in Milwaukee and was a huge fan of the early 70s Bucks. A couple of years after they won their championship my parents were selling our house in suburban Fox Point. Bucks player Bobby Dandridge looked at our house. Our neighbors didn't realize he was a Buck, they just saw a black man. They were not happy about it!

    We received several calls and visits from neighbors telling us not to sell to a black. Someone even called in a death threat! When they found out it wasn't just any random black guy but a Milwaukee Buck most changed their mind. One man went from angry to excited. "I hope he buys the house so he can play basketball with my kids". He never did buy the house because the ceilings in parts of the house were too low for him.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Good ballplayer, Bobby Dandridge.

  183. @R.G. Camara
    @Steve Sailer

    Here's an article describing the phenomenon that multiple people who moved to Los Angeles have relayed to me: LA is dead after dark. LA is a 2am town for the most part, its not NYC or London or Tokyo.

    https://www.discotech.me/los-angeles/best-la-after-hours-spots/

    Obviously, you can always find exceptions.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Legally speaking, what does a person have to do after 2AM (aside from going to sleep) that he can’t do adequately enough before 2AM? Realistically, a person is probably doing drugs, over drinking, over nightclubbing between 2-5AM. And also the possibility of committing crimes. The rest of humanity (aside from working the graveyard shift) is home asleep.

    The LA metro is also far more spread out than the NY Metro.

  184. @ScarletNumber
    @Danindc


    [NC State] needed to win the ACC tournament just to get into the NCAA’s and won 3 thrillers just to do that.
     
    Their three wins came by a total of 11 points and the semi against UNC went to OT. However, I think they would have made it anyway as the ACC sent 4 teams (out of 52) that year. Maryland ended up being an 8 seed in the Midwest, while NC State was a 6 out West.

    Then they should’ve lost the opener in the NCAA to Fresno State and probably should’ve lost 2-3 more times.
     
    You could argue they should have lost that opening game (but it was against Dane Suttle and Pepperdine), as well as the regional quarterfinal against Sidney Green and UNLV, the regional final against Ralph Sampson and Virginia, and well as the National Championship against Phi Slama Jama and Houston.

    It is worth noting that they were the first team to have to win 6 games in the NCAA in order to win the title. The following year Georgetown only had to win 5, but it has been 6 ever since.

    Replies: @Danindc

    Good stuff, thanks. Maybe they get in if they lose ACC final but they were not in conversation to begin tournament.

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