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Babylon Bee on Elizabeth Warren
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Warren claimed she was simply on her evening walk with her favorite peyote blend when the two men leaped out of the bushes, fired a round, spent several minutes reloading their muzzle-loading rifles, fired again, and then hollered “battle cries” as they hurled smallpox-infested blankets at her.

… According to Warren, the men stuck a feather in her hair and then called her “macaroni” before dancing around her in a mock Native American rain dance

The Babylon Bee is like The Onion for Evangelical Christians (e.g., when it makes fun of overly logical male nerds, they are often depicted spouting Calvinist theological doctrines), but with less political correctness.

 
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  1. What will the Babylon Bee come up with for Karmasutra Harris?

    • Replies: @JohnnyD
    How about a letter of recommendation from Willie Harris?
  2. What will the Babylon Bee come up with for Karmasutra Harris?

    Maybe a burning hangman’s noose? (A combination of a lynching and suttee?)

    • Replies: @JohnnyD
    Or a letter of recommendation from Willie Harris?
  3. >”The men fired muskets at me, threw several blankets infested with smallpox in my general direction, and told me this was colonial country,” she said, holding back tears. “They told me to go back to my reservation and that I wasn’t welcome here.”

    According to Warren, the men stuck a feather in her hair and then called her “macaroni” before dancing around her in a mock Native American rain dance.<

    lol

    • Replies: @Lot
    Cory Booker is dandy, but not sure how with the girls be handy.

    https://www.politics-prose.com/sites/politics-prose.com/files/Booker_Credit%20Kelly%20Campbell.jpg
  4. I believe Elizabeth Warren.
    Best part is that Amelia Warren ,daughter of Mrs. Warren is married to a “Person of Color” and has three beautiful Brown children with her.
    What a slap to the faces of Nazis and White Supremacists.

    https://goo.gl/images/FRWdfm

    Her privileged White son is a bachelor.
    This is the future of America.
    My message to White Supremacists is that your time is up.
    You guys beholden to an absurd, inaccurate, nostalgic fantasy of what America used to be like — are dying. You’re like the bad guy in every horror movie ever made, who gets shot 7 times or blown up twice, and who will eventually pass — even if it takes 4 sequels to make it happen — but who in the meantime keeps coming back around, grabbing at our ankles as we walk by, we having been mistakenly convinced that you were finally dead this time. Fair enough, and have at it. But remember how this movie ends. Our ankles survive. You do not.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    '...You’re like the bad guy in every horror movie ever made...'

    No...the horror movie is only now scheduled for release.

    You and those like you produced it.

    ...and why can't you spell 'Krauthammer' correctly?

  5. I think the democrats and liberals are doing a fine job.

  6. Still want to see her mad flintknapping skills, and my atl-atl skills exceed hers. Peace. My backyard debitage better, yo.

    Sabatoge her debitage with a payback:

  7. When will the Bee do Lizzie on her “Universal Child Care” plan?

  8. Did they scream “this is no taxation without representation country, bitch” as they threw the blankets?

    • LOL: AndrewR
  9. Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids “swarming” and “blocking” a “tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war”

    • Replies: @Ozymandias
    Anyone want to give odds on Sandmann's lawyers calling Bezos to the stand?
    , @fish

    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!
     
    May he collect every last dime! It's just a pity that Bezos owns it ……it probably won't go belly up!
    , @Anon
    Well, the days of unsupervised SJWs posting to news websites may be over. There may be new jobs in media for close reading, fact checking editors. I anticipate a lot more verbiage from now on in articles, "according to a February 7 report on the such and such website retrieved at 9:00 today, which we have not independently verified, quote ... "

    I think the lawyers made one tactical mistake: I would have refrained from announcing the lawsuit on their website. Leave it to the Post to announce it, or let a legal blogger stumble across it. That makes it more menacing to other potential defendants. You're not out for publicity, nor to settle: your intention is to destroy them in a Tennessee court of law before a Tennessee jury.

    , @songbird
    The amount Bezos paid. Is it really worth that much? do they own good real estate?

    Speaking of embarrassing newspaper prices, back in 1993, the NYT paid $1.1 billion for "The Boston Globe.". In 1999 they paid $295 million for "The Worcester Telegram & Gazette. "
    , @Anon
    Reading the reporting on the various websites who also got the evidence preservation notices is fun. Very gingerly reported, with obvious rage barely constrained.

    Jezebel, not one of the targets if I recall, nevertheless is pulling its punches by only quoting the Washinton Post. According to Jezebel's Rebecca Fishbein, who in all her photos seems like one pissed off chick, ...

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1054436849517715456/louZDj2H_400x400.jpg

    The suit makes mention of a recent investigation into the January 18 incident—in which Sandmann and his fellow students appear to mock, smirk, and yell at Omaha Nation elder Nathan Phillips—found no evidence of explicit racism, or, at the very least, the investigation did not unearth evidence that the students made any “offensive or racist statements” toward Phillips and the other Native American activists, as well as toward a group of Black Hebrew Israelites who were also involved in the stand-off.

    The Washington Post, in fact, reported on that investigation. They also spoke with Dina Gilio-Whitaker, a member of Colville Confederated Tribes in California and professor of American Indian studies at California State University at San Marcos, who vehemently disagreed with the investigation’s findings. “Maybe they didn’t say overtly racist things, but the context of the incident needs to be analyzed,” she said, adding that she found the report “unfortunate and disgusting.”
     
    They didn't say anything racist, but they existed in an unanalyzed racist context. O.K. Let's see if that kind of reasoning flies in court.

    I've never seen Rebecca Fishbein's mother, but I think I can say with confidence that she is starting to look like her mother. She has that definite "starting to look like her mother" look about her.
    , @densa
    In light of this that smirk now looks suspiciously like a grin.
    , @indocon
    What's the chance this goes to a trial?
    , @Jefferson
    "a “tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war”

    Nathan Phillips ate at a Vietnamese restaurant once when Richard Milhous Nixon was POTUS, that's the extent of his exposure to The NAM in the 1970s.

    Bob Hope spent way more time in The NAM than Nathan Phillips ever did.

  10. @M Krauthammar
    I believe Elizabeth Warren.
    Best part is that Amelia Warren ,daughter of Mrs. Warren is married to a "Person of Color" and has three beautiful Brown children with her.
    What a slap to the faces of Nazis and White Supremacists.

    https://goo.gl/images/FRWdfm

    Her privileged White son is a bachelor.
    This is the future of America.
    My message to White Supremacists is that your time is up.
    You guys beholden to an absurd, inaccurate, nostalgic fantasy of what America used to be like — are dying. You’re like the bad guy in every horror movie ever made, who gets shot 7 times or blown up twice, and who will eventually pass — even if it takes 4 sequels to make it happen — but who in the meantime keeps coming back around, grabbing at our ankles as we walk by, we having been mistakenly convinced that you were finally dead this time. Fair enough, and have at it. But remember how this movie ends. Our ankles survive. You do not.

    ‘…You’re like the bad guy in every horror movie ever made…’

    No…the horror movie is only now scheduled for release.

    You and those like you produced it.

    …and why can’t you spell ‘Krauthammer’ correctly?

  11. @newrouter
    >"The men fired muskets at me, threw several blankets infested with smallpox in my general direction, and told me this was colonial country," she said, holding back tears. "They told me to go back to my reservation and that I wasn't welcome here."

    According to Warren, the men stuck a feather in her hair and then called her "macaroni" before dancing around her in a mock Native American rain dance.<

    lol

    Cory Booker is dandy, but not sure how with the girls be handy.

    • LOL: Corn, Abe
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Or at least black girls.
    , @Jim Christian
    Doesn't/Didn't Cory Booker have issues with some kind of rape or assault on some guy a month ago? As in, a homosexual issue?
  12. • LOL: Hail
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Never trust anyone with more than three names.
  13. I also chuckled at the Babylon Bee piece in which she admits that during her college years, she sometimes attended parties in paleface.

    • LOL: Bubba
  14. Here is something you don’t see everyday. Two, real legends exchanging tweets.

  15. @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    Anyone want to give odds on Sandmann’s lawyers calling Bezos to the stand?

  16. @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    May he collect every last dime! It’s just a pity that Bezos owns it ……it probably won’t go belly up!

  17. Wow. Actual satire is pretty satisfying in an age when nobody has the balls to do it.

  18. @Lot
    Cory Booker is dandy, but not sure how with the girls be handy.

    https://www.politics-prose.com/sites/politics-prose.com/files/Booker_Credit%20Kelly%20Campbell.jpg

    Or at least black girls.

    • Replies: @Lot
    So you're saying he does like women and girls, just not as thicc as hasty puddin'?
  19. Anon[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    Well, the days of unsupervised SJWs posting to news websites may be over. There may be new jobs in media for close reading, fact checking editors. I anticipate a lot more verbiage from now on in articles, “according to a February 7 report on the such and such website retrieved at 9:00 today, which we have not independently verified, quote … ”

    I think the lawyers made one tactical mistake: I would have refrained from announcing the lawsuit on their website. Leave it to the Post to announce it, or let a legal blogger stumble across it. That makes it more menacing to other potential defendants. You’re not out for publicity, nor to settle: your intention is to destroy them in a Tennessee court of law before a Tennessee jury.

    • Replies: @petit bourgeois
    You're obviously not a lawyer. Publicity in these cases are what create value, i.e. settlement. Why spend $300,000 on a trial when you can extort them with free negative publicity and create more value through settlement? No jury is going to give this kid 25 million dollars. Innocent people shot in the back by cops don't get even close to that. The 250 million dollars pleaded in the complaint is merely a place marker in the event a jury wants to go ape shit on the defendant.

    Speaking of free negative publicity, L. Lin Wood, the lead plaintiffs lawyer, will be on Hannity tomorrow night banging the war drum against the Washington Post.
    , @Hibernian
    It'll be a Kentucky court and jury.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Hannity said last night that the Covington kid's lawyer is the same guy who represented Richard Jewell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Jewell
  20. Uncle Sailer should tread lightly when endorsing The Blanket Solution and Zyklone Bee jokesters;
    it could make some very special people to get all red in their faces!

  21. @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    The amount Bezos paid. Is it really worth that much? do they own good real estate?

    Speaking of embarrassing newspaper prices, back in 1993, the NYT paid $1.1 billion for “The Boston Globe.”. In 1999 they paid $295 million for “The Worcester Telegram & Gazette. “

  22. Anon[100] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    Reading the reporting on the various websites who also got the evidence preservation notices is fun. Very gingerly reported, with obvious rage barely constrained.

    Jezebel, not one of the targets if I recall, nevertheless is pulling its punches by only quoting the Washinton Post. According to Jezebel’s Rebecca Fishbein, who in all her photos seems like one pissed off chick, …

    The suit makes mention of a recent investigation into the January 18 incident—in which Sandmann and his fellow students appear to mock, smirk, and yell at Omaha Nation elder Nathan Phillips—found no evidence of explicit racism, or, at the very least, the investigation did not unearth evidence that the students made any “offensive or racist statements” toward Phillips and the other Native American activists, as well as toward a group of Black Hebrew Israelites who were also involved in the stand-off.

    The Washington Post, in fact, reported on that investigation. They also spoke with Dina Gilio-Whitaker, a member of Colville Confederated Tribes in California and professor of American Indian studies at California State University at San Marcos, who vehemently disagreed with the investigation’s findings. “Maybe they didn’t say overtly racist things, but the context of the incident needs to be analyzed,” she said, adding that she found the report “unfortunate and disgusting.”

    They didn’t say anything racist, but they existed in an unanalyzed racist context. O.K. Let’s see if that kind of reasoning flies in court.

    I’ve never seen Rebecca Fishbein’s mother, but I think I can say with confidence that she is starting to look like her mother. She has that definite “starting to look like her mother” look about her.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "who in all her photos seems like one pissed off chick"
     
    If you looked like that, you'd be pissed off too.
    , @Simply Simon
    Egad, she has the same hair style as Debbie Blabbermouth Schulz.
  23. @Peripatetic Commenter
    What will the Babylon Bee come up with for Karmasutra Harris?

    How about a letter of recommendation from Willie Harris?

  24. @Peripatetic Commenter
    What will the Babylon Bee come up with for Karmasutra Harris?

    Maybe a burning hangman's noose? (A combination of a lynching and suttee?)

    Or a letter of recommendation from Willie Harris?

  25. target rich environment :
    Activists Vow John Wayne Will Never Work In Hollywood Again
    https://babylonbee.com/news/activists-vow-john-wayne-will-never-work-in-hollywood-again

    • Replies: @TheBoom
    Great line on Wayne

    "Many seemed confused about who Wayne actually was, with some assuming he may have been a relative of Batman,"
  26. @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    In light of this that smirk now looks suspiciously like a grin.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Does he actually deserve millions? No. But America is full of undeserved windfalls. Nice to see it going to someone who stood up to injustice and screaming leftists.
  27. I’m not saying this article was definitely about Daughter C, but I’m not ruling it out, either:

    Raising Them Right: This Baby’s First Word Was ‘Predestination’

    https://babylonbee.com/news/raising-them-right-this-babys-first-word-was-predestination

  28. @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    What’s the chance this goes to a trial?

    • Replies: @Haxo Angmark
    well, with his dick-pics

    about to cost him a $70,000,000,000 divorce settlement,

    I doubt if Bezos will concede this (admittedly, paltry) sum w/o a fight.
  29. Also, I’m not saying this is a pastor I’m trying to emulate in my own approach to preaching, but I’m not ruling it out, either:

    ‘Reformed Pastor Completes Brief 47-Year-Long Sermon Series On Book Of Romans’

    https://babylonbee.com/news/reformed-pastor-completes-brief-47-year-sermon-series-on-book-of-romans

    Killer quote:

    “Thirty-year-long sermon series are for Arminian churches and heretics,” he said, “But I repeat myself.”

    LOL, and I say again, LOL.

  30. Who cares about this grifter’s family? Pocahontas will never be president.

    Ad hominem racist invective like yours is intellectual deficiency of the most vile nature. At least Tiny Dick is an entertaining leftist dolt.

  31. @Anon
    Well, the days of unsupervised SJWs posting to news websites may be over. There may be new jobs in media for close reading, fact checking editors. I anticipate a lot more verbiage from now on in articles, "according to a February 7 report on the such and such website retrieved at 9:00 today, which we have not independently verified, quote ... "

    I think the lawyers made one tactical mistake: I would have refrained from announcing the lawsuit on their website. Leave it to the Post to announce it, or let a legal blogger stumble across it. That makes it more menacing to other potential defendants. You're not out for publicity, nor to settle: your intention is to destroy them in a Tennessee court of law before a Tennessee jury.

    You’re obviously not a lawyer. Publicity in these cases are what create value, i.e. settlement. Why spend $300,000 on a trial when you can extort them with free negative publicity and create more value through settlement? No jury is going to give this kid 25 million dollars. Innocent people shot in the back by cops don’t get even close to that. The 250 million dollars pleaded in the complaint is merely a place marker in the event a jury wants to go ape shit on the defendant.

    Speaking of free negative publicity, L. Lin Wood, the lead plaintiffs lawyer, will be on Hannity tomorrow night banging the war drum against the Washington Post.

    • Replies: @Lot
    The jury might give him $250 million, and the jusge may incorrectly let it stand.

    What killed Gawker was exactly this in Hulk Hogan's suit, underwritten by Peter Thiel.

    When Gawker tried to appeal, they were required to post 960 million as an appeal bond, which they didn't have.

    This was unjust in the abstract. But then so was posting Hulk's private sex tape.

    I'd hope the federal court in Kentucky would not be so hackish like the Florida courts were.

    I'd guess they settle for about a million.
  32. the bee be anti bbc lol

  33. @Lot
    Nick Sandmann sues WaPo for $250 million!

    http://www.hemmerlaw.com/blog/for-truth-for-justice-for-nicholas/

    Excellent focus on the explicit and indisputable lies told in one WaPo article after another, especially about the kids "swarming" and "blocking" a "tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war"

    https://www.insideedition.com/sites/default/files/images/2019-01/012019_maga_kid_web.jpg

    “a “tribe elder who also fought in the Vietnam war”

    Nathan Phillips ate at a Vietnamese restaurant once when Richard Milhous Nixon was POTUS, that’s the extent of his exposure to The NAM in the 1970s.

    Bob Hope spent way more time in The NAM than Nathan Phillips ever did.

  34. Christian comedy? Is that as to comedy what Christian rock is to rock? There is something fundamentally off, something mean in comedy (if it’s actually funny). I don’t think it lends itself to expressions of devout Christian religious worship.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    The terms used are, as always in The Current Year, tortured and unhelpful for actual communication.

    There are three distinguishable phenomena. Music, comedy, or any other art which is :

    1) created and disseminated by Christian artists, which may or may not have anything much to do with Christianity or the artist's being Christian, e.g., a portrait painted by George Bush or an album by Keith Urban.

    2) created and disseminated with Christian themes, explicity or implicitly advancing Christianity, or at least Christian concepts. Long Line of Leavers, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Silmarillion represent examples ranging from the explicit, to the metaphorical, to the, as it were, influenced.

    3) not necessarily Christian in any way, nor even nexessarily made by Christians, but unobjectionable to Christian sensibilities. Cartoons by Chuck Jones or I Love Lucy come to mind.

    Any of these can be of any quality.

    1) Keith Urban is a virtuoso, but George Bush is no Rembrandt

    2) The music of J.S. Bach and Caedmon's Call is compelling (even to a devout Muslim or an atheist; most of the "Jesus-is-my-boyfriend" dreck KLUV, well-intentioned or not, is at best mediocre and at worst execrable. Lewis and Tolkien were masters; the Left Behind series is probably best...left behind.

    3) Chuck Jones and Lucille Ball were funny; Full House and The Hogan Family infinitely forgettable.

    I digress. I find most people use "Christian comedy" to refer to comedians whose ouevre, at least in large part, fits the second of my categories supra. I occassionally hear comedians in this vein on the radio. Mark Lowry and Bob Smiley are not very funny; their bits beg for a rimshot or the classic three notes from a trombone descending a chromatic scale – what many now call "dad jokes." Jim Gaffigan, however, is a devout Christian perhaps best placed in my first category supra, and he is ine of the most hilarious comedians working today – no mean feat when you consider uou could take your saintly grandmother or your innocent eight-year-old child to his shows: he chooses to completely aboud the mountains of material to be mined by exploring ribald and otherwise off-colour topics. The man can make you laugh as much Eddie Murphy's raunchiest stuff (back when Murphy was still funny). Mind you, I'm not saying blue material is a cop-out. As Murphy himself famously observed, you can't get up in stage and "do no curse show" — but I do think it's more challenging to work clean. Andy Griffith, Bill Cosby, and others prove it can be done, and done very effectively, kust as Neal Morse and Mike Portnoy prove there's Christian rock (of the second category) far superiour to the vast majority of secular stuff. Even if I were a devout Muslim, I'd rather listen to "Entertaining Angels" than "Call Me Maybe."

    https://youtu.be/TwlPegAcJ9o
  35. @Anon
    Well, the days of unsupervised SJWs posting to news websites may be over. There may be new jobs in media for close reading, fact checking editors. I anticipate a lot more verbiage from now on in articles, "according to a February 7 report on the such and such website retrieved at 9:00 today, which we have not independently verified, quote ... "

    I think the lawyers made one tactical mistake: I would have refrained from announcing the lawsuit on their website. Leave it to the Post to announce it, or let a legal blogger stumble across it. That makes it more menacing to other potential defendants. You're not out for publicity, nor to settle: your intention is to destroy them in a Tennessee court of law before a Tennessee jury.

    It’ll be a Kentucky court and jury.

    • Replies: @Lot
    94% white. Trump won the county 60-34. Big third party vote. Much lower incomes than the national average.
  36. smallpox-infested blankets

    Did this ever actually happen? I hear it is a History Hate-Hoax.

    (No germ theory until the 19th century.)

    • Replies: @El Dato

    (No germ theory until the 19th century.)
     
    That's not needed. It is sufficient to know that the stuff's gonna work. Note that most of what we do is mostly voodoo stuff ... "it's gonna work, but I don't know why".

    From Jimbo's Crazy Mountain of Knowledge the Cat Dragged In:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_biological_warfare#North_America

    Two instances of documents discussing the use of biological disease by the British against North American Indians during Pontiac's Rebellion (1763–66) have been examined by historians, but the actual effectiveness is unknown.[11][12] In the first, during a parley at Fort Pitt on June 24, 1763, Captain Simeon Ecuyer gave representatives of the besieging Delawares two blankets and a handkerchief enclosed in small metal boxes that had been exposed to smallpox, hoping to spread the disease to the Natives in order to end the siege.[13] William Trent, the militia commander, sent a bill to the British Army indicating that the purpose of giving the blankets was "to Convey the Smallpox to the Indians." The invoice's approval confirms that the British command endorsed Ecuyer actions.
     
    Earlier, events transpired that should probably make Whitey racist against the Mongols:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_biological_warfare#Middle_Ages


    The Mongol Empire established commercial and political connections between the Eastern and Western areas of the world, through the most mobile army ever seen. The armies, composed of the most rapidly moving travelers who had ever moved between the steppes of East Asia (where bubonic plague was and remains endemic among small rodents), managed to keep the chain of infection without a break until they reached, and infected, peoples and rodents who had never encountered it. The ensuing Black Death may have killed up to 25 million in China and roughly a third of the population of Europe and in the next decades, changing the course of Asian and European history.

    During the Middle Ages, victims of the bubonic plague were used for biological attacks, often by flinging fomites such as infected corpses and excrement over castle walls using catapults. In 1346, during the siege of Kafa (now Feodossia, Crimea) the attacking Tartar Forces which were subjugated by the Mongol empire under Genghis Khan, used the bodies of Mongol warriors of the Golden Horde who had died of plague, as weapons. An outbreak of plague followed and the defending forces retreated, followed by the conquest of the city by the Mongols. It has been speculated that this operation may have been responsible for the advent of the Black Death in Europe. At the time, the attackers thought that the stench was enough to kill them, though it was the disease that was deadly.[6][7]

    At the siege of Thun-l'Évêque in 1340, during the Hundred Years' War, the attackers catapulted decomposing animals into the besieged area.[8]

    In 1422, during the siege of Karlstein Castle in Bohemia, Hussite attackers used catapults to throw dead (but not plague-infected) bodies and 2000 carriage-loads of dung over the walls.[9]

    English Longbowmen usually did not draw their arrows from a quiver; rather, they stuck their arrows into the ground in front of them. This allowed them to nock the arrows faster and the dirt and soil was likely to stick to the arrowheads, thus making the wounds much more likely to become infected.
     
    [It would be fun to speculate that YT analytic brainpower might be somehow linked to resistance to plague infection ... it could be possible! Novelists, to your Word Editors.]
  37. @newrouter
    target rich environment :
    Activists Vow John Wayne Will Never Work In Hollywood Again
    https://babylonbee.com/news/activists-vow-john-wayne-will-never-work-in-hollywood-again

    Great line on Wayne

    “Many seemed confused about who Wayne actually was, with some assuming he may have been a relative of Batman,”

  38. First they came for Ryan Adams, now this guy?

    “Man Forced To Apologize For Whatever He Did In Wife’s Dream Last Night”

    He attempted reasoning with her, using the “lame excuse” that he had no control over what dream Lee does, but after that failed, he resigned himself to apologizing for every action of the imaginary version of himself.

    https://babylonbee.com/news/man-forced-to-apologize-for-whatever-he-did-in-wifes-dream-last-night

  39. @Hail

    smallpox-infested blankets
     
    Did this ever actually happen? I hear it is a History Hate-Hoax.

    (No germ theory until the 19th century.)

    (No germ theory until the 19th century.)

    That’s not needed. It is sufficient to know that the stuff’s gonna work. Note that most of what we do is mostly voodoo stuff … “it’s gonna work, but I don’t know why”.

    From Jimbo’s Crazy Mountain of Knowledge the Cat Dragged In:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_biological_warfare#North_America

    Two instances of documents discussing the use of biological disease by the British against North American Indians during Pontiac’s Rebellion (1763–66) have been examined by historians, but the actual effectiveness is unknown.[11][12] In the first, during a parley at Fort Pitt on June 24, 1763, Captain Simeon Ecuyer gave representatives of the besieging Delawares two blankets and a handkerchief enclosed in small metal boxes that had been exposed to smallpox, hoping to spread the disease to the Natives in order to end the siege.[13] William Trent, the militia commander, sent a bill to the British Army indicating that the purpose of giving the blankets was “to Convey the Smallpox to the Indians.” The invoice’s approval confirms that the British command endorsed Ecuyer actions.

    Earlier, events transpired that should probably make Whitey racist against the Mongols:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_biological_warfare#Middle_Ages

    The Mongol Empire established commercial and political connections between the Eastern and Western areas of the world, through the most mobile army ever seen. The armies, composed of the most rapidly moving travelers who had ever moved between the steppes of East Asia (where bubonic plague was and remains endemic among small rodents), managed to keep the chain of infection without a break until they reached, and infected, peoples and rodents who had never encountered it. The ensuing Black Death may have killed up to 25 million in China and roughly a third of the population of Europe and in the next decades, changing the course of Asian and European history.

    During the Middle Ages, victims of the bubonic plague were used for biological attacks, often by flinging fomites such as infected corpses and excrement over castle walls using catapults. In 1346, during the siege of Kafa (now Feodossia, Crimea) the attacking Tartar Forces which were subjugated by the Mongol empire under Genghis Khan, used the bodies of Mongol warriors of the Golden Horde who had died of plague, as weapons. An outbreak of plague followed and the defending forces retreated, followed by the conquest of the city by the Mongols. It has been speculated that this operation may have been responsible for the advent of the Black Death in Europe. At the time, the attackers thought that the stench was enough to kill them, though it was the disease that was deadly.[6][7]

    At the siege of Thun-l’Évêque in 1340, during the Hundred Years’ War, the attackers catapulted decomposing animals into the besieged area.[8]

    In 1422, during the siege of Karlstein Castle in Bohemia, Hussite attackers used catapults to throw dead (but not plague-infected) bodies and 2000 carriage-loads of dung over the walls.[9]

    English Longbowmen usually did not draw their arrows from a quiver; rather, they stuck their arrows into the ground in front of them. This allowed them to nock the arrows faster and the dirt and soil was likely to stick to the arrowheads, thus making the wounds much more likely to become infected.

    [It would be fun to speculate that YT analytic brainpower might be somehow linked to resistance to plague infection … it could be possible! Novelists, to your Word Editors.]

    • Replies: @Hail
    I would dispute that this solitary and obscure 1763 incident validates the accusation.

    The accusation, in recent U.S. culture, is rarely made about any specific incident, but is assumed to permeate White-Indian relations in the 17th and 18th centuries. It goes something like this:

    The Smallpox-infected Blankets

    Did you know that the US gave these evil blankets to Indians all over the country, even here in California? Or Hudson Bay traders gave them to Indians in Canada? That those blankets wiped out “generations” of Indians? That the US gave them out to reservation Indians in the 1800’s? That Puritans gave out the blankets to Massachusetts Indians?
     
    Some substantial share of the U.S. population today at least vaguely believes (readily believes) that all the above is plausible, true, or highly likely true, and reflects a long-running, deliberate instrument of White 'genocidal' policy against Indians in peacetime in the 17th and 18th centuries. This is a now-strong cultural belief that IMO rests on very, very weak foundations.

    The quoted text above is from left-wing race-realist blogger Robert Lindsay in circa 2005 (rehosted in 2011), who in 2018 was banned -- his website is no more, but substantial traces live on via Archive.org. Here is Lindsay's conclusion:

    [Smallpox blankets" is] Another example of a big fat myth/legend/historical incident, that, once you cut it open – well, there’s nothing much there.
     

    Turns out, Americans never gave smallpox blankets to any Indians anywhere at any time. Not the government, not the Army, not anyone. So we are absolved on that one. The incident in question occurred in 1763, before there even was a USA, before there even were Americans. And American colonists (pre-Americans) didn’t do it either. It was the British that done the deed, and the one man who is always accused of doing it never even did it.

    Further, it was in the midst of a horrible and genocidal war (on both sides) called Pontiac’s Rebellion, which occurred around the Great Lakes area during this time.
     
    Linsday's post goes on at some length and some of the comments are useful (see one by c0mmenter 'etype.')

    Here is another blogger summarizing Lindsay:

    This is a story that everyone takes as true, but is actually almost completely false. [...] To make a long story short, there is a whopping one documented instance in all of colonial American history of such a thing having occurred
     
  40. So the Evangelical news parody site is funnier, sharper and more un-p.c. than the hipster Onion… Strange times indeed.

    To be fair, The Onion has showed some signs of improvement lately: https://politics.theonion.com/ilhan-omar-thankful-for-colleagues-educating-her-on-pai-1832540739

  41. @Mr. Anon
    Christian comedy? Is that as to comedy what Christian rock is to rock? There is something fundamentally off, something mean in comedy (if it's actually funny). I don't think it lends itself to expressions of devout Christian religious worship.

    The terms used are, as always in The Current Year, tortured and unhelpful for actual communication.

    There are three distinguishable phenomena. Music, comedy, or any other art which is :

    1) created and disseminated by Christian artists, which may or may not have anything much to do with Christianity or the artist’s being Christian, e.g., a portrait painted by George Bush or an album by Keith Urban.

    2) created and disseminated with Christian themes, explicity or implicitly advancing Christianity, or at least Christian concepts. Long Line of Leavers, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Silmarillion represent examples ranging from the explicit, to the metaphorical, to the, as it were, influenced.

    3) not necessarily Christian in any way, nor even nexessarily made by Christians, but unobjectionable to Christian sensibilities. Cartoons by Chuck Jones or I Love Lucy come to mind.

    Any of these can be of any quality.

    1) Keith Urban is a virtuoso, but George Bush is no Rembrandt

    2) The music of J.S. Bach and Caedmon’s Call is compelling (even to a devout Muslim or an atheist; most of the “Jesus-is-my-boyfriend” dreck KLUV, well-intentioned or not, is at best mediocre and at worst execrable. Lewis and Tolkien were masters; the Left Behind series is probably best…left behind.

    3) Chuck Jones and Lucille Ball were funny; Full House and The Hogan Family infinitely forgettable.

    I digress. I find most people use “Christian comedy” to refer to comedians whose ouevre, at least in large part, fits the second of my categories supra. I occassionally hear comedians in this vein on the radio. Mark Lowry and Bob Smiley are not very funny; their bits beg for a rimshot or the classic three notes from a trombone descending a chromatic scale – what many now call “dad jokes.” Jim Gaffigan, however, is a devout Christian perhaps best placed in my first category supra, and he is ine of the most hilarious comedians working today – no mean feat when you consider uou could take your saintly grandmother or your innocent eight-year-old child to his shows: he chooses to completely aboud the mountains of material to be mined by exploring ribald and otherwise off-colour topics. The man can make you laugh as much Eddie Murphy’s raunchiest stuff (back when Murphy was still funny). Mind you, I’m not saying blue material is a cop-out. As Murphy himself famously observed, you can’t get up in stage and “do no curse show” — but I do think it’s more challenging to work clean. Andy Griffith, Bill Cosby, and others prove it can be done, and done very effectively, kust as Neal Morse and Mike Portnoy prove there’s Christian rock (of the second category) far superiour to the vast majority of secular stuff. Even if I were a devout Muslim, I’d rather listen to “Entertaining Angels” than “Call Me Maybe.”

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
    Muslims might even appreciate "Days of Elijah." Great renditions on You Tube
  42. @Lot
    https://legalinsurrection.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Elizabeth-Warren-Bar-Card-Texas-Cropped-e1549415449341.jpg

    Never trust anyone with more than three names.

  43. @Hibernian
    It'll be a Kentucky court and jury.

    94% white. Trump won the county 60-34. Big third party vote. Much lower incomes than the national average.

  44. @petit bourgeois
    You're obviously not a lawyer. Publicity in these cases are what create value, i.e. settlement. Why spend $300,000 on a trial when you can extort them with free negative publicity and create more value through settlement? No jury is going to give this kid 25 million dollars. Innocent people shot in the back by cops don't get even close to that. The 250 million dollars pleaded in the complaint is merely a place marker in the event a jury wants to go ape shit on the defendant.

    Speaking of free negative publicity, L. Lin Wood, the lead plaintiffs lawyer, will be on Hannity tomorrow night banging the war drum against the Washington Post.

    The jury might give him $250 million, and the jusge may incorrectly let it stand.

    What killed Gawker was exactly this in Hulk Hogan’s suit, underwritten by Peter Thiel.

    When Gawker tried to appeal, they were required to post 960 million as an appeal bond, which they didn’t have.

    This was unjust in the abstract. But then so was posting Hulk’s private sex tape.

    I’d hope the federal court in Kentucky would not be so hackish like the Florida courts were.

    I’d guess they settle for about a million.

  45. @densa
    In light of this that smirk now looks suspiciously like a grin.

    Does he actually deserve millions? No. But America is full of undeserved windfalls. Nice to see it going to someone who stood up to injustice and screaming leftists.

  46. @Anon
    Well, the days of unsupervised SJWs posting to news websites may be over. There may be new jobs in media for close reading, fact checking editors. I anticipate a lot more verbiage from now on in articles, "according to a February 7 report on the such and such website retrieved at 9:00 today, which we have not independently verified, quote ... "

    I think the lawyers made one tactical mistake: I would have refrained from announcing the lawsuit on their website. Leave it to the Post to announce it, or let a legal blogger stumble across it. That makes it more menacing to other potential defendants. You're not out for publicity, nor to settle: your intention is to destroy them in a Tennessee court of law before a Tennessee jury.

    Hannity said last night that the Covington kid’s lawyer is the same guy who represented Richard Jewell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Jewell

  47. @El Dato

    (No germ theory until the 19th century.)
     
    That's not needed. It is sufficient to know that the stuff's gonna work. Note that most of what we do is mostly voodoo stuff ... "it's gonna work, but I don't know why".

    From Jimbo's Crazy Mountain of Knowledge the Cat Dragged In:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_biological_warfare#North_America

    Two instances of documents discussing the use of biological disease by the British against North American Indians during Pontiac's Rebellion (1763–66) have been examined by historians, but the actual effectiveness is unknown.[11][12] In the first, during a parley at Fort Pitt on June 24, 1763, Captain Simeon Ecuyer gave representatives of the besieging Delawares two blankets and a handkerchief enclosed in small metal boxes that had been exposed to smallpox, hoping to spread the disease to the Natives in order to end the siege.[13] William Trent, the militia commander, sent a bill to the British Army indicating that the purpose of giving the blankets was "to Convey the Smallpox to the Indians." The invoice's approval confirms that the British command endorsed Ecuyer actions.
     
    Earlier, events transpired that should probably make Whitey racist against the Mongols:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_biological_warfare#Middle_Ages


    The Mongol Empire established commercial and political connections between the Eastern and Western areas of the world, through the most mobile army ever seen. The armies, composed of the most rapidly moving travelers who had ever moved between the steppes of East Asia (where bubonic plague was and remains endemic among small rodents), managed to keep the chain of infection without a break until they reached, and infected, peoples and rodents who had never encountered it. The ensuing Black Death may have killed up to 25 million in China and roughly a third of the population of Europe and in the next decades, changing the course of Asian and European history.

    During the Middle Ages, victims of the bubonic plague were used for biological attacks, often by flinging fomites such as infected corpses and excrement over castle walls using catapults. In 1346, during the siege of Kafa (now Feodossia, Crimea) the attacking Tartar Forces which were subjugated by the Mongol empire under Genghis Khan, used the bodies of Mongol warriors of the Golden Horde who had died of plague, as weapons. An outbreak of plague followed and the defending forces retreated, followed by the conquest of the city by the Mongols. It has been speculated that this operation may have been responsible for the advent of the Black Death in Europe. At the time, the attackers thought that the stench was enough to kill them, though it was the disease that was deadly.[6][7]

    At the siege of Thun-l'Évêque in 1340, during the Hundred Years' War, the attackers catapulted decomposing animals into the besieged area.[8]

    In 1422, during the siege of Karlstein Castle in Bohemia, Hussite attackers used catapults to throw dead (but not plague-infected) bodies and 2000 carriage-loads of dung over the walls.[9]

    English Longbowmen usually did not draw their arrows from a quiver; rather, they stuck their arrows into the ground in front of them. This allowed them to nock the arrows faster and the dirt and soil was likely to stick to the arrowheads, thus making the wounds much more likely to become infected.
     
    [It would be fun to speculate that YT analytic brainpower might be somehow linked to resistance to plague infection ... it could be possible! Novelists, to your Word Editors.]

    I would dispute that this solitary and obscure 1763 incident validates the accusation.

    The accusation, in recent U.S. culture, is rarely made about any specific incident, but is assumed to permeate White-Indian relations in the 17th and 18th centuries. It goes something like this:

    The Smallpox-infected Blankets

    Did you know that the US gave these evil blankets to Indians all over the country, even here in California? Or Hudson Bay traders gave them to Indians in Canada? That those blankets wiped out “generations” of Indians? That the US gave them out to reservation Indians in the 1800’s? That Puritans gave out the blankets to Massachusetts Indians?

    Some substantial share of the U.S. population today at least vaguely believes (readily believes) that all the above is plausible, true, or highly likely true, and reflects a long-running, deliberate instrument of White ‘genocidal’ policy against Indians in peacetime in the 17th and 18th centuries. This is a now-strong cultural belief that IMO rests on very, very weak foundations.

    The quoted text above is from left-wing race-realist blogger Robert Lindsay in circa 2005 (rehosted in 2011), who in 2018 was banned — his website is no more, but substantial traces live on via Archive.org. Here is Lindsay’s conclusion:

    [Smallpox blankets” is] Another example of a big fat myth/legend/historical incident, that, once you cut it open – well, there’s nothing much there.

    Turns out, Americans never gave smallpox blankets to any Indians anywhere at any time. Not the government, not the Army, not anyone. So we are absolved on that one. The incident in question occurred in 1763, before there even was a USA, before there even were Americans. And American colonists (pre-Americans) didn’t do it either. It was the British that done the deed, and the one man who is always accused of doing it never even did it.

    Further, it was in the midst of a horrible and genocidal war (on both sides) called Pontiac’s Rebellion, which occurred around the Great Lakes area during this time.

    Linsday’s post goes on at some length and some of the comments are useful (see one by c0mmenter ‘etype.’)

    Here is another blogger summarizing Lindsay:

    This is a story that everyone takes as true, but is actually almost completely false. […] To make a long story short, there is a whopping one documented instance in all of colonial American history of such a thing having occurred

    • Replies: @Hail
    On the rise of the Smallpox Blanket meme,

    Consulting Ngram, we find ~no uses of the phrase "smallpox blankets" before the late 1970s; it quiets down in the 1980s but takes off again in the 1990s.

    Here is a no-smoothing view zoomed into late 1960s to 2000s, showing "smallpox blankets" was getting something like its current use only from 1991, which in turn suggests the likelihood that all of us born after ~1980 were trained in K-12 days to believe this. A small little founding myth of American colonial history. (Maybe some b.1970s'ers in the most left-wing areas, too.)

    Robert Lindsay himself, born c.1958 in California, wrote in 2005, in his post on the smallpox blankets meme to which I link above:

    Oh, how the American Indians love this story! I’ve heard it endlessly.
     
    His age, and his lifelong hobnobbing in leftists circles, suggests he could even have first heard it as a teenager or early-20s'er in the mid or late 1970s, aligning perfectly with the narrative suggested by the Ngram data, to wit:

    The patterns visible in the Ngram data suggest that this "smallpox blankets" 'meme' may have percolated up from the extreme, anti-White fringe circa the 1970s, at-least-chronologically associated with the American Indian Movement [AIM] of the same era. AIM was making waves in the late 1970s when Nathan Phillips (the harasser of the Convington, Kentucky, MAGA-hat boys in early 2019) was a young man, and with which Phillips is openly affiliated. (1978 is the first time the phrase occurs at any meaningful magnitude in the Ngram corpus.)

    From these shabby 1970s origins, "smallpox blankets" as a phrase knocked around a while, perhaps in academia. A transition, not readily clear to the casual observer, ends up with it emerging again, strongly, in the 1990s -- by which time, I might add, Nathan Phillips was a full-time Amerindian activist-malcontent, apparently living in Washington, D.C. and being a regular at AIM protests and related events. It settled into vaguely-held-cultural-belief in the 2000s, where it has remained in the 2010s with no readily visible prospect of a dislodging in the 2020s, but who knows.

    "Smallpox blankets" only appears consistently, year on year, in the Ngram corpus from 1987 onward; its 1991 to 2005 avg. appearance rate is up to 8x its 1970-1982 avg. rate (no smoothing). (Examine the data for yourself.) (Other phrasing variants suggest earlier origins for the idea, but if you look at earlier example sources, they are pretty generally unrelated to the 17th- and 18th-century North American context and unrelated to smallpox specifically; most 1900-1920 era hits for "infected blanks" go on and on about typhoid-infected blankets reportedly purchased by the British Army by mistake, purportedly resulting in unnecessary deaths in the Boer War.)

    Here are the no-smoothing appearance rates (numbers arbitrary but useful for scale) for "smallpox blankets":

    1965 -- 0
    1966 -- 0
    1967 -- 0
    1968 -- 0
    1969 -- 0
    1970 -- 0
    1971 -- 0
    1972 -- 0
    1973 -- 34
    1974 -- 0
    1975 -- 0
    1976 -- 0
    1977 -- 0
    1978 -- 63
    1979 -- 122
    1980 -- 0
    1981 -- 0
    1982 -- 0
    1983 -- 198
    1984 -- 0
    1985 -- 51
    1986 -- 0
    1987 -- 24
    1988 -- 69
    1989 -- 43
    1990 -- 20
    1991 -- 201
    1992 -- 147
    1993 -- 72
    1994 -- 134
    1995 -- 113
    1996 -- 122
    1997 -- 74
    1998 -- 85
    1999 -- 119
    2000 -- 133
    2001 -- 138
    2002 -- 63
    2003 -- 113
    2004 -- 155
    2005 -- 255

    The Ngram corpus does not, of course, reflect the news cycle but (in theory) the contents of published books which will significantly soften news-cycle noise but still reflect it; the spike in 2005 aligns with the sad little case of radical professor Ward Churchill (described by Steve Sailer as a "pseudo-Indian conman")'s spotlighting for his radical anti-White views. Churchill (a Marxist of partial Amerindian ancestry) denounced White Americans for consistent, deliberate, continent-scale use of "smallpox blankets" with consciously genocidal intent, among many other accusations during the early-2005 media firestorm (it started with him celebrating the 9/11 attacks).

    Smallpox-blanket-meme-promoter Ward Churchill received some pushback led by Fox News, and an academic panel at his university that looked into his life's work following the media firestorm found him guilty of fabrication and falsification in relation to these smallpox blankets claims, not to mention extensive plagiarism in previous works. (He was fired.)
    , @Ron Mexico
    I believe that James Loewen's "Lies my Teacher Told Me" perpetuated the Jeffrey Amherst biological warfare as a strategy theory.
  48. @Hail
    I would dispute that this solitary and obscure 1763 incident validates the accusation.

    The accusation, in recent U.S. culture, is rarely made about any specific incident, but is assumed to permeate White-Indian relations in the 17th and 18th centuries. It goes something like this:

    The Smallpox-infected Blankets

    Did you know that the US gave these evil blankets to Indians all over the country, even here in California? Or Hudson Bay traders gave them to Indians in Canada? That those blankets wiped out “generations” of Indians? That the US gave them out to reservation Indians in the 1800’s? That Puritans gave out the blankets to Massachusetts Indians?
     
    Some substantial share of the U.S. population today at least vaguely believes (readily believes) that all the above is plausible, true, or highly likely true, and reflects a long-running, deliberate instrument of White 'genocidal' policy against Indians in peacetime in the 17th and 18th centuries. This is a now-strong cultural belief that IMO rests on very, very weak foundations.

    The quoted text above is from left-wing race-realist blogger Robert Lindsay in circa 2005 (rehosted in 2011), who in 2018 was banned -- his website is no more, but substantial traces live on via Archive.org. Here is Lindsay's conclusion:

    [Smallpox blankets" is] Another example of a big fat myth/legend/historical incident, that, once you cut it open – well, there’s nothing much there.
     

    Turns out, Americans never gave smallpox blankets to any Indians anywhere at any time. Not the government, not the Army, not anyone. So we are absolved on that one. The incident in question occurred in 1763, before there even was a USA, before there even were Americans. And American colonists (pre-Americans) didn’t do it either. It was the British that done the deed, and the one man who is always accused of doing it never even did it.

    Further, it was in the midst of a horrible and genocidal war (on both sides) called Pontiac’s Rebellion, which occurred around the Great Lakes area during this time.
     
    Linsday's post goes on at some length and some of the comments are useful (see one by c0mmenter 'etype.')

    Here is another blogger summarizing Lindsay:

    This is a story that everyone takes as true, but is actually almost completely false. [...] To make a long story short, there is a whopping one documented instance in all of colonial American history of such a thing having occurred
     

    On the rise of the Smallpox Blanket meme,

    Consulting Ngram, we find ~no uses of the phrase “smallpox blankets” before the late 1970s; it quiets down in the 1980s but takes off again in the 1990s.

    Here is a no-smoothing view zoomed into late 1960s to 2000s, showing “smallpox blankets” was getting something like its current use only from 1991, which in turn suggests the likelihood that all of us born after ~1980 were trained in K-12 days to believe this. A small little founding myth of American colonial history. (Maybe some b.1970s’ers in the most left-wing areas, too.)

    Robert Lindsay himself, born c.1958 in California, wrote in 2005, in his post on the smallpox blankets meme to which I link above:

    Oh, how the American Indians love this story! I’ve heard it endlessly.

    His age, and his lifelong hobnobbing in leftists circles, suggests he could even have first heard it as a teenager or early-20s’er in the mid or late 1970s, aligning perfectly with the narrative suggested by the Ngram data, to wit:

    The patterns visible in the Ngram data suggest that this “smallpox blankets” ‘meme’ may have percolated up from the extreme, anti-White fringe circa the 1970s, at-least-chronologically associated with the American Indian Movement [AIM] of the same era. AIM was making waves in the late 1970s when Nathan Phillips (the harasser of the Convington, Kentucky, MAGA-hat boys in early 2019) was a young man, and with which Phillips is openly affiliated. (1978 is the first time the phrase occurs at any meaningful magnitude in the Ngram corpus.)

    From these shabby 1970s origins, “smallpox blankets” as a phrase knocked around a while, perhaps in academia. A transition, not readily clear to the casual observer, ends up with it emerging again, strongly, in the 1990s — by which time, I might add, Nathan Phillips was a full-time Amerindian activist-malcontent, apparently living in Washington, D.C. and being a regular at AIM protests and related events. It settled into vaguely-held-cultural-belief in the 2000s, where it has remained in the 2010s with no readily visible prospect of a dislodging in the 2020s, but who knows.

    “Smallpox blankets” only appears consistently, year on year, in the Ngram corpus from 1987 onward; its 1991 to 2005 avg. appearance rate is up to 8x its 1970-1982 avg. rate (no smoothing). (Examine the data for yourself.) (Other phrasing variants suggest earlier origins for the idea, but if you look at earlier example sources, they are pretty generally unrelated to the 17th- and 18th-century North American context and unrelated to smallpox specifically; most 1900-1920 era hits for “infected blanks” go on and on about typhoid-infected blankets reportedly purchased by the British Army by mistake, purportedly resulting in unnecessary deaths in the Boer War.)

    Here are the no-smoothing appearance rates (numbers arbitrary but useful for scale) for “smallpox blankets”:

    [MORE]

    1965 — 0
    1966 — 0
    1967 — 0
    1968 — 0
    1969 — 0
    1970 — 0
    1971 — 0
    1972 — 0
    1973 — 34
    1974 — 0
    1975 — 0
    1976 — 0
    1977 — 0
    1978 — 63
    1979 — 122
    1980 — 0
    1981 — 0
    1982 — 0
    1983 — 198
    1984 — 0
    1985 — 51
    1986 — 0
    1987 — 24
    1988 — 69
    1989 — 43
    1990 — 20
    1991 — 201
    1992 — 147
    1993 — 72
    1994 — 134
    1995 — 113
    1996 — 122
    1997 — 74
    1998 — 85
    1999 — 119
    2000 — 133
    2001 — 138
    2002 — 63
    2003 — 113
    2004 — 155
    2005 — 255

    The Ngram corpus does not, of course, reflect the news cycle but (in theory) the contents of published books which will significantly soften news-cycle noise but still reflect it; the spike in 2005 aligns with the sad little case of radical professor Ward Churchill (described by Steve Sailer as a “pseudo-Indian conman”)’s spotlighting for his radical anti-White views. Churchill (a Marxist of partial Amerindian ancestry) denounced White Americans for consistent, deliberate, continent-scale use of “smallpox blankets” with consciously genocidal intent, among many other accusations during the early-2005 media firestorm (it started with him celebrating the 9/11 attacks).

    Smallpox-blanket-meme-promoter Ward Churchill received some pushback led by Fox News, and an academic panel at his university that looked into his life’s work following the media firestorm found him guilty of fabrication and falsification in relation to these smallpox blankets claims, not to mention extensive plagiarism in previous works. (He was fired.)

  49. @Anon
    Reading the reporting on the various websites who also got the evidence preservation notices is fun. Very gingerly reported, with obvious rage barely constrained.

    Jezebel, not one of the targets if I recall, nevertheless is pulling its punches by only quoting the Washinton Post. According to Jezebel's Rebecca Fishbein, who in all her photos seems like one pissed off chick, ...

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1054436849517715456/louZDj2H_400x400.jpg

    The suit makes mention of a recent investigation into the January 18 incident—in which Sandmann and his fellow students appear to mock, smirk, and yell at Omaha Nation elder Nathan Phillips—found no evidence of explicit racism, or, at the very least, the investigation did not unearth evidence that the students made any “offensive or racist statements” toward Phillips and the other Native American activists, as well as toward a group of Black Hebrew Israelites who were also involved in the stand-off.

    The Washington Post, in fact, reported on that investigation. They also spoke with Dina Gilio-Whitaker, a member of Colville Confederated Tribes in California and professor of American Indian studies at California State University at San Marcos, who vehemently disagreed with the investigation’s findings. “Maybe they didn’t say overtly racist things, but the context of the incident needs to be analyzed,” she said, adding that she found the report “unfortunate and disgusting.”
     
    They didn't say anything racist, but they existed in an unanalyzed racist context. O.K. Let's see if that kind of reasoning flies in court.

    I've never seen Rebecca Fishbein's mother, but I think I can say with confidence that she is starting to look like her mother. She has that definite "starting to look like her mother" look about her.

    “who in all her photos seems like one pissed off chick”

    If you looked like that, you’d be pissed off too.

    • Replies: @Haxo Angmark
    she shouldn't be.

    looking Jewish

    is not her fault.
  50. @Lot
    Cory Booker is dandy, but not sure how with the girls be handy.

    https://www.politics-prose.com/sites/politics-prose.com/files/Booker_Credit%20Kelly%20Campbell.jpg

    Doesn’t/Didn’t Cory Booker have issues with some kind of rape or assault on some guy a month ago? As in, a homosexual issue?

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  51. @Hail
    I would dispute that this solitary and obscure 1763 incident validates the accusation.

    The accusation, in recent U.S. culture, is rarely made about any specific incident, but is assumed to permeate White-Indian relations in the 17th and 18th centuries. It goes something like this:

    The Smallpox-infected Blankets

    Did you know that the US gave these evil blankets to Indians all over the country, even here in California? Or Hudson Bay traders gave them to Indians in Canada? That those blankets wiped out “generations” of Indians? That the US gave them out to reservation Indians in the 1800’s? That Puritans gave out the blankets to Massachusetts Indians?
     
    Some substantial share of the U.S. population today at least vaguely believes (readily believes) that all the above is plausible, true, or highly likely true, and reflects a long-running, deliberate instrument of White 'genocidal' policy against Indians in peacetime in the 17th and 18th centuries. This is a now-strong cultural belief that IMO rests on very, very weak foundations.

    The quoted text above is from left-wing race-realist blogger Robert Lindsay in circa 2005 (rehosted in 2011), who in 2018 was banned -- his website is no more, but substantial traces live on via Archive.org. Here is Lindsay's conclusion:

    [Smallpox blankets" is] Another example of a big fat myth/legend/historical incident, that, once you cut it open – well, there’s nothing much there.
     

    Turns out, Americans never gave smallpox blankets to any Indians anywhere at any time. Not the government, not the Army, not anyone. So we are absolved on that one. The incident in question occurred in 1763, before there even was a USA, before there even were Americans. And American colonists (pre-Americans) didn’t do it either. It was the British that done the deed, and the one man who is always accused of doing it never even did it.

    Further, it was in the midst of a horrible and genocidal war (on both sides) called Pontiac’s Rebellion, which occurred around the Great Lakes area during this time.
     
    Linsday's post goes on at some length and some of the comments are useful (see one by c0mmenter 'etype.')

    Here is another blogger summarizing Lindsay:

    This is a story that everyone takes as true, but is actually almost completely false. [...] To make a long story short, there is a whopping one documented instance in all of colonial American history of such a thing having occurred
     

    I believe that James Loewen’s “Lies my Teacher Told Me” perpetuated the Jeffrey Amherst biological warfare as a strategy theory.

    • Replies: @Hank Yobo
    The one credible scholarly article about the 1763 incident at Fort Pitt is:

    Ranlet, Philip. (2000). "The British, the Indians, and Smallpox: What actually happened at Fort Pitt in 1763?" Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies, 67(3), 427-441. It can be downloaded for free and is well worth reading.
  52. @Ron Mexico
    I believe that James Loewen's "Lies my Teacher Told Me" perpetuated the Jeffrey Amherst biological warfare as a strategy theory.

    The one credible scholarly article about the 1763 incident at Fort Pitt is:

    Ranlet, Philip. (2000). “The British, the Indians, and Smallpox: What actually happened at Fort Pitt in 1763?” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies, 67(3), 427-441. It can be downloaded for free and is well worth reading.

  53. @Anon
    Reading the reporting on the various websites who also got the evidence preservation notices is fun. Very gingerly reported, with obvious rage barely constrained.

    Jezebel, not one of the targets if I recall, nevertheless is pulling its punches by only quoting the Washinton Post. According to Jezebel's Rebecca Fishbein, who in all her photos seems like one pissed off chick, ...

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1054436849517715456/louZDj2H_400x400.jpg

    The suit makes mention of a recent investigation into the January 18 incident—in which Sandmann and his fellow students appear to mock, smirk, and yell at Omaha Nation elder Nathan Phillips—found no evidence of explicit racism, or, at the very least, the investigation did not unearth evidence that the students made any “offensive or racist statements” toward Phillips and the other Native American activists, as well as toward a group of Black Hebrew Israelites who were also involved in the stand-off.

    The Washington Post, in fact, reported on that investigation. They also spoke with Dina Gilio-Whitaker, a member of Colville Confederated Tribes in California and professor of American Indian studies at California State University at San Marcos, who vehemently disagreed with the investigation’s findings. “Maybe they didn’t say overtly racist things, but the context of the incident needs to be analyzed,” she said, adding that she found the report “unfortunate and disgusting.”
     
    They didn't say anything racist, but they existed in an unanalyzed racist context. O.K. Let's see if that kind of reasoning flies in court.

    I've never seen Rebecca Fishbein's mother, but I think I can say with confidence that she is starting to look like her mother. She has that definite "starting to look like her mother" look about her.

    Egad, she has the same hair style as Debbie Blabbermouth Schulz.

  54. @indocon
    What's the chance this goes to a trial?

    well, with his dick-pics

    about to cost him a $70,000,000,000 divorce settlement,

    I doubt if Bezos will concede this (admittedly, paltry) sum w/o a fight.

  55. @Almost Missouri

    "who in all her photos seems like one pissed off chick"
     
    If you looked like that, you'd be pissed off too.

    she shouldn’t be.

    looking Jewish

    is not her fault.

  56. @Redneck farmer
    Or at least black girls.

    So you’re saying he does like women and girls, just not as thicc as hasty puddin’?

  57. @Autochthon
    The terms used are, as always in The Current Year, tortured and unhelpful for actual communication.

    There are three distinguishable phenomena. Music, comedy, or any other art which is :

    1) created and disseminated by Christian artists, which may or may not have anything much to do with Christianity or the artist's being Christian, e.g., a portrait painted by George Bush or an album by Keith Urban.

    2) created and disseminated with Christian themes, explicity or implicitly advancing Christianity, or at least Christian concepts. Long Line of Leavers, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Silmarillion represent examples ranging from the explicit, to the metaphorical, to the, as it were, influenced.

    3) not necessarily Christian in any way, nor even nexessarily made by Christians, but unobjectionable to Christian sensibilities. Cartoons by Chuck Jones or I Love Lucy come to mind.

    Any of these can be of any quality.

    1) Keith Urban is a virtuoso, but George Bush is no Rembrandt

    2) The music of J.S. Bach and Caedmon's Call is compelling (even to a devout Muslim or an atheist; most of the "Jesus-is-my-boyfriend" dreck KLUV, well-intentioned or not, is at best mediocre and at worst execrable. Lewis and Tolkien were masters; the Left Behind series is probably best...left behind.

    3) Chuck Jones and Lucille Ball were funny; Full House and The Hogan Family infinitely forgettable.

    I digress. I find most people use "Christian comedy" to refer to comedians whose ouevre, at least in large part, fits the second of my categories supra. I occassionally hear comedians in this vein on the radio. Mark Lowry and Bob Smiley are not very funny; their bits beg for a rimshot or the classic three notes from a trombone descending a chromatic scale – what many now call "dad jokes." Jim Gaffigan, however, is a devout Christian perhaps best placed in my first category supra, and he is ine of the most hilarious comedians working today – no mean feat when you consider uou could take your saintly grandmother or your innocent eight-year-old child to his shows: he chooses to completely aboud the mountains of material to be mined by exploring ribald and otherwise off-colour topics. The man can make you laugh as much Eddie Murphy's raunchiest stuff (back when Murphy was still funny). Mind you, I'm not saying blue material is a cop-out. As Murphy himself famously observed, you can't get up in stage and "do no curse show" — but I do think it's more challenging to work clean. Andy Griffith, Bill Cosby, and others prove it can be done, and done very effectively, kust as Neal Morse and Mike Portnoy prove there's Christian rock (of the second category) far superiour to the vast majority of secular stuff. Even if I were a devout Muslim, I'd rather listen to "Entertaining Angels" than "Call Me Maybe."

    https://youtu.be/TwlPegAcJ9o

    Muslims might even appreciate “Days of Elijah.” Great renditions on You Tube

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