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Atlantic: "The Intrusion of White Families Into Bilingual Schools"
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From The Atlantic:

The Intrusion of White Families Into Bilingual Schools

Will the growing demand for multilingual early-childhood programs push out the students these programs were designed to serve?

CONOR WILLIAMS 7:00 AM ET EDUCATION

… In Washington, D.C., dual-immersion programs are attracting significant demand from English-dominant families. One of the city’s oldest immersion programs, Oyster-Adams Bilingual School, has seen its surrounding neighborhood become so English-dominant (and white and wealthy) that the school is running short on native Spanish-speaking students. Neighborhood students get guaranteed slots at kindergarten, and these are now taken almost exclusively by English-speaking children, so the school has taken to overweighting its pre-k enrollment toward native Spanish speakers, reserving 30 of the 36 available pre-k seats for Spanish-dominant kids. Just 15 percent of the school’s students are classified as English learners. Not coincidentally, just 23 percent of students come from low-income families (across D.C. Public Schools, it’s 77 percent).

Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out.

Black Americans hate Spanish and aren’t crazy about Spanish-speakers either. They associate Spanish speakers with coming to take jobs by working cheaper and harder. They associate speaking Spanish on the street with plotting against them.

In contrast, African American girls kind of like French due to long elite cultural ties between upwardly mobile African Americans and France. (E.g., Ta-Nehisi Coates and Thomas Chatterton Williams recently lived in Paris, not Madrid, or, God forbid, Mexico City.). But you seldom hear of plans for English-French dual immersion schools, because they would attract blacks and would employ white teachers rather than Hispanic teachers.

For gentrifying white parents, the real deal is Mandarin Dual Immersion, like the Broadway Elementary School in the artsy beach town of Venice, CA, which saw its test scores shoot up when it switched to Mandarin as a second language, attracting white and Chinese parents and repelling the deadwood, who took their low test scores somewhere else to become somebody else’s problem.

 
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  1. It also seems a smart move to become bilingual in Spanish. Even if Trump builds his wall it will be useful. I am uncertain about Mandarin immersion unless it starts very young. As the language is tonal if you are surrounded by non-native speakers when you learn it, you will end up sounding like an ethnic joke.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @AKAHorace

    Spanish is only useful if you want to b a building contractor, welfare worker, or work in the restaurant industry.

    But the welfare departments and the food industry don’t really want Spanish speakers . They want Indian looking Hispanic immigrants.

    Contractors only need one of those specialized dictionaries like how to talk to your maid, janitor, day laborer you’ve hired to do unskilled code violating construction work , whatever.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @istevefan
    @AKAHorace

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn't give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English.

    Replies: @Sgt. Joe Friday, @AKAHorace, @Peter Akuleyev, @Alden, @Frankie P

    , @Neoconned
    @AKAHorace

    I'm going to have my kids, if I'm dumb enough to have any....go to Catholic schools and hopefully learn Spanish. I figure exposure early will help them over the other gringos.

    , @Nico
    @AKAHorace

    As others have pointed out, for the *most* part in the U.S. Spanish isn’t actually nearly as much a career-booster as simply being an autochthon or mestizo Hispanic (who does or does not speak Spanish) is. The only exception is if you live in Miami, and even there, good luck capitalizing on your Hispanophone credentials if you don’t have a Spanish surname.

    Still, the comments in this thread about which foreign language to learn are very revealing of the American mindset whereupon “education” = “job training” and the best choice of a foreign language thought to be what is perceived (rightly or wrongly) as the most “practical.” French was and in many countries remains the second language of choice for educated English-speakers and for cultural reasons we really should get back to that. Most Western students could also benefit from at least a year or two of Latin. Some people will of course find it necessary or useful or simply interesting to learn German, Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish, etc. but on the general track these should be relegated to second rung.

    , @Anonymous
    @AKAHorace

    If you learn Mandarin you'll be stuck working with the Chinese the rest of your life. And in my short time working with them I'd consider that an awful fate.

    I enjoy knowing French but live in a Mixed English/French area where the blue collar French people can help me look good at my job.

    Don't learn Mandarin or let your kid learn it! Sure they'll have lots of work, but they'll hate that work.

    Replies: @Opinionator

  2. What I found objectionable in the Atlantic article is the notion that Black women want to learn French! Are you kidding me?

    Sailer’s commentary contains a startling diagnosis: “Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out.”

    The first thing many parents will say is: Does it work? If so, sign us up!

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Kam Phlodius

    And what’s wrong with keeping African Americans out?

    Just 5 percent causes a lot of problems.
    10 percent blacks tips the school into violence and anarchy. It’s like putting 10 hungry wolves into a pen with 90 new born lambs

    , @Alden
    @Kam Phlodius

    It’s just one more proof that journalists just make up anything and it’s published

    The truth is that the school boards all over the country have dumped French and other languages for Spanish, Spanish, Spanish.

    The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish.

    In California the Southern and Central Valley schools all teach Spanish.

    The Bay Area and Santa Clara County aka Silicon Valley all teach Mandarin as the favored foreign language.

    It’s incredibly naive to teach non Chinese mandarin in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area.

    No matter how well they speak Mandarin, Chinese will always discriminate against non Chinese.

    The only reason to learn Spanish is to get a$30,000 a year job in the welfare department.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous, @Neoconned, @stillCARealist

    , @Anonymous
    @Kam Phlodius

    I'm sure there are several young black women in America who want to take French classes. They come from places like Senegal, Gabon and Haiti and are looking for an "easy A" or at least an "easy C".

    Replies: @Father O'Hara

    , @Prof. Woland
    @Kam Phlodius

    A couple of years ago, I went to New Orleans for the first time. Rather naively, I was expecting to meet at least one person who spoke French. The closest I got was a restaurant owned and operated by some Cajuns who were the real deal but all they spoke was Redneck.

    The other thing that stuck me what that so many of the younger people working in the hospitality industry there were from all over the Mississippi basin. I usually thing of Inter-US migration going from East to West, but here is was all North to South. There were lots of college educated well spoken (English) people who were recent arrivals and did not really know the town or a lick'n of French.

    Replies: @athEIst

  3. In contrast, African American girls kind of like French due to long elite cultural ties between upwardly mobile African Americans and France

    Elite French-speaking Louisiana mulattoes surely played a role here. A successful African-American businessman catching himself one of those is what produced Beyoncé.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @IHTG


    In contrast, African American girls kind of like French due to long elite cultural ties between upwardly mobile African Americans and France

    Elite French-speaking Louisiana mulattoes surely played a role here. A successful African-American businessman catching himself one of those is what produced Beyoncé.
     
    Also Haiti, as Metropolitan French is more elite than the Haitian patois.
  4. Spanish is a nice language, too bad the Mexicans ruined it.
    French is nice too, très chic. I prefer Italian, but to each his taste.
    Mandarin is an awful and difficult language.
    I think bilingualism is good for children, but not good for societies as a whole.
    Nothing wrong with learning many languages on your own, but what they do in Canada, talking the same thing twice once in English, once in French, is just stupid. “Press 2 for Spanish” is even more stupid as Spanish is not even an official language in the US, well, maybe in California.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dumbo

    The official language of California is English.

    Of course, it didn't take long for some busybody federal judge to "discovery" that such a law as written would violate some invisible, undocumented rights of our many vibrant, undocumented ilegales.

    Instead, ilegales are at the mercy of a cottage industry of semi-competent interpreters and translators, and Univision works hard to keep its Spanish-speaking clientele in thrall to their feudal lords.

    , @anonymous
    @Dumbo

    Don't forget New Mexico. Though not strictly bilingual de jure, in "Nuevo Mejico" Spanish and English are considered equal de facto

    , @al gore rhythms
    @Dumbo

    Switzerland seems like a pretty functional country. Canada and Belgium seem to have more issues in this regard, in their cases the two language groups are proxies for ethnic grievances on at least one side.

    And I agree that tonal languages are flat out ugly.

    Replies: @anon

  5. Anonymous [AKA "Jhg"] says:

    Wasn’t there an isteve post from years ago about someone trying to set up a hebrew/English immersion school?

    • Replies: @Karl
    @Anonymous

    5 Jhg > someone trying to set up a hebrew/English immersion school?


    there's about ten (last time I looked) of them now, USA-wide.

    There's a Florida-based organization.... and a competing, NewYorkCity one.

    The NYC is under the firm control of SJW talkalikes, at least in rhetoric.


    The Hebrew-est schools in America, radiate out from an epicentre in Tarzana, California.

    the IDF recruitment-registrar visits Tarzana once a year to handle the coupla dozen recruits they get each year, as their total natively-bi-lingualism makes them desireable to the Air Force and to some spook-flavored units

    PS: i've seen NSA doing the same in expat-American places in various strategic-but-neglected-language areas of the world.

  6. Such ignorance about why blacks like French names and what they think is French culture.

    Louisiana was originally settled by the French and like the rest of the slave states soon have vast amounts of the offspring of black women and White men.

    After the Haitian revolution, the black Haitians tried to genocide the light skinned Haitians so the mixed race Haitians fled to Louisiana because of the French culture and language. Many of those Haitians were almost Whites

    Blacks, especially the light skinned ones are very proud of this White French heritage. Even if just one great grandparent was from Louisiana they will pretend their entire family is from Louisiana.

    That’s why French names and even the popularity of made up names beginning with La are so popular. A lot of French words end with iou or ious. That’s where names like shitavious come from. Marquise was very popular at one time. Dominique is still popular.

    It seems journalists can just make up any kind of nonsense and get published.

    Does Nehi Cola think his weird made up name is French sounding? It’s not.

    Summation, blacks associate France and French names with Louisiana blacks who are much more White than the rest of them.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Alden


    Louisiana was originally settled by the French and like the rest of the slave states soon have vast amounts of the offspring of black women and White men.
     
    For her first century-and-a-half of statehood, Louisiana was third in percentage of population black, behind totally insane South Carolina and Mississippi.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @Dumbo
    @Alden


    That’s why French names and even the popularity of made up names beginning with La are so popular. A lot of French words end with iou or ious. That’s where names like shitavious come from. Marquise was very popular at one time. Dominique is still popular.
     
    That's very interesting and makes sense. However, I don't think that too many French words end in "iou" or "ious", maybe "ou" or "ous", without the "i" (caribou, au-dessous, loup-garou). And I can't think of any real French person's name ending in "ious". Of course, blacks also created many made-up names that supposedly sound African or Arabic and aren't really. Blacks are very creative with names, unfortunately for them.
  7. Black Americans hate Spanish and aren’t crazy about Spanish-speakers either.

    But are amazingly quick to adopt their names, e.g., Antonio, Latoya, Carlos, Marcos, Angel, etc.

    Though this is less pronounced now than in the past:
    http://abcnews.go.com/2020/top-20-whitest-blackest-names/story?id=2470131

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Reg Cæsar

    Don't forget Chad Ochocinco.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    There is no way to explain black names or predict where they’ll go, because they can recycle any era or culture or simply make something up out of thin air. They aren’t working within any sort of tradional framework. One thing you can count on is they won’t sound ‘white’ — and they’ll be completely bizarre to non-blacks.

    , @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    Latoya is a Spanish name?!

    Replies: @Autochthon

  8. @Kam Phlodius
    What I found objectionable in the Atlantic article is the notion that Black women want to learn French! Are you kidding me?

    Sailer's commentary contains a startling diagnosis: "Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out."

    The first thing many parents will say is: Does it work? If so, sign us up!

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden, @Anonymous, @Prof. Woland

    And what’s wrong with keeping African Americans out?

    Just 5 percent causes a lot of problems.
    10 percent blacks tips the school into violence and anarchy. It’s like putting 10 hungry wolves into a pen with 90 new born lambs

  9. “Oyster Adams” sounds like a #1 draft choice somewhere. Or a Boston beer utilizing the city’s maritime culinary tradition.

    But why white parents in yuppie-guppie DC would send their children to a school with faculty like Giovanni Pena is beyond me:

    http://wjla.com/news/crime/oyster-adams-bilingual-school-teacher-arrested-in-child-sex-abuse-case-114461

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Reg Cæsar

    A lot of the local microbrewers in MA have made a particular style of beer called Oyster Gose.

    http://draftmag.com/seaweed-and-oyster-goses/

    The brewer whose product appears in the photo, Night Shift, does a promotional event (Buck a Shuck) with a local shellfish company every year when they release their gose. I'll drink beer and eat $1 oysters all day!

  10. French Haiti being a rare successful black revolution also plays a part. Despite the fact that Haiti immediately went from a successful colony to a third-world heck hole and has never recovered is always handwaved away as caused by “racism”, and has been for 200 years (i.e. the reason Haiti still looks like that earthquake happened just yesterday instead of years ago? Racism!). Many well-read blacks romanticize the Haitian overthrow in a hagiographic manner that mixes Nat Turner with Moses.

    But another thing: French men have a minor stereotype of being more open to relationships with black women than other white males. The mulattoes and race-mixing balls of New Orleans being part of this stereotype, but also the stereotype goes with the mainland French: e.g. Josephine Baker, a legendary black American entertainer, moved to France in the 1920s and had marriages to white French men as well as relationships with other white French men. Many black jazz musicians felt accepted in Paris during the Jim Crow era, although how much of that was gay French men enjoying some exotic imported boytoys and how much was the French using their “openness” to the handful of blacks who came as a way to stick it to Americans as proof the French were more “open-minded and sophisticated” than the Americans who dealt with a far larger number of blacks in far less egalitarian terms.

    Perhaps enterprising, star-struck young black girls not only feel the traditional pull that Paris has on American females, but also feel like there’s more of a chance of landing a white man there than in a Spanish-speaking nation?

  11. Was the Atlantic just whinning about essentially white parents not having enough of their children in the local public school and denying it “diversity” or something. Now it’s whining when they show up and have their kids in school … taking up too much space.

    Damn’d if you don’t, damned if you do.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @AnotherDad

    Soon the Atlantic will offer coupons for reduced check-in rates at White Euthanasia Resorts.

    This will simplify reporting.

    , @MBlanc46
    @AnotherDad

    That’s the situation of whites in the US today. Anyway you look at it, we lose. And to a great extent, we’ve brought it on ourselves.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bomag

    , @Buffalo Joe
    @AnotherDad

    AnotherDad, soon blacks will demand that white parents who homeschool reserve seats at the kitchen table for their kids.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Desiderius
    @AnotherDad

    Those whose status is based on their deracination (and they are legion) are getting nervous.

  12. Inclusion, Intrusion, I get confused.

    So, when whites are included, it’s intrusion. And when Diversity intrudes, it’s inclusion.

    How about compromise at Incrusion?

    Btw, ‘bi-lingual’ is exclusive. What about mute people who use hands than tongues to communicate?
    They are into ‘bi-limbnal’ communication.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anon

    No no no! "Incrusion" is what happens when Orientals are involved.

    , @oddsbodkins
    @Anon

    "How about compromise at incrusion?"

    That's perfect for the english/mandarin class.

    , @415 reasons
    @Anon

    And poor old me sitting here with just one tongue.

  13. Over here we have (a very few) dual-language immersion schools in Gaelic and I think Welsh. Any call for them over yonder?

    • Replies: @Karl
    @Expletive Deleted

    13 Expletive Deleted > dual-language immersion schools in Gaelic and I think Welsh. Any call for them over yonder?


    several times a year, Hebrew-speakers cause international repercussions


    when is the last time that a Gaelic-speaker even got a bus route changed in London?

  14. @Kam Phlodius
    What I found objectionable in the Atlantic article is the notion that Black women want to learn French! Are you kidding me?

    Sailer's commentary contains a startling diagnosis: "Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out."

    The first thing many parents will say is: Does it work? If so, sign us up!

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden, @Anonymous, @Prof. Woland

    It’s just one more proof that journalists just make up anything and it’s published

    The truth is that the school boards all over the country have dumped French and other languages for Spanish, Spanish, Spanish.

    The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish.

    In California the Southern and Central Valley schools all teach Spanish.

    The Bay Area and Santa Clara County aka Silicon Valley all teach Mandarin as the favored foreign language.

    It’s incredibly naive to teach non Chinese mandarin in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area.

    No matter how well they speak Mandarin, Chinese will always discriminate against non Chinese.

    The only reason to learn Spanish is to get a$30,000 a year job in the welfare department.

    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @guest
    @Alden

    "in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area"

    They may not be planning that far ahead. There is a meantime.

    Not that it will help.

    "The only reason to learn Spanish..."

    Not the only. Unlike with the crafty Chinese, you can make money off Spanish-speakers. There are opportunities in the private sector.

    My brother is a professor of Spanish linguistics, so he did something with it. But I think he's lucky to have a job.

    If nothing else, you can overhear them plotting against you.

    Oh, and there actually is such a thing as Spanish literature (meaning literature in Spanish, but also literature from Spain itself).* Cervantes, Ortega y Gasset, Unamuno, Llosa, Borges, Barca, etc.

    *Judging by my book collection, I should learn French first, then German. Then Russian, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Italian. Maybe Spanish is next; I'm not sure.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Alden

    Spanish is a real useful skill to have if you work in law enforcement in California, for obvious reasons. Police get paid fairly well there.

    Its also useful for general contractors since they use so much Mexican labor. Experienced and successful GCs in California can easily make well over $100k a year.

    "The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish."

    That's a pretty small percent of Hispanics in California, most of them speak Mexican Spanish, but they don't learn very much English once they get here.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Alden

    , @Neoconned
    @Alden

    Being able to speak Mandarin is good if you want to do business in China.

    Knowing Spanish helps you if you want to live out west

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @stillCARealist
    @Alden

    The whole thing seems contrived to me. The entire world is learning English and is getting pretty good at it.

    Here's what I've observed: The Asians come here and master our language pretty quickly, the Spanish speakers do if they try (too many of them don't) and their kids all become fluent English speakers. The trait that most helps in life is having an excellent command of the English language. Being able to use a few expressions with your Spanish speaking gardener or house-cleaner is nice, but not critical.

    And everybody is forgetting about the Slavs. They have multiple languages that they've brought in but nobody is demanding bilingual education in Ukrainian. They're just learning English and slowly blending in with Anglo society. Does anybody think they want their kids becoming like the Mexicans?

  15. I know of French immersion schools in Cambridge, MA (the nice part) and Freeport, ME. Portland ME is rapidly becoming half ghetto, half hipster Brooklyn, and half third world toilet, but nearby Freeport is still Maine.

    Lower-class Mainers tend to regard French as a white trash language because, in Maine, it traditionally has been. But those aren’t the people sending their kids to the bilingual school in Freeport.

  16. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Ah, yes, whites are the ones “intruding” here…

    It is sad that this is what people have to resort to in DC and nearly every other city. Even our presumably excellent neighborhood DC public elementary school in Georgetown, where the residents are 90+ percent white, is about 40 percent black.

    If forced to choose, I’d be willing to take a gamble on a French immersion program instead, given the positive selection of blacks into it. I know the teachers at the nurseries I looked into were surprisingly more white than French speaking African.

    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies working for families with $2mil homes, pushing kids around in $1k strollers while they talk on the phone to their friends all day. The kids look utterly bored if not desperate. Same for the equally expensive day cares. People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute). We somehow managed to find someone short-term but ultimately face these same constraints and will be relocating very soon. Who is left running the country (so to speak) are the couples willing to raise their kids as strangers or not having kids at all, which should concern everyone.

    • Replies: @Marat
    @Anonymous

    French still has considerable pull in LA schooling, but will that change as the parents of these kids get further and further from Boomer taste and are themselves more of the SJW bent?

    I often wonder about the soundness of turning one's child care (for basic socialization as well as safety) over to someone with only the most tenuous grasp of the native culture. At times, the inherent goodness of strangers and driver patience seem to come to the rescue with potential stroller navigation mishaps and the like. Many Guatemalans have now made inroads into what was formerly Mexican-dominated nanny business in CA beach communities. While barely clearing the dashboard line of the missus's Range Rovers, they are talking to the kids in Spanish all morning long. Presumeably a fair number of tots are also picking up Oaxacan and other Indian dialects along the way. Maybe some parents have caught on that tuition earmarked for pre-school language immersion can be freed up for baby fencing classes or whatever status enhancing skill deemed crucial for junior's "getting ahead".

    , @Opinionator
    @Anonymous

    People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute).

    Can you explain this? How can people making $350k just barely be afloat? Is that sarcasm? How is it possible that such people cannot afford to pay $10/hour extra?

    Replies: @guest

    , @27 year old
    @Anonymous


    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies ...

    the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny

     

    They're concerned alright.

    The wives don't want to deal with a younger hotter tighter White girl hanging around their high earning alpha husbands, showing off their child raising skills and femininity in a stark contrast to the wife who is away from the kids for 9.5 hours per day senior-managing a Human Resources department.

    Not trying to say this is the whole story, many of these people are clueless true believers and many are in fact not concerned about their kids because narcissism.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @L Woods

    , @wrd9
    @Anonymous

    Here's how it's working out for elderly Swedes.

    https://voiceofeurope.com/2017/12/shocking-migrants-violently-rob-97-year-old-swedish-woman-at-her-care-home/


    It can be difficult to find decent whites to hire for household help. From my perspective, hiring a nanny should first off require a college degree, race/ethnicity is second although there are some I would never consider, like Muslims. The nanny I hired for my children for a few years was a college educated black woman whose parents were from Cape Verde. She was a delight - well spoken, very responsible, totally trustworthy.

  17. @AKAHorace
    It also seems a smart move to become bilingual in Spanish. Even if Trump builds his wall it will be useful. I am uncertain about Mandarin immersion unless it starts very young. As the language is tonal if you are surrounded by non-native speakers when you learn it, you will end up sounding like an ethnic joke.

    Replies: @Alden, @istevefan, @Neoconned, @Nico, @Anonymous

    Spanish is only useful if you want to b a building contractor, welfare worker, or work in the restaurant industry.

    But the welfare departments and the food industry don’t really want Spanish speakers . They want Indian looking Hispanic immigrants.

    Contractors only need one of those specialized dictionaries like how to talk to your maid, janitor, day laborer you’ve hired to do unskilled code violating construction work , whatever.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Alden


    Spanish is only useful if you want to be a building contractor, welfare worker, marry a stunning South American or Iberian beauty who is feminine and agreeable, or work in the restaurant industry.
     
    FIFY
  18. Blacks can barely speak one language. Every time I hear them speak English, my ears hear some sort of ghetto creole.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    @PaddyPearse

    That's true of American blacks. African blacks who immigrate here usually speak at least three languages.

  19. Despite the anti-white headline, presumably written by an editor of Hebrewness, the article itself is refreshingly free of race-baiting with the exception of one apparently-black individual who has a race-baiting quote. The comments are also refreshing in calling out the race-baiting. I hadn’t read the Atlantic’s comments in a long time but I recall the commentariat being slightly to the left of Mao. Perhaps my memory fails me.

    I concur with the consensus that these programs are good for all students and should be more widely available for all students.

  20. @AnotherDad
    Was the Atlantic just whinning about essentially white parents not having enough of their children in the local public school and denying it "diversity" or something. Now it's whining when they show up and have their kids in school ... taking up too much space.

    Damn'd if you don't, damned if you do.

    Replies: @El Dato, @MBlanc46, @Buffalo Joe, @Desiderius

    Soon the Atlantic will offer coupons for reduced check-in rates at White Euthanasia Resorts.

    This will simplify reporting.

  21. ” … that the school is running short on native Spanish-speaking students. …”

    Well, obviously, America needs more immigration to build up our rapidly dwindling supply of native Spanish-speaking students. That sounds like a no-brainer.

  22. anon • Disclaimer says:

    We lived in the Oyster neighborhood, and thought about sending our kids there. Steve’s analysis is more or less correct, but much of the benefit that Oyster used to provide in terms of student mix can now be had at several nearby primary schools.

    In effect, some DC schools at lower grades have now gotten quite good as the city has gentrified, and the new parents demand functioning schools for their kids. Once you get to middle school (Oyster actually goes though 8th IIRC), and especially high school, things change dramatically. The high schools draw from a bigger catchment area, and therefore have much more mixed populations. A typical Oyster family would be in the Wilson catchment area (~1/2 of students scored 50% or less on math/english assessments).

    I don’t think there is a single public high school in DC that doesn’t have a significant portion of the population that is a real problem. The “selective” high schools are kind of a joke.

    In reality, parents who want their kids to do well in school almost always do one of two things: (1) move to the suburbs, which have some of the best schools in America (e.g., Thomas Jefferson) or pay a lot of money to have their kids go to one of at least a dozen extremely competitive private schools (this is what we did). The great suburban public schools tend to be Asian-dominated, and the private schools full of rich, though usually smart and motivated, white kids with an admixture of minority charity cases (~10 – 15%).

    As usual, it works out fine for the rich, those fanatically dedicated to their kids, or reasonably-shit-together minorities. Guess who it doesn’t tend to work out well for?

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @anon

    Whom doesn't it work out well for?

  23. @Kam Phlodius
    What I found objectionable in the Atlantic article is the notion that Black women want to learn French! Are you kidding me?

    Sailer's commentary contains a startling diagnosis: "Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out."

    The first thing many parents will say is: Does it work? If so, sign us up!

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden, @Anonymous, @Prof. Woland

    I’m sure there are several young black women in America who want to take French classes. They come from places like Senegal, Gabon and Haiti and are looking for an “easy A” or at least an “easy C”.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @Anonymous

    I thought "Easy A" and"Easy C" were the girls' nicknames.

  24. love that “intrusion” word choice

  25. @IHTG

    In contrast, African American girls kind of like French due to long elite cultural ties between upwardly mobile African Americans and France
     
    Elite French-speaking Louisiana mulattoes surely played a role here. A successful African-American businessman catching himself one of those is what produced Beyoncé.

    Replies: @syonredux

    In contrast, African American girls kind of like French due to long elite cultural ties between upwardly mobile African Americans and France

    Elite French-speaking Louisiana mulattoes surely played a role here. A successful African-American businessman catching himself one of those is what produced Beyoncé.

    Also Haiti, as Metropolitan French is more elite than the Haitian patois.

  26. @Reg Cæsar

    Black Americans hate Spanish and aren’t crazy about Spanish-speakers either.
     
    But are amazingly quick to adopt their names, e.g., Antonio, Latoya, Carlos, Marcos, Angel, etc.

    Though this is less pronounced now than in the past:
    http://abcnews.go.com/2020/top-20-whitest-blackest-names/story?id=2470131

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Anonymous, @International Jew

    Don’t forget Chad Ochocinco.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dave Pinsen


    Don’t forget Chad Ochocinco.
     
    Can you blame a guy named Johnson?

    Gene Klein reported in First Down and a Billion that one of his mentally challenged Chargers told him "I'm Escondido", and adds, "apparently confusing himself with a small town north of San Diego". It's not so small anymore.
  27. But you seldom hear of plans for English-French dual immersion schools, because they would attract blacks

    No, that’s not it. Those would be the kind of well-behaved, high-end, blacks who are the most desireable commodity of all! They are what goodwhites have in mind when they talk about “diversity”. And there are way too few of these francophile blacks to ever amount to more than an ornamentally small fraction of the student body.

    We have such a school here in San Fran:
    https://www.frenchamericansf.org/index.cfm

    The real reason French schools are rare is the same reason that few American kids study French at any kind of school: it’s just not as immediately useful, to an American, as Spanish.

    • Replies: @anon
    @International Jew

    ironically, mere blocks from ground zero of the Anglicization of Spanish language programs is Washington International School, which does offer French language immersion.

  28. anon • Disclaimer says:

    my wife and i recently had this discussion. the neighborhood school is a dual-language program starting in kindergarten, but the neighborhood, uhh, does not suffer from oyster school’s problems. my wife has a chip on her shoulder that her Hispanic father never taught her Spanish and is bizarrely adamant about teaching the kids a second language.

    my response: “yeah, overseer for day laborers. if that doesn’t say upwardly mobile i don’t know what does!” suffice to say our oldest remains in the froo-froo private montessori school.

    french, on the other hand, is worth learning: if we move to switzerland when the kids are 10 and they know french, they’ll be eligible for citizenship at 18…

    • Replies: @Corn
    @anon

    “my wife has a chip on her shoulder that her Hispanic father never taught her Spanish and is bizarrely adamant about teaching the kids a second language.”

    I’ve never resented my grandma for not teaching me Irish as a small child. Always the Hispanics.....

    , @Joe Schmoe
    @anon

    German is the main language in Switzerland. In a multilingual situation, one language becomes dominant. In Switzerland it is German. German is a primary language partly because it has so many native speakers who are at least moderately affluent. German is also a primary language for original technology. For example, my son is an engineering major at state U. He was talking with German student who was telling him about some new thing. The German student told him that right now you can't find articles about it in English, but he found an article in a German language engineering journal. Conversely, major French journals have stopped publishing in French and now publish exclusively in English. There are about six medical journals in the world that are not in English, and one of those is in German. It doesn't appear to be a major journal, but is still around because there are so many German speaking doctors. We all know English is the language of our time. However, I don't think it is healthy for the world to be dominated by one language because it facilitates the activities of the globalists.

    Replies: @Opinionator

  29. @International Jew

    But you seldom hear of plans for English-French dual immersion schools, because they would attract blacks
     
    No, that's not it. Those would be the kind of well-behaved, high-end, blacks who are the most desireable commodity of all! They are what goodwhites have in mind when they talk about "diversity". And there are way too few of these francophile blacks to ever amount to more than an ornamentally small fraction of the student body.

    We have such a school here in San Fran:
    https://www.frenchamericansf.org/index.cfm

    The real reason French schools are rare is the same reason that few American kids study French at any kind of school: it's just not as immediately useful, to an American, as Spanish.

    Replies: @anon

    ironically, mere blocks from ground zero of the Anglicization of Spanish language programs is Washington International School, which does offer French language immersion.

  30. Broadway Elementary School’s success was due to teamwork, it says so on their website:

    The principal of Broadway Elementary School, which recently launched its English-Mandarin Chinese dual-language immersion program, credits the 107-point increase to teamwork and intervention—methods of helping struggling students make the grade.

  31. Kansas City has a French immersion charter school called Academie Lafayette: it’s 65% white and 18% black whereas the district itself is 9% white and 57% black. Hispanics only make up 3-4% of the schools’ two campuses despite being 28% of the district total. It has decent test scores and a waiting list despite the rest of the district being a dumpster fire for the most part.

    What I’ve noticed from watching the Kansas City Public Schools over the years is that SWPLs who don’t move out of the city directly (Johnson County schools right across the Kansas state line offer a release valve) find other ways to segregate, essentially, under the rubric of charter schools. KCPS also has an African-centric charter that operates as a honey-trap for dumb students: it’s 96.3% black and 1.9% white and the test scores are awful. That school has 0% Asians.

    The best black students apparently go to University Academy, which as a charter school has a waiting list and strictly enforced behavior policies to weed out less motivated students. The test scores are only mediocre though.

    Fortunately they made a nice tool you can use to compare schools within the district, including demographics and test scores:

    https://showmekcschools.org/compare-schools/

  32. New York City appears to have bilingual French schools. search on dual language program french

  33. @Kam Phlodius
    What I found objectionable in the Atlantic article is the notion that Black women want to learn French! Are you kidding me?

    Sailer's commentary contains a startling diagnosis: "Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out."

    The first thing many parents will say is: Does it work? If so, sign us up!

    Replies: @Alden, @Alden, @Anonymous, @Prof. Woland

    A couple of years ago, I went to New Orleans for the first time. Rather naively, I was expecting to meet at least one person who spoke French. The closest I got was a restaurant owned and operated by some Cajuns who were the real deal but all they spoke was Redneck.

    The other thing that stuck me what that so many of the younger people working in the hospitality industry there were from all over the Mississippi basin. I usually thing of Inter-US migration going from East to West, but here is was all North to South. There were lots of college educated well spoken (English) people who were recent arrivals and did not really know the town or a lick’n of French.

    • Replies: @athEIst
    @Prof. Woland

    all North to South

    Was it winter?

  34. Off-topic: Universe hits wormhole

    Media accuses White House Intern of making White Power sign:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5216137/White-House-intern-flashes-white-power-sign-Trump.html#article-5216137

    Anti-Defamation League discredits accusation:

    https://www.adl.org/blog/no-the-ok-gesture-is-not-a-hate-symbol

    Who’d a thunk?

  35. Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out.

    This is a pretty shrewd observation. But I think it actually extends much farther than that…

    Back in the late 1990s when I was very heavily involved in the Bilingual Wars, I quickly realized that the enthusiasm of so many Chinese immigrant parents in sending their children to “bilingual” schools seemed to be especially strong in places like SF that had a large local black population.

    I remember having dinner with a Chinese activist who said her parents very strongly supported keeping their existing bilingual programs and were worried that my initiative might ban them. And she said that what they liked most about their bilingual classes was that “everything was in English.” Presumably, the program name itself was enough to keep out the “bad elements.”

    Similarly, although Latino parents generally disliked their (Spanish-almost-only) “bilingual” programs, I strongly suspect that keeping out violent and unruly black students was one of the few partial silver linings…

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Ron Unz

    San Francisco has a large, local, black population!? Maybe it did in the 1990s....

  36. Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @MBlanc46


    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.
     
    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn't mean that one doesn't have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn't any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @(((Owen))), @bomag, @guest, @anonymous, @anon

    , @nebulafox
    @MBlanc46

    Just because you are paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you, you know.

  37. @AnotherDad
    Was the Atlantic just whinning about essentially white parents not having enough of their children in the local public school and denying it "diversity" or something. Now it's whining when they show up and have their kids in school ... taking up too much space.

    Damn'd if you don't, damned if you do.

    Replies: @El Dato, @MBlanc46, @Buffalo Joe, @Desiderius

    That’s the situation of whites in the US today. Anyway you look at it, we lose. And to a great extent, we’ve brought it on ourselves.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @MBlanc46


    Anyway you look at it, we lose.
     
    Laugh about it, shout about it
    When you've got to choose
    Every way you look at it you lose

    And to a great extent, we’ve brought it on ourselves.
     
    They sure didn't get here by themselves.
    , @bomag
    @MBlanc46


    we’ve brought it on ourselves.
     
    More like we made a bad deal: admit blame and accept a punishment; with the other side then behaving, pulling their weight, and ceasing the complaints.

    Now we have half of our side calling for one more program; one more effort; while the other side keeps beating us with the piñata stick.
  38. Here is a feel-good language story found via a link at Lew Rockwell. Some immersion starts by dipping a toe in the water.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2017/12/26/Pittsburgh-Catholic-schools-Latin-Greek-vocabulary-words-students/stories/201712250007

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Ivy

    Latin and Greek (and when they are at it, why not Hebrew and Sanskrit) would make the schools more exclusive and prestigious than Spanish or French.

    Replies: @Ivy, @Stephen Marle II

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Ivy

    At an orchestral High Mass at another St Agnes in another city, St Paul, I sat in front of a high school girl who sang along, knowing the tune and all the words. I was mightily impressed. Then, strangely, she left early. That was confusing.

    Turns out she had to go downstairs before anyone else. That week, it was her group's turn to man the doughnut table.

  39. @AnotherDad
    Was the Atlantic just whinning about essentially white parents not having enough of their children in the local public school and denying it "diversity" or something. Now it's whining when they show up and have their kids in school ... taking up too much space.

    Damn'd if you don't, damned if you do.

    Replies: @El Dato, @MBlanc46, @Buffalo Joe, @Desiderius

    AnotherDad, soon blacks will demand that white parents who homeschool reserve seats at the kitchen table for their kids.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Buffalo Joe


    AnotherDad, soon blacks will demand that white parents who homeschool reserve seats at the kitchen table for their kids.
     
    No, blacks won't. Ed school profs, welfare bureaucrats, and New York Times columnists will.
  40. I was in French immersion for elementary school. I hated it. The only French I took in high school was the single compulsory first year course.

    Even though my town and school was essentially all-White, the pattern Steve points out here was the same — the immersion class kids were much more likely to be from affluent middle class families. (No that doesn’t describe my family, however.)

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @BenKenobi

    There are french dual language public schools in NYC. In upper Manhattan and gentrifying Brooklyn (Carroll Gardens etc).

    http://frenchlanguagek12.org/4151-french-dual-language-programs-nyc-public-schools

  41. anon • Disclaimer says:

    “Black Americans hate Spanish and they are not crazy about Spanish-speakers either..”

    And yet all black politicians are on record as supporting mass immigration and blacks of all backgrounds vote en masse for the Democrtas, the party of mass (much of it “Spanish”) immigration. Go figure.

    In any case as a Canadian, my friendly warning is that “bilingualism” is nothing but bad news for any unilingual English-speaking American (whatever your skin colour).

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @anon

    While mass immigration has mostly been from Latin America, fertility rates are in decline there as modernity seeps in. Some Latin American countries have fertility rates below 2.1

    By contrast, I don't think any African countries have sub-replacement fertility.

    Black pols are playing the long game of being a team player in the Dem coalition. In return, they one day are hoping for mass immigration from Black Africa. Keith Ellison's black ethnostate has more institutional vision in the CBC than Richard Spencer's does in the Alt-Right.

  42. “Intrusion.” There’s a choice of words. As though white families aren’t “intruded upon” at every turn.

  43. “Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out.”

    I never thought of this, but … Hilarious! The ideal repellant for blacks would be English-Korean schools, at least in Los Angeles. Of all the “chanks,” the Koreans are the most despised by the black community, since they come here with nothing, take over businesses in the black community, and succeed in one generation. But since no white parents wants their kids learning Korean (too small a country, little practical use for the language), Chinese is probably the best overall black repellent.

    By the way, here’s a video of Ta-Nehisi Coates speaking French after a full-immersion program at a language program affiliated with Middlebury College, famous for the Charles Murray incident.

    • Replies: @Karl
    @Stephen Marle II

    43 Stephen Marie II > their kids learning Korean (too small a country, little practical use for the language), Chinese is probably the best overall black repellent


    I feel their desire-for-black-repellent pain, but that right there is the glass ceiling on the rejuvenation of White greatness

    PS: anyone who thinks that Korea is "small" or that being proficient in conversational Korean would be useless, has spent too much time immersed in Hollywood's version of the world. you know, the place where Brazil is "great" because it is so populated

  44. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Black Americans hate Spanish and aren’t crazy about Spanish-speakers either.
     
    But are amazingly quick to adopt their names, e.g., Antonio, Latoya, Carlos, Marcos, Angel, etc.

    Though this is less pronounced now than in the past:
    http://abcnews.go.com/2020/top-20-whitest-blackest-names/story?id=2470131

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Anonymous, @International Jew

    There is no way to explain black names or predict where they’ll go, because they can recycle any era or culture or simply make something up out of thin air. They aren’t working within any sort of tradional framework. One thing you can count on is they won’t sound ‘white’ — and they’ll be completely bizarre to non-blacks.

  45. @Dave Pinsen
    @Reg Cæsar

    Don't forget Chad Ochocinco.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Don’t forget Chad Ochocinco.

    Can you blame a guy named Johnson?

    Gene Klein reported in First Down and a Billion that one of his mentally challenged Chargers told him “I’m Escondido”, and adds, “apparently confusing himself with a small town north of San Diego”. It’s not so small anymore.

  46. What is it with black people and France? Do they think the French aren’t racist? Is that because when they’re over there they stick to commies, who flatter them into thinking they’re true universalists? I guarantee the French would have had Jim Crow (Jacques Corneille?) if there were ever enough blacks. And they would give them the colonial treatment if they had acted up.

    Does it have something to do with the fact that Europeans appreciated jazz slightly more? Or at least the blacker and more avant-garde forms of jazz. (How could they not, considering “avant-garde” is a French phrase?)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @guest

    It's not just France. Much of Northern and Western Europe has fetishized negroes for many decades. The novelty of it all; the exoticism.

    So they love the idea of having them in their countries full time, but then it turns out that theory sometimes fails to predict practice. But for many the impulse remains strong, and it won't take too much more before their societies become wrecked.

    Pity their children, who will have to deal with the ugly reality of third-world transplantation, and will never have enjoyed the theory beforehand.

  47. @Ivy
    Here is a feel-good language story found via a link at Lew Rockwell. Some immersion starts by dipping a toe in the water.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2017/12/26/Pittsburgh-Catholic-schools-Latin-Greek-vocabulary-words-students/stories/201712250007

    Replies: @epebble, @Reg Cæsar

    Latin and Greek (and when they are at it, why not Hebrew and Sanskrit) would make the schools more exclusive and prestigious than Spanish or French.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @epebble

    Hope springs eternal for greater appreciation of language. I'd like to see widespread of the classical language word roots worksheets. If that gets more kids interested in school, what's not to like?

    , @Stephen Marle II
    @epebble

    Bilingual Latin schools: Brilliant! One thing that has always amazed me from looking at old 19th century and before secondary school curricula is the amount of Latin and Greek that the kids had to learn. Check out the old texts that they used. Holy cow!

    A buddy of mine got one of the last classics degrees at his university before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies. He operates an online Skype-based Latin school using Wheelock, and he tells me that most of his students are home schoolers, with most of the rest being secondary and charter school teachers polishing up or learning Latin because their schools are reintroducing it.

    There are conversational Latin programs here and there. And Latin was continuously spoken in some form until a little more than a half century ago, since many seminaries used it, and before that there were also scholars who spoke it, badly, except for Erasmus. So there exist texts and lesson plans for spoken Latin, if you can decide on ecclesiastical vs. classical pronunciation.

    Latin might seem kind of useless compared to Chinese, but kids who study it really gain a lot in English vocabulary and reading skills, English writing skills because of the attention to grammar, which transfers to English, and overall concentration and analytical thinking. They're probably not going to end up fluent in Latin, but the Chinese learners for the most part peter out before any sort of usable abililty.

    Latin would repel all kinds of undesirables, and the ones that it didn't would be weeded out by the ablative mode.

    Replies: @Marat, @nebulafox, @Ron Mexico

  48. @Alden
    Such ignorance about why blacks like French names and what they think is French culture.

    Louisiana was originally settled by the French and like the rest of the slave states soon have vast amounts of the offspring of black women and White men.

    After the Haitian revolution, the black Haitians tried to genocide the light skinned Haitians so the mixed race Haitians fled to Louisiana because of the French culture and language. Many of those Haitians were almost Whites

    Blacks, especially the light skinned ones are very proud of this White French heritage. Even if just one great grandparent was from Louisiana they will pretend their entire family is from Louisiana.

    That’s why French names and even the popularity of made up names beginning with La are so popular. A lot of French words end with iou or ious. That’s where names like shitavious come from. Marquise was very popular at one time. Dominique is still popular.

    It seems journalists can just make up any kind of nonsense and get published.

    Does Nehi Cola think his weird made up name is French sounding? It’s not.

    Summation, blacks associate France and French names with Louisiana blacks who are much more White than the rest of them.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dumbo

    Louisiana was originally settled by the French and like the rest of the slave states soon have vast amounts of the offspring of black women and White men.

    For her first century-and-a-half of statehood, Louisiana was third in percentage of population black, behind totally insane South Carolina and Mississippi.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Reg Cæsar


    For her first century-and-a-half of statehood, Louisiana was third in percentage of population black, behind totally insane South Carolina and Mississippi.
     
    No one challenges Mississippi, but Louisiana is still #2. Cenus bureau has it a 34% a tick above Georgia, two above Maryland. South Carolina and Alabama a few ticks below them.

    It's shame. Louisiana--the delta, the swamp thing--isn't to my taste, but the South has some nice real estate for the modern world with screened windows, electric fans and AC. But it's much nicer to live in a community that is essentially a white community. Individual blacks can be--often are--fine folks, good company. But just being pickled in black (low IQ, low conscientiousness) behavior degrades quality of life for white folks.

    Said it before: whites are accused of all sorts of nonsense, but their one great crime against humanity is giving blacks a huge unearned demographic expansion into the New World with slavery.
  49. @MBlanc46
    @AnotherDad

    That’s the situation of whites in the US today. Anyway you look at it, we lose. And to a great extent, we’ve brought it on ourselves.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bomag

    Anyway you look at it, we lose.

    Laugh about it, shout about it
    When you’ve got to choose
    Every way you look at it you lose

    And to a great extent, we’ve brought it on ourselves.

    They sure didn’t get here by themselves.

  50. @Alden
    @Kam Phlodius

    It’s just one more proof that journalists just make up anything and it’s published

    The truth is that the school boards all over the country have dumped French and other languages for Spanish, Spanish, Spanish.

    The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish.

    In California the Southern and Central Valley schools all teach Spanish.

    The Bay Area and Santa Clara County aka Silicon Valley all teach Mandarin as the favored foreign language.

    It’s incredibly naive to teach non Chinese mandarin in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area.

    No matter how well they speak Mandarin, Chinese will always discriminate against non Chinese.

    The only reason to learn Spanish is to get a$30,000 a year job in the welfare department.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous, @Neoconned, @stillCARealist

    “in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area”

    They may not be planning that far ahead. There is a meantime.

    Not that it will help.

    “The only reason to learn Spanish…”

    Not the only. Unlike with the crafty Chinese, you can make money off Spanish-speakers. There are opportunities in the private sector.

    My brother is a professor of Spanish linguistics, so he did something with it. But I think he’s lucky to have a job.

    If nothing else, you can overhear them plotting against you.

    Oh, and there actually is such a thing as Spanish literature (meaning literature in Spanish, but also literature from Spain itself).* Cervantes, Ortega y Gasset, Unamuno, Llosa, Borges, Barca, etc.

    *Judging by my book collection, I should learn French first, then German. Then Russian, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Italian. Maybe Spanish is next; I’m not sure.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @guest

    Spanish literature is wonderful.

    Bécquer, Calderón de la Barca, Machado, Cervantes, Juan Ramón Jiménez, etc.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @guest

    It's both fun and scary to know a fair amount of Spanish. Most of them assume most of us can't understand a word they say, and their racism and contempt for white people can be bracing.

    Replies: @Corn, @guest

  51. “Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out.” That’s BS. Gentrifying White folks have an interest in their children’s future and so encourage some quality in education . The Average Negro student has different priorities .

    “In contrast, African American girls kind of like French due to long elite cultural ties between upwardly mobile African Americans and France. (E.g., Ta-Nehisi Coates and Thomas Chatterton Williams recently lived in Paris, not Madrid, or, God forbid, Mexico City.). But you seldom hear of plans for English-French dual immersion schools, because they would attract blacks and would employ white teachers rather than Hispanic teachers.” Do you know anything about Black females ? There is only one aspect of French “culture” that they like , and they think it’s a gift from Whitey .

  52. @Ivy
    Here is a feel-good language story found via a link at Lew Rockwell. Some immersion starts by dipping a toe in the water.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2017/12/26/Pittsburgh-Catholic-schools-Latin-Greek-vocabulary-words-students/stories/201712250007

    Replies: @epebble, @Reg Cæsar

    At an orchestral High Mass at another St Agnes in another city, St Paul, I sat in front of a high school girl who sang along, knowing the tune and all the words. I was mightily impressed. Then, strangely, she left early. That was confusing.

    Turns out she had to go downstairs before anyone else. That week, it was her group’s turn to man the doughnut table.

  53. @Buffalo Joe
    @AnotherDad

    AnotherDad, soon blacks will demand that white parents who homeschool reserve seats at the kitchen table for their kids.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    AnotherDad, soon blacks will demand that white parents who homeschool reserve seats at the kitchen table for their kids.

    No, blacks won’t. Ed school profs, welfare bureaucrats, and New York Times columnists will.

  54. “the students these programs were designed to serve”

    Were they really designed to serve poor, Spanish-speaking kids? Wouldn’t surprise me, considering educationists are stupid and/or evil.

    Want to help them? Immerse them in English-speaking classrooms. Throw ’em in the deep end.

    Assimilation. Worked for every other ethnic group, from Red Indians to Chinamen. (Except blacks, but they may be hopeless.) Not to be melted in one big America-pot so as to make us all the same. But usually enough to feed themselves.

  55. @Expletive Deleted
    Over here we have (a very few) dual-language immersion schools in Gaelic and I think Welsh. Any call for them over yonder?

    Replies: @Karl

    13 Expletive Deleted > dual-language immersion schools in Gaelic and I think Welsh. Any call for them over yonder?

    several times a year, Hebrew-speakers cause international repercussions

    when is the last time that a Gaelic-speaker even got a bus route changed in London?

  56. istevefan says:
    @AKAHorace
    It also seems a smart move to become bilingual in Spanish. Even if Trump builds his wall it will be useful. I am uncertain about Mandarin immersion unless it starts very young. As the language is tonal if you are surrounded by non-native speakers when you learn it, you will end up sounding like an ethnic joke.

    Replies: @Alden, @istevefan, @Neoconned, @Nico, @Anonymous

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn’t give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English.

    • Replies: @Sgt. Joe Friday
    @istevefan

    Actually, on an Air Panama International flight back in 1985, I sat next to a Japanese guy named " Ted" who, like me, was headed for Lima, Peru. We had a pleasant conversation about what each of us was doing in that part of the world, our employers, and so on. My Spanish back then was pretty good - pretty close to fluent - and I remember Ted telling me that aside from the alphabet, Spanish was not that difficult a language for native speakers of Japanese to learn.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @AndrewR, @RobRich

    , @AKAHorace
    @istevefan


    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn’t give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English
     
    Two reasons Americans should learn Spanish:

    -Latin America will be important for the United States simply because it is your neighbour. There is a benefit for you in understanding them, what ever your opinions about Latin America are.

    -Once you can think in one foreign language, learning the next one is easier. Spanish is probably the easiest language for English speakers to learn. Chinese would be good, but because of problems with tones, teaching it on a large scale would produce English speakers who spoke it like a comical ethnic character in a sitcom.

    If you could pick a list of the top three foreign languages that Americans should learn I think that Spanish would be on it. Please suggest other choices.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Alden, @BB753

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @istevefan

    In Europe English is compulsory almost everywhere, French and German are widely taught in countries where they aren’t native, and Spanish, Russian and Italian are often taught as electives in high school. My sense, in Austria at least, is that Italian is more popular. Since most university bound kids have to learn Latin in middle school, motivated kids can pick up basic Spanish pretty quickly. Unlike Russian, Spanish has no prestige as a business or scientific language, people learn it because they want to hang out in Spain, or maybe Argentina. Turkish would be far more useful than Spanish in daily life but I have never met a European who has studied Turkish unless they were married to a Turk. Europe is far behind the US in studying Mandarin, the Europeans didn’t take China seriously until recently.

    , @Alden
    @istevefan

    That’s true. The rest of the world is switching to English as a common language but America wants to become bi lingual English and Spanish.

    , @Frankie P
    @istevefan

    As the weight of economic balance shifts to the east, it would be wise to examine the trends in learning foreign languages. No, the Chinese are not streaming in droves into supplemental schools to learn Spanish. Yes, they are spending more money on giving their children greater fluency and literacy in English, striving for near-native speaker proficiency. I have taught English in Taiwan for 30 years now, and I currently teach corporate students in both international and local companies. My students constantly emphasize how management sees communicative competence in English as a VITAL factor for career path progression. This is also the situation in Mainland China, where people with money are putting their children into immersion English programs at younger and younger ages. The official language of communication for international companies, and I include ALL the large European (non British) companies here, is English. High level regional executives are ALL fluent in English, almost all having received an English education, even though they are Asian, mostly Chinese. Keep in mind that this region is driving profitability for these corporations, whether international or local. This trend will only continue, as the economies here are growing much faster than the developed European and US economies.

    Learning Mandarin in a non-native environment is very challenging; it is for this reason that I decided to have my children educated here in Taiwan through junior high school. The education environment here, with its large infrastructure of supplemental English institutions, provides an opportunity for students to achieve high fluency in English on the side as they attend the Chinese school. This was much easier in my case, as my children have a father who is an American native speaker who believes that raising his children is an every day hands on job, and interaction with the children is necessary. I need not mention the superior results in math and science in primary (and secondary) education here. I tore out my heart and sent my son to the US for his first year of high school this year, choosing a small private Christian school, not because of the religious component, more because I want him to avoid the bizarro world that is the government supported education system with its third bathrooms, attacks on traditional US (white) culture, and political correctness. I'm fortunate to have a sister and brother in law who are willing to board him and guide him. He is doing well, especially in math and science. He says that he is shooting to be the top student in both chemistry and math, not bad for his first year in the US. He is also able to communicate effectively with American classmates, who are very impressed with his level of English. I am hoping he will move towards a major in university in STEM, avoid the liberal arts protests against white privelege and get a good degree and look for a productive job.

    Frankie P

  57. @epebble
    @Ivy

    Latin and Greek (and when they are at it, why not Hebrew and Sanskrit) would make the schools more exclusive and prestigious than Spanish or French.

    Replies: @Ivy, @Stephen Marle II

    Hope springs eternal for greater appreciation of language. I’d like to see widespread of the classical language word roots worksheets. If that gets more kids interested in school, what’s not to like?

  58. Anonymous [AKA "Rattlesnake"] says:
    @Alden
    @Kam Phlodius

    It’s just one more proof that journalists just make up anything and it’s published

    The truth is that the school boards all over the country have dumped French and other languages for Spanish, Spanish, Spanish.

    The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish.

    In California the Southern and Central Valley schools all teach Spanish.

    The Bay Area and Santa Clara County aka Silicon Valley all teach Mandarin as the favored foreign language.

    It’s incredibly naive to teach non Chinese mandarin in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area.

    No matter how well they speak Mandarin, Chinese will always discriminate against non Chinese.

    The only reason to learn Spanish is to get a$30,000 a year job in the welfare department.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous, @Neoconned, @stillCARealist

    Spanish is a real useful skill to have if you work in law enforcement in California, for obvious reasons. Police get paid fairly well there.

    Its also useful for general contractors since they use so much Mexican labor. Experienced and successful GCs in California can easily make well over $100k a year.

    “The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish.”

    That’s a pretty small percent of Hispanics in California, most of them speak Mexican Spanish, but they don’t learn very much English once they get here.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anonymous

    Friend, making "well over $100,000.00 a year" in Mexinchifornia barely pays the bills; it's nothing to aspire to. I write from paiful personal experience.

    , @Alden
    @Anonymous

    That's really what I meant.

    Spanish is a requirement for most government jobs. But Spanish speaking is not actually the requirement. Being Hispanic and looking metizo is as much a requirement as speaking Spanish.

    I live in Los Angeles about 5 blocks from a police station so I see them driving back and forth at change of shift. Almost all the uniformed patrol officers are Hispanics. The LAPD has recently loosened rquirements to allow for HISPANIC applicants with felony convictions to be admitted. Because Hispanic mestizos tend to be chunky, they are adjusting the old weight and waist measurement requirements upward.

    LAPD is already loaded with Hispanics, but LAPD seems to want an all hispanci force. It's getting one

    My point was a government employee needs to be Hispanic as well as speaking Spanish. Of course blacks are still hired without speaking Spanish. So many White SJWs learned Spanish hoping to get a government job dealing with Hispanics but they aren't hired because they aren't Hispanic.

    I know a young woman who was raised in both Mexico and Los Angeles. She is a nurse. I once told her you'll always get a job because you speak good Spanish. She said, not really, in this neighborhood I will need to speak Farsi. I live in that neighborhood and there is no need whatsoever to speak Spanish.

    It is becoming the language of the welfare low wage proles and the government workers who ride herd on them.

  59. @Prof. Woland
    @Kam Phlodius

    A couple of years ago, I went to New Orleans for the first time. Rather naively, I was expecting to meet at least one person who spoke French. The closest I got was a restaurant owned and operated by some Cajuns who were the real deal but all they spoke was Redneck.

    The other thing that stuck me what that so many of the younger people working in the hospitality industry there were from all over the Mississippi basin. I usually thing of Inter-US migration going from East to West, but here is was all North to South. There were lots of college educated well spoken (English) people who were recent arrivals and did not really know the town or a lick'n of French.

    Replies: @athEIst

    all North to South

    Was it winter?

  60. @guest
    @Alden

    "in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area"

    They may not be planning that far ahead. There is a meantime.

    Not that it will help.

    "The only reason to learn Spanish..."

    Not the only. Unlike with the crafty Chinese, you can make money off Spanish-speakers. There are opportunities in the private sector.

    My brother is a professor of Spanish linguistics, so he did something with it. But I think he's lucky to have a job.

    If nothing else, you can overhear them plotting against you.

    Oh, and there actually is such a thing as Spanish literature (meaning literature in Spanish, but also literature from Spain itself).* Cervantes, Ortega y Gasset, Unamuno, Llosa, Borges, Barca, etc.

    *Judging by my book collection, I should learn French first, then German. Then Russian, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Italian. Maybe Spanish is next; I'm not sure.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Anonymous

    Spanish literature is wonderful.

    Bécquer, Calderón de la Barca, Machado, Cervantes, Juan Ramón Jiménez, etc.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Kylie


    Spanish literature is wonderful.

    Bécquer, Calderón de la Barca, Machado, Cervantes, Juan Ramón Jiménez, etc.
     

    I always hear this shibboleth about the great Spanish literature. Is it so wonderful that it is worth the years and years of gaining the high degree of fluency to catch the occasional nuance that a certainly fluent and experienced translator has already done his best to convey?

    There are lots of other more rewarding things one could be doing with all those years of studying a foreign language just to pick out a few gems here and there in the works of long dead authors in a foreign language.

    It definitely is some few people's passion, but hardly a broad recommendation that we should all turn to and start spending years of our lives upon.

    It doesn't matter anyhow, as language translation software gets ever better, the utility of being multilingual decreases and it will eventually become nearly worthless for anything other than a career involving linguistics, probably helping to improve translation applications.

    This is not far off. So it is potentially quite irresponsible to encourage kids today to spend any time picking up another language that they did not learn at their mother's knee if the point is teaching the kid a valuable life skill. Of course, if it is something the kid has a natural interest in, its all good.

    Whenever one makes recommendations to their kids, the tendency is to think what may have been good for oneself when young rather than what is good for them in the world they will face when grown.

    I've seen this in my own life. It is almost unimaginably easier being in a non-English speaking country today than just 5-10 years ago, much less when I was growing up when foreign language skill was highly valuable.

  61. @epebble
    @Ivy

    Latin and Greek (and when they are at it, why not Hebrew and Sanskrit) would make the schools more exclusive and prestigious than Spanish or French.

    Replies: @Ivy, @Stephen Marle II

    Bilingual Latin schools: Brilliant! One thing that has always amazed me from looking at old 19th century and before secondary school curricula is the amount of Latin and Greek that the kids had to learn. Check out the old texts that they used. Holy cow!

    A buddy of mine got one of the last classics degrees at his university before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies. He operates an online Skype-based Latin school using Wheelock, and he tells me that most of his students are home schoolers, with most of the rest being secondary and charter school teachers polishing up or learning Latin because their schools are reintroducing it.

    There are conversational Latin programs here and there. And Latin was continuously spoken in some form until a little more than a half century ago, since many seminaries used it, and before that there were also scholars who spoke it, badly, except for Erasmus. So there exist texts and lesson plans for spoken Latin, if you can decide on ecclesiastical vs. classical pronunciation.

    Latin might seem kind of useless compared to Chinese, but kids who study it really gain a lot in English vocabulary and reading skills, English writing skills because of the attention to grammar, which transfers to English, and overall concentration and analytical thinking. They’re probably not going to end up fluent in Latin, but the Chinese learners for the most part peter out before any sort of usable abililty.

    Latin would repel all kinds of undesirables, and the ones that it didn’t would be weeded out by the ablative mode.

    • Replies: @Marat
    @Stephen Marle II

    Latin was still part of the standard high school curriculum in the public school systems for the Greatest Generation. It was largely optional after WWII but was still widely taught in the 70s. Although I'd be hard put to string sentence together any longer, there isn't a day I don't use it numerous times, especially in medicine. Probably the same can be said by lawyers. It also made learning French (vocabulary) a snap.

    This really says it all, doesn't it? "before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies". Garbage in, garbage out.

    Replies: @Corn

    , @nebulafox
    @Stephen Marle II

    I agree. Knowing Latin is incredibly useful for understanding the basis of many Western languages, including English. Really polishes your verbal thought process. Though ironically my brother, who actually learned Latin, could care less about it. Engineering philistine.

    That said, if could go back and be educated again, I'd prefer to learn Greek. This is mostly due to personal interests, but the likelihood that that'll be even more of a filtering mechanism than Latin also appeals.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    , @Ron Mexico
    @Stephen Marle II

    Hillsdale Academy has 3 levels of Latin and offers French. I believe that Hillsdale College's Barney Charter School Initiative encourages the same curriculum in its member schools.

  62. AnotherDad, soon blacks will demand that white parents who homeschool reserve seats at the kitchen table for their kids.

    That would make a pretty good cartoon, if 9/10ths of funny weren’t currently verboten.

  63. @Anonymous
    Ah, yes, whites are the ones “intruding” here...

    It is sad that this is what people have to resort to in DC and nearly every other city. Even our presumably excellent neighborhood DC public elementary school in Georgetown, where the residents are 90+ percent white, is about 40 percent black.

    If forced to choose, I’d be willing to take a gamble on a French immersion program instead, given the positive selection of blacks into it. I know the teachers at the nurseries I looked into were surprisingly more white than French speaking African.

    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies working for families with $2mil homes, pushing kids around in $1k strollers while they talk on the phone to their friends all day. The kids look utterly bored if not desperate. Same for the equally expensive day cares. People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute). We somehow managed to find someone short-term but ultimately face these same constraints and will be relocating very soon. Who is left running the country (so to speak) are the couples willing to raise their kids as strangers or not having kids at all, which should concern everyone.

    Replies: @Marat, @Opinionator, @27 year old, @wrd9

    French still has considerable pull in LA schooling, but will that change as the parents of these kids get further and further from Boomer taste and are themselves more of the SJW bent?

    I often wonder about the soundness of turning one’s child care (for basic socialization as well as safety) over to someone with only the most tenuous grasp of the native culture. At times, the inherent goodness of strangers and driver patience seem to come to the rescue with potential stroller navigation mishaps and the like. Many Guatemalans have now made inroads into what was formerly Mexican-dominated nanny business in CA beach communities. While barely clearing the dashboard line of the missus’s Range Rovers, they are talking to the kids in Spanish all morning long. Presumeably a fair number of tots are also picking up Oaxacan and other Indian dialects along the way. Maybe some parents have caught on that tuition earmarked for pre-school language immersion can be freed up for baby fencing classes or whatever status enhancing skill deemed crucial for junior’s “getting ahead”.

  64. @istevefan
    @AKAHorace

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn't give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English.

    Replies: @Sgt. Joe Friday, @AKAHorace, @Peter Akuleyev, @Alden, @Frankie P

    Actually, on an Air Panama International flight back in 1985, I sat next to a Japanese guy named ” Ted” who, like me, was headed for Lima, Peru. We had a pleasant conversation about what each of us was doing in that part of the world, our employers, and so on. My Spanish back then was pretty good – pretty close to fluent – and I remember Ted telling me that aside from the alphabet, Spanish was not that difficult a language for native speakers of Japanese to learn.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Sgt. Joe Friday

    Friend, Spanish is not that difficult for anyone to learn. It's one of the easiest languages in the world to learn. Hell, if you cannot pick up Spanish, even as an adult, with some mild modicum of effort or immersion, you are not probably ... ahem... special ... or close to it. Or you've some bizarre reverse-idiot-savant syndrome whereby you simply cannot pick up new languages. (I suffer the problem vis-a-vis dancing and understanding all the dopey rules and jargon for football, but even then it's honestly mostly lack of motivation if I am honest with myself.)

    , @AndrewR
    @Sgt. Joe Friday

    Speaking of Japanese in Peru, I don’t know why Sailer hasn’t blogged about Peru’s former commie-killing president Alberto Fujimori’s pardon last week by Peru’s Polish-German-Jewish-Swiss-French president Pedro Kuczynski, whose daughter works for the NYT and is the granddaughter of a US congressman from MA. Lots of interesting stuff to work with.

    , @RobRich
    @Sgt. Joe Friday

    "Spanish is not that difficult for anyone to learn..."

    Spanish, like the saxophone, is easy to learn badly.

    It's the language with most native speakers in the most countries, and again replacing French as langue diplomatique et de la culture.

    Replies: @Frankie P, @Patrick Harris

  65. My brother went to an English / French dual immersion school. It attracted whites and Haitians.

  66. The great Richard Lamm said, ‘History shows, in my opinion, that no nation can survive the tension, conflict and antagonism of two competing languages and cultures. It is a blessing for an individual to be bilingual; it is a curse for a society to be bilingual.’

  67. @Stephen Marle II
    @epebble

    Bilingual Latin schools: Brilliant! One thing that has always amazed me from looking at old 19th century and before secondary school curricula is the amount of Latin and Greek that the kids had to learn. Check out the old texts that they used. Holy cow!

    A buddy of mine got one of the last classics degrees at his university before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies. He operates an online Skype-based Latin school using Wheelock, and he tells me that most of his students are home schoolers, with most of the rest being secondary and charter school teachers polishing up or learning Latin because their schools are reintroducing it.

    There are conversational Latin programs here and there. And Latin was continuously spoken in some form until a little more than a half century ago, since many seminaries used it, and before that there were also scholars who spoke it, badly, except for Erasmus. So there exist texts and lesson plans for spoken Latin, if you can decide on ecclesiastical vs. classical pronunciation.

    Latin might seem kind of useless compared to Chinese, but kids who study it really gain a lot in English vocabulary and reading skills, English writing skills because of the attention to grammar, which transfers to English, and overall concentration and analytical thinking. They're probably not going to end up fluent in Latin, but the Chinese learners for the most part peter out before any sort of usable abililty.

    Latin would repel all kinds of undesirables, and the ones that it didn't would be weeded out by the ablative mode.

    Replies: @Marat, @nebulafox, @Ron Mexico

    Latin was still part of the standard high school curriculum in the public school systems for the Greatest Generation. It was largely optional after WWII but was still widely taught in the 70s. Although I’d be hard put to string sentence together any longer, there isn’t a day I don’t use it numerous times, especially in medicine. Probably the same can be said by lawyers. It also made learning French (vocabulary) a snap.

    This really says it all, doesn’t it? “before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies”. Garbage in, garbage out.

    • Replies: @Corn
    @Marat

    My father graduated from high school in 1958 in a small farming town in Illinois. This town had less than 2000 people and the high school probably had an enrollment of 200 or less. Yet it taught Latin, and there was a Latin Club in the yearbook. Unthinkable today.

    “This really says it all, doesn’t it? “before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies”. Garbage in, garbage out.”

    The late blogger John J. Reilly observed that American schools started pushing multiculturalism about the same time they stopped teaching foreign languages.

  68. Evil white people go around leaving cities, destroying minority communities and now those whites go and move into communities of color destroying that community

    white people only want to throw poor minority men in jail just because their hobbies of murder and rape are not mainstream)

    white people use their privilege to take opportunity away from minorities. It’s the American way

    • Replies: @L Woods
    @Tiny Duck

    We are seriously phoning it in today.

    , @a reader
    @Tiny Duck




    Evil white people go around leaving cities, destroying minority communities
     

    those whites go and move into communities of color destroying that community
     
    You're absolutely right, notwithstanding the apparent contradiction of your gibberish.

    The intrusion of farmers' markets in urban communities is yet one more insidious tool of those evil whites.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  69. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @MBlanc46
    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @nebulafox

    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.

    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn’t mean that one doesn’t have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn’t any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You’ll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anonymous

    Those of us who have lived in such circumstances fought to preserve our own nation, and think and speak and act as we do now, precisely because the experience taught us the best thing for every one is to have his own nation ("that's what separate countries are for...").

    Of course, our efforts failed and now what used to be the U.S.A. is Brasil del Norte, but with more nasty, bitchy women whose asses are flat.

    , @(((Owen)))
    @Anonymous


    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You’ll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.
     
    Actually, treating outsiders the same as their own people is something only white people do. So there's no opportunity for white people to experience this themselves.

    But there are lots of opportunities to see how other peoples will treat you as an outsider. And Americans that have lived abroad in foreign lands tend quickly to decide that open borders making them a minority in their own country is a bad idea.
    , @bomag
    @Anonymous


    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right.
     
    Many problems here. As this post of Steve's points out, pretty much anything white people do eventually gets construed as racist; pretty much just existing becomes a racist act (privilege; legacy; etc). The racist tag doesn't stick to anyone else; thus the various Asian groups and Latinos are happily staking out their enclaves while whites circle the drain.

    Even if there isn’t any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly...

     

    Thus whites must be punished for evil thoughts. QED.

    ...that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.
     
    Humans relate to each other in the negative. Methinks thou dost protest too much.
    , @guest
    @Anonymous

    Firstly, this website is not a good barometer for how most white people think. It's full of "woke" whites. I certainly didn't used to think about race the way I do now.

    More importantly, if all blacks are talking about is that they're treated differently, positively or negatively, to any degrees whatsoever, big deal. Who cares? They can get in line with Filipinos or whoever, and we can stop groveling at their oppressed feet. Or they can just leave and go to a black country.

    White people are the only kind of people who come close to treating obvious outsiders as their own. Blacks should feel lucky to be here if they have to live outside their ancestral homelands.

    Long ago, I stopped giving a crap about the minute social cues involved in treating blacks, women, or whomever , in a slightly unequal manner. As if anybody treats anybody equally anyway. Colorblindness is impossible, so there will always be differential treatment. Again, who cares?

    If that's all racism consists of, why are we always talking about it? And what does it have to do with lynching, or whatever. Because that's what is meant by racism, really. They may not appreciate slightly improved treatment, and consider it condescending. But that's not what they spend theur time complaining about.

    It's the gap between black people naturally feeling uncomfortable in a room full of whites and elaborate conspiracies conspiracies against them that I don't get.

    You need to notice Jews exist, for instance, to send them to gas chambers. But though we could fail to notice them, to an extent, we can't fail to notice blacks. They stand out. But just because we notice them doesn't mean we're conspiring against them, as they believe. Like I said, Current Year white civilization conspires against different sorts of people the least of any group ever.

    , @anonymous
    @Anonymous


    incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right.
     
    In every such situation which I have been involved in, this has NOT been true. The blacks assumed racism when in truth the situation went against them for reasons entirely unrelated to race.

    To give just one of many examples, I was once accused of racism for not giving a black man directions when he asked for them.... but, in truth, I genuinely did not know the way, and would have given the exact same answer to a white person.

    , @anon
    @Anonymous

    Can you explain to me why I should be a minority in Toronto other then my treasonous government turning me into one via third world immigration? As for blacks being "treated differently" people gradually learn wariness around those who they should be wary of.

  70. @Stephen Marle II
    @epebble

    Bilingual Latin schools: Brilliant! One thing that has always amazed me from looking at old 19th century and before secondary school curricula is the amount of Latin and Greek that the kids had to learn. Check out the old texts that they used. Holy cow!

    A buddy of mine got one of the last classics degrees at his university before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies. He operates an online Skype-based Latin school using Wheelock, and he tells me that most of his students are home schoolers, with most of the rest being secondary and charter school teachers polishing up or learning Latin because their schools are reintroducing it.

    There are conversational Latin programs here and there. And Latin was continuously spoken in some form until a little more than a half century ago, since many seminaries used it, and before that there were also scholars who spoke it, badly, except for Erasmus. So there exist texts and lesson plans for spoken Latin, if you can decide on ecclesiastical vs. classical pronunciation.

    Latin might seem kind of useless compared to Chinese, but kids who study it really gain a lot in English vocabulary and reading skills, English writing skills because of the attention to grammar, which transfers to English, and overall concentration and analytical thinking. They're probably not going to end up fluent in Latin, but the Chinese learners for the most part peter out before any sort of usable abililty.

    Latin would repel all kinds of undesirables, and the ones that it didn't would be weeded out by the ablative mode.

    Replies: @Marat, @nebulafox, @Ron Mexico

    I agree. Knowing Latin is incredibly useful for understanding the basis of many Western languages, including English. Really polishes your verbal thought process. Though ironically my brother, who actually learned Latin, could care less about it. Engineering philistine.

    That said, if could go back and be educated again, I’d prefer to learn Greek. This is mostly due to personal interests, but the likelihood that that’ll be even more of a filtering mechanism than Latin also appeals.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @nebulafox

    Really polishes your verbal thought process.

    More than any other language, including English, would? Why so?

    Replies: @biz

  71. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Kylie
    @guest

    Spanish literature is wonderful.

    Bécquer, Calderón de la Barca, Machado, Cervantes, Juan Ramón Jiménez, etc.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Spanish literature is wonderful.

    Bécquer, Calderón de la Barca, Machado, Cervantes, Juan Ramón Jiménez, etc.

    I always hear this shibboleth about the great Spanish literature. Is it so wonderful that it is worth the years and years of gaining the high degree of fluency to catch the occasional nuance that a certainly fluent and experienced translator has already done his best to convey?

    There are lots of other more rewarding things one could be doing with all those years of studying a foreign language just to pick out a few gems here and there in the works of long dead authors in a foreign language.

    It definitely is some few people’s passion, but hardly a broad recommendation that we should all turn to and start spending years of our lives upon.

    It doesn’t matter anyhow, as language translation software gets ever better, the utility of being multilingual decreases and it will eventually become nearly worthless for anything other than a career involving linguistics, probably helping to improve translation applications.

    This is not far off. So it is potentially quite irresponsible to encourage kids today to spend any time picking up another language that they did not learn at their mother’s knee if the point is teaching the kid a valuable life skill. Of course, if it is something the kid has a natural interest in, its all good.

    Whenever one makes recommendations to their kids, the tendency is to think what may have been good for oneself when young rather than what is good for them in the world they will face when grown.

    I’ve seen this in my own life. It is almost unimaginably easier being in a non-English speaking country today than just 5-10 years ago, much less when I was growing up when foreign language skill was highly valuable.

  72. @MBlanc46
    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @nebulafox

    Just because you are paranoid doesn’t mean they aren’t out to get you, you know.

  73. Ali G questions Noam Chomsky on “bilingualism”:

    at 1:33

  74. @istevefan
    @AKAHorace

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn't give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English.

    Replies: @Sgt. Joe Friday, @AKAHorace, @Peter Akuleyev, @Alden, @Frankie P

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn’t give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English

    Two reasons Americans should learn Spanish:

    -Latin America will be important for the United States simply because it is your neighbour. There is a benefit for you in understanding them, what ever your opinions about Latin America are.

    -Once you can think in one foreign language, learning the next one is easier. Spanish is probably the easiest language for English speakers to learn. Chinese would be good, but because of problems with tones, teaching it on a large scale would produce English speakers who spoke it like a comical ethnic character in a sitcom.

    If you could pick a list of the top three foreign languages that Americans should learn I think that Spanish would be on it. Please suggest other choices.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @AKAHorace

    Spanish, all the way. Even as our phone companies, cable TV companies, doctors, electric companies etc go to hiring "customer service representatives" (today, mostly from the Philipines) who you can barely understand and who don't understand you either, if you can handle the "opríma 2 para Español" option, you're assured of getting someone who actually speaks Spanish.

    Telephone customer service: am I paranoid if I say it's, by design, an FU to the customer?

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @Anonymous
    @AKAHorace

    I think the availability of good quality (Mandarin) Chinese learning apps may make it increasingly easy to drill and practice Mandarin tones. I spent a few years in an all-French school as a child (pre-internet) and studied French at university, but never felt confident in my French accent. Last year I started learning Mandarin, and it's amazing what daily, repetitive drills from a non-judgemental computer game can give you. Young people online seem to treat the Mandarin tonal system and writing system like games they can hack.

    , @Alden
    @AKAHorace

    A lot of White, Black and Asian Californians absolutely refuse to learn Spanish as a form of resistance to the governments and liberals trying to force the language on us.

    I can read it but I’ll be dammed if I ever admit I can read it.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    , @BB753
    @AKAHorace

    Why not German? Closer to English, easier to pronounce for an English speaker than Spanish.

  75. @Reg Cæsar

    Black Americans hate Spanish and aren’t crazy about Spanish-speakers either.
     
    But are amazingly quick to adopt their names, e.g., Antonio, Latoya, Carlos, Marcos, Angel, etc.

    Though this is less pronounced now than in the past:
    http://abcnews.go.com/2020/top-20-whitest-blackest-names/story?id=2470131

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @Anonymous, @International Jew

    Latoya is a Spanish name?!

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @International Jew

    No. It is neither Spanish not even Latin(ate). It is a made-up name of recent vintage. It is no more traditional or rooted in any particular language or culture than are the names "Bombadil" and "Mum-Raa."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  76. @anon
    "Black Americans hate Spanish and they are not crazy about Spanish-speakers either.."

    And yet all black politicians are on record as supporting mass immigration and blacks of all backgrounds vote en masse for the Democrtas, the party of mass (much of it "Spanish") immigration. Go figure.

    In any case as a Canadian, my friendly warning is that "bilingualism" is nothing but bad news for any unilingual English-speaking American (whatever your skin colour).

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

    While mass immigration has mostly been from Latin America, fertility rates are in decline there as modernity seeps in. Some Latin American countries have fertility rates below 2.1

    By contrast, I don’t think any African countries have sub-replacement fertility.

    Black pols are playing the long game of being a team player in the Dem coalition. In return, they one day are hoping for mass immigration from Black Africa. Keith Ellison’s black ethnostate has more institutional vision in the CBC than Richard Spencer’s does in the Alt-Right.

  77. @AKAHorace
    @istevefan


    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn’t give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English
     
    Two reasons Americans should learn Spanish:

    -Latin America will be important for the United States simply because it is your neighbour. There is a benefit for you in understanding them, what ever your opinions about Latin America are.

    -Once you can think in one foreign language, learning the next one is easier. Spanish is probably the easiest language for English speakers to learn. Chinese would be good, but because of problems with tones, teaching it on a large scale would produce English speakers who spoke it like a comical ethnic character in a sitcom.

    If you could pick a list of the top three foreign languages that Americans should learn I think that Spanish would be on it. Please suggest other choices.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Alden, @BB753

    Spanish, all the way. Even as our phone companies, cable TV companies, doctors, electric companies etc go to hiring “customer service representatives” (today, mostly from the Philipines) who you can barely understand and who don’t understand you either, if you can handle the “opríma 2 para Español” option, you’re assured of getting someone who actually speaks Spanish.

    Telephone customer service: am I paranoid if I say it’s, by design, an FU to the customer?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @International Jew

    Your comment is important to us.

  78. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @AKAHorace
    @istevefan


    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn’t give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English
     
    Two reasons Americans should learn Spanish:

    -Latin America will be important for the United States simply because it is your neighbour. There is a benefit for you in understanding them, what ever your opinions about Latin America are.

    -Once you can think in one foreign language, learning the next one is easier. Spanish is probably the easiest language for English speakers to learn. Chinese would be good, but because of problems with tones, teaching it on a large scale would produce English speakers who spoke it like a comical ethnic character in a sitcom.

    If you could pick a list of the top three foreign languages that Americans should learn I think that Spanish would be on it. Please suggest other choices.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Alden, @BB753

    I think the availability of good quality (Mandarin) Chinese learning apps may make it increasingly easy to drill and practice Mandarin tones. I spent a few years in an all-French school as a child (pre-internet) and studied French at university, but never felt confident in my French accent. Last year I started learning Mandarin, and it’s amazing what daily, repetitive drills from a non-judgemental computer game can give you. Young people online seem to treat the Mandarin tonal system and writing system like games they can hack.

  79. Brooklyn has a Greek immersion school, Hellenic Classical Charter School. Test scores are high, better than 91% of the schools in the state. Enrollment is 38% Hispanic, 31% black, 26% white and 62% of the kids receive free or reduced price lunch.

    https://www.schooldigger.com/go/NY/schools/0014605815/school.aspx

  80. @Tiny Duck
    Evil white people go around leaving cities, destroying minority communities and now those whites go and move into communities of color destroying that community

    white people only want to throw poor minority men in jail just because their hobbies of murder and rape are not mainstream)

    white people use their privilege to take opportunity away from minorities. It's the American way

    Replies: @L Woods, @a reader

    We are seriously phoning it in today.

  81. @Alden
    @AKAHorace

    Spanish is only useful if you want to b a building contractor, welfare worker, or work in the restaurant industry.

    But the welfare departments and the food industry don’t really want Spanish speakers . They want Indian looking Hispanic immigrants.

    Contractors only need one of those specialized dictionaries like how to talk to your maid, janitor, day laborer you’ve hired to do unskilled code violating construction work , whatever.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Spanish is only useful if you want to be a building contractor, welfare worker, marry a stunning South American or Iberian beauty who is feminine and agreeable, or work in the restaurant industry.

    FIFY

  82. @Anonymous
    Ah, yes, whites are the ones “intruding” here...

    It is sad that this is what people have to resort to in DC and nearly every other city. Even our presumably excellent neighborhood DC public elementary school in Georgetown, where the residents are 90+ percent white, is about 40 percent black.

    If forced to choose, I’d be willing to take a gamble on a French immersion program instead, given the positive selection of blacks into it. I know the teachers at the nurseries I looked into were surprisingly more white than French speaking African.

    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies working for families with $2mil homes, pushing kids around in $1k strollers while they talk on the phone to their friends all day. The kids look utterly bored if not desperate. Same for the equally expensive day cares. People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute). We somehow managed to find someone short-term but ultimately face these same constraints and will be relocating very soon. Who is left running the country (so to speak) are the couples willing to raise their kids as strangers or not having kids at all, which should concern everyone.

    Replies: @Marat, @Opinionator, @27 year old, @wrd9

    People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute).

    Can you explain this? How can people making $350k just barely be afloat? Is that sarcasm? How is it possible that such people cannot afford to pay $10/hour extra?

    • Replies: @guest
    @Opinionator

    When people say they can't afford something in such a situation, they mean they prefer to use the money for something else. If cost went up in another area--insurance, phone, cable tv, whatever--they may gripe yet pay or not even notice. Economics is funny that way.

  83. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    @istevefan

    Actually, on an Air Panama International flight back in 1985, I sat next to a Japanese guy named " Ted" who, like me, was headed for Lima, Peru. We had a pleasant conversation about what each of us was doing in that part of the world, our employers, and so on. My Spanish back then was pretty good - pretty close to fluent - and I remember Ted telling me that aside from the alphabet, Spanish was not that difficult a language for native speakers of Japanese to learn.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @AndrewR, @RobRich

    Friend, Spanish is not that difficult for anyone to learn. It’s one of the easiest languages in the world to learn. Hell, if you cannot pick up Spanish, even as an adult, with some mild modicum of effort or immersion, you are not probably … ahem… special … or close to it. Or you’ve some bizarre reverse-idiot-savant syndrome whereby you simply cannot pick up new languages. (I suffer the problem vis-a-vis dancing and understanding all the dopey rules and jargon for football, but even then it’s honestly mostly lack of motivation if I am honest with myself.)

  84. @anon
    We lived in the Oyster neighborhood, and thought about sending our kids there. Steve's analysis is more or less correct, but much of the benefit that Oyster used to provide in terms of student mix can now be had at several nearby primary schools.

    In effect, some DC schools at lower grades have now gotten quite good as the city has gentrified, and the new parents demand functioning schools for their kids. Once you get to middle school (Oyster actually goes though 8th IIRC), and especially high school, things change dramatically. The high schools draw from a bigger catchment area, and therefore have much more mixed populations. A typical Oyster family would be in the Wilson catchment area (~1/2 of students scored 50% or less on math/english assessments).

    I don't think there is a single public high school in DC that doesn't have a significant portion of the population that is a real problem. The "selective" high schools are kind of a joke.

    In reality, parents who want their kids to do well in school almost always do one of two things: (1) move to the suburbs, which have some of the best schools in America (e.g., Thomas Jefferson) or pay a lot of money to have their kids go to one of at least a dozen extremely competitive private schools (this is what we did). The great suburban public schools tend to be Asian-dominated, and the private schools full of rich, though usually smart and motivated, white kids with an admixture of minority charity cases (~10 - 15%).

    As usual, it works out fine for the rich, those fanatically dedicated to their kids, or reasonably-shit-together minorities. Guess who it doesn't tend to work out well for?

    Replies: @Opinionator

    Whom doesn’t it work out well for?

  85. @istevefan
    @AKAHorace

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn't give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English.

    Replies: @Sgt. Joe Friday, @AKAHorace, @Peter Akuleyev, @Alden, @Frankie P

    In Europe English is compulsory almost everywhere, French and German are widely taught in countries where they aren’t native, and Spanish, Russian and Italian are often taught as electives in high school. My sense, in Austria at least, is that Italian is more popular. Since most university bound kids have to learn Latin in middle school, motivated kids can pick up basic Spanish pretty quickly. Unlike Russian, Spanish has no prestige as a business or scientific language, people learn it because they want to hang out in Spain, or maybe Argentina. Turkish would be far more useful than Spanish in daily life but I have never met a European who has studied Turkish unless they were married to a Turk. Europe is far behind the US in studying Mandarin, the Europeans didn’t take China seriously until recently.

  86. @International Jew
    @AKAHorace

    Spanish, all the way. Even as our phone companies, cable TV companies, doctors, electric companies etc go to hiring "customer service representatives" (today, mostly from the Philipines) who you can barely understand and who don't understand you either, if you can handle the "opríma 2 para Español" option, you're assured of getting someone who actually speaks Spanish.

    Telephone customer service: am I paranoid if I say it's, by design, an FU to the customer?

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Your comment is important to us.

  87. @Anonymous
    @Alden

    Spanish is a real useful skill to have if you work in law enforcement in California, for obvious reasons. Police get paid fairly well there.

    Its also useful for general contractors since they use so much Mexican labor. Experienced and successful GCs in California can easily make well over $100k a year.

    "The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish."

    That's a pretty small percent of Hispanics in California, most of them speak Mexican Spanish, but they don't learn very much English once they get here.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Alden

    Friend, making “well over $100,000.00 a year” in Mexinchifornia barely pays the bills; it’s nothing to aspire to. I write from paiful personal experience.

  88. @nebulafox
    @Stephen Marle II

    I agree. Knowing Latin is incredibly useful for understanding the basis of many Western languages, including English. Really polishes your verbal thought process. Though ironically my brother, who actually learned Latin, could care less about it. Engineering philistine.

    That said, if could go back and be educated again, I'd prefer to learn Greek. This is mostly due to personal interests, but the likelihood that that'll be even more of a filtering mechanism than Latin also appeals.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    Really polishes your verbal thought process.

    More than any other language, including English, would? Why so?

    • Replies: @biz
    @Opinionator


    (Latin) Really polishes your verbal thought process.

    More than any other language, including English, would? Why so?
     
    One major reason is that it is highly inflected, in particular, having a noun case structure. Unlike English or Western Romance languages, the grammatical role of a noun in a sentence, such as subject, direct object, indirect object, or possessor, is indicated explicitly by changing endings on the word. Also there are few auxiliary verb forms, so every combination of tense, mood, and person is made separately. It really forces one think about grammar and sentence structure in a way that learning a less inflected language, such as Spanish or French, or even Chinese, doesn't.

    At least as far as noun case structure, most of the Slavic and Baltic, Turkic, Greek, Persian, Indic, and Dravidian languages have the same thing, but far fewer people learn those than Latin, so Latin stands out as the way that Americans can be exposed to a highly inflected language.
  89. @AKAHorace
    It also seems a smart move to become bilingual in Spanish. Even if Trump builds his wall it will be useful. I am uncertain about Mandarin immersion unless it starts very young. As the language is tonal if you are surrounded by non-native speakers when you learn it, you will end up sounding like an ethnic joke.

    Replies: @Alden, @istevefan, @Neoconned, @Nico, @Anonymous

    I’m going to have my kids, if I’m dumb enough to have any….go to Catholic schools and hopefully learn Spanish. I figure exposure early will help them over the other gringos.

  90. @AnotherDad
    Was the Atlantic just whinning about essentially white parents not having enough of their children in the local public school and denying it "diversity" or something. Now it's whining when they show up and have their kids in school ... taking up too much space.

    Damn'd if you don't, damned if you do.

    Replies: @El Dato, @MBlanc46, @Buffalo Joe, @Desiderius

    Those whose status is based on their deracination (and they are legion) are getting nervous.

  91. Note to those under 35ish:

    This post is what actual Left-wing thinking looks like. Your parents/the govmint shelled out $100k per annum on fake-Left bullshit to keep you from hearing it.

  92. @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    Latoya is a Spanish name?!

    Replies: @Autochthon

    No. It is neither Spanish not even Latin(ate). It is a made-up name of recent vintage. It is no more traditional or rooted in any particular language or culture than are the names “Bombadil” and “Mum-Raa.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Autochthon

    Still, it sounds Spanish, and that's what counts with unwed teenagers.

    It's similar to our own abusive-- both black and white-- "Delores". Which was Spanish, as Dolores, i.e., (Our Lady of the) Sorrows. But now is kind of fake French.

  93. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dumbo
    Spanish is a nice language, too bad the Mexicans ruined it.
    French is nice too, très chic. I prefer Italian, but to each his taste.
    Mandarin is an awful and difficult language.
    I think bilingualism is good for children, but not good for societies as a whole.
    Nothing wrong with learning many languages on your own, but what they do in Canada, talking the same thing twice once in English, once in French, is just stupid. "Press 2 for Spanish" is even more stupid as Spanish is not even an official language in the US, well, maybe in California.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @anonymous, @al gore rhythms

    The official language of California is English.

    Of course, it didn’t take long for some busybody federal judge to “discovery” that such a law as written would violate some invisible, undocumented rights of our many vibrant, undocumented ilegales.

    Instead, ilegales are at the mercy of a cottage industry of semi-competent interpreters and translators, and Univision works hard to keep its Spanish-speaking clientele in thrall to their feudal lords.

  94. @Anon
    Inclusion, Intrusion, I get confused.

    So, when whites are included, it's intrusion. And when Diversity intrudes, it's inclusion.

    How about compromise at Incrusion?

    Btw, 'bi-lingual' is exclusive. What about mute people who use hands than tongues to communicate?
    They are into 'bi-limbnal' communication.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @oddsbodkins, @415 reasons

    No no no! “Incrusion” is what happens when Orientals are involved.

  95. @Ron Unz

    Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out.
     
    This is a pretty shrewd observation. But I think it actually extends much farther than that...

    Back in the late 1990s when I was very heavily involved in the Bilingual Wars, I quickly realized that the enthusiasm of so many Chinese immigrant parents in sending their children to "bilingual" schools seemed to be especially strong in places like SF that had a large local black population.

    I remember having dinner with a Chinese activist who said her parents very strongly supported keeping their existing bilingual programs and were worried that my initiative might ban them. And she said that what they liked most about their bilingual classes was that "everything was in English." Presumably, the program name itself was enough to keep out the "bad elements."

    Similarly, although Latino parents generally disliked their (Spanish-almost-only) "bilingual" programs, I strongly suspect that keeping out violent and unruly black students was one of the few partial silver linings...

    Replies: @Autochthon

    San Francisco has a large, local, black population!? Maybe it did in the 1990s….

  96. What is the deal with Venice? I’ve heard and read accounts that make it sound like Compton or Inglewood at their worst but this has never come close to what I’ve seen on screen. Quite a few movies have used it as a location for forty-plus years now.

  97. @Alden
    @Kam Phlodius

    It’s just one more proof that journalists just make up anything and it’s published

    The truth is that the school boards all over the country have dumped French and other languages for Spanish, Spanish, Spanish.

    The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish.

    In California the Southern and Central Valley schools all teach Spanish.

    The Bay Area and Santa Clara County aka Silicon Valley all teach Mandarin as the favored foreign language.

    It’s incredibly naive to teach non Chinese mandarin in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area.

    No matter how well they speak Mandarin, Chinese will always discriminate against non Chinese.

    The only reason to learn Spanish is to get a$30,000 a year job in the welfare department.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous, @Neoconned, @stillCARealist

    Being able to speak Mandarin is good if you want to do business in China.

    Knowing Spanish helps you if you want to live out west

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Neoconned


    Knowing Spanish helps you if you want to live out west
     
    Or in Florida, or Nueva Yorka, or Tejas, or in or near any of our major metropolises, except for the moribund ones--we leave those to other people.
  98. @Anonymous
    @MBlanc46


    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.
     
    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn't mean that one doesn't have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn't any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @(((Owen))), @bomag, @guest, @anonymous, @anon

    Those of us who have lived in such circumstances fought to preserve our own nation, and think and speak and act as we do now, precisely because the experience taught us the best thing for every one is to have his own nation (“that’s what separate countries are for…”).

    Of course, our efforts failed and now what used to be the U.S.A. is Brasil del Norte, but with more nasty, bitchy women whose asses are flat.

    • LOL: L Woods
  99. @Stephen Marle II
    "Dual Immersion public schools in gentrifying neighborhoods are basically a scam for keeping African Americans out."

    I never thought of this, but ... Hilarious! The ideal repellant for blacks would be English-Korean schools, at least in Los Angeles. Of all the "chanks," the Koreans are the most despised by the black community, since they come here with nothing, take over businesses in the black community, and succeed in one generation. But since no white parents wants their kids learning Korean (too small a country, little practical use for the language), Chinese is probably the best overall black repellent.

    By the way, here's a video of Ta-Nehisi Coates speaking French after a full-immersion program at a language program affiliated with Middlebury College, famous for the Charles Murray incident.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CudH0OPpKOs

    Replies: @Karl

    43 Stephen Marie II > their kids learning Korean (too small a country, little practical use for the language), Chinese is probably the best overall black repellent

    I feel their desire-for-black-repellent pain, but that right there is the glass ceiling on the rejuvenation of White greatness

    PS: anyone who thinks that Korea is “small” or that being proficient in conversational Korean would be useless, has spent too much time immersed in Hollywood’s version of the world. you know, the place where Brazil is “great” because it is so populated

  100. @istevefan
    @AKAHorace

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn't give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English.

    Replies: @Sgt. Joe Friday, @AKAHorace, @Peter Akuleyev, @Alden, @Frankie P

    That’s true. The rest of the world is switching to English as a common language but America wants to become bi lingual English and Spanish.

  101. @Anon
    Inclusion, Intrusion, I get confused.

    So, when whites are included, it's intrusion. And when Diversity intrudes, it's inclusion.

    How about compromise at Incrusion?

    Btw, 'bi-lingual' is exclusive. What about mute people who use hands than tongues to communicate?
    They are into 'bi-limbnal' communication.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @oddsbodkins, @415 reasons

    “How about compromise at incrusion?”

    That’s perfect for the english/mandarin class.

  102. @AKAHorace
    @istevefan


    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn’t give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English
     
    Two reasons Americans should learn Spanish:

    -Latin America will be important for the United States simply because it is your neighbour. There is a benefit for you in understanding them, what ever your opinions about Latin America are.

    -Once you can think in one foreign language, learning the next one is easier. Spanish is probably the easiest language for English speakers to learn. Chinese would be good, but because of problems with tones, teaching it on a large scale would produce English speakers who spoke it like a comical ethnic character in a sitcom.

    If you could pick a list of the top three foreign languages that Americans should learn I think that Spanish would be on it. Please suggest other choices.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Alden, @BB753

    A lot of White, Black and Asian Californians absolutely refuse to learn Spanish as a form of resistance to the governments and liberals trying to force the language on us.

    I can read it but I’ll be dammed if I ever admit I can read it.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Alden

    Spanish can be turned around as resistance. If you can speak Spanish, try pressing 2 for Spanish when calling some government office for help or an inquiry. In many jurisdictions you can get faster service by going this route. You will typically be informed by some perky little señorita that this line is for Spanish only. Ask for her name and badge number and supervisor's name. Then ask her if she thinks the official who authorizes her direct deposit paycheck speaks Spanish. Then ask her if she thinks the majority of taxpayers who fund her paycheck speak Spanish.

    Then switch to Spanish and tell her you'll be happy to go back and start the conversation from the beginning. That usually breaks the mare.

  103. @Anonymous
    @MBlanc46


    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.
     
    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn't mean that one doesn't have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn't any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @(((Owen))), @bomag, @guest, @anonymous, @anon

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You’ll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    Actually, treating outsiders the same as their own people is something only white people do. So there’s no opportunity for white people to experience this themselves.

    But there are lots of opportunities to see how other peoples will treat you as an outsider. And Americans that have lived abroad in foreign lands tend quickly to decide that open borders making them a minority in their own country is a bad idea.

  104. Is Venice still a black ghetto? Henry Rollins and Charles Bukowski made it seem that way with their writings/talk. Venice has appeared in many movies going back at least forty years and in all that time I didn’t see many blacks.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @spikewell

    As I often mention, Los Angeles was built inside out. Most coastal cities start out along the sea, but Los Angeles started out inland. The original 1781 pueblo was founded 17 miles inland because that was about the only place where the Los Angeles River ran above ground even in summer and fall.

    After L.A. was opened up to railroads in 1887, much of the initial investment was inland in warm, dry places like Pasadena because early arrivals tended to be Midwesterners worried about TB. So the beach cities started out somewhat downscale. For example, my friend Joe bought a house in Santa Monica in 1985 that was 900 square feet, because Santa Monica was full of tiny houses because when the houses were being built 90 to 110 years ago, only crazy people would risk dying of TB due to ocean fogs. But penicillin changed that perspective. Nowadays, he lives in a 4000 sq ft house in Santa Monica that is representative of what has been built in the last 40 years.

    My impression in 1980 when I looked at an apartment in Venice, just south of Santa Monica, was that people would warn me about Mexican rather than black gangs in Venice. Some of the more upscale black neighborhoods like Inglewood and Baldwin Hills are a few miles inland.

    I rode my bike on the Venice beachwalk once or twice a week in 1981-82 and it was fine. A mile inland it was still slummy, but Los Angeles slums don't look like, say, Baltimore slums.

    Venice at the beach was still semi-affordable about 30 years ago when my friend Steve lived at the main intersection about a block from the beach. In the 1990s comedy "Romy and Michelle's High School Reunion," Mira Sorvino and Lisa Kudrow play 90 IQ blondes who live in the same building as my friend used to live in, but by then it was getting out of reach.

    You could tell in the 1980s that the decaying old buildings would eventually be replaced by elaborate new construction.

    But these days it's an extremeley expensive white (and slightly Asian) beach city like Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach. It's more or less the tech center of Los Angeles with Snapchat headquartered there.

    By the way, inland Pasadena has also gotten really expensive because there is no more smog and people today appreciate the superb old buildings.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @spikewell

  105. Cisco Pike right up to Role Models and that made for cable Patrick Stuart series. Blunt Talk I think.

  106. @BenKenobi
    I was in French immersion for elementary school. I hated it. The only French I took in high school was the single compulsory first year course.

    Even though my town and school was essentially all-White, the pattern Steve points out here was the same -- the immersion class kids were much more likely to be from affluent middle class families. (No that doesn't describe my family, however.)

    Replies: @hhsiii

    There are french dual language public schools in NYC. In upper Manhattan and gentrifying Brooklyn (Carroll Gardens etc).

    http://frenchlanguagek12.org/4151-french-dual-language-programs-nyc-public-schools

  107. @spikewell
    Is Venice still a black ghetto? Henry Rollins and Charles Bukowski made it seem that way with their writings/talk. Venice has appeared in many movies going back at least forty years and in all that time I didn't see many blacks.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    As I often mention, Los Angeles was built inside out. Most coastal cities start out along the sea, but Los Angeles started out inland. The original 1781 pueblo was founded 17 miles inland because that was about the only place where the Los Angeles River ran above ground even in summer and fall.

    After L.A. was opened up to railroads in 1887, much of the initial investment was inland in warm, dry places like Pasadena because early arrivals tended to be Midwesterners worried about TB. So the beach cities started out somewhat downscale. For example, my friend Joe bought a house in Santa Monica in 1985 that was 900 square feet, because Santa Monica was full of tiny houses because when the houses were being built 90 to 110 years ago, only crazy people would risk dying of TB due to ocean fogs. But penicillin changed that perspective. Nowadays, he lives in a 4000 sq ft house in Santa Monica that is representative of what has been built in the last 40 years.

    My impression in 1980 when I looked at an apartment in Venice, just south of Santa Monica, was that people would warn me about Mexican rather than black gangs in Venice. Some of the more upscale black neighborhoods like Inglewood and Baldwin Hills are a few miles inland.

    I rode my bike on the Venice beachwalk once or twice a week in 1981-82 and it was fine. A mile inland it was still slummy, but Los Angeles slums don’t look like, say, Baltimore slums.

    Venice at the beach was still semi-affordable about 30 years ago when my friend Steve lived at the main intersection about a block from the beach. In the 1990s comedy “Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion,” Mira Sorvino and Lisa Kudrow play 90 IQ blondes who live in the same building as my friend used to live in, but by then it was getting out of reach.

    You could tell in the 1980s that the decaying old buildings would eventually be replaced by elaborate new construction.

    But these days it’s an extremeley expensive white (and slightly Asian) beach city like Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach. It’s more or less the tech center of Los Angeles with Snapchat headquartered there.

    By the way, inland Pasadena has also gotten really expensive because there is no more smog and people today appreciate the superb old buildings.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    Nowadays, he lives in a 4000 sq ft house in Santa Monica that is representative of what has been built in the last 40 years.
     
    OT: I wish I had Ron Unz’s money, I’d be a Santa Monica beach bum. If someone had the financial means to live in Santa Monica why would they live anywhere else?? E.g., people in Boston, where it’s now 1 degree Fahrenheit and won’t get above freezing until the second week in January, when it’ll go up to 33 degrees. Coincidentally, I recently asked that question- why wouldn’t someone live in Santa Monica if they could- to someone I know could afford to live there. His answer: because of earthquakes and fires.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @spikewell
    @Steve Sailer

    What was the name Chandler used as a stand in for Santa Monica? I felt bad for that older lady who couldn't afford the utility bills in her Pasadena mansion in that Wambaugh novel.

  108. @Anon
    Inclusion, Intrusion, I get confused.

    So, when whites are included, it's intrusion. And when Diversity intrudes, it's inclusion.

    How about compromise at Incrusion?

    Btw, 'bi-lingual' is exclusive. What about mute people who use hands than tongues to communicate?
    They are into 'bi-limbnal' communication.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @oddsbodkins, @415 reasons

    And poor old me sitting here with just one tongue.

  109. @AKAHorace
    It also seems a smart move to become bilingual in Spanish. Even if Trump builds his wall it will be useful. I am uncertain about Mandarin immersion unless it starts very young. As the language is tonal if you are surrounded by non-native speakers when you learn it, you will end up sounding like an ethnic joke.

    Replies: @Alden, @istevefan, @Neoconned, @Nico, @Anonymous

    As others have pointed out, for the *most* part in the U.S. Spanish isn’t actually nearly as much a career-booster as simply being an autochthon or mestizo Hispanic (who does or does not speak Spanish) is. The only exception is if you live in Miami, and even there, good luck capitalizing on your Hispanophone credentials if you don’t have a Spanish surname.

    Still, the comments in this thread about which foreign language to learn are very revealing of the American mindset whereupon “education” = “job training” and the best choice of a foreign language thought to be what is perceived (rightly or wrongly) as the most “practical.” French was and in many countries remains the second language of choice for educated English-speakers and for cultural reasons we really should get back to that. Most Western students could also benefit from at least a year or two of Latin. Some people will of course find it necessary or useful or simply interesting to learn German, Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish, etc. but on the general track these should be relegated to second rung.

    • Agree: Autochthon, Bill B.
  110. @Reg Cæsar
    "Oyster Adams" sounds like a #1 draft choice somewhere. Or a Boston beer utilizing the city's maritime culinary tradition.

    But why white parents in yuppie-guppie DC would send their children to a school with faculty like Giovanni Pena is beyond me:

    http://wjla.com/news/crime/oyster-adams-bilingual-school-teacher-arrested-in-child-sex-abuse-case-114461

    Replies: @Brutusale

    A lot of the local microbrewers in MA have made a particular style of beer called Oyster Gose.

    http://draftmag.com/seaweed-and-oyster-goses/

    The brewer whose product appears in the photo, Night Shift, does a promotional event (Buck a Shuck) with a local shellfish company every year when they release their gose. I’ll drink beer and eat $1 oysters all day!

  111. @Anonymous
    Ah, yes, whites are the ones “intruding” here...

    It is sad that this is what people have to resort to in DC and nearly every other city. Even our presumably excellent neighborhood DC public elementary school in Georgetown, where the residents are 90+ percent white, is about 40 percent black.

    If forced to choose, I’d be willing to take a gamble on a French immersion program instead, given the positive selection of blacks into it. I know the teachers at the nurseries I looked into were surprisingly more white than French speaking African.

    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies working for families with $2mil homes, pushing kids around in $1k strollers while they talk on the phone to their friends all day. The kids look utterly bored if not desperate. Same for the equally expensive day cares. People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute). We somehow managed to find someone short-term but ultimately face these same constraints and will be relocating very soon. Who is left running the country (so to speak) are the couples willing to raise their kids as strangers or not having kids at all, which should concern everyone.

    Replies: @Marat, @Opinionator, @27 year old, @wrd9

    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies …

    the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny

    They’re concerned alright.

    The wives don’t want to deal with a younger hotter tighter White girl hanging around their high earning alpha husbands, showing off their child raising skills and femininity in a stark contrast to the wife who is away from the kids for 9.5 hours per day senior-managing a Human Resources department.

    Not trying to say this is the whole story, many of these people are clueless true believers and many are in fact not concerned about their kids because narcissism.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @27 year old


    The wives don’t want to deal with a younger hotter tighter White girl hanging around their high earning alpha husbands, showing off their child raising skills and femininity in a stark contrast to the wife
     
    Around younger hotter tighter White girls, alpha husbands get crazy, lustful thoughts and do perverted and illegal stuff just to avoid an adulterous relationship. This story from a few days ago.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/cnbc-director-accused-spying-teen-nanny-bathroom-cam-article-1.3723183?utm_content=buffer5baee&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=NYDailyNewsTw

    CNBC director accused of spying on teen nanny with bathroom cam

    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Wednesday, December 27, 2017

    A CNBC director who worked on finance guru Suze Orman’s show has been accused of peeping on his teenage au pair with a spy-cam in a bathroom of his Westchester home, the Daily News has learned.

    Dan Switzen, 44, hid a camera inside a tissue box in his home in Pleasantville, according to authorities.

    On Nov. 13, his 18-year-old live-in nanny invited two of her friends, also 18, over to the house and one of them discovered the camera in the bathroom, sources said.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @L Woods
    @27 year old

    I'm always surprised at the au pair phenomenon for this reason. Although the ones that have been popping up on my tinder feed lately have been pretty meh...so maybe local SWPL scolds have learned?

  112. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    @istevefan

    Actually, on an Air Panama International flight back in 1985, I sat next to a Japanese guy named " Ted" who, like me, was headed for Lima, Peru. We had a pleasant conversation about what each of us was doing in that part of the world, our employers, and so on. My Spanish back then was pretty good - pretty close to fluent - and I remember Ted telling me that aside from the alphabet, Spanish was not that difficult a language for native speakers of Japanese to learn.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @AndrewR, @RobRich

    Speaking of Japanese in Peru, I don’t know why Sailer hasn’t blogged about Peru’s former commie-killing president Alberto Fujimori’s pardon last week by Peru’s Polish-German-Jewish-Swiss-French president Pedro Kuczynski, whose daughter works for the NYT and is the granddaughter of a US congressman from MA. Lots of interesting stuff to work with.

  113. @anon
    my wife and i recently had this discussion. the neighborhood school is a dual-language program starting in kindergarten, but the neighborhood, uhh, does not suffer from oyster school's problems. my wife has a chip on her shoulder that her Hispanic father never taught her Spanish and is bizarrely adamant about teaching the kids a second language.

    my response: "yeah, overseer for day laborers. if that doesn't say upwardly mobile i don't know what does!" suffice to say our oldest remains in the froo-froo private montessori school.

    french, on the other hand, is worth learning: if we move to switzerland when the kids are 10 and they know french, they'll be eligible for citizenship at 18...

    Replies: @Corn, @Joe Schmoe

    “my wife has a chip on her shoulder that her Hispanic father never taught her Spanish and is bizarrely adamant about teaching the kids a second language.”

    I’ve never resented my grandma for not teaching me Irish as a small child. Always the Hispanics…..

  114. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @spikewell

    As I often mention, Los Angeles was built inside out. Most coastal cities start out along the sea, but Los Angeles started out inland. The original 1781 pueblo was founded 17 miles inland because that was about the only place where the Los Angeles River ran above ground even in summer and fall.

    After L.A. was opened up to railroads in 1887, much of the initial investment was inland in warm, dry places like Pasadena because early arrivals tended to be Midwesterners worried about TB. So the beach cities started out somewhat downscale. For example, my friend Joe bought a house in Santa Monica in 1985 that was 900 square feet, because Santa Monica was full of tiny houses because when the houses were being built 90 to 110 years ago, only crazy people would risk dying of TB due to ocean fogs. But penicillin changed that perspective. Nowadays, he lives in a 4000 sq ft house in Santa Monica that is representative of what has been built in the last 40 years.

    My impression in 1980 when I looked at an apartment in Venice, just south of Santa Monica, was that people would warn me about Mexican rather than black gangs in Venice. Some of the more upscale black neighborhoods like Inglewood and Baldwin Hills are a few miles inland.

    I rode my bike on the Venice beachwalk once or twice a week in 1981-82 and it was fine. A mile inland it was still slummy, but Los Angeles slums don't look like, say, Baltimore slums.

    Venice at the beach was still semi-affordable about 30 years ago when my friend Steve lived at the main intersection about a block from the beach. In the 1990s comedy "Romy and Michelle's High School Reunion," Mira Sorvino and Lisa Kudrow play 90 IQ blondes who live in the same building as my friend used to live in, but by then it was getting out of reach.

    You could tell in the 1980s that the decaying old buildings would eventually be replaced by elaborate new construction.

    But these days it's an extremeley expensive white (and slightly Asian) beach city like Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach. It's more or less the tech center of Los Angeles with Snapchat headquartered there.

    By the way, inland Pasadena has also gotten really expensive because there is no more smog and people today appreciate the superb old buildings.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @spikewell

    Nowadays, he lives in a 4000 sq ft house in Santa Monica that is representative of what has been built in the last 40 years.

    OT: I wish I had Ron Unz’s money, I’d be a Santa Monica beach bum. If someone had the financial means to live in Santa Monica why would they live anywhere else?? E.g., people in Boston, where it’s now 1 degree Fahrenheit and won’t get above freezing until the second week in January, when it’ll go up to 33 degrees. Coincidentally, I recently asked that question- why wouldn’t someone live in Santa Monica if they could- to someone I know could afford to live there. His answer: because of earthquakes and fires.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    A much bigger reason for me would be that it's part of the LA Metro which is a bit of a mess and a potential time bomb. Monterey is where I'd live, but even there Anglos are in the minority.

  115. @Marat
    @Stephen Marle II

    Latin was still part of the standard high school curriculum in the public school systems for the Greatest Generation. It was largely optional after WWII but was still widely taught in the 70s. Although I'd be hard put to string sentence together any longer, there isn't a day I don't use it numerous times, especially in medicine. Probably the same can be said by lawyers. It also made learning French (vocabulary) a snap.

    This really says it all, doesn't it? "before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies". Garbage in, garbage out.

    Replies: @Corn

    My father graduated from high school in 1958 in a small farming town in Illinois. This town had less than 2000 people and the high school probably had an enrollment of 200 or less. Yet it taught Latin, and there was a Latin Club in the yearbook. Unthinkable today.

    “This really says it all, doesn’t it? “before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies”. Garbage in, garbage out.”

    The late blogger John J. Reilly observed that American schools started pushing multiculturalism about the same time they stopped teaching foreign languages.

  116. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @27 year old
    @Anonymous


    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies ...

    the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny

     

    They're concerned alright.

    The wives don't want to deal with a younger hotter tighter White girl hanging around their high earning alpha husbands, showing off their child raising skills and femininity in a stark contrast to the wife who is away from the kids for 9.5 hours per day senior-managing a Human Resources department.

    Not trying to say this is the whole story, many of these people are clueless true believers and many are in fact not concerned about their kids because narcissism.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @L Woods

    The wives don’t want to deal with a younger hotter tighter White girl hanging around their high earning alpha husbands, showing off their child raising skills and femininity in a stark contrast to the wife

    Around younger hotter tighter White girls, alpha husbands get crazy, lustful thoughts and do perverted and illegal stuff just to avoid an adulterous relationship. This story from a few days ago.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/cnbc-director-accused-spying-teen-nanny-bathroom-cam-article-1.3723183?utm_content=buffer5baee&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=NYDailyNewsTw

    CNBC director accused of spying on teen nanny with bathroom cam

    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Wednesday, December 27, 2017

    A CNBC director who worked on finance guru Suze Orman’s show has been accused of peeping on his teenage au pair with a spy-cam in a bathroom of his Westchester home, the Daily News has learned.

    Dan Switzen, 44, hid a camera inside a tissue box in his home in Pleasantville, according to authorities.

    On Nov. 13, his 18-year-old live-in nanny invited two of her friends, also 18, over to the house and one of them discovered the camera in the bathroom, sources said.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous


    Around younger hotter tighter White girls, alpha husbands get crazy, lustful thoughts and do perverted and illegal stuff just to avoid an adulterous relationship. This story from a few days ago.
     
    Is it worse to be in trouble for having an affair with an above legal age nanny or not having a physical affair but putting a camera in her bathroom?

    Already, the guy is charged with a felony.

    Some "alpha", too, skulking around putting cameras in bathrooms and spying on women.

    Also, a friend on a short visit immediately discovers a camera that the live in nanny hasn't discovered despite actually living there for some period of time? That sounds a little fishy.

  117. You just need to look at the ethnic cleansing of the areas of LA to get an understanding of the affinity of blacks and spanish-speakers. As for french, what you would get is Haitians, and nobody in that area of DC wants them.

  118. @Steve Sailer
    @spikewell

    As I often mention, Los Angeles was built inside out. Most coastal cities start out along the sea, but Los Angeles started out inland. The original 1781 pueblo was founded 17 miles inland because that was about the only place where the Los Angeles River ran above ground even in summer and fall.

    After L.A. was opened up to railroads in 1887, much of the initial investment was inland in warm, dry places like Pasadena because early arrivals tended to be Midwesterners worried about TB. So the beach cities started out somewhat downscale. For example, my friend Joe bought a house in Santa Monica in 1985 that was 900 square feet, because Santa Monica was full of tiny houses because when the houses were being built 90 to 110 years ago, only crazy people would risk dying of TB due to ocean fogs. But penicillin changed that perspective. Nowadays, he lives in a 4000 sq ft house in Santa Monica that is representative of what has been built in the last 40 years.

    My impression in 1980 when I looked at an apartment in Venice, just south of Santa Monica, was that people would warn me about Mexican rather than black gangs in Venice. Some of the more upscale black neighborhoods like Inglewood and Baldwin Hills are a few miles inland.

    I rode my bike on the Venice beachwalk once or twice a week in 1981-82 and it was fine. A mile inland it was still slummy, but Los Angeles slums don't look like, say, Baltimore slums.

    Venice at the beach was still semi-affordable about 30 years ago when my friend Steve lived at the main intersection about a block from the beach. In the 1990s comedy "Romy and Michelle's High School Reunion," Mira Sorvino and Lisa Kudrow play 90 IQ blondes who live in the same building as my friend used to live in, but by then it was getting out of reach.

    You could tell in the 1980s that the decaying old buildings would eventually be replaced by elaborate new construction.

    But these days it's an extremeley expensive white (and slightly Asian) beach city like Santa Monica and Manhattan Beach. It's more or less the tech center of Los Angeles with Snapchat headquartered there.

    By the way, inland Pasadena has also gotten really expensive because there is no more smog and people today appreciate the superb old buildings.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @spikewell

    What was the name Chandler used as a stand in for Santa Monica? I felt bad for that older lady who couldn’t afford the utility bills in her Pasadena mansion in that Wambaugh novel.

  119. Anonymous [AKA "Stuart Cram"] says:
    @AKAHorace
    It also seems a smart move to become bilingual in Spanish. Even if Trump builds his wall it will be useful. I am uncertain about Mandarin immersion unless it starts very young. As the language is tonal if you are surrounded by non-native speakers when you learn it, you will end up sounding like an ethnic joke.

    Replies: @Alden, @istevefan, @Neoconned, @Nico, @Anonymous

    If you learn Mandarin you’ll be stuck working with the Chinese the rest of your life. And in my short time working with them I’d consider that an awful fate.

    I enjoy knowing French but live in a Mixed English/French area where the blue collar French people can help me look good at my job.

    Don’t learn Mandarin or let your kid learn it! Sure they’ll have lots of work, but they’ll hate that work.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Anonymous

    What is awful about working with the Chinese?

    Replies: @Anonymous

  120. @PaddyPearse
    Blacks can barely speak one language. Every time I hear them speak English, my ears hear some sort of ghetto creole.

    Replies: @Twodees Partain

    That’s true of American blacks. African blacks who immigrate here usually speak at least three languages.

  121. @Dumbo
    Spanish is a nice language, too bad the Mexicans ruined it.
    French is nice too, très chic. I prefer Italian, but to each his taste.
    Mandarin is an awful and difficult language.
    I think bilingualism is good for children, but not good for societies as a whole.
    Nothing wrong with learning many languages on your own, but what they do in Canada, talking the same thing twice once in English, once in French, is just stupid. "Press 2 for Spanish" is even more stupid as Spanish is not even an official language in the US, well, maybe in California.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @anonymous, @al gore rhythms

    Don’t forget New Mexico. Though not strictly bilingual de jure, in “Nuevo Mejico” Spanish and English are considered equal de facto

  122. @Anonymous
    @MBlanc46


    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.
     
    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn't mean that one doesn't have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn't any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @(((Owen))), @bomag, @guest, @anonymous, @anon

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right.

    Many problems here. As this post of Steve’s points out, pretty much anything white people do eventually gets construed as racist; pretty much just existing becomes a racist act (privilege; legacy; etc). The racist tag doesn’t stick to anyone else; thus the various Asian groups and Latinos are happily staking out their enclaves while whites circle the drain.

    Even if there isn’t any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly…

    Thus whites must be punished for evil thoughts. QED.

    …that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    Humans relate to each other in the negative. Methinks thou dost protest too much.

  123. Rather than foreign languages, young people should learn programming languages.

    • Replies: @L Woods
    @prosa123

    Another overrated panacea. The main thing is to be shielded from offshoring and immigration. To that end, the best protection the average person can hope to receive is to get a civil service job that requires a security clearance. The best "skill" young people should learn then is to stay relatively straight laced.

    , @Jung-Freud
    @prosa123

    In a world where people bitch endlessly about 'white privilege' and 'white supremacism', why don't we hear anything about 'English privilege' and 'English supremacism'?

    Tongue Tyranny must end.

    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @prosa123

    Not unless they're prepared to shit in the street.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  124. Only in far-left up-is-down America is Whites learning Spanish, the language of those who consider themselves the mother White race, criticized as Whites taking over.

    Time to #DeplatformTheFarLeft

  125. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    @istevefan

    Actually, on an Air Panama International flight back in 1985, I sat next to a Japanese guy named " Ted" who, like me, was headed for Lima, Peru. We had a pleasant conversation about what each of us was doing in that part of the world, our employers, and so on. My Spanish back then was pretty good - pretty close to fluent - and I remember Ted telling me that aside from the alphabet, Spanish was not that difficult a language for native speakers of Japanese to learn.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @AndrewR, @RobRich

    “Spanish is not that difficult for anyone to learn…”

    Spanish, like the saxophone, is easy to learn badly.

    It’s the language with most native speakers in the most countries, and again replacing French as langue diplomatique et de la culture.

    • Replies: @Frankie P
    @RobRich

    Hilarious! I guess we just don't count those Chinese, do we? There are just shy of a BILLION speakers of Chinese, and as time goes by more and more of them are completely fluent in Mandarin, although many also speak another dialect. That represents over 14% of the world's population. Spanish speakers, in contrast, make up less than 6% of the world's population. Replacing French as the langue diplomatique? Preposterous!

    , @Patrick Harris
    @RobRich

    Outside the US, where is Spanish becoming more prevalent? It's a useful language if you want to work in Latin America or in certain contexts stateside, but it simply isn't a global language in the same way French is (though English has no peer, of course).

  126. L Woods says:
    @prosa123
    Rather than foreign languages, young people should learn programming languages.

    Replies: @L Woods, @Jung-Freud, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Another overrated panacea. The main thing is to be shielded from offshoring and immigration. To that end, the best protection the average person can hope to receive is to get a civil service job that requires a security clearance. The best “skill” young people should learn then is to stay relatively straight laced.

  127. @27 year old
    @Anonymous


    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies ...

    the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny

     

    They're concerned alright.

    The wives don't want to deal with a younger hotter tighter White girl hanging around their high earning alpha husbands, showing off their child raising skills and femininity in a stark contrast to the wife who is away from the kids for 9.5 hours per day senior-managing a Human Resources department.

    Not trying to say this is the whole story, many of these people are clueless true believers and many are in fact not concerned about their kids because narcissism.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @L Woods

    I’m always surprised at the au pair phenomenon for this reason. Although the ones that have been popping up on my tinder feed lately have been pretty meh…so maybe local SWPL scolds have learned?

  128. After studying a foreign language for a few years at public school in America, the student will be able to do little more in it than say “please” and “thank you” to a waiter.

  129. In school, it’s Spanish or Mandarin, but after school, it’s all Ebonics for everyone.

    Daaaang.

  130. @prosa123
    Rather than foreign languages, young people should learn programming languages.

    Replies: @L Woods, @Jung-Freud, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    In a world where people bitch endlessly about ‘white privilege’ and ‘white supremacism’, why don’t we hear anything about ‘English privilege’ and ‘English supremacism’?

    Tongue Tyranny must end.

  131. @Opinionator
    @nebulafox

    Really polishes your verbal thought process.

    More than any other language, including English, would? Why so?

    Replies: @biz

    (Latin) Really polishes your verbal thought process.

    More than any other language, including English, would? Why so?

    One major reason is that it is highly inflected, in particular, having a noun case structure. Unlike English or Western Romance languages, the grammatical role of a noun in a sentence, such as subject, direct object, indirect object, or possessor, is indicated explicitly by changing endings on the word. Also there are few auxiliary verb forms, so every combination of tense, mood, and person is made separately. It really forces one think about grammar and sentence structure in a way that learning a less inflected language, such as Spanish or French, or even Chinese, doesn’t.

    At least as far as noun case structure, most of the Slavic and Baltic, Turkic, Greek, Persian, Indic, and Dravidian languages have the same thing, but far fewer people learn those than Latin, so Latin stands out as the way that Americans can be exposed to a highly inflected language.

    • Agree: Opinionator
  132. @Reg Cæsar
    @Alden


    Louisiana was originally settled by the French and like the rest of the slave states soon have vast amounts of the offspring of black women and White men.
     
    For her first century-and-a-half of statehood, Louisiana was third in percentage of population black, behind totally insane South Carolina and Mississippi.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    For her first century-and-a-half of statehood, Louisiana was third in percentage of population black, behind totally insane South Carolina and Mississippi.

    No one challenges Mississippi, but Louisiana is still #2. Cenus bureau has it a 34% a tick above Georgia, two above Maryland. South Carolina and Alabama a few ticks below them.

    It’s shame. Louisiana–the delta, the swamp thing–isn’t to my taste, but the South has some nice real estate for the modern world with screened windows, electric fans and AC. But it’s much nicer to live in a community that is essentially a white community. Individual blacks can be–often are–fine folks, good company. But just being pickled in black (low IQ, low conscientiousness) behavior degrades quality of life for white folks.

    Said it before: whites are accused of all sorts of nonsense, but their one great crime against humanity is giving blacks a huge unearned demographic expansion into the New World with slavery.

  133. @prosa123
    Rather than foreign languages, young people should learn programming languages.

    Replies: @L Woods, @Jung-Freud, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Not unless they’re prepared to shit in the street.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Bob Lassiter



    Rather than foreign languages, young people should learn programming languages.
     
    Not unless they’re prepared to shit in the street.
     
    You got something against night soil? Collecting it is an honest trade.
  134. @Alden
    @Kam Phlodius

    It’s just one more proof that journalists just make up anything and it’s published

    The truth is that the school boards all over the country have dumped French and other languages for Spanish, Spanish, Spanish.

    The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish.

    In California the Southern and Central Valley schools all teach Spanish.

    The Bay Area and Santa Clara County aka Silicon Valley all teach Mandarin as the favored foreign language.

    It’s incredibly naive to teach non Chinese mandarin in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area.

    No matter how well they speak Mandarin, Chinese will always discriminate against non Chinese.

    The only reason to learn Spanish is to get a$30,000 a year job in the welfare department.

    Replies: @guest, @Anonymous, @Neoconned, @stillCARealist

    The whole thing seems contrived to me. The entire world is learning English and is getting pretty good at it.

    Here’s what I’ve observed: The Asians come here and master our language pretty quickly, the Spanish speakers do if they try (too many of them don’t) and their kids all become fluent English speakers. The trait that most helps in life is having an excellent command of the English language. Being able to use a few expressions with your Spanish speaking gardener or house-cleaner is nice, but not critical.

    And everybody is forgetting about the Slavs. They have multiple languages that they’ve brought in but nobody is demanding bilingual education in Ukrainian. They’re just learning English and slowly blending in with Anglo society. Does anybody think they want their kids becoming like the Mexicans?

  135. @Anonymous
    Ah, yes, whites are the ones “intruding” here...

    It is sad that this is what people have to resort to in DC and nearly every other city. Even our presumably excellent neighborhood DC public elementary school in Georgetown, where the residents are 90+ percent white, is about 40 percent black.

    If forced to choose, I’d be willing to take a gamble on a French immersion program instead, given the positive selection of blacks into it. I know the teachers at the nurseries I looked into were surprisingly more white than French speaking African.

    In any case, it’s shocking how unconcerned these type-A, very high-earning people are about who is looking after their kids. African and Spanish-speaking nannies working for families with $2mil homes, pushing kids around in $1k strollers while they talk on the phone to their friends all day. The kids look utterly bored if not desperate. Same for the equally expensive day cares. People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute). We somehow managed to find someone short-term but ultimately face these same constraints and will be relocating very soon. Who is left running the country (so to speak) are the couples willing to raise their kids as strangers or not having kids at all, which should concern everyone.

    Replies: @Marat, @Opinionator, @27 year old, @wrd9

    Here’s how it’s working out for elderly Swedes.

    https://voiceofeurope.com/2017/12/shocking-migrants-violently-rob-97-year-old-swedish-woman-at-her-care-home/

    It can be difficult to find decent whites to hire for household help. From my perspective, hiring a nanny should first off require a college degree, race/ethnicity is second although there are some I would never consider, like Muslims. The nanny I hired for my children for a few years was a college educated black woman whose parents were from Cape Verde. She was a delight – well spoken, very responsible, totally trustworthy.

  136. @Alden
    @AKAHorace

    A lot of White, Black and Asian Californians absolutely refuse to learn Spanish as a form of resistance to the governments and liberals trying to force the language on us.

    I can read it but I’ll be dammed if I ever admit I can read it.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Spanish can be turned around as resistance. If you can speak Spanish, try pressing 2 for Spanish when calling some government office for help or an inquiry. In many jurisdictions you can get faster service by going this route. You will typically be informed by some perky little señorita that this line is for Spanish only. Ask for her name and badge number and supervisor’s name. Then ask her if she thinks the official who authorizes her direct deposit paycheck speaks Spanish. Then ask her if she thinks the majority of taxpayers who fund her paycheck speak Spanish.

    Then switch to Spanish and tell her you’ll be happy to go back and start the conversation from the beginning. That usually breaks the mare.

  137. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Learning a foreign language in this age of near instant translation software is a total waste of time, especially when English is now basically the lingua franca of the world. Kids’ time would’ve been better spent learning more (and better) English, math and science. My kids’ school offer Mandarin, 99% of kids who take it are Chinese kids with parents who speak it at home and are looking for an easy A. That to me is cheating but then that’s what the Chinese are good at.

    Why bother learning mandarin when a billion Chinese are all clamoring to learn English so they can emigrate? Only treasonous Americans will learn that language to ease the colonization of the US by the Chinese. Same goes for those who learn Spanish to ease the colonization of Mexicans, traitorous and stupid.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Anonymous

    yes, a different angle on what I said earlier. Travel to any semi-civilized place in the world and people are speaking English. Learning any other language is not a priority unless you're trying to improve your English. French helps with that, or Latin (so I'm told).

    , @Eagle Eye
    @Anonymous

    "The frog in the well cannot speak of the sea."

    The upper classes in New England and the UK are going BACK to securing a classical education (including Latin AND Greek) for their more intelligent offspring.

    Mark Zuckerberg, the public face of Fakebook, famously likes to recite chunks from the Iliad in classical Greek.

  138. @MBlanc46
    @AnotherDad

    That’s the situation of whites in the US today. Anyway you look at it, we lose. And to a great extent, we’ve brought it on ourselves.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @bomag

    we’ve brought it on ourselves.

    More like we made a bad deal: admit blame and accept a punishment; with the other side then behaving, pulling their weight, and ceasing the complaints.

    Now we have half of our side calling for one more program; one more effort; while the other side keeps beating us with the piñata stick.

  139. @Autochthon
    @International Jew

    No. It is neither Spanish not even Latin(ate). It is a made-up name of recent vintage. It is no more traditional or rooted in any particular language or culture than are the names "Bombadil" and "Mum-Raa."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Still, it sounds Spanish, and that’s what counts with unwed teenagers.

    It’s similar to our own abusive– both black and white– “Delores”. Which was Spanish, as Dolores, i.e., (Our Lady of the) Sorrows. But now is kind of fake French.

  140. @Anonymous
    @MBlanc46


    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.
     
    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn't mean that one doesn't have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn't any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @(((Owen))), @bomag, @guest, @anonymous, @anon

    Firstly, this website is not a good barometer for how most white people think. It’s full of “woke” whites. I certainly didn’t used to think about race the way I do now.

    More importantly, if all blacks are talking about is that they’re treated differently, positively or negatively, to any degrees whatsoever, big deal. Who cares? They can get in line with Filipinos or whoever, and we can stop groveling at their oppressed feet. Or they can just leave and go to a black country.

    White people are the only kind of people who come close to treating obvious outsiders as their own. Blacks should feel lucky to be here if they have to live outside their ancestral homelands.

    Long ago, I stopped giving a crap about the minute social cues involved in treating blacks, women, or whomever , in a slightly unequal manner. As if anybody treats anybody equally anyway. Colorblindness is impossible, so there will always be differential treatment. Again, who cares?

    If that’s all racism consists of, why are we always talking about it? And what does it have to do with lynching, or whatever. Because that’s what is meant by racism, really. They may not appreciate slightly improved treatment, and consider it condescending. But that’s not what they spend theur time complaining about.

    It’s the gap between black people naturally feeling uncomfortable in a room full of whites and elaborate conspiracies conspiracies against them that I don’t get.

    You need to notice Jews exist, for instance, to send them to gas chambers. But though we could fail to notice them, to an extent, we can’t fail to notice blacks. They stand out. But just because we notice them doesn’t mean we’re conspiring against them, as they believe. Like I said, Current Year white civilization conspires against different sorts of people the least of any group ever.

  141. @Opinionator
    @Anonymous

    People in this neighborhood are just barely afloat with $350k dual income they can’t afford the $10/hr *extra* it would cost to find a white American nanny who can afford to live somewhat close (or doesn’t mind a long commute).

    Can you explain this? How can people making $350k just barely be afloat? Is that sarcasm? How is it possible that such people cannot afford to pay $10/hour extra?

    Replies: @guest

    When people say they can’t afford something in such a situation, they mean they prefer to use the money for something else. If cost went up in another area–insurance, phone, cable tv, whatever–they may gripe yet pay or not even notice. Economics is funny that way.

  142. @Anonymous
    @Alden

    Spanish is a real useful skill to have if you work in law enforcement in California, for obvious reasons. Police get paid fairly well there.

    Its also useful for general contractors since they use so much Mexican labor. Experienced and successful GCs in California can easily make well over $100k a year.

    "The problem is that the primitive Indian kids may have Spanish names but their parents don’t speak more than one hundred or so words of Spanish."

    That's a pretty small percent of Hispanics in California, most of them speak Mexican Spanish, but they don't learn very much English once they get here.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Alden

    That’s really what I meant.

    Spanish is a requirement for most government jobs. But Spanish speaking is not actually the requirement. Being Hispanic and looking metizo is as much a requirement as speaking Spanish.

    I live in Los Angeles about 5 blocks from a police station so I see them driving back and forth at change of shift. Almost all the uniformed patrol officers are Hispanics. The LAPD has recently loosened rquirements to allow for HISPANIC applicants with felony convictions to be admitted. Because Hispanic mestizos tend to be chunky, they are adjusting the old weight and waist measurement requirements upward.

    LAPD is already loaded with Hispanics, but LAPD seems to want an all hispanci force. It’s getting one

    My point was a government employee needs to be Hispanic as well as speaking Spanish. Of course blacks are still hired without speaking Spanish. So many White SJWs learned Spanish hoping to get a government job dealing with Hispanics but they aren’t hired because they aren’t Hispanic.

    I know a young woman who was raised in both Mexico and Los Angeles. She is a nurse. I once told her you’ll always get a job because you speak good Spanish. She said, not really, in this neighborhood I will need to speak Farsi. I live in that neighborhood and there is no need whatsoever to speak Spanish.

    It is becoming the language of the welfare low wage proles and the government workers who ride herd on them.

  143. @Dumbo
    Spanish is a nice language, too bad the Mexicans ruined it.
    French is nice too, très chic. I prefer Italian, but to each his taste.
    Mandarin is an awful and difficult language.
    I think bilingualism is good for children, but not good for societies as a whole.
    Nothing wrong with learning many languages on your own, but what they do in Canada, talking the same thing twice once in English, once in French, is just stupid. "Press 2 for Spanish" is even more stupid as Spanish is not even an official language in the US, well, maybe in California.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @anonymous, @al gore rhythms

    Switzerland seems like a pretty functional country. Canada and Belgium seem to have more issues in this regard, in their cases the two language groups are proxies for ethnic grievances on at least one side.

    And I agree that tonal languages are flat out ugly.

    • Replies: @anon
    @al gore rhythms

    I would mention that the language polices Switzerland has adopted (strict territorial unilingualism) is the exact opposite of the polices Canada has pursued since Pierre Trudeau's days (continental wide full bilingualism, coast to coast, border to north pole) utterly irrespective of the actual demographic considerations on the ground. Thus every announcement in Vancouver airport is fully repeated in French, although nobody understands a word of it.

  144. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @guest
    What is it with black people and France? Do they think the French aren't racist? Is that because when they're over there they stick to commies, who flatter them into thinking they're true universalists? I guarantee the French would have had Jim Crow (Jacques Corneille?) if there were ever enough blacks. And they would give them the colonial treatment if they had acted up.

    Does it have something to do with the fact that Europeans appreciated jazz slightly more? Or at least the blacker and more avant-garde forms of jazz. (How could they not, considering "avant-garde" is a French phrase?)

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It’s not just France. Much of Northern and Western Europe has fetishized negroes for many decades. The novelty of it all; the exoticism.

    So they love the idea of having them in their countries full time, but then it turns out that theory sometimes fails to predict practice. But for many the impulse remains strong, and it won’t take too much more before their societies become wrecked.

    Pity their children, who will have to deal with the ugly reality of third-world transplantation, and will never have enjoyed the theory beforehand.

  145. @guest
    @Alden

    "in the hope they will not be shoved aside when the Chinese take over the area"

    They may not be planning that far ahead. There is a meantime.

    Not that it will help.

    "The only reason to learn Spanish..."

    Not the only. Unlike with the crafty Chinese, you can make money off Spanish-speakers. There are opportunities in the private sector.

    My brother is a professor of Spanish linguistics, so he did something with it. But I think he's lucky to have a job.

    If nothing else, you can overhear them plotting against you.

    Oh, and there actually is such a thing as Spanish literature (meaning literature in Spanish, but also literature from Spain itself).* Cervantes, Ortega y Gasset, Unamuno, Llosa, Borges, Barca, etc.

    *Judging by my book collection, I should learn French first, then German. Then Russian, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Italian. Maybe Spanish is next; I'm not sure.

    Replies: @Kylie, @Anonymous

    It’s both fun and scary to know a fair amount of Spanish. Most of them assume most of us can’t understand a word they say, and their racism and contempt for white people can be bracing.

    • Replies: @Corn
    @Anonymous

    I’ve heard that white women who have for some reason learned an Asian language can get a very rude awakening upon stepping into a nail salon.

    , @guest
    @Anonymous

    I know a smidgen. A conversation once took place between my mother and two Hispanics, with one translating for the other. They kept up a parallel mini-conversation between them. After they were done, I guess told my mother one of them was flirting with the other, and she was like, "Really?"

    They do that rather openly, and don't consider we're ever privvy. Every time I've ever said a phrase in Spanish to one of them, they look at my like I'm a wonder of the world. Even if it could be the only phrase I know.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  146. @Neoconned
    @Alden

    Being able to speak Mandarin is good if you want to do business in China.

    Knowing Spanish helps you if you want to live out west

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Knowing Spanish helps you if you want to live out west

    Or in Florida, or Nueva Yorka, or Tejas, or in or near any of our major metropolises, except for the moribund ones–we leave those to other people.

  147. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @MBlanc46


    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.
     
    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn't mean that one doesn't have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn't any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @(((Owen))), @bomag, @guest, @anonymous, @anon

    incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right.

    In every such situation which I have been involved in, this has NOT been true. The blacks assumed racism when in truth the situation went against them for reasons entirely unrelated to race.

    To give just one of many examples, I was once accused of racism for not giving a black man directions when he asked for them…. but, in truth, I genuinely did not know the way, and would have given the exact same answer to a white person.

  148. @Tiny Duck
    Evil white people go around leaving cities, destroying minority communities and now those whites go and move into communities of color destroying that community

    white people only want to throw poor minority men in jail just because their hobbies of murder and rape are not mainstream)

    white people use their privilege to take opportunity away from minorities. It's the American way

    Replies: @L Woods, @a reader

    Evil white people go around leaving cities, destroying minority communities

    those whites go and move into communities of color destroying that community

    You’re absolutely right, notwithstanding the apparent contradiction of your gibberish.

    The intrusion of farmers’ markets in urban communities is yet one more insidious tool of those evil whites.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @a reader

    I've said it before, I'll say it again : you need some safe white space, simply head for the produce department of the nearest grocery store.

    And yes, middle and upper class Asians count as honorary whites for this, as for much else.

  149. @Anonymous
    Learning a foreign language in this age of near instant translation software is a total waste of time, especially when English is now basically the lingua franca of the world. Kids' time would've been better spent learning more (and better) English, math and science. My kids' school offer Mandarin, 99% of kids who take it are Chinese kids with parents who speak it at home and are looking for an easy A. That to me is cheating but then that's what the Chinese are good at.

    Why bother learning mandarin when a billion Chinese are all clamoring to learn English so they can emigrate? Only treasonous Americans will learn that language to ease the colonization of the US by the Chinese. Same goes for those who learn Spanish to ease the colonization of Mexicans, traitorous and stupid.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Eagle Eye

    yes, a different angle on what I said earlier. Travel to any semi-civilized place in the world and people are speaking English. Learning any other language is not a priority unless you’re trying to improve your English. French helps with that, or Latin (so I’m told).

  150. @Anonymous
    @guest

    It's both fun and scary to know a fair amount of Spanish. Most of them assume most of us can't understand a word they say, and their racism and contempt for white people can be bracing.

    Replies: @Corn, @guest

    I’ve heard that white women who have for some reason learned an Asian language can get a very rude awakening upon stepping into a nail salon.

  151. Anonymous [AKA "Craig from Canada"] says:

    In Ontario in Canada French immersion education is a way of providing an enrichment stream for your child within the public system. There are virtually no NAMs in French immersion. Having French is also an advantage later on for getting jobs in the Federal government.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    French immersion here in Ontario is a way to get to de facto send your child to a private school while getting the taxpayer to pay for it.

  152. @Anonymous
    @MBlanc46


    Maybe blacks are right, after all. Maybe everything is a plot against them.
     
    As they say, just because one is paranoid doesn't mean that one doesn't have enemies.

    But seriously, incidents where a black person is charging racism due to some interaction with a white person, the black person is usually right. Even if there isn't any overt act of racism, you know the white person is thinking to themselves, before the incident, what many of you, his fellow whites, express so overtly, that black people are flawed, defective, undesirable, whatever.

    This blog is proof that white people have all sorts of negative stereotypes about blacks that are intrinsic to their mental makeup.

    Try living somewhere as a racial minority for a while. You'll be surprised at how easy it is to discern the majority people treating you differently, for good or bad, than they do the minority while trying not to or even completely unconscious of how they are treating you differently, again, whether in a positive or negative fashion.

    It is blindingly obvious to the minority person in a way that it is not to the majority member.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @(((Owen))), @bomag, @guest, @anonymous, @anon

    Can you explain to me why I should be a minority in Toronto other then my treasonous government turning me into one via third world immigration? As for blacks being “treated differently” people gradually learn wariness around those who they should be wary of.

  153. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @al gore rhythms
    @Dumbo

    Switzerland seems like a pretty functional country. Canada and Belgium seem to have more issues in this regard, in their cases the two language groups are proxies for ethnic grievances on at least one side.

    And I agree that tonal languages are flat out ugly.

    Replies: @anon

    I would mention that the language polices Switzerland has adopted (strict territorial unilingualism) is the exact opposite of the polices Canada has pursued since Pierre Trudeau’s days (continental wide full bilingualism, coast to coast, border to north pole) utterly irrespective of the actual demographic considerations on the ground. Thus every announcement in Vancouver airport is fully repeated in French, although nobody understands a word of it.

  154. @Anonymous
    In Ontario in Canada French immersion education is a way of providing an enrichment stream for your child within the public system. There are virtually no NAMs in French immersion. Having French is also an advantage later on for getting jobs in the Federal government.

    Replies: @anon

    French immersion here in Ontario is a way to get to de facto send your child to a private school while getting the taxpayer to pay for it.

  155. Of course, our efforts failed and now what used to be the U.S.A. is Brasil del Norte, but with more nasty, bitchy women whose asses are flat.

    The (thin) silver lining is that being a gringo in Brasil del Norte turns people who, in a more homogeneous place and time, would have become GoodWhites into, more or less, Steve Sailer and Jared Taylor.

    Yeah, I’d prefer to live in America, instead of Los Angeles, but you play the hand you’re dealt.

  156. Homeschool.

    All these work-around programs pale in comparison to what you can do at home.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  157. @Stephen Marle II
    @epebble

    Bilingual Latin schools: Brilliant! One thing that has always amazed me from looking at old 19th century and before secondary school curricula is the amount of Latin and Greek that the kids had to learn. Check out the old texts that they used. Holy cow!

    A buddy of mine got one of the last classics degrees at his university before they shuttered the program and replaced it with Intersectional Studies. He operates an online Skype-based Latin school using Wheelock, and he tells me that most of his students are home schoolers, with most of the rest being secondary and charter school teachers polishing up or learning Latin because their schools are reintroducing it.

    There are conversational Latin programs here and there. And Latin was continuously spoken in some form until a little more than a half century ago, since many seminaries used it, and before that there were also scholars who spoke it, badly, except for Erasmus. So there exist texts and lesson plans for spoken Latin, if you can decide on ecclesiastical vs. classical pronunciation.

    Latin might seem kind of useless compared to Chinese, but kids who study it really gain a lot in English vocabulary and reading skills, English writing skills because of the attention to grammar, which transfers to English, and overall concentration and analytical thinking. They're probably not going to end up fluent in Latin, but the Chinese learners for the most part peter out before any sort of usable abililty.

    Latin would repel all kinds of undesirables, and the ones that it didn't would be weeded out by the ablative mode.

    Replies: @Marat, @nebulafox, @Ron Mexico

    Hillsdale Academy has 3 levels of Latin and offers French. I believe that Hillsdale College’s Barney Charter School Initiative encourages the same curriculum in its member schools.

  158. @Anonymous
    @guest

    It's both fun and scary to know a fair amount of Spanish. Most of them assume most of us can't understand a word they say, and their racism and contempt for white people can be bracing.

    Replies: @Corn, @guest

    I know a smidgen. A conversation once took place between my mother and two Hispanics, with one translating for the other. They kept up a parallel mini-conversation between them. After they were done, I guess told my mother one of them was flirting with the other, and she was like, “Really?”

    They do that rather openly, and don’t consider we’re ever privvy. Every time I’ve ever said a phrase in Spanish to one of them, they look at my like I’m a wonder of the world. Even if it could be the only phrase I know.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @guest

    It's fun to do, especially if you look 100% Anglo as I do. After getting over their initial shock, most treat you as the Second Coming. However, this doesn't mean I want another hundred million of them flooding my country.

    Moreover there is a new racial consciousness among the mesoamerican indians and that includes their own languages, which remain quite impenetrable to me.

  159. @Alden
    Such ignorance about why blacks like French names and what they think is French culture.

    Louisiana was originally settled by the French and like the rest of the slave states soon have vast amounts of the offspring of black women and White men.

    After the Haitian revolution, the black Haitians tried to genocide the light skinned Haitians so the mixed race Haitians fled to Louisiana because of the French culture and language. Many of those Haitians were almost Whites

    Blacks, especially the light skinned ones are very proud of this White French heritage. Even if just one great grandparent was from Louisiana they will pretend their entire family is from Louisiana.

    That’s why French names and even the popularity of made up names beginning with La are so popular. A lot of French words end with iou or ious. That’s where names like shitavious come from. Marquise was very popular at one time. Dominique is still popular.

    It seems journalists can just make up any kind of nonsense and get published.

    Does Nehi Cola think his weird made up name is French sounding? It’s not.

    Summation, blacks associate France and French names with Louisiana blacks who are much more White than the rest of them.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dumbo

    That’s why French names and even the popularity of made up names beginning with La are so popular. A lot of French words end with iou or ious. That’s where names like shitavious come from. Marquise was very popular at one time. Dominique is still popular.

    That’s very interesting and makes sense. However, I don’t think that too many French words end in “iou” or “ious”, maybe “ou” or “ous”, without the “i” (caribou, au-dessous, loup-garou). And I can’t think of any real French person’s name ending in “ious”. Of course, blacks also created many made-up names that supposedly sound African or Arabic and aren’t really. Blacks are very creative with names, unfortunately for them.

  160. Iberiano [AKA "Deloge"] says:

    My family on my mom’s side are from the original Spanish Criollos of Louisiana. Most people don’t realize that everything East of Baton Rouge were from the old Spanish Parishes (indeed, most of the French Quarter is Spanish architecture). The descendants of the Spaniards that settled in Louisiana are Criollo, and we are almost 100 percent Iberian, mixed with some French. We are as “Hispanic” as Tejanos from Texas, and I consider and count myself as Hispanic on any and all forms (my grandmother spoke Spanish). Most folks east of Baton Rouge who were of Spanish descent, mixed with Scots-Irish settlers and today, other than being “Iberian” in some aspects, are basically Southern Baptist Southerners, who are more likely to eat grits than tapas. Still, Jambalaya and Roux/Gumbo are common and are part of the culture.

    French was spoken in New Orleans until the 1940s, but is still widely spoken in Lafayette (west) and many other parishes west of New Orleans, all the way to Texas. The state started CODIFIL (or something like that) as a program for French immersion, many years ago, but it has not had much success, and there are complaints that it is not teaching Cajun/Creole French, but instead regular French, which–ironically was the original french spoken in Louisiana, known as “Plantation French”, long before the Cajuns arrived.

    There are many French families in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, who long precede the Cajuns–and many of them mixed with the early Spaniards, to create a sort of hybrid Latin-ized culture, which we call “Creole” now, but is really a mix of French, Spanish and Native American.

    Like Texas, Louisiana has it’s own culture and law, and history, quite distinct from the Anglo and Germanic culture of the North East and Midwest.

  161. @RobRich
    @Sgt. Joe Friday

    "Spanish is not that difficult for anyone to learn..."

    Spanish, like the saxophone, is easy to learn badly.

    It's the language with most native speakers in the most countries, and again replacing French as langue diplomatique et de la culture.

    Replies: @Frankie P, @Patrick Harris

    Hilarious! I guess we just don’t count those Chinese, do we? There are just shy of a BILLION speakers of Chinese, and as time goes by more and more of them are completely fluent in Mandarin, although many also speak another dialect. That represents over 14% of the world’s population. Spanish speakers, in contrast, make up less than 6% of the world’s population. Replacing French as the langue diplomatique? Preposterous!

  162. @istevefan
    @AKAHorace

    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn't give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English.

    Replies: @Sgt. Joe Friday, @AKAHorace, @Peter Akuleyev, @Alden, @Frankie P

    As the weight of economic balance shifts to the east, it would be wise to examine the trends in learning foreign languages. No, the Chinese are not streaming in droves into supplemental schools to learn Spanish. Yes, they are spending more money on giving their children greater fluency and literacy in English, striving for near-native speaker proficiency. I have taught English in Taiwan for 30 years now, and I currently teach corporate students in both international and local companies. My students constantly emphasize how management sees communicative competence in English as a VITAL factor for career path progression. This is also the situation in Mainland China, where people with money are putting their children into immersion English programs at younger and younger ages. The official language of communication for international companies, and I include ALL the large European (non British) companies here, is English. High level regional executives are ALL fluent in English, almost all having received an English education, even though they are Asian, mostly Chinese. Keep in mind that this region is driving profitability for these corporations, whether international or local. This trend will only continue, as the economies here are growing much faster than the developed European and US economies.

    Learning Mandarin in a non-native environment is very challenging; it is for this reason that I decided to have my children educated here in Taiwan through junior high school. The education environment here, with its large infrastructure of supplemental English institutions, provides an opportunity for students to achieve high fluency in English on the side as they attend the Chinese school. This was much easier in my case, as my children have a father who is an American native speaker who believes that raising his children is an every day hands on job, and interaction with the children is necessary. I need not mention the superior results in math and science in primary (and secondary) education here. I tore out my heart and sent my son to the US for his first year of high school this year, choosing a small private Christian school, not because of the religious component, more because I want him to avoid the bizarro world that is the government supported education system with its third bathrooms, attacks on traditional US (white) culture, and political correctness. I’m fortunate to have a sister and brother in law who are willing to board him and guide him. He is doing well, especially in math and science. He says that he is shooting to be the top student in both chemistry and math, not bad for his first year in the US. He is also able to communicate effectively with American classmates, who are very impressed with his level of English. I am hoping he will move towards a major in university in STEM, avoid the liberal arts protests against white privelege and get a good degree and look for a productive job.

    Frankie P

  163. English is also the international language of computer software.

  164. @Anonymous
    @AKAHorace

    If you learn Mandarin you'll be stuck working with the Chinese the rest of your life. And in my short time working with them I'd consider that an awful fate.

    I enjoy knowing French but live in a Mixed English/French area where the blue collar French people can help me look good at my job.

    Don't learn Mandarin or let your kid learn it! Sure they'll have lots of work, but they'll hate that work.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    What is awful about working with the Chinese?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Opinionator

    They have a reputation for being venal and avaricious as well as industrious. They are known for being high-handed and even quite cruel to underlings while ever-obsequious to clients and superiors. They maintain an oppositional stance to all other races. They worship money. Not for nothing are they often called "The Jews of Asia."

  165. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    @27 year old


    The wives don’t want to deal with a younger hotter tighter White girl hanging around their high earning alpha husbands, showing off their child raising skills and femininity in a stark contrast to the wife
     
    Around younger hotter tighter White girls, alpha husbands get crazy, lustful thoughts and do perverted and illegal stuff just to avoid an adulterous relationship. This story from a few days ago.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/cnbc-director-accused-spying-teen-nanny-bathroom-cam-article-1.3723183?utm_content=buffer5baee&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=NYDailyNewsTw

    CNBC director accused of spying on teen nanny with bathroom cam

    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Wednesday, December 27, 2017

    A CNBC director who worked on finance guru Suze Orman’s show has been accused of peeping on his teenage au pair with a spy-cam in a bathroom of his Westchester home, the Daily News has learned.

    Dan Switzen, 44, hid a camera inside a tissue box in his home in Pleasantville, according to authorities.

    On Nov. 13, his 18-year-old live-in nanny invited two of her friends, also 18, over to the house and one of them discovered the camera in the bathroom, sources said.
     

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Around younger hotter tighter White girls, alpha husbands get crazy, lustful thoughts and do perverted and illegal stuff just to avoid an adulterous relationship. This story from a few days ago.

    Is it worse to be in trouble for having an affair with an above legal age nanny or not having a physical affair but putting a camera in her bathroom?

    Already, the guy is charged with a felony.

    Some “alpha”, too, skulking around putting cameras in bathrooms and spying on women.

    Also, a friend on a short visit immediately discovers a camera that the live in nanny hasn’t discovered despite actually living there for some period of time? That sounds a little fishy.

  166. @Anonymous
    Wasn't there an isteve post from years ago about someone trying to set up a hebrew/English immersion school?

    Replies: @Karl

    5 Jhg > someone trying to set up a hebrew/English immersion school?

    there’s about ten (last time I looked) of them now, USA-wide.

    There’s a Florida-based organization…. and a competing, NewYorkCity one.

    The NYC is under the firm control of SJW talkalikes, at least in rhetoric.

    The Hebrew-est schools in America, radiate out from an epicentre in Tarzana, California.

    the IDF recruitment-registrar visits Tarzana once a year to handle the coupla dozen recruits they get each year, as their total natively-bi-lingualism makes them desireable to the Air Force and to some spook-flavored units

    PS: i’ve seen NSA doing the same in expat-American places in various strategic-but-neglected-language areas of the world.

  167. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    Nowadays, he lives in a 4000 sq ft house in Santa Monica that is representative of what has been built in the last 40 years.
     
    OT: I wish I had Ron Unz’s money, I’d be a Santa Monica beach bum. If someone had the financial means to live in Santa Monica why would they live anywhere else?? E.g., people in Boston, where it’s now 1 degree Fahrenheit and won’t get above freezing until the second week in January, when it’ll go up to 33 degrees. Coincidentally, I recently asked that question- why wouldn’t someone live in Santa Monica if they could- to someone I know could afford to live there. His answer: because of earthquakes and fires.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    A much bigger reason for me would be that it’s part of the LA Metro which is a bit of a mess and a potential time bomb. Monterey is where I’d live, but even there Anglos are in the minority.

  168. @a reader
    @Tiny Duck




    Evil white people go around leaving cities, destroying minority communities
     

    those whites go and move into communities of color destroying that community
     
    You're absolutely right, notwithstanding the apparent contradiction of your gibberish.

    The intrusion of farmers' markets in urban communities is yet one more insidious tool of those evil whites.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again : you need some safe white space, simply head for the produce department of the nearest grocery store.

    And yes, middle and upper class Asians count as honorary whites for this, as for much else.

  169. @guest
    @Anonymous

    I know a smidgen. A conversation once took place between my mother and two Hispanics, with one translating for the other. They kept up a parallel mini-conversation between them. After they were done, I guess told my mother one of them was flirting with the other, and she was like, "Really?"

    They do that rather openly, and don't consider we're ever privvy. Every time I've ever said a phrase in Spanish to one of them, they look at my like I'm a wonder of the world. Even if it could be the only phrase I know.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It’s fun to do, especially if you look 100% Anglo as I do. After getting over their initial shock, most treat you as the Second Coming. However, this doesn’t mean I want another hundred million of them flooding my country.

    Moreover there is a new racial consciousness among the mesoamerican indians and that includes their own languages, which remain quite impenetrable to me.

  170. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Opinionator
    @Anonymous

    What is awful about working with the Chinese?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    They have a reputation for being venal and avaricious as well as industrious. They are known for being high-handed and even quite cruel to underlings while ever-obsequious to clients and superiors. They maintain an oppositional stance to all other races. They worship money. Not for nothing are they often called “The Jews of Asia.”

  171. @anon
    my wife and i recently had this discussion. the neighborhood school is a dual-language program starting in kindergarten, but the neighborhood, uhh, does not suffer from oyster school's problems. my wife has a chip on her shoulder that her Hispanic father never taught her Spanish and is bizarrely adamant about teaching the kids a second language.

    my response: "yeah, overseer for day laborers. if that doesn't say upwardly mobile i don't know what does!" suffice to say our oldest remains in the froo-froo private montessori school.

    french, on the other hand, is worth learning: if we move to switzerland when the kids are 10 and they know french, they'll be eligible for citizenship at 18...

    Replies: @Corn, @Joe Schmoe

    German is the main language in Switzerland. In a multilingual situation, one language becomes dominant. In Switzerland it is German. German is a primary language partly because it has so many native speakers who are at least moderately affluent. German is also a primary language for original technology. For example, my son is an engineering major at state U. He was talking with German student who was telling him about some new thing. The German student told him that right now you can’t find articles about it in English, but he found an article in a German language engineering journal. Conversely, major French journals have stopped publishing in French and now publish exclusively in English. There are about six medical journals in the world that are not in English, and one of those is in German. It doesn’t appear to be a major journal, but is still around because there are so many German speaking doctors. We all know English is the language of our time. However, I don’t think it is healthy for the world to be dominated by one language because it facilitates the activities of the globalists.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Joe Schmoe

    However, I don’t think it is healthy for the world to be dominated by one language because it facilitates the activities of the globalists.

    That is why Hebrew was invented.

  172. @Joe Schmoe
    @anon

    German is the main language in Switzerland. In a multilingual situation, one language becomes dominant. In Switzerland it is German. German is a primary language partly because it has so many native speakers who are at least moderately affluent. German is also a primary language for original technology. For example, my son is an engineering major at state U. He was talking with German student who was telling him about some new thing. The German student told him that right now you can't find articles about it in English, but he found an article in a German language engineering journal. Conversely, major French journals have stopped publishing in French and now publish exclusively in English. There are about six medical journals in the world that are not in English, and one of those is in German. It doesn't appear to be a major journal, but is still around because there are so many German speaking doctors. We all know English is the language of our time. However, I don't think it is healthy for the world to be dominated by one language because it facilitates the activities of the globalists.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    However, I don’t think it is healthy for the world to be dominated by one language because it facilitates the activities of the globalists.

    That is why Hebrew was invented.

  173. @Anonymous
    Learning a foreign language in this age of near instant translation software is a total waste of time, especially when English is now basically the lingua franca of the world. Kids' time would've been better spent learning more (and better) English, math and science. My kids' school offer Mandarin, 99% of kids who take it are Chinese kids with parents who speak it at home and are looking for an easy A. That to me is cheating but then that's what the Chinese are good at.

    Why bother learning mandarin when a billion Chinese are all clamoring to learn English so they can emigrate? Only treasonous Americans will learn that language to ease the colonization of the US by the Chinese. Same goes for those who learn Spanish to ease the colonization of Mexicans, traitorous and stupid.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @Eagle Eye

    “The frog in the well cannot speak of the sea.”

    The upper classes in New England and the UK are going BACK to securing a classical education (including Latin AND Greek) for their more intelligent offspring.

    Mark Zuckerberg, the public face of Fakebook, famously likes to recite chunks from the Iliad in classical Greek.

  174. @RobRich
    @Sgt. Joe Friday

    "Spanish is not that difficult for anyone to learn..."

    Spanish, like the saxophone, is easy to learn badly.

    It's the language with most native speakers in the most countries, and again replacing French as langue diplomatique et de la culture.

    Replies: @Frankie P, @Patrick Harris

    Outside the US, where is Spanish becoming more prevalent? It’s a useful language if you want to work in Latin America or in certain contexts stateside, but it simply isn’t a global language in the same way French is (though English has no peer, of course).

  175. @Anonymous
    @Kam Phlodius

    I'm sure there are several young black women in America who want to take French classes. They come from places like Senegal, Gabon and Haiti and are looking for an "easy A" or at least an "easy C".

    Replies: @Father O'Hara

    I thought “Easy A” and”Easy C” were the girls’ nicknames.

  176. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @prosa123

    Not unless they're prepared to shit in the street.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Rather than foreign languages, young people should learn programming languages.

    Not unless they’re prepared to shit in the street.

    You got something against night soil? Collecting it is an honest trade.

  177. @AKAHorace
    @istevefan


    How do other nations treat Spanish? Are the Japanese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians and others learning Spanish? I doubt they are doing so in numbers. Additionally, are people around the world wanting to emigrate to the Spanish New World? Most who do probably only intend to use Mexico as a stepping stone into the USA.

    The only reason people in the USA are being led to believe Spanish is important is because our leaders are deliberately allowing the USA to become a de facto part of Latin America. The rest of the world probably doesn’t give 2 cents about the Spanish world. Transactions are conducted in US dollars and more than likely are negotiated in English
     
    Two reasons Americans should learn Spanish:

    -Latin America will be important for the United States simply because it is your neighbour. There is a benefit for you in understanding them, what ever your opinions about Latin America are.

    -Once you can think in one foreign language, learning the next one is easier. Spanish is probably the easiest language for English speakers to learn. Chinese would be good, but because of problems with tones, teaching it on a large scale would produce English speakers who spoke it like a comical ethnic character in a sitcom.

    If you could pick a list of the top three foreign languages that Americans should learn I think that Spanish would be on it. Please suggest other choices.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous, @Alden, @BB753

    Why not German? Closer to English, easier to pronounce for an English speaker than Spanish.

  178. Never tried to learn German so I cannot say for sure, but I have heard that the grammar is more difficult. There are a lot of Latin words in English that are more or less the same in Spanish.

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